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Sample records for berkeley laboratory progress

  1. Fifty Years of Progress, 1937-1987 [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL, LBNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet was prepared for the 50th anniversary of medical and biological research at the Donner Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. The intent is to present historical facts and to highlight important facets of fifty years of accomplishments in medical and biological sciences. A list of selected scientific publications from 1937 to 1960 is included to demonstrate the character and lasting importance of early pioneering work. The organizational concept is to show the research themes starting with the history, then discoveries of medically important radionuclides, then the use of accelerated charged particles in therapy, next human physiology studies then sequentially studies of biology from tissues to macromolecules; and finally studies of the genetic code.

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  6. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  7. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  8. Former Fermilab boss to lead Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Particle physicist Michael Witherell - current vice-chancellor for research at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - has been appointed the next director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL).

  9. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  11. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  13. Guide to user facilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' user facilities are described. Specific facilities include: the National Center for Electron Microscopy; the Bevalac; the SuperHILAC; the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility; the National Tritium Labeling Facility; the 88 inch Cyclotron; the Heavy Charged-Particle Treatment Facility; the 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff; the Sky Simulator; the Center for Computational Seismology; and the Low Background Counting Facility. (GHT)

  14. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  15. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  16. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  17. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  1. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  2. Collecting and Using Low Latency Data at Berkeley Seismological Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlié, N.; Allen, R.; Hellweg, P.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Romanowicz, B.

    2008-12-01

    Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area are among the US regions that combine high earthquake hazard and high population density. To rapidly and reliably monitor tectonic movement and develop an understanding of fault dynamics, measurements must cover a range of scales in time (0.1 s to years), space (mms to 100s of km) and displacement (microns to 10s of m). With these goals in mind, Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) continuously collects a wide variety of data at low latencies from seismic through geodetic, strain and electromagnetic instrumentation with sampling rates spanning 0.001 sps to 500 sps. Data from broadband seismometers and accelerometers, generally with latencies of less than 10 s, contribute to real time earthquake monitoring in Northern California including rapid assessments of source (moment tensor and finite fault) and shaking (ShakeMap). The BSL is also currently operating a real time system in test mode, using these data for earthquake early warning (ElarmS). Data from these instruments are also used for research on earthquake sources and scaling, fault-related tremor and studies of local, regional and global velocity structure. Low latency GPS data can complement seismic data, contributing robust real time continuous information especially for large earthquakes, and can potentially contribute to early warning. GPS-derived static deformation gives an independent estimate of fault orientation and dimensions, scalar seismic moment and magnitude. It also can extend the upper limits of a strong motion network to include the displacements of tens of meters expected in large and great earthquakes, and in the near field is less likely to be clipped during large movements. In an active tectonic context such as Northern California, low latency is important for data transmission, but also for reliability. At the BSL we are committed to using telemetry that is as robust as possible and often have more than one telemetry path to ensure

  3. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  4. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  5. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  6. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  7. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  8. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  9. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  10. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  11. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  12. Last days in the old radiation laboratory (ORL), Berkeley, California, 1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Andrew A

    2010-09-01

    Govindjee, the founding editor of the Historical Corner of Photosynthesis Research, invited me 3 years ago to tell the story of why I left Melvin Calvin's laboratory in the mid 1950s long before the 1961 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Calvin for the path of carbon in photosynthesis. I have already written my scientific perspective on this topic (see Benson (Photosynth Res 73:29-49, 2002); also see Bassham (Photosynth Res 76:35-52, 2003) as he was also a major player in this research). Here, I present my recollections of my last days in the old radiation laboratory (ORL) at Berkeley, California. References have been added by Govindjee for the benefit of the readers.

  13. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  14. A forensic laboratory tests the Berkeley microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspoon, Susan A; Yeung, Stephanie H I; Johnson, Kelly R; Chu, Wai K; Rhee, Han N; McGuckian, Amy B; Crouse, Cecelia A; Chiesl, Thomas N; Barron, Annelise E; Scherer, James R; Ban, Jeffrey D; Mathies, Richard A

    2008-07-01

    Miniaturization of capillary electrophoresis onto a microchip for forensic short tandem repeat analysis is the initial step in the process of producing a fully integrated and automated analysis system. A prototype of the Berkeley microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device was installed at the Virginia Department of Forensic Science for testing. Instrument performance was verified by PowerPlex 16 System profiling of single source, sensitivity series, mixture, and casework samples. Mock sexual assault samples were successfully analyzed using the PowerPlex Y System. Resolution was assessed using the TH01, CSF1PO, TPOX, and Amelogenin loci and demonstrated to be comparable with commercial systems along with the instrument precision. Successful replacement of the Hjerten capillary coating method with a dynamic coating polymer was performed. The accurate and rapid typing of forensic samples demonstrates the successful technology transfer of this device into a practitioner laboratory and its potential for advancing high-throughput forensic typing.

  15. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server ``cedrcd.lbl.gov``. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill@lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  16. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-03-12

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 89 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 45 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access.

  17. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov''. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  18. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  19. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s).

  20. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s).

  1. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  2. Technology Being Developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Ultra-Low- Emission Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Technologies Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed simple, low-cost, yet robust combustion technologies that may change the fundamental design concept of burners for boilers and furnaces, and injectors for gas turbine combustors. The new technologies utilize lean premixed combustion and could bring about significant pollution reductions from commercial and industrial combustion processes and may also improve efficiency. The technologies are spinoffs of two fundamental research projects: An inner-ring burner insert for lean flame stabilization developed for NASA- sponsored reduced-gravity combustion experiments. A low-swirl burner developed for Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences research on turbulent combustion.

  3. Environmental research at Berkeley

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    The information concerning the Energy and Environment Programme at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on a talk given at CERN by A.M. Sessler, one of the initiators of the Programme. (Dr. Sessler has been appointed Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in succession to Prof. E. M. McMillan, from 1 November.) Many of the topics mentioned merit an extended story in themselves but the purpose of this article is simply to give a sketch of what is happening.

  4. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  5. Use of the Berkeley Physics Laboratory to Teach an Advanced Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, James David

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a course, centered around 32 experiments taught for advanced students, designed to develop a laboratory strongly suggestive of contemporary research using relatively sophisticated apparatus. Its unique advantage lies in enriching advanced physics curriculum. (DF)

  6. Final Report: Letter to Mr. Kim Abbott, DOE-OAK Cal/EPA-UC Berkeley Bioremediation Reference Laboratory, Report, September 15, 1996 - November 1, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1999-03-15

    Letter-format report to Project Officer summarizing information on the establishment at the University of California Berkeley campus of a Bioremediation Reference Laboratory to provide independent reference services and testing as needed to assist the California Environmental Protection Agency in the evaluation of bioremediation technologies submitted for the certification/ verification of performance claims under California statute. The project resulted in the establishment of a technical capability not otherwise available to the Agency.

  7. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  8. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  9. Emissions and climate-relevant optical properties of pollutants emitted from a three-stone fire and the Berkeley-Darfur stove tested under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, Chelsea V; Hadley, Odelle L; Gadgil, Ashok J; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2014-06-03

    Cooking in the developing world generates pollutants that endanger the health of billions of people and contribute to climate change. This study quantified pollutants emitted when cooking with a three-stone fire (TSF) and the Berkeley-Darfur Stove (BDS), the latter of which encloses the fire to increase fuel efficiency. The stoves were operated at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory testing facility with a narrow range of fuel feed rates to minimize performance variability. Fast (1 Hz) measurements of pollutants enabled discrimination between the stoves' emission profiles and development of woodsmoke-specific calibrations for the aethalometer (black carbon, BC) and DustTrak (fine particles, PM2.5). The BDS used 65±5% (average±95% confidence interval) of the wood consumed by the TSF and emitted 50±5% of the carbon monoxide emitted by the TSF for an equivalent cooking task, indicating its higher thermal efficiency and a modest improvement in combustion efficiency. The BDS reduced total PM2.5 by 50% but achieved only a 30% reduction in BC emissions. The BDS-emitted particles were, therefore, more sunlight-absorbing: the average single scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.36 for the BDS and 0.47 for the TSF. Mass emissions of PM2.5 and BC varied more than emissions of CO and wood consumption over all tests, and emissions and wood consumption varied more among TSF than BDS tests. The international community and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves have proposed performance targets for the highest tier of cookstoves that correspond to greater reductions in fuel consumption and PM2.5 emissions of approximately 65% and 95%, respectively, compared to baseline cooking with the TSF. Given the accompanying decrease in BC emissions for stoves that achieve this stretch goal and BC's extremely high global warming potential, the short-term climate change mitigation from avoided BC emissions could exceed that from avoided CO2 emissions.

  10. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  11. Radicals in Berkeley?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-04-03

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595-605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually.

  12. Telescience at the University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Marchant, W. T.; Kaplan, G. C.; Dobson, C. A.; Jernigan, J. G.; Lampton, M. L.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley (UCB) is a member of a university consortium involved in telescience testbed activities under the sponsorship of NASA. Our Telescience Testbed Project consists of three experiments using flight hardware being developed for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project at UCB's Space Sciences Laboratory. The first one is a teleoperation experiment investigating remote instrument control using a computer network such as the Internet. The second experiment is an effort to develop a system for operation of a network of remote workstations allowing coordinated software development, evaluation, and use by widely dispersed groups. The final experiment concerns simulation as a method to facilitate the concurrent development of instrument hardware and support software. We describe our progress in these areas.

  13. Progresses of Laboratory Astrophysics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gang; ZHANG Jie

    2011-01-01

    The exciting discoveries in astronomy such as the accelerating expansion of the universe, the atmospheric composition of exoplanets, and the abundance trends of various types of stars rely upon advances in laboratory astrophysics. These new discoveries have occurred along with dramatic improvements in measurements by ground- based and space-based instruments of astrophysical processes under extreme physical conditions. Laboratory astrophysics is an exciting and rapidly growing field emerging since the beginning of this century, which covers a wide range of scientific areas such as astrophysics,

  14. El idealismo de Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A este respecto se pone en conexión las ideas del autor con algunos planteamientos del último Husserl y con una interpretación de Popper sobre la sorprendente modernidad de algunas de las ideas berkeleyanas sobre la ciencia.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.

    2000-06-15

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 (October 1998 through September 1999). This annual progress report, which is the sixteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.; Green, D. W.; Lindahl, P. C.

    1999-03-29

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 (October 1997 through September 1998). This annual progress report, which is the fifteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  17. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Jackson State University, Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation Consortium: Progress report, October 1985-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Seventeen student papers are included, treating various topics in computer languages and software, physics, combustion and atmosphere, and biology. All are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  18. Analytical chemistry laboratory. Progress report for FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1996 through September 1997). This annual progress report is the fourteenth in this series for the ACL, and it describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  19. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  1. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  3. 2009 SCDNR Berkeley County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Berkeley County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  4. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks...

  5. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, WeiPing; Li, ZhiHong; He, JiangJun; Tang, XiaoDong; Lian, Gang; An, Zhu; Chang, JianJun; Chen, Han; Chen, QingHao; Chen, XiongJun; Chen, ZhiJun; Cui, BaoQun; Du, XianChao; Fu, ChangBo; Gan, Lin; Guo, Bing; He, GuoZhu; Heger, Alexander; Hou, SuQing; Huang, HanXiong; Huang, Ning; Jia, BaoLu; Jiang, LiYang; Kubono, Shigeru; Li, JianMin; Li, KuoAng; Li, Tao; Li, YunJu; Lugaro, Maria; Luo, XiaoBing; Ma, HongYi; Ma, ShaoBo; Mei, DongMing; Qian, YongZhong; Qin, JiuChang; Ren, Jie; Shen, YangPing; Su, Jun; Sun, LiangTing; Tan, WanPeng; Tanihata, Isao; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Peng; Wang, YouBao; Wu, Qi; Xu, ShiWei; Yan, ShengQuan; Yang, LiTao; Yang, Yao; Yu, XiangQing; Yue, Qian; Zeng, Sheng; Zhang, HuanYu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, LiYong; Zhang, NingTao; Zhang, QiWei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Zhang, XueZhen; Zhang, ZiMing; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Zuo; Zhou, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultra-low background of CJPL lab and high current accelerator based on an ECR source and a highly sensitive detector to directly study for the first time a number of crucial reactions occurring at their relevant stellar energies during the evolution of hydrostatic stars. In its first phase, JUNA aims at the direct measurements of 25Mg(p, γ)26Al, 19F(p, α)16O, 13C(α, n)16O and 12C(α, γ)16O reactions. The experimental setup, which includes an accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, a detector system, and a shielding material with low background, will be established during the above research. The current progress of JUNA will be given.

  6. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  7. 78 FR 29022 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... Berkeley Pier in approximate position 37 51'40'' N, 122 19'19'' W (NAD 83) from 9:30 p.m. until 10:15...

  8. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  9. Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Lopez, Christopher D.

    2003-08-01

    An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.

  10. The Berkeley extreme ultraviolet calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Jelinsky, Patrick; Malina, Roger F.

    1988-01-01

    The vacuum calibration facilities of the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley are designed for the calibration and testing of EUV and FUV spaceborne instrumentation (spectral range 44-2500 A). The facility includes one large cylindrical vacuum chamber (3 x 5 m) containing two EUV collimators, and it is equipped with a 4-axis manipulator of angular-control resolution 1 arcsec for payloads weighing up to 500 kg. In addition, two smaller cylindrical chambers, each 0.9 x 1.2 m, are available for vacuum and thermal testing of UV detectors, filters, and space electronics hardware. All three chambers open into class-10,000 clean rooms, and all calibrations are referred to NBS secondary standards.

  11. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the A. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to serve as the National Certifying Authority for nuclear reference materials and to provide an independent Federal technical staff and laboratory resource performing nuclear material measurement, safeguards, and non-proliferation functions in support of multiple program sponsors. This annual report describes accomplishments achieved in carrying out NBL`s assigned missions.

  12. Two amateur astronomers at Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The book on Mechanics of the Physics at Berkeley, by C. Kittel, W.D. Knight and M.A. Ruderman, is proposing at the end of its first chapter some problems of simple astronomy within the solar system. The discussion begins with two amateur astronomers who set for themselves the goal of determining the diameter and mass of the Sun. Here we discuss the problems proposed by the book and some other matters on ancient and modern astronomical studies of the solar system.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  16. The Berkeley Hood: Development and commercialization of an innovative high-performance laboratory fume hood. Progress report and research status: 1995-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Geoffrey; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan

    2001-01-01

    Existing approaches for saving energy in hoods are complicated and costly to implement, and do not address the worker safety issues inherent in the traditional fume hood design. Innovation is hampered by various barriers stemming from existing fume hood testing/rating procedures, entrenched rules of thumb, and ambiguous and often contradictory guidance on safe levels of airflow. To address the shortcomings of existing approaches and to promote innovation in the marketplace, Lawrence Ber...

  17. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... Berkeley Pier in position 37 51'40'' N, 122 19'19'' W (NAD 83) from 9:30 p.m. until 10:15 p.m. on July...

  18. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  19. Research Laboratory of Electronics Progress Report Number 133

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    The substantial labora- ZnSe tory renovation was completed in February; the CBE system hardware was delivered in March and Sponsors installed...laboratories of E.N.E.A. ( Energia ceedings of the International Sherwood Theory Nucleare e Energie Alternative), as well as in- Meeting, Williamsburg, Virginia

  20. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R., ed.

    2004-05-12

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab.

  1. China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory(CRARL) Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiao-rong; LI; Wei-min; BIAN; Xiao-yan; ZHU; Ling-fan

    2015-01-01

    According to the arrangement of the Radiochemistry Department’s annual work conference,the main tasks of China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory(CRARL)in 2015 are as follows.In the first half of the year,strive 100 days to prepare for the hot test by strengthening the team’s cohesion and overcoming the difficulties.In the second half of the year,escort the

  2. New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL`s interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL`s status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL`s small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

  4. Recent Studies of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei Using the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.W.; Batchelder, J.C.; Ninov, V.; Gregorich, K.E.; Toth, K.S.; Bingham, C.R.; Piechaczek, A.; Xu, X.J.; Powell, J.; Joosten, R.; Cerny, J.

    1999-10-07

    The Berkeley Gas-filled Separator provides new research opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's X-Inch Cyclotron. The use of this apparatus for the study of proton drip-line nuclides is discussed. Preliminary results of {sup 78}Kr bombardments of {sup 102}Pd targets at mid-target energies of 360, 375 and 385 MeV are presented. Improvements planned partially as a result of this measurement are also discussed.

  5. Progress in glial cell studies in some laboratories in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Glial cells in the central nervous system(CNS) consist of a heterogeneous population of cell types,each characterized by distinct morphological features,physiological properties,and specific markers.In contrast to the previous view that glial cells were passive elements in the brain,accumulating evidence suggests that glial cells are active participants in various brain functions and brain disorders.This review summarizes recent progress of glial cell studies from several groups in China,ranging from studies about the mechanisms of neuron-glia crosstalking to investigations on the roles of glial cells in various CNS disorders.

  6. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  7. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory. Annual progress report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Singh, B.N

    2003-05-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. (au)

  8. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Singh, B.N. (eds.)

    2001-08-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas and studies of nonlinear dynamical processes related to turbulence and turbulent transport in the edge region of magnetised fusion plasmas. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion rector materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2000. (au)

  9. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Singh, B.N. [eds.

    2001-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas and studies of nonlinear dynamical processes related to electrostatic turbulence and turbulent transport in magnetised plasmas. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 1999. (au)

  10. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Singh, B.N. (eds.)

    2006-11-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2005. (au)

  11. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  12. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Michelsen, P.; Singh, B.N. [eds.

    1995-06-01

    The program of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within (a) studies of nonlinear dynamical processes in magnetized plasmas, (b) development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas, and (c) development of pellet injectors for fusion experiments. The activities in technology cover (a) radiation damage of fusion reactor materials and (b) water radiolysis under ITER conditions. A summary of the activities in 1994 is presented. (au) 20 ills., 19 refs.

  13. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Singh, B.N.

    2004-05-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2003. (au)

  14. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Singh, B.N (eds.)

    2005-06-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2004. (au)

  15. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Singh, B.N. [eds.

    1997-05-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas and studies of nonlinear dynamical processes related to electrostatic turbulence and turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 1996. (au) 5 tabs., 25 ills., 11 refs.

  16. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory Annual Progress Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Singh, B.N. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas and studies of nonlinear dynamical processes related to electrostatic turbulence and turbulent transport in magnetised plasmas. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. The technology activities also include contributions to macrotasks, which are carried out under the programme for Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF). A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 1998. (au) 27 ills., 18 refs.

  17. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynov, J.P.; Singh, B.N. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within development of laser diagnostics for fusion plasmas and studies of nonlinear dynamical processes related to electrostatic turbulence and turbulent transport in magnetised plasmas. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. The technology activities also include contributions to macrotasks carried out under the programme for Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF). A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 1997. (au) 5 tabs., 30 ills., 12 refs.

  18. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.; Stetter, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    Technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) are reported for fiscal year 1984. The ACL is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division, the principal user, but provides technical support for all of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has three technical groups - Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, and Organic Analysis. Under technical activities 26 projects are briefly described. Under professional activities, a list is presented for publications and reports, oral presentations, awards and meetings attended. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory annual progress report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Singh, B.N. (eds.)

    2007-09-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. These activities contribute to the Next Step, the Long-term and the Underlying Fusion Technology programme. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2006. (au)

  20. Exploring new frontiers in the pulsed power laboratory: Recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adamenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fundamental processes in the Universe, nucleosynthesis of elements drives energy production in stars as well as the creation of all atoms heavier than hydrogen. To harness this process and open new ways for energy production, we must recreate some of the extreme conditions in which it occurs. We present results of experiments using a pulsed power facility to induce collective nuclear interactions producing stable nuclei of virtually every element in the periodic table. A high-power electron beam pulse striking a small metallic target is used to create the extreme dynamic environment. Material analysis studies detect an anomalously high presence of new chemical elements in the remnants of the exploded target supporting theoretical conjectures of the experiment. These results provide strong motivation to continue our research looking for additional proofs that heavy element nucleosynthesis is possible in pulsed power laboratory.

  1. Final Progress Report: Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Ryan Q. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10

    Originally I was tasked fluidized bed modeling, however, I changed projects. While still working with ANSYS Fluent, I performed a study of particle tracks in glove boxes. This is useful from a Health-Physics perspective, dealing respirable particles that can be hazardous to the human body. I iteratively tested different amounts of turbulent particles in a steady-state flow. The goal of this testing was to discover how Fluent handles built-in Rosin-Rammler distributions for particle injections. I worked on the health physics flow problems and distribution analysis under the direction of two mentors, Bruce Letellier and Dave Decroix. I set up and ran particle injection calculations using Fluent. I tried different combinations of input parameters to produce sets of 500,000, 1 million, and 1.5 million particles to determine what a good test case would be for future experiments. I performed a variety of tasks in my work as an Undergraduate Student Intern at LANL this summer, and learned how to use a powerful CFD application in addition to expanding my skills in MATLAB. I enjoyed my work at LANL and hope to be able to use the experience here to further my career in the future working in a security-conscious environment. My mentors provided guidance and help with all of my projects and I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Berkeley-Madonna implementation of Ikeda's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecave-Jallon, J; Baconnier, P

    2007-01-01

    Starting from one model, we check the possibility of using Berkeley-Madonna software to transpose and simulate some existing biological integrated models. The considered model is the one of Ikeda et al., proposed in 1979, which treats of fluid regulation and which is very well described mathematically in the original paper. Despite a few mistakes or bugs, the model has been easily and successfully implemented under Berkeley-Madonna. We recover the same simulation results as Ikeda and new simulations can now easily be carried out, thanks to the user-friendly qualities of Berkeley-Madonna.

  3. The anticentre old open clusters Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36: new additions to the BOCCE project

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Cignoni, M; Cocozza, G; Tosi, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of the evolutionary status of three open clusters: Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. All of them were observed with SUSI2@NTT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that Berkeley 27 has an age between 1.5 and 1.7 Gyr, a reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.40 and 0.50, and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.3; Berkeley 34 is older with an age in the range 2.1 and 2.5 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.57 and 0.64, and (m-M)_0 between 14.1 and 14.3; Berkeley 36, with an age between 7.0 and 7.5 Gyr, has a reddening E(B-V)~0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.2. For all the clusters our analysis suggests a sub-solar metallicity ...

  4. Research Progress of Nuclear Astrophysics Physics:Progress of Jinping Underground Laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics Experiment JUNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Wei-ping; LI; Zhi-hong; HE; Jian-jun; TANG; Xiao-dong; LIAN; Gang; GUO; Bing; AN; Zhu; CHEN; Qing-hao; CHEN; Xiong-jun; CHEN; Yang-ping; CHEN; Zhi-jun; CUI; Bao-qun; DU; Xian-chao; FU; Chang-bo; GAN; Lin; HAN; Zhi-yu; HE; Guo-zhu; A.Heger; HOU; Su-qing; HUANG; Han-xiong; HUANG; Ning; JIA; Bao-lu; JIANG; Li-yang; S.Kubono; LI; Jian-min; LI; Kuo-ang; LI; Tao; LI; Xin-yue; LI; Yun-ju; M.Lugaro; LUO; Xiao-bing; MA; Shao-bo; MEI; Dong-ming; QIAN; Yong-zhong; QIN; Jiu-chang; REN; Jie; SU; Jun; SUN; Liang-ting; TAN; Wan-peng; I.Tanihata; WANG; Peng; WANG; You-bao; WU; Qi; XU; Shi-wei; YAN; Sheng-quan; YANG; Li-tao; YU; Xiang-qing; YUE; Qian; ZENG; Sheng; ZHANG; Huan-yu; ZHANG; Hui; ZHANG; Li-yong; ZHANG; Ning-tao; ZHANG; Qi-wei; ZHANG; Tao; ZHANG; Xiao-peng; ZHANG; Xue-zhen; ZHANG; Zi-min; ZHAO; Wei; ZHAO; Zhuo; ZHOU; Chao; ZHOU; Yong

    2015-01-01

    1 Progress of this program This program is supported by the China Jinping Underground Laboratory(CJPL)and the direct measurement of stellar key reactions of(α,γ),(α,n),(p,γ)and(p,α)will be precisely carried out at the merit of current project by utilizing high stability and intensity accelerator,high efficiency detector and the shielding of extremely low background.Four

  5. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  6. Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced yesterday the completion of a key component of the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider, a particle accelerator under construction at CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland

  7. Inventory of data bases, models, and graphics packages at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, P.J.; Mathisen, D.I.

    1978-10-01

    The Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) was initiated in FY77 because DOE had a need for improved access to information at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Savannah River Laboratory, and the six DOE national laboratories. The task for FY77 was to establish guidelines and procedures for this activity with plans of implementing the procedures in FY78 and FY79. The purpose of this report is to document the progress that has been made during FY78 for this project.

  8. Progress in Harmonizing Tiered HIV Laboratory Systems: Challenges and Opportunities in 8 African Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; Umaru, Farouk; Edgil, Dianna; Kuritsky, Joel

    2016-09-28

    In 2014, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS released its 90-90-90 targets, which make laboratory diagnostics a cornerstone for measuring efforts toward the epidemic control of HIV. A data-driven laboratory harmonization and standardization approach is one way to create efficiencies and ensure optimal laboratory procurements. Following the 2008 "Maputo Declaration on Strengthening of Laboratory Systems"-a call for government leadership in harmonizing tiered laboratory networks and standardizing testing services-several national ministries of health requested that the United States Government and in-country partners help implement the recommendations by facilitating laboratory harmonization and standardization workshops, with a primary focus on improving HIV laboratory service delivery. Between 2007 and 2015, harmonization and standardization workshops were held in 8 African countries. This article reviews progress in the harmonization of laboratory systems in these 8 countries. We examined agreed-upon instrument lists established at the workshops and compared them against instrument data from laboratory quantification exercises over time. We used this measure as an indicator of adherence to national procurement policies. We found high levels of diversity across laboratories' diagnostic instruments, equipment, and services. This diversity contributes to different levels of compliance with expected service delivery standards. We believe the following challenges to be the most important to address: (1) lack of adherence to procurement policies, (2) absence or limited influence of a coordinating body to fully implement harmonization proposals, and (3) misalignment of laboratory policies with minimum packages of care and with national HIV care and treatment guidelines. Overall, the effort to implement the recommendations from the Maputo Declaration has had mixed success and is a work in progress. Program managers should continue efforts to advance the

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radioecology and ecology programs. 1983 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markham, O. D. [ed.

    1983-06-01

    Progress is reported in research on: the baseline ecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the effects of disturbance on animal and plant communities, and the behavior of radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste sites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  10. Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, A-L; Stedman, D B; Ball, J; Hillegass, J M; Flood, A; Zhang, C X; Panzica-Kelly, J; Cao, J; Coburn, A; Enright, B P; Tornesi, M B; Hetheridge, M; Augustine-Rauch, K A

    2012-04-01

    This report provides a progress update of a consortium effort to develop a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicity assay. Twenty non-proprietary compounds (10 animal teratogens and 10 animal non-teratogens) were evaluated blinded in 4 laboratories. Zebrafish embryos from pond-derived and cultivated strain wild types were exposed to the test compounds for 5 days and subsequently evaluated for lethality and morphological changes. Each of the testing laboratories achieved similar overall concordance to the animal data (60-70%). Subsequent optimization procedures to improve the overall concordance focused on compound formulation and test concentration adjustments, chorion permeation and number of replicates. These optimized procedures were integrated into a revised protocol and all compounds were retested in one lab using embryos from pond-derived zebrafish and achieved 85% total concordance. To further assess assay performance, a study of additional compounds is currently in progress at two laboratories using embryos from pond-derived and cultivated-strain wild type zebrafish.

  11. Berkeley Low Background Counting Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Sensitive low background assay detectors and sample analysis are available for non-destructive direct gamma-ray assay of samples. Neutron activation analysis is also...

  12. University of California at Berkeley

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The goal of this Center is to establish a forum for the multi-disciplinary approach to understand and reduce the environmental health risks of children. This Center...

  13. MIT Laboratory for Computer Science Progress Report, July 1984-June 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    transcription and translation, according to the operon theory of procaryotic genetics. The first program, GENEX I, used a procedural encoding of how to...goals 1 and 2, are critically needed components of most medical consulting and critiquing programs. Within our own research laboratory, results from...RESEARCH PROGRESS In the past year of work on the clinical cognition subproject, we have collected transcripts from eight expert physicians solving

  14. Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-05-06

    OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D&D activities beginning in 1997.

  15. Analytical progresses of the International Olympic Committee and World Anti-Doping Agency Olympic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Costas; Saugy, Martial; Giraud, Sylvain; Robinson, Neil; Alsayrafi, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    The Summer Olympic Games constitute the biggest concentration of human sports and activities in a particular place and time since 776 BCE, when the written history of the Olympic Games in Olympia began. Summer and Winter Olympic anti-doping laboratories, accredited by the International Olympic Committee in the past and the World Anti-Doping Agency in the present times, acquire worldwide interest to apply all new analytical advancements in the fight against doping in sports, hoping that this major human event will not become dirty by association with this negative phenomenon. This article summarizes the new analytical progresses, technologies and knowledge used by the Olympic laboratories, which for the vast majority of them are, eventually, incorporated into routine anti-doping analysis.

  16. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo, E-mail: ignacio.negueruela@ua.es, E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  17. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  18. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hules, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  19. Recent Progresses in Laboratory Astrophysics with Ames’ COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-06-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) [3] and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [4] and planetary atmospheres [5]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References: [1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Salama F., Galazutdinov G., Krelowski J

  20. Recent Progress in Planetary Laboratory Astrophysics achieved with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-10-01

    We describe the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for "Cosmic Simulation Chamber" and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nanoparticles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate various space environments such as planetary atmospheres. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. The COSmIC experimental setup is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion, that generates a plasma in the stream of a free supersonic jet expansion, coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection [2, 3], and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [4].Recent results obtained using COSmIC will be highlighted. In particular, the progress that has been achieved in an on-going study investigating the formation and the characterization of laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols generated from gas-phase molecular precursors [5] will be presented. Plans for future laboratory experiments on planetary molecules and aerosols in the growing field of planetary laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed, as well as the implications of studies underway for astronomical observations.References: [1] Salama F., in Organic Matter in Space, IAU S251, Kwok & Sandford eds, CUP, S251, 4, 357 (2008).[2] Biennier L., Salama, F., Allamandola L., & Scherer J., J. Chem. Phys., 118, 7863 (2003)[3] Tan X, & Salama F., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 84318 (2005)[4] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Ergonomics Committee FY 94 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the Committee`s accomplishments for fiscal year 1994. Ergonomic issues are getting increased attention nationwide. This is a result of ergonomic hazards impacting the safety and health of employees, and companies ``bottom line`` via an increase in medical and workers` compensation costs. The Committee reviews injury and illness data, advises management of ergonomic trends at LBL, initiates corrective action to mitigate ergonomic hazards, and sponsors ergonomic awareness activities. Documented evidence supports the claim that implementing cost-effective ergonomic solutions are a good investment.

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1978-01-01

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers. (RWR)

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  4. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  5. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  6. Three new bricks in the wall: Berkeley 23, Berkeley 31, and King 8

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, Michele; Bragaglia, Angela; Tosi, Monica

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive census of Galactic open cluster properties places unique constraints on the Galactic disc structure and evolution. In this framework we investigate the evolutionary status of three poorly-studied open clusters, Berkeley 31, Berkeley 23 and King 8, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. To this aim, we make use of deep LBT observations, reaching more than 6 mag below the main sequence Turn- Off. To determine the cluster parameters, namely age, metallicity, distance, reddening and binary fraction, we compare the observational colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC and FST) and metallicities. We find that Berkeley 31 is relatively old, with an age between 2.3 and 2.9 Gyr, and rather high above the Galactic plane, at about 700 pc. Berkeley 23 and King 8 are younger, with best fitting ages in the range 1.1-1.3 Gyr and 0.8-1.3 Gyr, respectively. The position above the Galactic plane is about 500- 600 pc...

  7. Careers in Data Science: A Berkeley Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Last year, I took on an amazing opportunity to serve as the Executive Director of the new Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS). After a 15-year career working with geospatial data to advance our understanding of the environment, I have been presented with a unique opportunity through BIDS to work with talented researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds. Founded in 2013, BIDS is a central hub of research and education at UC Berkeley designed to facilitate and nurture data-intensive science. We are building a community centered on a cohort of talented data science fellows and senior fellows who are representative of the world-class researchers from across our campus and are leading the data science revolution within their disciplines. Our initiatives are designed to bring together broad constituents of the data science community, including domain experts from the life, social, and physical sciences and methodological experts from computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics. While many of these individuals rarely cross professional paths, BIDS actively seeks new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across these different research fields. In this presentation, I will share my own story, along with some insights into how BIDS is supporting the careers of data scientists, including graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and research staff. I will also describe how these individuals we are helping support are working to address a number of data science-related challenges in scientific research.

  8. Quality Indicators in Laboratory Medicine: the status of the progress of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; West, Jamie; Garcia Del Pino Castro, Isabel; Furtado Vieira, Keila; Ivanov, Agnes; Plebani, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of error rates is essential in all clinical laboratories as it enables them to accurately identify their risk level, and compare it with those of other laboratories in order to evaluate their performance in relation to the State-of-the-Art (i.e. benchmarking) and define priorities for improvement actions. Although no activity is risk free, it is widely accepted that the risk of error is minimized by the use of Quality Indicators (QIs) managed as a part of laboratory improvement strategy and proven to be suitable monitoring and improvement tools. The purpose of QIs is to keep the error risk at a level that minimizes the likelihood of patients. However, identifying a suitable State-of-the-Art is challenging, because it calls for the knowledge of error rates measured in a variety of laboratories throughout world that differ in their organization and management, context, and the population they serve. Moreover, it also depends on the choice of the events to keep under control and the individual procedure for measurement. Although many laboratory professionals believe that the systemic use of QIs in Laboratory Medicine may be effective in decreasing errors occurring throughout the total testing process (TTP), to improve patient safety as well as to satisfy the requirements of International Standard ISO 15189, they find it difficult to maintain standardized and systematic data collection, and to promote continued high level of interest, commitment and dedication in the entire staff. Although many laboratories worldwide express a willingness to participate to the Model of QIs (MQI) project of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety", few systematically enter/record their own results and/or use a number of QIs designed to cover all phases of the TTP. Many laboratories justify their inadequate participation in data collection of QIs by claiming that the number of QIs included in the MQI is excessive. However, an analysis of results suggests

  9. The Berkeley gas-filled separator

    CERN Document Server

    Ninov, V; McGrath, C A

    1998-01-01

    The BGS is being constructed at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL in Berkeley. The magnetic configuration of the BGS will allow a large angular acceptance and good suppression of primary beam particles. BGS operates as a mass spectrometer with a A/ Delta A approximately =200 and as a gas filled separator at pressures between 0.1-50 hPa. The reaction products recoiling off a thin target will be collected with efficiencies from 10-80at the focal plane. A Monte Carlo simulation program of the ion transport through the gas-filled magnets in combination of 3-dimensional TOSCA field maps has been developed and reproduces closely the experimental behavior of BGS. (9 refs).

  10. The Berkeley SETI program - SERENDIP IV instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthimer, Dan; Bowyer, Stuart; Ng, David; Donnelly, Charles; Cobb, Jeff; Lampton, Michael; Airieau, Sabine

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the hardware design of SERENDIP IV, which will be deployed in early 1997 for a 21-cm sky survey at the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center's 305-m radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. SERENDIP IV is a 167 million channel spectrum analyzer, covering a 100-Mhz bandwidth, with 0.6-Hz resolution and a 1.7-s integration time. SERENDIP IV's modular design incorporates a bank of digital mixers and filters to separate the 100 MHz band into 40 2.5 MHz subbands. Each 2.5 MHz subband is further broken down into 0.6 Hz bins by means of a four million point fast Fourier transform. The resulting power spectra are analyzed by 40 high-speed processors. Narrowband signals having power significantly above background noise levels are recorded along with telescope coordinates, time, and frequency. The data are sent in real time to Berkeley for analysis.

  11. Junior High Schools of Berkeley, California. Bulletin, 1923, No. 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, James T.; Clark, W. B.; Glessner, H. H.; Hennessey, D. L.

    1923-01-01

    This bulletin demonstrates that Berkeley, California's educational problem is and has been that of meeting the varied needs of a population such as may be found in any typical American city. The varied population needs, together with the rapid growth, have brought many difficult problems to Berkeley, just has they have to other cities. Based on…

  12. Summary Report on 2011 CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop, Berkeley, June 1-2, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help with the research planning and prioritization, EPA and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO2 Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources.” The objective of the workshop, held at LBNL on June 1–2, 2011, was to evaluate the current s...

  13. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  14. Laboratory capacity for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease in Eastern Africa: implications for the progressive control pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurate diagnosis is pertinent to any disease control programme. If Eastern Africa is to work towards control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) using the Progressive Control Pathway for FMD (PCP-FMD) as a tool, then the capacity of national reference laboratories (NRLs) mandated...... to diagnose FMD should match this task. This study assessed the laboratory capacity of 14 NRLs of the Eastern Africa Region Laboratory Network member countries using a semi-structured questionnaire and retrospective data from the World Reference Laboratory for FMD annual reports and Genbank (R) through...... National Centre for Biotechnology Information for the period 2006-2010. Results: The questionnaire response rate was 13/14 (93%). Twelve out of the 13 countries/regions had experienced at least one outbreak in the relevant five year period. Only two countries (Ethiopia and Kenya) had laboratories...

  15. Progress in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion research at the laboratory for laser energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Y.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States); McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Betti, S.R.; Goncharov, V.N. [Rochester Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Physics and Astronomy, NY (United States); Fletcher, A.; Freeman, C.; Padalino, S. [SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, NY (United States); Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kilkenny, J.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The demonstration of high areal densities in hydro-dynamically scaled cryogenic DT or D{sub 2} implosions with neutron yields that are a significant fraction of the 'clean' 1-D predictions will validate the ignition-equivalent direct-drive target performance on the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). This paper highlights the recent experimental and theoretical progress leading toward achieving this validation in the next few years. The NIF will initially be configured for X-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the 'polar-direct-drive' (PDD) approach that directs beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-dimensional simulations have shown ignition. A unique 'Saturn-like' plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity. LLE is currently constructing the multibeam, 2.6-kJ/beam, peta-watt laser system OMEGA-EP (Extended Performance). Integrated fast-ignition experiments, combining the OMEGA-EP and OMEGA Laser Systems, will begin in 2008. (authors)

  16. What Made Berkeley Great? The Sources of Berkeley's Sustained Academic Excellence. Research & Occasional Paper Series CSHE.3.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2011-01-01

    University of California (UC) Berkeley's chief academic officer explores the historical sources of Berkeley' academic excellence. He identifies five key factors: (1) wealth from many sources; (2) supportive and skilled governors; (3) leadership from key UC presidents; (4) the pioneering ethos within the State of California; and (5) a process of…

  17. A Radiation Homeland Security Workshop Presented to the City of Berkeley Fire Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Howard

    2005-04-01

    A radiation incident in a community, ranging from a transportation accident to a dirty bomb, is expected to be rare, but still can occur. First responders to such an incident must be prepared. City of Berkeley officials met with members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory staff and agreed that the laboratory participants would create material and teach it to all of their fire fighting staff. To design such a course, nuclear physicists, biologists and health physicists merged some of their existing teaching material together with previous homeland security efforts to produce a course that lasted one full day. The material was designed to help alleviate the myths and fear of radiation experienced by many first responders. It included basic nuclear physics information, biological effects, and methods that health physicists use to detect and handle radiation. The curriculum included several hands on activities which involved working directly with the meters the Berkeley Fire Department possessed. In addition, I will discuss some observations from teaching this course material plus some unusual problems that we encountered, such as suddenly the whole class responding to a fire.

  18. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  19. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul M. Bertsch, (Director)

    2002-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of The University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory's research mission during the 2002 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of 76 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 50 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members, staff, and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section titled Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 51. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, stable isotopes, sandhills ecology, and phytoremediation: (1) A collaborative study between Dr. Tom Hinton at SREL and scientists at SRTC demonstrated the feasibility of using illite clay to sequester 137Cs in sediments along the P and R reactor cooling canal system, where approximately 3,000 acres of land are contaminated. Overall, the study showed significant decreases in cesium concentrations and bioavailability following the addition of illite with no sign of harm to the ecosystem. While the cesium remains sequestered from the biosphere, its radioactivity decays and the process progresses from contaminant immobilization to remediation. (2) SREL's stable isotope laboratory is now fully functional. Stable isotope distributions in nature can provide important insights into many historical and current environmental processes. Dr. Christopher Romanek is leading SREL's research

  20. The fate of a progressive science: the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory, athletes, the science of work and the politics of reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2011-06-01

    In the early twentieth century, fatigue research marked a site of conflicting scientific, industrial, and cultural understandings of working bodies. Many fatigue researchers understood fatigue to be a physiological fact and allied themselves with Progressive-era reformers in urging industrial regulation. Reformers clashed with advocates of Taylorism, who held that productivity could be perpetually increased through managerial efficiency. Histories of this conflict typically cease with the end of the First World War. I examine the work of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory in the 1920s and 1930s to explore the impact that the introduction of biochemical methods had on the relationship between science and reform. The Laboratory developed sophisticated techniques to study the blood of exercising individuals. In particular, it found that exercising individuals could attain a biochemically "steady state," or equilibrium, and extrapolated from this to assert that fatigue was psychological, not physiological, in nature. In contrast to Progressive-era research, the Laboratory reached this conclusion through laboratory examination, not of workers, but of Laboratory staff members and champion marathon runners. I present the Laboratory's institutional history, scientific work, and finally how common cultural understandings of athletes and work lent plausibility to its efforts to make authoritative statements about industrial conditions.

  1. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1997 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.; McLean, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    This annual water data report from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contains flow data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of the Laboratory`s property. The authors focused data collection on the Laboratory`s downstream boundary, approximated by New Mexico State Highway 4; the upstream boundary is approximated by New Mexico State Highway 501. Some of the gaging stations are within Laboratory boundaries and were originally installed to assist groups other than the Water Quality and Hydrology Group (ESH-18) that also conduct site-specific earth science research. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle.

  2. Characteristics of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy clarified through internet-assisted laboratory surveillance in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamichi Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a rare but fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV, occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. As PML develops in individuals with various underlying disorders sporadically and infrequently, a nationwide survey of PML is difficult. This study was conducted to elucidate the characteristics of PML in Japan through an internet-assisted laboratory surveillance program. Methods A diagnostic support system for PML was established using a real-time PCR assay of JCV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and requests for testing were received from clinicians via specialized websites. Medical histories of patients were collected through standardized questionnaires, and a database of CSF JCV loads and clinical information was created and analyzed. Results For 4 years from April 2007 to March 2011, CSF specimens from 419 patients were tested. Forty-eight individuals were found positive for JCV DNA in their CSF and were diagnosed with PML. PML primarily occurred not only in HIV-positive patients (33.3% but also in patients with hematologic disorders after receiving stem cell transplantation, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive treatment (39.6%. The frequencies of PML cases among the subjects in these two categories were 20.3% and 23.5%, respectively. Although no significant features were observed with respect to CSF JCV loads in PML patients with an HIV infection or hematologic disorder, males were predominant in both groups (100% and 89.5%, respectively. The proportion of PML cases with autoimmune disorders (6.3% or solid-organ transplants (2.1% was smaller than those with HIV infection or hematologic disorders, probably due to the limited availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and transplantation from brain dead donors. Conclusions The results suggest that the internet-assisted laboratory surveillance program might be a useful strategy for collecting precise real

  3. The Astrophysics Major at the University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, J.; Heiles, C.

    2001-12-01

    The Astrophysics major offered by the Berkeley Astronomy Department has been redesigned to reflect broad educational goals. Students preparing for graduate school study mostly Physics and Mathematics, leavened with four semesters of astrophysics at the sophomore and senior level. These courses make heavy use of their concurrent Physics and Math. Astrophysics and Physics majors differ in the astrophysics courses replacing other electives which a Physics major might choose. The major's redesign also opened the door to students who wish to pursue a major which gives them broad technical training without having graduate school as a goal. Many such students follow the same track as those pursuing the graduate school option; others take courses specifically designed for people with alternate careers in mind. The major change has been a laboratory requirement for all Astrophysics majors, in either track. We now have advanced undergraduate laboratories: optical, radio, and near infrared; details are on our web page. These share the common thread of development of deep capabilities in data gathering, analysis, and presentation. Students achieve expertise in these areas because the labs include the complete range of activities normally encountered in observational or experimental research. Students use laboratory equipment to measure the fundamental parameters of devices and systems, make astronomical observations with those systems, write software in UNIX and IDL to control equipment and analyze the results, and write formal lab reports in LATEX. We avoid ``black box'' or ``cookbook'' procedures . The students leave the course having gained experience and knowledge, and a ``feel'' for how to proceed when faced with sometimes recalcitrant equipment and imperfect data. A by product of the training has been an increase in student involvement in undergraduate research projects. These innovations have led to a major that has doubled in size and, in a quite unanticipated

  4. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the ..pi.. beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of ..pi..-..gamma.. angular correlations, low energy ..pi..-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies.

  6. Radioactive ion beam development in Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    Wutte, D C; Leitner, M A; Xie, Z Q

    1999-01-01

    Two radioactive ion beam projects are under development at the 88" Cyclotron, BEARS (Berkeley Experiment with accelerated radioactive species) and the 14O experiment. The projects are initially focused on the production of 11C and 14O, but it is planned to expand the program to 17F, 18F, 13N and 76Kr. For the BEARS project, the radioactivity is produced in form of either CO2 or N2O in a small medical 10 MeV proton cyclotron. The activity is then transported through a 300 m long He-jet line to the 88" cyclotron building, injected into the AECR-U ion source and accelerated through the 88" cyclotron to energies between 1 to 30 MeV/ nucleon. The 14O experiment is a new experiment at the 88" cyclotron to measure the energy-shape of the beta decay spectrum. For this purpose, a target transfer line and a radioactive ion beam test stand has been constructed. The radioactivity is produced in form of CO in a hot carbon target with a 20 MeV 3He from the 88" Cyclotron. The activity diffuses through an 8m long stainless s...

  7. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  8. Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark N.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary program at the University of California (Berkeley) that addresses the multifaceted problems of energy and resources through a teaching and resource program. Discusses the program's structure, curriculum, research activities, students, resources, and problems and possibilities. (TW)

  9. U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Enterprise Rotary Club , Enterprise, AL, 19 January 2010. U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory — Fiscal Year 2010 36 The abstract “ZAG-otolith...Laboratory — Fiscal Year 2010 40 Brozoski, F. (Principal Investigator), & Duma , S. (Co-Investigator). Facial Fracture Injury Risk Functions for

  10. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  12. Laboratory for Computer Science progress report 24, July 1986-June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    The work reported here was carried out within the Laboratory for Computer Science, an MIT interdepartmental laboratory. Partial contents include: Clinical Decision Making; An Artificial Intelligence Approach to Clinical Decision Making; A Program for the Management of Heart Failure; Computation Structures; Computer Languages and Systems; Computer Applications; Distributed Computing; Bulk Data Transfer Protocol; Information Mechanics; The CAM-7 Multiprocessor; Fluid Dynamics; Texture-Locked Loops; Mercury; Parallel Processing; Computer Programming Methodology; Real Time Systems. A list of publications follows this report.

  13. Annual progress report, 1 January 1975--31 December 1975. [Information center on laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    The Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR) was founded in 1952 under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC). Located within the Division of Biological Sciences, Assembly of Life Sciences, ILAR serves as a coordinating agency to disseminate information, survey existing and required resources, establish standards and guidelines, promote education, hold conferences, and, generally, upgrade laboratory animal resources within the United States. Activities during 1976 are reported.

  14. Automation and work-simplification in the urinalysis laboratory. A pilgrim's progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P P

    1988-09-01

    The evolution of the modern clinical laboratory has produced a gap between medical/scientific competence on the one hand and management skills on the other. Physician-managers need both sets of competencies. Concepts of operations management and cost accounting shape criteria for strategic decisions in technology improvement programs. Automation and work-simplification are key strategies for improving cost performance in clinical laboratories.

  15. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  16. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  17. Teaching Physicists' Thinking Skills in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, F.; St. John, Mark

    1979-01-01

    Describes an introductory physics laboratory course, used at the University of California in Berkeley, designed to teach students some general intellectual skills. Results of the course evaluation are also discussed. (HM)

  18. Biotechnology action programme BAP 1985-1989. Progress report. Vol. 2. Scientific reports from participating laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnien, E. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The present progress report has been prepared after the programme has been running for one and a half years. It outlines, in a condensed form, the preliminary results obtained during 1986 and the first semester of 1987 from transnational cost-shared research contracts between the Commission and associated public or private institutions from different Member States. With 105 figs., 26 tabs..

  19. Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Department`s continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene.

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  1. Berkeley Phylogenomics Group web servers: resources for structural phylogenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, Jake Gunn; Kirshner, Dan; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenomic analysis addresses the limitations of function prediction based on annotation transfer, and has been shown to enable the highest accuracy in prediction of protein molecular function. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group provides a series of web servers for phylogenomic analysis: classification of sequences to pre-computed families and subfamilies using the PhyloFacts Phylogenomic Encyclopedia, FlowerPower clustering of proteins sharing the same domain architecture, MUSCLE multiple sequence alignment, SATCHMO simultaneous alignment and tree construction and SCI-PHY subfamily identification. The PhyloBuilder web server provides an integrated phylogenomic pipeline starting with a user-supplied protein sequence, proceeding to homolog identification, multiple alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, subfamily identification and structure prediction. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group resources are available at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  3. The Research Laboratory of Electronics Progress Report Number 133, January 1-December 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-31

    form of a working Beam Epitaxy (MOMBE) of research facility in 1990. The substantial labora- ZnSe tory renovation was completed in February; the CBE...colleagues at Bernstein Waves in Toroidal Plasmas." Pro- the Italian laboratories of E.N.E.A. ( Energia ceedings of the International Sherwood Theory

  4. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

  5. Near IR photometry of the old open clusters Berkeley 17 and Berkeley 18 Probing the age of the galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, G; Girardi, L; Richichi, A; Carraro, Giovanni; Vallenari, Antonella; Girardi, Leo; Richichi, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    We report on near IR ($J$ and $K$ bands) observations of two $8 \\times 8 Berkeley~18, for which only optical photometry (in $B$,$V$ and $I$ bands) exists. $J$ and $K$ photometry allows us to obtain an independent estimate of cluster metallicity by means of the relationship between the spectroscopic metallicity and the Red Giant Branch (RGB) slope calibrated by Tiede et al (1997). From the analysis of the colour magnitude diagram (CMD) and luminosity function (LF), Berkeley~17 turns out to have a metal content $[Fe/H]~\\sim~-0.35$. It is $9~Gyr$ old, suffers from a reddening $E(B-V) = 0.58 mag$ and has an heliocentric distance of $2.5 kpc$. Berkeley~17 comes out to be substantially younger than in previous work (age $\\approx 13~Gyr$). On the other hand Berkeley~18 is found to have solar metal abundance, and to be younger than Berkeley~17, with an age of about $4~Gyr$. While we confirm Kaluzny (1997) reddening estimate, we significantly revise the distance of the cluster, which lies $4.5 kpc$ from the Sun. These...

  6. Berkeley's Advanced Labs for Undergraduate Astronomy Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiles, C.

    1998-12-01

    We currently offer three advanced laboratory courses for undergraduate majors: optical, IR, and radio. These courses contain both intellectual and practical content; in this talk we focus on the radio lab as a representative example. The first half of the semester concentrates on fundamentals of microwave electronics and radio astronomy techniques in four formal laboratory exercises which emphasize hands-on use of microwave devices, laboratory instruments, and computer-controlled data taking. The second half of the course emphasizes astronomy, using a horn with ~ 1 m(2) aperture to map the HI in the Galaxy and a two-element interferometer composed of ~ 1 m diameter dishes on a ~ 10 m baseline to measure accurate positions of radio sources and accurate diameters for the Sun and Moon. These experiments and observations offer ideal opportunities for teaching coordinates, time, rotation matrices, data reduction techniques, least squares, signal processing, image processing, Fourier transforms, and laboratory and astronomical instrumentation. The students can't get along without using computers as actually used by astronomers. We stay away from packaged software such as IRAF, which are ``black boxes''; rather, students learn far more by writing their own software, usually for the first time. They use the IDL language to take and reduce data and prepare them for the lab reports. We insist on quality reports---including tables, postscript graphs and images, correct grammar, spelling, and all the rest---and we strongly urge (successfully!) the students to use LATEX. The other two lab courses have the same emphasis: the guiding spirit is to place the students in a real-life research-like situation. There is too much to do, so students perform the work in small groups of 3 or 4 and groups are encouraged to share their knowledge. Lab reports are written individually. These courses are very demanding, requiring an average of 20 hours per week from the students (and probably

  7. Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stoots; J. O' Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  8. US Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory Annual Progress Report for FY 84. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-24

    Field Assessment of Laboratory- 123 Derived Test Protocols and Water Quality Criterion Modifications with Pentachlorophenol and Ammonia 042 (83PP3813...Classification (odfU) Chemical Warfare Agents; (U) Chemical Synthesis ; (TT) Elemental Analyses- (U) Reference Reagentso (U) Nerve Agents; (U) RAM V 23 TECHNICAL...procedures will be evaluated. Synthesis of the above described substances will then be performed. 25. (U) 8310 - 8409. Contract- synthesis of some of the

  9. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barks, R. [ed.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  10. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory annual progress report 2005

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction withthe plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology cover investi...

  11. Laboratory for Computer Science Progress Report 21, July 1983-June 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Gateway. In 1984, the Laboratory issued the LCS Achievement Award to Professor Joel Moses for his pioneering work on MACSYMA; and the one-time LCS...Tufts University-New England Medical Center Hospital A. Moskowitz , M.D., Tufts-New England Medical Center Hospital S. Naimi, M.D.. Tufts-New England...Hollenberg and Moskowitz have taken courses at MIT and interacted frequently with other members of the Clinical Decision Making Group. We plan to

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  13. Teaching at Berkeley: A Guide for Foreign Teaching Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robby, Ed.; Robin, Ron, Ed.

    A handbook for foreign teaching assistants (TAs) is presented by foreign graduate students with teaching experience and other educators who have worked closely with them. Language skills, teaching strategies, cultural issues, resources, and the environment at the University of California, Berkeley, are addressed in 16 articles. Article titles and…

  14. For Berkeley's Sports Endowment, a Goal of $1-Billion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Josh

    2009-01-01

    Most athletics programs, if forced to raise $300-million to renovate a football stadium, would not set an ambitious endowment goal at the same time. The University of California at Berkeley is trying to do both. The university's California Memorial Stadium sits directly over an earthquake fault: it needs a major seismic retrofit that will take…

  15. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer - BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D. M.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV airglow rocket spectrometer (BEARS) instrument is described. The instrument was designed in particular to measure the dominant lines of atomic oxygen in the FUV and EUV dayglow at 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 A, which is the ultimate source of airglow emissions. The optical and mechanical design of the instrument, the detector, electronics, calibration, flight operations, and results are examined.

  16. Integration Defended: Berkeley Unified's Strategy to Maintain School Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Lisa; Frankenberg, Erica

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, the Supreme Court limited the tools that school districts could use to voluntarily integrate schools. In the aftermath of the decision, educators around the country have sought models of successful plans that would also be legal. One such model may be Berkeley Unified School District's (BUSD) plan. Earlier this year, the California…

  17. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  18. Progress in laboratory high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion): Prospects for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, E.; Lindl, J.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Bernat, T.P.; Coleman, L.W.; Emmett, J.L.; Hogan, W.J.; Hunt, J.T.; Krupke, W.F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a thermonuclear reaction in a small (/approximately/5 mm diameter) fuel capsule filled with a few milligrams of deuterium and tritium, has been the subject of very fruitful experimentation since the early 1970's. High gain ICF is now on the threshold of practical applications. With a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), these applications will have major implications for national defense, basic and applied science, and power production. With a driver capable of delivering about 10 MJ in a 10-ns pulse at an intensity of /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, an appropriately configured cryogenic capsule could be compressed to a density of about 200 g/cm/sup 3/ and a temperature of 3--5 keV. Under these conditions, up to 10 mg of DT could be ignited, and with a burn efficiency of about 30%, release up to 1000 MJ of fusion energy, an energy gain of about 100. A thousand megajoules is equivalent to about one quarter ton of TNT, or about 7 gallons of oil--an amount of energy tractable under laboratory conditions and potentially very useful for a variety of applications. 61 refs., 33 figs.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  20. SETI Programs at the University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, E. J.; Siemion, A. V. P.; Werthimer, D.; Korff, J. V.; Gautham, A.; Cobb, J.; Lebofsky, M.; Dexter, M.; MacMahon, D.; Wright, S.

    2014-03-01

    I describe recent SETI efforts by the University of California, Berkeley SETI Research center and efforts to be undertaken in the near future. In addition to our well known SETI@home (Korpela 2011) and Astropulse (Von Korff et al. 2013) public participation SETI survey projects, we have performed several targeted obsevations of different object classes. These include 1) Observations between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz of planetary systems idenfied by Kepler as containing earthlike planets in or near the habitable zones. (Siemion et al. 2013) 2) Wide-band Arecibo observations of 112 sky locations where the Astropulse project has identified strong µs duration dispersed radio pulses. 3) Observations of Kepler identified planetary systems at times when two planets would appear to be in conjuction when viewed from Earth. We plan a future campaign to simultaneously observe known planetary systems at radio, optical and IR wavelengths. We have also continued to advance our instrumentation. We are currently building the sixth generation of our SERENDIP (Siemion et al. 2011, Korpela et al. 2011) series of SETI instrumentation for installation at both Arecibo and GBT. SERENDIP VI will utilize an FPGA based polyphase filter bank course spectrometer feeding 8 or more GPU based compute nodes. The Arecibo version of this spectrometer will be capable of providing thresholded 1Hz resolution spectra of all seven beams of the 320 MHz bandwidth Arecibo L-band Feed Array in dual polarization. A separate front end will be available to allow up to 2.2 GHz of bandwidth in dual polarization from single pixel receivers. The Green Bank version of this spectrometer will utilize the single pixel front end. We are invesitating the possibility of simultaneous back end stages operating on the same or minimal processed data, for example, we could support simulataneous detection of fast extragalactic radio bursts (Thornton et al. 2013) by adding additional compute nodes. We are also developing new instruments

  1. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical Univ. of Denmark. Annual progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Korsholm, S.B.; Rasmussen, J.J. (eds.)

    2008-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007. (Author)

  2. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  3. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  4. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  5. Analysis and stabilization of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s multiphase mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B.A.

    1995-05-19

    Five drums of mixed waste were accepted from LBL during FY 1994; they contain inorganic acids and compounds, as well as organic reagents and radioactive materials. This document defines the work plan for stabilization and characterization of the waste in three of these 5 drums.

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura; Rosier, Brenda

    2001-06-30

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related

  7. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40

  8. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists: The Berkeley Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley sends more undergraduate students to economics PhD programs than any other public university. While this fact is surely a function of its size, there may be lessons from the Berkeley experience that others could adopt. To investigate why Berkeley generates so many economics PhD students, the author convened…

  9. National Laboratory of Hydraulics. 1996 progress report; Laboratoire National d`Hydraulique. Rapport d`activite 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This progress report of the National Laboratory of Hydraulics (LNH) of Electricite de France (EdF) summarizes, first, the research and development studies carried out in 1996 for the development of research tools for industrial fluid mechanics and environmental hydraulics and for the development of computer tools (computer codes and softwares for fluid mechanics modeling, modeling of reactive, compressible, two-phase and turbulent flows and of complex chemical kinetics using finite elements and finite volume methods). A second parts describes the research studies performed for other services of EdF, concerning: the functioning of nuclear reactors (thermohydraulic studies of the reactor vessel and of the primary coolant circuit, gas flows following severe accidents, fluid-structure thermal coupling etc...), fossil fuel power plants, the equipment and operation of thermal power plants and hydraulic power plants, the use of electric power. A third part summarizes the river and marine hydraulic studies carried out for other companies. (J.S.) 63 refs.

  10. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  11. Progress Towards a Laboratory Test of Alfvénic Electron Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J. W. R.; Skiff, F.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Dorfman, S.

    2016-10-01

    Alfvén waves are thought to be a key mechanism for accelerating auroral electrons. Due to inherent limitations of single point measurements, in situ data has been unable to demonstrate a causal relationship between Alfvén waves and accelerated electrons. Electron acceleration occurs in the inner magnetosphere where the Alfvén speed is greater than the electron thermal speed. In these conditions, Alfvén waves can have an electric field aligned with the background magnetic field B0 if the scale of wave structure across B0 is comparable to the electron skin depth. In the Large Plasma Device (LaPD), Alfvén waves are launched in conditions relevant to the inner magnetosphere. The reduced parallel electron distribution function is measured using a whistler-mode wave absorption diagnostic. The linear electron response has been measured as oscillations of the electron distribution function at the Alfvén wave frequency. These measurements agree with linear theory. Current efforts focus on measuring the nonlinear acceleration of electrons that is relevant to auroral generation. We report on recent progress including experiments with a new higher-power Alfvén wave antenna with the goal of measuring nonlinear electron acceleration. This work was supported by the NSF GRFP and by Grants from NSF, DOE, and NASA. Experiments were performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  12. 94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, S.D. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board`s concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management.

  13. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen (Ed.), Todd

    2007-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

  15. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    2008-10-15

    system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making HEVs practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies.

  17. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE

  20. Evaluating the Impact of Open Access at Berkeley: Results from the 2015 Survey of Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) Funding Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitzky, Samantha; Phillips, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) was one of the first campus-based open access (OA) funds to be established in North America and one of the most active, distributing more than $244,000 to support University of California (UC) Berkeley authors. In April 2015, we conducted a qualitative study of 138 individuals who had received BRII…

  1. Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, A. [ed.; Benner, W.H.; DePaolo, D.J.; Faybishenko, B.; Majer, E.L.; Pallavicini, M.; Russo, R.E.; Shultz, P.G.; Wan, J.

    1997-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was awarded eight Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report summarizes the progress of each grant in addressing significant DOE site cleanup issues after completion of the first year of research. The technical progress made to date in each of the research projects is described in greater detail in individual progress reports. The focus of the research projects covers a diversity of areas relevant to site cleanup, including bioremediation, health effects, characterization, and mixed waste. Some of the projects cut across a number of focus areas. Three of the projects are directed toward characterization and monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, as a test case for application to other sites.

  2. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  3. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  4. Stability of the Zagreb Carnegie-Mellon-Berkeley model

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanović, H; Švarc, A; Hadžimehmedović, M; Stahov, J

    2011-01-01

    In ref. [1] we have used the Zagreb realization of Carnegie-Melon-Berkeley coupled-channel, unitary model as a tool for extracting pole positions from the world collection of partial wave data, with the aim of eliminating model dependence in pole-search procedures. In order that the method is sensible, we in this paper discuss the stability of the method with respect to the strong variation of different model ingredients. We show that the Zagreb CMB procedure is very stable with strong variation of the model assumptions, and that it can reliably predict the pole positions of the fitted partial wave amplitudes.

  5. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, M

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  6. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-12-17

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  7. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Austin, M.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  8. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  9. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90 - III. Cluster parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    The open cluster Berkeley 90 is the home to one of the most massive binary systems in the Galaxy, LS III +46°11, formed by two identical, very massive stars (O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*), and a second early-O system (LS III +46°12 with an O4.5 IV((f)) component at least). Stars with spectral types earlier than O4 are very scarce in the Milky Way, with no more than 20 examples. The formation of such massive stars is still an open question today, and thus the study of the environments where the most massive stars are found can shed some light on this topic. To this aim, we determine the properties and characterize the population of Berkeley 90 using optical, near-infrared and WISE photometry and optical spectroscopy. This is the first determination of these parameters with accuracy. We find a distance of 3.5^{+0.5}_{-0.5} kpc and a maximum age of 3 Ma. The cluster mass is around 1000 M⊙ (perhaps reaching 1500 M⊙ if the surrounding population is added), and we do not detect candidate runaway stars in the area. There is a second population of young stars to the southeast of the cluster that may have formed at the same time or slightly later, with some evidence for low-activity ongoing star formation.

  10. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. III. Cluster parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    The open cluster Berkeley 90 is the home to one of the most massive binary systems in the Galaxy, LS III +46$^{\\circ}$11, formed by two identical, very massive stars (O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*), and a second early-O system (LS III +46$^{\\circ}$12 with an O4.5 IV((f)) component at least). Stars with spectral types earlier than O4 are very scarce in the Milky Way, with no more than 20 examples. The formation of such massive stars is still an open question today, and thus the study of the environments where the most massive stars are found can shed some light on this topic. To this aim, we determine the properties and characterize the population of Berkeley 90 using optical, near-infrared and WISE photometry and optical spectroscopy. This is the first determination of these parameters with accuracy. We find a distance of $3.5^{+0.5}_{-0.5}$ kpc and a maximum age of 3 Ma. The cluster mass is around $1000$ $M_{\\odot}$ (perhaps reaching $1500$ $M_{\\odot}$ if the surrounding population is added), and we do not detect cand...

  11. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  12. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  13. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  15. BVI photometry of the very old open cluster Berkeley 17

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Marconi, G; Tosi, M; Andreuzzi, Gloria; Bragaglia, Angela; Marconi, Gianni; Tosi, Monica

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained BVI CCD imaging of Berkeley 17, an anticentre open cluster that competes with NGC 6791 as the oldest known open cluster. Using the synthetic colour magnitude diagrams (CMD) technique with three sets of evolutionary tracks we have determined that its age is 8.5 - 9.0 Gyr, it distance modulus is (m-M)_0 = 12.2, with a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.62 - 0.60. Differential reddening, if present, is at the 5 % level. All these values have been obtained using models with metallicity about half of solar (Z=0.008 or Z=0.01 depending on the stellar evolution tracks), which allows us to reproduce the features of the cluster CMD better than other metallicities. Finally, from the analysis of a nearby comparison field we think to have intercepted a portion of the disrupting Canis Major dwarf galaxy.

  16. Visualization and communication of pharmacometric models with berkeley madonna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A; Lowe, P J

    2014-05-28

    Population or other pharmacometric models are a useful means to describe, succinctly, the relationships between drug administration, exposure (concentration), and downstream changes in pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers and clinical endpoints, including the mixed effects of patient factors and random interpatient variation (fixed and random effects). However, showing a set of covariate equations to a drug development team is perhaps not the best way to get a message across. Visualization of the consequences of the knowledge encapsulated within the model is the key component. Yet in many instances, it can take hours, perhaps days, to collect ideas from teams, write scripts, and run simulations before presenting the results-by which time they have moved on. How much better, then, to seize the moment and work interactively to decide on a course of action, guided by the model. We exemplify here the visualization of pharmacometric models using the Berkeley Madonna software with a particular focus on interactive sessions. The examples are provided as Supplementary Material.

  17. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  18. Narrative and Spectacle in the Hollywood Musical: Contrasting the Choreography of Busby Berkeley and Gene Kelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattullo, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between narrative and spectacle in the Hollywood musical, with reference to the work of Busby Berkeley and Gene Kelly. It discusses Busby Berkeley's "backstage" musicals in terms of his "aggregate" approach to dealing with the narrative/spectacle relationship, and considers the effect of the backstage musical's…

  19. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease.

  20. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  1. Subjektiv idealisme møder virtuel virkelighed: George Berkeley og Second Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Pilegaard, Jesper

    Filosoffen George Berkeleys (1685-1753) velkendte motto var esse est percipi aut percipere: to be is to be perceived or to perceive. Berkeleys hensigt var at kortlægge en forståelse af den virkelige verden som noget, der kun bestod af bevidstheder og bevidsthedsindhold, perceivers and perceptions....... Berkeleys filosofi indeholder mange elementer, som gør, at den er relevant i forhold til de filosofiske spørgsmål, der trænger sig på i relation til den voksende sammenfletning, vi oplever mellem it-styret virtuel virkelighed og den aktuelle virkelighed. Second Life, et open access online virtuel univers......, er et eksempel på denne form for virtuel virkelighed, hvor Berkeleys filosofi giver en rig kontekst for refleksion over forholdene mellem perceivers og perceptions. Berkeleys amerikanske hjem 1729-1731 bærer navnet Whitehall. På SDU's virtuelle campus i Second Life, SDUSL, findes der et virtuelt...

  2. The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

    2010-11-01

    Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

  3. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd

    2004-03-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

  4. 77 FR 75448 - Welded Tube-Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling, Aerotek and Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Welded Tube--Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling... Worker Adjustment Assistance on October 10, 2012, applicable to workers of Welded Tube--Berkeley... Welded Tube-- Berkeley. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under...

  5. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

  6. The BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network: initial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Alexis A.; Teige, Virginia E.; Turner, Alexander J.; Newman, Catherine; Kim, Jinsol; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    With the majority of the world population residing in urban areas, attempts to monitor and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily center on cities. However, existing carbon dioxide observation networks are ill-equipped to resolve the specific intra-city emission phenomena targeted by regulation. Here we describe the design and implementation of the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N), a distributed CO2 monitoring instrument that utilizes low-cost technology to achieve unprecedented spatial density throughout and around the city of Oakland, California. We characterize the network in terms of four performance parameters - cost, reliability, precision, and systematic uncertainty - and find the BEACO2N approach to be sufficiently cost-effective and reliable while nonetheless providing high-quality atmospheric observations. First results from the initial installation successfully capture hourly, daily, and seasonal CO2 signals relevant to urban environments on spatial scales that cannot be accurately represented by atmospheric transport models alone, demonstrating the utility of high-resolution surface networks in urban greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  7. The berkeley wavelet transform: a biologically inspired orthogonal wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Ben; Prenger, Ryan J; Wu, Michael C-K; Gallant, Jack L

    2008-06-01

    We describe the Berkeley wavelet transform (BWT), a two-dimensional triadic wavelet transform. The BWT comprises four pairs of mother wavelets at four orientations. Within each pair, one wavelet has odd symmetry, and the other has even symmetry. By translation and scaling of the whole set (plus a single constant term), the wavelets form a complete, orthonormal basis in two dimensions. The BWT shares many characteristics with the receptive fields of neurons in mammalian primary visual cortex (V1). Like these receptive fields, BWT wavelets are localized in space, tuned in spatial frequency and orientation, and form a set that is approximately scale invariant. The wavelets also have spatial frequency and orientation bandwidths that are comparable with biological values. Although the classical Gabor wavelet model is a more accurate description of the receptive fields of individual V1 neurons, the BWT has some interesting advantages. It is a complete, orthonormal basis and is therefore inexpensive to compute, manipulate, and invert. These properties make the BWT useful in situations where computational power or experimental data are limited, such as estimation of the spatiotemporal receptive fields of neurons.

  8. Berkeley PHOG: PhyloFacts orthology group prediction web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ruchira S; Meacham, Christopher; Samad, Bushra; Neyer, Christoph; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2009-07-01

    Ortholog detection is essential in functional annotation of genomes, with applications to phylogenetic tree construction, prediction of protein-protein interaction and other bioinformatics tasks. We present here the PHOG web server employing a novel algorithm to identify orthologs based on phylogenetic analysis. Results on a benchmark dataset from the TreeFam-A manually curated orthology database show that PHOG provides a combination of high recall and precision competitive with both InParanoid and OrthoMCL, and allows users to target different taxonomic distances and precision levels through the use of tree-distance thresholds. For instance, OrthoMCL-DB achieved 76% recall and 66% precision on this dataset; at a slightly higher precision (68%) PHOG achieves 10% higher recall (86%). InParanoid achieved 87% recall at 24% precision on this dataset, while a PHOG variant designed for high recall achieves 88% recall at 61% precision, increasing precision by 37% over InParanoid. PHOG is based on pre-computed trees in the PhyloFacts resource, and contains over 366 K orthology groups with a minimum of three species. Predicted orthologs are linked to GO annotations, pathway information and biological literature. The PHOG web server is available at http://phylofacts.berkeley.edu/orthologs/.

  9. Status of the UC-Berkeley SETI Efforts

    CERN Document Server

    Korpela, Eric J; Bankay, Robert; Cobb, Jeff; Howard, Andrew; Lebofsky, Matt; Siemion, Andrew P V; von Korff, Joshua; Werthimer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths using an automated 30 inch telescope. The ongoing SERENDIP V.v sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with ~1.6 Hz spectral resolution. SETI@home uses the desktop computers of volunteers to analyze over 160 TB of data at taken at Arecibo looking for two types of continuous wave signals and two types of pulsed signals. A version to be released this summer adds autocorrelation analysis to look for complex wave forms that have been repeated (and overlayed) after a short delay. SETI@home will soon be processing data of Kepler exoplanet systems collected at the GBT. The Astropulse project is the first SETI search for $\\mu$s time scale dispersed pulses in the radio spectrum. We recently reobserved 114 sky loc...

  10. A study of the old galactic star cluster Berkeley 32

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, T; Richtler, Tom; Sagar, Ram

    2001-01-01

    We present new CCD photometry of the distant old open star cluster Berkeley 32 in Johnson V and Cousins I passbands. A total of about 3200 stars have been observed in a field of 13X13 arcmin**2. The colour-magnitude diagram in V, (V-I) has been generated down to V = 22 mag. A broad but well defined main sequence is clearly visible. Some blue stragglers, a well developed subgiant branch and a Red Clump are also seen. By fitting isochrones to this CMD as well as to other CMDs available in the literature, and using the Red Clump location, the reddening, distance and age of the star cluster have been determined. The cluster has a distance of 3.3 kpc, its radius is about 2.4 pc; the reddening E(B-V) is 0.08 mag and the age is 6.3 Gyr. By comparison with theoretical isochrones, a metallicity of [Fe/H]= -0.2 dex has been estimated. We find a much flatter mass function than what has been found for young clusters. If the mass function is a power law dN/dm = const.*m**alpha, then we get alpha = -0.5+-0.3 in the mass ra...

  11. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  12. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  13. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  14. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards -- Fiscal Year 2002 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Egorov, Oleg B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Grate, Jay W.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; McGrail, B. Peter; Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Panetta, Paul D.; Pfund, David M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Su, Yali; Sundaram, S. K.; Weber, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2002-06-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been awarded a total of 80 Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants since the inception of the program in 1996. The Laboratory has collaborated on an additional 14 EMSP awards with funding received through other institution. This report describes how each of the projects awarded in 1999, 2000, and 2001 addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in the individual project reports included in this document. Projects are under way in three main areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  15. Electronics Research Laboratory, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group annual progress report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief progress report, covering our research in general plasma theory and simulation, plasma-wall physics theory and simulation, and code development. Reports written in this period are included with this mailing. A publications list plus abstracts for two major meetings are included.

  16. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  17. Distributed Embedded Real-time Database Engine Based on Berkeley DB%基于Berkeley DB核心嵌入式实时数据库引擎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志刚

    2007-01-01

    在研究Berkeley DB的基础上,对其数据模型、数据字典、网络特性、事务处理等方面进行优化,设计一个基于Berkeley DB核心的分布式嵌入实时数据库引擎.这种简洁的轻量级数据库系统更适合于嵌入式实时系统应用,可以为其提供更丰富的数据管理功能.

  18. Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.; Fayer, M.J.; Wogman, N.A.; Nelson, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies dealing with mill tailings: long-term stabilizaton; interim stabilization of mill tailings piles; tailings dewatering techniques; tailings neutralization and other alternatives in immobilizing toxic materials in tailings; evaluation of seepage and leachate transport from tailings disposal facilities; effluent and environmental monitoring methods and equipment and instrument testing; attenuation of radon emissions; assessment of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings; and methods of minimizing ground water contamination in in-situ leach uranium mining.

  19. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  20. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  1. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

    1998-12-31

    This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

    1997-12-31

    This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

  4. Energy budgets of animals: behavioral and ecological implications. Progress report. [Egg laying in laboratory by desert lizards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, W.P.

    1975-05-01

    Climate effects on biomass requirements for mammal and reptile maintenance, growth, and reproduction and implications for climate-influenced population dynamics were explored using computer simulations. The simulations revealing critical shortages of appropriate data have led to the design of experiments to acquire the needed information. The development of a technique to induce repeated egg laying in the laboratory for reproduction studies of some desert lizards was accomplished this year. (CH)

  5. W.E. Henry Symposium Compendium, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 19, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-19

    at the office, Don Gailbraith, the manager of Advanced Projects, got flip chart paper and made charts using the same data we had presented to Colby...The next day a pre- sentation was made to Colby, and he approved the project. In his view, spoken data is hand waving; the same information on flip ...

  6. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  7. The U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory and Department of Physics Submillimeter Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, D. T.; Genzel, R.

    1986-01-01

    The UCB submm heterodyne receiver is a complete system for high-resolution astronomical spectroscopy in the 350-micron and 450-micron atmospheric windows. This compact system mounts directly at the Cassegrain focus of large optical and IR telescopes. It consists of a laser local oscillator, open structure mixer, quasi-optical coupling system, a broad-band IF system, and an acoustooptical spectrometer. The local oscillator is a 1-m-long submm laser optically pumped by a CO2 laser. The mixer is a quasi-optical corner-cube antenna structure and Schottky diode. The mixer is currently operated at room temperature, and its performance at 77 K is being evaluated. The system noise temperature is less than 7000 K SSB during observations.

  8. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  9. Clinical results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. Since then, over 800 patients have received stereotactically-directed plateau-beam heavy-charged particle pituitary irradiation at this institution. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of these treatments. 11 refs.

  10. Nuclear science annual report, July 1, 1977-June 30, 1978. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.; Gough, R.A.; Nurmia, M.J. (eds.)

    1978-01-01

    Activities for the period July 1, 1977, through June 30, 1978, are reported in the following areas: experimental research (nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; relativistic heavy ions - projectile and target fragmentation, central collisions; the Table of Isotopes Project, atomic physics, and magnetic monopoles), theory of nuclear collisions (microscopic, macroscopic, relativistic), and apparatus (accelerator operations and development, nuclear instrumentation). Also included are thesis abstracts, publications lists, and an author index. Individual abstracts were prepared for 33 of the reports in this volume. (RWR)

  11. Twenty-five years of artificial photosynthesis research at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the research done on artificial photosynthesis by the Calvin Group between 1970 and 1995 when the program was terminated. It contains a compilation of the personnel involved as well as a bibliography of publications supported by the project.

  12. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Javendel, I. (eds.)

    1992-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1991. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental data in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts.

  13. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.A.; Javandel, I.; Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Thorson, P.A. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1992. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental information in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.``

  14. HIV实验室检测及其研究进展%Present Situation and Progress in Research on HIV Laboratory Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome(AIDS)is a severe infectious disease induced by human immuno deficiency virus(HIV). The laboratory testing method to be further discussed.Methods:This article focuses on the advances in HIV laboratory techniques and procedures.Results:HIV laboratory testing is vital for the diagnosis, treatment and epidemic surveillance and monitoring of AIDS.Conclusion:During the past twenty years,great progress has been made in laboratory testing.HIV laboratory testing is now developing towards a simple, rapid, sensitive,accurate and automatic way of diagnosing this condition.%目的:艾滋病又称获得性免疫缺陷综合征(AIDS),由人类免疫缺陷病毒(HIV,又称艾滋病病毒)引起,是危胁人类健康甚至导致死亡的一种严重传染病,其实验室检测方法需要进一步探讨.方法:本文从常用HIV检测方法及HIV检测新进展两个方面总结了HIV实验室检测及进展.结果:HIV的实验室检测是预防AIDS的主要方法,可直接影响到AIDS的筛查及诊治.结论:在经历20多年后,HIV 的实验室检测法有了飞跃的发展,如今的HIV的实验室检测目标聚焦在如何开发更加准确、更加敏感、更加快速、更加简单化、更加自动化几个方向上,其研究任重而道远,需要我们共同努力携手完成.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  16. Laboratory capacity for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease in Eastern Africa: implications for the progressive control pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten;

    2013-01-01

    National Centre for Biotechnology Information for the period 2006-2010. Results: The questionnaire response rate was 13/14 (93%). Twelve out of the 13 countries/regions had experienced at least one outbreak in the relevant five year period. Only two countries (Ethiopia and Kenya) had laboratories...... at biosecurity level 3 and only three (Ethiopia, Kenya and Sudan) had identified FMD virus serotypes for all reported outbreaks. Based on their own country/region assessment, 12/13 of these countries/regions were below stage 3 of the PCP-FMD. Quarantine (77%) and vaccination (54%) were the major FMD control...

  17. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E. [eds.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy. Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program (STP) is a program in LLNL`s Nuclear Chemistry Division that develops advanced, nondestructive-analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Our work focuses on R&D relating to x- and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques. A review of the Safeguards Technology Program at LLNL by representatives of the Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security and Office of Research was conducted via teleconference on March 4, 1994. Objectives, milestones, and recent accomplishments were presented for each of the four LLNL tasks in NDA, and plans to address user needs in these NDA areas were discussed. An informal presentation on the LLNL Safeguards Technology Program was presented to the JOWOG-30 meeting at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 10, 1994. The JOWOG meetings bring together representatives from Laboratories in the DOE complex, as well as their counterparts from the United Kingdom. Within JOWOG-30 a variety of topics are discussed, including NDA and its various applications within the U.S. and U.K. complexes.

  19. A clinical and laboratory study evaluating the profile of cytokine levels in relapsing remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lucchesi, Cinzia; Pecori, Chiara; Metelli, Maria Rita; Pellegrini, Silvia; Iudice, Alfonso; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2015-01-15

    The main aim of the study was to evaluate levels of cytokines IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, TNF-alfa, TGB-beta1 and IFN-gamma in 30 patients with relapsing remitting (RRMS) compared to 30 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) in a peripheral blood sample. Statistical analysis showed significant higher levels of IL-17 and INF-gamma, which are cytokines with pro-inflammatory properties, and lower levels of TGF-beta1, a molecule with immunosuppressant activity, in RRMS compared to SPMS. These results underline the existence of a different cytokines dysregulation in RRMS compared to SPMS phases with higher pro-inflammatory activity in RRMS.

  20. UXO Detection and Characterization using new Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperikova, E.; Morrison, H. F.; Smith, J. T.; Becker, A.

    2006-05-01

    An optimally designed active electromagnetic system (AEM), Berkeley UXO Discriminator, BUD, has been developed for detection and characterization of UXO in the 20 mm to 150 mm size range. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters, and eight pairs of differenced receivers. The transmitter-receiver assembly together with the acquisition box, as well as the battery power and GPS receiver, is mounted on a small cart to assure system mobility. BUD not only detects the object itself but also quantitatively determines its size, shape, orientation, and metal content (ferrous or non-ferrous, mixed metals). Moreover, the principal polarizabilities and size of a metallic target can be determined from a single position of the BUD platform. The search for UXO is a two-step process. The object must first be detected and its location determined then the parameters of the object must be defined. A satisfactory classification scheme is one that determines the principal dipole polarizabilities of a target. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability (principal moment) coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, the scrap metal has all three principal moments entirely different. This description of the inherent polarizabilities of a target is a major advance in discriminating UXO from irregular scrap metal. Our results clearly show that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of a target and that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal. Target properties are determined by an inversion algorithm, which at any given time inverts the response to yield the location (x, y, z) of the target, its attitude and its principal polarizabilities (yielding an apparent aspect ratio). Signal-to-noise estimates (or measurements) are interpreted in this inversion to yield error estimates on the location, attitude and polarizabilities. This inversion at a succession of times provides

  1. National laboratory of hydraulics. 1997 progress report; Laboratoire national d`hydraulique. Rapport d`activite 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report summaries the 1997 activity of the national laboratory of hydraulics from the direction of studies and researches (DER) of Electricite de France (EdF). The report comprises two parts. Part 1 gives an overview of the studies carried out for other EdF departments or for other companies or partners (functioning of nuclear reactors and fossil fuel power plants, equipments and operation of fossil fuel, nuclear and hydraulic power plants, studies related to the use of electric power, maritime and fluvial studies). Part 2 concerns the research and development of tools for industrial fluid mechanics and environmental hydraulics and the development of computer codes. A selection of relevant publications is given. (J.S.) 23 refs.

  2. Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

  3. CaMKIIα underlies spontaneous and evoked pain behaviors in Berkeley sickle cell transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Chen, Yan; Tian, Xuebi; Yang, Cheng; Lu, Jian; Xiao, Chun; DeSimone, Joseph; Wilkie, Diana J; Molokie, Robert E; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most challenging and stressful conditions to patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and their clinicians. Patients with SCD start experiencing pain as early as 3 months old and continue having it throughout their lives. Although many aspects of the disease are well understood, little progress has been made in understanding and treating pain in SCD. This study aimed to investigate the functional involvement of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) in the persistent and refractory pain associated with SCD. We found that nonevoked ongoing pain as well as evoked hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli were present in Berkeley sickle cell transgenic mice (BERK mice), but not nonsickle control littermates. Prominent activation of CaMKIIα was observed in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn region of BERK mice. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a selective inhibitor of CaMKII, significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in BERK mice. Meanwhile, spinal inhibition of CaMKII elicited conditioned place preference in the BERK mice, indicating the contribution of CaMKII in the ongoing spontaneous pain of SCD. We further targeted CaMKIIα by siRNA knockdown. Both evoked pain and ongoing spontaneous pain were effectively attenuated in BERK mice. These findings elucidated, for the first time, an essential role of CaMKIIα as a cellular mechanism in the development and maintenance of spontaneous and evoked pain in SCD, which can potentially offer new targets for pharmacological intervention of pain in SCD.

  4. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  5. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2002-03-15

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

  7. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2000-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

  8. Research Progress on Laboratory Diagnostic Methods for Tuberculous Pleuritis%结核性胸膜炎实验室诊断方法的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨泽西; 张泽明; 王震; 安蕾

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous pleurity ( TP ) is the most common cause of exudative pleural effusions, its traditional laboratory diagnostic methods mainly includes etiology examination, immunology examination and pleura biopsy. With the development of science and technology, especially the clinical application of drug sensitive test and molecular biological techniques,some new laboratory diagnostic methods for TP occurred. This paper reviewed the research progress on etiology diagnostic method,immunological diagnostic method and molecular biological diagnostic method for TP,in order to provide references for early diagnosis of TP.%结核性胸膜炎( TP)是引起渗出性胸腔积液最常见的病因,传统的诊断方法主要为病原学、免疫学和胸膜病理检查。随着科学技术的发展,尤其是药敏试验与分子生物学技术在临床的应用,出现了一些新的TP诊断技术。本文就TP的病原学诊断方法、免疫学诊断方法及分子生物学诊断方法的研究进展进行综述,以期为TP的早期诊断提供参考。

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the first quarter of fiscal year 1994 (October through December, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: (1) Safeguards Technology, (2) Safeguards and Decision Support, (3) Computer Security, (4) DOE Automated Physical Security, and (5) DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. This report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strauch, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 1997 (October through December, 1996). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in four areas: (1) safeguards technology; (2) safeguards and material accountability; (3) computer security--distributed systems; and (4) physical and personnel security support. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these four areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

    1993-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 1993 (July through September, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: Safeguards Technology, Safeguard System Studies, Computer Security, DOE Automated Physical Security and DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  12. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  13. Berkeley e o papel das hipóteses na filosofia natural Berkeley and the role of hypothesis in natural philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Seno Chibeni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A questão do estatuto epistemológico das hipóteses que postulam entes e mecanismos inobserváveis tornou-se proeminente com o advento da ciência moderna, no século XVII. Uma das razões para isso é que, por um lado, as novas teorias científicas passaram a empregá-las amplamente na explicação dos fenômenos naturais, enquanto que, por outro lado, a epistemologia empirista, geralmente adotada desde então para a análise da ciência, parecia proscrever seu uso. Neste artigo analisam-se as soluções propostas por George Berkeley para essa tensão. Mostra-se que nos Princípios do conhecimento humano ele introduz uma nova noção de explicação científica, segundo a qual a ciência poderia prescindir de hipóteses sobre inobserváveis, quaisquer que sejam. Depois, para acomodar epistemologicamente a mecânica newtoniana, ele propõe, no De motu, a interpretação instrumentalista das hipóteses sobre forças, que são centrais nessa teoria, considerada por ele "a melhor chave para a ciência natural". Finalmente, em sua obra tardia, Siris, Berkeley envolve-se, de forma aparentemente realista, na discussão e defesa de uma série de hipóteses sobre fluidos inobserváveis. Examina-se brevemente, no final do artigo, a possibilidade de conciliar essa posição com os princípios fundamentais da epistemologia e metafísica de Berkeley.The issue of the epistemological status of hypotheses postulating unobservable entities became prominent with the advent of modern science, in the 17th century. The basic reason is that such entities were widely employed by the new scientific theories in the explanation and prediction of natural phenomena, whereas empiricist epistemology, which at that time became very popular among philosophers and scientists, formed a clearly inhospitable background for unobservable elements in general. This paper examines the stands adopted, and the proposals made on this topic by George Berkeley, one of the most important

  14. FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems

  15. FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry

  16. FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2007-10-01

    as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2007 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in

  17. The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Braund

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of whether perception is direct or if it depends on additional, cognitive contributions made by the perceiving subject, is posed with particular force in an Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (NTV. It is evident from the recurrent treatment it receives therein that Berkeley considers it to be one of the central issues concerning perception. Fittingly, the NTV devotes the most attention to it. In this essay, I deal exclusively with Berkeley's treatment of the problem of indirect distance perception, as it is presented in the context of that work.

  18. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  19. FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M

    2005-11-22

    appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its

  20. FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry

  1. FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems

  2. The Berkeley Puppet Interview: A Screening Instrument for Measuring Psychopathology in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lisanne L.; van Daal, Carlijn; van der Maten, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Otten, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: While child self-reports of psychopathology are increasingly accepted, little standardized instruments are utilized for these practices. The Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) is an age-appropriate instrument for self-reports of problem behavior by young children. Objective: Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the BPI will be…

  3. Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology: A Decade of Broadening Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Orpheus S. L.; Harrison, Christopher D.; Haas, Guy; Garcia, Daniel D.; Humphreys, Sheila M.; Lewis, Colleen M.; Khooshabeh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology is a decade-old endeavor to expose pre-college young women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities to the fields of computer science and engineering, and prepare them for rigorous, university-level study. We have served more than 150 students, and graduated more than 65…

  4. "A Woman's World": The University of California, Berkeley, during the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Charles

    2008-01-01

    During World War II, female students at the University of California, Berkeley--then the most populous undergraduate campus in American higher education--made significant advances in collegiate life. In growing numbers, women enrolled in male-dominated academic programs, including mathematics, chemistry, and engineering, as they prepared for…

  5. UC Berkeley's Undocumented Student Program: Holistic Strategies for Undocumented Student Equitable Success across Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ruben Elias Canedo; So, Meng L.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, Ruben Elias Canedo Sanchez and Meng L. So share the history and development of the Undocumented Student Program at the University of California, Berkeley. In describing the creation of the program, the authors offer reflections on the strategies employed to holistically support undocumented students' success on campus. By drawing on…

  6. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  7. Visual Access to Visual Images: The UC Berkeley Image Database Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Howard

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the problem of access in managing image collections and describes a prototype system for the University of California Berkeley which would include the University Art Museum, Architectural Slide Library, Geography Department's Map Library and Lowie Museum of Anthropology photographs. The system combines an online public access catalog…

  8. You Learn What You Eat: Cognition Meets Nutrition in Berkeley Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, David

    2001-01-01

    In the past 5 years, the Center for Ecoliteracy's Food Systems Project has grown from one schoolyard garden to the complete reinvention of Child Nutrition Services throughout the Berkeley Unified School District. Using food as the organizing principle for systemic change, the project is devising a pattern of healthy food, improved academic…

  9. Multiple Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Richard J.; Graymer, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    With the exception of Los Angeles, perhaps no urban area in the United States is more at risk from landsliding, triggered by either precipitation or earthquake, than the San Francisco Bay region of northern California. By January each year, seasonal winter storms usually bring moisture levels of San Francisco Bay region hillsides to the point of saturation, after which additional heavy rainfall may induce landslides of various types and levels of severity. In addition, movement at any time along one of several active faults in the area may generate an earthquake large enough to trigger landslides. The danger to life and property rises each year as local populations continue to expand and more hillsides are graded for development of residential housing and its supporting infrastructure. The chapters in the text consist of: *Introduction by Russell W. Graymer *Chapter 1 Rainfall Thresholds for Landslide Activity, San Francisco Bay Region, Northern California by Raymond C. Wilson *Chapter 2 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 3 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 4 Landslide Hazard Modeled for the Cities of Oakland, Piedmont, and Berkeley, Northern California, from a M=7.1 Scenario Earthquake on the Hayward Fault Zone by Scott B. Miles and David K. Keefer *Chapter 5 Synthesis of Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike The plates consist of: *Plate 1 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike, Russell W. Graymer, Sebastian Roberts, Naomi B. Kalman, and Steven Sobieszczyk *Plate 2 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven

  10. Research progress of laboratory diagnostic techniques for Brucella%布鲁杆菌实验室诊断技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周梅

    2012-01-01

    tests play a major role in diagnosis when the bacteria cannot be detected by culture. The routine identification and differentiation of Brucellaspecies is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process which frequently places personnel at risk of laboratory-acquired infection and the bacteria from laboratory diffusion. In recent years the appeared new immunological methods and polymerase chain reaction has high sensitivity and specificity. The article reviews the laboratory diagnostic techniques and research progress of Brucella.

  11. Cyclist safety on bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikel, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the safety of bicyclists riding on bicycle boulevards to those riding on parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California. Literature on the impact of motor vehicle traffic characteristics on cyclist safety shows that high motor vehicle speeds and volumes and the presence of heavy vehicles are all detrimental to cyclist safety. This suggests that cyclists may be safer on side streets than on busy arterials. Bicycle boulevards-traffic-calmed side streets signed and improved for cyclist use-purport to offer cyclists a safer alternative to riding on arterials. Police-reported bicycle collision data and manually collected cyclist count data from bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California from 2003 to 2010 are used to test the hypothesis that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards have lower cyclist collision rates and a lower proportion of bicycle collisions resulting in severe injury. While no significant difference is found in the proportion of collisions that are severe, results show that collision rates on Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are two to eight times lower than those on parallel, adjacent arterial routes. The difference in collision rate is highly statistically significant, unlikely to be caused by any bias in the collision and count data, and cannot be easily explained away by self-selection or safety in numbers. Though the used dataset is limited and the study design is correlational, this study provides some evidence that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are safer for cyclists than its parallel arterial routes. The results may be suggestive that, more generally, properly implemented bicycle boulevards can provide cyclists with a safer alternative to riding on arterials.

  12. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2005-03-22

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also

  14. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO

  15. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  16. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. The specific tasks addressed were to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Initial measurements were conducted of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants. A prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon are described. Methodology was developed to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  17. 犊牛腹泻病原实验室诊断研究进展%Research Progress on Laboratory Diagnosis Methods of Infectious Etiology of Calf Diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹德琦; 何润霞; 龙淼

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common disease in calf rearing. Serious diarrhea always causes death of calf and brings huge economic loss to dairy cow breeding industry worldwide. While the emergence and prevalence of calf diarrhea was controlled in some of the dairy farms to some extent as the increase of feeding level, the calf diarrhea is still hard to be completely controlled due to the numerous infectious etiologies and the complex infection situation. The research progress on laboratory diagnosis methods of infectious etiology of calf diarrhea was reviewed in this paper, with the hope to provide theoretical foundation for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of calf diarrhea.%犊牛腹泻是犊牛培育过程中的常见疾病,严重时可导致犊牛死亡,常给奶牛养殖业造成严重的经济损失。随着奶牛场犊牛饲养管理水平的提高,犊牛腹泻的流行和发生在一定程度上得到了控制,但由于引起该病发生的病原种类较多、感染情况较为复杂,使得奶牛场对该病的防控仍存在一定难度。介绍了与犊牛腹泻有关的传染性病原的实验室诊断方法研究进展,以期为犊牛腹泻的诊断和防治提供理论依据。

  18. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  19. Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, And Their Foes From Berkeley To Russell And Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Mikhail G; 10.1007/s10670-012-9370-y

    2012-01-01

    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century and 20th century developments such as Robinson's theory. Robinson's hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, Robinson regards Berkeley's criticisms of the infinitesimal calculus as aptly demonstrating the inconsistency of reasoning with historical infinitesimal magnitudes. We argue that Robinson, among others, overestimates the force of Berkeley's criticisms, by underestimating the mathematical and philosophical resources available to Leibniz. Leibniz's infinitesimals are fictions, not logical fictions, as Ishiguro proposed, but ...

  20. Stellar Mass Segregation in the Aged Galactic Open Star Cluster Berkeley 17

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Souradeep; Vaidya, Kaushar; Chen, Wen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the morphology of Berkeley\\,17, the oldest known open cluster ($\\sim10$ Gyr), using a probabilistic star counting of Pan-STARRS point sources, and confirm its core-tail shape, plus an antitail, previously detected with 2MASS data. The stellar population, as diagnosed by the color-magnitude diagram and theoretical isochrones, shows more massive than lower-mass members in the cluster core, whereas there is a paucity of massive members in both tails. This manifests mass segregation in this aged star cluster with the low-mass members being stripped away from the system. It has been claimed that Berkeley 17 is associated with an excessive number of blue stragglers. Our analysis in comparison of the cluster with nearby reference fields indicates that about half of the blue stragglers may be field contaminations, and some may be confused with the rare blue horizontal-branch stars in this cluster.

  1. The Berkeley EUV/FUV Shuttle Telescope - Observations of dust reflection in the FUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Martin, Christopher; Bowyer, Stuart

    1986-01-01

    Observations by the Berkeley EUV/FUV Shuttle Telescope of the FUV reflection from dust clouds are reported. Spectra of the diffuse UV background from regions of low and high hydrogen column density have been taken. The intensity of the continuum correlates well with the column density of neutral hydrogen, and the slope of this correlation is interpreted with a simple model of optically thin scattering to obtain a measurement of a combination of the albedo and asymmetry parameter in the FUV.

  2. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. II. The foreground ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Simón-Díaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nearly one century after their discovery, the carrier(s) of Diffuse Interstellar Bands is/are still unknown and there are few sightlines studied in detail for a large number of DIBs. Aims: We want to study the ISM sightlines towards LS III +46 11 and LS III +46 12, two early-O-type stellar systems, and LS III +46 11 B, a mid-B-type star. The three targets are located in the stellar cluster Berkeley 90 and have a high extinction. Methods: We use the multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra presented in paper I (Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. 2015), the extinction results derived there, and additional spectra. Results: We have measured equivalent widths, velocities, and FWHMs for a large number of absorption lines in the rich ISM spectrum in front of Berkeley 90. The absorbing ISM has at least two clouds at different velocities, one with a lower column density (thinner) in the K I lines located away from Berkeley 90 and another one with a higher column density (thicker) associated with the cluster. The first cl...

  3. Near-infrared photometry of the young open clusters NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, A; Carraro, G; Girardi, L; Vallenari, Antonella; Richichi, Andrea; Carraro, Giovanni; Girardi, Leo

    1999-01-01

    We present photometry in the J and K near-infrared bands for two regions centered on the young open clusters NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86. We study 700 stars down to K = 17 in the field of NGC 1893, and about 2000 stars in the field of Berkeley 86 down to K$\\sim$ 16.5, for which near-infrared photometry was insofar not available. Coupling J-K data with UBV photometry taken from literature, we produce reddening corrected colour-magnitude diagrams. We find that our data are consistent with previous determinations: the clusters are roughly coeval with an age between 4 and 6 million years. The mean reddening (measured as E(J-K)) values turn out to be 0.35 and 0.50 for NGC 1893 and Berkeley 86, respectively.Using colour-colour plots we discuss the presence of candidate pre-main sequence stars showing infrared excess. Candidates are found in both cluster regions, confirming the young age of these clusters.

  4. Hayward Fault rate constraints at Berkeley: Evaluation of the 335-meter Strawberry Creek offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    At UC Berkeley the active channel of Strawberry Creek is offset 335 meters by the Hayward fault and two abandoned channels of Strawberry Creek are laterally offset 580 and 730 meters. These relationships record the displacement of the northern Hayward fault at Berkeley over a period of tens of millennia. The Strawberry Creek site has a similar geometry to the central San Andreas fault's Wallace Creek site, which arguably provides the best geological evidence of "millennial" fault kinematics in California (Sieh and Jahns, 1984). Slip rate determinations are an essential component of overall hazard evaluation for the Hayward fault, and this site is ripe to disclose a long-term form of this parameter, to contrast with geodetic and other geological rate evidence. Large offsets at the site may lower uncertainty in the rate equation relative to younger sites, as the affect of stream abandonment age, generally the greatest source of rate uncertainty, is greatly reduced. This is helpful here because it more-than-offsets uncertainties resulting from piercing projections to the fault. Strawberry Creek and its ancestral channels suggest west-side-up vertical deformation across the Hayward fault at this location. The development of the vertical deformation parameter will complement ongoing geodetic measurements, particularly InSAR, and motivate testing of other geological constraints. Up-to-the-west motion across the Hayward fault at Berkeley has important implications for the partitioning of strain and kinematics of the northern Hayward fault, and may explain anomalous up-on-the-west landforms elsewhere along the fault. For example, geological features of the western Berkeley Hills are consistent with rapid and recent uplift to the west of the fault. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of the offset channels of Strawberry Creek, up-to-the-west uplift is about 0.5mm/yr across the Hayward fault at Berkeley. If this is in fact the long-term rate, the 150 m height of the Hills

  5. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R P; Ghiorso, W; Staples, J; Huang, T M; Sannibale, F; Kramasz, T D

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  6. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  7. Fun and games in Berkeley: the early years (1956-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Life at Berkeley for the past 57 years involved research on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic properties of RNA to better understand its structures, interactions, and functions. We (myself and all the graduate students and postdocs who shared in the fun) began with dinucleoside phosphates and slowly worked our way up to megadalton-sized RNA molecular motors. We used UV absorption, circular dichroism, circular intensity differential scattering, fluorescence, NMR, and single-molecule methods. We learned a lot and had fun doing it.

  8. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  9. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  10. NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81: three BOCCE clusters of intermediate age

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Bragaglia, A; Cignoni, M; Tosi, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the evolutionary status of three open clusters: NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81. They are all of intermediate age, two are located in the Galactic anti-centre direction while the third one is located in the Galactic centre direction. All of them were observed with LBC@LBT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that NGC 1817 has subsolar metallicity, age between 0.8 and 1.2 Gyr, reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.21 and 0.34, and distance modulus (m-M)_0 of about 10.9; NGC 2141 is older, with age in the range 1.25 and 1.9 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.36 and 0.45, (m-M)_0 between 11.95 and 12.21, and subsolar metallicity; Berkeley~81 has metallicity about solar, with age between 0.75 and 1.0 Gyr, has reddening E(B-V)~0.90...

  11. Searching for multiple stellar populations in the massive, old open cluster Berkeley 39

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; D'Orazi, V; Sneden, C; Lucatello, S

    2012-01-01

    The most massive star clusters include several generations of stars with a different chemical composition (mainly revealed by an Na-O anti-correlation) while low-mass star clusters appear to be chemically homogeneous. We are investigating the chemical composition of several clusters with masses of a few 10^4 Msun to establish the lower mass limit for the multiple stellar population phenomenon. Using FLAMES@VLT spectra we determine abundances of Fe, O, Na, and several other elements (alpha, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements) in the old open cluster Berkeley 39. This is a massive open cluster: M~10^4 Msun, approximately at the border between small globular clusters and large open clusters. Our sample size of about 30 stars is one of the largest studied for abundances in any open cluster to date, and will be useful to determine improved cluster parameters, such as age, distance, and reddening when coupled with precise, well-calibrated photometry. We find that Berkeley 39 is slightly metal-poor, =-0.20, in ag...

  12. The old anticentre open cluster Berkeley 32: membership and fundamental parameters

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazi, V; Fabrizio, L D; Held, E V; Tosi, M

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained medium-low resolution spectroscopy and BVI CCD imaging of Berkeley 32, an old open cluster which lies in the anticentre direction. From the radial velocities of 48 stars in the cluster direction we found that 31 of them, in crucial evolutionary phases, are probable cluster members, with an average radial velocity of +106.7 (sigma = 8.5) km/s. From isochrone fitting to the colour magnitude diagrams of Berkeley 32 we have obtained an age of 6.3 Gyr, (m-M)0 = 12.48 and E(B-V) = 0.10. The best fit is obtained with Z=0.008. A consistent distance, (m-M)0 ~= 12.6 +/- 0.1, has been derived from the mean magnitude of red clump stars with confirmed membership; we may assume (m-M)0 ~= 12.55 +/- 0.1. The colour magnitude diagram of the nearby field observed to check for field stars contamination looks intriguingly similar to that of the Canis Major overdensity.

  13. 农业转基因实验室生物风险研究进展%Research Progress on Biolog ical Risks of Agricultural GM Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨君; 杨德礼

    2011-01-01

    The paper summarized the research status on biological risks of agricultural GM laboratory and the risk factors of bio-safety in GM crops laboratory, and then proposes some corresponding safety management suggestions.%综述了我国农业转基因实验室生物安全研究的现状以及转基因作物实验室的生物安全风险因素,并提出了相应的安全管理建议.

  14. Berkeley DB Java Edition数据结构的研究与应用%Research and Application of Berkeley DB Java Edition Data Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽; 杨晓松

    2009-01-01

    研究了Berkeley DB Java Edition的数据存储结构.通过分析日志文件中日志记录类型的数据格式,推导出JE树中各种节点包含的字段、类型以及含义;通过分析JE的恢复过程得出JE的B+树在内存中重建的过程;并分析了JE树及其各种节点占用内存的情况,为硬件资源受限设备上的数据库引擎的应用提供了技术条件.同时介绍了基于JE的移动支付系统的设计,该系统中服务器端数据库的数据文件结构在JE数据结构的基础上进行了适当的修改,使其更适合于该系统,同时验证了B+树占用内存的情况.

  15. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  16. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  17. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  18. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1993 and research proposal for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnbaum, H.K.

    1993-03-01

    The materials research laboratory program is about 30% of total Materials Science and Engineering effort on the Univ. of Illinois campus. Coordinated efforts are being carried out in areas of structural ceramics, grain boundaries, field responsive polymeric and organic materials, molecular structure of solid-liquid interfaces and its relation to corrosion, and x-ray scattering science.

  19. Clinical and laboratory studies on herds affected with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in Denmark, France, Spain, and Sweden: Disease progression and a proposal for herd case definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, L.; Baekbo, P.; Rose, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To propose and evaluate a protocol to establish a diagnosis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) at herd level. Materials and methods: The data used included both laboratory data from previous epidemiological studies carried out in Italy, Denmark, and Spain and original...

  20. Spatial data on energy, environmental, socioeconomic, health and demographic themes at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: 1978 inventory. [SEEDIS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, B.R.; Merrill, D.W. (eds.)

    1979-04-01

    Spatial data files covering energy, environmental, socio-economic, health, and demographic themes are described. Descriptions provide data dates, abstracts, geographic coverage, documentation, original data source, availability limitations, and contact person. A current version of this document is maintained as part of the Socio-Economic-Environmental-Demographic Information System (SEEDIS) within the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department, and is available for on-line retrieval using the Virginia Sventek, (415) 486-5216 or (FTS) 451-5216 for further information.

  1. Opportunities for high aspect ratio micro-electro-magnetic-mechanical systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S. [ed.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy quarter ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the details of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and securities program. This program is focused on developing new technology, such as x- and gamma-ray spectrometry, for measurement of special nuclear materials. This program supports the Office of Safeguards and Securities in the following five areas; safeguards technology, safeguards and decision support, computer security, automated physical security, and automated visitor access control systems.

  3. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report compiles the annual reports of Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects supported by the Berkeley Lab. Projects are arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Accelerator and fusion research division; (2) Chemical sciences division; (3) Computing Sciences; (4) Earth sciences division; (5) Environmental energy technologies division; (6) life sciences division; (7) Materials sciences division; (8) Nuclear science division; (9) Physics division; (10) Structural biology division; and (11) Cross-divisional. A total of 66 projects are summarized.

  4. Controlling mercury spills in laboratories with a thermometer exchange program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLouth, Lawrence D.

    2002-03-25

    This paper presents a case for replacing mercury thermometers with their organic-liquid-filled counterparts. A review of liquid-in glass-thermometers is given. In addition, a brief summary of mercury's health effects and exposure limits is presented. Spill cleanup methods and some lessons learned from our experience are offered as well. Finally, an overview of the mercury thermometer exchange program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is presented.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Berkeley 90. III. Cluster parameters (Marco+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present tables with coordinates in J2000, Johnson photometry and near-IR photometry for stars in the open cluster Berkeley 90 and a field to the southeast of this region. We used the imager and spectrograph Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) at the La Palma observatory to obtain UBVR photometry on the night of 2007 July 9, and spectroscopy of 20 selected stars on the nights of 2004 October 4, 2005 October 2-4 and 2007 July 10. We also downloaded UKIDSS (https://www.ukidss.org/archive/archive.html) images in the JHKS filters to perform deep near-IR photometry. (2 data files).

  6. Interviews with Michael Baxandall, February 3rd and 4th, 1994, Berkeley, CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Langdale

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The following interviews with Michael Baxandall were conducted in Berkeley on February 3rd and 4th of 1994. The content of these interviews include general responses about developments in art history in the years between 1960 and 1985, a period of dramatic modifications in the discipline. Among the issues are the rise of the social history of art and the sources from anthropology that informed Baxandall’s concept of the ‘Period Eye’. Baxandall talks about his own work, his personal intellectual history, and the scholars of past and current generations who influenced him. Other topics include Baxandall’s professional trajectory, the Warburg Library, and aspects of cultural history having to do with Renaissance Humanism. These interviews first appeared as an appendix to the PhD dissertation by Allan Langdale, Art History and Intellectual History: Michael Baxandall’s Work between 1963 and 1985, U. C. Santa Barbara, 1995.

  7. Photometric study of W UMa type binaries in the old open cluster Berkeley 39

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandulapati Sriram; Yellapragada Ravi Kiron; Pasagada Vivekananda Rao

    2009-01-01

    The study of W UMa binary systems gives a wealth of information about their nature as well as their parent bodies(if any).like clusters.In this paper,we present the Ⅰ passband photometric solutions of four W UMa binaries in the open cluster Berkeley 39 using the latest version of the W-D program.The result shows that two binary systems are W-subtype W UMa binary systems and the other two systems are H-subtype W UMa binary systems.No third body has been found in any of the four systems.we found a correlation between the period and mass-ratio as well as temperature and mass-ratio for the respective variables,which is similar to the relationship between mass ratio and total mass of the contact binaries as shown by van't Veer and Li et al.

  8. UC Berkeley's Adaptations to the Crisis of Public Higher Education in the US: Privatization? Commercialization? or Hybridization? Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.17.13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley now delivers more to the public of California than it ever has, and it does this on the basis of proportionally less funding by the State government than it has ever received. This claim may come as a surprise, since it is often said that Berkeley is in the process of privatizing, becoming less of a public…

  9. Platelet activation biomarkers in Berkeley sickle cell mice and the response to prasugrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kousaku; Tanaka, Hisako; Samata, Naozumi; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Mizuno, Makoto; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is a common complication that occurs in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Although underlying mechanisms of VOC remain unclear, platelet activation has been associated with VOC. In the present study, plasma adenine nucleotide measurements using LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that plasma ADP in the Berkeley murine model of SCD was significantly higher (applox. 2.7-fold increase) compared with control mice. Assessment of platelet activation markers using flow cytometry indicated that in SCD mice at steady state (8 weeks old), circulating platelets were partially activated and this tended to increase with age (15 weeks old). The administration of prasugrel, a thienopiridyl P2Y12 antagonist, did not affect the activation state of circulating platelets suggesting P2Y12 independent mechanism of activation. In this murine SCD model, ex vivo addition of ADP or PAR4 TRAP resulted in further platelet activation as assessed by expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and P-selectin both at 8 and 15 weeks. In 15 weeks old SCD mice, agonist-induced increases in activation markers were enhanced compared to control mice. Oral administration of prasugrel effectively inhibited ex vivo platelet activation consistent with clinical data in patients with SCD. In conclusion, in the Berkeley murine model of SCD, we found evidence of basal and agonist-stimulated platelet activation which could in part be attenuated by prasugrel. These data are consistent with observations made in patients with SCD and suggest possible utility of this murine model and prasugrel therapy in exploring treatment options for patients with SCD.

  10. Progress of laboratory diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in children%小儿急性胰腺炎的实验室诊断研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓红

    2010-01-01

    小儿急性胰腺炎诊断及预测其严重程度的传统实验室指标包括血、尿淀粉酶,血脂肪酶,尿胰蛋白酶原-2,C反应蛋白,淀粉酶和肌酐清除比率以及细胞因子等.传统实验室诊断指标操作简便、经济,但敏感性和特异性不够理想.近年来降钙素原、磷脂酶A2、胰酶试剂盒、胰蛋白酶原活性肽、羧肽酶B活性肽、人胰腺特异蛋白/羧肽酶原B、多形核白细胞弹性蛋白酶、血清淀粉样蛋白A及细胞间黏附分子1等新的实验室指标被相继发现和应用,为小儿急性胰腺炎的早期诊断和病情严重程度预测提供了可靠的判断方法,但新的实验室诊断指标多数检测繁琐、价格昂贵,限制了其在临床的广泛应用.因此,仍需寻找更敏感、特异、廉价和可操作性强的实验室指标应用于临床诊断.%The traditional laboratory markers of acute pancreatitis in children include serum amylase and urine amylase, serum lipase, urinary trypsinogen-2, C-reactive protein, cytokines, amylase and creatinine clearance ratio and so on. They can be simply detected and economic, but the sensitivity and specificity are not satisfied. Several new laboratory markers of acute pancreatitis in children, which include procalcitonin, phospholipase A2, PankrinTM, trypsinogen activation peptide, carboxypeptidase B activation peptide, human pancreas-specific protein/procarboxypeptidase B, polymorphonuclear elastase, serum amyloid protein A, and as well as intercellular adhesion molecule- 1, have been found and applied in recent years .They can provide reliable judgment methods for early diagnosis and prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis in children, but most of the new laboratory markers are rarely used in clinic because they are difficult to be detected and expensive. More sensitive, specific, cheap and operable laboratory markers which can be used in clinic are to be explored.

  11. Chemistry and Materials Science Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory-Directed Research and Development. Second half progress report, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research are surface research, uranium research, physics and processing of metals, energetic materials. Group study areas included strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds, advanced synchrotron radiation study of materials, and theory, modeling, and computation. Individual projects were life prediction for composites and thermoelectric materials with exceptional figures of merit. The laboratory-directed R and D include director`s initiatives (aerogel-based electronic devices, molecular levels of energetic materials), individual projects, and transactinium institute studies. An author index is provided.

  12. A Proposal to Eliminate the SAT in Berkeley Admissions. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.4.16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Saul

    2016-01-01

    The SAT is used for two purposes at the University of California. First is "eligibility": Determining whether applicants meet the minimum requirements for admission to the UC system. Second is "admissions selection": At high-demand campuses such as Berkeley, with many more eligible applicants than places available, test scores…

  13. Doing Much More with Less: Implementing Operational Excellence at UC Berkeley. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.10.13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Lyons, Richard; Huston, Peggy; Wilton, John

    2013-01-01

    Universities are undergoing historic change, from the sharp downward shift in government funding to widespread demands to document performance. At the University of California Berkeley, this led to an operational change effort unlike any the university had ever attempted, dubbed Operational Excellence. The authors describe their experiences…

  14. Progress and prospect in research on laboratory tree shrew in China%中国树鼩实验动物化研究进展和展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈培清; 角建林; 郑红; 刘汝文; 陈丽玲; 李波; 何保丽; 李进涛; 贲昆龙; 曹筱梅

    2011-01-01

    We outline the historical research on the laboratory tree shrew in China and discuss its current research trends. Five key aspects of applied research are emphasized in this review, including quality control standards for laboratory tree shrews, the establishment of an inbred colony, commercial preparation of major molecular and cellular research tools, further research on tree shrew models for human diseases, and the establishment of the tree shrew seed institution at state level.%该文回顾了我国树鼩驯养繁殖和研究的发展历史,介绍了树鼩实验动物化研究的最新进展,并结合我国目前的状况,提出了今后的工作建议:加强实验树鼩标准化(包括地方和国家标准)的研究、近交系动物的研制、达到商业化树鼩的基础分子与细胞生物学研究工具的研制、人类重大疾病树鼩动物模型研究和建设国家实验树鼩种源基地等.

  15. 梅毒螺旋体感染实验室诊断方法研究进展%Laboratory diagnostic methods for Treponema pallidum infection: research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武雨霖; 阮森林; 王敏敏

    2013-01-01

    梅毒是一种性传播疾病,病程长、危害大、临床表现复杂,容易造成漏诊和误诊.梅毒的早期诊断对控制梅毒传播具有重要意义.本文对当前梅毒螺旋体的病原学、血清学及分子生物学等检测方法及研究进展作一综述.%Syphilis is a kind of sexually transmitted diseases. Because of its long duration, great harm and complex clinical manifestations, it is liable to make misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis. The early diagnosis of syphilis is important for the control of syphilis transmission. This paper reviewed the etiological, serological and molecular biological methods for Treponema pallidum detection and the research progress.

  16. Progress in automated extraction and purification of in situ {sup 14}C from quartz: Results from the Purdue in situ {sup 14}C laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifton, Nathaniel, E-mail: nlifton@purdue.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Goehring, Brent, E-mail: bgoehrin@tulane.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Wilson, Jim, E-mail: jim.wilson@aeonlaboratories.com [Aeon Laboratories, LLC, 5835 North Genematas Drive, Tucson, AZ 85704 (United States); Kubley, Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Caffee, Marc [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Current extraction methods for in situ {sup 14}C from quartz [e.g., Lifton et al., (2001), Pigati et al., (2010), Hippe et al., (2013)] are time-consuming and repetitive, making them an attractive target for automation. We report on the status of in situ {sup 14}C extraction and purification systems originally automated at the University of Arizona that have now been reconstructed and upgraded at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). The Purdue in situ {sup 14}C laboratory builds on the flow-through extraction system design of Pigati et al. (2010), automating most of the procedure by retrofitting existing valves with external servo-controlled actuators, regulating the pressure of research purity O{sub 2} inside the furnace tube via a PID-based pressure controller in concert with an inlet mass flow controller, and installing an automated liquid N{sub 2} distribution system, all driven by LabView® software. A separate system for cryogenic CO{sub 2} purification, dilution, and splitting is also fully automated, ensuring a highly repeatable process regardless of the operator. We present results from procedural blanks and an intercomparison material (CRONUS-A), as well as results of experiments to increase the amount of material used in extraction, from the standard 5 g to 10 g or above. Results thus far are quite promising with procedural blanks comparable to previous work and significant improvements in reproducibility for CRONUS-A measurements. The latter analyses also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative extraction of in situ {sup 14}C from sample masses up to 10 g. Our lab is now analyzing unknowns routinely, but lowering overall blank levels is the focus of ongoing research.

  17. Challenges and Opportunities To Achieve 50% Energy Savings in Homes. National Laboratory White Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Marcus V.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This report summarizes the key opportunities, gaps, and barriers identified by researchers from four national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) that must be addressed to achieve the longer term 50% saving goal for Building America to ensure coordination with the Building America industry teams who are focusing their research on systems to achieve the near-term 30% savings goal. Although new construction was included, the focus of the effort was on deep energy retrofits of existing homes.

  18. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    At the end of the war it became apparent that the teamwork of government and scientific institutions, which had been so effective in wartime work, must somehow be perpetuated in order to insure the continued progress of nuclear science in peace time. The enormous expense of the tools needed to pursue the next steps in this research -- nuclear reactors and high energy accelerators -- and the shortage of scientifically trained personnel pointed towards the establishment of a cooperative laboratory. Such a laboratory, using government funds, could carry out a comprehensive research program that would benefit the many interested research groups throughout the country. As a result of the wartime programs under the Manhattan District, centers of research in nuclear science were already active at the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, at Los Alamos in New Mexico, at the Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at the Argonne Laboratory in Chicago. No analogous nuclear research laboratories, however, had developed in the Northeast, and since so much of the nation's scientific talent and industrial activities are concentrated in the northeastern states, it was proposed that a new laboratory be established near New York City. As a result of this plan, the Brookhaven National Laboratory is now in operation at Upton, Long Island. The work of this Laboratory is performed under a contract between the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a corporation, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) , formed by representatives of nine of the larger private universities in the northeast: Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, the University of Rochester, and Yale. The purpose of this laboratory is the advancement of knowledge in the fundamentals of nuclear science, the extension of its application to other fields, and the training of young scientists in these new subjects. This

  19. 艰难梭菌实验室检测方法的进展%Progress of laboratory detection of Clostridium difficile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭; 彭子元; 吴永华

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a kind of intestinal disease caused by C .di f f icile toxin ,the clinical man-ifestations vary from asymptomatic carriage ,mild diarrhea ,toxic megacolon to colon perforation or even death .In recent years ,the incidence of C .dif f icile infection shows an upward trend in patients of hospitals and communi-ties .The survey shows that in Europe ,for 10 ,000 hospitalized patients on average ,7 had the C .dif f icile infec-tion .In America ,however ,the C .di f f icile infection is the leading cause of hospitalization-related infection ,lead-ing to about 14 ,000 deaths in a year of average .The C .dif f icile infection has become a global health problem . The laboratory detection of the C .dif f icile is crucial to clinical diagnosis and treatment of the C .dif f icile infec-tion ,and the article briefly introduces the laboratory diagnosis of the C .di f f icile .%艰难梭菌感染(Clostridium difficile infection ,CDI)是一种由艰难梭菌毒素引起的肠道疾病,临床表现可从无症状携带、轻度腹泻、中毒性巨结肠,到结肠穿孔甚至死亡。近几年,CDI在医院和社区患者中的发病率持续上升。调查显示,在欧洲,平均每10000例住院患者中就有7例CDI患者。而在美国,CDI是住院相关性感染的首要原因,平均每年大约造成14000例死亡。CDI已成为全球性卫生问题。其实验室检查对CDI临床诊断和治疗至关重要,本研究将对艰难梭菌实验室诊断的进展进行综述。

  20. Progress Toward a Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical-Biological (THMCB) Experiment in the Homestake Mine Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenthal, E. L.; Maher, K.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Uzunlar, N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Conrad, M. E.; Olsen, N. J.; Jones, T. L.; Cruz, M. F.; Torchinsky, A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of performing a long-term hydrothermal experiment in a deep mine is to gain a scientific understanding of the coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes taking place in fractured rock under the influence of mechanical stress, thermal effects, and fluid flow. Only in a controlled experiment in a well-characterized rock mass, can a fractured rock be probed in 3-D through geophysical imaging, in situ measurements, geochemical/biological sampling, and numerical modeling. Our project is focused on the feasibility of a THMCB experiment in the Homestake Mine, South Dakota to study the long-term evolution (10+ years) of a perturbed heterogeneous rock mass. In addition to the experiment as a laboratory for studying crustal processes, it has direct application to Enhanced Geothermal Systems, carbon sequestration, and contaminant transport. Field activities have focused on fracture and feature mapping, flux measurements from flowing fractures, and collection of water and rock samples for geochemical, biological, and isotopic analyses. Fracture mapping and seepage measurements are being used to develop estimates of permeability and fluxes at different length scales and design the location and orientation of the heater array. Fluxes measured up to several liters/minute indicate localized regions of very high fracture permeability, likely in excess of 10-10 m2. Isotopic measurements indicate heterogeneity in the fracture network on the scale of tens of meters in addition to the large-scale geochemical heterogeneity observed in the mine. New methods for sampling and filtering water samples were developed and tested with the goal of performing radiocarbon analyses in DNA and phospholipid fatty acids. Analytical and numerical models of the thermal perturbation have been used to design the heater orientation and spacing. Reaction path and THC simulations were performed to assess geochemical and porosity/permeability changes as a function of the heat input

  1. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  2. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  3. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  4. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR). DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  5. The research progress in respiratory virus laboratory testing technology%呼吸道病毒实验室检测技术的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶星晨(综述); 杨海鸥; 王静(审校)

    2015-01-01

    呼吸道病毒是威胁人类健康的主要因素之一,因此快速准确地鉴别病原微生物具有重要的临床意义。文章介绍了目前应用于呼吸道病毒检测的一些经典或新兴实验室技术,包括病毒分离培养技术、免疫学技术、核酸扩增技术、芯片技术、下一代测序技术、质谱( MS)技术等。这些技术以其各自的特点应用于呼吸道病毒的临床诊断、疗效观察以及科学研究与探索。%Respiratory virus is one of main factors that threatens human health, so it is significant to identify pathogenic microorganisms accurately and rapidly.This article introduces some traditional or new laboratory testing technologies that have been applied to respiratory virus determination nowdays, including virus isolation culture technique, immunological technique, nucleic acid sequence amplification technique, chip technology, next generation sequencing technique, mass spectrometry ( MS ) technique and so on.These technologies are applied into clinical diagnosis, curative effect observation, scientific research and investigation of respiratory virus by their characteristics.

  6. University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. Report NPL-845. [Nuclear Physics Lab. , Univ. of Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1978 to October 31, 1979, under contract EY-76-C-02-0535.A003 between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. Experimental studies of light ion-induced reactions were performed with the AVF cyclotron, which continues each year to produce beams of yet higher quality. Charged-particle studies continued to emphasize use of the high-resolution spectrometer system, but some return to broad-range spectroscopic studies using solid state detectors also occurred. Neutron time-of-flight experiments used 9-meter and 30-meter flight paths. Neutron-gamma ray coincidence studies developed into a new and promising field. The new PDP 11/34 data acquisition system was of great value in allowing such multiparameter experiments. Smaller programs in nuclear astrophysics, plasma diagnostic development, and medical physics were also undertaken. Research activities based at other accelerators grew. Studies of future directions for light-ion accelerators, including work on intense pulsed ion sources, orbit dynamics, and storage rings, were greatly enlarged. 19 of the articles in this report were abstracted and indexed individually. Lists of publications and personnel conclude this report. (RWR)

  7. The Advanced Raven's Progressive Matrices: Normative Data for an American University Population and an Examination of the Relationship with Spearman's g.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Steven M.

    1986-01-01

    Normative data for the Advanced Raven's Progressive Matrices are presented based on 300 University of California, Berkeley, students. Correlations with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Terman Concept Mastery Test are explored. The relationship between the Advanced Raven's Progressive Matrices and Spearman's g is explored. (Author)

  8. Progress of laboratory diagnostic methods of Clostridium difficile infection%艰难梭菌感染实验室诊断方法的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨靖; 李雅静; 温海楠; 赵建宏

    2012-01-01

    艰难梭菌是一种专性厌氧革兰阳性芽孢杆菌,一般认为是环境和人类肠道中的正常菌群.长期应用抗生素、免疫抑制剂或化疗药物使耐药的艰难梭菌产毒株过度繁殖并释放毒素是导致艰难梭菌相关性腹泻(CDAD)的主要因素.CDAD的发病率在全球范围内不断上升,尤其是高产毒株在北美地区引起了医院内的暴发流行,引起了世界范围的关注.在此对艰难梭菌的致病机制和实验室诊断方法的研究进展进行阐述,为CDAD的早期诊断和治疗提供新思路.%Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive,anaerobic spore-forming bacillus commonly found in the environment and human gut.Excessive use of antibiotics,immunosuppressive agents and chemotherapy drugs may lead to overgrowth of the toxic strain of Clostridium difficile with high resistance,which are supposed to be the major contributing factors leading to Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea(CDAD).The globally increasing incidence of CDAD,especially the outbreak of nosocomial infection caused by the hypervirulent strain in North America,arouse worldwide attention.For providing new ideas to the early diagnosis and treatment of CDAD,this review summarize the latest development on pathogenesis and rapid laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile.

  9. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under

  11. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    François Pépin

    2014-01-01

    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  12. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Pépin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  13. Progress of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Laboratory Investigation%微生物提高原油采收率室内研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋绍富; 张忠智; 李术元

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, easy process for screening microorganisms, and introduces a laboratory simulation device and process of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR), which is a necessary research step for trial in oilfields. The MEOR mechanism and the influence of adsorption, diffusion, metabolism, nutrition, porosity, and permeability are analyzed. The research indicates that different microbes have different efficiencies in EOR and that different culture types play different roles in EOR. The effect of syrup is better than that of glucose, and larger porosity is favorable to the reproduction and growth of microbes, thereby improving the oil recovery. Using crude oil as a single carbon source is more appreciable because of the decrease in cost of oil recovery. At the end of this paper, the development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the future is discussed.%介绍了一套简便易行的用于微生物采油菌株筛选的程序和室内微生物驱油模拟实验装置及模拟过程.简要阐明了微生物的采油机理,并对吸附、扩散、细菌代谢、营养、孔隙度、渗透率等因素的影响进行了分析.不同细菌具有不同的驱油效果;培养基类型对原油采收率的影响较大,利用糖蜜培养的细菌其采收率优于采用葡萄糖培养的;油层的孔隙度越大,越有利于细菌的增殖,从而使原油采收率提高.考虑到采油成本,以原油为唯一碳源的研究更有前景.最后简单介绍了聚合酶链式反应并展望了微生物采油技术的前景.

  14. Effects of university affiliation and "school spirit" on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Poggesi, Rosa M; Palmer, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people's average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877-8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring undergraduates' color preferences at two rival universities, Berkeley and Stanford, to determine whether students liked their university's colors better than their rivals did. Students not only preferred their own colors more than their rivals did, but the degree of their preference increased with self-rated positive affect ("school spirit") for their university. These results support the EVT's claim that color preference is caused by learned affective responses to associated objects and institutions, because it is unlikely that students choose their university or develop their degree of school spirit on the basis of preexisting color preferences.

  15. Distinguishing distress and psychopathology among survivors of the Oakland/Berkeley firestorm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Carol S; Hong, Barry A; Suris, Alina; Spitznagel, Edward L

    2008-01-01

    Disaster mental health research has historically focused on assessment of psychopathology, using measures of psychiatric symptoms and disorders. The Oakland/Berkeley firestorm provided an opportunity to explore resilience among highly exposed survivors through consideration of psychiatric variables in the context of personality. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule/Disaster Supplement was administered to 62 firestorm survivors at approximately 4, 16, and 39 months and the Temperament and Character Inventory administered at 16 months postdisaster. Few individuals had postdisaster psychopathology (16% with any diagnosis, 5%with PTSD). There was considerable evidence of distress, however, indicated by an abundance of reported posttraumatic symptoms, functional impairments, and endorsement of emotional upset, all of which decreased substantially over time. Group C (avoidance/numbing) posttraumatic symptoms were relatively uncommon and were specifically associated with elevated Self-Transcendence. Groups B (intrusion) and D (hyperarousal) symptoms were prevalent and were associated with high Harm Avoidance and low Self-Directedness. The generally healthy personality profiles of these firestorm survivors reflected their psychological resilience. Examination of symptoms and distress in the context of psychiatric disorders after this disaster demonstrated that symptomatic distress is not inconsistent with psychological resilience. The choice of research focus and methods can provide very different portraits of outcomes post-disaster.

  16. Surficial geologic map of the Charleston region, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, and Georgetown Counties, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Robert E.; Lewis, William C.; Lemon, Earl M.

    2014-01-01

    This map portrays the surface and shallow subsurface geology of the greater Charleston, S.C. region east of 80°30′ west and south of 33°15′ north. The region covers the entirety of Charleston County and portions of Berkeley, Colleton, Dorchester, and Georgetown Counties. Units locally exposed at the surface range in age from middle Eocene to Holocene, but most of the area is covered by Quaternary interglacial deposits. These are, from oldest to youngest, the Okefenokee, Waccamaw(?), Penholoway, Ladson, Ten Mile Hill, and Wando Formations and the Silver Bluff beds. Two cross sections, one running southeast from Harleyville to the coastline on James Island and the other running along the coastal barrier islands from the town of Edisto Beach to the northeast end of Bull Island at the southwest edge of Bull Bay, portray the complex geometry of the Paleogene and Neogene marine units that directly lie beneath the Quaternary units. These older units include the Santee Limestone, Tupelo Bay, Parkers Ferry, Ashley, Chandler Bridge, Edisto, Parachucla, and Marks Head Formations, the Goose Creek Limestone, and the Raysor Formation. The estimated locations of deeply buried active basement faults are shown which are responsible for ongoing modern seismicity in the Charleston, S.C. area.

  17. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and future directions for improvements. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  18. Design, Analysis, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and the future directions for improvements. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  19. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program II: Initial Analysis of Spectra Obtained Near Maximum Brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2012-01-01

    In this second paper in a series we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z < 0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20 d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 through the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I (Silverman et al., submitted). We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEW), spectral feature depths, and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. A sanity check of the consistency of our measurements is performed using our data (as well as a separate spectral dataset). We investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences a...

  20. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  1. The apoptosis effect of hispolon from Phellinus linteus (Berkeley & Curtis) Teng on human epidermoid KB cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; He, Fei-Yu; Li, Yong-Quan

    2006-04-21

    Phellinus linteus (Berkeley & Curtis) Teng, a well-known fungus of the genus Phellinus in the family of Hymenochaetaceae, is being increasingly used to treat a wide variety of disease processes such as oral ulcer, gastroenteric disorder, inflammation, lymphatic disease, and various cancers. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-oral cancer effect is poorly understood. In the present study, we prepared the ethanol extract of Phellinus linteus as a crude drug, and then obtained the active component hispolon by bioassay-guided isolation. Hispolon showed a dose-dependent inhibition of human epidermoid KB cell proliferation with IC50 of 4.62+/-0.16 microg/ml. Furthermore, it was revealed that hispolon could induce human epidermoid KB cell apoptosis with the characteristic of a DNA ladder, and with a significant increase of sub-G1. This process was accompanied by the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of Caspase-3. These results demonstrated that hispolon induced the death of KB cells through a mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway. We propose that Phellinus linteus and its effective components could be used as an anti-oral cancer drug for future studies.

  2. CCD photometry of W UMa-type contact binaries in the old open cluster Berkeley 39

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yellapragada Ravi Kiron; Kandulapati Sriram; Pasagada Vivekananda Rao

    2011-01-01

    We present the combined BVI multicolor photometric solutions of seven EW variables in the old open cluster Berkeley 39.The observations were carried out in the B and V passbands from the 2 m telescope at the IUCAA-Girawali Observatory in India.The analysis is done using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code and the fitted light curves are presented.The light curves appear to be symmetric in all the passbands.The photometric solutions suggest that the variables are W-type systems.The new ephemeris indicates that the orbital periods of the studied variables have not changed during the timespan of observations.Revised orbital period,absolute mass,radius and luminosity of the respective variables are presented.The absolute physical parameters of the variables follow the trend of field EW stars.Comparing the results obtained with the other theoretical works,we suggest that there is an excess loss of mass and angular momentum in these systems which may be due to their short period and relatively young age,possibly due to the presence of a third component or the initial detached period being less than 2 d.

  3. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, O., E-mail: makarov@anl.gov [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hilgart, M.; Ogata, C.; Pothineni, S. [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cork, C. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  4. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  5. Solar Fridges and Personal Power Grids: How Berkeley Lab is Fighting Global Poverty (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluswar, Shashi [Director, LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies; Gadgil, Ashok

    2012-11-26

    At this November 26, 2012 Science at the Theater, scientists discussed the recently launched LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT) at Berkeley Lab. LIGTT is an ambitious mandate to discover and develop breakthrough technologies for combating global poverty. It was created with the belief that solutions will require more advanced R&D and a deep understanding of market needs in the developing world. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Shashi Buluswar and seven other LIGTT scientists discussed what it takes to develop technologies that will impact millions of people. These include: 1) Fuel efficient stoves for clean cooking: Our scientists are improving the Berkeley Darfur Stove, a high efficiency stove used by over 20,000 households in Darfur; 2) The ultra-low energy refrigerator: A lightweight, low-energy refrigerator that can be mounted on a bike so crops can survive the trip from the farm to the market; 3) The solar OB suitcase: A low-cost package of the five most critical biomedical devices for maternal and neonatal clinics; 4) UV Waterworks: A device for quickly, safely and inexpensively disinfecting water of harmful microorganisms.

  6. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  7. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  8. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  9. Quantifying the Seafood Consumption Patterns of Recreational Anglers in Charleston and Berkeley Counties, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkinson, Matthew T; Faith, Trevor D; Vahey, Grace M; Vena, John E; Williams, Edith M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to provide self-reported data on the frequency of fish consumption and shellfish consumption in Charleston and Berkeley (CB) counties, South Carolina. While commercial fishing and recreational fishing have played an important role in the culture and history of the area, information on the specific patterns of consumption by recreational anglers has been previously unavailable. The pilot data presented here will help determine the feasibility of a large-scale survey of seafood consumption in coastal South Carolina. The study's sampling frame consisted of CB county anglers who had purchased a recreational saltwater fishing license for the 2005/2006 year with oversampling in North Charleston. Survey recipients were asked to provide information on fish consumption and shellfish consumption, general angling habits, perception of water and fishing quality, and demographics. Of the 2500 individuals who were sent questionnaires, about one-fourth responded. Respondents were generally white, middle, or upper class and highly educated. The majority fished by boat and most often ate flounder, spotted sea trout, and red drum. Most respondents ate shrimp several times a month and also supplemented their recreational catch with seafood purchased from grocery stores, markets, and restaurants. Almost all respondents had eaten some seafood in the last year, and more than one-fourth ate seafood twice a week or more. Most anglers responded positively about the area's fishing and water qualities, but many referred to areas where they would hesitate to eat their catch. Further research may need to incorporate direct distribution of surveys to underrepresented groups and financial incentives to encompass a more diverse population of anglers.

  10. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Watthanai; Muangruen, Panya; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Mairiang, Dumrong

    2016-01-01

    Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC) is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST) to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software.

  11. Young children's self-reported emotional, behavioral, and peer problems: the Berkeley Puppet Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringoot, Ank P; Jansen, Pauline W; Steenweg-de Graaff, Jolien; Measelle, Jeffrey R; van der Ende, Jan; Raat, Hein; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2013-12-01

    Adult observers are typically the only informants on emotional and behavioral problems in young children. Although additional information can be provided by child self-report, few validated, structured instruments are available to obtain self-report from young children. The Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) has been developed to obtain structured self-reports on multiple domains of mental health and social well-being. This study was the 1st to evaluate the psychometric properties of the BPI in a large sample. We studied 8 a priori scales of the interview in a Dutch community sample of 6,375 children ages 5-7 years. Using confirmatory factor analysis, we demonstrated adequate fit (Tucker-Lewis index = .90; comparative fit index = .90; root-mean-square error of approximation = .03) of a multidimensional model with 50 items loading on 8 latent factors (Depression, Separation Anxiety, Overanxious, Oppositional Defiant, Overt Hostility, Conduct Problems, Bullied by Peers, and Peer Acceptance/Rejection). This model was invariant across gender. Children reported anxiety-related problems more frequently than depressive problems, behavioral problems, or difficulties in peer relations. Reliability analyses showed that 3 broadband scales designated as Internalizing, Externalizing, and Peer Relations were homogeneous constructs (αs = .68-.79). Higher scores on most BPI scales were associated with lower maternal education, lower family income, and non-Western ethnicity. Boys reported more behavioral and peer relation problems, whereas girls reported more emotional problems. The findings indicate that young children from socioeconomically and demographically diverse backgrounds are capable of providing valid, multidimensional information on their emotional, behavioral, and peer relation problems using the BPI. Young children's self-report is a promising addition to existing assessment tools.

  12. Annual Progress Report (SEATO Medical Research Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    1974-31 March 1975 Number of Number Percent Species Specimens Positive Positive Canine 555 234 42.2 Feline 122 14 11.5 Human 2 2 100.0 Rodent 24 2 (a...0.99 (404) 1.34 ± 1.33 (434) -G Eosinophils 2.29± 2.38 (491) 3.05 3.06 (457) 2.484- 2.38 (404) 2.21 ± 2.17 (434) e Monocytes 3.61 ± 2.29 (491) 4.00...105) Neutrophils 31.19 4- 12.65 (105) SBasophils 1.02 ± 0.78 (105) *, Eosinophils 2.44 -±- 3.14 (105) "Moncoytes 3.41 - 2.13 (105) Bands 0.60 -4

  13. Underground laboratories in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shin Ted, E-mail: linst@mails.phys.sinica.edu.tw [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 China (China); Yue, Qian, E-mail: yueq@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Ministry of Education) and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 China (China)

    2015-08-17

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. [ed.; Chartock, M.

    1999-02-05

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

  15. UC Berkeley/Stanford Children’s Environment Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The overall goal of this Center is to better understand the effects of exposure in the womb to air pollutants and airborne bacteria on newborn health, immune system...

  16. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  17. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  18. Some Recent Progress in the Field of High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics%高能量密度实验室天体物理近年来的一些进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩波; 王菲鹿; 赵刚

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics is one of the youngest branches of astrophysics. Its name was coined about 30 years ago. It is successful because the physical laws we discover on Earth should work everywhere. We use laboratory experiments to expand our understanding of physical processes and then apply these results to the processes throughout the Universe. High energy density laboratory astrophysics (HEDLA) allows a depth study and comparison of the measurements produced by laboratory Z-pinches and lasers. In this paper, we review the recent progress in several fields of HEDLA, such as the supernova explosion, stellar jets, photoionized plasmas, stellar opacity and equation of state (EOS) and solar magnetic reconnection. In some cases laboratory experiments can reproduce similar physics. For example, the charged plasmas can be created in the laboratory to study the interactions among photons, electrons and ions that occur in the stars, the solar corona and the X-ray binaries. In other cases, we need some scales to study the processes behind the astrophysical phenomena by the experiments. For example, the evolution of a laboratory plasma jet, with typical spatial scales of a few mm and characteristic timescales of hundreds of ns, can be a scaled version of large-scale jets from young stars (typically thousands of astronomical units in length and evolving in timescales of many years). In order for this scaling to be valid, both the laboratory and astrophysical jets must have similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number, Reynolds number, and Peclet number. HEDLA is being paced by large experiments such as NIF, LMJ, and Shenguang lasers. New experimental techniques, improved simulations codes, and experimental diagnostics provide the ground-based testing which benefits our understanding of the Universe. The most powerful laser project is the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in which 196 laser beams deliver nearly 2 megajoules to a millimeter sized target

  19. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  20. Progress on laser plasma accelerator development using transverselyand longitudinally shaped plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C.B.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Panasenko, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.R.; Lin, C.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cary, J.R.

    2009-03-31

    A summary of progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is given on: (1) experiments on down-ramp injection; (2) experiments on acceleration in capillary discharge plasma channels; and (3) simulations of a staged laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Control of trapping in a LWFA using plasma density down-ramps produced electron bunches with absolute longitudinal and transverse momentum spreads more than ten times lower than in previous experiments (0.17 and 0.02 MeV Ic FWHM, respectively) and with central momenta of 0.76 +- 0.02 MeV Ic, stable over a week of operation. Experiments were also carried out using a 40 TW laser interacting with a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic bunches up to 300 MeV were observed. By detuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy bunches, up to 1 Ge V, was found. In this regime, peak electron energy was correlated with the amount of trapped charge. Simulations show that bunches produced on a down-ramn and iniected into a channel-guided LWFA can produce stable beams with 0.2 MeV Ic-class momentum spread at high energies.

  1. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  2. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  3. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  4. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  5. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  6. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  7. Anatomy of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC): The NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center on MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    a larger research organization than most research  consortia   would be able to maintain.   (4) Maintain collaboration with  Industrial  Members to insure...DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Anatomy of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC): The NSF Industry /University...This has been achieved through creative combinations of resources, incentives and shared goals involving Academia, Industry , and Government. The

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  9. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  10. 临床微生物实验室细菌分离接种技术的研究进展%Research progress on the bacterial inoculation techniques in clinical microbiology laboratories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敬华; 葛平; 陈蓉; 徐蓉; 刘学杰

    2015-01-01

    近年来,自动化研究方兴未艾,出现了商品化的自动化、半自动化微生物接种仪,如Robobact system全自动微生物分离培养系统、EasySpiral Pro全自动螺旋接种仪以及PREVI Isola自动化微生物接种仪等。然而临床实践表明,目前尚没有比较理想的自动化接种仪,特别是能够准确定量接种的自动化仪器,致使现有商品化自动接种仪在临床实验室难以推广。同时,建立细菌培养定量检验方法,进一步统一和标准化操作程序,已成为临床微生物检验质量控制的发展趋势。基于伯努利原理和流体力学,国内学者设计研发的多通道自动化微生物接种仪,有望建立基于自动化接种技术的细菌培养定量检验方法。现就临床微生物实验室细菌分离接种技术的发展现状、趋势和研究进展进行综述。%In recent years , researches on the bacterial inoculation automation are booming .The commercialized automatic or semi-automatic microbial inoculation instruments are developing , such as, Robobact system , EasySpiral Pro and PREVI Isola.However, the experience of clinical application indicates that no instrument employed is satisfactory , let alone the accurate quantitative inoculation instrument , and they are hard to be popularized in clinical microbiology laboratories.Meanwhile, to develop a new method of accurate quantitative determination and to unify and standardize operating procedure , is the development tendency of quality control .Based on Bernoulli principle and fluid mechanics , a new-type instrument , called the multichannel microbial inoculation instument , is invented by Chinese scholars .It is hopeful to develop a new method for the quantitative determination for microbiology based on automatic technique .In this review, the research and development progress of bacterial inoculation technique in clinical microbiology laboratories are summarized.

  11. Panofsky Agonisters: 1950 Loyalty Oath at Berkeley; Pief navigates the crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John David

    2008-08-14

    In 1949-1951 the University of California was traumatized and seriously damaged by a Loyalty Oath controversy. Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky, a young and promising physics professor and researcher at Lawrence's Radiation Laboratory, was caught up in the turmoil.

  12. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  13. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  14. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  15. Berkeley Sensor Database, an Implementation of CUAHSI's ODM for the Keck HydroWatch Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, G.; Bode, C.; Fung, I.

    2010-12-01

    The Keck HydroWatch Project is a multidisciplinary project devoted to understanding how water interacts with atmosphere, vegetation, soil, and fractured bedrock. It is experimenting with novel techniques to monitor and trace water pathways through these mediums, including developing an intensive wireless sensor network, in the Angelo Coast Range and Sagehen Reserves in California. The sensor time-series data is being supplemented with periodic campaigns experimenting with sampling and tracing techniques, including water chemistry, stable isotope analysis, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and neutron probes. Mechanistic and statistical modeling is being performed with these datasets. One goal of the HydroWatch project is to prototype technologies for intensive sampling that can be upscaled to the watershed scale. The Berkeley Sensor Database was designed to manage the large volumes of heterogeneous data coming from this sensor network. This system is based on the Observations Data Model (ODM) developed by the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI). Due to need for the use of open-source software, UC Berkeley ported the ODM to a LAMP system (Linux, Apache, MySQL, Perl). As of August 2010, the Berkeley Sensor Database contains 33 million measurements from 1200 devices, with several thousand new measurements being added each hour. Data for this research is being collected from a wide variety of equipment. Some of this equipment is experimental and subject to constant modification, others are industry standards. Well pressure transducers, sap flow sensors, experimental microclimate motes, standard weather stations, and multiple rock and soil moisture sensors are some examples. While the Hydrologic Information System (HIS) and the ODM are optimized for data interoperability, they are not focused on facility management and data quality control which occur at a complex research site. In this presentation, we describe our

  16. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  17. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  18. Toward a surface photoelectron diffractometer: A progress report on selected advances and an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, D.A [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Zheng, Yu; Petersen, B.L.; Hussain, Z.; Huff, W.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Barton, J.J. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-10-06

    X-ray diffractometric determination of atomic structures in ordered bulk systems is highly automated and has wide application. By contrast, surface crystallography, whether based on photon or electron scattering, is still in a relatively early stage of development. A summary is given of recent selected highlights in efforts to make progress toward surface photoelectron diffractometry and holography by our Berkeley-Penn State group. It is concluded that an automated photoelectron diffractometer is practical and desirable.

  19. US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    dressingT1placement after hemostasis was obtained (Table 1). E-Z Derm ( Genetics Laboratories, St. Paul, MN) ’as applied in 3-in wide strips, with either...Fraser S, Sammons R, and Green AR: A chronobiologic study of melatonin and cortisol secretion in depressed subjects: plasma melatonin, a biochemical... Chronobiology Int 1:87-92, 1984. 38. Dixon WJ (ed): BMDP Statistical Software. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1983. 88 39. Wilkinson RT, El

  20. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-01

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  1. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  2. The Berkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACON): Measuring Greenhouse Gases and Criteria Pollutants within the Urban Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teige, V. E.; Weichsel, K.; Hooker, A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, while global in their impacts, often focus on local and regional scales for execution and are dependent on the actions of communities and individuals. Evaluating the effectiveness of local policies requires observations with much higher spatial resolution than are currently available---kilometer scale. The Berkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACON):, launched at the end of 2011, aims to provide measurements of urban-scale concentrations of CO2, temperature, pressure, relative humidity, O3, CO, and NO2 with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the sources of CO2 within cities. Our initial deployment in Oakland, California uses ~40 sensor packages at a roughly 2 km spacing throughout the city. We will present an initial analysis of the vertical gradients and other spatial patterns observed to date.

  3. Challenges and Opportunities To Achieve 50% Energy Savings in Homes: National Laboratory White Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M. V. A.

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, researchers from four of the national laboratories involved in residential research (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) were asked to prepare papers focusing on the key longer term research challenges, market barriers, and technology gaps that must be addressed to achieve the longer term 50% saving goal for Building America to ensure coordination with the Building America industry teams who are focusing their research on systems to achieve the near-term 30% savings goal. Although new construction was included, the focus of the effort was on deep energy retrofits of existing homes. This report summarizes the key opportunities, gaps, and barriers identified in the national laboratory white papers.

  4. 疾病和污染的屏障或实验动物科学屏障的进展%Barriers to Disease and Contamination or Barriers to progress in Laboratory Animal Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    斯蒂芬·德莱维

    2003-01-01

    As we enter a new era of laboratory sciences it is important not to loose sight of the important use of barriers.This presentation will offer a brief history of barrier design and re-affirm the importance of the barrier and monitoring of the effectiveness to the present generation of laboratory animal scientists.

  5. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  6. Berkeley's New Approach to Global Engagement: Early and Current Efforts to Become More International. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Nicholas B.; Gilman, Nils

    2015-01-01

    This essay discusses past and current thinking about the globalization of higher education (from a U.S. point of view in particular) and a new model we are attempting to develop at the University of California, Berkeley. This essay begins with a brief narrative of the historical evolution of efforts to internationalize education, from the…

  7. The Berkeley High spatial Resolution (BEHR) OMI NO2 retrieval: Effects of emission control technology and the economic recession over the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R. C.; Russell, A. R.; Valin, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the Berkeley High Spatial Resolution OMI NO2 retrieval and analyses of trends in urban and rural locations in the U.S. based on that retrieval. The role of catalytic convertors and other emission control technologies and the global recession of the last 5 years will be assessed.

  8. Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laing, W.R.; Corbin, L.T.

    1979-01-01

    The Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory was completed 15 years ago and has been used since as an analytical chemistry support lab for reactor, fuel development, and reprocessing programs. Additions have been made to the building on two occasions, and a third addition is planned for the future. Major maintenance items include replacement of ZnBr/sub 2/ windows, cleanup of lead glass windows, and servicing of the intercell conveyor. An upgrading program, now in progress, includes construction of new hot-cell instrumentation and the installation of new equipment such as an x-ray fluorescence analyzer and a spark source mass spectrometer.

  9. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  10. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  11. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  12. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  13. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley: um precursor ao surgimento da História Ambiental The Berkeley School's cultural-historical Geography: a precursor to Environmental History's emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Mathewson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available No decorrer das últimas três décadas, a história ambiental se tornou um subcampo reconhecido com seus próprios clássicos, um grande número de monografias notáveis, um fluxo contínuo de artigos publicados e mais do que mil pesquisadores ativos em vários continentes, incluindo uma comunidade crescente na América Latina. Um olhar para além dos limites disciplinares da história mostra que há também outras tradições que se enquadram perfeitamente na temática. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley sob a égide de Carl Sauer talvez seja uma dessas perspectivas alternativas conhecidas. Muitos estudos de Sauer, seus alunos e colaboradores podem ser considerados pesquisas em história ambiental; muitas delas se baseiam em matérias sobre a América Latina. Neste artigo, procuramos traçar o desenvolvimento dessa corrente alternativa para a história ambiental que se iniciou com a tese de doutoramento de Carl Sauer em 1915 e se consolidou nos anos 50, tendo sua continuidade no presente através dos trabalhos de diversos geógrafos.Over the past three decades environmental history has become a recognized subfield, with a cannon of classics, many dozens of distinguished monographs, a steady flow of published articles, and more than one thousand active practitioners on several continents, including a growing cohort in Latin America. If one looks beyond history's disciplinary bounds, one finds other traditions that equally fit perfectly into the array of environmental history. Perhaps the broadest and deepest current is represented by Carl Sauer's Berkeley School of cultural-historical geography. Much of the work of Sauer, his students, and his associates, can be considered environmental history. Moreover, much of it is based on Latin American materials. In this paper, we trace the development of an alternative current within environmental history - one that began with Carl Sauer's doctoral dissertation in 1915, became well

  14. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  15. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  16. Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, P.

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations playa central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  17. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.; Ice, L.W. [ed.

    1992-02-01

    This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

  18. Influence of copper recovery on the water quality of the acidic Berkeley Pit lake, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Nicholas J; Gammons, Christopher H

    2015-04-07

    The Berkeley Pit lake in Butte, Montana, formed by flooding of an open-pit copper mine, is one of the world's largest accumulations of acidic, metal-rich water. Between 2003 and 2012, approximately 2 × 10(11) L of pit water, representing 1.3 lake volumes, were pumped from the bottom of the lake to a copper recovery plant, where dissolved Cu(2+) was precipitated on scrap iron, releasing Fe(2+) back to solution and thence back to the pit. Artificial mixing caused by this continuous pumping changed the lake from a meromictic to holomictic state, induced oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+), and caused subsequent precipitation of more than 2 × 10(8) kg of secondary ferric compounds, mainly schwertmannite and jarosite, which settled to the bottom of the lake. A large mass of As, P, and sulfate was also lost from solution. These unforeseen changes in chemistry resulted in a roughly 25-30% reduction in the lake's calculated and measured total acidity, which represents a significant potential savings in the cost of lime treatment, which is not expected to commence until 2023. Future monitoring is needed to verify that schwertmannite and jarosite in the pit sediment do not convert to goethite, a process which would release stored acidity back to the water column.

  19. Low Background Counting with the Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Alan; Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team; Black Hills State University Underground Campus Team

    2016-09-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and 4,850 feet underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD in a dedicated cleanroom at the Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC). A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors. Experiments utilizing these needs often include those studying dark matter, neutrinos, or neutrinoless double beta decay. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. The BHUC will ultimately host several HPGe low background counting stations and other sensitive instruments from several incoming low background groups and projects that will operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC facility, status, and future plans will also be discussed.

  20. Lz-0 × Berkeley: a new Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population for the mapping of complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capron, Arnaud; Chang, Xue Feng; Shi, Chun; Beatson, Rodger; Berleth, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the generation and test of a genetic resource suited to identify determinants of cell biological traits in plants. The use of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for a better genetic understanding of cell biological traits is still at an early stage, even for biotechnologically important cell properties, such as the dimensions of fiber cells. A common strategy, the mapping of QTLs in recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, is limited by the fact that the existing RIL populations exploit only a small fraction of the existing natural variation. Here, we report the mapping of QTLs impacting on the length of fiber cells in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems in a newly generated RIL population derived from a cross between the accessions Berkeley and the little known Lz-0. Through inbreeding of individual F(2) plants, a total of 159 new F8 lines were produced and genotyped with a set of 49 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The population was successfully used not only for the mapping of three QTLs controlling fiber length, but also to map five QTL controlling flowering time under short and long-day conditions. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of this new genetic resource by mapping in it QTLs underlying a poorly explored cellular trait as well as an already better explored regulatory pathway. The new RIL population and an online platform for the continuous supplementation of genetic markers will be generally available to substantially broaden the genetic diversity through which loci with impact on plant quantitative traits can be identified.

  1. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V; Kong, Jason J; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G; Steele, Thea N; Barris, Brian J; Bloom, Joshua S; Cobb, Bethany E; Coil, Alison L; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Gates, Elinor L; Ho, Luis C; Jha, Saurabh W; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Li, Weidong; Mandel, Kaisey S; Modjaz, Maryam; Moore, Matthew R; Mostardi, Robin E; Papenkova, Marina S; Park, Sung; Perley, Daniel A; Poznanski, Dovi; Reuter, Cassie A; Scala, James; Serduke, Franklin J D; Shields, Joseph C; Swift, Brandon J; Tonry, John L; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wong, Diane S

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z < 0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilizing our newly constructed set of SNID ...

  2. Laboratory Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  3. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  4. DISCURSO E VERDADE: SEIS CONFERÊNCIAS DADAS POR MICHEL FOUCAULT, EM BERKELEY, ENTRE OUTUBRO E NOVEMBRO DE 1983, SOBRE A PARRHESIA - APRESENTAÇÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Os Editores da Prometeus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é a tradução, produzida pela equipe de tradutores daPrometeus, de O Discurso e a Verdade: a problematização da parrhesia, seisconferências de Michel Foucault proferidas em inglês na Universidade daCalifórnia, em Berkeley, entre outubro e novembro de 1983. A transcrição que nosserviu de base para a tradução foi editada em inglês em 1985 por Joseph Pearson ecompilada a partir das gravações das conferências, disponíveis para download no sítiodo Media Resources Center da Moffitt Library (UC Berkeley1. Essa transcrição foireeditada em 1999 por www.repb.net.

  5. Optimizing Excited-State Electronic-Structure Codes for Intel Knights Landing: A Case Study on the BerkeleyGW Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslippe, Jack; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Barnes, Taylor; Wichmann, Nathan; Raman, Karthik; Sasanka, Ruchira; Louie, Steven G.

    2016-10-06

    We profile and optimize calculations performed with the BerkeleyGW code on the Xeon-Phi architecture. BerkeleyGW depends both on hand-tuned critical kernels as well as on BLAS and FFT libraries. We describe the optimization process and performance improvements achieved. We discuss a layered parallelization strategy to take advantage of vector, thread and node-level parallelism. We discuss locality changes (including the consequence of the lack of L3 cache) and effective use of the on-package high-bandwidth memory. We show preliminary results on Knights-Landing including a roofline study of code performance before and after a number of optimizations. We find that the GW method is particularly well-suited for many-core architectures due to the ability to exploit a large amount of parallelism over plane-wave components, band-pairs, and frequencies.

  6. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley AutoMounters (BAM2) at GM/CA CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, O; Hilgart, M; Ogata, C; Pothineni, S; Cork, C

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction.A second generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23-BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  7. AN INTRODUCTION TO EXPLORING LAW, DISABILITY, AND THE CHALLENGE OF EQUALITY IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES: PAPERS FROM THE BERKELEY SYMPOSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It brings me great pleasure to write this Introduction to Exploring Law, Disability, and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States. This special collection of articles in the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice [WYAJ] stems from a symposium of the same name held at the Berkeley Law School at the University of California on 5 December 2014. Writing this introduction allows me to bring together my identities as a law and disability scholar, the principal organizer and convener of the Berkeley Symposium, and editor-in-chief of the WYAJ. In these roles, I have had the opportunity to engage with this set of articles and their authors in a distinct way – from the early versions of these articles through to the final peer-reviewed publications. The Berkeley Symposium is the first conference, of which we are aware, to bring together scholars and experts from both Canada and the United States to present research and exchange ideas on equality issues affecting persons with disabilities in both countries.1 Each academic was invited to write about an equality issue of their choice that is of contemporary concern to persons with disabilities, and to focus on Canada, the United States,or both, at their  option. The result is a set of articles that is simultaneously introspective and comparative.

  8. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  9. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  10. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  11. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  12. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  13. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  14. Investigation on non-glass laser fusion targets: their fabrication, characterization, and transport. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 2-81, progress report, June 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the research progress made under LLNL Subcontract 8320003 for the period of June 1, 1980 through January 31, 1981. The main theme of the research has continued to be the development of techniques for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting laser fusion targets on a continuous basis. The target fabrication techniques are intended mainly for non-glass spherical shell targets, both cryogenic and non-cryogenic. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following categories. (1) Investigation of liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical laser fusion target. (2) Development of automated target characterization scheme. (3) Study of cryogenic target fabrication scheme utilizing cold-gas-levitation and electric field positioning. (4) Development of a cryogenic target fabrication system based on target free-fall method. (5) Generation of hydrogen powder using electro-hydrodynamic spraying. (6) Study of target-charging techniques for application to contactless cryogenic target fabrication. (7) Development of hollow metal sphere production technique. A brief summary of the research progress made in each category is presented.

  15. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  16. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  17. New progress in Organic FET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Co-funded by NSFC,MOST and CAS,researchers from the Key laboratory of Organic Solids,Institute of Chemistry,CAS,made new progress in organic field-effect transistors (FET).The results of the study were published recently in the journal of Advanced Materials (2008,20,1286-1290).

  18. Neutron Stars in the Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Graber, Vanessa; Hogg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars are astrophysical laboratories of many extremes of physics. Their rich phenomenology provides insights into the state and composition of matter at densities which cannot be reached in terrestrial experiments. Since the core of a mature neutron star is expected to be dominated by superfluid and superconducting components, observations also probe the dynamics of large-scale quantum condensates. The testing and understanding of the relevant theory tends to focus on the interface between the astrophysics phenomenology and nuclear physics. The connections with low-temperature experiments tend to be ignored. However, there has been dramatic progress in understanding laboratory condensates (from the different phases of superfluid helium to the entire range of superconductors and cold atom condensates). In this review, we provide an overview of these developments, compare and contrast the mathematical descriptions of laboratory condensates and neutron stars and summarise the current experimental state-o...

  19. Putting the Laboratory at the Center of Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an effective approach to teaching chemistry by bringing the laboratory to the center of teaching, to bring the excitement of discovery to the learning process. The lectures and laboratories are closely integrated to provide a holistic learning experience. The laboratories progress from verification to open-inquiry and…

  20. Berkeley Lighting Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lask, Kathleen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-24

    A lighting cone is a simple metal cone placed on the fuel bed of a stove during ignition to act as a chimney, increasing the draft through the fuel bed. Many stoves tend to be difficult to light due to poor draft through the fuel bed, so lighting cones are used in various parts of the world as an inexpensive accessory to help with ignition.

  1. The Berkeley Serendip Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Tarter, J.; Buhse, R.

    1986-01-01

    An automated system was designed to perform a real time search for narrow band radio signals in the spectra of sources in a regularly scheduled, non-SETI astronomical observing program. The system will compute the power spectrum using a 65,536 channel fast Fourier transform processor with a real time bandwidth of 128 KHz and 2 Hz per channel resolution. After search for peaks in a 100 KHz portion of the IF band of the radio telescope, the system will move to the next 100 KHz portion using a programmable frequency synthesizer. When the whole IF band is scanned, the process will start again. Unidentified peaks in the power spectra are candidates for further study and their celestial coordinates will be recorded along with the time and power, IF and RF frequency, and bandwidth of the peak. Most of the hardware was developed and the machine software is in the process of being finalized. A number of means for identifying and rejecting power spectra peaks which have a high likelihood of being nonuseful are being investigated.

  2. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  3. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  4. Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

  5. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  6. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  7. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  8. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  9. Denver District Laboratory (DEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDEN-DO Laboratory is a multi-functional laboratory capable of analyzing most chemical analytes and pathogenic/non-pathogenic microorganisms found...

  10. Jane Eyre de Michael Berkeley et de David Malouf : La transposition opératique d’un grand classique de la littérature anglaise Jane Eyre by Michael Berkeley and David Malouf: The Operatic Rewriting of a Great Classic English Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Michael Berkeley’s opera Jane Eyre. Premiered on June 30, 2000 by Music Theatre Wales at the Cheltenham International Festival of Music, this opera is based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë and the libretto is written by the Australian poet, novelist, playwright and librettist, David Malouf. It was risky and daring to try to adapt this famous and long novel for the stage. We will particularly focus on the similarities and differences between the novel and the opera as well as on the strategies used both by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley to adapt it. Through the analysis of the similarities we will see how Michael Berkeley set to music some of the great themes and elements of the novel: passion, a sense of entrapment, the “Gothic” atmosphere. On the other hand, the analysis of the discrepancies between the novel and the opera as they appear in both the libretto and the music will lead us to a modern apprehension of the characterization of madness as well as of the metafictional dimension of the rewriting of Jane Eyre by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley.  

  11. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  12. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  13. Photovoltaic Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's PV characterization laboratory is used to measure the electrical performance and opto-electronic properties of solar cells and modules. This facility consists...

  14. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  15. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  16. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  17. Geospatial Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: To process, store, and disseminate geospatial data to the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies. DESCRIPTION: The Geospatial Services Laboratory...

  18. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  19. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  20. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  1. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  2. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  3. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  4. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  5. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  6. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  7. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation's most challenging security issues.Sandia National Laboratories...

  9. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  10. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems. DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  11. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  12. Wireless Emulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Wireless Emulation Laboratory (WEL) is a researchtest bed used to investigate fundamental issues in networkscience. It is a research infrastructure that emulates...

  13. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  14. Composites Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose of the Composites Characterization Laboratory is to investigate new and/or modified matrix materials and fibers for advanced composite applications both...

  15. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems.DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  16. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  17. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  18. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  19. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  20. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  1. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  2. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  3. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  4. Magnetocardiogram Measurement of Laboratory Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I. S.; Ahn, San; Kwon, H. C. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, J. H. [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We have developed a high-Tc SQUID magnetocardiogram (MCG) system for small laboratory animals. White noise of the measurement system was about 30 fT/ Hz{sup 1/2}when measured in a magnetically shielded room. We optimized the measurement position to obtain clear MCG wave from rat's small heart by using grid measurements. With the optimization, the MCG signal was successfully detected with the peak amplitude of about 30 pT. We could observe well defined P-, QRS-, and T-waves from the rat MCG. The results suggest that the developed system has a strong potential to monitor the progress of the heart disease model by using a laboratory rat.

  5. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  6. Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  7. Women in Physics: The Next Generation At Our National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krossa, Cheryl

    2001-04-01

    Just as a house must be built on a strong foundation, with each subsequent course of bricks placed upon those that went before, the advances of women in physics are built upon the accomplishments of those women who have gone before. How are we preparing for the next course of bricks? Where will the next generation of women in physics come from, and how are these women being prepared to take their place among your ranks? The United States Department of Energy is helping to mold the next generation of women in physics, in part, through the efforts of its fifteen national laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Fermi, Idaho, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Princeton Plasma Physics, Sandia, National Energy Technology Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This presentation will showcase some of the creative and innovative approaches these institutions are taking, from outreach to girls in elementary schools to executive appointments, to secure not only this nation's future, but that of women in physics.

  8. Laboratory Evaluation of Residential Furnace BlowerPerformance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain S.; Lutz, Jim D.

    2005-09-01

    A testing program was undertaken at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an electric utility (Pacific Gas and Electric Co.) to compare the performance of furnace blowers. This laboratory testing program was undertaken to support potential changes to California Building Standards regarding in-field furnace blower energy use. This technical support includes identifying suitable performance metrics and target performance levels for use in standards. Five different combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. Three different types of blower and motor combinations were tested in two different furnace cabinets. The blowers were standard forward--curved impellors and a prototype impeller with reverse-inclined blades. The motors were two 6-pole permanent split capacitor (PSC) single-phase induction motors, a brushless permanent magnet (BPM) motor and a prototype BPM designed for use with a prototype reverse-inclined impellor. The laboratory testing operated each blower and furnace combination over a range of air flows and pressure differences to determine air flow performance, power consumption and efficiency. Additional tests varied the clearance between the blower housing and the furnace cabinet, and the routing of air flow into the blower cabinet.

  9. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  10. Challenges of Implementing Iranian National Laboratory Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mahdavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After four years of publishing the Iranian National Laboratory Standard and following a strategic plan to implement its requirements, it was decided to review the taken actions, evaluating the achievements and the failures, as well as analyzing the gaps and planning the interventional activities to resolve the problems. A thorough evaluation revealed that the progress of implementation process varies considerably in different provinces, as well as in laboratories in different public and private sectors. Diversity and heterogeneousity of laboratories throughout the country is one of unresolvable problems. Although we encounter shortage of resources in the country, improper allocation or distribution of resources and budgets make the problems more complicated. Inadequacy of academic training in laboratory sciences has resulted in necessity of holding comprehensive post-graduate training courses. Revising academic curriculum of laboratory sciences could be mostly helpful, moreover there should be organized, training courses with pre-determined practical topics. providing specific technical guidelines, to clarify the required technical details could temporarily fill the training gaps of laboratory staff. Inadequate number of competent auditors was one of the difficulties in universities. Another important challenge returns to laboratory equipment, developing the national controlling system to manage the laboratory equipment in terms of quality and accessibility has been planned in RHL. At last cultural problems and resistance to change are main obstacles that have reduced the pace of standardization, it needs to rationalize the necessity of establishing laboratory standards for all stakeholders.

  11. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National

  12. DISCURSO E VERDADE: SEIS CONFERÊNCIAS DADAS POR MICHEL FOUCAULT, EM BERKELEY, ENTRE OUTUBRO E NOVEMBRO DE 1983, SOBRE A PARRHESIA - APRESENTAÇÃO

    OpenAIRE

    *** Os Editores da Prometeus

    2013-01-01

    O presente trabalho é a tradução, produzida pela equipe de tradutores daPrometeus, de O Discurso e a Verdade: a problematização da parrhesia, seisconferências de Michel Foucault proferidas em inglês na Universidade daCalifórnia, em Berkeley, entre outubro e novembro de 1983. A transcrição que nosserviu de base para a tradução foi editada em inglês em 1985 por Joseph Pearson ecompilada a partir das gravações das conferências, disponíveis para download no sítiodo Media Resources Center da Moffi...

  13. Solutions that stick: activating cross-disciplinary collaboration in a graduate-level public health innovations course at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Jaspal S; Hosang, Robert Nap; Madsen, Kristine A

    2015-03-01

    Since 2011 we have taught a public health innovations course at the University of California, Berkeley. Students gain skills in systematic innovation, or human-centered design, while working in small interdisciplinary teams on domestic and global health projects with client organizations. To support acquisition of meaningful problem-solving skills, we structured the course so that the majority of learning happens in scenarios that do not involve faculty. Taken by students representing 26 graduate programs (as diverse as epidemiology, city planning, and mechanical engineering), it is one of the 10 highest-rated courses offered by the School of Public Health. We present the blueprints for our course with the hope that other institutions whose students could benefit will borrow from our model.

  14. Physics on your feet Berkeley graduate exam questions : or ninety minutes of shame but a PhD for the rest of your life!

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry; Demas, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Physics on Your Feet gives a collection of physics problems covering the broad range of topics in classical and modern physics that were, or could have been, asked at oral PhD exams at Berkeley. The questions are easy to formulate, but some of them can only be answered using an out-of-the-box approach. Detailed solutions are provided, from which the reader is guaranteed to learn a lot about the physicists' way of thinking. The book is also packed full of cartoons and dry humour to help take the edge off the stress and anxiety surrounding exams. This is a helpful guide to students preparing for their exams, as well as to University lecturers looking for good instructive problems. No exams are necessary to enjoy the book!

  15. Projecto português do gabinete de história oral regional (Biblioteca de Bancroft, Universidade de Berkeley – Califórnia)

    OpenAIRE

    Warrin, Donald

    2016-01-01

    O Gabinete de História Oral Regional (ROHO – Regional Oral History Office) é um programa de investigação da Universidade de Berkeley (Califórnia) que funciona na Biblioteca de Bancroft. O ROHO produz, analisa e arquiva documentos de história oral e vídeos numa extensa variedade de áreas temáticas. O ROHO preserva a história da área da Baía de São Francisco (Califórnia) e Ocidente dos Estados Unidos. Através de entrevistas cuidadosamente preparadas, gravadas e transcritas, o ROHO produz um arq...

  16. Performance Assessment and Translation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models from acslX™ to Berkeley Madonna™, MATLAB®, and R language: Oxytetracycline and Gold Nanoparticles as Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; He, Chunla; Jin, Shiqiang; Yang, Raymond S H; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-04-08

    Many physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for environmental chemicals, drugs, and nanomaterials have been developed to aid risk and safety assessments using acslXTM. However, acslXTM has been rendered sunset since November 2015. Alternative modeling tools and tutorials are needed for future PBPK applications. This forum article aimed to: (1) demonstrate the performance of four PBPK modeling software packages (acslXTM, Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language) tested using two existing models (oxytetracycline and gold nanoparticles); (2) provide a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion from acslXTM to Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language; (3) discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each software package in the implementation of PBPK models in toxicology, and (4) share our perspective about future direction in this field. Simulation results of plasma/tissue concentrations/amounts of oxytetracycline and gold from different models were compared visually and statistically with linear regression analyses. Simulation results from the original models were correlated well with results from the recoded models, with time-concentration/amount curves nearly superimposable and determination coefficients of 0.86-1.00. Step-by-step explanations of the recoding of the models in different software programs are provided in the Supplementary Data. In summary, this article presents a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion for a small molecule and a nanoparticle among four software packages, and a performance comparison of these software packages in PBPK model implementation. This tutorial helps beginners learn PBPK modeling, provides suggestions for selecting a suitable tool for future projects, and may lead to the transition from acslXTM to alternative modeling tools.

  17. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work in basic nuclear physics carried out between October 1, 1995, the closing of our last Progress Report, and September 30, 1996 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under contracts DE-FG03-93ER-40774 and DE-FG03-95ER-40913 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental contract supports broadly-based experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics. This report includes results from studies of Elementary Systems involving the study of the structure of the nucleon via polarized high-energy positron scattering (the HERMES experiment) and lower energy pion scattering from both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. Results from pion- and kaon-induced reactions in a variety of nuclear systems are reported under the section heading Meson Reactions; the impact of these and other results on understanding the nucleus is presented in the Nuclear Structure section. In addition, new results from scattering of high-energy electrons (from CEBAF/TJNAF) and pions (from KEK) from a broad range of nuclei are reported in the section on Incoherent Reactions. Finally, the development and performance of detectors produced by the laboratory are described in the section titled Instrumentation.

  18. Product Evaluation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory offers the services of highly trained and experienced specialists that have a full complement of measuring equipment. It is equipped with two optical...

  19. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  20. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to...