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Sample records for beryllium foils revision

  1. Deposition of selenium coatings on beryllium foils. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, E.D.; Tassano, P.L.; Reiss, R.H.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for preparing selenium films on 50.8 micrometers thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. A water-cooled enclosure was used to minimize contamination of the vacuum system and to reduce the exposure of personnel to toxic and obnoxious materials. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicated selenium thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 micrometers. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable deposition controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV

  2. Characterization of beryllium foil produced by hot rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenauer, J.; Nieh, T.G.; Waychunas, G.

    1992-01-01

    Beryllium foil is important for a number of aerospace applications including honeycomb structures and metal-matrix composites. In this study, a method of producing beryllium foil directly from powder or flake is demonstrated. A variety of foils were produced in the thickness range 90-300 μm, free from defects such as pinholes and excessive surface roughness, and exhibiting sufficient formability for honeycomb manufacture. Foil produced directly from powder or flake exhibits crystallographic texture, microstructure, and formability equivalent to foil produced from more massive precursors. (Author)

  3. Preparation of selenium coatings onto beryllium foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, E.D.; Tassano, P.L.; Reiss, R.H.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-09-01

    A technique for preparing selenium films onto 50.8 microns thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicate deposit thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 microns. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable thin film controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV. 15 references, 3 figures

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHAO, Y.; WANG, H.

    2000-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature

  5. Electron microscope observation of single - crystalline beryllium thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolin, J.; Poirier, J.P.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1965-01-01

    Thin foils prepared from single crystalline beryllium simples deformed at room temperature, have been observed by transmission electron microscopy. The various deformation modes have been investigated separately, from their early stages and their characteristic dislocation configurations have been observed. Basal slip is characterized at is outset by the presence of numerous dipoles and elongated prismatic loops. More pronounced cold work leads to the formation of dislocation tangles and bundles which eventually give a cellular structure. Prismatic slip begins by the cross-slip of dislocations from the basal plane into the prismatic plane. A cellular structure is equally observed in heavily deformed samples. Sessile dislocations have been observed in twin boundaries; they are produced by reactions between slip dislocations and twin dislocations. Finally, the study of samples quenched from 1100 deg. C and annealed at 200 deg. C has shown that the observed loops lie in prismatic planes and have a Burgers vector b 1/3 . (authors) [fr

  6. Comparison of Americium-Beryllium neutron spectrum obtained using activation foil detectors and NE-213 spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunny, Sunil; Subbaiah, K.V.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron spectrum of Americium - Beryllium (α,n) source is measured with two different spectrometers vis-a-vis activation foils (foil detectors) and NE-213 organic scintillator. Activity induced in the foils is measured with 4π-β-γ sodium iodide detector by integrating counts under photo peak and the saturation activity is found by correcting to elapsed time before counting. The data on calculated activity is fed into the unfolding code, SAND-II to obtain neutron spectrum. In the case of organic scintillator, the pulse height spectrum is obtained using MCA and this is processed with unfolding code DUST in order to get neutron spectrum. The Americium - Beryllium (α,n) neutron spectrum thus obtained by two different methods is compared. It is inferred that the NE-213 scintillator spectrum is in excellent agreement with the values beyond 1MeV. Neutron spectrum obtained by activation foils depends on initial guess spectrum and is found to be in reasonable agreement with NE-213 spectrum. (author)

  7. Electron microscope observation of single - crystalline beryllium thin foils; Observation de lames minces monocristallines de beryllium en microscopie electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, J; Poirier, J P; Dupouy, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Thin foils prepared from single crystalline beryllium simples deformed at room temperature, have been observed by transmission electron microscopy. The various deformation modes have been investigated separately, from their early stages and their characteristic dislocation configurations have been observed. Basal slip is characterized at is outset by the presence of numerous dipoles and elongated prismatic loops. More pronounced cold work leads to the formation of dislocation tangles and bundles which eventually give a cellular structure. Prismatic slip begins by the cross-slip of dislocations from the basal plane into the prismatic plane. A cellular structure is equally observed in heavily deformed samples. Sessile dislocations have been observed in twin boundaries; they are produced by reactions between slip dislocations and twin dislocations. Finally, the study of samples quenched from 1100 deg. C and annealed at 200 deg. C has shown that the observed loops lie in prismatic planes and have a Burgers vector b 1/3<1 1 2-bar 0>. (authors) [French] On a observe en microscopie electronique par transmission des lames minces tirees d'eprouvettes monocristallines de beryllium deformees a l'ambiante. On a etudie separement les differents modes de deformation a partir de leur stade elementaire en observant les configurations de dislocations caracteristiques. Le glissement basal est caracterise a son debut par la presence de nombreux dipoles et de boucles prismatiques allongees. Des ecrouissages plus forts conduisent a la formation d'echeveaux et de gerbes qui finissent par donner une structure cellulaire. Le glissement prismatique debute par le glissement des dislocations hors du plan de base dans les plans prismatiques. On trouve egalement une structure cellulaire pour de forts ecrouissages. Dans les joints de macle, on a observe des dislocations sessiles formees par la reaction entre dislocations de macle et dislocations de glissement. Enfin l'etude d

  8. Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Beryllium is a mineral commodity that is used in a variety of industries to make products that are essential for the smooth functioning of a modern society. Two minerals, bertrandite (which is supplied domestically) and beryl (which is currently supplied solely by imports), are necessary to ensure a stable supply of high-purity beryllium metal, alloys, and metal-matrix composites and beryllium oxide ceramics. Although bertrandite is the source mineral for more than 90 percent of the beryllium produced globally, industrial beryl is critical for the production of the very high purity beryllium metal needed for some strategic applications. The current sole domestic source of beryllium is bertrandite ore from the Spor Mountain deposit in Utah; beryl is imported mainly from Brazil, China, Madagascar, Mozambique, and Portugal. High-purity beryllium metal is classified as a strategic and critical material by the Strategic Materials Protection Board of the U.S. Department of Defense because it is used in products that are vital to national security. Beryllium is maintained in the U.S. stockpile of strategic materials in the form of hot-pressed beryllium metal powder.Because of its unique chemical properties, beryllium is indispensable for many important industrial products used in the aerospace, computer, defense, medical, nuclear, and telecommunications industries. For example, high-performance alloys of beryllium are used in many specialized, high-technology electronics applications, as they are energy efficient and can be used to fabricate miniaturized components. Beryllium-copper alloys are used as contacts and connectors, switches, relays, and shielding for everything from cell phones to thermostats, and beryllium-nickel alloys excel in producing wear-resistant and shape-retaining high-temperature springs. Beryllium metal composites, which combine the fabrication ability of aluminum with the thermal conductivity and highly elastic modulus of beryllium, are ideal for

  9. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In this data sheet the occurrence, ore processing, chemical and physical properties and the uses of beryllium and its alloys is presented. The hazards involved in the use of beryllium and its compounds in the laboratory are discussed with particular reference to its toxicity, carcinogenicity, handling, storage, disposal, fire prevention and the principal health hazards. Further reading is suggested. (UK)

  10. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.B.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determination of beryllium in minerals and rocks is described. The method comprises microanalysis and trace analysis. Because of the toxidity of beryllium the method is designed for determination of a hitherto unknown small amount, 1-10 nanogram Be. With the optimal amount for determination, 3 ng Be, the relative error of the method is 10%. The description includes an inventory of chemicals and apparatus, also an example of application of the method on the mineral epididymite. In brief, the sample is melted with sodium carbonate and sodium tetra borate; when required the sample in advance is fumed with hydrogen fluoride and sulphuric acid to evaporate silica. The residuum is dissolved in water and hydrogen chloride, upon which the solution is made to volume. In the Ring oven interfering compounds are masked with EDTA. Beryllium is settled with chrome azurol and ammonia. Beryllium is identified and evaluated in comparison with previously produced standards. (author)

  11. Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    A method for determination of beryllium in minerals and rocks is described. The method comprises microanalysis and trace analysis. Because of the toxidity of beryllium the method is designed for determination of a hitherto unknown small amount, 1-10 nanogram Be. With the optimal amount for determination, 3 ng Be, the relative error of the method is 10%. The description includes an inventory of chemicals and apparatus, also an example of application of the method on the mineral epididymite. In brief, the sample is melted with sodium carbonate and sodium tetra borate; when required the sample in advance is fumed with hydrogen fluoride and sulphuric acid to evaporate silica. The residuum is dissolved in water and hydrogen chloride, upon which the solution is made to volume. In the Ring oven interfering compounds are masked with EDTA. Beryllium is settled with chrome azurol and ammonia. Beryllium is identified and evaluated in comparison with previously produced standards. (author)

  12. Foil fabrication for the ROMANO event. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo, J.G. Jr.; Weed, J.W.; Griggs, G.E.; Brown, T.G.; Tassano, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Vacuum Processes Lab (VPL), of LLNL's M.E. Dept. - Material Fabrication Division (MFD), conducted various vacuum related support activities for the ROMANO nuclear physics experiment. This report focuses on the foil fabrication activities carried out between July and November 1983 for the ROMANO event. Other vacuum related activities for ROMANO, such as outgassing tests of materials, are covered in separate documentation. VPL was asked to provide 270 coated Parylene foils for the ROMANO event. However, due to the developmental nature of some of the procedures, approximately 400 coated foils were processed. In addition, VPL interacted with MFD's Plastics Shop to help supply Parylene substrates to other organizations (i.e., LBL and commercial vendors) which had also been asked to provide coated foils for ROMANO. The purposes of this report are (A) to document the processes developed and the techniques used to produce the foils, and (B) to suggest future directions. The report is divided into four sections describing: (1) nuclear target foil fabrication, (2) Parylene substrate preparation and production, (3) calibration foil fabrication, and (4) foil and substrate inspections

  13. Measurements of beryllium sputtering yields at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Stamp, M. F.; Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.

    2011-08-01

    The lifetime of the beryllium first wall in ITER will depend on erosion and redeposition processes. The physical sputtering yields for beryllium (both deuterium on beryllium (Be) and Be on Be) are of crucial importance since they drive the erosion process. Literature values of experimental sputtering yields show an order of magnitude variation so predictive modelling of ITER wall lifetimes has large uncertainty. We have reviewed the old beryllium yield experiments on JET and used current beryllium atomic data to produce revised beryllium sputtering yields. These experimental measurements have been compared with a simple physical sputtering model based on TRIM.SP beryllium yield data. Fair agreement is seen for beryllium yields from a clean beryllium limiter. However the yield on a beryllium divertor tile (with C/Be co-deposits) shows poor agreement at low electron temperatures indicating that the effect of the higher sputtering threshold for beryllium carbide is important.

  14. Research of beryllium safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Dolan, T.J.; Hankins, M.R.; Pawelko, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Beryllium has been identified as a leading contender for the plasma-facing material in ITER. Its use has some obvious advantages, but there are also a number of safety concerns associated with it. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has undertaken a number of studies to help resolve some of these issues. One issue is the response of beryllium to neutron irradiation. We have tested samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and are currently preparing to make measurements of the change in mechanical properties of beryllium samples irradiated at elevated temperatures in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at the INEL. Mechanical tests will be conducted at the irradiation temperatures of 375-550 C. Other experiments address permeation and retention of implanted tritium in plasma-sprayed beryllium. In one test the porosity of the material allowed 0.12% of implanted ions and 0.17% of atoms from background gas pressure to pass through the foil with essentially no delay. For comparison, similar tests on fully dense hot-rolled, vacuum melted or sintered powder foils of high purity beryllium showed only 0.001% of implanting ions to pass through the foil, and then only after a delay of several hours. None of the molecular gas appeared to permeate these latter targets. An implication is that plasma-sprayed beryllium may substantially enhance recycling of tritium to the plasma provided it is affixed to a relatively impermeable substrate. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of Beryllium Windows for Coherent X-ray Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shunji; Yabashi, Makina; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Beryllium foils fabricated by several processes were characterized using spatially coherent x rays at 1-km beamline of SPring-8. By thickness dependence of bright x-ray spot density due to Fresnel diffraction from several-micron deficiencies, we found that speckles (bright x-ray spots) were due to voids with densities 103-104 mm-3 in powder foils and ingot foils. Compared with powder and ingot foils, a polished physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) beryllium foil gave highly uniform beams with no speckles. The PVD process eliminates the internal voids in principle and the PVD foil is the best for coherent x-ray applications

  16. Beryllium production using beryllium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, Carlos Henrique

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the beryllium production by thermal decomposition of the ammonium beryllium fluoride, followed by magnesium reduction, obtained in the small pilot plant of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - Nuclear Engineering Institute

  17. Beryllium allergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenherr, S.; Pevny, I.

    1989-12-01

    Beryllium is not only a high potent allergen, but also a fotoallergen and can provoke contact allergic reactions, fotoallergic reactions, granulomatous skin reactions, pulmonary granulomatous diseases and sometimes even systemic diseases. The authors present 9 own cases of a patch test positive beryllium allergy, 7 patients with relevant allergy and 5 patients with an allergic contact stomatitis. (author)

  18. Hydrogen transport behavior of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Hankins, M.R.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G. (Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Beryllium is being evaluated for use as a plasma-facing material in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). One concern in the evaluation is the retention and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. We performed laboratory-scale studies to investigate mechanisms that influence hydrogen transport and retention in beryllium foil specimens of rolled powder metallurgy product and rolled ingot cast beryllium. Specimen characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) techniques. Hydrogen transport was investigated using ion-beam permeation experiments and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Results indicate that trapping plays a significant role in permeation, re-emission, and retention, and that surface processes at both upstream and downstream surfaces are also important. (orig.).

  19. Laser welding of a beryllium/tantalum collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingenfelter, A.C.; Anglin, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the methods utilized in the fabrication of a collimator from 0.001 inch thick beryllium and tantalum foil. The laser welding process proved to be an acceptable method for joining the beryllium in a standing edge joint configuration

  20. Beryllium poisonings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibert, S.

    1959-03-01

    This note reports a bibliographical study of beryllium toxicity. Thus, this bibliographical review addresses and outlines aspects and issues like aetiology, cases of acute poisoning (cutaneous manifestations, pulmonary manifestations), chronic poisoning (cutaneous, pulmonary and bone manifestations), excretion and localisation, and prognosis

  1. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  2. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  3. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  4. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who are exposed to beryllium will not experience health effects. Studies have shown that on average, 1 – 6 percent of exposed workers develop beryllium sensitization, although the rates can be ...

  5. Laser fabrication of beryllium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.; Ramos, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    Working with the beryllium industry on commercial applications and using prototype parts, the authors have found that the use of lasers provides a high-speed, low-cost method of cutting beryllium metal, beryllium alloys, and beryllium-beryllium oxide composites. In addition, they have developed laser welding processes for commercial structural grades of beryllium that do not need a filler metal; i.e., autogenous welds were made in commercial structural grades of beryllium by using lasers

  6. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  7. Beryllium. Evaluation of beryllium hydroxide industrial processes. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    This work continues the 'Beryllium' series. It is a historical review of different industrial processes of beryllium hydroxide obtention from beryllium ores. Flowsheats and operative parameters of five plants are provided. These plants (Degussa, Brush Beryllium Co., Beryllium Corp., Murex Ltd., SAPPI) were selected as representative samples of diverse commercial processes in different countries. (Author) [es

  8. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958; Le beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, P; Rigaud, A

    1959-07-01

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  9. Extractive metallurgy of the beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Neusa; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    1995-01-01

    A bibliographic review is performed on the beryllium extractive metallurgy. The work describes the main type of ores and processes applied to the metallic beryllium production, beryllium oxide production using fluoride, sulfide and direct chlorination. The thermodynamic consideration are made on beryllium reduction processes, discussing the viability of the beryllium oxide and hallide reduction processes. Under the technological viewpoint, the Cu-Be alloys main production processes are discussed, and the main toxicity problems related with beryllium are mentioned

  10. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  11. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  12. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing beryllium hydride by the direct reaction of beryllium borohydride and aluminum hydride trimethylamine adduct. Volatile by-products and unreacted reactants are readily removed from the product mass by sublimation and/or evaporation. (U.S.)

  13. Reduction of surface erosion caused by helium blistering in sintered beryllium and sintered aluminum powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to find materials with microstructures which minimize the formation of blisters. A promising class of materials appears to be sintered metal powder with small average grain sizes and low atomic number Z. Studies of the surface erosion of sintered aluminum powder (SAP 895) and of aluminum held at 400 0 C due to blistering by 100 keV helium ions have been conducted and the results are compared to those obtained earlier for room temperature irradiation. A significant reduction of the erosion rate in SAP 895 in comparison to annealed aluminum and SAP 930 is observed. In addition results on the blistering of sintered beryllium powder (type I) irradiated at room temperature and 600 0 C by 100 keV helium ions are given. These results will be compared with those reported recently for vacuum cast beryllium foil and a foil of sintered beryllium powder (type II) which was fabricated differently, than type I. For room temperature irradiation only a few blisters could be observed in sintered beryllium powder type I and type II and they are smaller in size and in number than in vacuum cast beryllium. For irradiation at 600 0 C large scale exfoliation of blisters was observed for vacuum cast beryllium but much less exfoliation was seen for sintered beryllium powder, type I, and type II. The results show a reduction in erosion rate cast beryllium, for both room temperature and 600 0 C

  14. Development and experimental study of beryllium window for ITER radial X-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhaoxi [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Jin, Guangxu [Materion Brush (United States); Chen, Kaiyun; Chen, Yebin; Song, Yuntao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Liqun, E-mail: lqhu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Niu, Luying; Sheng, Xiuli; Cheng, Yong; Lu, Kun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The thickness of the beryllium foil is chosen as 80 μm to guarantee its safety under high pressure differential in accident events. • Using low purity of beryllium as the transition material, the effect of thermal stress caused by diffusion bonding process can be reduced. • Sealing ring and honeycomb-like supports are designed and used in the mechanical clamped beryllium window to enhance its sealing and safety performance. • The beryllium windows have good performance under severe working conditions like high temperature baking, vibration or impact load. -- Abstract: Radial X-ray camera (RXC) is a diagnostic device planned to be installed in the ITER Equatorial Port no. 12. Beryllium window will be installed between the inner and outer camera of RXC, which severs as the transmission photocathode substrate and also the vacuum isolation component. In this paper the design and manufacture process of two types of beryllium windows were introduced. Although 50 μm thickness of beryllium foil is the best choice, the 80 μm one with X-ray threshold of 1.34 keV was selected for safety consideration. Using the intermediate layer (low purity of beryllium) between the beryllium foil and the stainless steel base flange is an effective strategy to limit the welding thermal deformation and thermal stress of the thin foil caused by bonding between different materials. By using ANSYS software, the feasibility of the aperture design was analyzed and validated. Metal sealing ring was applied in the mechanical clamped beryllium window for its good stability under high temperature and neutron radiation. Although both of the hollow metal sealing ring with 0.03 mm silver coating and the pure silver sealing ring can satisfy the sealing requirement, the later one was chosen to produce the final product. Two hours 240 °C high temperature baking test, two hours 3.3 Hz vibration test and fatigue test were performed on the two types of beryllium windows. Based on the

  15. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  16. Beryllium poisonings; Les intoxications par le beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alibert, S.

    1959-03-15

    This note reports a bibliographical study of beryllium toxicity. Thus, this bibliographical review addresses and outlines aspects and issues like aetiology, cases of acute poisoning (cutaneous manifestations, pulmonary manifestations), chronic poisoning (cutaneous, pulmonary and bone manifestations), excretion and localisation, and prognosis.

  17. Study beryllium microplastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papirov, I.I.; Ivantsov, V.I.; Nikolaenko, A.A.; Shokurov, V.S.; Tuzov, Yu.V.

    2015-01-01

    Microplastic flow characteristics systematically studied for different varieties beryllium. In isostatically pressed beryllium it decreased with increasing particle size of the powder, increasing temperature and increasing the pressing metal purity. High initial values of the limit microelasticity and microflow in some cases are due a high level of internal stresses of thermal origin and over time it can relax slowly. During long-term storage of beryllium materials with high initial resistance values microplastic deformation microflow limit and microflow stress markedly reduced, due mainly to the relaxation of thermal microstrain

  18. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowrance, B.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of beryllium hydride which comprises pyrolyzing, while in solution in a solvent inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products and at a temperature in the range of about 100 0 to about 200 0 C, sufficient to result in the formation of beryllium hydride, a di-t-alkyl beryllium etherate wherein each tertiary alkyl radical contains from 4 to 20 carbon atoms. The pyrolysis is carried out under an atmosphere inert under the reaction conditions, with respect to reactants and products. (U.S.)

  19. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  20. Beryllium and copper-beryllium alloys; Beryllium und Kupfer-Beryllium-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Nikolaus [Materion Brush GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Operation and Quality/EH and S

    2017-02-15

    The light metal beryllium is a comparatively rare element, which today is primarily derived from bertrandite. It is mainly used as pure metal or in the form of copper-beryllium alloys, e.g., in automotive industry, aerospace, and electrical components. The wide range of applications is mainly attributed to the extremely high rigidity/density ratio. An overview of the history of the metal, its production, and recycling as well as the properties of CuBe alloys are given.

  1. The immunotoxicity of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    In the disease berylliosis, granulomatous hypersensitivity is the specific immune response to tissue contact with a poorly soluble particle of beryllium compound, mediated through the accumulation and proliferation of reticuloendothelial cells. A review is given of the work accomplished since the 1950's and particularly since the 1970's to elucidate the nature and consequences of this response to beryllium and its compounds. (U.K.)

  2. Preparation of beryllium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, C.R.; Baker, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Beryllium hydride of high bulk density, suitable for use as a component of high-energy fuels, is prepared by the pyrolysis, in solution in an inert solvent, of a ditertiary-alkyl beryllium. An agitator introduces mechanical energy into the reaction system, during the pyrolysis, at the rate of 0.002 to 0.30 horsepower per gallon of reaction mixture. (U.S.)

  3. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  4. Foil changing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crist, C.E.; Ives, H.C.; Leifeste, G.T.; Miller, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    A self-contained foil changer apparatus for replenishing foil material across the path of a high energy particle beam is described comprising: a cylindrical hermetically sealed housing comprising an end plate having an aperture defining a beam passageway therethrough; foil supply means disposed inside the housing for storing a foil web and supporting a portion of the web across the beam passageway to form a plane perpendicular to the beam path; a barrel assembly disposed inside the housing; web control means extending through the housing and operably connected to the foil supply means for selectively advancing the foil web to replenish a portion across the beam passageway; and barrel control means extending through the housing and operably connected to the barrel assembly for selectively moving the barrel to and from the advanced and retracted positions

  5. Boron nitride protective coating of beryllium window surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1991-12-01

    The use of beryllium windows on white synchrotron radiation beamlines is constrained by the fact that the downstream surfaces of these windows should not be exposed to ambient atmosphere. They should, rather, be protected by a tail-piece under vacuum or containing helium atmosphere. This tailpiece is typically capped by Kapton (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) or aluminum foil. The reason for such an arrangement is due to the health risk associated with contaminants (BeO) which from on the exposed beryllium window surfaces and due to possible loss of integrity of the windows. Such a tail-piece may, however, add unwanted complications to the beamline in the form of vacuum pumps or helium supplies and their related monitoring systems. The Kapton windows may burn through in the case of high intensity beams and lower energy radiation may be absorbed in the case of aluminum foil windows. A more ideal situation would be to provide a coating for the exposed beryllium window surface, sealing it off from the atmosphere, thus preventing contamination and/or degradation of the window, and eliminating the need for helium or vacuum equipment

  6. Thermal effects on beryllium mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinswig, S.

    1989-01-01

    Beryllium is probably the most frequently used material for spaceborne system scan mirrors. Beryllium's properties include lightweightedness, high Young's modulus, high stiffness value, high resonance value. As an optical surface, beryllium is usually nickel plated in order to produce a higher quality surface. This process leads to the beryllium mirror acting like a bimetallic device. The mirror's deformation due to the bimetallic property can possibly degrade the performance of the associated optical system. As large space borne systems are designed and as temperature considerations become more crucial in the instruments, the concern about temporal deformation of the scan mirrors becomes a prime consideration. Therefore, two sets of tests have been conducted in order to ascertain the thermal effects on nickel plated beryllium mirrors. These tests are categorized. The purpose of this paper is to present the values of the bimetallic effect on typical nickel plated beryllium mirrors

  7. Beryllium. Its minerals. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1990-01-01

    With this work a series of reports begins, under the generic name 'Beryllium', related to several aspects of beryllium technology. The target is to update, with critical sense, current bibliographic material in order to be used in further applications. Some of the most important beryllium ores, the Argentine emplacement of their deposits and world occurrence are described. Argentine and world production, resources and reserves are indicated here as well. (Author) [es

  8. Beryllium Metal Supply Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Carcinogen Assessment Group (U.S. Environmental Protec- tion Agency, 1987). The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health is currently examining...Epidemiology of beryllium intox- ication. Arch. Ind. Hyg. Occup . Med. 4:123-151. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 1987. Health Assessment Document...1957 to 1961. He rejoined the Bureau of Mines in 1961 as the aluminum and bauxite commcdity specialist. In 1973 he became chief of the Division of

  9. Beryllium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesse, Marc

    1959-01-01

    Pure beryllium and zirconium, both isolated at about the same date but more than a century ago remained practically unused for eighty years. Fifteen years ago they were released from this state of inactivity by atomic energy, which made them into current metal a with an annual production which runs into tens of tons for the one and thousands for the other. The reasons for this promotion promise well for the future of the two metals, which moreover will probably find additional uses in other branches of industry. The attraction of beryllium and zirconium for atomic energy is easily explained. The curve of figure 1 gives the price per gram of uranium-235 as a function of enrichment: this price increases by about a factor of 3 on passing from natural uranium (0, 7 percent 235 U) to almost pure uranium-235. Because of their tow capture cross-section beryllium and zirconium make it possible, or at least easier, to use natural uranium and they thus enjoy an advantage the extent of which must be calculated for each reactor or fuel element project, but which is generally considerable. It will be seen later that this advantage should be based on figures which are even more favourable that would appear from the simple ratio 3 of the price of pure uranium- 235 contained in natural uranium. Reprint of a paper published in 'Industries Atomiques' - n. 1-2, 1959

  10. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  11. Beryllium. Beryllium oxide, obtention and properties. Pt.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    As a continuation of the 'Beryllium' series this work reviews several methods of high purity beryllia production. Diverse methods of obtention and purification from different beryllium compounds are described. Some chemical, mechanical and electrical properties related with beryllia obtention methods are summarized. (Author) [es

  12. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum-4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  13. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum 4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  14. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  15. Method for fabricating beryllium structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Thin-walled beryllium structures are prepared by plasma spraying a mixture of beryllium powder and about 2500 to 4000 ppm silicon powder onto a suitable substrate, removing the plasma-sprayed body from the substrate and placing it in a sizing die having a coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of the beryllium, exposing the plasma-sprayed body to a moist atmosphere, outgassing the plasma-sprayed body, and then sintering the plasma-sprayed body in an inert atmosphere to form a dense, low-porosity beryllium structure of the desired thin-wall configuration. The addition of the silicon and the exposure of the plasma-sprayed body to the moist atmosphere greatly facilitate the preparation of the beryllium structure while minimizing the heretofore deleterious problems due to grain growth and grain orientation.

  16. Doped beryllium lanthanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Monocrystals of doped beryllium lanthanate, Be 2 Lasub(2-2x)Zsub(2x)O 5 --where Z may be any rare earth, but preferably neodymium, and x may have values between 0.001 and 0.2, but preferably between 0.007 and 0.015-- are recommended as laser hosts. They are softer and may be grown at a lower temperature than Y 3 A1 5 O 12 :Nd (YAG:Nd). Their chemical composition and preparation are described. An example of an optically pumped laser apparatus with this type of monocrystal as laser host is presented

  17. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m 2 to 5 MW/m 2 and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m 2 ) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m 2 . These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures ≤ 600 degrees C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T max ≤ 750 degrees C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with Φ = 25 MW/m 2 and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed

  18. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  19. The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of 56 Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo 4 . The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a 56 Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO 4 solution, and produce a 56 Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a 56 Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs

  20. Offshoots from beryllium development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.P.; Sinha, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper briefly presents extraction and processing of beryllium metal as practiced in the beryllium facilities at Turbhe, New Bombay. These facilities have been set up to meet the indigenous requirements of the metal in space and nuclear science programmes. As offshoot of this beryllium development programme has been the development of a number of pyro and powder metallurgical equipment. Indigenous development of these pieces of equipment has been a professionally rewarding experience. Efforts are now on to promote these equipment for industrial use. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Densities of carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, J.O. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The densities of arc-evaporated carbon target foils have been measured by several methods. The density depends upon the method used to measure it; for the same surface density, values obtained by different measurement techniques may differ by fifty percent or more. The most reliable density measurements are by flotation, yielding a density of 2.01±0.03 g cm -3 , and interferometric step height with the surface density known from auxiliary measurements, yielding a density of 2.61±0.4 g cm -3 . The difference between these density values mayy be due in part to the compressive stresses that carbon films have while still on their substrates, uncertainties in the optical calibration of surface densities of carbon foils, and systematic errors in step-height measurements. Mechanical thickness measurements by micrometer caliper are unreliable due to nonplanarity of these foils. (orig.)

  2. Experiments with activated metal foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malati, M A [Medway and Maidstone Coll. of Tech., Chatham (UK)

    1978-09-01

    Experiments based on the activation of metal foils by slow neutron bombardment which can be used to demonstrate various aspects of artificial radioactivity are described and discussed. Suitable neutron sources and foils are considered.

  3. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  4. Fracture toughness of irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeston, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The fracture toughness of nuclear grade hot-pressed beryllium upon irradiation to fluences of 3.5 to 5.0 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , E greater than 1 MeV, was determined. Procedures and data relating to a round-robin test contributing to a standard ASTM method for unirradiated beryllium are discussed in connection with the testing of irradiated specimens. A porous grade of beryllium was also irradiated and tested, thereby enabling some discrimination between the models for describing the fracture toughness behavior of porous beryllium. The fracture toughness of unirradiated 2 percent BeO nuclear grade beryllium was 12.0 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 60 percent upon irradiation at 339 K and testing at 295 K. The fracture toughness of a porous grade of beryllium was 13.1 MPa m/sup 1 / 2 /, which was reduced 68 percent upon irradiation and testing at the same conditions. Reasons for the reduction in fracture toughness upon irradiation are discussed

  5. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET

  6. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET.

  7. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Longhurst, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (United States); Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.) 29 refs.

  8. Beryllium R and D for blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R and D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point. (orig.)

  9. Beryllium R&D for blanket application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, M. Dalle; Longhurst, G. R.; Kawamura, H.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes the main problems and the R&D for the beryllium to be used as neutron multiplier in blankets. As the four ITER partners propose to use beryllium in the form of pebbles for their DEMO relevant blankets (only the Russians consider the porous beryllium option as an alternative) and the ITER breeding blanket will use beryllium pebbles as well, the paper is mainly based on beryllium pebbles. Also the work on the chemical reactivity of fully dense and porous beryllium in contact with water steam is described, due to the safety importance of this point.

  10. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80 0 C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V

  11. Safe waste management practices in beryllium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.N.; Soundararajan, S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium, an element with the atomic symbol Be, atomic number 4, has very high stiffness to weight ratio and low density. It has good electrical conductive properties with low coefficient of thermal expansion. These properties make the metal beryllium very useful in varied technological endeavours, However, beryllium is recognised as one of the most toxic metals. Revelation of toxic effects of beryllium resulted in institution of stringent health and safety practices in beryllium handling facilities. The waste generated in such facilities may contain traces of beryllium. Any such waste should be treated as toxic waste and suitable safe waste management practices should be adopted. By instituting appropriate waste management practice and through a meticulously incorporated safety measures and continuous surveillance exercised in such facilities, total safety can be ensured. This paper broadly discusses health hazards posed by beryllium and safe methods of management of beryllium bearing wastes. (author)

  12. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. All diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 {mu}m thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency. (author)

  13. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

    1998-02-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. A diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 microm thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency

  14. The nature of beryllium disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in modern industry poses a continuing health hazard with a real risk of producing incapacitating disease and even death. Beryllium and its salts are very toxic, even in small doses and may produce lesions in any organ. The majority of cases follow inhalation and may cause either acute or chronic lung disease. Acute pulmonary disease is a form of chemical pneumonitis while the chronic disease is characterised by the production of granulomas and fibrosis. The skin may be affected with the finding of dermatitis, acute or chronic ulceration. Other organs commonly involved include the liver and kidneys. The pathology of beryllium disease is not specific and diagnosis depends on satisfying the following criteria - history of exposure, consistent clinical, radiographic and pathological finding, presence of beryllium in tissue/fluid and evidence of hypersensitivity. Recent development of 'in vitro' tests of hypersensitivity may prove of value in both diagnosis and prevention of disease. Beryllium disease responds to steroid therapy but the only sure treatment is avoidance of exposure. (author)

  15. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Mark [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Garcia, Pete [U.S. Department of Energy - Richland Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Goeckner, Julie [U.S. Department of Energy - HQ, EMCBC, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (United States); Millikin, Emily [Washington Closure Hanford, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Stoner, Mike [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    for assuring that consensus was achieved on products developed as part of the CAP and the closure process. The original CAP was developed based on a large number of actions developed from the HSS report. This was essentially a 'bottoms up' approach. The revised CAP development team concluded that a more holistic, process-based approach was appropriate to assure that the resulting deliverable resulted in a best-in-class product. Consequently, issues and recommendations contained in the HSS report were grouped into 11 program areas, specific product deliverables were identified within each of the program areas, and a work breakdown structure (WBS) was logically applied to number the groupings. While the revised approach to product development utilizes a more holistic, 'top down' approach, the intent was still to incorporate specific recommendations and address specific issues contained in the HSS report. Through implementation of this new approach, a collaborative team has been established that works together using a consensus process for ensuring product completion. Benefits of the new approach include building a level of trust amongst all parties, quality of the products have improved, and acceptance by all parties of what action will truly meet the intent of the deficiency and make the beryllium program stronger. Open dialogue occurs amongst the core Be CAP team members, Hanford contractors, and DOE. It has been a learning process and will continue to be one, but everyone shares the common goal of reducing worker exposure to beryllium. (authors)

  16. High-strength beryllium block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, N.P.; Keith, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium billets hot isopressed using fine powder of high purity have exceptionally attractive properties; average tensile ultimate, 0.2% offset yield strength and elongation are 590 MPa, 430 MPa and 4.0% respectively. Properties are attributed to the fine grain size (about 4.0 μm average diameter) and the relatively low levels of BeO present as fine, well-dispersed particles. Dynamic properties, e.g., fracture toughness, are similar to those of standard grade, high-purity beryllium. The modulus of beryllium is retained to very high stress levels, and the microyield stress or precision elastic limit is higher than for other grades, including instrument grades. Limited data for billets made from normal-purity fine powders show similar room temperature properties. (author)

  17. Effect of beryllium filter purity on x-ray emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, M. B.; Franz, P.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium foils of the purity grade typically specified for use as filters in soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostics may contain sufficient heavy element impurities to distort the energy transmission response of the filter. Electron microprobe analysis of the foils used in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) SXR tomography diagnostic revealed an impurity content of ˜0.3% fractional abundance by weight, comprised primarily of iron, zirconium, chromium, and nickel. These impurities lower the peak filter transmission in the energy range of the detector and alter the shape of the transmission curve. As a result, foil impurities introduce errors in any general measurement where radiation is being filtered. For example, neglecting the effect of impurities on filter transmission leads to large systematic errors (50%) in the electron temperature measured using the SXR double-filter technique on MST.

  18. Effect of beryllium filter purity on x-ray emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, M B; Hartog, D J Den; Goetz, J A; Franz, P

    2014-01-01

    Beryllium foils of the purity grade typically specified for use as filters in soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostics may contain sufficient heavy element impurities to distort the energy transmission response of the filter. Electron microprobe analysis of the foils used in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) SXR tomography diagnostic revealed an impurity content of ∼0.3% fractional abundance by weight, comprised primarily of iron, zirconium, chromium, and nickel. These impurities lower the peak filter transmission in the energy range of the detector and alter the shape of the transmission curve. As a result, foil impurities introduce errors in any general measurement where radiation is being filtered. For example, neglecting the effect of impurities on filter transmission leads to large systematic errors (50%) in the electron temperature measured using the SXR double-filter technique on MST. (paper)

  19. Cause of pitting in beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Light microscopy, bare-film radiography, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron microprobe and physical testing were used to examine beryllium specimens exhibiting a stratified, pitted, pattern after chemical milling. The objective was to find the cause of this pattern. Specimens were found to have voids in excess of density specification allowances. These voids are attributed, at least in part, to the sublimation of beryllium fluoride during the vacuum hot pressing operation. The origin of the pattern is attributed to these voids and etching out of fines and associated impurities. Hot isostatic pressing with a subsequent heat treatment close residual porosity and dispersed impurities enough to correct the problem

  20. Bioenvironmental Engineering Guide to Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Dermal contact with beryllium can result in dermatitis resembling first- or second-degree burns and skin granulomas [7]. Beryllium dust, fume...minute short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 2.0 µg/m3 [§1910.1024(c)(2) & §1926.1124(c)(2)], and added provisions to prevent skin contact [§1910.1024(b...document you want more information, contact the Environmental, Safety, and Occupational Health (ESOH) Service Center at DSN 798-3764, 1-888-232-ESOH (3764

  1. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is

  2. Inhalation hazards from machining beryllium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Finch, G.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Eidson, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Beryllium metal has special nuclear and structural properties that make it useful for applications in fission and fusion reactor designs. Unfortunately, concerns for its toxicity have made designers wary of using beryllium metal. The work being reported here was undertaken to characterize the aerosols produced by two very common operations performed during preparation or modification of components for use in reactor systems: sawing and milling of beryllium metal. The study also covered beryllium metal alloys to allow comparison. Information from this study is to enable better assessments of the risk of using beryllium metal in reactor designs

  3. Optimization of beryllium for fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The primary function of beryllium in a fusion reactor blanket is neutron multiplication to enhance tritium breeding. However, because heat, tritium and helium will be generated in and/or transported through beryllium and because the beryllium is in contact with other blanket materials, the thermal, mechanical, tritium/helium and compatibility properties of beryllium are important in blanket design. In particular, tritium retention during normal operation and release during overheating events are safety concerns. Accommodating beryllium thermal expansion and helium-induced swelling are important issues in ensuring adequate lifetime of the structural components adjacent to the beryllium. Likewise, chemical/metallurgical interactions between beryllium and structural components need to be considered in lifetime analysis. Under accident conditions the chemical interaction between beryllium and coolant and breeding materials may also become important. The performance of beryllium in fusion blanket applications depends on fabrication variables and operational parameters. First the properties database is reviewed to determine the state of knowledge of beryllium performance as a function of these variables. Several design calculations are then performed to indicate ranges of fabrication and operation variables that lead to optimum beryllium performance. Finally, areas for database expansion and improvement are highlighted based on the properties survey and the design sensitivity studies

  4. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 degrees C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper)

  5. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  6. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, 'Minnema Report.'

  7. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  8. FOIL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1963-07-16

    A method of making a foil-type fuel element is described. A foil of fuel metal is perforated in; regular design and sheets of cladding metal are placed on both sides. The cladding metal sheets are then spot-welded to each other through the perforations, and the edges sealed. (AEC)

  9. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  10. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  11. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  12. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Mallants, D.; Sillen, X.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  13. Beryllium minerals - demand strong for miniaturisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an essential constituent of over 40 minerals of which two are exploited commercially. Beryl is largely produced in the USSR and China and bertrandite in the U.S.A. Phenacite, from Canada, is also under investigation. The largest extraction plant for the recovery of beryllium in the western world is in Utah, U.S.A. and the company also produces beryllium oxide used in the manufacture of ceramics widely used in the electronics industry and for refractory articles. Beryllium-copper alloys in strip, rod and tube form are produced in the U.S.A., Germany and the U.K. Beryllium ceramics are important because of their high thermal conductivity, electrical insulation, strength and rigidity. The alloys, used as electric connectors, microswitch contacts are important for their high suitability for miniaturisation. The future growth potential for the beryllium industry is in the automotive industries in Europe and Japan. (U.K.)

  14. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ambrose H.; Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G.; Mowery, Erb H.

    1988-01-01

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  15. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeston, J.M.; Longhurst, G.R.; Wallace, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75deg C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium. (orig.)

  16. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeston, J. M.; Longhurst, G. R.; Wallace, R. S.; Abeln, S. P.

    1992-10-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75°C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium.

  17. New audio applications of beryllium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.

    1977-01-01

    The major applications of beryllium metal in the field of audio appliances are for the vibrating cones for the two types of speakers 'TWITTER' for high range sound and 'SQUAWKER' for mid range sound, and also for beryllium cantilever tube assembled in stereo cartridge. These new applications are based on the characteristic property of beryllium having high ratio of modulus of elasticity to specific gravity. The production of these audio parts is described, and the audio response is shown. (author)

  18. Thermal expansion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukhin, A.V.; Kruzhalov, A.V.; Mazurenko, V.G.; Maslov, V.A.; Medvedev, V.A.; Polupanova, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    Precise measurements of temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear expansion in the 22-320 K temperature range on beryllium oxide monocrystals are conducted. A model of thermal expansion is suggested; the range of temperature dependence minimum of the coefficient of thermal expansion is well described within the frames of this model. The results of the experiment may be used for investigation of thermal stresses in crystals

  19. Tritium behavior in ITER beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The beryllium neutron multiplier in the ITER breeding blanket will generate tritium through transmutations. That tritium constitutes a safety hazard. Experiments evaluating tritium storage and release mechanisms have shown that most of the tritium comes out in a burst during thermal ramping. A small fraction of retained tritium is released by thermally activated processes. Analysis of recent experimental data shows that most of the tritium resides in helium bubbles. That tritium is released when the bubbles undergo swelling sufficient to develop porosity that connects with the surface. That appears to occur when swelling reaches about 10--15%. Other tritium appears to be stored chemically at oxide inclusions, probably as Be(OT) 2 . That component is released by thermal activation. There is considerable variation in published values for tritium diffusion through the beryllium and solubility in it. Data from experiments using highly irradiated beryllium from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory showed diffusivity generally in line with the most commonly accepted values for fully dense material. Lower density material, planned for use in the ITER blanket may have very short diffusion times because of the open structure. The beryllium multiplier of the ITER breeding blanket was analyzed for tritium release characteristics using temperature and helium production figures at the midplane generated in support of the ITER Summer Workshop, 1990 in Garching. Ordinary operation, either in Physics or Technology phases, should not result in the release of tritium trapped in the helium bubbles. Temperature excursions above 600 degree C result in large-scale release of that tritium. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Intoxication experiments with beryllium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucurescu, I.; Stan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The changes in the particular number of animals in two groups of 40 rats each subjected to intoxication experiments with beryllium sulphate was investigated. The two investigations had very different characteristics. In the case of chronic intoxication there was a marked lethality over given time intervals. In the case of subacute intoxication the number of animals decreased with time. It was found empirically that this change can be described by an exponential relationship which lends itself to statistical interpretation. (author)

  1. Thermodynamic properties of beryllium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Lecocq, A.

    1964-01-01

    The study of the hydro-thermal decomposition of beryllium hydroxide has made it possible to determine the free energy of formation and the entropy. The results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated from the solubility product of this substance. They give furthermore the possibility of acquiring a better understanding of the BeO-H 2 O-Be (OH) 2 system between 20 and 1500 C. (authors) [fr

  2. Thermal Properties of Beryllium Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae Won; Baek, Je Kyun; Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the presence of as-fabricated porosity largely affect thermal conductivity of beryllium. Therefore, in this paper we will suggest a new thermal conductivity equation which consider volume fraction and discuss how this can be applied to irradiation induced degradation of thermal conductivity later. This study was performed to develop a new correlation of thermal conductivity of Beryllium. Although there are many factors like BeO contents, impurity level, grain size, and porosity, we assumed porosity will be the dominant factor for thermal conductivity. Therefore, a new correlation which consider volume fraction by applying Maxwell-Eucken equation is developed and this is consistent to some degrees. However, increasing impurity level and decreasing grain size will decrease thermal conductivity. Therefore, we need to consider their effects although we assume BeO contents, impurity, and grain size do not make noticeable effects in the future. Furthermore, thermal conductivity degradation by neutron irradiation should be considered afterward. There are two main factors for the thermal conductivity degradation: the one is defects formed by neutron collisions and the other is helium generated by transmutation of Be. It is known that they make a considerable degradation of conductivity. Beryllium is known there are considerable volume increases by helium accumulation. Therefore, we anticipate our suggested model can be applicable if it has been developed furthermore considering irradiation induced swelling

  3. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouret, P.; Rigaud, A.

    1959-01-01

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  4. Beryllium dust generation resulting from plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.; Mays, C.

    1997-01-01

    The beryllium dust resulting from erosion of beryllium samples subjected to plasma bombardment has been measured in PISCES-B. Loose surface dust was found to be uniformly distributed throughout the device and accounts for 3% of the eroded material. A size distribution measurement of the loose surface dust shows an increasing number of particles with decreasing diameter. Beryllium coatings on surfaces with a line of sight view of the target interaction region account for an additional 33% of the eroded beryllium material. Flaking of these surface layers is observed and is thought to play a significant role in dust generation inside the vacuum vessel. (orig.)

  5. Microplasticity in hot-pressed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plane, D.C.; Bonfield, W.

    1977-01-01

    Closed hysteresis loops measured in the microstrain region of hot pressed, commercially pure, polycrystalline beryllium are correlated with a dislocation - impurity atom, energy dissipating mechanism. (author)

  6. Beryllium thin films for resistor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.

    1972-01-01

    Beryllium thin films have a protective oxidation resistant property at high temperature and high recrystallization temperature. However, the experimental film has very low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  7. Beryllium and growth. II. The effect of beryllium on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, M B

    1952-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine whether beryllium could replace magnesium in a growing organism. This was stimulated by the several known growth effects of beryllium in animals and by the fact that beryllium apparently competes with magnesium for animal alkaline phosphatases. The following findings are noted: (1) beryllium can reduce the magnesium requirement of plants by some 60% within a certain range of magnesium deficiency. (2) The residual obligatory magnesium requirements is probably accounted for by chlorophyll since beryllium appears to have no primary effect on chlorophyll or chlorophyll production. (3) The pH of the nutrient solution is critical: at acid pH's, beryllium is highly toxic, and growth increase due to beryllium only appears at initial pH's above 11.2, although this initial pH rapidly falls to neutrality during the experimental period. 22 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Quantification and micron-scale imaging of spatial distribution of trace beryllium in shrapnel fragments and metallurgic samples with correlative fluorescence detection method and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Agrawal, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a report raised the possibility of shrapnel-induced chronic beryllium disease (CBD) from long-term exposure to the surface of retained aluminum shrapnel fragments in the body. Since the shrapnel fragments contained trace beryllium, methodological developments were needed for beryllium quantification and to study its spatial distribution in relation to other matrix elements, such as aluminum and iron, in metallurgic samples. In this work, we developed methodology for quantification of trace beryllium in samples of shrapnel fragments and other metallurgic sample-types with main matrix of aluminum (aluminum cans from soda, beer, carbonated water, and aluminum foil). Sample preparation procedures were developed for dissolving beryllium for its quantification with the fluorescence detection method for homogenized measurements. The spatial distribution of trace beryllium on the sample surface and in 3D was imaged with a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instrument, CAMECA IMS 3f SIMS ion microscope. The beryllium content of shrapnel (~100 ppb) was the same as the trace quantities of beryllium found in aluminum cans. The beryllium content of aluminum foil (~25 ppb) was significantly lower than cans. SIMS imaging analysis revealed beryllium to be distributed in the form of low micron-sized particles and clusters distributed randomly in X-Y-and Z dimensions, and often in association with iron, in the main aluminum matrix of cans. These observations indicate a plausible formation of Be-Fe or Al-Be alloy in the matrix of cans. Further observations were made on fluids (carbonated water) for understanding if trace beryllium in cans leached out and contaminated the food product. A direct comparison of carbonated water in aluminum cans and plastic bottles revealed that beryllium was below the detection limits of the fluorescence detection method (~0.01 ppb). These observations indicate that beryllium present in aluminum matrix was either present in an

  9. Quantification and micron-scale imaging of spatial distribution of trace beryllium in shrapnel fragments and metallurgic samples with correlative fluorescence detection method and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J L; Chandra, S; Agrawal, A

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a report raised the possibility of shrapnel-induced chronic beryllium disease from long-term exposure to the surface of retained aluminum shrapnel fragments in the body. Since the shrapnel fragments contained trace beryllium, methodological developments were needed for beryllium quantification and to study its spatial distribution in relation to other matrix elements, such as aluminum and iron, in metallurgic samples. In this work, we developed methodology for quantification of trace beryllium in samples of shrapnel fragments and other metallurgic sample-types with main matrix of aluminum (aluminum cans from soda, beer, carbonated water and aluminum foil). Sample preparation procedures were developed for dissolving beryllium for its quantification with the fluorescence detection method for homogenized measurements. The spatial distribution of trace beryllium on the sample surface and in 3D was imaged with a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument, CAMECA IMS 3f secondary ion mass spectrometry ion microscope. The beryllium content of shrapnel (∼100 ppb) was the same as the trace quantities of beryllium found in aluminum cans. The beryllium content of aluminum foil (∼25 ppb) was significantly lower than cans. SIMS imaging analysis revealed beryllium to be distributed in the form of low micron-sized particles and clusters distributed randomly in X-Y- and Z dimensions, and often in association with iron, in the main aluminum matrix of cans. These observations indicate a plausible formation of Be-Fe or Al-Be alloy in the matrix of cans. Further observations were made on fluids (carbonated water) for understanding if trace beryllium in cans leached out and contaminated the food product. A direct comparison of carbonated water in aluminum cans and plastic bottles revealed that beryllium was below the detection limits of the fluorescence detection method (∼0.01 ppb). These observations indicate that beryllium present in aluminum matrix was either

  10. Beryllium in aircraft brakes - a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenczak, S.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium has been in use in aircraft brakes for ten years. During the original design phases of the several aircraft programs using beryllium a number of problems requiring solution confronted the designers. In actual service the solution to these problems performed much better than had been anticipated. A summary is presented. (author)

  11. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lingxia; Wei Kentang; Ye Yunchang

    2002-01-01

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  12. Investigation of beryllium/steam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekhonadskikh, A.M.; Vurim, A.D.; Vasilyev, Yu.S.; Pivovarov, O.S. [Inst. of Atomic Energy National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V.P.; Tazhibayeva, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report program on investigations of beryllium emissivity and transient processes on overheated beryllium surface attacked by water steam to be carried out in IAE NNC RK within Task S81 TT 2096-07-16 FR. The experimental facility design is elaborated in this Report. (author)

  13. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  14. Managing health effects of beryllium exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures; Committee on Toxicology; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2008-01-01

    ... to its occurrence in exposed people. Despite reduced workplace exposure, chronic beryllium disease continues to occur. In addition, beryllium has been classified as a likely human carcinogen by several agencies, such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the National Toxicology Program, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Thos...

  15. Structure investigations of some beryllium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeldt, I; Lagerberg, G

    1960-05-15

    Metallographic structure, microhardness and texture have been studied on various types of beryllium metal including hot pressed powder, a rolled strip and an extruded tube It was found that beryllium exhibits its highest hardness in directions perpendicular to the basal plane. Good ideas of the prevailing textures were obtained with an ordinary X-ray diffractometer.

  16. Some aspects of beryllium disposal in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestakov, V.; Chikhray, Y.; Shakhvorostov, Yr.

    2004-01-01

    Historically in Kazakhstan all disposals of used beryllium and beryllium wasted materials were stored and recycled at JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant''. Since Ulba Metallurgical Plant (beside beryllium and tantalum production) is one of the world largest complex producers of fuel for nuclear power plants as well it has possibilities, technologies and experience in processing toxic and radioactive wastes related with those productions. At present time only one operating Kazakhstan research reactors (EWG1M in Kurchatov) contains beryllium made core. The results of current examination of that core allow using it without replacement long time yet (at least for next five-ten years). Nevertheless the problem how to utilize such irradiated beryllium becomes actual issue for Kazakhstan even today. Since Kazakhstan is the member of ITER/DEMO Reactors Projects and is permanently considered as possible provider of huge amount of beryllium for those reactors so that is the reason for starting studies of possibilities of large scale processing/recycling of such disposed irradiated beryllium. It is clear that the Ulba Metallurgical Plant is considered as the best site for it in Kazakhstan. The draft plan how to organize experimental studies of irradiated beryllium disposals in Kazakhstan involving National Nuclear Center, National University (Almaty), JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant'' (Ust-Kamenogorsk) would be presented in this paper as well as proposals to arrange international collaboration in that field through ISTC (International Science Technology Center, Moscow). (author)

  17. Structure investigations of some beryllium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, I.; Lagerberg, G.

    1960-05-01

    Metallographic structure, microhardness and texture have been studied on various types of beryllium metal including hot pressed powder, a rolled strip and an extruded tube It was found that beryllium exhibits its highest hardness in directions perpendicular to the basal plane. Good ideas of the prevailing textures were obtained with an ordinary X-ray diffractometer

  18. Moving foil stripper for a particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorka, A.J. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Thin foils for stripping a particle beam are stored on the edge of a disk spinning in the accelerator vacuum. Cutting a foil at one edge releases the foil to project beyond the disk for insertion into the beam at a time determined by controlling the phase of the disk. A wiper removes a spent foil from the disk. The foil release and wiper are operable from a remote location. (U.S.)

  19. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R. E-mail: gx1@inel.gov; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-12-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented.

  20. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented

  1. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  2. Beryllium Measurement In Commercially Available Wet Wipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant(trademark) Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  3. Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danna, J.G.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as ''Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.'' Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material

  4. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described

  5. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  6. Beryllium coating on Inconel tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, V.; Burcea, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Mustata, I.; Lungu, A.M.; Rubel, M.; Coad, J.P.; Matthews, G.; Pedrick, L.; Handley, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Joint European Torus (JET) is a large experimental nuclear fusion device. Its aim is to confine and study the behaviour of plasma in conditions and dimensions approaching those required for a fusion reactor. The plasma is created in the toroidal shaped vacuum vessel of the machine in which it is confined by magnetic fields. In preparation for ITER a new ITER-like Wall (ILW) will be installed on Joint European Torus (JET), a wall not having any carbon facing the plasma [1]. In places Inconel tiles are to be installed, these tiles shall be coated with Beryllium. MEdC represented by the National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest and in direct cooperation with Nuclear Fuel Plant Pitesti started to coat Inconel tiles with 8 μm of Beryllium in accordance with the requirements of technical specification and fit for installation in the JET machine. This contribution provides an overview of the principles of manufacturing processes using thermal evaporation method in vacuum and the properties of the prepared coatings. The optimization of the manufacturing process (layer thickness, structure and purity) has been carried out on Inconel substrates (polished and sand blasted) The results of the optimization process and analysis (SEM, TEM, XRD, Auger, RBS, AFM) of the coatings will be presented. Reference [1] Takeshi Hirai, H. Maier, M. Rubel, Ph. Mertens, R. Neu, O. Neubauer, E. Gauthier, J. Likonen, C. Lungu, G. Maddaluno, G. F. Matthews, R. Mitteau, G. Piazza, V. Philipps, B. Riccardi, C. Ruset, I. Uytdenhouwen, R and D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET TIER-like Wall Project, 24. Symposium on Fusion Technology - 11-15 September 2006 -Warsaw, Poland. (authors)

  7. Neutron spectrum determination of d(20)+Be source reaction by the dosimetry foils method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanik, Milan; Bem, Pavel; Majerle, Mitja; Novak, Jan; Simeckova, Eva

    2017-11-01

    The cyclotron-based fast neutron generator with the thick beryllium target operated at the NPI Rez Fast Neutron Facility is primarily designed for the fast neutron production in the p+Be source reaction at 35 MeV. Besides the proton beam, the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the NPI provides the deuterons in the energy range of 10-20 MeV. The experiments for neutron field investigation from the deuteron bombardment of thick beryllium target at 20 MeV were performed just recently. For the neutron spectrum measurement of the d(20)+Be source reaction, the dosimetry foils activation method was utilized. Neutron spectrum reconstruction from resulting reaction rates was performed using the SAND-II unfolding code and neutron cross-sections from the EAF-2010 nuclear data library. Obtained high-flux white neutron field from the d(20)+Be source is useful for the intensive irradiation experiments and cross-section data validation.

  8. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements

  9. Multiscale modeling of beryllium: quantum mechanics and laser-driven shock experiments using novel diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.C.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Kyrala, George A.; Hauer, Allan

    2002-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanics was used to construct a thermodynamically complete and rigorous equation of state for beryllium in the hexagonal and body-centred cubic structures, and to predict elastic constants as a function of compression. The equation of state agreed well with Hugoniot data and previously-published equations of state, but the temperatures were significantly different. The hexagonal/bcc phase boundary agreed reasonably well with published data, suggesting that the temperatures in our new equation of state were accurate. Shock waves were induced in single crystals and polycrystalline foils of beryllium, by direct illumination using the TRIDENT laser at Los Alamos. The velocity history at the surface of the sample was measured using a line-imaging VISAR, and transient X-ray diffraction (TXD) records were obtained with a plasma backlighter and X-ray streak cameras. The VISAR records exhibited elastic precursors, plastic waves, phase changes and spall. Dual TXD records were taken, in Bragg and Laue orientations. The Bragg lines moved in response to compression in the uniaxial direction. Because direct laser drive was used, the results had to be interpreted with the aid of radiation hydrodynamics simulations to predict the loading history for each laser pulse. In the experiments where there was evidence of polymorphism in the VISAR record, additional lines appeared in the Bragg and Laue records. The corresponding pressures were consistent with the phase boundary predicted by the quantum mechanical equation of state for beryllium. A model of the response of a single crystal of beryllium to shock loading is being developed using these new theoretical and experimental results. This model will be used in meso-scale studies of the response of the microstructure, allowing us to develop a more accurate representation of the behaviour of polycrystalline beryllium.

  10. Post-foil interaction in foil-induced molecular dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Kanter, E.P.; Koenig, W.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have investigated the foil-induced dissociation of 175- 250- keV/amu CH + , NH + , and OH + , FH + and NeH + ions by coincident detection of the fragment atoms. The dissociation energies corresponding to in-foil and post-foil interactions were deduced from the measured relative flight times of the fragment pairs to a set of detectors downstream from the target. The authors considered final states consisting of a) a proton and a heavy-ion and, b) a hydrogen atom and a heavy-ion. Surprisingly, in both cases the energy released in the post-target interaction shows a similar linear increase with the charge state of the heavy partner

  11. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  12. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copat, A; Sood, S P

    1984-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740/sup 0/C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide

  13. Production of beryllium oxide of nuclear purity from beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copat, A.; Sood, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Production of beryllium oxide from beryl by the fluoride process was optimized in this study. Optimum results were obtained using a mixture of sodium hexafluorsilicate and sodium hexafluorferrate as flux and calcinating at 740 0 C for 2 hours. The beryllium concentrate produced was further purified by crystallization as beryllium sulfate to obtain nuclear grade beryllium oxide (Author) [pt

  14. Mechanical properties of irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.; Longhurst, G.R.; Wallace, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.); Abeln, S.P. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Beryllium is planned for use as a neutron multiplier in the tritium breeding blanket of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). After fabricating samples of beryllium at densities varying from 80 to 100% of the theoretical density, we conducted a series of experiments to measure the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties, especially strength and ductility. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to a neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10[sup 25] n/m[sup 2] (E > MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 75deg C. These samples were subsequently compression-tested at room temperature, and the results were compared with similar tests on unirradiated specimens. We found that the irradiation increased the strength by approximately four times and reduced the ductility to approximately one fourth. Failure was generally ductile, but the 80% dense irradiated samples failed in brittle fracture with significant generation of fine particles and release of small quantities of tritium. (orig.).

  15. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparacino, N.; Sabbioneda, S.

    1996-10-01

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure

  16. Research of flaw assessment methods for beryllium reflector elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Akira; Ito, Masayasu; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Tanimoto, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Reflector elements made from metal beryllium is widely used as neutron reflectors to increase neutron flux in test reactors. When beryllium reflector elements are irradiated by neutron, bending of reflector elements caused by swelling occurs, and beryllium reflector elements must be replaced in several years. In this report, literature search and investigation for non-destructive inspection of Beryllium and experiments for Preliminary inspection to establish post irradiation examination method for research of characteristics of metal beryllium under neutron irradiation were reported. (author)

  17. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  18. Study on lifetime of C stripping foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongbin; Lu Ziwei; Zhao Yongtao; Li Zhankui; Xu Hushan; Xiao Guoqing; Wang Yuyu; Zhang Ling; Li Longcai; Fang Yan

    2007-01-01

    The carbon stripping foils can be prepared with the AC and DC arc discharge methods, or even sandwiched with AC-DC alternative layers. The lifetime of the carbon stripping foils of 19 μg/cm 2 prepared with different methods and/or structures was measured. The factors affecting the bombarding lifetime of the carbon stripping foils, especially the method of the foil preparation and the structure of the carbon stripping foils, were discussed. It is observed that the foils prepared with the DC arc discharge method have a longer bombarding lifetime than those prepared with the AC arc discharge method. (authors)

  19. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  20. Beryllium and growth. III. The effect of beryllium on plant phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, M B

    1952-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations was to correlate the apparent ability of beryllium to substitute for magnesium in plant growth with a specific biochemical effect of the metal. Through association with earlier work on beryllium inhibition of animal alkaline phosphatase, a study was made of the effect of beryllium and other metals upon the activity of a phosphatase derived from tomato leaves. Although only indirect evidence is available that this enzyme system was magnesium-activated, beryllium was found to inhibit reversibly the splitting of GP and ATP. Other metals were also found to be inhibitory but the ATP-ase inhibition - and especially the ratio of P split from GP to P split from ATP - was higher for beryllium than for any other metal studied. The significance of this finding in relation to energy metabolism, growth, and beryllium toxicity is discussed. 12 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Spectrographic measurement of beryllium in the atmosphere; Dosage spectrographique du beryllium dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaud, J; Cittanova, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Service d' Analyses et Recherches Chimiques Appliquees, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Crehange, G; Frequelin, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Dir. des Applications Militaires, Service Chimie, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Baudin, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We describe here a method for the spectrographic determination of beryllium on filters which is valid for amounts varying between 0,01 and 30 {mu}g of beryllium and which is independent of the nature of the beryllium compound involved. This is a flux method (graphite-lithium carbonate mixture), the excitation being by a direct current arc. (author) [French] Nous decrivons ici, une methode de dosage spectrographique de beryllium sur filtre, valable pour des teneurs comprises entre 0,01 et 30 {mu}g de beryllium et independante de la nature du compose de beryllium a doser. C'est une methode de 'flux' (melange graphite-carbonate de lithium) l'excitation etant un arc a courant continu. (auteur)

  2. Hydrogen permeation through metallic foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.I.B.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The process of electrolytic permeation of hydrogen through metallic foils is studied. A double electrolytic cell, in glass, in which the two compartments of reaction are separated by a metallic foil to be studied, was built. As direct result, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal is obtained. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the palladium and, in austenitic stainless steels 304 and 304 L, used in the Angra-1 reactor, were obtained. Samples of stainless steels with and without welding, were used. (Author) [pt

  3. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerberg, G

    1960-02-15

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed.

  4. THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BERYLLIUM TECHNOLOGY UPDATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    A Beryllium Technology Update meeting was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on July 18, 2007. Participants came from the U.S., Japan, and Russia. There were two main objectives of this meeting. One was a discussion of current technologies for beryllium in fission reactors, particularly the Advanced Test Reactor and the Japan Materials Test Reactor, and prospects for material availability in the coming years. The second objective of the meeting was a discussion of a project of the International Science and Technology Center regarding treatment of irradiated beryllium for disposal. This paper highlights discussions held during that meeting and major conclusions reached

  5. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerberg, G.

    1960-02-01

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed

  6. Beryllium health effects in the era of the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, L A

    2001-05-01

    The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis, screening, and surveillance of beryllium health effects. Based on the development of a beryllium-specific cell-mediated immune response, the BeLPT has allowed us to define early health effects of beryllium, including beryllium sensitization (BeS), and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) at a subclinical stage. The use of this test as a screening tool has improved our understanding of these health effects. From a number of studies it is apparent that BeS precedes CBD and develops after as little as 9 weeks of beryllium exposure. CBD occurs within 3 months and up to 30 years after initial beryllium exposure. Exposure-response variables have been associated with BeS/CBD, including work as a machinist, chemical or metallurgical operator, laboratory technician, work in ceramics or beryllium metal production, and years of beryllium exposure. Recent studies have found BeS and CBD in workplaces in which the majority of exposures were below the 2 microg/m3 OSHA time-weighted average (TWA). Ideally, the BeLPT would be used in surveillance aimed at defining other risk-related processes, determining exposure variables which predict BeS and CBD, and defining the exposure level below which beryllium health effects do not occur. Unfortunately, the BeLPT can result in false negative tests and still requires an invasive procedure, a bronchoscopy, for the definitive diagnosis of CBD. Thus, research is needed to establish new tests to be used alone or in conjunction with the BeLPT to improve our ability to detect early beryllium health effects.

  7. Be Foil ''Filter Knee Imaging'' NSTX Plasma with Fast Soft X-ray Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.C. Stratton; S. von Goeler; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; L.E. Zakharov

    2005-01-01

    A fast soft x-ray (SXR) pinhole camera has been implemented on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This paper presents observations and describes the Be foil Filter Knee Imaging (FKI) technique for reconstructions of a m/n=1/1 mode on NSTX. The SXR camera has a wide-angle (28 o ) field of view of the plasma. The camera images nearly the entire diameter of the plasma and a comparable region in the vertical direction. SXR photons pass through a beryllium foil and are imaged by a pinhole onto a P47 scintillator deposited on a fiber optic faceplate. An electrostatic image intensifier demagnifies the visible image by 6:1 to match it to the size of the charge-coupled device (CCD) chip. A pair of lenses couples the image to the CCD chip

  8. Combined aging of beryllium bronze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraev, P.P.; Kaplun, Yu.A.; Pastukhova, Zh.P.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    This article evaluates the possibility of increasing the resistance of beryllium bronze to small plastic deformations as a result of the application of stepped aging under stress. Low-temperature aging under conditions of bending under a stress of about 100 MPa was applied to alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg at 150, 180, and 210 0 C, high-temperature aging at 300 and 340 0 C under stress and without stress. As a result of applying stepped aging under stress, the elastic limit of the alloy BrBNT1, 9Mg was raised to 900 MPa. Stepped aging under stress has a substantial effect on the relaxation stability of the alloy. The procedure suggested in the article for aging may be used efficiently for treating elastic elements made of other brands of bronze as well

  9. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  10. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength

  11. Experiments on tritium behavior in beryllium, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hirokatsu; Sugai, Hiroyuki; Tanase, Masakazu.

    1990-02-01

    Beryllium has been used as the neutron reflector of material testing reactor and as the neutron multiplier for the fusion reactor lately. To study the tritium behavior in beryllium, we conducted the experiments, i.e., tritium release by recoil or diffusion by using the hot-pressed beryllium which had been produced both tritium and helium by neutron irradiation. From our experiments, we found that (1) amount of tritium production per one cycle irradiation (lasting 22 days) of JMTR is 10 mCi/g, (2) amount of tritium per surface area of hot-pressed beryllium released by recoil is 4 μCi/cm 2 , (3) diffusion coefficient of tritium in a temperature range of 800 ∼1180degC can be expressed with the following equation; D = 8.7 x 10 4 exp(-2.9x10 5 /R/T) cm 2 /s. (author)

  12. Numerical and experimental investigation of bump foil mechanical behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jon Steffen; Cerda Varela, Alejandro Javier; Santos, Ilmar

    2014-01-01

    Corrugated foils are utilized in air foil bearings to introduce compliance and damping thus accurate mathematical predictions are important. A corrugated foil behaviour is investigated experimentally as well as theoretically. The experimental investigation is performed by compressing the foil...

  13. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  14. Effect of transient heating loads on beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, Igor B.; Porezanov, Nicolay P.; Nikolaev, Georgyi N.; Kurbatova, Liudmila A.; Podkovyrov, Vyacheslav L.; Muzichenko, Anatoliy D.; Zhitlukhin, Anatoliy M.; Khimchenko, Leonid N.; Gervash, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the effect of transient plasma loads on beryllium erosion and surface microstructure. • Beryllium targets were irradiated by plasma streams with energy of 0.5–1 MJ/m 2 at ∼250 °C. • Under plasma loads 0.5–1 MJ/m 2 cracking of beryllium surface is rather slight. • Under 0.5 MJ/m 2 the mass loss of Be is no more than 0.2 g/m 2 shot and decreasing with shots number. • Under 1 MJ/m 2 maximum mass loss of beryllium was 3.7 g/m 2 shot and decreasing with shots number. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a plasma facing material for ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of ITER first wall. The results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility are presented. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to upto 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams with pulse duration of 0.5 ms at ∼250 °C and average heat loads of 0.5 and 1 MJ/m 2 . Experiments were performed at 250 °C. The evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology as well as beryllium mass loss are investigated under erosion process

  15. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal

  16. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F. E-mail: francesco.scaffidi@iket.fzk.de; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-11-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal.

  17. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  18. Beryllium electrodeposition on aluminium cathode from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichkov, I.F.; Novikov, E.A.; Serebryakov, G.A.; Kanashin, Yu.P.; Sardyko, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cathodic processes during beryllium deposition on liquid and solid aluminium cathodes are investigated. Mixture of sodium, potassium and beryllium chloride melts served as an lectrolyte. Beryllium ion discharge at the expense of alloy formation takes place at more positive potentials than on an indifferent cathode at low current densities ( in the case of liquid aluminium cathode). Metallographic analysis and measurements of microhardness have shown, that the cathodic product includes two phases: beryllium solid solution in aluminium and metallic beryllium. It is concluded, that aluminium-beryllium alloys with high cathodic yield by current can be obtained by the electrolytic method

  19. Sanitary-hygienic and ecological aspects of beryllium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Sidorov, V.L.; Slobodin, D.B.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report describes An organization of sanitary-hygienic and ecological control of beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant. It involves: (1) the consideration of main methods for protection of beryllium production personnel from unhealthy effect of beryllium, (2) main kinds of filters, used in gas purification systems at different process areas, (3) data on beryllium monitoring in water, soil, on equipment. This Report also outlines problems connected with designing devices for a rapid analysis of beryllium in air as well as problems of beryllium production on ecological situation in the town. (author)

  20. Beryllium satellite thrust cone design, manufacture and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiter, H.; Chandler, D.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-formed beryllium sheet material has been used in the design, manufacturing and test of a satellite thrust cone structure. Adhesive bonding was used for attachment of aluminium flanges and conical segment lap strips. Difficulties in beryllium structure design such as incompatibilities with aluminium and handling problems are discussed. Testing to optimize beryllium-beryllium and beryllium-aluminium adhesive bonds is described. The completed thrust cone assembly has been subjected to static load testing and the results are presented. A summary of the relative merits of the use of beryllium in satellite structures is given with recommendations for future users. (author)

  1. Beryllium-rich intermediate phases in beryllium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of the factors affecting the formation of phases of stoichiometry MBe 5 , M 2 Be 17 , MBe 12 and MBe 13 are presented. Using published information it is shown that the structures adopted at the higher Be:M ratios involve different characteristics from those adopted at lower Be:M ratios. In the ThMn 12 and NaZn 13 structures adopted in the former case dsub(M-Be) > (rsub(M) + rsub(Be)), (where the atomic radii refer to coordination number 12) and the dsub(Be-Be) distances are contracted. In the CaCu 5 structure adopted at composition MBe 5 , dsub(M-Be) < (rsub(M) + rsub(Be)) and interactions between unlike atoms are significant. The structural characteristics, occurrence, and the stabilities of these phases, and of the others mentioned above, are discussed in terms of atomic radius ratios, the position of the M component in the periodic table, and the value of the univalent ionic radius of the M component, taken as a measure of the extension in space of the hard incompressible ionic core. Though the compound-forming characteristics of beryllium are largely dictated by its small atomic diameter, other factors such as the nature of the bonding which can be exerted by the partner atoms are also significant. In particular, the proportions of the volumes of the atoms which are occupied by the hard incompressible ionic cores assume importance. (author)

  2. Thermal damage study of beryllium windows used as vacuum barriers in synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdener, F.R.; Johnson, G.L.; Karpenko, V.P.; Wiggins, R.K.; Cerino, J.A.; Dormiani, M.T.; Youngman, B.P.; Hoyt, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate thermal-induced damage to SSRL-designed beryllium foil windows was performed at LLNL's Laser Welding Research Facility. The primary goal of this study was to determine the threshold at which thermal-stress-induced damage occurs in these commonly used vacuum barriers. An Nd:Yag pulsed laser with cylindrical optics and a carefully designed test cell provided a test environment that closely resembles the actual beamline conditions at SSRL. Tests performed on two beryllium window geometries, with different vertical aperture dimensions but equal foil thicknesses of 0.254 mm, resulted in two focused total-power thresholds at which incipient damage was determined. For a beam spot size similar to that of the Beamline-X Wiggler Line, onset of surface damage for a 5-mm by 25-mm aperture window was observed at 170 W after 174,000 laser pulses (1.2-ms pulse at 100 pps). A second window with double the vertical aperture dimension (10 mm by 25 mm) was observed to have surface cracking after 180,000 laser pulses with 85 W impinging its front surface. It failed after approximately 1,000,000 pulses. Another window of the same type (10 mm by 25 mm) received 2,160,000 laser pulses at 74.4 W, and subsequent metallographic sectioning revealed no signs of through-thickness damage. Comparison of windows with equal foil thicknesses and aperture dimensions has effectively identified the heat flux limit for incipient failure. The data show that halving the aperture's vertical dimension allows doubling the total incident power for equivalent onsets of thermal-induced damage

  3. Thermomechanical testing of beryllium for the JET/ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Materials testing of S-65-B beryllium has been conducted in support of the beryllium limiter experiment on the ISX-B tokamak. The S-65-B grade of hot-pressed beryllium was chosen over S-200-E because of its superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The testing has included measurement of tensile and yield strength, ductility, Young's Modulus, thermal conductivity, and specific heat from 50 0 C to 700 0 C. Thermal fatigue testing of a 2.5 cm beryllium cube was conducted using an electron beam to apply a heat flux of 2.5 kw/cm 2 for 0.3 second pulses for 1500 cycles. Results from the tests are compared to elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations. The testing indicates that the ISX-B beryllium limiter should survive the tokamak environment without serious structural failure, although some surface cracking is expected to occur. (author)

  4. Zika Vaccine Development: Flavivirus Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Martins, Bavari, Zika Vaccine Development 1 Zika Vaccine Development: Flavivirus Foils Martins KAO, Bavari S. The current Zika virus...States government. The rapid response to Zika is perhaps the first of its kind, and it undoubtedly has been made possible by the lessons learned from...the response to the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa. However, Zika virus is not Ebola virus. As of February 2016 there were only 296

  5. Beryllium. Health hazards and their control. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Delfino, C.A.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this work (continuation of 'Beryllium' series) health hazards, toxic effects, limits of permissible atmospheric contamination and safe exposure to beryllium are described. Guidelines to the design, control operations and hygienic precautions of the working facilities are given. (Author) [es

  6. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... are used in nuclear weapons as nuclear reactor moderators or reflectors and as nuclear reactor fuel...), grinding, and machine tooling of parts. Inhalation of beryllium particles may cause chronic beryllium...

  7. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, J.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.

    1985-09-01

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 μs. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed

  8. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, J.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; von Goeler, S.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.; McGuire, K.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.

    1985-09-01

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 ..mu..s. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed.

  9. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  10. Experiments on tritium behavior in beryllium, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Etsuo; Matsumoto, Mikio; Inada, Seiji; Sezaki, Katsuji; Saito, Minoru; Kato, Mineo.

    1989-06-01

    In JMTR, it was observed that the tritium concentration of the primary coolant increases with the reactor operation at 50 MW. As one of the tritium generation sources, we paid attention to a neutron reflector made of beryllium because the tritium generation rate in the beryllium is bigger than other components in the reactor core. On the other hand, the irradiation test of blanket materials (i.e. tritium breeding materials and neutron multipling materials) are planned for development of the fusion reactor in JMTR and the beryllium will be also irradiated as a neutron multiplier with tritium breeding materials. Therefore, as the irradiated specimens, we used a hot-pressed beryllium disk fabricated by the same method as the neutron reflector or the neutron multiplier and conducted the irradiation tests in JMTR. The purpose of these tests are to clarify the tritium behavior in the hot-pressed beryllium. In this paper, from a viewpoint of the fabrication of capsules for neutron irradiation, the specifications of the irradiated specimens and capsules are summarized. Additionally, the results on the puncture test of the container of the irradiation specimens are described. (author)

  11. Effect of machining damage on tensile properties of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that damage introduced at the surface of beryllium during machining operations can lower its mechanical properties. Tensile tests were conducted to illustrate this on beryllium presently being used for parts in the W79 program and similar to the new powder-processed beryllium specified for production (tentative specification MEL 76-001319). The objective of this study is to quantitatively illuminate the importance of controlling machining damage in this particular grade of powder-processed beryllium

  12. Occupational and non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilaplana, J; Romaguera, C; Grimalt, F [Allergy Department, Dermatological Service Hospital Clinico, Barcelona (Spain)

    1992-01-01

    There are various references to sensitization to beryllium in the literature. Since introducing a patch testing series for patients with suspected sensitization to metals, we have found 3 cases of sensitization to beryllium. Of these 3 cases, we regard the first 2 as having relevant sensitization. Beryllium chloride (1% pet.) was positive in 3 patients and negative in 150 controls. (au).

  13. Occupational and non-occupational allergic contact dermatitis from beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaplana, J.; Romaguera, C.; Grimalt, F.

    1992-01-01

    There are various references to sensitization to beryllium in the literature. Since introducing a patch testing series for patients with suspected sensitization to metals, we have found 3 cases of sensitization to beryllium. Of these 3 cases, we regard the first 2 as having relevant sensitization. Beryllium chloride (1% pet.) was positive in 3 patients and negative in 150 controls. (au)

  14. Beryllium phonon spectrum from cold neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inelastic coherent scattering of neutrons with the initial energy E 0 =4.65 MeV on the spectrometer according to the time of flight is studied in polycrystalline beryllium. The measurements are made for the scattering angles THETA=15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg at 293 K. The phonon spectrum of beryllium, i-e. g(w) is reestablished from the experimental data. The data obtained are compared with the data of model calculations. It is pointed out that the phonon spectrum of beryllium has a bit excessive state density in the energy range from 10 to 30 MeV. It is caused by the insufficient statistical accuracy of the experiment at low energy transfer

  15. Spectrographic determination of impurities in beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula Reino, L.C. de; Lordello, A.R.; Pereira, A.S.A.

    1986-03-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, NaNi, Si and Zn in nuclear grade beryllium oxide has been developed. The determination of Co, Al, Na and Zn is besed upon a carrier distillation technique. Better results were obtained with 2% Ga 2 O 3 as carrier in beryllium oxide. For the elements B, Cd, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mg, Ni and Si the sample is loaded in a Scribner-Mullin shallow cup electrode, covered with graphite powder and excited in DC arc. The relative standard deviation values for different elements are in the range of 10 to 20%. The method fulfills requirements of precision and sensitivity for specification analysis of nuclear grade beryllium oxide.(Author) [pt

  16. Fusion welding of thin metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of fusion welding of thin metal foils are reviewed and the current techniques employed at LASL to join foils are described. Techniques for fusion welding approximately 0.025-mm-thick foils of copper, aluminum, and stainless steels have been developed using both electron beam and laser welding equipment. These techniques, together with the related aspects of joint design, tooling and fixturing, joint preparation, and modifications to the commercially available welding equipment, are included in the review. (auth)

  17. Technical Development Path for Gas Foil Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  18. INJECTION CARBON STRIPPING FOIL ISSUES IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; WEI, J.

    2001-01-01

    We are reporting the results of studies on issues related to the injection stripping foil in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. The problems related to foil heating and foil lifetime, such as current density distribution and temperature distribution in the foil, are investigated. The impact of injection errors on the beam losses at the foil is studied. The particle traversal rate and the beam losses due to scattering in the foil are summarized. Finally, SNS end-to-end simulation results of the foil-missing rate, the foil-hitting rate and the maximum foil temperature are presented

  19. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.J.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques

  20. Radiation lifetimes and failure mechanisms of carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auble, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes of thin carbon foils under heavy-ion irradiation are compiled and recent advances in stripper foil technology are reviewed. The impact of recent foil lifetime improvements, many by more than an order of magnitude, on heavy-ion electrostatic accelerators is discussed. Foil inhomogeneities, particularly those caused by sputtering are suggested to be a prime factor in usable foil lifetimes

  1. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Donne, M.D.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma facing component of first wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold isostatic pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation

  2. Method of beryllium implantation in germanium substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, S.; Baba, Y.; Kaneda, T.; Shirai, T.

    1983-01-01

    A semiconductor device is disclosed, as well as a method for manufacturing it in which ions of beryllium are implanted into a germanium substrate to form a layer containing p-type impurity material. There after the substrate is heated at a temperature in the range of 400 0 C. to 700 0 C. to diffuse the beryllium ions into the substrate so that the concentration of beryllium at the surface of the impurity layer is in the order of 10 17 cm- 3 or more. In one embodiment, a p-type channel stopper is formed locally in a p-type germanium substrate and an n-type active layer is formed in a region surrounded by, and isolated from, the channel stopper region. In another embodiment, a relatively shallow p-type active layer is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate and p-type guard ring regions are formed surrounding, and partly overlapping said p-type active layer. In a further embodiment, a p-type island region is formed at one part of an n-type germanium substrate, and an n-type region is formed within said p-type region. In these embodiments, the p-type channel stopper region, p-type guard ring regions and the p-type island region are all formed by implanting ions of beryllium into the germanium substrate

  3. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Polyakov, A.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Zashkvara, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  4. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabikin, Yu A; Polyakov, A I; Petukhov, Yu V; Bitenbaev, M I; Zashkvara, O V [Physical-Technical Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  5. Beryllium, a material of great promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fauconnier, J.P.; Nomine, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the lightest metals. It also owns an outstanding combination of physical, mechanical and nuclear properties which gives it a favorable position, compared to more usual materials, in various fields of applications. Constant technological advancements in the elaboration and working up have induced a significant improvement of its ductility and a reduction of the production costs. (Author). 12 refs., 7 figs

  6. Thermophysical properties of solid and liquid beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivineau, M.; Arles, L.; Vermeulen, J.M.; Thevenin, Th.

    1993-01-01

    A submillisecond resistive heating technique under high pressure (0.12 GPa) has been used to measure selected thermophysical properties of both solid and liquid beryllium. Data have been obtained between room temperature and 2900 K. Results on enthalpy, volume expansion, electrical resistivity, and sound velocity measurements are presented

  7. Critical parameters controlling irradiation swelling in beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation effects in beryllium can hardly be explained within a framework of the conventional theory based on the bias concept due to elastic interaction difference (EID) between vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) since beryllium belongs to hexagonal close-packed metals where diffusion has been shown to be anisotropic. Diffusional anisotropy difference (DAD) between point defects changes the cavity bias for their absorption and leads to dependence of the dislocation bias on the distribution of dislocations over crystallographic directions. On the other hand, the elastic interaction between point defects and cavities gives rise to the size and gas pressure dependencies of the cavity bias, resulting in new critical quantities for bubble-void transition effects at low temperature irradiation. In the present paper, we develop the concept of the critical parameters controlling irradiation swelling with account of both DAD and EID, and take care of thermal effects as well since they are of major importance for beryllium which has an anomalously low self-diffusion activation energy. Experimental data on beryllium swelling are analyzed on the basis of the present theory. (orig.)

  8. Potential exposures and risks from beryllium-containing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Henry H; Florig, H Keith

    2002-10-01

    Beryllium is the strongest of the lightweight metals. Used primarily in military applications prior to the end of the Cold War, beryllium is finding new applications in many commercial products, including computers, telecommunication equipment, and consumer and automotive electronics. The use of beryllium in nondefense consumer applications is of concern because beryllium is toxic. Inhalation of beryllium dust or vapor causes a chronic lung disease in some individuals at concentrations as low as 0.01 microg/m3 in air. As beryllium enters wider commerce, it is prudent to ask what risks this might present to the general public and to workers downstream of the beryllium materials industry. We address this question by evaluating the potential for beryllium exposure from the manufacturing, use, recycle, and disposal of beryllium-containing products. Combining a market study with a qualitative exposure analysis, we determine which beryllium applications and life cycle phases have the largest exposure potential. Our analysis suggests that use and maintenance of the most common types of beryllium-containing products do not result in any obvious exposures of concern, and that maintenance activities result in greater exposures than product use. Product disposal has potential to present significant individual risks, but uncertainties concerning current and future routes of product disposal make it difficult to be definitive. Overall, additional exposure and dose-response data are needed to evaluate both the health significance of many exposure scenarios, and the adequacy of existing regulations to protect workers and the public. Although public exposures to beryllium and public awareness and concern regarding beryllium risks are currently low, beryllium risks have psychometric qualities that may lead to rapidly heightened public concern.

  9. Release studies of a thin foil tantalum target for the production of short-lived radioactive nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, J R J; Drumm, P V; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Catherall, R; Jonsson, O C; Ravn, H L; Simon, H

    2002-01-01

    Measurements have been made at ISOLDE, of the release curves and yields of radioactive beams of lithium, sodium and beryllium from a target constructed from 2 $\\mu$m thick foils. The release curves have been analysed by fitting to a mathematical model to determine the coefficients of diffusion of the particles in the foils and effusion through the target and ionizer at several temperatures. Through a better understanding of the rate of transport of the particles, it is possible to design targets and ionizers with improved yields. This is most important for the rare, short-lived isotopes in which there is considerable interest for physics experiments. This target has demonstrated large increases in the yields of $^{11}$Li and $^{12}$Be, in agreement with the predictions of the model. (11 refs).

  10. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma-facing component of first-wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold-isostatic-pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well as its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation.In this current work, the range of anticipated fusion operating conditions is reviewed. The thermal, mechanical, chemical compatibility, tritium retention/release, and helium retention/swelling databases are then reviewed for fabrication methods and fusion operating conditions of interest. Properties correlations and uncertainty ranges are also discussed. In the case of the more complex phenomena of tritium retention/release and helium-induced swelling, fundamental mechanisms and models are reviewed in more detail. Areas in which additional data are needed are highlighted, along with some trends which suggest ways of optimizing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications. (orig.)

  11. Chromic acid anodizing of aluminum foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, H.

    1988-01-01

    The success of the Space Station graphite/epoxy truss structure depends on its ability to endure long-term exposure to the LEO environment, primarily the effects of atomic oxygen and the temperture cycling resulting from the 94 minute orbit. This report describes the development and evaluation of chromic acid anodized (CAA) aluminum foil as protective coatings for these composite tubes. Included are: development of solar absorptance and thermal emittance properties required of Al foil and development of CAA parameters to achieve these optical properties; developing techniques to CAA 25 ft lengths of Al foil; developing bonding processes for wrapping the Al foil to graphite/epoxy tubes; and atomic oxygen testing of the CAA Al foil. Two specifications were developed and are included in the report: Chromic Acid Anodizing of Aluminum Foil Process Specification and Bonding of Anodized Aluminum Foil to Graphite/Epoxy Tubes. Results show that CAA Al foil provides and excellent protective and thermal control coating for the Space Station truss structure.

  12. Low-energy foil aberration corrector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aken, R.H. van; Hagen, C.W.; Barth, J.E.; Kruit, P.

    2002-01-01

    A spherical and chromatic aberration corrector for electron microscopes is proposed, consisting of a thin foil sandwiched between two apertures. The electrons are retarded at the foil to almost zero energy, so that they can travel ballistically through the foil. It is shown that such a low-voltage corrector has a negative spherical aberration for not too large distances between aperture and foil, as well as a negative chromatic aberration. For various distances the third- and fifth-order spherical aberration coefficients and the first- and second-order chromatic aberration coefficients are calculated using ray tracing. Provided that the foils have sufficient electron transmission the corrector is able to correct the third-order spherical aberration and the first-order chromatic aberration of a typical low-voltage scanning electron microscope. Preliminary results show that the fifth-order spherical aberration and the second-order chromatic aberration can be kept sufficiently low

  13. Circuit design on plastic foils

    CERN Document Server

    Raiteri, Daniele; Roermund, Arthur H M

    2015-01-01

    This book illustrates a variety of circuit designs on plastic foils and provides all the information needed to undertake successful designs in large-area electronics.  The authors demonstrate architectural, circuit, layout, and device solutions and explain the reasons and the creative process behind each. Readers will learn how to keep under control large-area technologies and achieve robust, reliable circuit designs that can face the challenges imposed by low-cost low-temperature high-throughput manufacturing.   • Discusses implications of problems associated with large-area electronics and compares them to standard silicon; • Provides the basis for understanding physics and modeling of disordered material; • Includes guidelines to quickly setup the basic CAD tools enabling efficient and reliable designs; • Illustrates practical solutions to cope with hard/soft faults, variability, mismatch, aging and bias stress at architecture, circuit, layout, and device levels.

  14. Lifetimes of carbon foils deposited on etched substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, J.O. Jr.; Bashkin, S.; Hartog, P.D.; Thomas, G.; Yntema, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The methods currently in use for producing long-lived carbon foils are listed. The possible common factors which are important in making long lasting foils are a) making a strong, coherent, continuous layer, b) making a foil slack, loose, or baggy, and c) making a foil whose molecular structure minimizes shrinkage. The behavior of foils deposited on etched substrates is compared with foils deposited upon conventional microscope slides

  15. New intensifier foils in roentgenologic diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, H K; Schulze, B

    1981-09-01

    The main components of the foils are the carrier layer and the luminescent layer, which are in direct contact through an adhesive layer. Carrier layer and adhesive layer absorb and reflect parts of the light. In order to reduce this effect, modern foils are slightly dyed, mostly in the complementary colour of the emitted light. The luminescent layer is attached to the carrier layer by means of a binder. The mean binder content of the luminescent layer is about 10% of the weight of the luminescent material. The particle or crystal range between 5 and 10 ..mu..m. The luminescent layer thickness varies between 0.1 and 0.5 mm, according to the intensification. The imposing with luminescents consequently increases from 20 up to 100 mg/cm/sup 2/. In most cases the luminescent layer is protected by a thin layer (10 to 20 ..mu..m thick) of a very resistant and well-transparent synthetic resin. A foil combination consists of a front and a rear foil, the rear foil often providing a higher degree of intensification than the front foil. Foil quality is mainly defined by the intensification factor, quality on its part is characterized by the modulation transmission function and by the particle structure of the luminescent layer. Quality indicators are also the durability of the foils and the steadiness of the crystal arrangement in the luminescent layer. The representation quality is deteriorated also by the irregular blackening of the roentgen film, resulting from the statistic fluctuations of the roentgen quantums, which are absorbed in the luminescent layer. This unfavourable feature, termed quantum noise, increases with decreasing irradiation intensity, with increasing film gradation, and with increasing sensivity of the film-foil-system. Moreover, an optimal image quality is only possible when film and foil are in good contact conditions (in the cassette).

  16. Safety handling of beryllium for fusion technology R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makoto; Terai, Takayuki; Odawara, Osamu; Ashibe, Kusuo; Ohara, Atsushi.

    1992-07-01

    Feasibility of beryllium use as a blanket neutron multiplier, first wall and plasma facing material has been studied for the D-T burning experiment reactors such as ITER. Various experimental work of beryllium and its compounds will be performed under the conditions of high temperature and high energy particle exposure simulating fusion reactor conditions. Beryllium is known as a hazardous substance and its handling has been carefully controlled by various health and safe guidances and/or regulations in many countries. Japanese regulations for hazardous substance provide various guidelines on beryllium for the protection of industrial workers and environment. This report was prepared for the safe handling of beryllium in a laboratory scale experiments for fusion technology R and D such as blanket development. Major items in this report are; (1) Brief review of guidances and regulations in USA, UK and Japan. (2) Safe handling and administration manuals at beryllium facilities in INEL, LANL and JET. (3) Conceptual design study of beryllium handling facility for small to mid-scale blanket R and D. (4) Data on beryllium toxicity, example of clinical diagnosis of beryllium disease, and environmental occurence of beryllium. (5) Personnel protection tools of Japanese Industrial Standard for hazardous substance. (author) 61 refs

  17. Control of beryllium powder at a DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, G.C.; Creek, K.L.; Castro, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is contained in a number of domestic and national defense items. Although many items might contain beryllium in some manner, few people need worry about the adverse effects caused by exposure to beryllium because it is the inhalable form of beryllium that is most toxic. Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a granulomas and fibrotic lung disease with long latency, can be developed after inhalation exposures to beryllium. It is a progressive, debilitating lung disease. Its occurrence in those exposed to beryllium has been difficult to predict because some people seem to react to low concentration exposures whereas others do not react to high concentration exposures. Onset of the disease frequently occurs between 15 to 20 years after exposure begins. Some people develop the disease after many years of low concentration exposures but others do not develop CBD even though beryllium is shown to be present in lungs and urine. Conclusions based on these experiences are that their is some immunological dependence of developing CBD in about 3--4% of the exposed population, but the exact mechanism involved has not yet been identified. Acute beryllium disease can occur after a single exposure to a concentration of greater than 0.100 mg/m3 (inhalation exposure); it is characterized by the development of chemical pneumoconiosis, a respiratory disease. The acute effect of skin contact is a dermatitis characterized by itching and reddened, elevated, or fluid-accumulated lesions which appear particularly on the exposed surfaces of the body, especially the face, neck, arms, and hands. Small particles of beryllium that enter breaks in the skin can lead to the development of granulomas and/or open sores that do not heal until the beryllium has been removed. Our interest is only airborne beryllium, which is found in areas that machine or produce beryllium

  18. Toxicokinetics of beryllium following inhalation of beryllium oxide by Beagle dogs. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Haley, P.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Bice, D.E.; Eidson, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    Young adult Beagle dogs inhaled radiolabeled beryllium oxide aerosols ( 7 BeO) prepared at either 500 deg. or 1000 deg. C to achieve one of two initial lung burdens (ILBs) of BeO. After exposure, animals were monitored by whole body counting for 7 Be, and excreta, clinical, and radiographic data were collected. One group of dogs was assigned for serial sacrifice for quantitation of beryllium clearance from lung, translocation to other organs, and histopathologic analysis of lung and lymph nodes. A second group of dogs was subjected to periodic bronchopulmonary lavage for analysis of lymphocyte responsiveness to beryllium. These latter dogs were subsequently re-exposed to the high ILB level of BeO prepared t 500 deg. C. ILBs following the second exposure were higher than that after the first exposure (74 vs. 42 μg BeO/kg, respectively). Except for one dog that exhibited enhanced beryllium retention after the second exposure, patterns of whole body clearance were similar to those observed after the initial exposures to the 500 deg. C-BeO. Analysis of lymphocyte responsiveness to beryllium in the second group of dogs is continuing. (author)

  19. Toxicokinetics of beryllium following inhalation of beryllium oxide by Beagle dogs. III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, G L; Haley, P J; Hoover, M D; Mewhinney, J A; Bice, D E; Eidson, A F

    1988-12-01

    Young adult Beagle dogs inhaled radiolabeled beryllium oxide aerosols ({sup 7}BeO) prepared at either 500 deg. or 1000 deg. C to achieve one of two initial lung burdens (ILBs) of BeO. After exposure, animals were monitored by whole body counting for {sup 7}Be, and excreta, clinical, and radiographic data were collected. One group of dogs was assigned for serial sacrifice for quantitation of beryllium clearance from lung, translocation to other organs, and histopathologic analysis of lung and lymph nodes. A second group of dogs was subjected to periodic bronchopulmonary lavage for analysis of lymphocyte responsiveness to beryllium. These latter dogs were subsequently re-exposed to the high ILB level of BeO prepared t 500 deg. C. ILBs following the second exposure were higher than that after the first exposure (74 vs. 42 {mu}g BeO/kg, respectively). Except for one dog that exhibited enhanced beryllium retention after the second exposure, patterns of whole body clearance were similar to those observed after the initial exposures to the 500 deg. C-BeO. Analysis of lymphocyte responsiveness to beryllium in the second group of dogs is continuing. (author)

  20. Hyaluronan-lecithin foils and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BiaIopiotrowicz, Tomasz; Janczuk, BronisIaw; Fiedorowicz, Maciej; Khachatryan, Gohar; Tomasik, Piotr; Bakos, Dusan

    2006-01-01

    Thin, elastic foils of good resistance to the air exposure, patented as wound healing aids, were prepared by evaporation of a blend of lecithin (L) and sodium hyaluronan (H) taken under varying proportions. The contact angle for water, glycerol, formamide, ethylene glycol and diiodomethane, was determined for these foils. The contact angle was correlated against the H:L foil composition. For all liquids but formamide the highest contact angle was noted for the H:L = 2:1 (g g -1 ) ratio. The contact angles provided estimation of the work of adhesion. At the same L:H ratio the work of adhesion was the lowest. It was suggested that lecithin cross-linked hyaluronan. Since the work of adhesion of the studied liquids was similar to that of diiodomethane, it could be concluded that almost all functional groups on the foil surface were completely blocked. Perhaps, at H:L = 2:1 (g g -1 ) a stoichiometric complex of hyaluronic acid with lecithin was formed, and polar functional groups from both reagents were involved. Foils seem to be electrostatic complexes of H with L. Foils with the H:L equal to 2:1 exhibited specific properties confirmed by the IR reflectance spectra of the foils. The thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) also revealed unique thermal behaviour confirming other specific properties of the foil of this composition. For the same ratio a thorough inspection of the scanning electron micrographs (SEM) revealed few irregularly distributed perforations of 1-2 μm in diameter seen as black points, which can be recognized as pores. Properties of the foils determined in the contact angle measurements are nicely backed by the results from thermogravimetric and scanning electron microscopic studies

  1. Status of material development for lifetime expansion of beryllium reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, C [Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites, California (United States); Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Hatano, Y [Univ. of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Chakrov, P [INP-KNNC, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kodama, M [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Beryllium has been used as the reflector element material in the reactor, specifically S-200F structural grade beryllium manufactured by Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites (former, Brush Wellman Inc.). As a part of the reactor upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) also has carried out the cooperation experiments to extend the operating lifetime of the beryllium reflector elements. It will first be necessary to determine which of the material's physical, mechanical and chemical properties will be the most influential on that choice. The irradiation testing plans to evaluate the various beryllium grades are also briefly considered and prepared. In this paper, material selection, irradiation test plan and PEI development for lifetime expansion of beryllium are described for material testing reactors. (author)

  2. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  3. Characterization of Plasma Sprayed Beryllium ITER First Wall Mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Richard G.; Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Hollis, Kendall J.

    1997-10-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/sq m without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface

  4. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  5. Study on neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as neutron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    More than 300 tons beryllium is expected to be used as a neutron multiplier in ITER, and study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) were performed to get the engineering data for fusion blanket design. This study started as the study on the tritium behavior in beryllium neutron reflector in order to make clear the generation mechanism on tritium of JMTR primary coolant since 1985. These experiences were handed over to beryllium studies for fusion study, and overall studies such as production technology of beryllium pebbles, irradiation behavior evaluation and reprocessing technology have been started since 1990. In this presentation, study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with JMTR was reviewed from the point of tritium release, thermal properties, mechanical properties and reprocessing technology. (author)

  6. Analysis of Mechanical Properties for GEM Foil

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Yuk Ming

    2016-01-01

    In view of new assembly technique of the GEM detector; in which three foils stack is stretched to get the uniform gaps among the foils. We studied the mechanical properties of the foil material. We conditioned the samples in different environments to make them extra dry and wet. As holes are the major source of the charge amplification their deformation can effect the detector performance. Therefore in our studies we also studied at which level of the stress the holes deformation is seen. These tensile and holes deformation studies can help to optimize the stress during detector assembly.

  7. Measuring device for bending of beryllium reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Seiri; Sakamoto, Naoki.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention can measure bending of a beryllium reflector formed in a reactor core of a nuclear reactor by a relatively easy operation. Namely, a sensor portion comprises a long-support that can be inserted to a fuel element-insertion hole disposed in the reactor and a plurality of distance sensors disposed in a longitudinal direction of the support. A supersonic wave sensor which is advantageous in the heat resistance, the size and the accuracy and can conduct measurement in water relatively easily is used as the distance sensors. However, other sensors, instead of the sensor described above, may also be used. The plurality of distance sensors detect the bending amount of the beryllium reflector in the longitudinal direction by such an easy operation of inserting such a sensor portion to the fuel element-insertion hole upon exchange of fuel elements. (I.S.)

  8. Interaction of hydrogen and its isotopes with irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Pomanenko, O.G.; Chikhraj, E.V.; Kenzhin, E.A.; Zverev, V.V.; Kolbanenkov, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    In the article the results of experiments on hydrogen and its isotopes accumulation and gas-release from irradiated beryllium are presented. The irradiation was conducted at different media and temperatures in the RA and IVG.1M reactors. The measurements were carried out by thermal desorption method. Hydrogen release from beryllium samples saturated at different conditions were calculated. Dependence of hydrogen confinement character in beryllium from grain orientation in the sample, temperature and irradiation rate was revealed

  9. Premelting hcp to bcc Transition in Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, P.; Zhang, D.-B.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2017-04-01

    Beryllium (Be) is an important material with wide applications ranging from aerospace components to x-ray equipment. Yet a precise understanding of its phase diagram remains elusive. We have investigated the phase stability of Be using a recently developed hybrid free energy computation method that accounts for anharmonic effects by invoking phonon quasiparticles. We find that the hcp → bcc transition occurs near the melting curve at 0 materials.

  10. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmur, N.F.

    1986-12-01

    It is known that various crystalline and liquid compounds form on the downstream surfaces of beryllium windows exposed to air. It is also known that the integrity of such windows may be compromised resulting in leaks through the window. The purpose of this report is to document the occurrences described as they pertain to the NSLS and to analyze, where possible, the various substances formed

  11. Preparation and properties of beryllium diphosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, J.F.; Gerardin, R.; Zanne, M.; Gleitzer, C.; Aubry, J.

    1975-01-01

    The compound BeP 2 can be obtained by direct action of phosphor on beryllium metal at 800-1000 0 C, and by removal of arsenic with phosphor in the diarsenide BeAs 2 . BeP 2 is a non hygroscopic brown-red powder. The X rays diffraction provide evidence for a quadratic cell with a = 7.08 A and c = 15.06 A. The atomic stacking is diamond type

  12. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; O' hira, Shigeru; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x10{sup 13} D atoms/m{sup 2}s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  13. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  14. Dynamic behaviour of S200F beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Dominique

    1991-01-01

    Compression tests have been made on a large scale of strain, strain rate (up to 2000 s -1 ) and temperature (between 20 C and 300 C). From these experiences, we have calculated a constitutive model for beryllium S200F, which can be used by computer codes. Its formulation is not far from Steinberg, Cochran and Guinan's. But in our case, the influences of temperature and strain rate appear clearly within the expression. To validate our equation, we have used it in a computer code. Its extrapolation for higher strain rates is in good agreement with experiments such as Taylor impact tests or plate impact tests (strain rates greater than 10 4 s -1 ). With micrography, we could settle a link between the main strain mode within the material, and the variation of one parameter of the model. Beside the constitutive model, we have shown that shock loaded beryllium behaves in two different ways. If the strain rate is lower than 5.10 6 s -1 , then it is proportional to the squared shock pressure. Beyond, it is a linear function of shock pressure to the power of four. By a spall study on beryllium, we have confirmed that it is excessively fragile. Its fracture is sudden, at a strength near 1 GPa. (author) [fr

  15. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  16. The Cryogenic Properties of Several Aluminum-Beryllium Alloys and a Beryllium Oxide Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Performance related mechanical properties for two aluminum-beryllium (Al-Be) alloys and one beryllium-oxide (BeO) material were developed at cryogenic temperatures. Basic mechanical properties (Le., ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percent elongation, and elastic modulus were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 at cryogenic [-195.5"C (-320 F) and -252.8"C (-423"F)I temperatures. Basic mechanical properties for the Be0 material were obtained at cyrogenic [- 252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. Fracture properties were obtained for the investment cast alloy Beralcast 363 at cryogenic [-252.8"C (-423"F)] temperatures. The AlBeMetl62 material was extruded, the Be0 material was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) consolidated, and the Beralcast 363 material was investment cast.

  17. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site beryllium characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, D.M.; Miller, J.R.; Allen, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    A site beryllium characterization project was completed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in 1997. Information from historical reviews, previous sampling surveys, and a new sampling survey were used to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the locations and levels of beryllium contamination in 35 buildings. A feature of the sampling strategy was to test if process knowledge was a good predictor of where beryllium contamination could be found. Results revealed that this technique was effective at identifying where surface contamination levels might exceed the RFETS smear control level but that it was not effective in identifying where low concentrations of beryllium might be found

  18. Formation of cellular structure in beryllium at plastic working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papirov, I.I.; Nikolaenko, A.A.; Shokurov, V.S.; Pikalov, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions of cellular structure formation are investigated at various kinds of deformation and heat treatment of beryllium ingots. It is shown that the cellular structure plays the important role in formation of complex of physical mechanical properties of beryllium. Influence of impurity, various conditions of deformation (temperature, squeezing degree) and heat treatments on substructure, texture and mechanical properties of metal is investigated. Optimum conditions of rolling and heat treatments of beryllium are defined. The way of sign-variable cyclic deformation of beryllium ingots is offered for reception quasi-isotropic fine-grained metal. Physical-mechanical properties of ultra fine-grained metal are studied

  19. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  20. Corrosion of beryllium oxide; Corrosion de l'oxyde de beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, J; Caillat, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m{sup 3}, - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm{sup 2} water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author)Fren. [French] La volatilisation de l'oxyde de beryllium dans l'air humide est etudiee en fonction de la temperature pour differentes teneurs de vapeur d'eau. Les essais decrits portent sur de l'oxyde de beryllium en poudre ou sur des echantillons d'oxyde de beryllium fritte de differentes densites. Avec un debit d'air de 12 I/h contenant 25 g de vapeur par m{sup 3} correspondant a une vitesse de 40 m/h sur la surface de l'echantillon, la volatilisation des frittes a 1300 deg. C reste tres faible. Sur de la poudre d'oxyde de beryllium calcinee initialement a 1300 deg. C, on observe un grossissement de la taille des grains sous l'influence de l'air humide a 1100 deg. C. Par exemple, elle passe de 0,5 a au moins 2 microns apres 500 heures d'exposition a cette temperature. On donne d'autre part les resultats d'une etude de la corrosion de frittes d'oxyde de beryllium par l'eau, en autoclave. A 250 deg. C, sous une pression de 40 kg/cm{sup 2}, l'action de l'eau reste tres

  1. A state enumeration of the foil knot

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaharo, Franck; Rakotondrajao, Fanja

    2017-01-01

    We split the crossings of the foil knot and enumerate the resulting states with a generating polynomial. Unexpectedly, the number of such states which consist of two components are given by the lazy caterer's sequence. This sequence describes the maximum number of planar regions that is obtained with a given number of straight lines. We then establish a bijection between this partition of the plane and the concerned foil splits sequence.

  2. Light Barrier for Non-Foil Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    foil and all-plastic materials were retorted and a second set of all-plastic packaged entrees were Microwave Sterilized on the Washington State...Copolymers for Retort Applications; SPE Polyolefins and Flexible Packaging Conference: Society of Plastics Engineers. Newtown. CT, 43pp. Thellen C...Final Scientific Report Light Barrier for Non-Foil Packaging Contract No. W911QY-08-C-0132 Final Scientific Report Contract No. W911QY-08-C-0132

  3. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Analyses and characterisation of tungsten foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Andreas; Yi Xiaoou; Armstrong, David E.J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been attempted for several years to synthesise a tungsten material with a low brittle-to-ductile transition temperature and a high fracture toughness that can be used for structural parts. It was shown in our previous work that tungsten foil is ductile at room temperature and that this ductility can be transformed to bulk by synthesising a tungsten laminate. In this work we want to focus on tungsten foil and assess the microstructure as well as the mechanical properties of the foil. The assessment of the microstructure of 0.1 mm tungsten foil will be performed using electron microscopy. It will be shown that the grains of the tungsten foil have a dimension of 0.5 μm × 3 μm × 15 μm and a clear texture in (1 0 0) 〈0 1 1〉. This texture becomes even more pronounced by annealing. Three-point-bending tests with tungsten foil, as-received, will define the barriers: ductile at room temperature and brittle in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C). This shows that the ductility is a thermally activated process. Recrystallised tungsten foil (annealed for 1 h/2700 °C) shows ductile material behaviour at 200 °C. The paper closes with a discussion on the reasons of the ductility of 0.1 mm tungsten foil. These might be the ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructure or, in other words, a nano microstructure (see tungsten foil as-received), the high amount of mobile edge dislocations, and/or the foil effect, which means that dislocations can move to the surface and are annihilated (see tungsten foil recrystallised).

  4. Deuterium/hydrogen isotope exchange on beryllium and beryllium nitride; Deuterium/Wasserstoff-Isotopenaustausch an Beryllium und Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollase, Petra; Eichler, Michael; Koeppen, Martin; Dittmar, Timo; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the fusion experiments JET and ITER, the first wall is made up of beryllium. The use of nitrogen is discussed for radiative cooling in the divertor. This can react with the surface of the first wall to form beryllium nitride (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}). The hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, which react in the fusion reaction to helium and a neutron, are used as fuel. Since the magnetic confinement of the plasma is not perfect, deuterium and tritium ions are also found on the beryllium wall and can accumulate there. This should be avoided due to the radioactivity of tritium. Therefore the isotope exchange with deuterium is investigated to regenerate the first wall. We investigate the isotopic exchange of deuterium and protium in order to have not to work with radioactive tritium. The ion bombardment is simulated with an ion source. With voltages up to a maximum of 5 kV, deuterium and protic hydrogen ions are implanted in polycrystalline Be and Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}. The samples are then analyzed in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Subsequently, samples prepared under the same conditions are characterized ex-situ by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). [German] In den Fusionsexperimenten JET und ITER besteht die erste Wand im Hauptraum aus Beryllium (Be). Zur Strahlungskuehlung im Divertor wird der Einsatz von Stickstoff diskutiert. Dieser kann mit der Oberflaeche der ersten Wand zu Berylliumnitrid (Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}) reagieren. Als Brennstoff werden die Wasserstoffisotope Deuterium und Tritium eingesetzt, die in der Fusionsreaktion zu Helium und einem Neutron reagieren. Da der magnetische Einschluss des Plasmas nicht perfekt ist, treffen auch Deuterium- und Tritiumionen auf die Berylliumwand auf und koennen sich dort anreichern. Das soll aufgrund der Radioaktivitaet von Tritium unbedingt vermieden werden. Daher wird zur Regenerierung der ersten Wand der Isotopenaustausch mit Deuterium untersucht. Wir

  5. Sintering of beryllium oxide; Frittage de l'oxyde de beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, R; Pointud, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [French] Cette etude a eu pour origine la recherche d'un procede permettant de fabriquer industriellement des briques d'oxyde de beryllium nucleaireraent pures, de densite aussi elevee que possible et de forme standardisee. Le frittage sous charge fut la technique retenue pour la fabrication des briques. En raison de la grande toxicite de l'oxyde de beryllium, les caracteristiques generales du frittage, pour l'etude preliminaire, ont ete determine en utilisant de l'alumine. Les resultats obtenus pourront servir d'indication generale pour des etudes ulterieurs avec frittage sous charge. (M.B.)

  6. Beryllium-stimulated neopterin as a diagnostic adjunct in chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Lisa A; Kittle, Lori A; Mroz, Margaret M; Newman, Lee S

    2003-06-01

    The diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) relies on the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) to demonstrate a Be specific immune response. This test has improved early diagnosis, but cannot discriminate beryllium sensitization (BeS) from CBD. We previously found high neopterin levels in CBD patients' serum and questioned whether Be-stimulated neopterin production by peripheral blood cells in vitro might be useful in the diagnosis of CBD. CBD, BeS, Be exposed workers without disease (Be-exp) normal controls and sarcoidosis subjects were enrolled. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMN) were cultured in the presence and absence of beryllium sulfate. Neopterin levels were determined from cell supernatants by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical evaluation of CBD subjects included chest radiography, pulmonary function testing, exercise testing, and the BeLPT. CBD patients produced higher levels of neopterin in both unstimulated and Be-stimulated conditions compared to all other subjects (P workplace screening. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Implanted deuterium retention and release in carbon-coated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Oates, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 angstrom. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 angstrom revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400 degrees C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400 degrees C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 X 10 19 D/m 2 sec), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. Implanted Deuterium Retention and Release in Carbon-Coated Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Longhurst, G. R.; Pawelko, R. J.; Oates, M. A.

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 Å. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 Å revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400°C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400°C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 × 1019 D/m2-s), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples.

  9. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview workers...

  10. Atlas of hot isostatic beryllium powder pressing diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoev, P.I.; Papirov, I.I.; Tikhinskij, G.F.; Vasil'ev, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Diagrams of hot isotopic pressing (HIP) of beryllium powder with different grain size in a wide range of pressing parameters are built by mathematical modeling methods. The HIP diagrams presented are divided into 3 groups: parametric dependencies D=f(P,T); technological HIP diagrams; compacting mechanisms. The created data bank permits to optimise beryllium powder HIP with changing parameters. 4 refs., 23 figs

  11. Reactivity effects due to beryllium poisoning of BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Ponsard, B.; Koonen, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates the impact of the poisoning of the beryllium reflector on reactivity variations of the Belgian MTR BR2 in SCK.CEN. Detailed calculations by MCNP-4C of reactivity effects caused by strong neutron absorbers 3 He and 6 Li during reactor operation history are presented. The importance of beryllium poisoning for the accuracy of reactivity predictions is discussed. (authors)

  12. Progress report of preliminary studies of beryllium toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, H.C.

    1947-09-01

    This document was prepared in connection with a symposium of beryllium poisoning held at the Saranac Laboratories and describes progress made and a research program aimed at characterizing the toxicity of beryllium. Seven individual papers in this document are separately indexed and cataloged for the database.

  13. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  14. Protection of air in premises and environment against beryllium aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitkolov, N.Z.; Vishnevsky, E.P.; Krupkin, A.V. [Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    First and foremost, the danger of beryllium aerosols concerns a possibility of their inhalation. The situation is aggravated with high biological activity of the beryllium in a human lung. The small allowable beryllium aerosols` concentration in air poses a rather complex and expensive problem of the pollution prevention and clearing up of air. The delivery and transportation of beryllium aerosols from sites of their formation are defined by the circuit of ventilation, that forms aerodynamics of air flows in premises, and aerodynamic links between premises. The causes of aerosols release in air of premises from hoods, isolated and hermetically sealed vessels can be vibrations, as well as pulses of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it is possible the redispersion of aerosols from dirty surfaces. The effective protection of air against beryllium aerosols at industrial plants is provided by a complex of hygienic measures: from individual means of breath protection up to collective means of the prevention of air pollution. (J.P.N.)

  15. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusasco, R.; Letts, S.; Miller, P.; Saculla, M.; Cook, R.

    1995-01-01

    We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 μm hr -1 were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates

  16. Reaction-diffusion modeling of hydrogen in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Mirko; Matveev, Dmitry; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium will be used as first-wall material for the future fusion reactor ITER as well as in the breeding blanket of DEMO. In both cases it is important to understand the mechanisms of hydrogen retention in beryllium. In earlier experiments with beryllium low-energy binding states of hydrogen were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which are not yet well understood. Two candidates for these states are considered: beryllium-hydride phases within the bulk and surface effects. The retention of deuterium in beryllium is studied by a reaction rate approach using a coupled reaction diffusion system (CRDS)-model relying on ab initio data from density functional theory calculations (DFT). In this contribution we try to assess the influence of surface recombination.

  17. Cryostat with Foil and MLI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Peter K.F.; Gung, Chen-yu

    2005-10-06

    Induction cores are used to accelerate heavy ion beam array, which are built around the outer diameter of the cryostat housing the superconducting quadruple array. Compact cryostat is highly desirable to reduce the cost of the induction cores. Recent experiences in fabrication of a cryostat for single beam transport revealed that it is possible to reduce the spacing in the cryostat vacuum jacket by using low-emissivity thermal insulation material instead of conventional MLI. However, it is labor-intensive to install the new type of insulation as compared with using MLI. It is promising to build a cost-effective compact cryostat for quadruple magnet array for heavy ion beam array transport by using low-emissivity material combined with conventional MLI as radiation insulation. A matrix of insulation designs and tests will be performed as the feasibility study and for the selection of the optimal thermal insulation as the Phase I work. The selected mixed insulation will be used to build prototype compact cryostats in the Phase II project, which are aiming for housing quadruple doublet array. In this STTR phase I study, a small cryostat has been designed and built to perform calorimetric characterization of the heat load in a liquid helium vessel insulated with a vacuum layer with a nominal clearance of 3.5 mm. The vacuum clearance resembled that used in the warm-bore beam tube region in a prototype cryostat previously built for the heavy ion beam transport experiment. The vacuum clearance was geometrically restricted with a heater shell with the temperature controlled at near 300 K. Various combinations of radiation and thermal shields were installed in the tight vacuum clearance for heat load measurements. The measured heat loads are reported and compared with previous test result using a compact vacuum layer. Further developments of the thermal insulations used in the present study are discussed. The compact cryostat with foil and MLI insulation may be used in the

  18. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  19. Moessbauer study of iron diffusion in beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepiol, B.; Ruebenbauer, K.; Miczko, B.; Birchall, T.

    1991-01-01

    The broadening of the 14.41 keV Moessbauer line of 57 Fe dure to diffusion of iron atoms in polycrystalline beryllium has been investigated in the temperature range 1123 to 1423 K. The observed broadenings obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.66(10) eV, i.e., lower than that obtained from the corresponding polycrystalline tracer data. The variations of the resonant fraction, second order Doppler shift and quadrupole splitting versus temperature are reported. An average diffusion coefficient has been calculated from the obtained broadenings and compared with the tracer results. (orig.)

  20. Additional security features for optically variable foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Allan C.; Russo, Frank

    1998-04-01

    For thousands of years, man has exploited the attraction and radiance of pure gold to adorn articles of great significance. Today, designers decorate packaging with metallic gold foils to maintain the prestige of luxury items such as perfumes, chocolates, wine and whisky, and to add visible appeal and value to wide range of products. However, today's products do not call for the hand beaten gold leaf of the Ancient Egyptians, instead a rapid production technology exists which makes use of accurately coated thin polymer films and vacuum deposited metallic layers. Stamping Foils Technology is highly versatile since several different layers may be combined into one product, each providing a different function. Not only can a foil bring visual appeal to an article, it can provide physical and chemical resistance properties and also protect an article from human forms of interference, such as counterfeiting, copying or tampering. Stamping foils have proved to be a highly effective vehicle for applying optical devices to items requiring this type of protection. Credit cards, bank notes, personal identification documents and more recently high value packaged items such as software and perfumes are protected by optically variable devices applied using stamping foil technology.

  1. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kost, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be 2 C island formation for T≥770 K. At high temperatures (T≥1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be 2 W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be 2 W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be 2 C, W 2 C, WC and Be 2 W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be 2 C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures. Depending on the layer

  2. Assessment of the feasibility and advantages of beryllium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Braet, J.; Ooms, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a generic route for the recycling of beryllium from fusion reactors, based on critical issues associated with beryllium pebbles after their service life in the HCPB breeding blanket. These critical issues are the high tritium inventory, the presence of long-lived radionuclides (among which transuranics due to traces of uranium in the base metal), and the chemical toxicity of beryllium. On the basis of the chemical and radiochemical characteristics of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles, we describe a possible recycling route. The first step is the detritiation of the material. This can be achieved by heating the pebbles to 800 o C under an argon flow. The argon gas avoids oxidation of the beryllium, and at the proposed temperature the tritium inventory is readily released from the pebbles. In a second step, the released tritium can be oxidised on a copper oxide bed to produce tritiated water, which is consistent with the current international strategy to convert all kinds of tritiated waste into tritiated water, which can subsequently be treated in a water detritiation plant. Removal of radionuclides from the beryllium pebbles may be achieved by several types of chloride processes. The first step is to pass chlorine gas (in an argon flow) over the pebbles, thus yielding volatile BeCl 2 . This beryllium chloride can then be purified by fractional distillation. As a small fraction of the beryllium chloride contains the long-lived 10 Be isotope, 10BeCl 2 has to be separated from 9BeCl 2 , which could be achieved by centrifugal techniques. The product can then be reduced to obtain high-purity metallic beryllium. Two candidate reduction methods were identified: fused salt electrolysis and thermal decomposition. Both these methods require laboratory parametric studies to maximise the yield and achieve a high purity metal, before either process can be upgraded to a larger scale. The eventual product of the chloride reduction process must be a high

  3. Microstructure Analysis on Beryllium Reflector Blocks of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Han, Chang Hee; Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Seok; Oh, Kyu Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A pure beryllium has a very low mass absorption coefficient: it has been used as the reflector element material in research reactors. The lifetime of beryllium reflector elements usually determined by the swelling: the swelling leads to dimensional change in the reflector frame, which results in bending or cracking of the parts. The mechanical interference in between parts should be avoided; the anisotropy of beryllium also needs to be considered. A beryllium has hexagonal close-pack (HCP) crystal structure, which is inherently anisotropic. It has virtually no ductility in one direction. There are two main aspects in the manufacturing of beryllium which will affect its isotropy, and those are the powder morphology and the consolidation process. Powder metallurgy permits the material to be produced in isotropic and fine-grained form, which overcomes the crystal structure problem by distributing loads in low ductility oriented grains to high ductility oriented grains. There are three representative consolidating methods to make beryllium reflector blocks. Traditionally, most powder-derived grades of beryllium have been consolidated by vacuum hot-pressing (VHP). A column of loose beryllium powder is compacted under vacuum by the pressure of the opposed upper and lower punches, bringing the billet to final density. The VHP process is directional in nature: it contributes to the anisotropy of the material properties. Another consolidating method for beryllium powder is hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), which will enhance its isotropy. During HIPing, The argon gas exerts pressure uniformly in all directions on the can containing the beryllium powder. The HIP process is effective to improve the isotropy of the resulting material as well as refinement of grain sizes. The last consolidating method is hot extrusion (HE). A roughly close packed beryllium is subjected to severe plastic defomation, the grains are refined and the tensile strength is enhanced. Since the material

  4. Status of beryllium study for fusion in RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomutov, A.M.; Kupriyanov, I.B.; Markushkin, Yu.E.; Gervash, A.; Kolbasov, B.N.

    2004-01-01

    The main directions of research activities in the field of beryllium application science and technology carried out in Russia during 2001-2003 have been reviewed. The main results of these investigations have been highlighted. First wall and port-limier. The investigation on the actively cooled components with beryllium cladding is under progress objecting on the clarification of their ultimate thermo cycling capabilities. The study of behavior of bulk beryllium and the boundary region of the contact with the cooling structure under the intensive thermo cycling loading and neutron irradiation have been the object of consideration in particular. The works on the optimization and modification of industrial fabrication processes for commercial scaled production of beryllium tile were also under way. The influence of neutron irradiation. The new experimental data on the nuclear properties of several Russian beryllium grades has been obtained. The samples have been subjected to the high neutron dozes. The influence of low temperature (70-200degree C) neutron irradiation on the thermal conductivity has been examined in particular. The interrelations of the helium inventory and temperature of neutron irradiation with tritium release out of irradiated beryllium samples have been analyzed. The beryllium associated safety questions. The experiments on the modeling of normal working conditions and conditions imitating the plasma disruption events in ITER performance scenario have been continued. The new experimental information on the coefficient of pulverization of beryllium and the accumulation of deuterium in beryllium under the action of proton beam has been collected. The dependence of the reaction rate constant for the beryllium oxidation by the water vapor for different conditions has been analyzed. The compact, porous and powder beryllium samples have been tested at the wide range of temperature, pressure and duration of reaction with water vapor. The calculating

  5. Composite Design for a Foiling Optimist Dinghy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Oddy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In April 2017, a foiling Optimist dingy designed entirely by students, was successfully tested under standard sailing conditions in the waters outside Gothenburg. In order to achieve take of wind speeds as low as 6 m/s, a stiff and lightweight design of the dinghy and its foiling components was necessary. There have been few successful attempts to make an Optimist foil in a stable manner, as such there were no standards or recommendations available for the design. Therefore, a simulation driven structural design methodology for hydrofoils, centreboards, centreboard-to-hull connections, and necessary hull reinforcements using sandwich structures was adopted. The proposed design was then manufactured, allowing for a significantly stiffer hull and a 20% decrease in weight over a conventional Optimist. Excluding the rig and sail, the final weight came to 27 kg.

  6. Copper-beryllium alloys for technical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    1976-01-01

    Data of physical properties are compiled for the most commonly used copper-beryllium alloys (CuBe 2, CuBe 1.7, CuCoBe, and CuCoAgBe), with emphasis on their temperature dependence and their variation with particular annealing and hardening treatments. The purpose is to provide a reference source and to indicate the versatility of these materials with respect to other copper alloys and to pure copper. The special features of CuBe alloys include high mechanical strength with reasonably high electrical conductivity, as well as good wear and corrosion resistance. For example, CuBe 2 has a yield strength of up to 1200 N/mm 2 , about three times that of pure copper, whilst the electrical conductivity of CuCoBe can be as high as 28 MS/m, nearly half that of pure copper. Typical applications are springs and electrical contacts. The importance of a proper heat treatment is discussed in some detail, notably the metallurgy and effects of low-temperature annealing (precipitation-hardening). A chapter on manufacturing processes covers machining, brazing, welding, and cleaning. This is followed by some remarks on safety precautions against beryllium poisoning. CuBe alloys are commercially available in the form of wires, strips, rods, and bars. Typical dimensions, specifications, a brief cost estimate, and addresses of suppliers are listed. (Author)

  7. Development of all-beryllium riveted structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, D.R.; Leslie, W.W.; Miley, D.V.; Nokes, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a development program aimed at making a full-scale, all-beryllium frustrum by riveted assembly methods. Included are descriptions of the sheet-metal fabrication practices and assembly plans. Results of extensive mechanical testing of both ingot- and powder-source beryllium products that are presented include tensile, notch-tensile, bearing, and shear tests. Although the full-size structure has not been built, examples are given of several conical and cylindrical structures that were made. The largest of these is a 20-in. diameter, 15-in. long cylinder that was roll-formed from one 0.050-in. thick ingot sheet and assembled with 60 countersunk rivets. Tensile testing of riveted flat coupons is also reported as is bulge testing of riveted cylindrical shells. A cost comparison of riveted deep-drawn and powder-source cylinders is made. Results show that when strength and dimensional tolerance requirements are not severe, a riveted assembly approach is warranted. 33 figures, 8 tables

  8. Charge-density study of crystalline beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R F [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray structure factors for crystalline beryllium measured by Brown (Phil. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377) have been analyzed with multipole deformation functions for charge-density information. Single exponential radial functions were used for the valence charge density. A valence monopole plus the three harmonics, P/sup 3//sub 5/(cos theta) sin 3phi, P/sub 6/(cos theta) and P/sup 3//sub 7/(cos theta) sin 3phi, provide a least-squares fit to the data with Rsub(w)=0.0081. The superposition of these density functions describes a bonding charge density between Be atoms along the c axis through the tetrahedral vacancy. The results reported here are in qualitative agreement with a recent pseudo-potential calculation of metallic beryllium. The final residuals in the analysis are largest at high sin theta/lambda values. This suggests that core charge deformation is present and/or anharmonic motion of the nuclei is appreciable.

  9. Physical properties of beryllium oxide - Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    This work has been carried out in view of determining several physical properties of hot-pressed beryllium oxide under various conditions and the change of these properties after irradiation. Special attention has been paid on to the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient and thermal diffusivity coefficient. Several designs for the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient have been achieved. They permit its determination between 50 and 300 deg. C, between 400 and 800 deg. C. Some measurements have been made above 1000 deg. C. In order to measure the thermal diffusivity coefficient, we heat a perfectly flat surface of a sample in such a way that the heat flux is modulated (amplitude and frequency being adjustable). The thermal diffusivity coefficient is deduced from the variations of temperature observed on several spots. Tensile strength; compressive strength; expansion coefficient; sound velocity and crystal parameters have been also measured. Some of the measurements have been carried out after neutron irradiation. Some data have been obtained on the change of the properties of beryllium oxide depending on the integrated neutron flux. (author) [fr

  10. Thrust augmentation in tandem flapping foils by foil-wake interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik; Lauder, George

    2006-11-01

    Propulsion by pitching and heaving airfoils and hydrofoils has been a focus of much research in the field of biologically inspired propulsion. Organisms that use this sort of propulsion are self-propelled, so it is difficult to use standard experimental metrics such as thrust and drag to characterize performance. We have constructed a flapping foil robot mounted in a flume on air-bearings that allows for the determination of self-propelled speed as a metric of performance. We have used a pair of these robots to examine the impact of an upstream flapping foil on a downstream flapping foil as might apply to tandem fins of a swimming organism or in-line swimming of schooling organisms. Self-propelled speed and a force transducer confirmed significant thrust augmentation for particular foil-to-foil spacings, phase differences, and flapping frequencies. Flow visualization shows the mechanism to be related to the effective angle of attack of the downstream foil due to the structure of the wake of the upstream foil. This confirms recent computational work and the hypotheses by early investigators of fish fluid dynamics.

  11. Spectra from foil-excited molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Cecchi, J.L.; Kruse, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet spectra (5 to 55 nm) for foil-excited molybdenum ions have been measured using 22 to 200 MeV beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility, 20 μg/cm 2 C stripping foils, and a grazing incidence spectrometer. The mean ion charge states (13 to 28) and the narrow distribution widths (about 2 charge states) were accurately predictable from experimental parameters. Where possible, comparisons are given with Mo radiation from tokamaks, vacuum sparks, and laser-excited plasmas

  12. Calculation of electron transmission through aluminium foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Mel'ker, A.I.; Mikhajlin, A.I.; Sirotinkin, V.V.; Tokmakov, I.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculated by Monte Carlo method energy and angular distributions of electrons transmitted through aluminium foil with 50 μm thickness are presented. 200-500 electron energy ranges and angles of electron incidence on foil from 0 to 40 deg C are considered. That allows to use results for more universal accelerator group, for example, for accelerators with scanning beam used in industry. The received values of angular and energy characteristics allow to increase essentially estimation accuracy of accelerator extraction devices and dose distribution on irradiating item

  13. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpern, David G [Los Angeles, CA; McCabe, Niall [Torrance, CA; Gee, Mark [South Pasadena, CA

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  14. Ion beam assisted deposition of metal-coatings on beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, I.S.; Tul'ev, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Thin films were applied on beryllium substrates on the basis of metals (Cr, Ti, Cu and W) with method of the ion-assisted deposition in vacuum. Me/Be structures were prepared using 20 kV ions irradiation during deposition on beryllium neutral fraction generated from vacuum arc plasma. Rutherford back scattering and computer simulation RUMP code were applied to investigate the composition of the modified beryllium surface. Researches showed that the superficial structure is formed on beryllium by thickness ~ 50-60 nm. The covering composition includes atoms of the deposited metal (0.5-3.3 at. %), atoms of technological impurity carbon (0.8-1.8 at. %) and oxygen (6.3-9.9 at. %), atoms of beryllium from the substrate. Ion assisted deposition of metals on beryllium substrate is accompanied by radiation enhanced diffusion of metals, oxygen atoms in the substrate, out diffusion of beryllium, carbon atoms in the deposited coating and sputtering film-forming ions assists. (authors)

  15. Spallation Neutron Source SNS Diamond Stripper Foil Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Robert W.; Plum, Michael A.; Wilson, Leslie L.; Feigerle, Charles S.; Borden, Michael J.; Irie, Y.; Sugai, I.; Takagi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Diamond stripping foils are under development for the SNS. Freestanding, flat 300 to 500 (micro)g/cm 2 foils as large as 17 x 25 mm 2 have been prepared. These nano-textured polycrystalline foils are grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition in a corrugated format to maintain their flatness. They are mechanically supported on a single edge by a residual portion of their silicon growth substrate; fine foil supporting wires are not required for diamond foils. Six foils were mounted on the SNS foil changer in early 2006 and have performed well in commissioning experiments at reduced operating power. A diamond foil was used during a recent experiment where 15 (micro)C of protons, approximately 64% of the design value, were stored in the ring. A few diamond foils have been tested at LANSCE/PSR, where one foil was in service for a period of five months (820 C of integrated injected charge) before it was replaced. Diamond foils have also been tested in Japan at KEK (640 keV H - ) where their lifetimes slightly surpassed those of evaporated carbon foils, but fell short of those for Sugai's new hybrid boron carbon (HBC) foils.

  16. Beryllium-copper reactivity in an ITER joining environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C.; Cadden, C.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium-copper reactivity was studied using test parameters being considered for use in the ITER reactor. In this application, beryllium-copper tiles are produced using a low-temperature copper-copper diffusion bonding technique. Beryllium is joined to copper by first plating the beryllium with copper followed by diffusion bonding the electrodeposited (ED) copper to a wrought copper alloy (CuNiBe) at 450 C, 1-3 h using a hot isostatic press (HIP). In this bonded assembly, beryllium is the armor material and the CuNiBe alloy is the heat sink material. Interface temperatures in service are not expected to exceed 350 C. For this study, an ED copper-beryllium interface was subjected to diffusion bonding temperatures and times to study the reaction products. Beryllium-copper assemblies were subjected to 350, 450 and 550 C for times up to 200 h. Both BeCu and Be 2 Cu intermetallic phases were detected using scanning electron microscopy and quantitative microprobe analysis. Growth rates were determined experimentally for each phase and activation energies for formation were calculated. The activation energies were 66 mol and 62 kJ mol -1 for the BeCu and Be 2 Cu, respectively. Tensile bars were produced from assemblies consisting of coated beryllium (both sides) sandwiched between two blocks of Hycon-3. Tensile tests were conducted to evaluate the influence of these intermetallics on the bond strength. Failure occurred at the beryllium-copper interface at fracture strengths greater than 300 MPa for the room-temperature tests. (orig.)

  17. Historical perspectives on the uses and health risks of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, O.P.

    1985-01-01

    Unawareness of the health risks of beryllium resulted in a decade of unmitigated exposure of several thousand workers and numerous cases of beryllium disease in employees and nearby residents. Subsequent adoption of exposure limits and their implementation with effective technical controls reduced the occurrence of new cases, which were mainly due to accidental exposures, to a minimum. The fact that continuously growing production and consumption did not alter this trend demonstrates the effectiveness of the present threshold limit value. It shows that the potential health hazard can be well contained and that beryllium can be produced and fabricated without undue risk to employees or the general public

  18. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmur, N.F.

    1987-06-01

    An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined

  19. About kinetics of paramagnetic radiation malformations in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabinkin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper [1] specifies that γ-radiation of the beryllium-oxide-based ceramics results in development of paramagnetic radiation malformations emerging the ESR spectrum in form of doublet with the splitting rate of oestrasid Δ∼1.6 and g-factor of 2.008. This report presents evaluation outcomes of dependence of paramagnetic radiation malformations concentration in beryllium ceramics on gamma-radiation dose ( 60 Co) within the range of 0-100 Mrad. Total paramagnetic parameters of beryllium ceramics in the range 0-100 Mrad of gamma-radiation dose varied slightly, and were specified by the first type of paramagnetic radiation malformations

  20. Evaluation of the hazard associated with fabricating beryllium copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senn, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    Beryllium-copper alloys should be considered toxic materials and proper controls must be used when they are machined, heated, or otherwise fabricated. Air samples should be taken for each type of fabrication to determine the worker's exposure and the effectiveness of the controls in use. It has been shown that aerosols containing beryllium are generated during the four methods of fabrication tested, and that these aerosols can be reduced through local exhaust to undetectable levels. Considering the acute, chronic and possibly carcinogenic effects of exposure to beryllium, effective controls should be required because they are feasible both technologically and economically. The health hazards and control measures are reviewed

  1. Preparation of a sinterable beryllium oxide through decomposition of beryllium hydroxide (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, M.

    1963-01-01

    In the course of the present study, we have attempted to precise the factors which among the ones effective in the course of the preparation of the beryllium hydroxide and oxide and during the sintering have an influence on the final result: the density and homogeneity of the sintered body. Of the several varieties of hydroxides precipitated from a sulfate solution the β-hydroxide only is always contaminated with beryllium sulfate and cannot be purified even by thorough washing. We noticed that those varieties of the hydroxide (gel, α, β) have different decomposition rates; this behaviour is used to identify and even to dose the different species in (α, β) mixtures. The various hydroxides transmit to the resulting oxides the shape they had when precipitated. Accordingly the history of the oxide is revealed by its behaviour during its fabrication and sintering. By comparing the results of the sintering operation with the various measurements performed on the oxide powders we are led to the conclusion that an oxide obtained from beryllium hydroxide is sinterable under vacuum if the following conditions are fulfilled: the particle size must lie between 0.1 and 0.2 μ and the BeSO 4 content of the powder must be less than 0.25 per cent wt (expressed as SO 3 /BeO). The best fitting is obtained with the oxide issued from an α-hydroxide precipitated as very small aggregates and with a low sulfur-content. We have observed that this is also the case for the oxide obtained by direct calcination of beryllium sulfate. (author) [fr

  2. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our key innovation will be the use of single-layer graphene as LENA conversion foils, with appropriate microgrids and nanogrids to support the foils. Phase I...

  3. Particle velocity measurements in laser irradiated foils using ORVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, S.A.; Fisk, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum foils from 2- to 200-μm thick have been subjected to a Nd:YAG laser pulse of low irradiance (10 9 W/cm 2 , approx. 10 ns pulse) to produce laser-driven shocks in the foils. The particle velocity history of the foil side opposite the laser deposition was monitored with nanosecond resolution by a velocity interferometer system called ORVIS. These histories indicate a shock reverberation process accelerates the foil. Peak foil velocities can be adequately calculated using a ricket propulsion model developed from experiments at much higher irradiances. A velocity of 1 km/s was developed in a 2-μm-thick free foil in a time of 50 ns. Water-confined foils attained peak particle velocities about three times higher than those of free foils

  4. Production and thickness determination of thin plastic scintillator foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, B.; Lee, S.; Hagel, K.; Haddad, F.; Li, J.; Lou, Y.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Tezkratt, R.; Wada, R.; Utley, D.; Natowitz, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    A method of making large thin plastic scintillator foils with good uniformity is presented. The use of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to test the foil uniformity and to establish an empirical thickness calibration curve is described. ((orig.))

  5. Examination of the picture properties of luminescence memory foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewert, U.; Heine, S.; Nockemann, C.; Stade, J.; Tillack, G.R.; Wessel, H.; Zscherpel, U.; Mattis, A.

    1995-01-01

    Luminescence memory foils are a new medium for radiography without films. They are known by the name of image plates or digital memory foils. The suitability of such systems for industrial radiography is examined. (orig.) [de

  6. Novel plasma source for safe beryllium spectral line studies in the presence of beryllium dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, B. D.; Vinić, M.; Gavrilović Božović, M. R.; Ivković, M.

    2018-05-01

    Plasma source for beryllium spectral line studies in the presence of beryllium dust particles was realised. The guideline during construction was to prevent exposure to formed dust, considering the toxicity of beryllium. Plasma source characterization through determination of optimal working conditions is described. The necessary conditions for Be spectral line appearance and optimal conditions for line shape measurements are found. It is proven experimentally that under these conditions dust appears coincidently with the second current maximum. The electron density measured after discharge current maximum is determined from the peak separation of the hydrogen Balmer beta spectral line, and the electron temperature is determined from the ratios of the relative intensities of Be spectral lines emitted from successive ionized stages of atoms. Maximum values of electron density and temperature are measured to be 9.3 × 1022 m-3 and 16 800 K, respectively. Construction details and testing of the BeO discharge tube in comparison with SiO2 and Al2O3 discharge tubes are also presented in this paper.

  7. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…

  8. Foil Panel Mirrors for Nonimaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, D. J.; Castillo, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Large durable, lightweight mirrors made by bonding thick aluminum foil to honeycomb panels or other rigid, flat backings. Mirrors suitable for use as infrared shields, telescope doors, solar-furnance doors, advertising displays, or other reflectors that require low thermal emissivity and high specularity but do not require precise surface figure necessary for imaging.

  9. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a symmetric foil performing pitching oscillations in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we visualize a variety of wakes with up to 46 vortices per oscillation period, including von Karman vortex street...

  10. Real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium, at OSHA limit levels, by time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Real-time detection of beryllium particulate is being investigated by the new technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For beryllium detection we monitor the 313.1-nm feature of once ionized beryllium (Be II). Numerous publications describe the technique, our beryllium results, and other applications. Here we summarize the important points and describe our experiments with beryllium

  11. Forming of electron beams from a betatron by foils scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A P; Shishov, V A [N.N. Petrov Research Inst. of Oncology, Leningrad (USSR). Laboratory of High Energics

    1976-12-01

    The technique of forming electron beams by one scattering foil and one compensating foil is discussed. This method provides a means for producing large-size uniform dose distributions with much smaller losses in dose rate as compared with conventional beam forming by ine foil. Moreover, the energy losses involved in this process and the background of concomitant bremsstrahlung are much less. A techinque of calculation to determine approximate parameters of the compensating foils is described.

  12. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  13. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  14. Beam-foil study of neon in the EUV with foils of carbon, silver and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarest, J.A.; Watson, R.L.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station

    1988-01-01

    A beam-foil study of 40 MeV neon was conducted in the EUV with a 1-meter grazing incidence spectrometer configured with a position sensitive microchannel plate detector. A number of new lines of Ne IX, mainly from transitions to n = 3 levels, were detected in the wavelength region covering 50-350 A. Comparison of the spectra obtained using the different foils revealed that the average charge state of the neon projectiles was nearly one unit higher with carbon than with either of the two metals. Measurements of line intensities versus distance from the foils showed that cascade contributions were greatly reduced for the metals. It was also found that n = 3 states of low l were overpopulated relative to a statistical distribution, irrespective of the foil material. (orig.)

  15. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims

  16. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T irr .> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power ∼ 5 MW/m 2 ). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses ≥ 5x10 22 m -2 the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10 25 m -2

  17. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.

    2010-01-01

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s 2 1 S e ground state (37.73a 0 3 ) and the 2s2p 3 P 0 o metastable state (39.04a 0 3 ) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s 2 1 S e -2s2p 3 P 0 o clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  18. Primordial beryllium as a big bang calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2011-03-25

    Many models of new physics including variants of supersymmetry predict metastable long-lived particles that can decay during or after primordial nucleosynthesis, releasing significant amounts of nonthermal energy. The hadronic energy injection in these decays leads to the formation of ⁹Be via the chain of nonequilibrium transformations: Energy(h)→T, ³He→⁶He, ⁶Li→⁹Be. We calculate the efficiency of this transformation and show that if the injection happens at cosmic times of a few hours the release of O(10 MeV) per baryon can be sufficient for obtaining a sizable ⁹Be abundance. The absence of a plateau structure in the ⁹Be/H abundance down to a O(10⁻¹⁴) level allows one to use beryllium as a robust constraint on new physics models with decaying or annihilating particles.

  19. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reardon, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter

  20. Electron-beam fusion welding of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.P.; Dixon, R.D.; Liby, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Ingot-sheet beryllium (Be) having three different chemistries and three different thicknesses was fusion-welded by the electron-beam process. Several different preheats were used to obtain 100% penetration and crack-free welds. Cracking susceptability was found to be related to aluminum (Al) content; the higher Al-content material was most susceptable. However, adequate preheat allowed full penetration and crack-free welds to be made in all materials tested. The effect of a post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of these compositions was also determined. The heat treatment produced no significant effect on the ultimate tensile strength. However, the yield strength was decreased and the ductility was increased. These changes are attributed to the formation of AlFeBe 4 and FeBe 11

  1. Stripping foils for the PSB H- injection system

    CERN Document Server

    Aiba, M; Goddard, B; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    Beam physics considerations for the stripping foil of the PSB H- injection system are described, including the arguments for the foil type, thickness, geometry and positioning. The foil performance considerations are described, including expected stripping efficiency, emittance growth, energy straggling, temperature and lifetime. The required movement ranges and tolerances are detailed, together with the assumptions used.

  2. Electron microscope study of irradiated beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisson, A.A.

    1965-06-01

    The beryllium oxide is studied first by fractography, before and after irradiation, using sintered samples. The fractures are examined under different aspects. The higher density sintered samples, with transgranular fractures are the most interesting for a microscopic study. It is possible to mark the difference between the 'pores' left by the sintering process and the 'bubbles' of gases that can be produced by former thermal treatments. After irradiation, the grain boundaries are very much weakened. By annealing, it is possible to observe the evolution of the gases produced by the reaction (n, 2n) and (n. α) and gathered on the grain boundaries. The irradiated beryllium oxide is afterwards studied by transmission. For that, a simple method has been used: little chips of the crushed material are examined. Clusters of point defects produced by neutrons are thus detected in crystals irradiated at the three following doses: 6 x 10 19 , 9 x 10 19 and 2 x 10 20 n f cm -2 at a temperature below 100 deg. C. For the irradiation at 6 x 10 19 n f cm -2 , the defects are merely visible, but at 2 x l0 20 n f cm -2 the crystals an crowded with clusters and the Kikuchi lines have disappeared from the micro-diffraction diagrams. The evolution of the clusters into dislocation loops is studied by a series of annealings. The activation energy (0,37 eV) calculated from the annealing curves suggests that it must be interstitials that condense into dislocation loops. Samples irradiated at high temperatures (650, 900 and 1100 deg. C) are also studied. In those specimens the size of the loops is not the same as the equilibrium size obtained after out of pile annealing at the same temperature. Those former loops are more specifically studied and their Burgers vector is determined by micro-diffraction. (author) [fr

  3. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800 degrees C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and 60 Co;7.4 MBq/day

  4. Deuterium permeation and diffusion in high-purity beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, E.; Riehm, M.P.; Thompson, D.A.; Smeltzer, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The permeation rate of deuterium through high-purity beryllium membranes was measured using the gas-driven permeation technique. The time-dependent and the steady-state deuterium flux data were analyzed and the effective diffusivities of the samples were determined. Using multilayer permeation theory the effects of surface oxide were eliminated and the diffusion coefficients of the bulk beryllium determined. The diffusion parameters obtained for the extra-grade beryllium samples (99.8%) are D 0 =6.7x10 -9 m 2 /s and E D =28.4 kJ/mol. For the high-grade beryllium samples (99%) the parameters are D 0 =8.0x10 -9 m 2 /s and E D =35.1 kJ/mol. (orig.)

  5. Deuterium permeation and diffusion in high purity beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, E.

    1990-05-01

    The permeation rate of deuterium through high-purity beryllium membranes was measured using the gas-driven permeation technique. The time-dependent and the steady-state deuterium flux data were analyzed and the effective diffusivities of the samples were determined. A multilayer permeation theory was used in order to eliminate the surface oxide effects and the diffusion coefficients of the bulk beryllium were determined. The diffusion parameters obtained for the extra-grade beryllium samples (99.8%) are D 0 = 6.7 x 10 -9 [m 2 /s] and E D = 28.4 [KJ/mol]; and for the high-grade beryllium samples (99%) the parameters are D 0 = 8.0 x 10 -9 [m 2 /s] and E D = 35.1 [KJ/mol

  6. Spectrochemical determination of beryllium and lithium in stream sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallimore, D.L.; Hues, A.D.; Palmer, B.A.; Cox, L.E.; Simi, O.R.; Bieniewski, T.M.; Steinhaus, D.W.

    1979-11-01

    A spectrochemical method was developed to analyze 200 or more samples of stream sediments per day for beryllium and lithium. One part of ground stream sediment is mixed with two parts graphite-SiO 2 buffer, packed into a graphite electrode, and excited in a direct-current arc. The resulting emission goes to a 3.4-m, direct-reading, Ebert spectrograph. A desk-top computer system is used to record and process the signals, and to report the beryllium and lithium concentrations. The limits of detection are 0.2 μg/g for beryllium and 0.5 μg/g for lithium. For analyses of prepared reference materials, the relative standard deviations were 16% for determining 0.2 to 100 μg/g of beryllium and 15% for determining 0.5 to 500 μg/g of lithium. A correction is made for vanadium interference

  7. Electropolishing or chemical milling of beryllium to remove machining defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helms, J.R.

    1975-12-01

    The techniques of electropolishing and chemical milling to remove machine damage from beryllium are compared. Both techniques are found to be effective; chemical milling is recommended because it is easier to use and control

  8. Beryllium brazing considerations in CANDU fuel bundle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmsen, J.; Pant, A.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' Appendages of CANDU fuel bundle elements are currently joined to zircaloy sheaths by vacuum beryllium brazing. Ongoing environmental and workplace concerns about beryllium combined with the continuous efforts by Cameco Fuel Manufacturing in its improvement process, initiated this study to find a substitute for pure beryllium. The presentation will review the necessary functionality of brazing alloy components and short list a series of alloys with the potential to duplicate the performance of pure beryllium. Modifications to current manufacturing processes based on in-plant testing will be discussed in relation to the use of these alloys. The presentation will conclude with a summary of the progress to date and further testing expected to be necessary.

  9. Health effects of beryllium exposure: a literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures, Committee on Toxicology, National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    Beryllium is an important metal that is used in a number of industries-including the defense, aerospace, automotive, medical, and electronics industries-because of its exceptional strength, stability...

  10. Phosphorus-containing azo compounds as analytical reagents for beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisenko, N.F.; Dolzhnikova, E.N.; Petrova, G.S.; Tsvetkov, E.N.; Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel'skij Inst. Khimicheskikh Reaktivov i Osobo Chistykh Veshchestv, Moscow; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehlementoorganicheskikh Soedinenij)

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of beryllium with six new azocompounds based on chromotropic or R-acids and o-aminophenyl-phenylphosphonic acids is studied. A sharp difference in the detection limit for beryllium by the two groups of compounds is found. Azoderivatives based on chromotropic acid are promising agent for beryllium due to sufficiently high selectivity. The introduction of the methyl-group into the o-position of the phosphorus-containing group improves the analytical properties of agents. Techniques are developed for the determination of beryllium in bronze, sewage water and in an artificial mixture using a sodium salt of 1.8-dioxi-2 [2' - (oxi- (o-methylphenyl)-phosphenyl)-phenilazo]-naphtalene-3.6-disulfoacid

  11. Beryllium armour produced by evaporation-condensation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.; Frolov, V.; Moszherin, S.; Pepekin, G.; Pirogov, A.; Komarov, V.; Mazul, I.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium, as armour material for ITER plasma facing components, has a limited erosion lifetime. In order to repair the surface of eroded tiles in-situ, Be-deposition technologies are under consideration. One of them uses the physical vapour deposition of beryllium on copper or beryllium substrate produced by a hot Be-target placed in the vicinity of this substrate. Three different options for using this technology for ITER Be-armour application are considered. The first option is the repair in-situ of eroded Be-tiles. The second option suggests the use of this technology to provide the joining of Be to Cu-substrate. The third option assumes the use of evaporated-condensed beryllium as a bulk tile material bonded to copper substrate by conventional joining (Brazing et al.) techniques. The first results and prospects of these approaches are presented below. (orig.)

  12. Data Needs for Erosion and Tritium Retention in Beryllium Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2011-07-01

    A Consultants' Meeting was held at IAEA Headquarters 30-31 May 2011 with the aim to provide advice about the scope and aims of a planned IAEA coordinated research project on erosion and tritium retention in beryllium plasma-facing materials and about other activities of the A+M Data Unit in the area of plasma interaction with beryllium surfaces. The present report contains the proceedings, recommendations and conclusions of that Consultants' Meeting. (author)

  13. The beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant (Ust-Kamenogrsk, Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant (Zavod), Ust-Kamenogorsk, Abay prospect 102 (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report includes data on beryllium production of Ulba metallurgical plant, located in Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan). Beryllium production is showed to have extended technological opportunities in manufacturing semi-products (beryllium ingots, master alloys, metallic beryllium powders, beryllium oxide) and in production of structural beryllium and its parts. Ulba metallurgical plant owns a unique technology of beryllium vacuum distillation, which allows to produce reactor grades of beryllium with a low content of metallic impurities. At present Ulba plant does not depend on raw materials suppliers. The quantity of stored raw materials and semi-products will allow to provide a 25-years work of beryllium production at a full capacity. The plant has a satisfactory experience in solving ecological problems, which could be useful in ITER program. (author)

  14. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smitherman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}m aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.

  15. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1995-01-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis of the beryllium/steam reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druyts, Frank E-mail: fdruyts@sckcen.be; Iseghem, Pierre van

    2000-11-01

    In view of the safety assessment of new fusion reactor designs, kinetic data are needed on the beryllium/steam reaction. Therefore, thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the reactivity of beryllium in steam as a function of temperature, irradiation history and porosity of the samples. To this purpose, reference unirradiated S-200 VHP beryllium samples were compared with specimens irradiated in the BR2 reactor up to fast neutron fluences (E>1 MeV) of respectively 1.6x10{sup 21} n cm{sup -2} (resulting in a helium content of 300 appm He and a theoretical density of 99.9%) and 4x10{sup 22} n cm{sup -2} (21000 appm He, 97.2% theoretical density). Kinetics were parabolic for all tested beryllium types at 600 deg. C. At 700 deg. C, kinetics were parabolic for the unirradiated and irradiated 99.9% dense beryllium, and accelerating/linear for the irradiated 97.2% material. At 800 deg. C, all samples showed accelerating/linear behaviour. There was no influence of porosity on the reaction rate of beryllium in steam within the limited investigated density range, except at 700 deg. C, where the measured reaction rate for the irradiated 97.2% dense samples is an order of magnitude higher than for the irradiated 99.9% dense specimens.

  17. Status of beryllium R and D in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Ishida, K.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, several R and D program of beryllium for fusion are being promoted in Japan and community of beryllium study is growing up. In the R and D area of beryllium for solid breeding blanket, major subjects are beryllide application for prototype reactor, lifetime evaluation of neutron multiplier, impurity effect of beryllium and recycling of irradiated beryllium. Especially, the study of beryllide application has significant progress in these two years. The basic properties such as tritium inventory, oxidation behavior, steam interaction for stoichiometric Be 12 Ti fabricated by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) have been studied and some advantages against beryllium were made clear. For manufacturing technology development, phase diagram and ductility improvement have been studied. And, Be 12 Ti pebbles with the improved microstructure were successfully fabricated by Rotating Electrode Process. In order to enhance the R and D activities, the R and D network consisted of industries, universities and laboratories in all Japan have been organized. Many collaboration and information exchange strongly promotes the R and D and some projects for commercial application have been launched form these activities. Also international collaborative project such as IEA and ISTC have been launched or planned. Recent result of R and D in Japan is described on this paper. (author)

  18. Nuclear target foil fabrication for the Romano Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, J.W.; Romo, J.G. Jr.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Vacuum Processes Lab, of LLNL's M.E. Dept. - Material Fabrication Division, was requested to provide 250 coated Parylene target foils for a nuclear physics experiment titled the ROMANO Event. Due to the developmental nature of some of the fabrication procedures, approximately 400 coated foils were produced to satisfy the event's needs. The foils were used in the experiment as subkilovolt x-ray, narrow band pass filters, and wide band ultraviolet filters. This paper is divided into three sections describing: (1) nuclear target foil fabrication, (2) Parylene substrate preparation and production, and (3) foil and substrate inspections

  19. Collodion-reinforcement and plasma-cleaning of target foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, John O.

    2002-03-01

    The preparation of evaporated target foils can often be facilitated by use of collodion coatings either on the substrate sides or on the exterior surfaces of the foils. Later, such coatings must usually be removed. Cleaning of a foil is necessary if thin layers of adhesives have crept onto the foil. Removal and/or cleaning can often be done satisfactorily with an oxygen plasma. Apparatus and procedures used for this are described. Foils that were cleaned successfully, and some that were incompatible with the cleaning process are listed.

  20. Collodion-reinforcement and plasma-cleaning of target foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, John O.

    2002-01-01

    The preparation of evaporated target foils can often be facilitated by use of collodion coatings either on the substrate sides or on the exterior surfaces of the foils. Later, such coatings must usually be removed. Cleaning of a foil is necessary if thin layers of adhesives have crept onto the foil. Removal and/or cleaning can often be done satisfactorily with an oxygen plasma. Apparatus and procedures used for this are described. Foils that were cleaned successfully, and some that were incompatible with the cleaning process are listed

  1. Exposure and genetics increase risk of beryllium sensitisation and chronic beryllium disease in the nuclear weapons industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Michael V; Martyny, John W; Mroz, Margaret M; Silveira, Lori J; Strand, Matt; Cragle, Donna L; Tankersley, William G; Wells, Susan M; Newman, Lee S; Maier, Lisa A

    2011-11-01

    Beryllium sensitisation (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) are caused by exposure to beryllium with susceptibility affected by at least one well-studied genetic host factor, a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69) of the HLA-DPβ chain (DPβE69). However, the nature of the relationship between exposure and carriage of the DPβE69 genotype has not been well studied. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between DPβE69 and exposure in BeS and CBD. Current and former workers (n=181) from a US nuclear weapons production facility, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA), were enrolled in a case-control study including 35 individuals with BeS and 19 with CBD. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined by PCR-SSP. Beryllium exposures were assessed through worker interviews and industrial hygiene assessment of work tasks. After removing the confounding effect of potential beryllium exposure at another facility, multivariate models showed a sixfold (OR 6.06, 95% CI 1.96 to 18.7) increased odds for BeS and CBD combined among DPβE69 carriers and a fourfold (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.43 to 11.0) increased odds for those exposed over an assigned lifetime-weighted average exposure of 0.1 μg/m(3). Those with both risk factors had higher increased odds (OR 24.1, 95% CI 4.77 to 122). DPβE69 carriage and high exposure to beryllium appear to contribute individually to the development of BeS and CBD. Among workers at a beryllium-using facility, the magnitude of risk associated with either elevated beryllium exposure or carriage of DPβE69 alone appears to be similar.

  2. Computational modeling of plasma-flow switched foil implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A ''plasma-flow'', or ''commutator'', switch has been proposed as a means of achieving high dI/dt in a radially imploding metallic foil plasma. In this concept, an axially moving foil provides the initial coaxial gun discharge path for the prime power source and provides and ''integral'' inductive storage of magnetic energy. As the axially moving foil reaches the end of the coaxial gun, a radially imploding load foil is switched into the circuit. The authors have begun two-dimensional computer modeling of the two-foil implosion system. They use a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model which includes tabulated state and transport properties of the metallic foil material. Moving numerical grids are used to achieve adequate resolution of the moving foils. A variety of radiation models are used to compute the radiation generated when the imploding load foil converges on axis. These computations are attempting to examine the interaction of the switching foil with the load foil. In particular, they examine the relationship between foil placement and implosion quality

  3. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment); Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Masakazu; Takatsu, Hideyuki.

    1992-11-01

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author).

  4. Carbon stripper foils held in place with carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Miller, Shawn A.; Stoner, John O.; Ladd, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is planned to initially utilize carbon stripper foils having areal densities approximately 260 μg/cm 2 . The projected design requires that each foil be supported by only one fixed edge. For stability of the foil, additional support is to be provided by carbon fibers. The feasibility of manufacturing and shipping such mounted carbon foils produced by arc evaporation was studied using two prototypes. Production of the foils is described. Fibers were chosen for satisfactory mechanical strength consistent with minimal interference with the SNS beam. Mounting of the fibers, and packaging of the assemblies for shipping are described. Ten completed assemblies were shipped to SNS for further testing. Preliminary evaluation of the survivability of the foils in the SNS foil changer is described

  5. Expectations for the Laguna foil implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, A.; Brownell, J.; Caird, R.; Goforth, J.; Price, R.; Trainor, J.

    1987-01-01

    Building on the results achieved in the Pioneer shot series, the Los Alamos Trailmaster project is embarking on the Laguna foil implosion experiments. In this series a Mark-IX helical generator will be coupled to an explosively formed fuse opening switch, a surface-tracking closing switch, and a vacuum power flow and load chamber. In this paper the system design will be discussed and results from zero-, one-, and two-dimensional MHD simulations will be presented. It is anticipated that the generator will provide more than 10 MA of which ∼5.5 MA will be switched to the 5-cm-radius, 2-cm-high, 250-nm-thick aluminum foil load. This should give rise to a 1 μs implosion with more than 100 kJ of kinetic energy

  6. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  7. Testing conformal mapping with kitchen aluminum foil

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, S.; Cooke, D. A.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental verification of conformal mapping with kitchen aluminum foil. This experiment can be reproduced in any laboratory by undergraduate students and it is therefore an ideal experiment to introduce the concept of conformal mapping. The original problem was the distribution of the electric potential in a very long plate. The correct theoretical prediction was recently derived by A. Czarnecki (Can. J. Phys. 92, 1297 (2014)).

  8. Destruction of metallic foils under laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, N.P.; Lisitsyn, Yu.V.; Mineev, V.N.; Ivanov, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which illustrate the process of destruction of aluminium, lead and tantalum foils under irradiation of a neodymium laser, working in free generation regime with a power density varying from 5.10 5 - 5.10 6 wt/sq.cm. Calorimeters and photocells sensitive to the radiation with lambda=1.06 have been used for measuring the energy and recording the shape of the radiation pulse incident onto the target and passing through the disintegration products. The weight of the target has been determined prior to and after the experiment to find out the weight of Δm material expelled from the target. Rates of product scattering and a target destruction period, an amount of the material expelled and parameters of the radiation passing through the disintegration products have been determined as a function of the power density and an angle of the radiation incidence on the surface of the specimens. Average densities and absorption coefficients of the disintegration products of the foils under study have been assessed. A comparison of the characteristics of the metal foil (t 1 j) destruction in Pb-Ta-Al series with the metal thermal properties in this series shows that the destruction characteristics periodically vary as heat capacity, thermal conduction, evaporation heat and melting heat alter. A period of the target destruction becomes longer and the expelled mass smaller as the aforesaid thermal properties of the metals in Pb-Ta-Al series intensity [ru

  9. Brazing Inconel 625 Using the Copper Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Cheng-Yen; Shiue, Ren-Kae

    2013-12-01

    Brazing Inconel 625 (IN-625) using the copper foil has been investigated in this research. The brazed joint is composed of nanosized CrNi3 precipitates and Cr/Mo/Nb/Ni quaternary compound in the Cu/Ni-rich matrix. The copper filler 50 μm in thickness is enough for the joint filling. However, the application of Cu foil 100 μm in thickness has little effect on the shear strength of the brazed joint. The specimen brazed at 1433 K (1160 °C) for 1800 seconds demonstrates the best shear strength of 470 MPa, and its fractograph is dominated by ductile dimple fracture with sliding marks. Decreasing the brazing temperature slightly decreases the shear strength of the brazed joint due to the presence of a few isolated solidification shrinkage voids smaller than 15 μm. Increasing the brazing temperature, especially for the specimen brazed at 1473 K (1200 °C), significantly deteriorates the shear strength of the joint below 260 MPa because of coalescence of isothermal solidification shrinkage voids in the joint. The Cu foil demonstrates potential in brazing IN-625 for industrial application.

  10. Self-propulsion of a pitching foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anil; Shukla, Ratnesh; Govardhan, Raghuraman

    2017-11-01

    Undulatory motions serve as a fundamental mechanism for bio-locomotion at moderate and high Reynolds numbers. An understanding of the interactions between self-propelling undulatory motions and the surrounding fluid, not only provides insight into the efficiency of bio-locomotion, but also yields valuable pointers for the design of autonomous under-water and micro-aerial vehicles. Here, we investigate a simplified model of a self-propelling pitching foil that undergoes time-periodic oscillations about its quarter chord. We consider two-dimensional configurations in which the foil is free to propel along only longitudinal and both transverse and longitudinal directions. In both the configurations, the time-averaged self-propelling velocity increases monotonically with the Reynolds number Re (based on trailing edge speed and chord as the characteristic velocity and length). The rate of increase is particularly pronounced in the low Re regime (Re spaced wake vortices dissipate within a few chord lengths. At moderate and high Re, the wake exhibits increasingly complex structure in both the configurations. For a fixed Re, the foil with a single translational degree of freedom propels at a higher speed for a higher input power requirement. Differences between the two configurations will be discussed within the context of undulatory self-propulsion observed in nature.

  11. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Photon Sciences, NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Camino, Fernando [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  12. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  13. Microstructural study of hydrogen-implanted beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, S.P.; Chakrov, P.V.; Utkelbayev, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Hot pressed beryllium (TGP-56) was implanted by 650 keV H + ions to a dose of 6.7 x 10 16 cm -2 at a temperature below 50 C. TEM examinations were performed both at as-irradiated specimens and after post-irradiation annealings at 400-600 C for 15 min. After irradiation, a high density of ''black dot'' defects with a size of about 5 nm is observed in the straggling zone, some of which are resolved as small dislocation loops. During post-irradiation annealing, growth of dislocation loops and oriented gas-filled bubbles are observed in the damaged zone. The bubbles are strongly elongated along the left angle 0001 right angle direction, and their sidelong facts lie along {1-100} planes. These facets have a regular ''toothed'' surface with ''tooth'' facets on {1-100} planes. The size of the ''teeth'' increases with annealing temperature, as well as the total volume of bubbles, with their length growing faster than their width. (orig.)

  14. Beryllium application in ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Federici, G.; Barabash, V.; Cardella, A.; Jakeman, R.; Ioki, K.; Janeschitz, G.; Parker, R.; Tivey, R.; Pacher, H.D.; Wu, C.H.; Bartels, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is a candidate armour material for the in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), namely the primary first wall, the limiter, the baffle and the divertor. However, a number of issues arising from the performance requirements of the ITER plasma facing components (PFCs) must be addressed to better assess the attractiveness of Be as armour for these different components. These issues include heat loading limits arising from temperature and stress constraints under steady state conditions, armour lifetime including the effects of sputtering erosion as well as vaporisation and loss of melt during disruption events, tritium retention and permeation, and chemical hazards, in particular with respect to potential Be/steam reaction. Other issues such as fabrication and the possibility of in-situ repair are not performance-dependent but have an important impact on the overall assessment of Be as PFC armour. This paper describes the present view on Be application for ITER PFCs. The key issues are discussed including an assessment of the current level of understanding based on analysis and experimental data; and on-going activities as part of the ITER EDA R and D program are highlighted. (orig.)

  15. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  16. The unusual properties of beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, R.; Hannon, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Be is a ''marginal metal.'' The stable phase, hcp-Be, has a low Fermi-level density of states and very anisotropic structural and elastic properties, similar to a semiconductor's. At the Be(0001) surface, surface states drastically increase the Fermi-level density of states. The different nature of bonding in bulk-Be and at the Be(0001) surface explains the large outward relaxation. The presence of surface states causes large surface core-level shifts by inducing a higher electrostatic potential in the surface layers and by improving the screening at the surface. The authors experimental and theoretical investigations of atomic vibrations at the Be(0001) surface demonstrate clearly that Be screening of atomic motion by the surface states makes the surface phonon dispersion fundamentally different from that of the bulk. Properties of Be(0001) are so different from those of the bulk that the surface can be considered a new ''phase'' of beryllium with unique electronic and structural characteristics. For comparison they also study Be(11 bar 20), a very open surface without important surface states. Be(11 bar 20) is the only clean s-p metal surface known to reconstruct (1 x 3 missing row reconstruction)

  17. Beryllium parabolic refractive x-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, B.; Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Benner, B.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Somogyi, A.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses are novel optical components for the hard x-ray range from about 5 keV to about 120 keV. They focus in both directions. They are compact, robust, and easy to align and to operate. They can be used like glass lenses are used for visible light, the main difference being that the numerical aperture N.A. is much smaller than 1 (of order 10-4 to 10-3). Their main applications are in micro- and nanofocusing, in imaging by absorption and phase contrast and in fluorescence mode. In combination with tomography they allow for 3-dimensional imaging of opaque media with submicrometer resolution. Finally, they can be used in speckle spectroscopy by means of coherent x-ray scattering. Beryllium as lens material strongly enhances the transmission and the field of view as compared to aluminium. With increased N.A. the lateral resolution is also considerably improved with Be lenses. References to a number of applications are given

  18. Foil changer for the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.R.; Kilborn, R.I.; Mouris, J.E.; Proulx, D.R.; Weaver, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Capture of an injected beam in the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron requires that a carbon stripping foil be accurately placed in a dee to intercept the incoming beam. Foil radial position must be precisely adjustable and foils must be easily replaced. A foil changing apparatus has been designed, built and tested to meet these requirements. The main components are a supply magazine, a transport system, and unloading and loading mechanisms. The magazine is on top of the cyclotron. It holds 300 foils and can be isolated from machine vacuum for refilling. Each foil is mounted on a stainless steel frame. A stainless steel roller chain fitted with 33 copper sleeves (shrouds) carries foils, one per shroud, down a dee stem to the midplane. A 12-bit absolute optical shaft encoder senses foil position. To replace a foil a shroud is positioned at the top of the cyclotron, a foil is removed, and another is transferred from the magazine to the empty shroud. Three stepping motors and associated electronics provide mechanical drive and are interfaced with a CAMAC control system

  19. Foil changer for the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.R.; Kilborn, R.I.; Mouris, J.F.; Proulx, D.R.; Weaver, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Capture of an injected beam in the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron requires that a carbon stripping foil be accurately placed in a dee to intercept the incoming beam. Foil radial position must be precisely adjustable and foils must be easily replaced. A foil changing apparatus has been designed, built and tested to meet these requirements. The main components are a supply magazine, a transport system, and unloading and loading mechanisms. The magazine is on top of the loading mechanisms. The magazine is on top of the cyclotron. It holds 300 foils and can be isolated from machine vacuum for refilling. Each foil is mounted on a stainless steel frame. A stainless steel roller chain fitted with 33 copper sleeves (shrouds) carries foils, one per shroud, down a dee stem to the midplane. A 12-bit absolute optical shaft encoder senses foil position. To replace a foil a shroud is positioned at the top of the cyclotron, a foil is removed, and another is transferred from the magazine to the empty shroud. Three stepping motors and associated electronics provide mechanical drive and are interfaced with a CAMAC control system

  20. Monitoring the degradation of partly decomposable plastic foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rétháti Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have monitored the behaviour of different polyethylene foils including virgin medium density polyethylene (MDPE, MDPE containing pro-oxydative additives (238, 242 and MDPE with pro-oxydative additives and thermoplastic starch (297 in the soil for a period of one year. A foil based on a blend of polyester and polylactic acid (BASF Ecovio served as degradable control. The experiment was carried out by weekly measurements of conductivity and capacity of the soil, since the setup was analogous to a condenser, of which the insulating layer was the foil itself. The twelve replications allowed monthly sampling; the specimen taken out from the soil each month were tested visually for thickness, mechanical properties, morphological and structural changes, and molecular mass. Based on the obtained capacity values, we found that among the polyethylene foils, the one that contained thermoplastic starch extenuated the most. This foil had the greatest decrease in tensile strength and elongation at break due to the presence of thermoplastic starch. The starch can completely degrade in the soil; thus, the foil had cracks and pores. The polyethylene foils that contained pro-oxydant additives showed smaller external change compared to the virgin foil, since there was no available UV radiation and oxygen for their degradation. The smallest change occurred in the virgin polyethylene foil. Among the five examined samples, the commercially available BASF foil showed the largest extenuation and external change, and it deteriorated the most in the soil.

  1. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cynthia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  2. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, T.D.; Easterling, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  3. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included

  4. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  5. The structure, properties and performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-spray technology is under investigation as a method for producing high thermal conductivity beryllium coatings for use in magnetic fusion applications. Recent investigations have focused on optimizing the plasma-spray process for depositing beryllium coatings on damaged beryllium surfaces. Of particular interest has been optimizing the processing parameters to maximize the through-thickness thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. Experimental results will be reported on the use of secondary H 2 gas additions to improve the melting of the beryllium powder and transferred-arc cleaning to improve the bonding between the beryllium coatings and the underlying surface. Information will also be presented on thermal fatigue tests which were done on beryllium coated ISX-B beryllium limiter tiles using 10 sec cycle times with 60 sec cooldowns and an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant divertor heat flux slightly in excess of 5 MW/m 2

  6. High heat flux tests on beryllium and beryllium-copper joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.

    1997-01-01

    A large test program has been set up to evaluate the performance of beryllium as a plasma facing material for the divertor in thermonuclear fusion devices. Simulation of steady state heat loads of 5 MWm -2 and above on actively cooled divertor modules, and off-normal plasma conditions with energy densities in the range 1-7 MJm -2 , have been investigated. Thermal shock tests were carried out with the ITER reference grade S65-C and several Russian grades of beryllium. At incident energies up to 7 MJm -2 the best erosion behaviour is observed for S65-C and for TGP-56. Steady state heating tests with actively cooled Be/Cu mock-ups were performed at incident powers of up to 5.8 MWm -2 . All samples investigated in these tests did not show any indications of failure. A Be/Cu mock-ups with Incusil braze was loaded in thermal fatigue up to 500 cycles at an incident power of 4.8 MWm -2 . Up to the end of the experiment no temperature increase of the surface and no indication of failure was observed. (orig.)

  7. Spectrographic determination of beryllium in the atmosphere; Dosage spectrographique du beryllium dans l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudain, G; Morawek, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Since the apparatus for continuous determination of beryllium is not yet perfect, a discontinuous method has been developed. The air to be analysed is filtered, and the dust laden filter is dissolved in a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acid. The pH and the conductivity of the solution obtained were adjusted to standard values, and it was then analysed spectro-graphically by the rotating sector method. Up to 0.01 x 10{sup 6} of Be per cm{sup 3} of solution can be detected. The precision is of the order of 10 per cent. (author) [French] Les appareils de dosage du beryllium en continu n'etant pas encore suffisamment au point, on a elabore une methode discontinue. L'air a analyser est filtre et le filtre charge de poussieres est mis en solution par une attaque sulfo-nitrique. La solution obtenue est normalisee par ajustage de son PH et de sa conductivite puis analysee spectrographiquement par la methode du disque tournant. On peut detecter jusqu'a 0,01.10{sup 6} de Be par cm{sup 3} de solution. La precision est de l'ordre de 10 pour cent. (auteur)

  8. Erosion of beryllium under ITER – Relevant transient plasma loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Nikolaev, G.N.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Porezanov, N.P.; Podkovyrov, V.L.; Muzichenko, A.D.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Gervash, A.A.; Safronov, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the erosion, mass loss/gain and surface structure evolution of Be/CuCrZr mock-ups, armored with beryllium of TGP-56FW grade after irradiation by deuterium plasma heat load of 0.5 MJ/m 2 at 250 °C and 500 °C. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 250 °C is rather small (no more than 0.2 g/m 2 shot and 0.11 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 40 shots) and tends to decrease with increasing number of shots. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 500 °C is much higher (∼2.3 g/m 2 shot and 1.2 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 10 shot) and tends to decrease with increasing the number of shots (∼0.26 g/m 2 pulse and 0.14 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 100 shot). • Beryllium erosion value derived from the measurements of profile of irradiated surface is much higher than erosion value derived from mass loss data. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2–0.5 MJ/m 2 at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology

  9. Erosion of beryllium under ITER – Relevant transient plasma loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B., E-mail: igkupr@gmail.com [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, G.N.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Porezanov, N.P. [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Muzichenko, A.D.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation); Gervash, A.A. [Efremov Research Institute, S-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Project Center of ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We study the erosion, mass loss/gain and surface structure evolution of Be/CuCrZr mock-ups, armored with beryllium of TGP-56FW grade after irradiation by deuterium plasma heat load of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at 250 °C and 500 °C. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 250 °C is rather small (no more than 0.2 g/m{sup 2} shot and 0.11 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 40 shots) and tends to decrease with increasing number of shots. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 500 °C is much higher (∼2.3 g/m{sup 2} shot and 1.2 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 10 shot) and tends to decrease with increasing the number of shots (∼0.26 g/m{sup 2} pulse and 0.14 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 100 shot). • Beryllium erosion value derived from the measurements of profile of irradiated surface is much higher than erosion value derived from mass loss data. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2–0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology.

  10. Capillary self-alignment of mesoscopic foil components for sensor-systems-in-foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutinov, Gari; Smits, Edsger C P; Van Heck, Gert; Van den Brand, Jeroen; Schoo, Herman F M; Mastrangeli, Massimo; Dietzel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the effective use of capillary self-alignment for low-cost and time-efficient assembly of heterogeneous foil components into a smart electronic identification label. Particularly, we demonstrate the accurate (better than 50 µm) alignment of cm-sized functional foil dies. We investigated the role played by the assembly liquid, by the size and the weight of assembling dies and by their initial offsets in the self-alignment performance. It was shown that there is a definite range of initial offsets allowing dies to align with high accuracy and within approximately the same time window, irrespective of their initial offset. (paper)

  11. Preparation of copper-beryllium alloys from Indian beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, C.M.; Sharma, B.P.; Subba Rao, K.S.; Rajadhyaksha, M.G.; Sundaram, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    The report presents the results of laboratory scale investigations on the preparation of copper-beryllium and aluminium-beryllium master alloys starting from Indian beryl and adopting the fluoride process. The flow-sheet involves : (1) conversion of the Be-values in beryl into water soluble sodium beryllium fluoride (2) preparation of beryllium hydroxide by alkali treatment of aqueous Na 2 BeF 4 (3) conversion of Be(OH) 2 to (NH 4 ) 2 BeF 4 by treatment with NH 4 HF 2 (4) thermal decomposition of (NH 4 ) 2 BeF 4 to BeF 2 and (5) magnesium reduction of BeF 2 (with the addition of copper/aluminium) to obtain beryllium alloys. The method has been successfully employed for the preparation of Cu-Be master alloys containing about 8% Be and free of Mg on a 200 gm scale. An overall Be-recovery of about 80% has been achieved. Al-8% Be master alloys have also been prepared by this method. Toxicity and health hazards associated with Be are discussed and the steps taken to ensure safe handling of Be are described. (author)

  12. Compatibility of stainless steels and lithiated ceramics with beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-07-01

    The introduction of beryllium as a neutron multiplier in ceramic blankets of thermonuclear fusion reactors may give rise to the following compatibility problems: (i) oxidation of Be by ceramics (lithium aluminate and silicates) or by water vapour; (ii) interaction between beryllium and austenitic and martensitic steels. The studies were done in contact tests under vacuum and in tests under wet sweeping helium. The contact tests under vacuum have revealed that the interaction of beryllium with ceramics seems to be low up to 700°C, the interaction of beryllium with steels is significant and is characterized by the formation of a diffusion layer and of a brittle Be-Fe-Ni compound. With type 316 L austenitic steel, this interaction appears quite large at 600°C whereas it is noticeable only at 700°C with martensitic steels. The experiments carried out with sweeping wet helium at 600°C have evidenced a slight oxidation of beryllium due to water vapour which can be enhanced in the front of uncompletely dehydrated ceramics.

  13. Preparation of copper-beryllium alloys from Indian beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, C.M.; Sharma, B.P.; Subba Rao, K.S.; Rajadhyaksha, M.G.; Sundaram, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory-scale investigations on the preparation of copper-beryllium and aluminium beryllium master alloys starting from Indian beryl and adopting the fluoride process. The flowsheet involves: (1) conversion of the Be-values in beryl into water soluble sodium beryllium fluoride, (2) preparation of beryllium hydroxide by alkali treatment of aqueous Na 2 BeF 4 (3) conversion of Be(OH) 2 to (NH 4 ) 2 BeF 4 by treatment with NH 4 HF 2 (4) thermal decomposition of (NH 4 ) 2 BeF 4 to BeF 2 and (5) magnesium reduction of BeF 2 (without/with) the addition of copper/aluminium to obtain beryllium metal/alloys. The method has been successfully employed for the preparation of Cu-Be master alloys containing about 8% Be and free of Mg on a 200 gm scale. A1-80% Be master alloys have also been prepared by this method. Toxicity and health hazards associated with Be are discussed and the steps taken to ensure safe handling of Be are described. (author)

  14. Erosion of beryllium under ITER - Relevant transient plasma loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Kurbatova, L. A.; Porezanov, N. P.; Podkovyrov, V. L.; Muzichenko, A. D.; Zhitlukhin, A. M.; Gervash, A. A.; Safronov, V. M.

    2015-08-01

    Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2-0.5 MJ/m2 at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology.

  15. Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, P. W. (Patrick W.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Pappin, P. A. (Pallas A.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Burgardt, P. (Paul)

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

  16. The results of medical surveillance of beryllium production personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koviazin, A.; Urikh, A.; Kovianzina, L.

    2004-01-01

    The report presents results of surveillance of 1836 workers of beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant JSC with the acute and chronic forms of occupation diseases for 52 years of its operation. The dependence of acute and chronic occupation lesions on the protection degree is shown. It has been found out that, the risk of getting an occupation disease increases sharply at the moments of experimental works and at the time of reconstruction and some other extreme conditions in the production, that is supported by fixed lesions of eye mucous coat, skin and lung lesions. In this case, the readiness of people for their work in deleterious conditions and their personal responsibility for following the regulations of safety occupational standards plays a definite role. Therefore, the issues of protection are of paramount importance in prophylaxis both of acute and chronic exposure to beryllium. An influence of duration of service and occupation on chronic beryllium diseases is shown. A parallel between the lung beryllium disease and skin lesions by insoluble beryllium compounds is drawn for the first time. (author)

  17. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  18. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Manly, W.D.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers

  19. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  20. Experimental studies and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes interaction with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Romanenko, O.G.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Shestakov, V.P.; Kulsartov, T.V. [Science Research Inst. of Experimental and Theoretical Physics of Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kenzhin, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work was to clarify the surface beryllium oxide influence on hydrogen-beryllium interaction characteristics. Analysis of experimental data and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes accumulation, diffusion and release from neutron irradiated beryllium was used to achieve this purpose as well as the investigations of the changes of beryllium surface element composition being treated by H{sup +} and Ar{sup +} plasma glowing discharge. (author)

  1. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  2. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    This detailed report on Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is funcioning effectively

  3. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    This report on the control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is functioning effectively

  4. The Effect Of Beryllium Interaction With Fast Neutrons On the Reactivity Of ETRR-2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El Messiry, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of beryllium interactions with fast neutrons is studied for Etrr 2 research reactors. Isotope build up inside beryllium blocks is calculated under different irradiation times. a new model for the Etrr 2 research reactor is designed using MCNP code to calculate the reactivity and flux change of the reactor due to beryllium poison

  5. Optical temperature sensing on flexible polymer foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stanislav; Xiao, Yanfen; Hofmann, Meike; Schmidt, Thomas; Gleissner, Uwe; Zappe, Hans

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to established semiconductor waveguide-based or glass fiber-based integrated optical sensors, polymerbased optical systems offer tunable material properties, such as refractive index or viscosity, and thus provide additional degrees of freedom for sensor design and fabrication. Of particular interest in sensing applications are fully-integrated optical waveguide-based temperature sensors. These typically rely on Bragg gratings which induce a periodic refractive index variation in the waveguide so that a resonant wavelength of the structure is reflected.1,2 With broad-band excitation, a dip in the spectral output of the waveguide is thus generated at a precisely-defined wavelength. This resonant wavelength depends on the refractive index of the waveguide and the grating period, yet both of these quantities are temperature dependent by means of the thermo-optic effect (change in refractive index with temperature) and thermal expansion (change of the grating period with temperature). We show the design and fabrication of polymer waveguide-integrated temperature sensors based on Bragggratings, fabricated by replication technology on flexible PMMA foil substrates. The 175 μm thick foil serves as lower cladding for a polymeric waveguide fabricated from a custom-made UV-crosslinkable co-monomer composition. The fabrication of the grating structure includes a second replication step into a separate PMMA-foil. The dimensions of the Bragg-gratings are determined by simulations to set the bias point into the near infrared wavelength range, which allows Si-based detectors to be used. We present design considerations and performance data for the developed structures. The resulting sensor's signal is linear to temperature changes and shows a sensitivity of -306 nm/K, allowing high resolution temperature measurements.

  6. Stresses in the foil of an electron accelerator extraction channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Makarenko, T.I.; Tokmakov, I.L.

    1983-01-01

    Stresses in the foil of an electron accelerator extraction channel are assessed with account of contributions of thermal expansion and stress concentrations during switchings. Optimization of extraction grid parameters of the electron accelerator extraction channel and choice of foil material for high current electron beam is conducted. It is suggested that an extraction grid with circular cells and Al-Mg foil should be used. A simple formula applicable for design calculations is proposed for evaluation of stress concentration coefficient during phase switchings

  7. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures needed to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element, making its......Context: This review describes the health effects of beryllium exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to beryllium on physiological function and well being. Materials and Methods: The criteria used...... tabulated. Years 2001-10 gave the greatest match (45.9%) for methodological parameters, followed by 27.71% for 1991-2000. Years 1971-80 and 1981-90 were not significantly different in the information published and available whereas years 1951-1960 showed a lack of suitable articles. Some articles were...

  8. On modeling of beryllium molten depths in simulated plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsotridis, G.; Rother, H.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma-facing components in tokamak-type fusion reactors are subjected to intense heat loads during plasma disruptions. The influence of high heat fluxes on the depth of heat-affected zones of pure beryllium metal and beryllium containing very low levels of surface active impurities is studied by using a two-dimensional transient computer model that solves the equations of motion and energy. Results are presented for a range of energy densities and disruption times. Under certain conditions, impurities, through their effect on surface tension, create convective flows and hence influence the flow intensities and the resulting depths of the beryllium molten layers during plasma disruptions. The calculated depths of the molten layers are also compared with other mathematical models that are based on the assumption that heat is transported through the material by conduction only. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  9. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petykhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ( 60 Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects

  10. Ab Initio Simulation Beryllium in Solid Molecular Hydrogen: Elastic Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Perlado, Jose M.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of inertial confinement fusion targets Deuterium-Tritium are manufactured with a solid layer, it must have specific properties to increase the efficiency of ignition. Currently there have been some proposals to model the phases of hydrogen isotopes and hence their high pressure, but these works do not allow explaining some of the structures present at the solid phase change effect of increased pressure. By means of simulation with first principles methods and Quantum Molecular Dynamics, we compare the structural difference of solid molecular hydrogen pure and solid molecular hydrogen with beryllium, watching beryllium inclusion in solid hydrogen matrix, we obtain several differences in mechanical properties, in particular elastic constants. For C11 the difference between hydrogen and hydrogen with beryllium is 37.56%. This may produce a non-uniform initial compression and decreased efficiency of ignition.

  11. Extraction of beryllium sulfate by a long chain amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etaix, E.S.

    1968-01-01

    The extraction of sulfuric acid in aqueous solution by a primary amine in benzene solution, 3-9 (diethyl) - 6-amino tri-decane (D.E.T. ) - i.e., with American nomenclature 1-3 (ethyl-pentyl) - 4-ethyl-octyl amine (E.P.O.) - has made it possible to calculate the formation constants of alkyl-ammonium sulfate and acid sulfate. The formula of the beryllium and alkyl-ammonium sulfate complex formed in benzene has next been determined, for various initial acidity of the aqueous solution. Lastly, evidence has been given of negatively charged complexes of beryllium and sulfate in aqueous solution, through the dependence of the aqueous sulfate ions concentration upon beryllium extraction. The formation constant of these anionic complexes has been evaluated. (author) [fr

  12. Corrosion of beryllium exposed to celotex and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Celotex is a commercial rigid cellulose fiberboard product primarily used in the building construction industry. Currently celotex is being used as a packing material in AL-R8 containers. Ion chromatography of celotex packing material at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has indicated that this material contains aggressive anions, including chloride, which may accelerate corrosion. It is well known that beryllium is susceptible to pitting corrosion when exposed to chloride containing environments. Levy noted pitting in beryllium at the open circuit potential when exposed to 0.1 M NaCl solution. This investigation attempts to evaluate the potential risk of accelerated beryllium corrosion from celotex and water which may occur naturally when celotex dust comes into contact with moisture from the atmosphere

  13. Radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' , Largo B Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Liseykina, Tatyana V, E-mail: macchi@df.unipi.i [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The acceleration of sub-wavelength, solid-density plasma foils by the ultraintense radiation pressure of circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated analytically and with simulations. An improved 'Light Sail' or accelerating mirror model, accounting for nonlinear self-induced transparency effects, is used for estimating the optimal thickness for acceleration. The model predictions are in good agreement with one-dimensional simulations. These latter are analyzed in detail to unfold the dynamics and self-organization of electrons and ions during the acceleration. Two-dimensional simulations are also performed to address the effects of target bending and of laser intensity inhomogeneity.

  14. Foil focusing of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-26

    When an intense relativistic electron beams (IREB) passes through a grounded metal foil, the transverse electric field due to the beam space charge is locally shorted out, and the beam is focused by the magnetic field of its current. The effect can be treated as focusing by a thin lens with first order aberration. Expressions for the focal length and aberration coefficient of the equivalent thin lens are developed in this note. These are then applied to practical examples representative of IREB research at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. The Los Alamos foil implosion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, J.; Parker, J.; Bartsch, R.; Benage, J.; Bowers, R.; Cochrane, J.; Forman, P.; Goforth, J.; Greene, A.; Kruse, H.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Los Alamos foil implosion project is to produce an intense (>100 TW), multi-megajoule, laboratory soft x-ray source for material studies and fusion experiments. The concept involves the implosion of annular, current-carrying, cylindrical metallic plasmas via their self-magnetic forces. The project features inductive storage systems using both capacitor banks and high explosive-driven flux compression generators as prime energy sources. Fast opening switches are employed to shorten the electrical pulses. The program will be described and activities to date will be summarized

  16. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Implementing graphene foils in existing neutral atom detector designs will increase their angular and energy resolution, and also improve their mass discrimination...

  17. Ti foil light in the ATA [Advanced Test Accelerator] beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, D.R.; Chong, Y.P.; Goosman, D.R.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    An experiment is in progress to characterize the visible light produced when a Ti foil is immersed in the ATA 2 kA, 43 MeV beam. Results obtained to date indicate that the optical condition of the foil surface is a critical determinant of these characteristics, with a very narrow angular distribution obtained when a highly polished and flat foil is used. These data are consistent with the present hypothesis that the light is produced by transition radiation. Incomplete experiments to determine the foil angle dependence of the detected light and its polarization are summarized and remaining experiments are described

  18. Characterization of U-Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Danny J.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Henager, Charles H.; Burkes, Douglas; Senor, David J.

    2012-11-07

    Twelve AFIP in-process foil samples, fabricated by either Y-12 or LANL, were shipped from LANL to PNNL for potential characterization using optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Of these twelve, nine different conditions were examined to one degree or another using both techniques. For this report a complete description of the results are provided for one archive foil from each source of material, and one unirradiated piece of a foil of each source that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Additional data from two other LANL conditions are summarized in very brief form in an appendix. The characterization revealed that all four characterized conditions contained a cold worked microstructure to different degrees. The Y-12 foils exhibited a higher degree of cold working compared to the LANL foils, as evidenced by the highly elongated and obscure U-Mo grain structure present in each foil. The longitudinal orientations for both of the Y-12 foils possesses a highly laminar appearance with such a distorted grain structure that it was very difficult to even offer a range of grain sizes. The U-Mo grain structure of the LANL foils, by comparison, consisted of a more easily discernible grain structure with a mix of equiaxed and elongated grains. Both materials have an inhomogenous grain structure in that all of the characterized foils possess abnormally coarse grains.

  19. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  20. Investigation of electrically exploded large area foil for current switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyshev, V.K.; Boyko, A.M.; Kostyukov, V.N.; Kuzyaev, A.I.; Kulagin, A.A.; Mamyshev, V.I.; Mezhevov, A.B.; Nechaev, A.I.; Petrukhin, A.A.; Protasov, M.S.; Shevtsov, V.I.; Yakubov, V.B.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of microsecond ∼40 MA current switching from EMG into a quasiconstant inductive load by an electrically exploded foil is investigated. The copper foil of large area, S ∼ 10 4 cm 2 , was placed between thin-walled insulators into a coaxial transmission line (TL). This paper shows a conceptual device scheme. To feed a foil opening switch (FOS), a disc explosive magnetic generator (DEMG) with 20 μs current rise time was employed. An inductive coaxial load was connected to a FOS at a moment, that was close to the foil vaporization start by means of an axisymmetric explosive current commutator (ECC)

  1. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of airfoil bearing based on bump foil structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Maraiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The load carrying capacity of the gas foil bearing depends on the material properties and the configuration of the underlying bump strip’s structure. This paper presents three different cases for selecting the dimensions of the foil bearing to guarantee the highest possible load carrying capacity. It focuses on three main parameters that affect the compliance number; these parameters are the length of bump in θ direction, the pitch of bump foil, and the thickness of bump foil. It also studies the effect of changing these parameters on load carrying capacity according to both isothermal and thermohydrodynamic approaches.

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of eight glass-coated beryllium mirrors for the LHCb RICH1 detector

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of eight glass-coated beryllium mirrors for the LHCb RICH1 detector. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract, without competitive tendering, with the ISTC Moscow (RU) for the supply of eight glass-coated beryllium mirrors for a total amount of 282 000 US dollars, not subject to revision. At the present rate of exchange this is equivalent to approximately 370 000 Swiss francs. The contract will be financed by PPARC (GB) and CERN. PPARC will contribute 65 000 US dollars (approximately 85 000 Swiss francs) and CERN will contribute 217 000 US dollars (approximately 285 000 Swiss francs).

  3. Neutron irradiation behavior of ITER candidate beryllium grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Scientific Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Melder, R.R.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the main candidate materials both for the neutron multiplier in a solid breeding blanket and for the plasma facing components. That is why its behaviour under the typical for fusion reactor loading, in particular, under the neutron irradiation is of a great importance. This paper presents mechanical properties, swelling and microstructure of six beryllium grades (DshG-200, TR-30, TshG-56, TRR, TE-30, TIP-30) fabricated by VNIINM, Russia and also one - (S-65) fabricated by Brush Wellman, USA. The average grain size of the beryllium grades varied from 8 to 25 {mu}m, beryllium oxide content was 0.8-3.2 wt. %, initial tensile strength was 250-680 MPa. All the samples were irradiated in active zone of SM-3 reactor up to the fast neutron fluence (5.5-6.2) {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (2.7-3.0 dpa, helium content up to 1150 appm), E > 0.1 MeV at two temperature ranges: T{sub 1} = 130-180degC and T{sub 2} = 650-700degC. After irradiation at 130-180degC no changes in samples dimensions were revealed. After irradiation at 650-700degC swelling of the materials was found to be in the range 0.1-2.1 %. Beryllium grades TR-30 and TRR, having the smallest grain size and highest beryllium oxide content, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was no more than 0.1 % at 650-700degC and fluence 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Tensile and compression test results and microstructure parameters measured before and after irradiation are also presented. (author)

  4. Preparation of a sinterable beryllium oxide through decomposition of beryllium hydroxide (1963); Preparation d'un oxyde de beryllium frittable par decomposition de l'hydiloxyde (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    In the course of the present study, we have attempted to precise the factors which among the ones effective in the course of the preparation of the beryllium hydroxide and oxide and during the sintering have an influence on the final result: the density and homogeneity of the sintered body. Of the several varieties of hydroxides precipitated from a sulfate solution the {beta}-hydroxide only is always contaminated with beryllium sulfate and cannot be purified even by thorough washing. We noticed that those varieties of the hydroxide (gel, {alpha}, {beta}) have different decomposition rates; this behaviour is used to identify and even to dose the different species in ({alpha}, {beta}) mixtures. The various hydroxides transmit to the resulting oxides the shape they had when precipitated. Accordingly the history of the oxide is revealed by its behaviour during its fabrication and sintering. By comparing the results of the sintering operation with the various measurements performed on the oxide powders we are led to the conclusion that an oxide obtained from beryllium hydroxide is sinterable under vacuum if the following conditions are fulfilled: the particle size must lie between 0.1 and 0.2 {mu} and the BeSO{sub 4} content of the powder must be less than 0.25 per cent wt (expressed as SO{sub 3}/BeO). The best fitting is obtained with the oxide issued from an {alpha}-hydroxide precipitated as very small aggregates and with a low sulfur-content. We have observed that this is also the case for the oxide obtained by direct calcination of beryllium sulfate. (author) [French] Au cours de cette etude, nous avons cherche a preciser les facteurs qui, intervenant tout au long de la preparation de l'hydroxyde, puis de l'oxyde de beryllium et enfin du frittage, peuvent avoir une influence sur le resultat final: la densite et l'homogeneite du fritte. Parmi tous les hydroxydes precipites d'une solution de sulfate, seul l'hydroxyde {beta} est toujours fortement pollue par le sulfate

  5. Modeling tritium processes in plasma-facing beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Dolan, T.J.; Mulock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present techniques and recommended parameters for modeling tritium implantation, trapping and release, and permeation, in beryllium-clad structures adjacent to the plasma. Among the features that should be considered are the effects of surface films, the mobility of beryllium through those films, damage caused by ion implantation, especially in regions where pitting may be expected, and bubble formation. Tritium transport parameters recommended are based on fits with experimental data and available theory. Estimates of inventories in ITER using these parameters are also given. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  7. Factors influencing the creep strength of hot pressed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, D.; Crooks, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    The parameters controlling the creep strength of hot pressed beryllium block have been determined. Creep strength was improved by a high initial dislocation density, a coarse grain size, and a low impurity content. The impurities most detrimental to creep strength were found to be aluminum, magnesium, and silicon. A uniform distribution of BeO was found to give creep strength which was inferior to a grain boundary distribution. The creep strength of very high purity, hot isostatically pressed beryllium was found to compare favorably with that of other more commonly used high temperature metals

  8. Beryllium for first wall, limiter and divertor - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, A.; Smid, I.; Kny, E.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of the topical literature on beryllium as material for plasma interactive components in future fusion devices is given. The radiation damage which can be expected as a result of the neutron irradiation from ignited tokamak plasma is discussed. The response to high heat fluxes and simulation experiments in different test facilities are referred. Another focus will be on the material properties literature data, on joining techniques and on compatibility with other materials. The performance of a beryllium coated first wall at JET is reported. Some relevant literature on other candidate materials for plasma interactive components shall be considered

  9. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  10. Measurements of fusion neutron multiplication in spherical beryllium shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, H.; Kappler, F.; Tayama, R.; Moellendorff, U. von; Alevra, A.; Klein, H.

    1996-01-01

    New results of spherical-shell transmission measurements with 14-MeV neutrons on pure beryllium shells up to 17 cm thick are reported. The spectral flux above 3 MeV was measured using a liquid scintillation detector. At 17 cm thickness, also the total neutron multiplication was measured using a Bonner sphere system. The results agree well with calculations using beryllium nuclear data from the EFF-1 or the ENDF/B-Vi library. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Multilayer mirror and foil filter AXUV diode arrays on CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Stutman, D.; Iovea, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.; Munsat, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Recent upgrades to CDX-U spherical torus diagnostics include two 10-channel AXUV diode arrays. The multilayer mirror (MLM) array measures the λ150 O VI brightness profile in the poloidal plane using the Mo/B 4 C synthetic multilayer structures as dispersive elements. The foil filter array has a tangential view and is equipped with interchangeable clear aperture, beryllium and titanium filters. This allows measurements of radiated power, O VI or C V radial distributions, respectively. The O VI and C V emissivity and the radiated power profiles are highly peaked. A Neoclassical impurity accumulation mechanism is considered as an explanation. For radiated power measurements in the T e ≤100 eV plasmas, photon energy dependent corrections must be used in order to account for nonlinear AXUV sensitivity in the range E phot ≤20 eV. The arrays are also used for characterization of resistive MHD phenomena, such as the low m modes, saw-tooth oscillations and internal reconnection events. Based on the successful operation of the diagnostics, a new ultra soft x-ray multilayer mirror diode AXUV diode array monitoring the 34 Aa emissivity distribution of C VI will be built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

  12. Extraction of beryllium sulfate by a long chain amine; Extraction du sulfate de beryllium par une amine a longue chaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etaix, E S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The extraction of sulfuric acid in aqueous solution by a primary amine in benzene solution, 3-9 (diethyl) - 6-amino tri-decane (D.E.T. ) - i.e., with American nomenclature 1-3 (ethyl-pentyl) - 4-ethyl-octyl amine (E.P.O.) - has made it possible to calculate the formation constants of alkyl-ammonium sulfate and acid sulfate. The formula of the beryllium and alkyl-ammonium sulfate complex formed in benzene has next been determined, for various initial acidity of the aqueous solution. Lastly, evidence has been given of negatively charged complexes of beryllium and sulfate in aqueous solution, through the dependence of the aqueous sulfate ions concentration upon beryllium extraction. The formation constant of these anionic complexes has been evaluated. (author) [French] L'etude de l'extraction de l'acide sulfurique en solution aqueuse par une amine primaire en solution dans le benzene, le diethyl-3,9 amino-6 tridecane (D.E.T.) - autre nom americain 1-3 (ethylpentyl) - 4-ethyloctylamine (E.P.O.) a permis de calculer les constantes de formation du sulfate et de l'hydrogenosulfate d'alkyl-ammonium. La formule du complexe de sulfate de beryllium et d'alkyl-ammonium forme en solution benzenique a ete ensuite determinee pour diverses acidites initiales de la solution aqueuse. Enfin, l'influence de la concentration des ions sulfate de la phase aqueuse sur l'extraction du beryllium a mis en evidence la formation en solution aqueuse de complexes anioniques de sulfate et de beryllium dont la constante de formation a ete evaluee. (auteur)

  13. Extraction of beryllium sulfate by a long chain amine; Extraction du sulfate de beryllium par une amine a longue chaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etaix, E.S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The extraction of sulfuric acid in aqueous solution by a primary amine in benzene solution, 3-9 (diethyl) - 6-amino tri-decane (D.E.T. ) - i.e., with American nomenclature 1-3 (ethyl-pentyl) - 4-ethyl-octyl amine (E.P.O.) - has made it possible to calculate the formation constants of alkyl-ammonium sulfate and acid sulfate. The formula of the beryllium and alkyl-ammonium sulfate complex formed in benzene has next been determined, for various initial acidity of the aqueous solution. Lastly, evidence has been given of negatively charged complexes of beryllium and sulfate in aqueous solution, through the dependence of the aqueous sulfate ions concentration upon beryllium extraction. The formation constant of these anionic complexes has been evaluated. (author) [French] L'etude de l'extraction de l'acide sulfurique en solution aqueuse par une amine primaire en solution dans le benzene, le diethyl-3,9 amino-6 tridecane (D.E.T.) - autre nom americain 1-3 (ethylpentyl) - 4-ethyloctylamine (E.P.O.) a permis de calculer les constantes de formation du sulfate et de l'hydrogenosulfate d'alkyl-ammonium. La formule du complexe de sulfate de beryllium et d'alkyl-ammonium forme en solution benzenique a ete ensuite determinee pour diverses acidites initiales de la solution aqueuse. Enfin, l'influence de la concentration des ions sulfate de la phase aqueuse sur l'extraction du beryllium a mis en evidence la formation en solution aqueuse de complexes anioniques de sulfate et de beryllium dont la constante de formation a ete evaluee. (auteur)

  14. Actinide Foil Production for MPACT Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, Denis

    2012-10-30

    Sensitive fast-neutron detectors are required for use in lead slowing down spectrometry (LSDS), an active interrogation technique for used nuclear fuel assay for Materials Protection, Accounting, and Controls Technologies (MPACT). During the past several years UNLV sponsored a research project at RPI to investigate LSDS; began development of fission chamber detectors for use in LSDS experiments in collaboration with INL, LANL, and Oregon State U.; and participated in a LSDS experiment at LANL. In the LSDS technique, research has demonstrated that these fission chamber detectors must be sensitive to fission energy neutrons but insensitive to thermal-energy neutrons. Because most systems are highly sensitive to large thermal neutron populations due to the well-known large thermal cross section of 235U, even a miniscule amount of this isotope in a fission chamber will overwhelm the small population of higher-energy neutrons. Thus, fast-fission chamber detectors must be fabricated with highly depleted uranium (DU) or ultra-pure thorium (Th), which is about half as efficient as DU. Previous research conducted at RPI demonstrated that the required purity of DU for assay of used nuclear fuel using LSDS is less than 4 ppm 235U, material that until recently was not available in the U.S. In 2009 the PI purchased 3 grams of ultra-depleted uranium (uDU, 99.99998% 238U with just 0.2 ± 0.1 ppm 235U) from VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. We received the material in the form of U3O8 powder in August of 2009, and verified its purity and depletion in a FY10 MPACT collaboration project. In addition, chemical processing for use in FC R&D was initiated, fission chamber detectors and a scanning alpha-particle spectrometer were developed, and foils were used in a preliminary LSDS experiment at a LANL/LANSCE in Sept. of 2010. The as-received U3O8 powder must be chemically processed to convert it to another chemical form while maintaining its purity, which then must be used to electro-deposit U

  15. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits

  16. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  17. Reducing the cost of S-65C grade beryllium for ITER first wall applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczynski, D.; Sato, K.; Savchuk, V.V.; Shestakov, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium is the current material of choice for plasma-facing components in ITER. The present design is for 10 mm thick beryllium tiles bonded to an actively cooled copper substrate. Brush Wellman grade S65C beryllium is preferred grade off beryllium for these tiles. S65C has the best resistance to low-cycle thermal fatigue than any other beryllium grad in the world. S65C grade beryllium has been successfully deployed in fusion reactors for more than two decades, most recently in the JET reactor. This paper will detail a supply chain to produce the most cost-effective S65C plasma facing components for ITER. This paper will also propose some future work too demonstrate the best technology for bonding beryllium to copper. (author)

  18. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.W.; Cowgill, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1-5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits. (orig.)

  19. Movement of liquid beryllium during melt events in JET with ITER-like wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergienko, G; Huber, A; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V; Samm, U; Arnoux, G; Matthews, G F; Nunes, I; Riccardo, V; Sirinelli, A; Devaux, S

    2014-01-01

    The ITER-like wall recently installed in JET comprises solid beryllium limiters and a combination of bulk tungsten and tungsten-coated carbon fibre composite divertor tiles without active cooling. During a beryllium power handling qualification experiment performed in limiter configuration with 5 MW neutral beam injection input power, accidental beryllium melt events, melt layer motion and splashing were observed locally on a few beryllium limiters in the plasma contact areas. The Lorentz force is responsible for the observed melt layer movement. To move liquid beryllium against the gravity force, the current flowing from the plasma perpendicularly to the limiter surface must be higher than 6 kA m −2 . The thermo-emission current at the melting point of beryllium is much lower. The upward motion of the liquid beryllium against gravity can be due to a combination of the Lorentz force from the secondary electron emission and plasma pressure force. (paper)

  20. Status of the beryllium replacement project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimayuga, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Corcoran, E. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, T. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Harmsen, J. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing Inc., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Lu, E. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Onderwater, T.; Palleck, S. [General Electric- Hitachi, Wilmington, North Carolina (United States); Pant, A. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing Inc., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, beryllium (Be) is used as the filler metal for brazing appendages on the sheaths of CANDU® fuel elements. Because of its toxicity, occupational exposure limits for Be are being reduced to very low levels, resulting in significant challenges to CANDU® fuel fabricators. The CANDU® Owners Group (COG) initiated a test program to identify a filler material to replace Be and confirm that the brazed joints meet the established technical requirements for CANDU® fuel. Together with eliminating health risks associated with the use of Be, the industry needs to be assured that continuation of fuel supply remains unaffected and that fuel fabrication processes continue to comply with health and safety standards. A literature survey of studies on brazing and joining of Zircaloy identified potential filler materials that can meet or exceed existing design requirements of the brazed joint, including the required mechanical, microstructural, corrosion resistance, and irradiation properties equivalent to those obtained with Be as braze material. Candidate materials were evaluated against several criteria, including manufacturability, melting point, wettability, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, effect on neutron economy, potential activation products, and interaction with fuel channels and other related disciplines. This exercise resulted in a list of promising candidate materials that were recommended for the first phase of testing. These materials include stainless steel (304 or 316), Al-Si, Ni-P, and Zr-Mn alloys. To allow a CANDU® utility have sufficient confidence in considering implementation of a different braze filler material, a Be Replacement Test Program, involving out-reactor and in-reactor tests, is being undertaken as a collaborative endeavour by the Canadian nuclear industry. The out-reactor tests consist of: a constructability assessment to determine the material’s suitability with current fuel manufacturing methods; evaluation of

  1. Irradiation effects on aluminium and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, M.

    1992-01-01

    ductility of 1.6%. Besides, due to the effects of embrittlement and swelling induced by irradiation, the HFR beryllium reflector elements had to be replaced after more than 25 years of operation. Operational and practical experiences with these reflector elements are commented, as well as main engineering features of the new reflector elements: upper-end fittings of both filler element and insert in stainless steel, no radially drilled holes and no roll pins

  2. Beryllium research on FFHR molten salt blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.; Sze, D.-K.

    2000-01-01

    Force-free helical reactor, FFHR, is a demo-relevant heliotron-type D-T fusion reactor based on the great amount of R and D results obtained in the LHD project. Since 1993, collaboration works have made great progress in design studies of FFHR with standing on the major advantage of current-less steady operation with no dangerous plasma disruptions. There are two types of reference designs, FFHR-1 and FFHR-2, where molten Flibe (LiF-BeF2) is utilized as tritium breeder and coolant. In this paper, we present the outline of FFHR blanket design and some related R and D topics focusing on Be utilization. Beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier in the design and Be pebbles are placed in the front part of the tritium breeding zone. In a Flibe blanket, HF (TF) generated due to nuclear transmutation will be a problem because of its corrosive property. Though nickel-based alloys are thought to be intact in such a corrosive environment, FFHR blanket design does not adopt the alloys because of their induced radioactivity. The present candidate materials for the structure are low-activated ferritic steel (JLF-1), V-4Cr-4Ti, etc. They are capable to be corroded by HF in the operation condition, and Be is expected to work as a reducing agent in the system as well. Whether Be pebbles placed in a Flibe flow can work well or not is a very important matter. From this point, Be solubility in Flibe, reaction rate of the Redox reaction with TF in the liquid and on the surface of Be pebbles under irradiation, flowing behavior of Flibe through a Be pebble bed, etc. should be investigated. In 1997, in order to establish more practical and new data bases for advanced design works, we started a collaboration work of R and D on blanket engineering, where the Be research above mentioned is included. Preliminary dipping-test of Be sheets and in-situ tritium release experiment from Flibe with Be sheets have got started. (orig.)

  3. Characterization of laser-cut copper foil X-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, G. W.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Wei, M. S.; Reed, C. T.; Forsman, A. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative data analyses of laser-cut Cu foil X-pinch experiments on the 150 ns quarter-period, ˜250 kA GenASIS driver are presented. Three different foil designs are tested to determine the effects of initial structure on pinch outcome. Foil X-pinch data are also presented alongside the results from wire X-pinches with comparable mass. The X-ray flux and temporal profile of the emission from foil X-pinches differed significantly from that of wire X-pinches, with all emission from the foil X-pinches confined to a ˜3 ns period as opposed to the delayed, long-lasting electron beam emission common in wire X-pinches. Spectroscopic data show K-shell as well as significant L-shell emission from both foil and wire X-pinches. Fits to synthetic spectra using the SCRAM code suggest that pinching foil X's produced a ˜1 keV, ne ≥ 1023 cm-3 plasma. The spectral data combined with the improved reliability of the source timing, flux, and location indicate that foil X-pinches generate a reproducible, K-shell point-projection radiography source that can be easily modified and tailored to suit backlighting needs across a variety of applications.

  4. Process for producing molybdenum foil and collapsible tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretts, G. R.; Gavert, R. B.; Groschke, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Manufacturing process produces molybdenum foil 0.002 cm thick and 305 m long, and forms foil into high-strength, thin-walled tubing which can be flattened for storage on a spool. Desirable metal properties include high thermal conductivity stiffness, yield and tensile stress, and low thermal expansion coeffecient.

  5. Practical and research aspects of beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, S.

    1974-01-01

    Practical aspects of the application of low-energy accelerators to research in beam-foil spectroscopy are discussed, and the kinds of equipment and associated costs are described in some detail. Some typical beam-foil experiments, emphasizing the most recent studies, are treated so as to show how relatively simple facilities can be used to produce physics of great interest

  6. Codeposition of deuterium ions with beryllium oxide at elevated temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Markin, A V; Gorodetsky, A E; Negodaev, M A; Rozhanskii, N V; Scaffidi-Argentina, F; Werle, H; Wu, C H; Zalavutdinov, R K; Zakharov, A P

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium-loaded BeO films were produced by sputtering the beryllium target with 10 keV Ne ions in D sub 2 gas at a pressure of approximately 1 Pa. The sputtered beryllium reacts - on the substrate surface - with the residual oxygen, thus forming a beryllium oxide layer. Biasing the substrate negatively with respect to the target provides the simultaneous bombardment of the growing film surface with D ions formed by Ne-D sub 2 collisions. Substrate potential governs the maximum energy of ions striking the growing film surface while its size governs the flux density. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) data, the beryllium is deposited in the form of polycrystalline hcp-BeO layers with negligible (about 1 at.%) carbon and neon retention. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) data shows a strong deuterium bonding, with a desorption peak at 950 K, in the films deposited at -50 and -400 V substrate potentia...

  7. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  8. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  9. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Ochiai, K.; Verzilov, Y.; Ito, M.; Wada, M.; Nishitani, T.

    2004-01-01

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  10. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, M; Ochiai, K; Verzilov, Y; Ito, M; Wada, M; Nishitani, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2004-03-01

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  11. The experience in production of composite refraction lenses from beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, A. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Gorlevskiy, V. V.; Sheverdyaev, M. S.; Lizunov, A. V.; Brylev, D. A.; Anikin, A. S.; Klykov, S. S.; Kozlova, E. V.; Lesina, I. G.; Nebera, A. L.; Morozov, I. A.; Demin, A. V. [Bochvar High-Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russian Federation); Buzmakov, A. V.; Dymshicz, Yu. M.; Volkov, V. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Konarev, P. V.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Seregin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation); and others

    2017-01-15

    The choice of beryllium-based material for the use in X-ray optics has been substantiated based on electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction data. The first results of applying refraction lenses made of this material are reported.

  12. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  13. Quantifying design trade-offs of beryllium targets on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Kline, J. L.; Loomis, E. N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Shah, R. C.; Perry, T. S.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; MacLaren, S. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Masse, L. P.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tipton, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2017-10-01

    An important determinant of target performance is implosion kinetic energy, which scales with the capsule size. The maximum achievable performance for a given laser is thus related to the largest capsule that can be imploded symmetrically, constrained by drive uniformity. A limiting factor for symmetric radiation drive is the ratio of hohlraum to capsule radii, or case-to-capsule ratio (CCR). For a fixed laser energy, a larger hohlraum allows for driving bigger capsules symmetrically at the cost of reduced peak radiation temperature (Tr). Beryllium ablators may thus allow for unique target design trade-offs due to their higher ablation efficiency at lower Tr. By utilizing larger hohlraum sizes than most modern NIF designs, beryllium capsules thus have the potential to operate in unique regions of the target design parameter space. We present design simulations of beryllium targets with a large CCR = 4.3 3.7 . These are scaled surrogates of large hohlraum low Tr beryllium targets, with the goal of quantifying symmetry tunability as a function of CCR. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52- 06NA25396, and by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Morphing ab initio potential energy curve of beryllium monohydride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špirko, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 330, Dec (2016), s. 89-95 ISSN 0022-2852 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : beryllium monohydride * potential energy function * reduced potential * homotopic morphing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.618, year: 2016

  15. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V.P. E-mail: fae@niiar.ru; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B. E-mail: vniinm.400@g23.relkom.ru

    2001-11-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10{sup 22} and 8.0x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket.

  16. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10 22 and 8.0x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket

  17. Gas amplification properties of GEM foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Jeannine

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the detector concept International Linear Detector for the future accelerator project International Linear Collider, in which electrons and positrons at c. m. energies of 500 GeV are brought to collision, a time projection chamber shall be applied as central track detector. By the application of such a chamber as track detector a three-dimensional reconstruction of the track points is possible. If a particle passes the gas volume within the chamber it ionizises single gas atoms and the arising electrons move after the amplification in the GEM arrangement to the anode, so that a two-dimensional projection of the particle track is possible. The third dimension is calculated from the drift time of the electrons. The advances of this readout system consist therein that a better position resolution than by a multiwire proportional chamber is reached and the back-drifting ions can be strongly suppressed. Aim of this thesis are studies for a GEM module, which shall be used in a large TPC prototype. Concerning different requirements it is valid to compare different GEMs in order to can meet an optimal choice. In a small prototype present at DESY measurements for the acquisition of GEM-describing parameters were performed. The taking into operation of the test TPC was part of this thesis. Tracks were generated by a radioactive source, by means of which the gas amplification was determined. With the measurement arrangement gas-amplifier foils of different kind were compared in view of their amplification properties and their energy resolution power and systematically studied. Five different GEM performances were studied in the test TPC. These foils differ in their geometrical classification parameters, the fabrication process, or the materials. The GEMs produced at CERN possess in comparison with GEMs of the Japanese firm SciEnergy and a GEM of the US-American firm Tech-Etch the best amplification and resolution properties. Furthermore a new GEM framing

  18. Thin foil expansion into a vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma expansion into a vacuum is an old problem which has been renewed recently in various contexts: expansion of ultra-cold plasmas, cluster expansion, of dust grains, expansion of thin foils. In this presentation I will first discuss the physics of the expansion of a thin foil irradiated by an ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulse. The expansion results in the formation of high energy ions. For an infinitely steep plasma-vacuum interface the fastest ions are located in the outer part of the expansion and their velocity is given by ν m ax∼ 2 C s (In ω p it) where c s (Zk B T e /m i )''1/2 is the ion-acoustic velocity ω p i=(n e 0Ze''2/m i e 0 )''1/2 is the ion plasma frequency, n e 0 is the electron density in the unperturbed plasma, Z is the ion charge number. In the above expression, t is either the pulse duration or the effective acceleration time (in particular t∼L/2c s , where L is the width of the foil, when the electron cooling is taken into account). A salient characteristic of the expansion is the occurrence of a double layer structure and a peak of the accelerating electric field at the ion front. I will explain the origin of the peak and predict its temporal behavior. This peak has been diagnosed in recent experiments. I will also discuss the effect of a 2-temperatures electron distribution function on the expansion, showing the dominant role of the hot electron component. Finally I will discuss the occurrence of ion spikes in the expansion when the initial density profile is smooth. The ion spike is due to a wave breaking which cannot be handled in a satisfactory way by a fluid code and requires a kinetic description. A. simple collisionless particle code has been used to treat the evolution of the spike after the wave breaking and the results will be shown. (Author)

  19. Identification of an abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frome, Edward L.; Newman, Lee S.; Cragle, Donna L.; Colyer, Shirley P.; Wambach, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    The potential hazards from exposure to beryllium or beryllium compounds in the workplace were first reported in the 1930s. The tritiated thymidine beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro blood test that is widely used to screen beryllium exposed workers in the nuclear industry for sensitivity to beryllium. The clinical significance of the BeLPT was described and a standard protocol was developed in the late 1980s. Cell proliferation is measured by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into dividing cells on two culture dates and using three concentrations of beryllium sulfate. Results are expressed as a 'stimulation index' (SI) which is the ratio of the amount of tritiated thymidine (measured by beta counts) in the simulated cells divided by the counts for the unstimulated cells on the same culture day. Several statistical methods for use in the routine analysis of the BeLPT were proposed in the early 1990s. The least absolute values (LAV) method was recommended for routine analysis of the BeLPT. This report further evaluates the LAV method using new data, and proposes a new method for identification of an abnormal or borderline test. This new statistical-biological positive (SBP) method reflects the clinical judgment that: (i) at least two SIs show a 'positive' response to beryllium; and (ii) that the maximum of the six SIs must exceed a cut-point that is determined from a reference data set of normal individuals whose blood has been tested by the same method in the same serum. The new data is from the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge (Y-12) and consists of 1080 workers and 33 non-exposed control BeLPTs (all tested in the same serum). Graphical results are presented to explain the statistical method, and the new SBP method is applied to the Y-12 group. The true positive rate and specificity of the new method were estimated to be 86% and 97%, respectively. An electronic notebook that is accessible via the Internet was used in

  20. Design considerations for foil windows for PET radioisotope targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughey, B.J.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study performed at SRL to develop analytical and computational techniques for optimizing the design of conduction-cooled foil windows for PET targets. Single foil conduction cooled windows have been found to be good target entrance windows for both low energy accelerators and medium energy cyclotrons. Detailed thermal analysis has given an approximate analytical expression for the maximum temperature reached in a foil window under conditions of realistic ion beam bombardment. The effects of 'hot spots' in the beam density profile were investigated. It was shown that a factor of two safety margin in window design should be adequate to compensate for any possible beam hot spots. In addition, the reduction of foil stress by slack mounting was verified by experiments. The properties of conventional and novel foil materials were investigated for use in conduction cooled windows. Novel foil materials include two-component Al/Ti and Al/Havar foil. Results on the testing of candidate foil materials for thermal conductivity and mechanical strength at elevated temperature were presented. Two optimum foil window geometries were analyzed: a high aspect ratio window and a multiply slotted window. The multiply slotted window combines the advantages of a high aspect ratio foil window with a circular beam strike and is a promising window design for both TCA and cyclotron targets. A multiply slotted window for a N 2 gas target for 15 O production was designed using the methodologies discussed above. This prototype target was successfully tested using the TCA beam at SRL. (author) 6 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  1. European Fusion Programme. ITER task T23: Beryllium characterisation. Progress report. Tensile tests on neutron irradiated and reference beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1996-02-01

    As part of the European Technology Fusion Programme, the irradiation embrittlement characteristics of the more ductile and isotopic grades of beryllium manufactured by Brush Wellman has been investigated using modern powder production and consolidation techniques . This study was initiated in support of the development and evaluation of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for the solid breeder blanket design concepts proposed for a DEMO fusion power reactor. Four different species of beryllium: S-200 F (vacuum hot pressed, 1.2 wt% BeO), S-200FH (hot isostatic pressed, 0.9 wt% BeO), S-65 (vacuum hot pressed, 0.6 wt% BeO), S-65H (hot isostatic pressed, 0.5 wt% BeO) have been compared. Three batches of the beryllium have been investigated, a neutron batch, a thermal control batch and a reference batch. Neutron irradiation has been performed at temperatures between 175 and 605 degrees Celsius up to a neutron fluence of 2.1 10 25 n.m -2 (E> 1 MeV) or 750 appm He. The results of the tensile tests are summarized

  2. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces; Untersuchung des ternaeren Systems Beryllium-Kohlenstoff-Wolfram und Betrachtungen von Beryllium auf Kohlenstoffoberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, Florian

    2009-05-25

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be{sub 2}C island formation for T{>=}770 K. At high temperatures (T{>=}1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be{sub 2}W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be{sub 2}W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be{sub 2}C, W{sub 2}C, WC and Be{sub 2}W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be{sub 2}C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures

  3. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  4. Effects of the Addictives on Etching Characteristics of Aluminum Foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.K.; Jang, J.M.; Chi, C.S. [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea); Shin, D.C. [Sungnam Polytechnic, Sungnam (Korea); Lee, J.H.; Oh, H.J. [Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of additives in the HCI etching solution on etching behaviors of aluminium foil as dielectric film for electrolytic capacitors were investigated. The etch pits formed in 1M hydrochloric acid containing ethylene glycol as an additive contain more fine and homogeneous etch tunnels compared to thoese in 1 M hydrochloric acid only, which led to the increase in the effective internal surface area of aluminum foil. After anodizing of aluminum foil etched in etching solutions, the LCR meter results have shown that the capacitance of dielectric film etched in hydrochloric acid with ethylene glycol was increased remarkably compared to that etched in hydrochloric acid only. (author). 21 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Preparation of self-supporting metallic foils of nickel isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Isao.

    1975-01-01

    This is the fourth report on the practical methods of target preparation for use in low energy nuclear experiments following the previous one (INS-J-150). An electroplating method has been developed as a dependable and reproducible technique for making self-supporting metallic foils of nickel in the thickness range of 0.5 to 10 mg/cm 2 . The procedures minimized the necessary amount of material so that nickel isotopes could be processed economically. Impurity contamination of the nickel foils during the electroplating process was less than 500 ppm, and the thickness variation in each foil was less than 3% of the central thickness. (auth.)

  6. Method of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Jackie G [Seymour, TN; DeMint, Amy L [Kingston, TN

    2012-04-24

    Methods of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil are described. The foil may be substantially pure uranium, or may be a uranium alloy such as a uranium-molybdenum alloy. The method typically includes a series of hot rolling operations on a cast plate material to form a thin sheet. These hot rolling operations are typically performed using a process where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant percentage. The sheet is typically then annealed and then cooled. The process typically concludes with a series of cold rolling passes where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant thickness amount to form the foil.

  7. Hybrid-type long-lived carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Isao; Kato, Hajime

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the preparation of hybrid-type long-lived carbon stripper foils was developed. The new procedure is based on a modification of our controlled dc arc-discharge method. The carbon foils are of the multilayer type and the layers are composed of carbon particles emitted from the electrodes in the ac arc-discharge and from the cathode in the dc arc-discharge. With this simple and powerful method long lived carbon stripper foils can be prepared with higher reliability and reproducibility than with the previous procedure. (orig.)

  8. Experience of beryllium blocks operation in the SM and MIR nuclear reactors useful for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Melder, R.R.; Belozerov, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    The results are presented concerning the examinations of state of beryllium blocks after the completion of their operation in the SM and MIR reactors. Both cracks and more significant mechanical damages are revealed in the irradiated beryllium blocks. Under neutron irradiation of beryllium radiation degradation of its physical and mechanical properties occurs. It shows itself in embrittlement, decrease of brittle strength level as well in worsening of thermal conductivity that leads to increase of thermal stresses into beryllium block. Under irradiation it takes place damage of beryllium microstructure, in particular, formation of radiation defects occurs in the form of dislocation loops and great amount of helium atoms. Optimization of beryllium radioactive waste storage is related to their preliminary surface and volumetric decontamination. (author)

  9. Beryllium coating produced by evaporation-condensation method and some their properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepekin, G.I.; Anisimov, A.B.; Chernikov, A.S.; Mozherinn, S.I.; Pirogov, A.A. [SRI SIA Lutch., Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The method of vacuum evaporation-condensation for deposition of beryllium coatings on metal substrates, considered in the paper, side by side with a plasma-spray method is attractive fon ITER application. In particular this technique may be useful for repair the surface of eroded tiles which is operated in a strong magnetic field. The possibility of deposition of beryllium coatings with the rate of layer growth 0.1-0.2 mm/h is shown. The compatibility of beryllium coating with copper or stainless steel substrate is provided due to intermediate barrier. The results of examination of microstructure, microhardness, porosity, thermal and physical properties and stability under thermal cycling of beryllium materials are presented. The value of thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of condensed beryllium are approximately the same as for industrial grade material produced by powder mettalurgy technique. However, the condensed beryllium has higher purity (up to 99.9-99.99 % wt.). (author)

  10. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-09-01

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (10 22 atoms/cm 2 ) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project

  11. 5. IEA International workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The collection includes the abstracts of reports presented to the 5-th IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. The themes of reports are as follows: status of beryllium technology for fusion in Russia; manufacturing and testing of Be armoured first wall mock-up for ITER; development of the process of diffusion welding of metals stainless steel-copper-beryllium into a single composite; some features of beryllium-laser beam interaction; the effect of irradiation dose on tritium and helium release from neutron irradiated beryllium; thermal properties of neutron irradiated Be{sub 12}Ti. The results of investigating the mechanical properties variation and swelling of beryllium under high temperature neutron irradiation are presented.

  12. 5. IEA International workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The collection includes the abstracts of reports presented to the 5-th IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. The themes of reports are as follows: status of beryllium technology for fusion in Russia; manufacturing and testing of Be armoured first wall mock-up for ITER; development of the process of diffusion welding of metals stainless steel-copper-beryllium into a single composite; some features of beryllium-laser beam interaction; the effect of irradiation dose on tritium and helium release from neutron irradiated beryllium; thermal properties of neutron irradiated Be 12 Ti. The results of investigating the mechanical properties variation and swelling of beryllium under high temperature neutron irradiation are presented [ru

  13. Development of the NBS beryllium isotopic standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inn, K.G.W; Fassett, J.D.; Coursey, B.M.; Walker, R.L.; Raman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards, in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry community, is in the process of developing a beryllium isotopic solution Standard Reference Material. The master 10 Be/ 9 Be solution was characterized isotopically by resonance-ionization and secondary-ion mass-spectrometric-based techniques, and radioactivity measurements were by liquid scintillation counting. The master solution was gravimetrically diluted with 9 Be to a final 10 Be/ 9 Be atomic ratio of 3 x 10 -11 . The preliminary data indicate a half life for 10 Be of 1.3 million years, and AMS measurements are within 10% of the known beryllium isotopic ratio

  14. Multiscale modelling of hydrogen behaviour on beryllium (0001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Stihl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beryllium is proposed to be a neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in future fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to acquire an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms of tritium accumulation and release as a result of transmutation processes that Be undergoes under neutron irradiation. A multiscale simulation of ad- and desorption of hydrogen isotopes on the beryllium (0001 surface is developed. It consists of ab initio calculations of certain H adsorption configurations, a suitable cluster expansion approximating the energies of arbitrary configurations, and a kinetic Monte Carlo method for dynamic simulations of adsorption and desorption. The processes implemented in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulation are deduced from further ab initio calculations comprising both, static relaxation as well as molecular dynamics runs. The simulation is used to reproduce experimental data and the results are compared and discussed. Based on the observed results, proposals for a refined model are made.

  15. Response of porous beryllium to static and dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbell, W.M.; Walton, O.R.; Ree, F.H.

    1977-07-01

    Previous investigstions of the mechanical response of porous materials to dynamic loading have been extended to include the shock wave response of a brittle metal. The complex response of berylliums of 85 to 90 percent porosity in two initial conditions has been examined in a theoretical and experimental program to be described. The study has resulted in the development of constitutive relations placed in hydrocodes which are capable of accurately predicting wave propagation in the berylliums. A comprehensive set of static (0 to 4 Gpa) and dynamic (0 to 35 Gpa) experiments was performed to measure the behavior of these brittle, porous materials to imposed loads. The results of the experiments guided a modeling effort which added several new features to previous models, including deviatoric stresses, porosity-dependent relaxation time of pore closure, elastic-plastic reopening of pores, and improved compaction functions.

  16. Status of RF beryllium characterization for ITER Fist Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanov, I. B.; Nikolaev, G. N.; Roedig, M.; Gervash, A. А.; Linke, I. J.; Kurbatova, L. A.; Perevalov, S. I.; Giniyatulin, R. N.

    2011-10-01

    The status of RF R&D activities in production and characterization of TGP-56FW beryllium grade is presented. The results of metallographic studies of microstructure and cracks morphology are reported for full-scale Be tiles (56 × 56 × 10 mm) subjected to VDE simulation tests in TSEFEY-M testing facility (VDE-10 MJ/m 2 during 0.1 s, 1 shot ) and following low cycle thermal fatigue tests (500 thermal cycles at 1.5 MW/m 2). First results of plasma disruption tests ( E = 1.2-5 MJ/m 2, 5 ms), which were obtained during the realization of Thermal Shock/VDE Qualification program of RF beryllium in JUDITH-1 facility, are also discussed.

  17. Status of RF beryllium characterization for ITER Fist Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Nikolaev, G.N.; Roedig, M.; Gervash, A.A.; Linke, I.J.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Perevalov, S.I.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    The status of RF R and D activities in production and characterization of TGP-56FW beryllium grade is presented. The results of metallographic studies of microstructure and cracks morphology are reported for full-scale Be tiles (56 x 56 x 10 mm) subjected to VDE simulation tests in TSEFEY-M testing facility (VDE-10 MJ/m 2 during 0.1 s, 1 shot) and following low cycle thermal fatigue tests (500 thermal cycles at 1.5 MW/m 2 ). First results of plasma disruption tests (E = 1.2-5 MJ/m 2 , 5 ms), which were obtained during the realization of Thermal Shock/VDE Qualification program of RF beryllium in JUDITH-1 facility, are also discussed.

  18. Gravimetric determination of beryllium in the presence of transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozova, S.S.; Nikitina, L.V.; Dyatlova, N.M.; Serebryakova, G.V.; Vol'nyagina, A.N.

    1976-01-01

    A new organic reagent, nitrolotrimethylphosphonic acid (H 6 L), is proposed for gravimetric determination of beryllium. This complexone forms with Be hardly soluble complexes in a wide pH range. The separated complex has a composition Be 5 (HL) 2 x10H 2 O. To elucidate the possibility of determining Be in the presence of transition metals, often accompanying beryllium in alloys, interaction of cations of these metals with H 6 L at different pH has been studied potentiometrically. It has been established that at pH=1.1 in the presence of masking reagent (diethylentriaminopentacetic acid) Be can be determined when zinc, copper, chromium, cobalt, nickel, iron, manganese and cadmium are present. Gravimetric method of determining Be with the help of H 6 L has been developed. The weight form is obtained by drying the precipitate which reduces considerably the time of analysis and the error of determination

  19. Response of porous beryllium to static and dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isbell, W.M.; Walton, O.R.; Ree, F.H.

    1977-07-01

    Previous investigstions of the mechanical response of porous materials to dynamic loading have been extended to include the shock wave response of a brittle metal. The complex response of berylliums of 85 to 90 percent porosity in two initial conditions has been examined in a theoretical and experimental program to be described. The study has resulted in the development of constitutive relations placed in hydrocodes which are capable of accurately predicting wave propagation in the berylliums. A comprehensive set of static (0 to 4 Gpa) and dynamic (0 to 35 Gpa) experiments was performed to measure the behavior of these brittle, porous materials to imposed loads. The results of the experiments guided a modeling effort which added several new features to previous models, including deviatoric stresses, porosity-dependent relaxation time of pore closure, elastic-plastic reopening of pores, and improved compaction functions

  20. Examination of respiratory tract in workers occupationally exposed to beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianciara, M.; Swiatkowski, J.

    1989-01-01

    In a group (30) occupationally exposed to beryllium below the Maximum Allowed Concentration, deviations from the norm were found in 13% of chest x rays and impairments of lung ventilatory reserves in 46%. The low intensity and non-specific character of the changes did not allow confirmation of connection with occupational exposure. Radiological examination of the lungs, expanded functional testing of the respiratory system and measurements of blood gases are recommended to identify workers with respiratory changes at an early stage. (UK)

  1. Solid state bonding of beryllium to copper and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, D.R.; Liby, A.L.; Weaver, W.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this effort was to demonstrate that ingot metallurgy (IM) beryllium (Be) can be bonded to dissimilar metals such as copper (Cu) or vanadium (V) at low temperatures by using silver (Ag) as a bonding aid. It is hoped that success at the coupon stage will stimulate more extensive studies of the mechanical and thermal integrity of such joints, leading ultimately to use of this technology to fabricate first wall structures for ITER. (orig.)

  2. Beryllium isotopes in cosmic radiation measured with plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, K.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.

    1976-01-01

    Plastic stacks consisting of Daicel cellulose nitrate and Kodak cellulose nitrate were flown from Fort Churchill, Canada in 1971 for the study of isotopic components of light nuclei, especially beryllium, in primary cosmic rays. Tracks found in these detectors were analysed for charge and mass identification; the ratio between Be 7 and total Be is obtained as 0.64 +- 0.25 at detector level. (orig.) [de

  3. Pre-melting hcp to bcc Transition in Beryllium

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Y.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Ping.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, D. -B.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium (Be) is an important material with wide applications ranging from aerospace components to X-ray equipments. Yet a precise understanding of its phase diagram remains elusive. We have investigated the phase stability of Be using a recently developed hybrid free energy computation method that accounts for anharmonic effects by invoking phonon quasiparticles. We find that the hcp to bcc transition occurs near the melting curve at 0

  4. Standard specification for nuclear-grade beryllium oxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This specification defines the physical and chemical requirements of nuclear-grade beryllium oxide (BeO) powder to be used in fabricating nuclear components. This specification does not include requirements for health and safety. It recognizes the material as a Class B poison and suggests that producers and users become thoroughly familiar with and comply to applicable federal, state and local regulations and handling guidelines. Special tests and procedures are given

  5. Photoneutron cross sections for D2O and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, H.F.; Woods, F.J.; Baumann, N.P.

    1975-01-01

    The photodissociation cross section by 24 Na gamma rays was measured for deuterium in order to resolve a discrepancy between earlier measurements (1.43 to 1.59 millibarns) and a more recently reported one (1.34 mb). The measurement of the beryllium (γ,n) cross section for 24 Na gamma rays was also included as a check. Results for deuterium (1.54 mb) are in agreement with the earlier values

  6. Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degrees C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m 2 . Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP'd sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe 12 . Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  7. Some implications of accurate thermal parameters for beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, D.M.; Whitehurst, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    Authoritative values for the parameters of harmonic thermal motion have been used as criteria for various least-squares refinements of the structure model for beryllium metal. A change in the absolute scale of Brown [Philos. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377-1394] improves the correspondence of the associated data with the true thermal parameters. Contraction of the core-electron distribution upon bonding is a possible implication of the rescaled data. (Auth.)

  8. Presence of Beryllium (Be) in urban soils: human health risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, A.; Gonzalez, M. J.; Lobo, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    Berylium (Be) is, together with As, Cd, Hg, Pb and Ti, one of the trace elements more toxic for human being (Vaessen) and Szteke, 2000; Yaman and Avci, 2006), but in spite of the exponential increment of its applications during the last decades, surprisingly there isn't hardly information about its presence and environmental distribution. The aim of this work is to evaluate the presence of Beryllium in urban soils in Alcala de Henares, (Madrid Spain).

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study of Kapton thin foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, G. S.; Ravelli, L.; Löwe, B.; Egger, W.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variable energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (VE-PALS) experiments on polyimide material Kapton are reported. Thin Kapton foils are widely used in a variety of mechanical, electronic applications. PALS provides a sensitive probe of vacancy-related defects in a wide range of materials, including open volume in polymers. Varying the positron implantation energy enables direct measurement of thin foils. Thin Kapton foils are also commonly used to enclose the positron source material in conventional PALS measurements performed with unmoderated radionuclide sources. The results of depth-profiled positron lifetime measurements on 7.6 μm and 25 μm Kapton foils are reported and determine a dominant 385(1) ps lifetime component. The absence of significant nanosecond lifetime component due to positronium formation is confirmed.

  10. Method of stabilizing Nb3Sn superconducting foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzliak, J.; Lences, P.; Allarova, H.

    1982-01-01

    The stabilization of niobium-tin Nb 3 Sn superconducting foils with copper is carried out by deposition or by diffusion in pure copper or in a tin bath containing different copper levels, with the surface etched or unetched. The foils are covered with a copper film at a temperature of 300 to 5O0 degC using a tin solder, spread on a copper, silver or nickel layer deposited on the foil surface from solutions for electroless plating. The bond between the surface of the superconducting foil and the electroless plated metal layer is annealed in a controlled atmosphere or in a vacuum at a temperature of 200 to 500 degC for over 20 to 60 minutes. The copper stabilization layer can also be produced electrolytically. (J.B.)

  11. A study of molecular effects in beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Veje, E.

    1979-01-01

    Relative populations of ns + nd levels in hydrogen as functions of the principal quantum number n have been measured with beams of H + , H 2 + , and H 3 + impinging on thin carbon foils at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu. Enhancements of 20% and 45% for dimer and trimer clusters are observed uniformly for all levels. A possible explanation in terms of screening of the Coulomb repulsion between the protons inside the foil, thus reducing the effective thickness of the foil, is given. All relative populations closely follow an nsup(P) power law with p = -4.0 and -3.7 at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu, respectively, in perfect analogy with atomic collision experiments. O + /O 2 + -foil excitations at 100 keV and 155 keV show a simular molecular effect, but in reverse with a larger mean charge produced by the dimer. (Auth.)

  12. Decontamination with pasty pickling agents forming a strippable foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselgartner, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-situ decontamination procedure by applying onto the contaminated surface (in an one-step or multi-step process) pasty, chemically aggressive agents causing dilution and adsorption of the contaminant and then hardening to form a strippable foil. The use of such a foil will result in following advantages, with respect to usual techniques: - sensibly shorter operation duration resulting in lower personnel doses; - reduction of the arising secondary waste volume because there is no need for washing; the volume of the spent strippable foil is much smaller than currently used water volumes; - optimal conditioning of the radioactive waste due to its fixation in a solid (foil); - an accidental contamination in a controlled area can easily be fixed and covered avoiding its propagation

  13. Design of foil implosion system for Pioneer I experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, D.J.; Caird, R.S.; Fowler, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    A foil implosion system is described that integrates an explosive flux-compression generator, a flat plate feed section with power conditioning switches, and a vacuum electrode region containing a cylindrical foil/plasma load. Power conditioning, obtained with an explosive-driven plasma compression opening switch and explosive-actuated closing switches, provides a submicrosecond multimegampere pulse for the implosion of an aluminum plasma. The flat plate section is configured for bidirectional feed to the coaxial vacuum electrodes. Important considerations in the design of the vacuum power flow region include gap failure, feed symmetry, and radial diagnostic access. The system presently accommodates a foil radius of 3 cm. Innovative foil insertion and clamping techniques are also described

  14. Detail analysis of fusion neutronics benchmark experiment on beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Chikara; Ochiai, Kentaro; Takakura, Kosuke; Ohnishi, Seiki; Kondo, Keitaro; Wada, Masayuki; Sato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the integral experiments (in situ and TOF experiments) on beryllium with DT neutrons at JAEA/FNS pointed out two problems by using MCNP4C and the latest nuclear data libraries; one was a strange larger neutron peak around 12 MeV appearing in the TOF experiment analysis with JEFF-3.1 and the other was an overestimation on law energy neutrons in the in situ experiment analyses with all the nuclear data libraries. We investigated reasons for these problems in detail. It was found out that the official ACE file MCJEFF3.1 of JEFF-3.1 had an inconsistency with the original JEFF-3.1, which caused the strange larger neutron peak around 12 MeV in the TOF experiment analysis. We also found out that the calculated thermal neutron peak was probably too large in the in situ experiment. On trial we examined influence of the thermal neutron scattering law data of beryllium metal in ENDF/B-VI. The result pointed out that the coherent elastic scattering cross-section data in the thermal neutron scattering law data of beryllium metal were probably too large.

  15. Zone-refining of beryllium(II) acetylacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Isao; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Keihei

    1975-01-01

    Zone melting was applied to bis (acetylacetonato) beryllium(II), Be(AA) 2 , to remove trace metal constiutents. The effective distribution coefficient, k, of a minor component measured in a binary mixture with the majority of Be(AA) 2 , fell in the range of 0.4 to 0.8, while the value obtained in a multiple component mixture fell in the range of 0.8 to 0.9 except Zn(II)- and Ni(II) chelates. Cr(AA) 3 was concentrated upward in the direction of the zone travelling, and similar results were obtained with Cu(II)-, Co(III)- Fe(III)- and Al(III) acetylacetonates, while Zn(II)-, Ni(II)- and Mn(III) chelates were fractionated in the both ends of the column. On the other hand, when the zone was moved downward, the minor components were concentrated in the lower end of a column. Efficiency in zone refining was compared to each other between the upward- and downward zone travelling modes on the crude beryllium acetylacetonates obtained from a commercial reagent of beryllium nitrate, and the latter mode was found more effective in the concentration of trace components. Discussion was given on possible mechanisms resulting in the difference in the refining efficiency. (author)

  16. Investigation of the beryllium ion-surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Birukov, A.Yu. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Gureev, V.M. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Daneljan, L.S. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Korshunov, S.N. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, Yu.V. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Moskovkin, P.S. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, Yu.A. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Stoljarova, V.G. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S. [M.V. Lomonosov University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zatekin, V.V. [M.V. Lomonosov University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The energy and temperature dependence of self-sputtering yields of beryllium were measured. The energy dependence of the beryllium self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by Eckstein et al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yields are temperature independent; at T{sub irr.}>870 K the yield increases steeply. Beryllium samples were implanted at 370 K with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary hydrogen plasma power flux of about 5 MW/m{sup 2}. In the fluence range of 5 x 10{sup 22}-1.5 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2} the depth profile is shifted towards the surface with increasing fluence and the concentration of trapped hydrogen atoms is reduced from 3.3 x 10{sup 21} to 7.4 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2}. About 95% of the trapped hydrogen is located within bubbles and only {proportional_to}5% is trapped as atoms. With increasing implantation fluence the bubbles coalesce, producing channels through which hydrogen escapes. (orig.).

  17. A diethylhydroxylaminate based mixed lithium/beryllium aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Raphael J.F. [Paris-Lodron Universitaet Salzburg (Austria). Fachbereich fuer Materialwissenschaften und Physik; Jana, Surajit [Asansol Girls College, West-Bengal (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Froehlich, Roland [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Organisch-Chemisches Inst.; Mitzel, Norbert W. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Anorganische Chemie und Strukturchemie

    2015-07-01

    A mixed lithium/beryllium diethylhydroxylaminate compound containing {sup n}butyl beryllium units of total molecular composition {sup n}Be(ONEt{sub 2}){sub 2} [(LiONEt{sub 2}){sup 2} {sup n}BuBeONEt{sub 2}]{sub 2} (1) was isolated from a reaction mixture of {sup n}butyl lithium, N,N-diethylhydroxylamine and BeCl{sub 2} in diethylether/thf. The crystal structure of 1 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The aggregate is composed of two ladder-type subunits connected in a beryllium-centered distorted tetrahedron of four oxygen atoms. Only the lithium atoms are engaged in coordination with the nitrogen donor atoms. The DFT calculations support the positional occupation determined for Li and Be in the crystal structure. The DFT and the solid-state structure are in excellent agreement, indicating only weak intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Structural details of metal atom coordination are discussed.

  18. Test of a beryllium limiter in the tokamak UNITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackmann, J.; Uhlenbusch, J.

    1984-01-01

    Beryllium rail limiters are inserted into the tokamak UNITOR to study the compatibility of this material with the plasma. The power load onto the limiter surface is 1-2 kW/cm 2 during the plasma pulse length of 50 ms duration. The concentration of heavy (Cr) and light (O) impurities is monitored by means of spectroscopy. In comparison with other materials tested likewise (graphite, Ni, Al 2 O 3 , TiC, SiC, SS) the Be-experiments have shown the following improvements: (a) the concentration of heavy impurities is considerably reduced, (b) this reduction is preserved if the poloidal Be-limiters are retracted from the plasma, (c) the plasma resistivity is diminished, (d) the occurrence of disruptions decreases. A total amount of 6 mg beryllium was found distributed on the inner torus wall after 1500 shots. The decontamination of the apparatus was performed without major problems. Only very little volatile Be-dust was detected, and peripheric parts (pumps, mass spectrometer etc.) were not contaminated. The beryllium released from the limiters was found to be entirely deposited on the torus wall mainly in the vicinity of the limiters. (orig.)

  19. Finite Element Modelling of Bends and Creases during Folding Ultra Thin Stainless Steel Foils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datta, K.; Akagi, H.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han

    2003-01-01

    Finite Element Modelling of an ultra thin foil of SUS 304 stainless steel is carried out. These foils are 20 mm and below in thickness. The development of stresses and strains during folding of these foils is studied. The objective of this study is to induce qualities of paper in the foils of

  20. 75 FR 1596 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Reynolds Packaging LLC (Aluminum Foil Liner Stock...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Status, Reynolds Packaging LLC (Aluminum Foil Liner Stock), Louisville, Kentucky Pursuant to its...-purpose subzone at the aluminum foil liner stock manufacturing and distribution facilities of Reynolds... manufacturing and distribution of aluminum foil liner stock and aluminum foil at the facilities of Reynolds...

  1. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. 189... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED FROM USE IN HUMAN FOOD... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one...

  2. DML and Foil Measurements of ETA Beam Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W; Weir, J

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the ETA beam radius have been made with a quartz foil and a diamagnetic loop (DML). While the measurements agreed at some settings they diverged at others. While the DML measures the rms radius of the total beam, the foil measures mainly the core and the divergence can be explained by the presence of a low density halo. Evidence of such a halo from other measurements is presented

  3. Practical and research aspects of beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, S.

    1975-01-01

    The application of a heavy-ion accelerator to research in beam-foil spectroscopy requires certain capital equipment which is somewhat unorthodox when viewed from the standpoint of conventional, low-energy nuclear physics. It is necessary that people who wish to expand their accelerator work to include beam-foil studies understand the nature and cost of such major apparatus. We will survey the equipment needs, starting with the particle analyzer at the output of the accelerator and including the equipment used in a variety of beam-foil experiments. Electronic and computer devices will not be discussed since they are essentially identical with those employed in nuclear studies. Considerable attention will be given to optical spectrometers and spectographs including simple instruments which might be used by a laboratory just getting started in beam-foil research, or which has limited financial resources. Attention will be given to the production and use of the exciter foils. We will then discuss some typical beam-foil experiments having to do with the excitation, detection, and analysis of spectral lines from electronic levels in multiply-ionized atoms, and also with the measurement of the mean lives of such levels. Finally, we will review some of the special properties of the beam-foil light source as regards the population of the magnetic sub-states of a given level. Recent work on the character of the emitted light will be presented. That work will deal specifically with the origin of the polarization of the light. The relevant experiments involve varying the angle between the plane of the exciter foil and the particle velocity. (author)

  4. Alignment and orientation effects in beam-foil experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y.B.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of the orientation and alignment of atoms observed upon emergence from tilted foils is presented. The interaction with the foil surface is taken into account in the production process of particular states. Once they are produced, the evolution of these states, under the influence of the residual field near the surface, is calculated in the fashion introduced by Eck. The most general effect of this evolution is presented

  5. Magazine for handling stripping foils in a particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorka, A.J. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Thin foils for stripping a particle beam are stored in a magazine that is operable remotely to display an individual foil, release it when it is spent, and repeat this process. The magazine is operable in the high-vacuum, high-radiation environment in the interior of a particle accelerator, and it uses the magnetic field of the accelerator to operate the display and dropping mechanism. (U.S.)

  6. CFD Simulation on Cooling Down of Beryllium Filters for Neutron Conditioning for Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azraf Azman; Shahrir Abdullah; Mohd Rizal Mamat

    2011-01-01

    The cryogenic system for cooling Beryllium filter utilizing liquid nitrogen was designed, fabricated, tested and installed at SANS instrument of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI research reactor. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to predict the cooling performance of the beryllium for optimization of neutron beam resolution and transmission. This paper presents the transient CFD results of temperature distributions via the thermal link to the beryllium and simulation of heat flux. The simulation data are also compared with the experimental results for the cooling time and distribution to the beryllium. (author)

  7. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanafee, J.E. (ed.)

    1988-02-19

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (DLC)

  8. Method of crude ore defluoridation in hydrometallurgy of beryllium, affording fluorosilicic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlov, V.I.; Borsuk, A.N.; Zherin, I.I.

    2006-01-01

    Results of laboratory and industrial tests conducted at Ul'ba Metallurgical Plant on leaching bertrandite - phenacite - fluorite flotation concentrate containing ∼4 wt. % beryllium in a rotary furnace using sulfuric acid are presented. The technology is shown to provide a 7.8% reduction in the net cost of beryllium production (1 kg) in the form of technical-grade Be(OH) 2 by obviating the need of smelting beryllium concentrates and alkali fluxes. Besides, the technology permits concomitant production of H 2 SiF 6 , its commercial sales promoting a 17.6% reduction in beryllium production net cost [ru

  9. Testing of beryllium marker coatings in PISCES-B for the JET ITER-like wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdowson, A.; Baldwin, M.J.; Coad, J.P.; Doerner, R.P.; Hanna, J.; Hole, D.E.; Matthews, G.F.; Rubel, M.; Seraydarian, R.; Xu, H.

    2009-01-01

    Beryllium has been chosen as the first wall material for ITER. In order to understand the issues of material migration and tritium retention associated with the use of beryllium, a largely beryllium first wall will be installed in JET. As part of the JET ITER-like wall, beryllium tiles with marker coatings are proposed as a diagnostic tool for studying the erosion and deposition of beryllium around the vessel. The nominal structure for these coatings is a ∼10 μm beryllium surface layer separated from the beryllium tile by a 2-3 μm metallic inter-layer. Two types of coatings are tested here; one with a nickel inter-layer and one with a copper/beryllium mixed inter-layer. The coating samples were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering at General Atomics and were exposed to deuterium plasma in PISCES-B. The results of this testing show that the beryllium/nickel marker coating would be suitable for installation in JET.

  10. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers

  11. The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisson, Michael

    2013-06-03

    At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

  12. Behavior of porous beryllium under thermomechanical loading. Part 6. Effect of pressure on the microstructure of plasma-sprayed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.; Snell, E.O.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pressure and specimen preparation on the microstructure of two grades of porous plasma-sprayed beryllium were determined. One grade, P-1, was sintered after spraying while the other grade, P-10, was tested in the as-sprayed condition. the principal microstructural characteristics studied were grain size: grain morphology, and void distribution and size. It was found that machining can readily cause a significant dense surface layer on the porous beryllium specimens, and that the dense surface layer can be removed by etching. There was substantial difference in microstructure between the P-1 sintered and P-10 unsintered specimens both before and after being subjected to shock waves and static compression. (U.S.)

  13. Properties of polymer foils used as solid-state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.

    1973-05-01

    Polymer foils were studied with a view to their application as solid-state alpha track detectors. The detection efficiency was determined as was its alpha energy dependence and the quality of the surface and the natural background of the foils were evaluated. The kinetics of etching was studied in three selected type of foils. Characteristic constants for the selected foils and methods of etching were calculated. The possible applications of the foils as track detectors are discussed and the effect is dealt with of the selected foil and of the method of chemical etching on the foil applicability in nuclear sciences, especially in fast neutron dosimetry and in alpha spectrometry. (author)

  14. P-type diamond stripper foils for tandem ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.W.; Koba, R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors are developing a stripper foil composed of a p-type diamond membrane. This diamond stripper foil should have a significantly longer lifetime than any conventional stripper foil material. To be useful for stripper foils, the boron-doped blue diamond films must be thinner than 0.8 μm and pore-free. Two methods are compared for their ability to achieve a high nucleation areal density on a W substrate. Some W substrates were first coated with think layer of boron (≤20 nm) in order to enhance nucleation. Other W substrates were scratched with submicron diamond particles. A schematic diagram of the stripper foil is shown. Stripper foils were created by etching away the central area of W substrates. The diamond membrane was then supported by an annulus of W. Tungsten was selected as a ring-support material because of its high electrical and thermal conductivity, relatively low thermal expansion, and proven suitability as a substrate for diamond CVD. Warping or fracture of the diamond film after substrate etch-back was investigated

  15. Automatic spark counting of alpha-tracks in plastic foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.; Medveczky, L.; Hunyadi, I.; Nyako, B.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of alpha-track counting by jumping spark counter in cellulose acetate and polycarbonate nuclear track detectors was studied. A theoretical treatment is presented which predicts the optimum residual thickness of the etched foils in which completely through-etched tracks (i.e. holes) can be obtained for alpha-particles of various energies and angles of incidence. In agreement with the theoretical prediction it is shown that a successful spark counting of alpha-tracks can be performed even in polycarbonate foils. Some counting characteristics, such as counting efficiency vs particle energy at various etched foil thicknesses, surface spark density produced by electric breakdowns in unexposed foils vs foil thickness, etc. have been determined. Special attention was given to the spark counting of alpha-tracks entering thin detectors at right angle. The applicability of the spark counting technique is demonstrated in angular distribution measurements of the 27 Al(p,α 0 ) 24 Mg nuclear reaction at Ep = 1899 keV resonance energy. For this study 15 μm thick Makrofol-G foils and a jumping spark counter of improved construction were used. (orig.) [de

  16. Introduction to beryllium: uses, regulatory history, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanz, M E

    2001-05-01

    Beryllium is an ubiquitous element in the environment, and it has many commercial applications. Because of its strength, electrical and thermal conductivity, corrosion resistance, and nuclear properties, beryllium products are used in the aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and electronics industries. What eventually came to be known as chronic beryllium disease (CBD) was first identified in the 1940s, when a cluster of cases was observed in workers from the fluorescent light industry. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission recommended the first 8-hour occupational exposure limit (OEL) for beryllium of 2.0 microg/m3 in 1949, which was later reviewed and accepted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the vast majority of countries and standard-setting bodies worldwide. The 2.0 microg/m3 standard has been in use by the beryllium industry for more than 50 years and has been considered adequate to protect workers against clinical CBD. Recently, improved diagnostic techniques, including immunological testing and safer bronchoscopy, have enhanced our ability to identify subclinical CBD cases that would have formerly remained unidentified. Some recent epidemiological studies have suggested that some workers may develop CBD at exposures less than 2.0 microg/m3. ACGIH is currently reevaluating the adequacy of the current 2.0 microg/m3 guideline, and a plethora of research initiatives are under way to provide a better understanding of the cause of CBD. The research is focusing on the risk factors and exposure metrics that could be associated with CBD, as well as on efforts to better characterize the natural history of CBD. There is growing evidence that particle size and chemical form may be important factors that influence the risk of developing CBD. These research efforts are

  17. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  18. Health status of cows fed maize silage covered with oxo-biodegradable foil

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr SZTERK; Piotr DORSZEWSKI; Małgorzata GRABOWICZ; Lucyna PODKÓWKA

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural practice, silage production uses pure, low density polyethylene foil. This foil, after use, becomes farm waste, having a negative impact on the environment. Instead of conventional foil, an environmentally safe biodegradable foil can be used, made from naturally occurring polymers or from synthetic multiparticulates, easily degradable by microorganisms. Silage covered with this type of foil should be safe for animal health. The purpose of the study was to determine whether oxo...

  19. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  20. SAFARI-1 research reactor beryllium reflector element replacement, management and relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Marisa De; Vlok, Jwh; Steynberg, B J [South Africa Atomic Energy Corporation (Necsa) (South Africa)

    2012-03-15

    The beryllium (Be) reflector elements of the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor were replaced in October 2011 as part of the Ageing Management Programme of the reactor. After more than three million MWh of operation over a period of 47 years, core reloading became more difficult due to the geometric deformation of the beryllium reflector elements. During the replacement of the reflector elements, criticality and reactivity worth experiments were performed and found to compare favorably with calculated values. A Beryllium Management Programme was established at SAFARI-1 to identify and apply effective and appropriate actions and practices for managing the ageing of the new beryllium reflector elements. This will provide timely detection and mitigation of ageing mechanisms relevant to beryllium reflector elements, supporting the life extension of these elements. These actions and practices include monitoring of the tritium levels in the primary water, calculating and measuring the fluxes within the beryllium reflector positions, measuring the straightness of the elements to track geometric deformation and visually inspecting the reflector elements for crack formation. Acceptance criteria indicating the end of life of the elements were established. These criteria take into account the smallest gap that could exist between elements, sudden changes in the tritium levels and formation of cracks. All the data obtained through the Beryllium Management Programme are recorded in a database. Additional benefits gained through a Beryllium Management Programme are the availability of a complete irradiation history of the beryllium reflector elements at any point in time and the establishment of a knowledge base to assists in the understanding of the behavior of the beryllium reflector elements in an irradiation environment. Straightness baseline measurements of the new beryllium reflector elements were performed with a beryllium straightness measurement tool, designed at SAFARI-1. The

  1. SAFARI-1 research reactor beryllium reflector element replacement, management and relocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kock, Marisa De; Vlok, Jwh; Steynberg, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The beryllium (Be) reflector elements of the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor were replaced in October 2011 as part of the Ageing Management Programme of the reactor. After more than three million MWh of operation over a period of 47 years, core reloading became more difficult due to the geometric deformation of the beryllium reflector elements. During the replacement of the reflector elements, criticality and reactivity worth experiments were performed and found to compare favorably with calculated values. A Beryllium Management Programme was established at SAFARI-1 to identify and apply effective and appropriate actions and practices for managing the ageing of the new beryllium reflector elements. This will provide timely detection and mitigation of ageing mechanisms relevant to beryllium reflector elements, supporting the life extension of these elements. These actions and practices include monitoring of the tritium levels in the primary water, calculating and measuring the fluxes within the beryllium reflector positions, measuring the straightness of the elements to track geometric deformation and visually inspecting the reflector elements for crack formation. Acceptance criteria indicating the end of life of the elements were established. These criteria take into account the smallest gap that could exist between elements, sudden changes in the tritium levels and formation of cracks. All the data obtained through the Beryllium Management Programme are recorded in a database. Additional benefits gained through a Beryllium Management Programme are the availability of a complete irradiation history of the beryllium reflector elements at any point in time and the establishment of a knowledge base to assists in the understanding of the behavior of the beryllium reflector elements in an irradiation environment. Straightness baseline measurements of the new beryllium reflector elements were performed with a beryllium straightness measurement tool, designed at SAFARI-1. The

  2. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  3. Interaction of relativistic H- ions with thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, A.H.

    1990-09-01

    The response of relativistic H - ions to thin carbon foils was investigated for beam energies ranging from 226 MeV to 800 MeV. For the foil thicknesses we have studied, ranging from 15 to 300 μg/cm 2 , an appreciable fraction of the H - beam survives intact, some H - ions are stripped down to protons, and the remainder is distributed over the states of H 0 . This experiment is different from the low energy studies in that the projectile velocity is comparable to the speed of light, leading to an interaction time of typically less than a femtosecond. The present results challenge the theoretical understanding of the interaction mechanisms. An electron spectrometer was used to selectively field-ionize the Rydberg states, 9 < n < 17, at beam energies of 581 MeV and 800 MeV. The yield of low-lying states were measured by Doppler tuning a Nd:YAG laser to excite transitions to a Rydberg state which was then field-ionized and detected. A simple model is developed to fit the yield of each state as a function of foil thickness. The simple model is successful in predicting the general features of the yield data. However, the data are suggestive of a more complex structure in the yield curves. The yield of a given state depends strongly on the foil thickness, demonstrating that the excited states are formed during the passage of the ions through a foil. The optimum thickness to produce a given state increases with the principal quantum number of the state suggesting an excitation process which is at least pratially stepwise. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation are compared with the experimental data to estimate the distribution of the excited states coming out of a foil. The distributions of the excited states and their dependence on foil thickness are discussed

  4. BANGERTER FOILS IN THE POSTOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ESOTROPIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina G. Dimitrova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the application of Bangerter foils in the postoperative management of esotropia Methods: A retrospective study of 200 patients who underwent bimedial recessions for various forms of alternating/alternated esotropia in the period of 2000-2013. In the cases of residual postoperative angle, tendency of recurrence of strabismus and preferred fixation, Bangerter foil was fixed on the corrective glass of the dominant eye- either on the next day of surgery, or on the 10-th postoperative day and was in use for at least 6 months. Results: Bangerter foils were applied in 67(35,1% under corrected patients with a mean residual angle for near 7,01±3,51Δ. Mean residual angle in patients without foils was 3,47±4,06Δ (p<0,001. Statistically significant factors in patients with filters were amblyopia treatment before surgery (p<0,001, anisometropia (p=0,003 and type of esotropia (accommodative vs. non accommodative (p<0,001. Within the group without filters there was a significant increase of the residual angle for near on the third (p<0,001 and sixth month (p=0,036, while within the group with foils angle was not significantly changed (p=0,325; p=0,058 with time. In the group with foils no cases with relapse of strabismus and amblyopia were recorded and even a decrease of the postoperative angle was clinically observed in some patients. Conclusion: To our experience Bangerter foils are a reliable tool in the postoperative management of undercorrected esotropia.

  5. Transient and steady state behaviour of elasto–aerodynamic air foil bearings, considering bump foil compliance and top foil inertia and flexibility: A numerical investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Bjerregaard; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2017-01-01

    utilise two types of eight-node isoparametric elements. The rotor is modelled as a rigid body without rotational inertia, i.e. as a journal. The bump foil is included via a bilinear version of the simple elastic foundation model. This paper introduces the bilinear simple elastic foundation model, which...

  6. Technical issues and solutions on ITER first wall beryllium application. Industrial viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwadachi, T.; Uda, M.; Ito, M.; Miyakawa, M.; Ibuki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium is selected as reference armor material of ITER primary first wall and is joined to the copper alloy heat sink such as CuCrZr or Dispersion Strengthened Copper (DSCu) Various joining technologies have been successfully developed and the manufacturing possibilities of large size first wall panels with beryllium armor has been demonstrated. Based on such results, further technical improvement is needed to reduce manufacturing cost and ensure the reliability of joining in actual size first wall. The technical issues to optimize the fabrication process of beryllium attachment were shown in this paper from an industrial point of view. Determination of the optimum size and the surface qualities of beryllium tiles are important issues in term of the material specification to ensure joining reliability and to reduce cost. The consolidation method and the finish machining methods of beryllium tiles are also critical in terms of material cost. These items should be determined by paying concern to the accommodation of the joining methods. The selections of slitting methods for attached beryllium have a great influence on fabrication cost. In the actual fabrication of beryllium attachment, safety provisions for exposure to beryllium in working environment and the recycling of the waste from the fabrication processes will be concerned sufficiently. (author)

  7. Continuous operation of a pilot plant for the production of beryllium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, T C; Amaral, S; Silveira, C M.S.; de Oliveira, A P [Instituto de Tecnologia, Governador Valadares (Brazil)

    1975-12-01

    A method of obtaining beryllium oxide with a purity of 99,2% was developed in a pilot plant with a capacity of 7 tons per month destined to operate continuously. The operation market prospects and control of production with the objective of obtaining internacional technical grade beryllium oxide are discussed.

  8. Low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET: beryllium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Hugon, M.; Booth, S.J.; Dean, J.R.; Dietz, K.J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Watkins, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of graphite and beryllium, as a low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET, are compared. A consideration of data on thermomechanical properties, retention of hydrogen and gettering action, indicates that beryllium offers the best prospects as a material for the JET belt limiters and walls. (U.K.)

  9. Continuous operation of a pilot plant for the production of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, T.C.; Amaral, S.; Silveira, C.M.S.; Oliveira, A.P. de

    1975-01-01

    A method of obtaining beryllium oxide with a purity of 99,2% was developed in a pilot plant with a capacity of 7 tons per month destined to operate continuously. The operation market prospects and control of production with the objective of obtaining internacional technical grade beryllium oxide are discussed [pt

  10. Proceedings of the third IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third International Energy Agency International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The workshop was held on October 22-24, 1997, at the Sangyou Kaikan in Mito City with 68 participants who attended from the Europe, the Russian Federation, the Kazakstan, the United States and Japan. The topics for papers were arranged into 9 sessions; beryllium applications for ITER, production and characterization, chemical compatibility and corrosion, forming and joining, plasma/tritium interactions, beryllium coating, first wall applications, neutron irradiation effects, health and safety. To utilize beryllium in the pebble type blanket, a series of discussions were intensified in multiple view points such as the swelling, He/T release from beryllium pebble irradiated up to high He content, effective thermal conductivity, tritium permeation and coating, and fabrication cost, and so on. As the plasma facing material, life time of beryllium and coated beryllium, dust and particle production, joining, waste treatment, mechanical properties and deformation by swelling were discussed as important issues. Especially, it was recognized throughout the discussions that the comparative study by the different researchers should be carried out to establish the reliability of the data reported in the workshop and in others. To enhance the comparative study, the world wide collaboration for the relative evaluation of the beryllium was proposed by the International Organization Committee and the proposal was approved by all of the participants. The 45 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Analysis of the KANT experiment on beryllium using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yi-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is an important material in fusion technology for multiplying neutrons in blankets. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. Recent investigations with the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo simulation of the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) demonstrated that beryllium reaction data are the main source of the calculation uncertainties between ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1. To clarify the calculation uncertainties from data libraries on beryllium, in this study TRIPOLI-4 calculations of the Karlsruhe Neutron Transmission (KANT) experiment have been performed by using ENDF/B-VII.0 and new JEFF-3.1.1 data libraries. The KANT Experiment on beryllium has been used to validate neutron transport codes and nuclear data libraries. An elaborated KANT experiment benchmark has been compiled and published in the NEA/SINBAD database and it has been used as reference in the present work. The neutron multiplication in bulk beryllium assemblies was considered with a central D-T neutron source. Neutron leakage spectra through the 5, 10, and 17 cm thick spherical beryllium shells were calculated and five-group partial leakage multiplications were reported and discussed. In general, improved C/E ratios on neutron leakage multiplications have been obtained. Both ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 beryllium data libraries of TRIPOLI-4 are acceptable now for fusion neutronics calculations.

  12. Comparison between actively cooled divertor dump plates with beryllium and CFC armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falter, H.D.; Araki, M.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Cardella, A.

    1995-01-01

    Actively cooled test sections with beryllium and graphite armour all withstand power densities between 15 and 20 MW/m 2 . Beryllium as structural material fails mechanically at low power densities. Monoblocks appear to be the most rigid design but frequently large variations in surface temperature are observed. All other test sections show a uniform surface temperature distribution. (orig.)

  13. Thermodynamic properties of molten mixtures of lithium, rubidium, cesium and beryllium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Podafa, B.P.; Dubovoj, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    e. m. f. in binary systems of beryllium chloride with rubidium and cesium chlorides were measured. Concentration dependences of thermodynamic functions (mixing entropy Gibbs free energy) of beryllium chloride in the systems as well as with the participation of lithium chloride were analysed

  14. Summary of beryllium electrorefining technology developed by KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistole, C.O.

    1983-01-01

    Proprietary beryllium electrorefining technology has been purchased from the KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc. by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, as part of a DOE beryllium option study. This technology has been reviewed and is summarized. 12 figures, 7 tables

  15. Influence of physicochemical properties of beryllium particles on cultured cell toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Cuddihy, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity of beryllium oxide (BeO)), beryllium metal, and beryllium sulfate (BeSO 4 ) was studied in two cell lines, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and lung epithelial cells (LEC). Beryllium oxide particles were prepared at either 500 or 1000 deg. C, and two different particle sizes of beryllium metal were used. Following a 20-h exposure to beryllium compounds, cells were grown in culture to quantitate cloning ability relative to controls as a measure of cell killing, The LEC cultures were more sensitive to beryllium cytotoxicity than the CHO cells. When expressed on the basis of the mass of material added to the cultures, the order of toxicity was BeSO 4 ≥ 500 deg. C -BeO > 1000 deg. C -BeO > Be metal (small) Be metal (large). When cytotoxic effects were expressed on the basis of particulate surface rather than mass, the relative differences in toxicity between compounds was decreased. The order of toxicity was Be metal (small) ∼ Be metal (large) ∼ 500 deg. C-BeO ∼ 1000 deg. C-BeO. These data indicate that solubility influences beryllium toxicity to short-term cell cultures. (author)

  16. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  17. Selecting foils for identification lineups: matching suspects or descriptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliff, J L; Clark, S E

    2000-04-01

    Two experiments directly compare two methods of selecting foils for identification lineups. The suspect-matched method selects foils based on their match to the suspect, whereas the description-matched method selects foils based on their match to the witness's description of the perpetrator. Theoretical analyses and previous results predict an advantage for description-matched lineups both in terms of correctly identifying the perpetrator and minimizing false identification of innocent suspects. The advantage for description-matched lineups should be particularly pronounced if the foils selected in suspect-matched lineups are too similar to the suspect. In Experiment 1, the lineups were created by trained police officers, and in Experiment 2, the lineups were constructed by undergraduate college students. The results of both experiments showed higher suspect-to-foil similarity for suspect-matched lineups than for description-matched lineups. However, neither experiment showed a difference in correct or false identification rates. Both experiments did, however, show that there may be an advantage for suspect-matched lineups in terms of no-pick and rejection responses. From these results, the endorsement of one method over the other seems premature.

  18. Dosimetric response of united, commercially available CTA foils for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two kinds of untinted CTA foils: Fuji CTR-125 dosimetric foil and technical CTA-T foil, produced by 'Zaklady Chemiczne, 'Gorzow Wielkopolski' as support for light-sensitive layers of amateur photo-films, for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray dosimetry was investigated. In spite of rather bad physical parameters of the technical foil (spread of foil thickness, high and different initial absorbance) the dosimetric response of both foils for sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays was similar. The CTA-T foil can be used for routine dosimetry providing that dosimetric signals have to be calculated exactly as recommended by the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard, i.e. as the difference of absorbance of irradiated and (the same) non-irradiated foil. Any other approach may lead to high errors of dose evaluation. The last is true also for other CTA foils, especially after long self-life.

  19. Dosimetric response of united, commercially available CTA foils for 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of two kinds of untinted CTA foils: Fuji CTR-125 dosimetric foil and technical CTA-T foil, produced by 'Zaklady Chemiczne, 'Gorzow Wielkopolski' as support for light-sensitive layers of amateur photo-films, for 60 Co gamma ray dosimetry was investigated. In spite of rather bad physical parameters of the technical foil (spread of foil thickness, high and different initial absorbance) the dosimetric response of both foils for 60 Co gamma rays was similar. The CTA-T foil can be used for routine dosimetry providing that dosimetric signals have to be calculated exactly as recommended by the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard, i.e. as the difference of absorbance of irradiated and (the same) non-irradiated foil. Any other approach may lead to high errors of dose evaluation. The last is true also for other CTA foils, especially after long self-life. (author)

  20. An Experimental Study on Micro Clinching of Metal Foils with Cutting by Laser Shock Forming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Cong; Ma, Youjuan; Shen, Zongbao; Sun, Xianqing; Sha, Chaofei; Gao, Shuai; Li, Liyin; Liu, Huixia

    2016-07-13

    This paper describes a novel technique for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils, namely micro clinching with cutting by laser shock forming. A series of experiments were conducted to study the deformation behavior of single layer material, during which many important process parameters were determined. The process window of the 1060 pure aluminum foils and annealed copper foils produced by micro clinching with cutting was analyzed. Moreover, similar material combination (annealed copper foils) and dissimilar material combination (1060 pure aluminum foils and 304 stainless steel foils) were successfully achieved. The effect of laser energy on the interlock and minimum thickness of upper foils was investigated. In addition, the mechanical strength of different material combinations joined by micro clinching with cutting was measured in single lap shearing tests. According to the achieved results, this novel technique is more suitable for material combinations where the upper foil is thicker than lower foil. With the increase of laser energy, the interlock increased while the minimum thickness of upper foil decreased gradually. The shear strength of 1060 pure aluminum foils and 304 stainless steel foils combination was three times as large as that of 1060 pure aluminum foils and annealed copper foils combination.

  1. An Experimental Study on Micro Clinching of Metal Foils with Cutting by Laser Shock Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel technique for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils, namely micro clinching with cutting by laser shock forming. A series of experiments were conducted to study the deformation behavior of single layer material, during which many important process parameters were determined. The process window of the 1060 pure aluminum foils and annealed copper foils produced by micro clinching with cutting was analyzed. Moreover, similar material combination (annealed copper foils and dissimilar material combination (1060 pure aluminum foils and 304 stainless steel foils were successfully achieved. The effect of laser energy on the interlock and minimum thickness of upper foils was investigated. In addition, the mechanical strength of different material combinations joined by micro clinching with cutting was measured in single lap shearing tests. According to the achieved results, this novel technique is more suitable for material combinations where the upper foil is thicker than lower foil. With the increase of laser energy, the interlock increased while the minimum thickness of upper foil decreased gradually. The shear strength of 1060 pure aluminum foils and 304 stainless steel foils combination was three times as large as that of 1060 pure aluminum foils and annealed copper foils combination.

  2. HEINBE; the calculation program for helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimakawa, Satoshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Sato, Minoru

    1992-11-01

    HEINBE is a program on personal computer for calculating helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation. The program can also calculate the tritium production in beryllium. Considering many nuclear reactions and their multi-step reactions, helium and tritium productions in beryllium materials irradiated at fusion reactor or fission reactor may be calculated with high accuracy. The calculation method, user's manual, calculated examples and comparison with experimental data were described. This report also describes a neutronics simulation method to generate additional data on swelling of beryllium, 3,000-15,000 appm helium range, for end-of-life of the proposed design for fusion blanket of the ITER. The calculation results indicate that helium production for beryllium sample doped lithium by 50 days irradiation in the fission reactor, such as the JMTR, could be achieved to 2,000-8,000 appm. (author)

  3. Operational experience with the JET beryllium evaporators in the J1W test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, A.T.; Dietz, K.J.; Israel, G.; Jensen, H.S.; Johnson, A.; Pick, M.A.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.

    1989-01-01

    Four beryllium evaporators were fitted onto the JET vessel during March 1989. These evaporators are planned to give the first introduction of beryllium into the JET machine to study the effect of using beryllium as a first wall material. Over 200 hours operational experience with such an evaporator had been gained on a test bed facility in which the evaporation rate, radial evaporant distribution and head operating temperature had been determined. The results obtained on this facility with two different heat materials, sintered S-65B and vacuum cast beryllium are described. The test vessel has also been used to conduct beryllium wall pumping experiments using the ''Langmuir effect''. The initial results of these experiments will be described. (author)

  4. Comparative thermal cyclic test of different beryllium grades previously subjected to simulated disruption loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Mazul, I.

    1999-01-01

    Considering beryllium as plasma facing armour this paper presents recent results obtained in Russia. A special process of joining beryllium to a Cu-alloy material structure is described and recent results of thermal cycling tests of such joints are presented. Summarizing the results, the authors show that a Cu-alloy heat sink structure armoured with beryllium can survive high heat fluxes (≥10 MW/m 2 ) during 1000 heating/cooling cycles without serious damage to the armour material and its joint. The principal feasibility of thermal cycling of beryllium grades and their joints directly in the core of a nuclear reactor is demonstrated and the main results of this test are presented. The paper also describes the thermal cycling of different beryllium grades having cracks initiated by previously applied high heat loads simulating plasma disruptions. (orig.)

  5. Detection of beryllium treatment of natural sapphires by NRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, P.C., E-mail: carolina.gutierrez@uam.e [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ynsa, M.-D.; Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dpto. Fisica Aplicada C-12, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Calligaro, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musees de France C2RMF, CNRS-UMR171, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Since the 1990's, artificial treatment of natural sapphires (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals coloured by impurities) by diffusion of beryllium at high temperature has become a growing practice. This process permits to enhance the colour of these gemstones, and thus to increase their value. Detection of such a treatment - diffusion of tens of {mu}g/g of beryllium in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals - is usually achieved using high sensitivity techniques like laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP/MS) or laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) which are unfortunately micro-destructive (leaving 50-100-{mu}m diameter craters on the gems). The simple and non-destructive alternative method proposed in this work is based on the nuclear reaction {sup 9}Be({alpha}, n{gamma}){sup 12}C with an external helium ion beam impinging on the gem directly placed in air. The 4439 keV prompt {gamma}-ray tagging Be atoms are detected with a high efficiency bismuth germanate scintillator. Beam dose is monitored using the 2235 keV prompt {gamma}-ray produced during irradiation by the aluminium of the sapphire matrix through the {sup 27}Al({alpha}, p{gamma}){sup 30}Si nuclear reaction. The method is tested on a series of Be-treated sapphires previously analyzed by LA-ICP/MS to determine the optimal conditions to obtain a peak to background appropriate to reach the required {mu}g/g sensitivity. Using a 2.8-MeV external He beam and a beam dose of 200 {mu}C, beryllium concentrations from 5 to 16 {mu}g/g have been measured in the samples, with a detection limit of 1 {mu}g/g.

  6. Model study in chemisorption: atomic hydrogen on beryllium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauschlicher, C.W. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The interaction between atomic hydrogen and the (0001) surface of Be metal has been studied by ab initio electronic structure theory. Self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations have been performed using minimum, optimized minimum, double zeta and mixed basis sets for clusters as large as 22 Be atoms. The binding energy and equilibrium geometry (the distance to the surface) were determined for 4 sites. Both spatially restricted (the wavefunction was constrained to transform as one of the irreducible representations of the molecular point group) and unrestricted SCF calculations were performed. Using only the optimized minimum basis set, clusters containing as many as 22 beryllium atoms have been investigated. From a variety of considerations, this cluster is seen to be nearly converged within the model used, providing the most reliable results for chemisorption. The site dependence of the frequency is shown to be a geometrical effect depending on the number and angle of the bonds. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen through a perfect beryllium crystal is predicted to be energetically unfavorable. The cohesive energy, the ionization energy and the singlet-triplet separation were computed for the clusters without hydrogen. These quantities can be seen as a measure of the total amount of edge effects. The chemisorptive properties are not related to the total amount of edge effects, but rather the edge effects felt by the adsorbate bonding berylliums. This lack of correlation with the total edge effects illustrates the local nature of the bonding, further strengthening the cluster model for chemisorption. A detailed discussion of the bonding and electronic structure is included. The remaining edge effects for the Be 22 cluster are discussed

  7. Paramagnetic centers in ternary coordinated oxygen in beryllium aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaginina, L.A.; Zatsepin, A.F.; Dmitriev, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Glasses of the composition 3BeO-Al 2 O 3 -6SiO 2 containing a homogenizing additive of MgF 2 were synthesized. The ESR spectra of x-ray and gamma irradiated specimens were determined. A complex ESR spectrum arose in the original glass. The ESR spectrum of the gamma-irradiated polycrystalline Be 2 SiO 4 glass was almost identical to the crystallized glass. It was shown that the presence of beryllium atoms in the composition of silicate glasses created the conditions for the formation of structural fragments with ternary coordinated oxygen

  8. Use of notched beams to establish fracture criteria for beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayville, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The fracture of an improved form of pure beryllium was studied under triaxial tensile stresses. This state of stress was produced by testing notched beams, which were thick enough to be in a state of plane strain at the center. A plane strain, elastic-incremental plasticity finite element program was then used to determine the stress and strain distributions at fracture. A four-point bend fixture was used to load the specimens. It was carefully designed and manufactured to eliminate virtually all of the shear stresses at the reduced section of the notched beams. The unixial properties were obtained

  9. Energy dependences of absorption in beryllium windows and argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantler, C.T.; Staudenmann, J-P.

    1994-01-01

    In part of an ongoing work on x-ray form factors, new absorption coefficients are being evaluated for all elements, across the energy range from below 100 eV to above 100 keV. These new coefficients are applied herein to typical problems in synchrotron radiation stations, namely the use of beryllium windows and argon gas detectors. Results are compared with those of other authors. The electron-ion pair production process in ionization chambers is discussed, and the effects of 3d-element impurities are indicated. 15 refs., 6 figs

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of the neutron irradiated beryllium with total fast neutron fluences of 1.3 - 4.3 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 327 - 616degC were studied. Swelling increased by high irradiation temperature, high fluence, and by the small grain size and high impurity. Obvious decreasing of the fracture stress was observed in the bending test and in small grain specimens which had many helium bubbles on the grain boundary. Decreasing of the fracture stress for small grain specimens was presumably caused by crack propagation on the grain boundaries which weekend by helium bubbles. (author)

  11. Study on microstructure of Al coating on beryllium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruiwen; Xian Xiaobin; Zou Juesheng; Zhang Pengcheng

    2002-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering ion plating and plasma spraying have been used to make aluminium coating on beryllium substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron energy spectrum (AES) and X-ray stress analysis were used to study microstructure and interface and residual stress and diffusion content of Al coating. The results show that width of diffusion zone made by magnetron sputtering ion plating is about 1 μm, coating is composed of columnar grains and internal stress of Al coating is about zero. Coating deposited by plasma spraying is not homogeneous and there are microcracks at interface

  12. Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.J.; Heiple, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Precipitation reactions in a beryllium-bearing stainless steel alloy have been studied by TEM and electron diffraction for ageing temperatures between 400 0 and 900 0 C. The nominal composition of the alloy was 38% Ni - 21% Cr - 1% Mn - 0.5% Be - Bal Fe. Specimens were solutionized for one hour at 1150 0 C and water quenched. The ageing reaction was studied by hardness measurements for times between 0.5 and 16 hours. The TEM specimens dicussed herein were made from samples aged one hour

  13. Effects of dynamic aging and tensile properties of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashuk, N.K.; Tkachenko, V.G.; Khamatov, R.I.; Artemyuk, S.A.; Kolesnik, L.I.; Yushko, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of temperature dependences of deformation and fracture characteristis (σsub(0.2),σ and σsub(B)) of the TGP beryllium, showed their nonmonotonous character, caused by dynamic aging effects at the temperatures of 200 and 500 deg C. These effects manifest themselves to a variable degree depending on structure and heat treatment of the metal. Dissolved interstitials are responsible for low-temperature aging, while substitutional impurities are responsible for high-temperature aging. Stated is the effect of high-temperature aging berrylium hot brittleness. The corresponding mechanisms are discussed within the frames of dislocation theory of strain aging

  14. Theoretical study of hydrogen-bridged beryllium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kenro; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Suehiro

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio closed-shell SCF method, combined with the energy gradient technique, was applied to study the molecular structures and the stability of (i) beryllium dihydride and its polymers (BeH 2 ) n (n = 1 to 5), and of (ii) monosubstituted beryllium hydrides HBeX (X = BH 2 , CH 3 , NH 2 , OH, F and Cl). Basis set dependence on the geometries and the force constants of BeH 2 and (BeH 2 ) 2 was carefully examined. The minimal basis set gives us a qualitative picture for chemical bonding of beryllium, though at least the split-valence type basis set is needed to obtain quantitative results. The effect of the electron correlation on the dimerization energy of BeH 2 was studied with SDCI and MP3 methods and was not so important as on the dimerization energy of Be atom. The dimer formation of BeH 2 results from the strong orbital interaction between a σ orbital (HOMO) of one of BeH 2 and a vacant 2p π orbital (LUMO) of the other. The energy gain from (BeH 2 ) n to (BeH 2 ) n+1 was almost constant for n = 2, 3, and 4 (about 120 kJ/mol) and it is larger than that from BeH 2 to (BeH 2 ) 2 (about 80 kJ/mol). This result means that in the chemical bonding of Be atom the sp 3 hybridization is more favorable than the sp 2 hybridization, and the sp 2 is more than the sp hybridization. With STO-3G and 3 - 21G basis sets the molecular structures of a series of monosubstituted beryllium hydrides and their dimers were determined, and the vibrational frequencies were evaluated for them. Bond lengths between a Be atom and a neighboring atom become shorter as the electronegativity of the neighboring atom increases. In particular, the bonding with oxygen is found to be very strong. These hydrides tends to dimerize, and the dimerization energy is about 60 ∼ 100 kJ/mol, when the bridged atoms are hydrogen atoms, irrespective of the terminal substituents. (author)

  15. Acceleration of polyethelene foils by laser driven ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Burginyon, G.A.; Haas, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    The production of thermonuclear energy, by laser driven implosion of spherical DT shells, with achievable laser technology, requires the development of an efficient and stable implosion. Certain aspects of the acceleration of the spherical shells can be studied experimentally by irradiating thin, 5 to 25 μm, polyethelene foils. The results of foil acceleration experiments performed using a Nd:YAG-Glass laser capable of producing 150 J, 1 nsec pulses will be discussed. The dynamics of the accelerated foil, the ion blow off, high energy electron spectrum (6 to 180 keV), x-ray spectrum (1 to 150 keV) the spatial distribution of the x-ray emission, the laser beam focal spot energy distribution, the laser temporal pulse shape and spectrum for reflected and transmitted radiation have all been measured simultaneously. The results of these measurements are compared with detailed numerical simulations. (U.S.)

  16. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Dietmar; Muñoz Hernandez, Gerardo; Alfonta, Lital

    2012-01-01

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms – tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  17. Development of single mask GEM foils in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, L.M.; Mohanty, A.K.; Pinto, O.J.; Gadhadharan, S.; Menon, Pradeep; Sharma, Archana; Oliveira, Rui De; )

    2014-01-01

    There are various techniques available around the globe for making punch through holes for Micro Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs), such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The GEM foils consists of 5 μm of Cu clad on both the sides of 50 μm polymide (PMMA/kapton) (5/50/5). At present these foils are developed in South Korea without having any adhesive between the Cu and polymide. The available techniques range from chemical etching, reactive plasma etching and laser etching. However, for GEM detectors, having an active area upto 5000 cm 2 , the chemical etching process using a Single Mask has been developed at CERN which is faster from the viewpoint of mass production of such foils for the upgrades which are foreseen in a couple of years with the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN

  18. Foil Bearing Coating Behavior in CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleming, Darryn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Sandia S-CO2 Recompression Closed Brayton Cycle (RCBC) utilizes a series of gas foil bearings in its turbine-alternator-compressors. At high shaft rotational speed these bearings allow the shaft to ride on a cushion of air. Conversely, during startup and shutdown, the shaft rides along the foil bearing surface. Low-friction coatings are used on bearing surfaces in order to facilitate rotation during these periods. An experimental program was initiated to elucidate the behavior of coated bearing foils in the harsh environments of this system. A test configuration was developed enabling long duration exposure tests, followed by a range of analyses relevant to their performance in a bearing. This report provides a detailed overview of this work. The results contained herein provide valuable information in selecting appropriate coatings for more advanced future bearing-rig tests at the newly established test facility in Sandia-NM.

  19. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  20. Effects of film/foil interactions on X-ray image quality - experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, H.J.; Goos, F.

    1985-01-01

    When assessing the quality of X-ray images, the interaction between film and foil should never be left out of account. Except for the case of green-emitting foils which require green-emitting films, films and foils are normally regarded separately, so that many variations are possible. The authors review the interaction between film and foil under practical aspects. Studies published so far have concentrated either on the amplification factor of foils or an the object imaging characteristics of certain films. Systematic studies on the interaction between film and foil have never been carried out. (orig.) [de