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Sample records for berkeley gas-filled separator

  1. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  2. Separation of actinide-made transurania by a gas-filled magnetic separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the gas-filled magnetic separator HECK at the UNI-LAC at GSI Darmstadt is described. The system consists of a 30 -dipole magnet and a quadrupole doublet of wide aperture. The separator is operated with helium at pressures between (0.1-1) hPa. It is used to investigate heavy ion induced fusion products in-flight. The recoils emerging from a thin target are separated with high efficiency of (10-50)%. The suppression factor of primary beam particles and transfer products is (1015) and (103), respectively. In this application of a gas-filled separator to synthesize transuranium elements using 238U-targets, isotopes of the elements fermium and nobelium were identified in irradiations with 16O- and 20Ne-beams. (orig.)

  3. Automation of the experiments at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schematics, codes and Builder C++ applications aimed at the synthesis of superheavy elements at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (DGFRS) of FLNR (JINR) are presented. Examples of applications in the heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions with 48Ca projectiles are presented.

  4. Research on heavy elements using the JYFL gas-filled recoil separator RITU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-filled recoil separator for studies of heavy elements produced in heavy-ion-induced fission reaction has been constructed. New neutron-deficient isotopes with Z=85-90 have been identified through their alpha decay. (author). 40 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Visual application for beam associated systems of gas-filled separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PC based code for Windows 98 operating together with the beam associated systems of the Dubna Gas-filled Recoil Separator is described. It is coded in C++ (Borland Builder v. 3.0). This code was tested in heavy ion-induced nuclear reactions at U-400 main Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) cyclotron

  6. Production of high intensity heavy ion beams for the experiments on a gas-filled separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-filled separator of heavy ions induced reactions products permits a substantial suppression of the background from primary beam ions. This feature allows one to obtain an extremely intensive ion beam from the cyclotron U-400. Experimental studies were performed to investigate the operation of various stripping carbon foils. 7 refs.; 2 figs

  7. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    OpenAIRE

    Even, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA(TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements.rnIn the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predi...

  8. The gas-filled magnet: An isobar separator for accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most difficult problem for accelerator mass spectrometry is the rejection of stable atomic isobars. The intensity of isobaric interference is expected to become a problem for 36Cl measurements with the use of new high-intensity ion sources. Although better chemical separation may be possible through improved sample preparation, the device expected to help most with this problem is the gas-filled magnet. We tested a gas-filled Enge split-pole spectrograph combined with a multi-plate gas ionization detector for the separation of 36S from 36Cl and obtained an isobar separation of about two orders of magnitude better than that possible with the detector alone. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. The Detection System of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dubna Gas-filled Recoil Separator, operated at the U400 cyclotron at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, is one of the most efficient existing separator systems used to separate heavy products of the complete fusion nuclear reactions. The system of detecting the compound nuclei α - decay sequences and spontaneous fission events, data processing, read-out and accumulation is described. The present system was successfully applied in our experiments aimed at the synthesis of superheavy elements with Z = 116 and Z = 114. (author)

  10. A new focal plane detector for the gas-filled separator TASCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superheavy elements (SHE) exist solely because of enhanced nuclear stability due to shell effects. The production cross sections for the synthesis of SHE decrease continuously, thus, exploration of SHE nuclei is close to the border of present technical limitation. To increase the efficiency and sensitivity in SHE experiments, highly efficient recoil separators with state-of-the-art detection systems are required. In the framework of this thesis, the new focal plane detection system with the dedicated electronics have been developed for the gas-filled recoil separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Schwerionenforschung GmbH. The new detection system has been successfully used in recent experiments on synthesis of the E114.

  11. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  12. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Julia

    2011-12-13

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  13. Nuclear charge and isobar separation in a gas-filled enge split-pole magnetic spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sepration technique is based on the fact that charge-changing processes of an ion in a gas, if they occur frequently enough in a magnetic field region, lead to trajectories determined by the average charge state of the ion in the gas. The technique has been used to separate isobaric 58Ni and 58Fe ions. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Development of the Focal Plane Detection System for the Future Gas-Filled Separator at the Cyclotron Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Erin; Mayorov, Dmitriy; Folden, Charles ``Cody'', III

    2015-10-01

    A focal plane detection system is being developed for use with the gas-filled separator previously known as SASSYER (Small Angle Separator System at Yale for Evaporation Residues) that will be installed at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. This system will be used to study heavy (Z >= 90) elements and features two 60×40 strip double-sided silicon detectors (DSSDs) and accompanying multiplexing read-out electronics. The DSSDs cover an area of 120×40 mm2 and are read-out by fourteen 16-channel multiplexers (Mesytec MUX-16) that perform the function of a preamplifier, shaper, and leading-edge discriminator in one unit. The multiplexers are controlled by four ``MUX drivers,'' each of which serves as a signal bus for multiple MUX-16 boards. The system allows a single 16-channel ADC to read the combined 200 strips of both DSSDs. A four peak source composed of 148Gd, 239Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm was used to characterize the performance of the system, with a preliminary energy resolution of ~ 60 keV measured for the 241Am alphas. This contribution will discuss the work performed in assembly of the test setup, optimization and performance check of the multiplexers, and the preliminary energy and position data collected with the α-source. Present address: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  15. Gas phase chemical studies of superheavy elements using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator - Stopping range determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, gas phase chemistry experiments with heaviest elements are usually performed with the gas-jet technique with the disadvantage that all reaction products are collected in a gas-filled thermalisation chamber adjacent to the target. The incorporation of a physical preseparation device between target and collection chamber opens up the perspective to perform new chemical studies. But this approach requires detailed knowledge of the stopping force (STF) of the heaviest elements in various materials. Measurements of the energy loss of mercury (Hg), radon (Rn), and nobelium (No) in Mylar and argon (Ar) were performed at low kinetic energies of around (40-270) keV per nucleon. The experimentally obtained values were compared with STF calculations of the commonly used program for calculating stopping and ranges of ions in matter (SRIM). Using the obtained data points an extrapolation of the STF up to element 114, eka-lead, in the same stopping media was carried out. These estimations were applied to design and to perform a first chemical experiment with a superheavy element behind a physical preseparator using the nuclear fusion reaction 244Pu(48Ca; 3n)289114. One decay chain assigned to an atom of 285112, the α-decay product of 289114, was observed.

  16. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Three sources and three components of success in detection of ultra-rare alpha decays at the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil separator

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    General philosophy of procedure of detecting rare events in the recent experiments with 48Ca projectile at the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator(DGFRS) aimed to the synthesis of superheavy elements (SHE) has been reviewed. Specific instruments and methods are under consideration. Some historical sources of the successful experiments for Z=112-118 are considered too. Special attention is paid to application of method of active correlations in heavy-ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Example of application in Z=115 experiment is presented. Brief description of the 243Am + 48Ca -> 291-x115+xn experiment is presented too. Some attention is paid to the role of chemical experiments in discoveries of SHEs. The DGFRS detection/monitoring system is presented in full firstly.

  18. Preparation of targets for the gas-filled recoil separator TASCA by electrochemical deposition and design of the TASCA target wheel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) is a recoil separator with maximized transmission designed for performing advanced chemical studies as well as nuclear reaction and structure investigations of the transactinide elements (Z>103) on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. TASCA will provide a very clean transactinide fraction with negligible contamination of lighter elements from nuclear side reactions in the target. For TASCA a new target chamber was designed and built at GSI including the rotating target wheel assembly ARTESIA for beam intensities up to 2 μA (particle). For the production of longer-lived isotopes of neutron-rich heavier actinide and transactinide elements, hot fusion reactions with actinide targets are required. Here, possible target materials range from thorium up to curium or even heavier elements. For the deposition of lanthanide and actinide elements on thin aluminum and titanium backings by means of Molecular Plating (MP), a new deposition cell has been constructed that allows precise temperature control of the organic solvent and stirring of the solution. The electrode geometry ensures homogeneity of the electric field inside the cell. With the new set-up, holmium and gadolinium layers (500 μg/cm2) on 2-5 μm thin titanium backings have been produced with deposition yields of the order of 90%. Systematic investigations are under way to further optimize the deposition conditions for other lanthanide and actinide elements including uranium and plutonium on different backing materials

  19. Comparison of scintillation and gas filled detectors for contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are now for radioactive contamination monitoring not only instruments with gas filled detectors but also devices with scintillation detectors in use. These detection techniques have significant physical differences and utilize hardware with specific properties. Therefore there are special advantages and drawbacks for the user and the application. A scintillator is usually a rugged component with a relatively low weight and high detection efficiency. The technical problems with scintillators are mainly in effective and uniform light detection. Gas filled detectors have good uniformities in detection efficiencies. Their main disadvantages are the gas supply and thin entrance windows. These foils can easily be damaged resulting in gas leakage. For both types of instruments efficiencies, typical background levels, position dependent responses and minimum detectable activities for a wide range of radionuclides are summarized and discussed. Also other handling features, like for instance weight, temperature ranges and aspects of service and maintenance are discussed. In addition to the presented data characterizing the different types of contamination monitors it is also important to think about service and maintenance. In general gas filled detectors could more easily be destroyed than scintillators. On an average this generates more problems and also higher repair cost. This is certainly one of the reasons that made scintillators in contamination monitoring so popular. Scintillation detection has been proven to be a reliable and competitive technology for contamination monitoring. The efficiencies and detection limits are in general superior to comparable gas filled detectors. This is also true for many nuclear medicine nuclides with photon emitters. Simultaneous and separate measurement of alpha- and beta-gamma radiation can easily be achieved by pulse analysis. The overall weight of a scintillation based instrument can be substantially lower than the weight of

  20. Isobaric Identification Using Gas-Filled Time-of-Flight Measurements in an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-Jing; RUAN Xiang-Dong; HE Ming; WANG Hui-Juan; LI Guo-Qiang; WU Shao-Yong; DONG Ke-Jun; LIN Min; JIANG Shan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A gas-filled time-of-flight (GF-TOF) detector has been built and developed to improve the ability of isobaric identification in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, and a time resolution (without gas filled)of better than 350ps is achieved. The GF-TOF detector is tested by means of measuring a standard AgCl(36Cl/Cl = 7.6 × 10-9g/g) sample with the 36Cl ion energy of 64, 49 and 33MeV, respectively. 36Cl and 36S particles were successfully separated in the TOF spectra output from the GF-TOF detector. The comparison between the gas-filled time-of-flight method and the △E - E method is described. Some results relative to the GF-TOF method are given as well.

  1. Innovations in gas filled ionisation chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas filled parallel plate ion chamber and coaxial cylindrical ion chambers are widely used for detection of nuclear radiations for more than hundred years. Thin Metal electrodes or metal coated planes are used as cathode and anodes in both parallel plate and cylindrical ionization chambers since its invention. For neutral particle detection, either the ionising medium or a coated electrode surface is used as a converter material for producing secondary charged particles which are detected in these ionisation chambers. Boron, and 235U are coated as thin layer on the cathode surface with optimum thickness to give maximum neutron detection sensitivity. The neutron sensitivity mostly depends upon the coated surface area and to enhance the neutron sensitivity diameter and the length/ diameter of the coated electrodes have to be increased which also results in an increase in the volume of the counter. For many applications, it is necessary to reduce the size of the counter by a factor of 2 to 5 but having the same efficiency. Recently this has been achieved by designing a non planar electrode surface/ s which has surface area larger by a factor or up to five keeping the external dimensions the same. By using this new technique, it is possible to increase the coated area up to 5 times, without changing the overall dimensions of the counter both for proportional counters and ion chambers. The three methods have been developed to enhance the neutron sensitivity the use of: additional coated wires, coated baffles, coated fins: in sensitive volume of gas detectors. The introduction of these three-dimensional boron coated structures into the sensitive volume without enlarging the outer detector dimensions increases the Boron/Uranium content in the sensitive region without any significant change in the nature of the pulses from these counters. In the newly developed Wire Plane Chambers both in the DC mode and pulse mode, wire planes have been used as anode and cathodes with

  2. Bishop Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Bindon, Francis (Irish artist, 1690-1765)

    2008-01-01

    'Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley. He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College, Dublin, completing a Master's degree in 1707. He remained at Trinity College after completion of his degree as a tutor and Greek lecturer.' (en.wikipedia.org)

  3. Gas-filled hohlraum study on Shenguang-III prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Huasen; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Experimental studies on gas-filled hohlraum were performed extensively in recent years on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. These experiments employed Au hohlraums within C5H12 gas fill heated by smoothing beams. In the first round of experiments, although the low-Z gas fill impeded the blow-off plasma ablated from hohlraum wall, the x-ray flux from the LEH decreased dramatically compared with the vacuum hohlraum. Further analysis of several ways of energy deposition including heating the gas-fill, extra scattered light and ablating the LEH membrane, revealed that too much laser energy were wasted in exploding the LEH membrane if we use a 1 ns square pulse. After we introduced a low power prepulse to intentionally exploding the membrane, the behavior of the x-ray flux from the gas-filled hohlraum is identical with the vacuum hohlraum. In subsequent studies, the motion of x-ray spot and corona plasma has also been studied using the gas-filled hohlraum. We obtained high quality data of the gas/wall interface and the boundary of the ablated wall near the LEH. The result agrees with that in simulation. However, there is a discrepancy between the experiment and the simulation in the spatial feature of the ablated wall near the LEH extracted from M-band x-ray image.

  4. Evolution of gas-filled nanocracks in crystalline solids

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hartmann; Trinkaus, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the evolution of gas-filled cracks under gas implantation and subsequent annealing is studied on the basis of an elastic continuum approach. The observed growth limitation of He-filled nanocracks in SiC is attributed to their stabilization by the formation of circular dislocation dipoles. The formation and Ostwald ripening of bubble-loop complexes at elevated temperatures is modeled in terms of gas atom exchange between such complexes coupled. with local matrix atom exchange bet...

  5. Principles of a gas filled magnetic spectrometer for fission studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of the prompt gamma decay from fission products gives information on the entry states, e.g. distribution functions for excitation energy and spin, and therefore a direct link to the fission process itself. This type of spectroscopy is, however, only possible when a filter can be constructed which allows setting a gate to the gamma-spectrum in a narrow region in mass and nuclear charge, as well as on the total excitation energy of the fragment split under investigation. A possible configuration of a prompt gamma-ray spectrometer consist of a gamma-ray array composed of high resolution germanium detectors, coupled to a gas filled magnet. We will outline the principles for a gas filled magnetic spectrometer for fission product spectroscopy. In particular the focusing characteristics of such a device, which are valid for particles in the velocity regime of E/A< 1 MeV/amu, will be addressed. First experiments on the LOHENGRIN spectrometer in Grenoble investigating on the behavior of fission products in gas filled magnets have been performed, and have validated the experimental approach to the nuclear fission process with such a device. (authors)

  6. Principles of a gas filled magnetic spectrometer for fission studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faust H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopy of the prompt gamma decay from fission products gives information on the entry states, e.g. distribution functions for excitation energy and spin, and therefore a direct link to the fission process itself. This type of spectroscopy is, however, only possible when a filter can be constructed which allows setting a gate to the gamma-spectrum in a narrow region in mass and nuclear charge, as well as on the total excitation energy of the fragment split under investigation. A possible configuration of a prompt gamma-ray spectrometer consist of a gamma-ray array composed of high resolution germanium detectors, coupled to a gas filled magnet. We will outline the principles for a gas filled magnetic spectrometer for fission product spectroscopy. In particular the focusing characteristics of such a device, which are valid for particles in the velocity regime of E/A< 1MeV/amu, will be addressed. First experiments on the LOHENGRIN spectrometer in Grenoble investigating on the behavior of fission products in gas filled magnets have been performed, and have validated the experimental approach to the nuclear fission process with such a device.

  7. Transactinide studies at U.C. Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical studies of the heaviest elements have a long-standing history at Berkeley. The Heavy Element Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group at LBNL conducts heavy element nuclear physics as well as transactinide chemistry studies. The new capabilities of the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS) have added to a further vitalization of the heavy element studies at LBNL. This talk gives an overview of the recent collaborative first ever chemical studies of elements 107, bohrium, and 108, hassium. A recoil transfer chamber (RTC) connected to the back end of the BGS was constructed and tested. With the RTC, compound nucleus evaporation residues (EVR) pass through a thin Mylar window at the BGS focal plane and are stopped in a gas, for gas-jet transport to remote chemical experiments; the transport gas has a substantially higher pressure than the gas in the BGS. The efficiency of the transport was tested with various EVR's and different chemical detection systems, such as the SISAK centrifugal aqueous/organic phase extraction system and the novel Cryogenic Thermo-chromatographic Separator (CTS) were used. The CTS is based on the high volatility at near-ambient temperature of the heavy metal oxides such as Osmium tetroxide, OsO4, the homologue of hassium tetroxide. The CTS consists of an assembly of two rows of silicon PIN-diodes arranged opposite to each other, thus forming a narrow rectangular channel through which the reaction gas flows. A decreasing thermal gradient ranging from room temperature to about minus 120 deg C is applied to the PIN-diode assembly. This results in the deposition of the heavy metal oxide on one of the detectors, where it is identified by alpha counting. Separation factor of 107 - 109 for actinides from the combined BGS-CTS system can be achieved. The successful combination of the BGS with chemical separation systems is a true breakthrough. It opens a new possibility to study more effectively the chemical behaviour of the heaviest elements by

  8. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila.

  9. First results from the nuclear astrophysics AMS program at the NSL using the MANTIS system in gas-filled mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magnet for Astrophysical Nucleosynthesis studies Through Isobar Separation (MANTIS) system is the new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) set-up created during recent upgrades of the Browne-Buechner spectrograph at the University of Notre Dame. Commissioning measurements performed on the separation of 58Fe-58Ni isobars at 114 MeV out of the FN tandem accelerator have shown clear separation, opening the door for a number of future measurements in nuclear astrophysics. The separation of mass-58 isobars has made this system the first in the world to utilise a Browne-Buechner spectrograph in gas-filled mode for AMS measurements with a special focus on nuclear astrophysics

  10. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ˜105 particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a 241Am ( t 1/2 = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  11. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ∼ 105 particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a 241Am (t1/2 = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  12. A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for the detection of fission fragments was developed for a highly segmented 4π γ-ray calorimeter, namely the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments located at the Lujan Center of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. It has been used successfully for experiments with 235U, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 241Pu isotopes to provide a unique signature to differentiate the fission from the competing neutron-capture reaction channel. It was also used to study the spontaneous fission in 252Cf. The design and performance of this avalanche counter for targets with extreme α-decay rate up to ∼2.4×108/s are described.

  13. High pressure gas-filled cermet spark gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of modernization of the R-48 and R-49 spark gaps making it possible to improve their electrical characteristics are presented. The design is described and characteristics of gas-filled cermet spark gaps are presented. By the voltage rise time of 5-6 μs in the Marx generator scheme they provide for the pulse break-through voltage of 120 and 150 kV. By the voltage rise time of 0.5-1 μs the break-through voltage of these spark gaps may be increased up to 130 and 220 kV. The proper commutation time is equal to ≤ 0.5 ns. Practical recommendations relative to designing cermet spark gaps are given

  14. A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.; Kwan, E.; Henderson, R. A.; Gostic, J. M.; Carter, D.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for the detection of fission fragments was developed for a highly segmented 4π γ-ray calorimeter, namely the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments located at the Lujan Center of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. It has been used successfully for experiments with 235U, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 241Pu isotopes to provide a unique signature to differentiate the fission from the competing neutron-capture reaction channel. It was also used to study the spontaneous fission in 252Cf. The design and performance of this avalanche counter for targets with extreme α-decay rate up to ˜2.4×108/s are described.

  15. A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y., E-mail: wu24@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chyzh, A.; Kwan, E.; Henderson, R.A.; Gostic, J.M.; Carter, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bredeweg, T.A.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Ullmann, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    A compact gas-filled avalanche counter for the detection of fission fragments was developed for a highly segmented 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter, namely the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments located at the Lujan Center of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. It has been used successfully for experiments with {sup 235}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu isotopes to provide a unique signature to differentiate the fission from the competing neutron-capture reaction channel. It was also used to study the spontaneous fission in {sup 252}Cf. The design and performance of this avalanche counter for targets with extreme {alpha}-decay rate up to {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}/s are described.

  16. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ∼ 10{sup 5} particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a {sup 241}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of gas-filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new simulation code has been developed that allows the response of gas-filled proportional counters to be calculated. The code is an electron transport code that simulates the elastic and inelastic scattering processes that occur as a result of electron-impact collisions with the gas atoms. The simulation concentrates on the avalanche development after the primary ionising particle has freed electrons in the gas volume, by tracking electrons until they reach the anode of the counter. The dynamics of the ions that accumulate in the gas volume are also considered. A major motivation for this work is the general renewed interest in proportional counters over the last decade, since the advent of micro-pattern detectors such as the micro-strip and the micro-gap detector. It is argued that the low relative cost, intrinsic amplification and environmental stability of these detectors gives them considerable advantages over other types of radiation detectors. The code has been benchmarked against experimental data. The manner in which the variation in the avalanche statistics affects the energy resolution properties of the detector is examined for single wire counters, micro-strip and micro-gap counters. The stability of micro-gap detectors when subjected to high rates of irradiation is also examined. It is envisaged that these detectors will be used in the future as part of a multiphase flow tomography device for imaging the flow of oil/water/natural gas mixtures that have been pumped through pipes from the seabed. (author)

  18. Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

  19. Hybrid recoil mass analyzer at IUAC – First results using gas-filled mode and future plans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Madhavan; S Nath; T Varughese; J Gehlot; A Jhingan; P Sugathan; A K Sinha; R Singh; K M Varier; M C Radhakrishna; E Prasad; S Kalkal; G Mohanto; J J Das; Rakesh Kumar; R P Singh; S Muralithar; R K Bhowmik; A Roy; Rajesh Kumar; S K Suman; A Mandal; T S Datta; J Chacko; A Choudhury; U G Naik; A J Malyadri; M Archunan; J Zacharias; S Rao; Mukesh Kumar; P Barua; E T Subramanian; K Rani; B P Ajith Kumar; K S Golda

    2010-08-01

    Hybrid recoil mass analyzer (HYRA) is a unique, dual-mode spectrometer designed to carry out nuclear reaction and structure studies in heavy and medium-mass nuclei using gas-filled and vacuum modes, respectively and has the potential to address newer domains in nuclear physics accessible using high energy, heavy-ion beams from superconducting LINAC accelerator (being commissioned) and ECR-based high current injector system (planned) at IUAC. The first stage of HYRA is operational and initial experiments have been carried out using gas-filled mode for the detection of heavy evaporation residues and heavy quasielastic recoils in the direction of primary beam. Excellent primary beam rejection and transmission efficiency (comparable with other gas-filled separators) have been achieved using a smaller focal plane detection system. There are plans to couple HYRA to other detector arrays such as Indian national gamma array (INGA) and 4 spin spectrometer for ER tagged spectroscopic/spin distribution studies and for focal plane decay measurements.

  20. Ultrasound detection in the Gulf menhaden requires gas-filled bullae and an intact lateral line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Maria; Montie, Eric W.; Mann, Kenneth A.; Mann, David A.

    2009-01-01

    via the lateral recess membrane. It has been hypothesized that the utricle of the inner ear is responsible for ultrasound detection through a specialized connection to the gas-filled bullae complex. Here, we show that the lateral line and its connection to the gas-filled bullae complex via the lateral...... recess are involved in ultrasound detection in Gulf menhaden. Removal of a small portion of the lateral line overlying the lateral recess membrane eliminates the ability of Gulf menhaden to detect ultrasound. We further show that the gas-filled bullae vibrates in response to ultrasound, that the gas......-filled bullae are necessary for detecting ultrasound, and that the bullae connections to the lateral line via the lateral recess membrane play an important role in ultrasound detection. These results add a new dimension to the role of the lateral line and bullae as part of the ultrasonic detection system in...

  1. Gas-filled targets for large scale-length plasma interaction experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimulated Brillouin backscatter from large scale-length gas-filled targets has been measured on the Nova laser. These targets were designed to approximate conditions in indirect drive ignition target designs in underdense plasma electron density (ne∼1021/cm3), temperature (Te>3 keV), and gradient scale lengths (Ln∼2 mm, Lv>6 mm) as well as calculated gain for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). The targets used in these experiments were gas-filled balloons with polyimide walls (gasbags) and gas-filled hohlraums. Detailed characterization using x-ray imaging and x-ray and optical spectroscopy verifies that the calculated plasma conditions are achieved. Time-resolved SBS backscatter from these targets is <3% for conditions similar to ignition target designs

  2. Gas-filled targets for large scalelength plasma interaction experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimulated Brillouin backscatter from large scale length gas-filled targets has been measured on Nova. These targets were designed to approximate conditions in indirect drive ignition target designs in underdense plasma electron density (ne∼1021/cm3), temperature (Te>3 keV), and gradient scale lengths (Ln∼ mm, Lv>6 mm) as well as calculated gain for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). The targets used in these experiments were gas-filled balloons with polyimide walls (gasbags) and gas-filled hohlraums. Detailed characterization using x-ray imaging and x-ray and optical spectroscopy verifies that the calculated plasma conditions are achieved. Time-resolved SBS backscatter from these targets is <3% for conditions similar to ignition target designs

  3. El idealismo de Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-01-01

    En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A...

  4. New gas-filled mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new gas-filled operation mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS at GANIL is reported. A beam rejection factor greater than 1010 is obtained for the 40Ca+150Sm system at 196 MeV. The unprecedented transmission efficiency for the evaporation residues produced in this reaction is estimated to be around 80% for αx n channels and above 95% for x ny p channels. A detailed study of the performance of the gas-filled VAMOS and future developments are discussed. This new operation mode opens avenues to explore the potential of fusion reactions in various kinematics.

  5. New gas-filled mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, C., E-mail: schmitt@ganil.f [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Lecornu, B.; Jacquot, B.; France, G. de; Lemasson, A.; Shrivastava, A. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Greenlees, P.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, Jyvaskyla (Finland); Subotic, K. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Theisen, Ch.; Sulignano, B. [CEA-Saclay DSM/IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L. [IPHC, UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, BP28, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-09-21

    A new gas-filled operation mode of the large-acceptance spectrometer VAMOS at GANIL is reported. A beam rejection factor greater than 10{sup 10} is obtained for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 150}Sm system at 196 MeV. The unprecedented transmission efficiency for the evaporation residues produced in this reaction is estimated to be around 80% for {alpha}x n channels and above 95% for x ny p channels. A detailed study of the performance of the gas-filled VAMOS and future developments are discussed. This new operation mode opens avenues to explore the potential of fusion reactions in various kinematics.

  6. Development of data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At IoP-NISER an initiative has been taken to build and test micro-pattern gas detector such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for several upcoming High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiment projects. Temperature (t), atmospheric pressure (p) and relative humidity (RH) monitor and recording is very important for gas filled detector development. A data logger to monitor and record the ambient parameters such as temperature, relative humidity and pressure has been developed. With this data logger continuous recording of t, p, RH and time stamp can be done with a programmable sampling interval. This data is necessary to correct the gain of a gas filled detector

  7. Environmental research at Berkeley

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    The information concerning the Energy and Environment Programme at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on a talk given at CERN by A.M. Sessler, one of the initiators of the Programme. (Dr. Sessler has been appointed Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in succession to Prof. E. M. McMillan, from 1 November.) Many of the topics mentioned merit an extended story in themselves but the purpose of this article is simply to give a sketch of what is happening.

  8. Development of Insulation Technology in Compact SF6 Gas-filled Bushings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokunohe, Toshiaki; Kato, Tatsuro; Hirose, Makoto; Ishiguro, Tetsu

    As for gas insulated switchgear (GIS), small space requirement and economical efficiency have been demanded. Circuit breakers (CB), disconnecting switches (DS) and earthing switches (ES) have been designed toward compactness. Compact & light bushings have been also required. As for bushings of GIS, there are roughly three types; capacitor, gas-filled and molding bushings. Since gas-filled bushings have the feature which is both of the lightness and the economical efficiency, it is important to develop compact and light gas-filled bushings by improvement of insulation technology. The main subject for compact design is reduction of electric field strength on the outside hollow insulator around the inside grounded electrode tip. We devised a new inner grounded electrode structure which consists of some column electrodes. This paper describes the effect of reduction of maximum value of electric field strength on the outside hollow insulator by a new inner grounded electrode. Then, improvement of insulation performance for electrodes with insulation coating in SF6 gas is described as composite insulation technology. Finally, the efficacy of these insulation technologies is described by fundamental insulation test results of prototype compact 800kV SF6 gas-filled bushing.

  9. Modeling of drive-symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes are more oblate than predicted using modeling methods which agree well with experiments in evacuated hohlraums. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued

  10. Physiological and behavioral responses of poultry exposed to gas-filled high expansion foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mckeegan, D.E.F.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Hindle, V.A.; Boulcott, P.; Sparrey, J.M.; Wathes, C.M.; Demmers, T.G.M.; Gerritzen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease control measures require poultry to be killed on farms to minimize the risk of disease being transmitted to other poultry and, in some cases, to protect public health. We assessed the welfare implications for poultry of the use of high-expansion gas-filled foam as a potentially humane, emerg

  11. Effects of plasma physics on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindman, E.L.; Delamater, N.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Hauer, A.

    1994-10-01

    Initial experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes from preliminary experiments are more oblate than predicted. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  12. The Influence of Electrode Material on Gas-Filled Surge Arresters Response Time in gamma and X radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of electrode material on the gas filled surge arrester' model pulse shape characteristic in gamma and X radiation field. We found that both radiations have increased gas filled surge arresters response time. The obtained results show that the optimal solution for GFSA model is with Al electrodes. (author)

  13. El idealismo de Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A este respecto se pone en conexión las ideas del autor con algunos planteamientos del último Husserl y con una interpretación de Popper sobre la sorprendente modernidad de algunas de las ideas berkeleyanas sobre la ciencia.

  14. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, M A; Kane, J; Loosmore, G; DeMuth, J; Latkowski, J

    2010-12-03

    ICF power plants, such as the LIFE scheme at LLNL, may employ a high-Z, target-chamber gas-fill to moderate the first-wall heat-pulse due to x-rays and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beam/target propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed plasma source producing 2-5 eV plasma comprised of high-Z gases. We use a 5-kJ, 100-ns theta discharge for high peak plasma-heating-power, an electrode-less discharge for minimizing impurities, and unobstructed axial access for diagnostics and beam (and/or target) propagation studies. We will report on the plasma source requirements, design process, and the system design.

  15. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  16. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  17. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Tassin, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Depierreux, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Gauthier, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Masson-Laborde, P. E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Monteil, M. C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Seytor, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Villette, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Arpajon (France); Lasinski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doeppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wallace, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sorce, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-07-25

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  18. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F.; Villette, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  19. Soliton dynamics in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers offer unprecedented opportunities to observe novel nonlinear phenomena. The various properties of gases that can be used to fill these fibers give additional degrees of freedom for investigating nonlinear pulse propagation in a wide range of different media. In this review, we will consider some of the the new nonlinear interactions that have been discovered in recent years, in particular those which are based on soliton dynamics.

  20. Soliton dynamics in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers offer unprecedented opportunities to observe novel nonlinear phenomena. The various properties of gases that can be used to fill these fibers give additional degrees of freedom for investigating nonlinear pulse propagation in a wide range of different media. In this review, we will consider some of the the new nonlinear interactions that have been discovered in recent years, in particular those which are based on soliton dynamics. (topical review)

  1. Tunable frequency-up/down conversion in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Based on the interplay between photoionization and Raman effect in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers, we propose a new optical device to control frequency-conversion of ultrashort pulses. By tuning the input-pulse energy, the output spectrum can be either down-converted, up-converted, or even frequency-shift compensated. For low input energies, Raman effect is dominant and leads to a redshift that increases linearly during propagation. For larger pulse energies, photoionization starts to tak...

  2. Welfare assessment of gas-filled foam as an agent for killing poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritzen, M.A.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Hindle, V.A.; McKeegan, D.E.F.; Sparrey, J.

    2010-01-01

    During outbreaks of notifiable diseases in poultry measures are taken to restrict the spread of the disease. Mass on-farm killing of birds using gasfilled foam is such a measure. This study examines the method and technologies involved using gas-filled foam and looks at the problems involved by scaling up the procedure. Methods and results are discussed in relation to poultry physiology and behaviour monitored during controlled studies. Recommendations are made for system design and an operat...

  3. High-energy laser-pulse self-compression in short gas-filled fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, P N; Horak, P.; Frey, J G; Brocklesby, W.S.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the spatiotemporal compression of energetic femtosecond laser pulses within short gas-filled fibers. The study is undertaken using an advanced nonlinear pulse propagation model based on a multimode generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation that has been modified to include plasma effects. Plasma defocusing and linear propagation effects are shown to be the dominant processes within a highly dynamical mechanism that enables 100-fs pulses to be compressed into the few-cycle regime a...

  4. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  5. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Lesko, K. T. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  6. Simulation of laser-plasma interaction experiments with gas-filled hohlraums on the LIL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Teychenné, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Tran, G.; Huser, G.; Rousseaux, C.; Hüller, S.; Héron, A.; Pesme, D.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-plasma interaction is a major issue for achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion schemes, and still a major concern for the upcoming french laser mégajoule (LMJ) program. In order to mitigate the deleterious effects due to laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), clearly evidenced during the recent US National Ignition Campaign conducted on the National Ignition Facility, we use the LIL facility as a demonstrator for LPI studies. In this article, we focus on preliminary results regarding the propagation of a typical LMJ quadruplet through gas-filled hohlraums. Results on hohlraum energetics will then be discussed.

  7. AMS Measurement of 36Cl With a Gas-filled Time of Flight Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANYong-jing; HEMing; RUANXiang-dong; WANGHui-juan; LIGuo-qiang; WUShao-yong; WUWei-ming; JIANGShan

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine 36Cl and 36S with high sensitivity by AMS, the present study has been done.Difference of time flight in the gas dependences to total energy, gas pressure in the chamber, and the flight length for isobars. The time resolution (FWHM) of the detector system is 800 ps without gas-filled when the ion energy is 72 MeV. Time straggling is growth with the increase of gas pressure in the chamber.Time straggling caused by the gas pressure is shown in Fig.1.

  8. Flat-top phase-matched high-order harmonics in gas-filled cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhua Xie(谢新华); Zhinan Zeng(曾志男); Ruxin Li(李儒新); Yunpei Deng(邓蕴沛); Haihe Lu(陆海鹤); Dingjun Yin(印定军); Zhizhan Xu(徐至展)

    2004-01-01

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation in Ar gas-filled cell is investigated experimentally. We obtain phase-matched 27th order harmonic driven by a commercially available solid-state femtosecond laser system at 0.55 m J/pulse energy level and 1-kHz repetition rate. Moreover, we find that the spatial distribution of intensity of high-order harmonics is flat-top profile other than a Gaussian one under the condition of optimized conversion efficiency in the static gas cell.

  9. Utilizing Gas Filled Cavities for the Generation of an Intense Muon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  10. D2 gas-filled blisters on deuterium-bombarded tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of spherical blisters formed by deuterium (D) bombardment (38 eV/D) up to 3 x 1024 D/m2 at 300 K on polycrystalline tungsten are fully elastic deformations. This has been proven by opening individual blisters with a focused ion beam and in situ observation of their complete relaxation by scanning electron microscopy. The D2 gas filling is confirmed by observing simultaneously the D2 puff. The gas pressure is causal for the stability of such spherical blisters after implantation and the gas release leads to sudden relaxation. The dilatation of the blister cap by trapped D can be excluded as cause for the blisters.

  11. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  12. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Neuffer, David V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  13. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  14. Focal spot size predictions for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from calculations of focal spot size for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor are summarized. In the converging beam mode, we find an enlargement of the focal spot due to multiple scattering and zeroth order self-field effects. This enlargement can be minimized by maintaining small reactors together with a careful choice of the gaseous medium. The self-focused mode, on the other hand, is relatively insensitive to the reactor environment, but is critically dependent upon initial beam quality. This requirement on beam quality can be significantly eased by the injection of an electron beam of modest current from the opposite wall

  15. Tunable frequency-up/down conversion in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-09-15

    Based on the interplay between photoionization and Raman effects in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers, we propose a new optical device to control frequency conversion of ultrashort pulses. By tuning the input-pulse energy, the output spectrum can be either down-converted, up-converted, or even frequency-shift compensated. For low input energies, the Raman effect is dominant and leads to a redshift that increases linearly during propagation. For larger pulse energies, photoionization starts to take over the frequency-conversion process and induces a strong blueshift. The fiber-output pressure can be used as an additional degree of freedom to control the spectrum shift. PMID:26371900

  16. A giant gas-filled abdominal mass in an elderly female: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi Man Deon Chong; Fung Yee Janet Lee; Anthony Lo; Chak Man Jimmy Li

    2011-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of gas-filled abdomi?nal mass caused by an ovarian teratoma fistulating to the sigmoid colon. The patient was an 85-year-old female, who presented with severe abdominal disten?sion. Urgent computed tomography scan showed a huge abdominal mass with air fluid level and fecal matter inside. Communication between the mass and the sigmoid colon was suspected. She underwent emergency laparotomy. The mass was resected with the involved segment of colon. Pathology confirmed squamous cell carcinoma arising from mature cystic teratoma of the ovary.

  17. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  18. Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development

  19. Berkeley automated supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982

  20. GeV-scale electron acceleration in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report experimental results on laser-driven electron acceleration with low divergence. The electron beam was generated by focussing 750 mJ, 42 fs laser pulses into a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide at electron densities in the range between 1018 and 1019 cm-3. Quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches with energies as high as 500 MeV have been detected, with features reaching up to 1 GeV, albeit with large shot-to-shot fluctuations. A more stable regime with higher bunch charge (20-45 pC) and less energy (200-300 MeV) could also be observed. The beam divergence and the pointing stability are around or below 1 mrad and 8 mrad, respectively. These findings are consistent with self-injection of electrons into a breaking plasma wave

  1. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materna T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  2. Structural Integrity of Gas-Filled Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Subjected to Orbital Debris Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telichev, Igor; Cherniaev, Aleksandr

    Gas-filled pressure vessels are extensively used in spacecraft onboard systems. During operation on the orbit they exposed to the space debris environment. Due to high energies they contain, pressure vessels have been recognized as the most critical spacecraft components requiring protection from orbital debris impact. Major type of pressurized containers currently used in spacecraft onboard systems is composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) manufactured by filament winding. In the present work we analyze the structural integrity of vessels of this kind in case of orbital debris impact at velocities ranging from 2 to 10 km/s. Influence of such parameters as projectile energy, shielding standoff, internal pressure and filament winding pattern on COPVs structural integrity has been investigated by means of numerical and physical experiments.

  3. Fast PC-based data acquisition system for gas-filled position sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high flux of the new generation of synchrotron radiation sources requires fast position sensitive detectors with high count rate data acquisition systems capability. Though the local count rate in a gas-filled position-sensitive detector is limited by the space charge effect, the integral rate will increase with the area of the detector. Thus, more than several 106 events per second can be achieved. Therefore, we developed a new PC-based histogramming and control interface (HCl) with an intrinsic dead time lower than 200 ns for linear and area X-ray detectors for time-resolved measurement applications. An overview of the complete acquisition system including a fast time-to-digital converter and image processing software will be given. The design principles and operating characteristics including experimental results obtained with a 100 mm linear delay-line detector at the SAXS beamline 5.2 in Elettra (Trieste) will be presented. (orig.)

  4. Numerical Simulation of Debris Cloud Propagation inside Gas-Filled Pressure Vessels under Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, F. F.; Pang, B. J.; Guan, G. S.

    2009-03-01

    In the paper SPH methods in AUTODYN-2D is used to investigate the characteristics of debris clouds propagation inside the gas-filled pressure vessels for hypervelocity impact on the pressure vessels. The effect of equation of state on debris cloud has been investigated. The numerical simulation performed to analyze the effect of the gas pressure and the impact condition on the propagation of the debris clouds. The result shows that the increase of gas pressure can reduce the damage of the debris clouds' impact on the back wall of vessels when the pressure value is in a certain range. The smaller projectile lead the axial velocity of the debris cloud to stronger deceleration and the debris cloud deceleration is increasing with increased impact velocity. The time of venting begins to occur is related to the "vacuum column" at the direction of impact-axial. The paper studied the effect of impact velocities on gas shock wave.

  5. Method and apparatus for producing gas-filled hollow spheres. [target pellets for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A system for forming hollow spheres containing pressured gas is described which includes a cylinder device containing a molten solid material with a nozzle at its end. A second gas nozzle, lying slightly upstream from the tip of the first nozzle, is connected to a source that applies pressured filler gas that is to fill the hollow spheres. High pressure is applied to the molten metal, as by moving a piston within the cylinder device, to force the molten material out of the first nozzle. At the same time, pressured gas fills the center of the extruded hollow liquid pipe that breaks into hollow spheres. The environment outside the nozzles contains gas at a high pressure such as 100 atmospheres. Gas is supplied to the gas nozzle at a slightly higher pressure such as 101 atmospheres. The pressure applied to the molten material is at a still higher pressure such as 110 atmospheres.

  6. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  7. X-ray Sources Generated from Gas-Filled Laser-Heated Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Grun, J; Decker, C D; Davis, J; Laming, J M; Feldman, U; Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Miller, M; Serduke, F; Wuest, C

    2000-06-06

    The X-ray sources in the 4-7 keV energy regime can be produced by laser-irradiating high-Z gas-filled targets with high-powered lasers. A series of experiments have been performed using underdense targets that are supersonically heated with {approx} 35 W of 0.35 {micro}m laser light. These targets were cylindrical Be enclosures that were filled with 1-2 atms of Xe gas. L-shell x-ray emission is emitted from the plasma and detected by Bragg crystal spectrometers and x-ray diodes. Absolute flux measurements show conversion efficiencies of {approx} 10% in the multi-kilovolt x-ray emission. These sources can be used as bright x-ray backlighters or for material testing.

  8. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Abrams, Robert [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Dinkel, Holly [U. Missouri, Columbia; Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, Grigory [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  9. Tunable frequency-up/down conversion in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Based on the interplay between photoionization and Raman effect in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers, we propose a new optical device to control frequency-conversion of ultrashort pulses. By tuning the input-pulse energy, the output spectrum can be either down-converted, up-converted, or even frequency-shift compensated. For low input energies, Raman effect is dominant and leads to a redshift that increases linearly during propagation. For larger pulse energies, photoionization starts to take over the frequency conversion process, and induces a strong blueshift. We have found also that by changing the fiber-output pressure the pulse spectrum blueshifts, providing an additional degree of freedom in the design.

  10. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  11. BERKELEY: ALS ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everybody at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center for Beam Physics is pleased with the rapid progress in commissioning LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS) electron storage ring, the foundation for this third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Designed for a maximum current of 400 mA, the ALS storage ring reached 407 mA just 24 days after storing the first beam on 16 March. ALS construction as a US Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility to provide high-brightness vacuum ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation began in October 1987. One technical requirement marking project completion was to accumulate a 50-mA current in the storage ring. The ALS passed this milestone on 24 March, a week ahead of the official deadline. Once injected, the electron beam decays quasi-exponentially primarily because of interactions with residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum chamber. Eventually, when the pressure in the vacuum chamber with beam decreases toward the expected operating level of 1 nano Torr, it will only be necessary to refill the storage ring at intervals of four to eight hours. At present the vacuum is improving rapidly as surfaces are irradiated (scrubbed) by the synchrotron radiation itself. At 100 mA, beam lifetime was about one hour (9 April)

  12. 2009 SCDNR Berkeley County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Berkeley County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  13. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1 + ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal the h...

  14. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ∼1 x 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mmx160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face and diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6x10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2x10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5x10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4x10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions

  15. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  16. Standard practice for examination of seamless, gas-filled, steel pressure vessels using angle beam ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a contact angle-beam shear wave ultrasonic technique to detect and locate the circumferential position of longitudinally oriented discontinuities and to compare the amplitude of the indication from such discontinuities to that of a specified reference notch. This practice does not address examination of the vessel ends. The basic principles of contact angle-beam examination can be found in Practice E 587. Application to pipe and tubing, including the use of notches for standardization, is described in Practice E 213. 1.2 This practice is appropriate for the ultrasonic examination of cylindrical sections of gas-filled, seamless, steel pressure vessels such as those used for the storage and transportation of pressurized gasses. It is applicable to both isolated vessels and those in assemblies. 1.3 The practice is intended to be used following an Acoustic Emission (AE) examination of stacked seamless gaseous pressure vessels (with limited surface scanning area) described in Test Met...

  17. Convergent ablation measurements with gas-filled rugby hohlraum on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Galmiche, D.

    2016-03-01

    Convergent ablation experiments with gas-filled rugby hohlraum were performed for the first time on the OMEGA laser facility. A time resolved 1D streaked radiography of capsule implosion is acquired in the direction perpendicular to hohlraum axis, whereas a 2D gated radiography is acquired at the same time along the hohlraum axis on a x-ray framing camera. The implosion trajectory has been measured for various kinds of uniformly doped ablators, including germanium-doped and silicon-doped polymers (CH), at two different doping fraction (2% and 4% at.). Our experiments aimed also at measuring the implosion performance of laminated capsules. A laminated ablator is constituted by thin alternate layers of un-doped and doped CH. It has been previously shown in planar geometry that laminated ablators could mitigate Rayleigh Taylor growth at ablation front. Our results confirm that the implosion of a capsule constituted with a uniform or laminated ablator behaves similarly, in accordance with post-shot simulations performed with the CEA hydrocode FCI2.

  18. New Hadron Monitor By Using A Gas-Filled RF Resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Fasce, Giorgio [ECONA, Rome; Flanagan, Gene [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2015-05-01

    It is trend to build an intense neutrino beam facility for the fundamental physics research, e.g. LBNF at Fermilab, T2K at KEK, and CNGS at CERN. They have investigated a hadron monitor to diagnose the primary/secondary beam quality. The existing hadron monitor based on an ionization chamber is not robust in the high-radiation environment vicinity of MW-class secondary particle production targets. We propose a gas-filled RF resonator to use as the hadron monitor since it is simple and hence radiation robust in this environment. When charged particles pass through the resonator they produce ionized plasma via the Coulomb interaction with the inert gas. The beam-induced plasma changes the permittivity of inert gas. As a result, a resonant frequency in the resonator shifts with the amount of ionized electrons. The radiation sensitivity is adjustable by the inert gas pressure and the RF amplitude. The hadron profile will be reconstructed with a tomography technique in the hodoscope which consists of X, Y, and theta layers by using a strip-shaped gas resonator. The sensitivity and possible system design will be shown in this presentation.

  19. Preparation and characterization of gas-filled liposomes: can they improve oil recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Anil; Morris, Robert; Bencsik, Martin; Perrie, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Although well known for delivering various pharmaceutical agents, liposomes can be prepared to entrap gas rather than aqueous media and have the potential to be used as pressure probes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using these gas-filled liposomes (GFL) as tracers, MRI imaging of pressure regions of a fluid flowing through a porous medium could be established. This knowledge can be exploited to enhance recovery of oil from the porous rock regions within oil fields. In the preliminary studies, we have optimized the lipid composition of GFL prepared using a simple homogenization technique and investigated key physico-chemical characteristics (size and the physical stability) and their efficacy as pressure probes. In contrast to the liposomes possessing an aqueous core which are prepared at temperatures above their phase transition temperature (T(c)), homogenization of the phospholipids such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC) in aqueous medium below their T(c) was found to be crucial in formation of stable GFL. DSPC based preparations yielded a GFL volume of more than five times compared to their DPPC counter part. Although the initial vesicle sizes of both DSPC and DPPC based GFL were about 10 microm, after 7 days storage at 25 degrees C, the vesicle sizes of both formulations significantly (p surfactant, stearylamine, at a molar ratio of 0.25 or 0.125. Interestingly, the zeta potential values remained around neutrality at both stearylamine ratios suggesting the cationic surfactant was not incorporated within the bilayers of the GFL. Microscopic analysis of GFL confirmed the presence of spherical structures with a size distribution between 1-8 microm. This study has identified that DSPC based GFL in aqueous medium dispersed in 2% w/v methyl cellulose although yielded higher vesicle sizes over time were most stable under high pressures exerted in MRI. PMID:18027246

  20. Reliability of semiconductor and gas-filled diodes for over-voltage protection exposed to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Koviljka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide-spread use of semiconductor and gas-filled diodes for non-linear over-voltage protection results in a variety of possible working conditions. It is therefore essential to have a thorough insight into their reliability in exploitation environments which imply exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of irradiation on over-voltage diode characteristics by exposing the diodes to californium-252 combined neutron/gamma radiation field. The irradiation of semiconductor over-voltage diodes causes severe degradation of their protection characteristics. On the other hand, gas-filled over-voltage diodes exhibit a temporal improvement of performance. The results are presented with the accompanying theoretical interpretations of the observed changes in over-voltage diode behaviour, based on the interaction of radiation with materials constituting the diodes.

  1. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  2. Study of the 30P(α,p)33S reaction using a gas-filled magnetic spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a technique using a gas-filled magnetic spectrograph which enables us to study (α,p) transfer reactions of astrophysical interest in inverse kinematics and by means of the time-inverse reactions. We present preliminary experimental results of the reaction 30P(α,p)33S which confirm that the technique permits the study of these kinds of transfer reactions.

  3. Observation of reduced beam deflection using smoothed beams in gas-filled hohlraum symmetry experiments at Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Execution and modeling of drive symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums have been pursued to provide both a better understanding of radiation symmetry in such hohlraums and to verify the accuracy of the design tools which are used to predict target performance for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. In this paper, the results of a series of drive symmetry experiments using gas-filled hohlraums at the Nova laser facility [C. Bibeau et al., Appl. Opt. 31, 5799 (1992)] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. A very important element of these experiments was the use of kineform phase plates (KPP) to smooth the Nova beams. The effect of smoothing the ten Nova beams with KPP phase plates is to remove most of the beam bending which had been observed previously, leaving a residual bending of only 1.5 degree sign , equivalent to a 35 μm pointing offset at the hohlraum wall. The results show that the symmetry variation with pointing of implosions in gas-filled hohlraums is consistent with time integrated modeling. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion

  6. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  7. MAG orbital welding with cover gas filling wire electrodes; MAG-Orbitalschweissen mit gasgeschuetzten Fuelldrahtelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engindeniz, E. [Oerlikon Schweisstechnik GmbH, Eisenberg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Pipelines made of steel are required to an increasing extent worldwide in the field of district heating and water supply and for the transport of petroleum, natural gas etc. In laying them, circular welds are produced by means of various welding processes. While EH welding with cellulose rod electrodes continues to be the dominant variant, the importance of suitable MAG orbital techniques is increasing by leaps and bounds. Economy and quality aspects are mainly decisive for this. Another reason to be mentioned, apart form the reproduceability of the quality of welds by mechanisation is humanisation of the workplace. At present MAG orbital welding has taken up a firm position in pipeline construction. The variant with cover gas filling wire electrodes on which this article reports, should be particularly emphasised here. The process is suitable for producing filling and top layers in the position sequence PE-PF-PA. Either EH or TIG welding can be considered for carrying out the root and hot pass, where one must mention that the first experiments on the mechanized welding of the root by the MAG process have been successfully concluded. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bereich der Fernwaerm Bereich der Fernwaerme sowie Wasserversorgung und fuer den Transport von Erdoel, -gas etc. werden weltweit in zunehendemendem Masse Rohrleitungen aus Stahl benoetigt. Bei der Verlegung erfolgt die Ausfuehrung der Rundnaehte ittels verschiedener Schmittels verschiedener Schmelzschweissverfahren. Waehrend das EH-Schweissen it Zellulose-Stabelektroden weiterhin als domit Zellulose-Stabelektroden weiterhin als dominierende e Variante gilt, ni mmt die Bedeutung geeigneter MAG-Orbitaltechnologien rasant zu. Fuer diese Entwicklung sind in erster Linie Wirtschaftlichkeits- und Qualitaetsaspekte assgebend. Als weiterer Grund ist neben der Reproduzierbarkeit der Nahtguete durch die Mechanisierung die Humassgebend. Als weiterer Grund ist neben der Reproduzierbarkeit der Nahtguete durch die Mechanisierung

  8. Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, N.

    2008-03-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers. The result is an energy efficient high-performing sustainable laboratory.

  9. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  10. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via ''no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is ''no fault'' and is not an ''audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 63Ni using a gas-filled magnet at the Munich Tandem Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugel, G.; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Marchetti, A. A.; McAninch, J. E.; Rühm, W.; Straume, T.; Wallner, C.

    2000-10-01

    The detection of 63Ni ( T1/2=100.1 yr) by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using a gas-filled magnet (GFM) is described. The experimental setup includes a dedicated ion source, a 14 MV MP tandem, a GFM and a multi-anode ionization chamber. First results indicate a background level of 63Ni/Ni ratios as low as 2×10 -14. This sensitivity will allow - for the first time ever - to detect 63Ni induced by fast neutrons in copper samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even for distances beyond 1500 m from the hypocenters. Thus, it will be possible to reconstruct experimentally the neutron doses of the A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 63Ni using a gas-filled magnet at the Munich Tandem Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of 63Ni (T1/2=100.1 yr) by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using a gas-filled magnet (GFM) is described. The experimental setup includes a dedicated ion source, a 14 MV MP tandem, a GFM and a multi-anode ionization chamber. First results indicate a background level of 63Ni/Ni ratios as low as 2x10-14. This sensitivity will allow - for the first time ever - to detect 63Ni induced by fast neutrons in copper samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even for distances beyond 1500 m from the hypocenters. Thus, it will be possible to reconstruct experimentally the neutron doses of the A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  15. Effect of a transverse magnetic field on the generation of electron beams in the gas-filled diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. H.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) on generation of an electron beam in the gas-filled diode is experimentally investigated. It is shown that, at voltage U = 25 kV across the diode and a low helium pressure (45 Torr), the transverse magnetic field influences the beam current amplitude behind a foil and its distribution over the foil cross section. At elevated pressures and under the conditions of ultrashort avalanche electron beam formation in helium, nitrogen, and air, the transverse magnetic field (0.080 and 0.016 T) has a minor effect on the amplitude and duration of the beam behind the foil. It is established that, when the voltage of the pulse generator reaches several hundreds of kilovolts, some runaway electrons (including the electrons from the discharge plasma near the cathode) are incident on the side walls of the diode.

  16. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  17. The decommissioning of Berkeley II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the decommissioning progress at the Magnox site at Berkeley in Gloucestershire.Throughout the work at Berkeley the emphasis has been on conducting decommissioning safely. This has been reflected in the progress of decommissioning starting with removal of the fuel from site and thus much greater than 99% of the radioactive inventory. The major radioactive hazard is the Intermediate Level Waste in the form of fuel element debris (graphite struts and extraneous magnox components removed to increase the packing density of fuel elements in flasks going to Sellafield), miscellaneous activated components, sludges and resins. Approximately 1500 m3 of such material exists and is stored in underground waste vaults on site. Work is underway to recover and encapsulate the waste in cement so rendering it 'passively safe'. All work on site is covered by a nuclear safety case which has a key objective of minimising the radiological exposures that could accrue to workers. Reflecting this an early decision has been taken to leave work on the Reactor Pressure Vessels themselves for several decades. Also important in protection of the workforce has been control of asbestos.Much material has been removed with redundant plant and equipment, but a programme of remediation in line with government legislation has been required to ensure personnel safety throughout the decommissioning period and into Care and Maintenance.In addition to health and safety matters the site approach to environmental issues has been consistent. Formally such standards as ISO 14001 have been adhered to and the appropriate certification maintained. At a working level the principles of reduce, reuse and recycle have been inculcated

  18. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  19. The anticentre old open clusters Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36: new additions to the BOCCE project

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Cignoni, M; Cocozza, G; Tosi, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of the evolutionary status of three open clusters: Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. All of them were observed with SUSI2@NTT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that Berkeley 27 has an age between 1.5 and 1.7 Gyr, a reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.40 and 0.50, and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.3; Berkeley 34 is older with an age in the range 2.1 and 2.5 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.57 and 0.64, and (m-M)_0 between 14.1 and 14.3; Berkeley 36, with an age between 7.0 and 7.5 Gyr, has a reddening E(B-V)~0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.2. For all the clusters our analysis suggests a sub-solar metallicity ...

  20. The Berkeley Digital Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Karavas, W.; Hellweg, M.; Uhrhammer, R.; Lombard, P.; Friday, J.; Lellinger, R.; Gardner, J.; McKenzie, M. R.; Bresloff, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since it began monitoring earthquakes in northern California 120 years ago, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) has been striving to produce the highest quality and most complete seismic data possible in the most modern way. This goal has influenced choices in instrumentation, installation and telemetry, as well as the investment in expertise and manpower. Since the transition to broadband (BB) instrumentation in the mid- 1980s and to a fully digitally telemetered network in the early 1990s, we have continued these efforts. Each of our 25 BB installations includes three component BB seismometers (STS-1s or STS-2) and digital accelerometers to capture the full range of ground motion from distant teleseisms to large, nearby earthquakes (almost 250 dB). The ground motion is recorded on-site by 24 bit dataloggers. Additional environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, are also monitored continuously. Many stations record also C-GPS data that is transmitted continuously to the BSL via shared real-time telemetry. The BDSN's first stations were installed in abandoned mines. In the last 15 years, we developed installations using buried shipping containers to reduce environmental noise and provide security and easy access to the equipment. Data are transmitted in real-time at several sampling rates to one or more processing centers, using frame relay, radio, microwave, and/or satellite. Each site has 7-30 days of onsite data storage to guard against data loss during telemetry outages. Each station is supplied with backup batteries to provide power for 3 days. The BDSN real-time data acquisition, earthquake analysis and archiving computers are housed in a building built to "emergency grade" seismic standards, with air conditioning and power backed up by a UPS and a large generator. Data latency and power are monitored by automated processes that alert staff via pager and email. Data completeness and timing quality are automatically assessed on a daily

  1. Picosecond pulses compression at 1053-nm center wavelength by using a gas-filled hollow-core fiber compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of picosecond pulses with 10-mJ of input energy at the 1053-nm center wavelength by using a one-meter-long gas-filled hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor and considering the third-order dispersion (TOD) effect. It is found that when the input pulse is about 1 ps/10 mJ, it can be compressed down to less than 20 fs with a high transmission efficiency. The gas for optimal compression is krypton gas which is filled in a HCF with a 400-μm inner diameter. When the input pulse duration is increased to 5 ps, it can also be compressed down to less than 100 fs efficiently under proper conditions. The results show that the TOD effect has little impact on picosecond pulse compression and the HCF compressor can be applied on compressing picosecond pulses efficiently with a high compression ratio, which will benefit the research of high-field laser physics. (paper)

  2. Experimental tests of Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization mechanisms with long pulse gas-filled halfraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Huser, G.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2008-11-01

    Mitigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth is a key issue on the road toward ignition. The graded doped ablator is a common concept for NIF [1] and LMJ [2] point designs. A complementary stabilization mechanism based on anisotropic thermal diffusion was theoretically underlined [3] for the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We will present the first ever experimental tests of these mechanisms. Indirect drive experiments were performed on the OMEGA laser facility with a long-pulse platform. We used in fact gas-filled halfraums and stack 15 drive beams along 2 cones to create a 7 ns long radiation drive. Halfraum energetics with E-IDI-300 phase plates was validated by dedicated shots along P5/P8 and is fairly reproduced by the simulations. These drive measurements allowed also to determine the graded doped planar emulator whose layers thicknesses and composition should be carefully optimized . Side-on and face-on data acquired with germanium-doped plastic samples (modulations wavelength 35 and 50 microns) will be presented and compared with FCI2 hydrocodes simulations. [1] S.W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056316 (2005). [2] C C-Cl'erouin et al 2008 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112 022023 [3] L. Masse., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 245001 (2007).

  3. Studies of implosion dynamics of D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as {rho}R) and burn of direct-drive, D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d{sup 3}He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. {rho}R asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average {rho}R, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target.

  4. Understanding fast neutrons utilizing a water Cherenkov detector and a gas-filled detector at the soudan underground laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Chiranjibi

    Many experiments are currently searching for Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), a well-motivated class of hypothetical dark matter candidates. These direct dark matter detection experiments are located in deep underground to shield from cosmic-ray muons and the fast neutrons they produce. Fast neutrons are particularly dangerous to WIMP detectors because they can penetrate a WIMP-search experiment's neutron shielding. Once inside, these fast neutrons can interact with high-Z material near the WIMP detector, producing slower neutrons capable of mimicking the expected WIMP signal. My research uses two detectors located in Soudan Underground Laboratory to understand fast neutron production by muons in an underground environment: a water-Cherenkov detector sensitive to fast neutrons; and a gas-filled detector sensitive to charged particles like muons. The different kinds of selection criterion and their efficiencies are reported in this thesis. This thesis estimate the number of high energy neutron-like candidates associated with a nearby muon by using data from both detector systems.

  5. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-12-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the ^{13}{C}_2{H}_2 P(16) (ν _1 + ν _3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal the hollow-core fiber with easy light coupling, showing negligible pressure increase over two months. The locked laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 8 × 10^{-12} for an averaging time up to 104 s. The lock-point repeatability over one month is 2.6 × 10^{-11}, corresponding to a standard deviation of 5.3 kHz. The system is also assembled in a more compact and easy-to-use configuration ( Plug&Play), showing comparable performance with previously published work. The real portability of this technology is proved by shipping the system to a collaborating laboratory, showing unchanged performance after the return.

  6. Studies of implosion dynamics of D3He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as ρR) and burn of direct-drive, D3He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d3He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. ρR asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average ρR, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target

  7. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  8. Late-time radiography of beryllium ignition-target ablators in long-pulse gas-filled hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple-laboratory campaign is underway to qualify beryllium as a fusion capsule ablator for the National Ignition Facility [Moses and Wuest, Fusion Sci. Technol. 43, 420 (2003)]. Although beryllium has many advantages over other ablator materials, individual crystals of beryllium have anisotropic properties, e.g., sound speed, elastic constants, and thermal expansion coefficients, which may seed hydrodynamic instabilities during the implosion phase of ignition experiments. Experiments based on modeling have begun at the OMEGA laser [Boehly, McCrory, Verdon et al., Fusion Eng. Design 44, 35 (1999)] to create a test bed for measuring instability growth rates with face-on radiography of perturbed beryllium samples with the goal of establishing a specification for microstructure in beryllium used as an ablator. The specification would include the size and distribution of sizes of grains and voids and the impurity content. The experimental platform is a 4 kJ laser-heated (for ∼6 ns) hohlraum that is well modeled for radiation temperature and for shock pressure and breakout timing through the driven beryllium sample. A 1 atm methane gas fill has been used to maintain a clear line of sight through the hohlraum for radiography with acceptable plasma backscatter losses. The peak radiation temperature is 145 eV; the pressure early in the laser pulse is 1 Mbar for over 1 ns. Radiographs of sinusoidally perturbed copper-doped (0.9% by atom) beryllium samples have been obtained more than 10 ns after drive initiation. With the current laser drive, a growth factor approaching ten has been measured for initial 2.5 μm perturbations with on-axis radiography

  9. Heat and mass transfer across gas-filled enclosed spaces between a hot liquid surface and a cooled roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed knowledge is required of the amounts of sodium vapour which may be transported from the hot surface of a fast reactor coolant pool through the cover gas to cooler regions of the structure. Evaporation from the unbounded liquid surfaces of lakes and seas has been studied extensively but the heat and mass transfer mechanisms in gas-vapour mixtures which occur in enclosed spaces have received less attention. Recent work at Harwell has provided a theoretical model from which the heat and mass transfer in idealised plane cavities can be calculated. An experimental study is reported in this paper which seeks to verify the theoretical prediction. Heat and mass transfer measurements have been made on a system in which a heated water pool transfers heat and mass across a gas-filled space to a cooled horizontal cover plate. Several cover gases were used in the experiments and the results show that, provided the partial density of the vapour is low compared with that of the gas, the heat transfer mechanism is that of combined convection and radiation. The enhancement in heat transfer due to the presence of the vapour is broadly consistent with assumption of a direct analogy between heat and mass transfer neglecting condensation in the interspace. The mass transfer measurements, in which water condensing on the cooled roof was measured directly, showed for low roof temperatures an imbalance between the mass and heat transfer. This observation is consistent with the theoretical predictions that heat transfer in the convecting system should be independent of the amount of condensation and 'rain-back' within the cavity. The results of tests with helium showed that convection was entirely suppressed by the presence of the water vapour. This confirms the behaviour predicted for gas-vapour mixtures in which the vapour density is of the same order as the gas density. (author)

  10. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, M

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  11. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  12. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-12-17

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  13. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  14. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, H; Belli, F; Liu, H; Calegari, F; Chavez-Cervantes, M; Li, M T; Lin, C T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J; Cavalleri, A; Travers, J C; Gierz, I

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials

  16. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer

  17. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M. B., E-mail: schneider5@llnl.gov; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  18. Reorganizing the Biological Sciences at Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trow, Martin A.

    1983-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley's substantial reorganization of the biological sciences due to internal and external needs is chronicled, focusing on the coordinated efforts of the institution and the strong, supportive leadership of the chancellor. The story is presented as an unusual case of institutional leadership within a highly…

  19. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  20. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1997. This report is structured into three basic areas that cover a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and the results of the surveillance and monitoring activities, including air quality, surface water, groundwater, sanitary sewer, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, radiation dose assessment, and quality assurance. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains the body of the report, a list of references, a list of acronyms and abbreviations, a glossary, Appendix A (NESHAPS annual report), and Appendix B (distribution list for volume I). Volume II contains Appendix C, the individual data results from monitoring programs. Each chapter in volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow

  1. Political-social reactor problems at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For better than ten years there was little public notice of the TRIGA reactor at UC-Berkeley. Then: a) A non-student persuaded the Student and Senate to pass a resolution to request Campus Administration to stop operation of the reactor and remove it from campus. b) Presence of the reactor became a campaign-issue in a City Mayoral election. c) Two local residents reported adverse physical reactions before, during, and after a routine tour of the reactor facility. d) The Berkeley City Council began a study of problems associated with radioactive material within the city. e) Friends Of The Earth formally petitioned the NRC to terminate the reactor's license. Campus personnel have expended many man-hours and many pounds of paper in responding to these happenings. Some of the details are of interest, and may be of use to other reactor facilities. (author)

  2. The Berkeley TRIGA Mark III research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Research Reactor went critical on August 10, 1966, and achieved licensed operating power of 1000 kW shortly thereafter. Since then, the reactor has operated, by and large, trouble free on a one-shift basis. The major use of the reactor is in service irradiations, and many scientific programs are accommodated, both on and off campus. The principal off-campus user is the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. The reactor is also an important instructional tool in the Nuclear Engineering Department reactor experiments laboratory course, and as a source of radioisotopes for two other laboratory courses given by the Department. Finally, the reactor is used in several research programs conducted within the Department, involving studies with neutron beams and in reactor kinetics

  3. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics

  4. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hules, John A

    2009-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  6. Rare correlated sequences detection with DSSSD detector in a real-time mode at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Method of active correlations is a key one to suppress radically beam associated backgrounds in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. This property is enhanced significantly when applying DSSSD detector instead of position sensitive resistive strip detector. Example of application in the 240Pu+48Ca->114+3n reaction is presented. An edge effect between neighbor strips is considered too. The value of the mentioned effect is measured as 15.9 percents for ER-alpha correlation chains. C++ Builder GFS2016 program package for spectral analysis is presented. Calibration parameters (totally 352) were obtained from natYb+48Ca nuclear reaction. New ultra intense FLNR DC280 cyclotron that is expected to be put into operation in the nearest future is also discussed from the viewpoint of the described method developments.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory's environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  9. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. Although this proof-of-principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser 'time-slicing' technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend-magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness

  10. Three new bricks in the wall: Berkeley 23, Berkeley 31, and King 8

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, Michele; Bragaglia, Angela; Tosi, Monica

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive census of Galactic open cluster properties places unique constraints on the Galactic disc structure and evolution. In this framework we investigate the evolutionary status of three poorly-studied open clusters, Berkeley 31, Berkeley 23 and King 8, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. To this aim, we make use of deep LBT observations, reaching more than 6 mag below the main sequence Turn- Off. To determine the cluster parameters, namely age, metallicity, distance, reddening and binary fraction, we compare the observational colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC and FST) and metallicities. We find that Berkeley 31 is relatively old, with an age between 2.3 and 2.9 Gyr, and rather high above the Galactic plane, at about 700 pc. Berkeley 23 and King 8 are younger, with best fitting ages in the range 1.1-1.3 Gyr and 0.8-1.3 Gyr, respectively. The position above the Galactic plane is about 500- 600 pc...

  11. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  12. Careers in Data Science: A Berkeley Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Last year, I took on an amazing opportunity to serve as the Executive Director of the new Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS). After a 15-year career working with geospatial data to advance our understanding of the environment, I have been presented with a unique opportunity through BIDS to work with talented researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds. Founded in 2013, BIDS is a central hub of research and education at UC Berkeley designed to facilitate and nurture data-intensive science. We are building a community centered on a cohort of talented data science fellows and senior fellows who are representative of the world-class researchers from across our campus and are leading the data science revolution within their disciplines. Our initiatives are designed to bring together broad constituents of the data science community, including domain experts from the life, social, and physical sciences and methodological experts from computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics. While many of these individuals rarely cross professional paths, BIDS actively seeks new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across these different research fields. In this presentation, I will share my own story, along with some insights into how BIDS is supporting the careers of data scientists, including graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and research staff. I will also describe how these individuals we are helping support are working to address a number of data science-related challenges in scientific research.

  13. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bauerschmidt, Sebastian T; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path-lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure-adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker nonlinear processes to be explored.

  14. Laser propagation in a gas-filled target with 0.53 and 0.35 μm at various electron densities on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin-walled gas-filled targets have been irradiated with the Nova laser in order to measure laser propagation into a gas to form a plasma with electron density ranging from 0.05--0.25 nc. The targets consist of a thin (0.6--1.0 μm) polyimide skin that is stretched across the two faces of a washer, and then inflated to hold 1 atmosphere of gas. The experiments were done with ≤ 1 atmosphere of neopentane (3 mg/cm3). Additional shots were done to propagate a Nova beam into a preformed plasma by using two opposing beams with a relative delay. Peak laser irradiance on the target was varied from 3 x 1014 to 6 x 1015 W/cm2. The beam propagation into the gas was measured from streaked and gated x-ray images taken normal to the direction of laser propagation. Plasma temperature was measured spectroscopically with dopants in the gas-fill mixture. The effect of phase plates and SSD on beam propagation into the gas were studied using an f/4 and an f/8 laser beam on Nova. Lateral heat flow was also measured from the gated x-ray imaging. The propagation of the laser burn-front is compared to LASNEX calculations. A mm-scale plasma is created at approximately 1--1.5 keV with 2--3 kJ of laser energy delivered to the target in a 1 ns square-profile pulse

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  16. What Made Berkeley Great? The Sources of Berkeley's Sustained Academic Excellence. Research & Occasional Paper Series CSHE.3.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2011-01-01

    University of California (UC) Berkeley's chief academic officer explores the historical sources of Berkeley' academic excellence. He identifies five key factors: (1) wealth from many sources; (2) supportive and skilled governors; (3) leadership from key UC presidents; (4) the pioneering ethos within the State of California; and (5) a process of…

  17. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  18. ORFEUS focal plane instrumentation: The Berkeley spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Bowyer, Stuart

    1988-01-01

    A spectrograph for the ORFEUS mission that incorporates four varied line-space, spherically figured diffraction gratings was designed. The ORFEUS, a 1-m normal incidence telescope is equipped with 2 focal plane spectrographs. The Berkeley spectrograph was developed with an optimizing raytracing computer code. Each grating accepts the light from 20 percent of the aperture of the telescope primary mirror and has a unique set of characteristics to cover a sub-bandpass within the 390 to 1200 A spectral range. Two photon-counting detectors incorporating a time delay readout system are used to record the spectra from all four gratings simultaneously. The nominal design achieves a spectral resolution (FWHM) in excess of 5500 at all wavelengths within the bandpass. The resolution is limited primarily by the detector spatial resolution. The 1 sigma astigmatism of this design varies between 13 and 150 micrometer on the same focal surface. An independent, direct imaging system tracks the drift of the target within the spectrometer aperture and allows measurement of the misalignment between the telescope optical axis and that of the external star tracker. The resolution and astigmatism achievable with this design are superior to those of a standard Rowland spectrograph designed with the same constraints.

  19. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. BERKELEY: Farewell to the Bevatron/Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nearly a hundred current and former Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory employees gathered at the Bevatron accelerator on 21 February to watch Ed Lofgren turn off the beam for the last time. Lofgren, in charge of the venerable machine from its completion in 1954 until his retirement in 1979, pushed a button that someone long ago labeled ''atom smasher offer'', bringing to an end four decades of accomplishment in high energy and heavy ion physics. Owen Chamberlain, who shared the 1959 physics Nobel with Emilio Segré for the discovery of the antiproton at the Bevatron, was among those present at the closing ceremony. The shutdown came 39 years to the week after Bevatron beam first circulated, and a touching moment came just after Lofgren shut the machine down when the poignant strains of the ''Taps'' salute wafted out over the PA system. The Bevatron - or Bevalac, as it was called after being linked to the Super HILAC linear accelerator in the 1970s - made major contributions in four distinct areas of research: high energy physics, heavy ion physics, medical research and therapy, and space-related studies of radiation damage and heavy particles in space. As well as the discovery of the antiproton, the early years of the Bevatron saw classic studies of the kaon, leading to a deeper understanding of both strong and weak interaction physics. With Luis Alvarez' development of Donald Glaser's original bubble chamber idea into a prolific physics technique, the Bevatron was a major focus of the heady days of resonance hunting in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Most recently the Bevalac (Bevatron-SuperHILAC combination) pioneered relativistic heavy ion physics. The central focus of this research programme was the production and study of extreme conditions in nuclear matter. Highlights include the first definitive evidence of collective flow of nuclear matter at high temperatures and densities, studies of the nuclear

  4. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Pass-Fail Grading at Berkeley: Facts and Opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, Sidney

    The facts and opinions regarding pass/no pass grading at Berkeley discussed in this report are based on three sources of information. These sources include a survey of faculty conducted in the spring quarter 1970, a survey of undergraduate students in the winter quarter 1971, and the records routinely generated in the Registrar's Office for the…

  7. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  9. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  10. Berkeley Off-line Radioisotope Generator (BORG)

    CERN Document Server

    Sudowe, R

    2001-01-01

    Development of chemical separations for the transactinides has traditionally been performed with longer-lived tracer activities purchased commercially. With these long-lived tracers, there is always the potential problem that the tracer atoms are not always in the same chemical form as the short-lived atoms produced in on-line experiments. This problem is especially severe for elements in groups 4 and 5 of the periodic table, where hydrolysis is present. The long-lived tracers usually are stored with a complexing agent to prevent sorption or precipitation. Chemistry experiments performed with these long-lived tracers are therefore not analogous to those chemical experiments performed in on-line experiments. One way to eliminate the differences between off-line and on-line chemistry experiments is through the use of a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf fission fragment collection device. A sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf fission fragment collection device has already been constructed [1]. This device is limited in its capabilities. A ...

  11. Magnetic measurements at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent magnetic measurement activities at LBL have been concentrated in two separate areas, electro-magnets and permanent magnets for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). A survey of the many different measurement systems is presented. These include: AC magnetic measurements of an ALS booster dipole engineering model magnet, dipole moment measurements of permanent magnet blocks for ALS wigglers and undulators, permeability measurements of samples destined for wiggler and undulator poles, harmonic error analysis of SSC one meter model dipoles and quadrupoles and five meter long SSC prototype quadrupoles, harmonic error analysis of ALS dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles, precision Hall probe mapping of ALS storage ring combined function magnets, and the design of the ALS insertion device magnets mapping system. We also describe a new UNIX based data acquisition system that is being developed for the SSC. Probes used for magnetic measurements include Helmholtz coils, integral coils, point coils, and bucking harmonic analysis coils, several different types of Hall probes, and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers. Both analog and digital integrators are used with the coils. Some problems that occurred and their rectification is described. The mechanisms used include rotating systems with optical encoders, X-Y mapping systems with optical encoders and a laser position measuring device. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  13. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  14. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs

  15. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material

  17. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division

  18. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  19. Applications of a 6.5T Superconducting Solenoidal Separator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 6.5 Tesla superconducting gas-filled solenoid (SOLITAIRE has been developed at the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the ANU as a reaction product separator. Key features of the device allowing its application for precise measurement of heavy ion fusion cross sections are described. The physical separation of beam particles and the high efficiency (~80% transport of heavy ion fusion products open up applications in nuclear structure physics, and in materials science. Finally, the developments to allow its application to providing beams of light radioactive isotopes (SOLEROO are described.

  20. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  4. High speed optical links between LLNL and Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1994-08-08

    The Advanced Telecommunications Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with Pacific Bell, is developing an experimental high speed, four wavelength, protocol independent optical link for evaluating wide area networking interconnection schemes and the use of fiber amplifiers. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote sited control centers and experiments. In this paper we discuss our vision of the future of Wide Area Networking and describe the plans for the wavelength division multiplexed link between Livermore and the University of California at Berkeley.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory upgrading approaches to existing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Plant Engineering Department instituted a seismic risk investigation and seismic upgrade program in 1970. This paper covers the upgrade of two buildings with dissimilar framing systems; Building No. 10, a World War II vintage heavy timber frame building, and Building No. 80, a steel frame structure constructed in 1954. The seismic upgrade task for both structures required that the buildings be kept in service during rehabilitation with a minimum of disruption to occupants. Rehabilitations were phased over two and three year periods with construction management and supervision performed by LBL Plant Engineering staff

  6. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Austin, M.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  7. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  8. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  9. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  10. Simulation of the Berkeley research reactor using DSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have been obtained from a simulation of the TRIGA Mark III Berkeley Research Reactor (BRR) using DSNP. The BRR utilizes fuel that is a mixture of zirconium hydride and uranium hydride, with a hydride-to-metal ratio of 1.65 and a 235U enrichment of 28%. At Berkeley, version 3.4 of DSNP runs on an IBM 3081 Computer. The neutronic modules used to simulate the BRR were CNTRL1, NEUTR4, TPOWR4, CORTR4, and FDBEK4. The hydraulic loop consisted of modules LPLEN4, CORTR4, UPLEN4, PIPEUI, IHMXA1, and PIPEIL. As indicated from their names, several of the modules contained in library 1 were rewritten to incorporate a better model. The problem-description program was written to allow data entry from the console, and thus the FORTRAN program did not have to be recompiled for differing reactivity insertions. The decay heat module, GAMAR1, was not employed, since the ultimate objective of the simulation was to investigate operation of the reactor beyond its licensed limits

  11. Seismic Protection of Laboratory Contents: The UC Berkeley Science Building Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Comerio, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this report is a part of the Disaster Resistant University (DRU) initiative funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the University of California, Berkeley. The first phase of the Disaster Resistant University initiative produced a study of potential earthquake losses at UC Berkeley together with an analysis of the economic impacts. In that report, Comerio (2000) found that despite the extraordinary building retrofit program, the UC Berkeley cam...

  12. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy's inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  13. On-line separators for the Dubna Superheavy Element Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popeko, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The main goal of creation of a Superheavy Element Factory at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) is to sufficiently improve the efficiency of studies on heavy and superheavy nuclei. The factory will be based on a high-current DC-280 cyclotron. The use of beams with the intensity up to 6 ×1013 s-1 (10 pμA) requires effective separators providing high suppression of unwanted reaction products. Following the analysis of the kinematic characteristics of several hundreds of reactions, a conclusion was drawn that it is necessary to construct three separators optimized for specific tasks: a universal gas-filled separator for synthesis and study of the properties of heavy isotopes, a velocity filter for spectroscopic investigations, and a pre-separator for further chemical separation and precise mass measurements.

  14. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  15. Observation of Interspecies Ion Separation in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions via Imaging X-Ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C; Hakel, P; Vold, E L; Schmitt, M J; Hoffman, N M; Rauenzahn, R M; Kagan, G; Tang, X -Z; Mancini, R C; Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W

    2016-01-01

    We report direct experimental evidence of interspecies ion separation in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. These experiments, which used plastic capsules with D$_2$/Ar gas fill (1% Ar by atom), were designed specifically to reveal interspecies ion separation by exploiting the predicted, strong ion thermo-diffusion between ion species of large mass and charge difference. Via detailed analyses of imaging x-ray-spectroscopy data, we extract Ar-atom-fraction radial profiles at different times, and observe both enhancement and depletion compared to the initial 1%-Ar gas fill. The experimental results are interpreted with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include recently implemented, first-principles models of interspecies ion diffusion. The experimentally inferred Ar-atom-fraction profiles agree reasonably, but not exactly, with calculated profiles associated with the incoming and rebounding first shock.

  16. Investigation of prototype gas-filled photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel-plate gas gain of more than 7000 has been observed in a methane-filled low pressure hexode with a semi-transparent photocathode. The photocathode lifetime has been studied in a similarly constructed phototetrode. Conclusions are drawn for the development of future higher gain devices for use in particle physics experiments in high magnetic fields. (author)

  17. Gas-Filled-Capillary Discharge Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Jiří; Koláček, Karel; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Štraus, Jaroslav; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš

    Washington, DC: IEEE, 2010, s. 707-709. (IEEE Xplore). ISBN 978-1-4244-4064-1. [IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference/17th./. Washington, D.C. (US), 28.06.2010-02.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR KJB100430702; GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : Capillary discharge * x-ray * laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?arnumber=5386405

  18. Gas-Filled-Capillary Discharge Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Jiří; Koláček, Karel; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Štraus, Jaroslav

    Vol. IEEE Catalog Number: CFP09PPC. Piscataway : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc, 2009. s. 245-245. ISBN 978-1-4244-4065-8. [IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference/17th./. 28.06.2009-02.07.2009, Washington, D.C.] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR KJB100430702; GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Capillary discharge * x-ray * laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://ppc.missouri.edu/Abstracts.pdf

  19. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, L.D. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations.

  1. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters

  2. Status of the UC-Berkeley SETI Efforts

    CERN Document Server

    Korpela, Eric J; Bankay, Robert; Cobb, Jeff; Howard, Andrew; Lebofsky, Matt; Siemion, Andrew P V; von Korff, Joshua; Werthimer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths using an automated 30 inch telescope. The ongoing SERENDIP V.v sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with ~1.6 Hz spectral resolution. SETI@home uses the desktop computers of volunteers to analyze over 160 TB of data at taken at Arecibo looking for two types of continuous wave signals and two types of pulsed signals. A version to be released this summer adds autocorrelation analysis to look for complex wave forms that have been repeated (and overlayed) after a short delay. SETI@home will soon be processing data of Kepler exoplanet systems collected at the GBT. The Astropulse project is the first SETI search for $\\mu$s time scale dispersed pulses in the radio spectrum. We recently reobserved 114 sky loc...

  3. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES ampersand H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES ampersand H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES ampersand H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES ampersand H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs

  4. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program II: Initial Analysis of Spectra Obtained Near Maximum Brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2012-01-01

    In this second paper in a series we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z < 0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20 d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 through the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I (Silverman et al., submitted). We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEW), spectral feature depths, and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. A sanity check of the consistency of our measurements is performed using our data (as well as a separate spectral dataset). We investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences a...

  6. Guidelines for the segregation characterization management of dry waste at Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managing and disposing of dry low level radioactive waste at Berkeley Lab. is problematic. The Waste Management Group must assure off site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that dry waste from Berkeley Lab. is free of liquids and regulated metals (such as lead and mercury). RTR (Real Time Radioagraphy) used for waste to be rejected. This pamphlet helps to clarify dry waste management requirements that will ensure that Berkeley Lab. dry waste will be accepted for off site shipment. These issues are critical if we are to have an off site disposal option for your dry radioactive waste

  7. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Henry, O.; Raffestin, D. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France)

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  11. Proposed University of California Berkeley fast pulsar search machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the discovery of 1937+21 by Backer et al. (1982) there is much renewed interest in an all sky survey for fast pulsars. University of California Berkeley has designed and is in the process of building an innovative and powerful, stand-alone, real-time, digital signal-processor to conduct an all sky survey for pulsars with rotation rates as high as 2000 Hz and dispersion measures less than 120 cm-3 pc at 800 MHz. The machine is anticipated to be completed in the Fall of 1985. The search technique consists of obtaining a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of the microwave signal. The transform is effected in two stages: a 64-channel, 3-level digital autocorrelator provides the radio frequency to delay transform and a fast 128K-point array processor effects the time to intensity fluctuation frequency transform. The use of a digital correlator allows flexibility in the choice of the observing radio frequency. Besides, the bandwidth is not fixed as in a multi-channel filter bank. In the machine, bandwidths can range from less than a MHz to 40 MHz. In the transform plane, the signature of a pulsar consists of harmonically related peaks which lie on a straight line which passes through the origin. The increased computational demand of a fast pulsar survey will be met by a combination of multi-CPU processing and pipeline design which involves a fast array processor and five commercial 68,000-based micro-processors. 6 references, 3 figures

  12. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  14. Odd-Z Transactinide Compound Nucleus Reactions Including the Discovery of 260Bh

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Sarah L.

    2008-01-01

    Several reactions producing odd-Z transactinide compound nuclei were studied with the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to produce the same compound nucleus at or near the same excitation energy with similar values of angular momentum via different nuclear reactions. In doing so, it can be determined if there is a preference in entrance channel, because under these experimental conditions the survival portion of ...

  15. Berkeley e o papel das hipóteses na filosofia natural Berkeley and the role of hypothesis in natural philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Seno Chibeni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A questão do estatuto epistemológico das hipóteses que postulam entes e mecanismos inobserváveis tornou-se proeminente com o advento da ciência moderna, no século XVII. Uma das razões para isso é que, por um lado, as novas teorias científicas passaram a empregá-las amplamente na explicação dos fenômenos naturais, enquanto que, por outro lado, a epistemologia empirista, geralmente adotada desde então para a análise da ciência, parecia proscrever seu uso. Neste artigo analisam-se as soluções propostas por George Berkeley para essa tensão. Mostra-se que nos Princípios do conhecimento humano ele introduz uma nova noção de explicação científica, segundo a qual a ciência poderia prescindir de hipóteses sobre inobserváveis, quaisquer que sejam. Depois, para acomodar epistemologicamente a mecânica newtoniana, ele propõe, no De motu, a interpretação instrumentalista das hipóteses sobre forças, que são centrais nessa teoria, considerada por ele "a melhor chave para a ciência natural". Finalmente, em sua obra tardia, Siris, Berkeley envolve-se, de forma aparentemente realista, na discussão e defesa de uma série de hipóteses sobre fluidos inobserváveis. Examina-se brevemente, no final do artigo, a possibilidade de conciliar essa posição com os princípios fundamentais da epistemologia e metafísica de Berkeley.The issue of the epistemological status of hypotheses postulating unobservable entities became prominent with the advent of modern science, in the 17th century. The basic reason is that such entities were widely employed by the new scientific theories in the explanation and prediction of natural phenomena, whereas empiricist epistemology, which at that time became very popular among philosophers and scientists, formed a clearly inhospitable background for unobservable elements in general. This paper examines the stands adopted, and the proposals made on this topic by George Berkeley, one of the most important

  16. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  17. The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Braund

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of whether perception is direct or if it depends on additional, cognitive contributions made by the perceiving subject, is posed with particular force in an Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (NTV. It is evident from the recurrent treatment it receives therein that Berkeley considers it to be one of the central issues concerning perception. Fittingly, the NTV devotes the most attention to it. In this essay, I deal exclusively with Berkeley's treatment of the problem of indirect distance perception, as it is presented in the context of that work.

  18. Ultracapacitor separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  19. 77 FR 75448 - Welded Tube-Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling, Aerotek and Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Welded Tube--Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling... Worker Adjustment Assistance on October 10, 2012, applicable to workers of Welded Tube--Berkeley... Register on October 29, 2012 (77 FR 65583). At the request of South Carolina State, the Department...

  20. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  1. Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology: A Decade of Broadening Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Orpheus S. L.; Harrison, Christopher D.; Haas, Guy; Garcia, Daniel D.; Humphreys, Sheila M.; Lewis, Colleen M.; Khooshabeh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology is a decade-old endeavor to expose pre-college young women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities to the fields of computer science and engineering, and prepare them for rigorous, university-level study. We have served more than 150 students, and graduated more than 65…

  2. The principle of phase stability and the accelerator program at Berkeley, 1945--1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the Principle of Phase Stability by Vladimir Veksler and Edwin McMillian and the end of the war released a surge of accelerator activity at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The University of California Radiation Laboratory). Six accelerators incorporating the Principle of Phase Stability were built in the period 1945--1954

  3. The Berkeley Puppet Interview: A Screening Instrument for Measuring Psychopathology in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lisanne L.; van Daal, Carlijn; van der Maten, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Otten, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: While child self-reports of psychopathology are increasingly accepted, little standardized instruments are utilized for these practices. The Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) is an age-appropriate instrument for self-reports of problem behavior by young children. Objective: Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the BPI will be…

  4. An Evaluation of the New Curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael G.; Kashani, Sandy; Saroj, Namrata

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the new curriculum at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Optometry by comparing the content of the new curriculum to the old curriculum and by surveying faculty and students regarding their opinion of the new curriculum. Findings indicated that the curriculum is successful in implementing desired changes, including reduced…

  5. Cyclist safety on bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikel, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the safety of bicyclists riding on bicycle boulevards to those riding on parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California. Literature on the impact of motor vehicle traffic characteristics on cyclist safety shows that high motor vehicle speeds and volumes and the presence of heavy vehicles are all detrimental to cyclist safety. This suggests that cyclists may be safer on side streets than on busy arterials. Bicycle boulevards-traffic-calmed side streets signed and improved for cyclist use-purport to offer cyclists a safer alternative to riding on arterials. Police-reported bicycle collision data and manually collected cyclist count data from bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California from 2003 to 2010 are used to test the hypothesis that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards have lower cyclist collision rates and a lower proportion of bicycle collisions resulting in severe injury. While no significant difference is found in the proportion of collisions that are severe, results show that collision rates on Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are two to eight times lower than those on parallel, adjacent arterial routes. The difference in collision rate is highly statistically significant, unlikely to be caused by any bias in the collision and count data, and cannot be easily explained away by self-selection or safety in numbers. Though the used dataset is limited and the study design is correlational, this study provides some evidence that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are safer for cyclists than its parallel arterial routes. The results may be suggestive that, more generally, properly implemented bicycle boulevards can provide cyclists with a safer alternative to riding on arterials. PMID:22269506

  6. Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, And Their Foes From Berkeley To Russell And Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Mikhail G; 10.1007/s10670-012-9370-y

    2012-01-01

    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century and 20th century developments such as Robinson's theory. Robinson's hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, Robinson regards Berkeley's criticisms of the infinitesimal calculus as aptly demonstrating the inconsistency of reasoning with historical infinitesimal magnitudes. We argue that Robinson, among others, overestimates the force of Berkeley's criticisms, by underestimating the mathematical and philosophical resources available to Leibniz. Leibniz's infinitesimals are fictions, not logical fictions, as Ishiguro proposed, but ...

  7. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  8. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs

  9. Tibet in the 1930s: Theos Bernard's Legacy at UC Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. White

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay accompanies an online photo essay titled, "Tibet in the 1930s: The Legacy of Theos Bernard at UC Berkeley" (https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/photo-essay/810?page=0. In 1936–1937, Theos Casimir Bernard made an extraordinary pilgrimage to Tibet in search of adventure and spiritual enlightenment. Bernard was already an ardent practitioner of hatha yoga but was eager to gain knowledge of the esoteric teachings within yoga. His journey was well documented in photographs and moving images, as well as by his own descriptions, which he published in 1939 in the book Penthouse of the Gods: A Pilgrimage into the Heart of Tibet and the Sacred City of Lhasa. During his journey, he collected manuscripts, paintings, prints, and sculptures that he intended to be used in teaching esoteric Buddhist studies in America....

  10. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  11. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL's existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required

  12. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  13. Latest results from the SEMATECH Berkeley extreme ultraviolet microfield exposure tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Chiu, Jerrin; Dean, Kim; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Hoef, Brian; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; Ma, Andy; Montgomery, Warren; Niakoula, Dimitra; Park, Joo-On; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2008-09-02

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to play a dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the 0.3 numerical aperture SEMATECH Berkeley MET operating as a resist and mask test center. Here they present an update on the tool summarizing some of the latest test and characterization results. they provide an update on the long-term aberration stability of the tool and present line-space imaging in chemically amplified photoresist down to the 20-nm half-pitch level. Although resist development has shown substantial progress in the area of resolution, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of mask contributors to the LER observed from the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  14. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-redshift Supernova Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, G.; Perlmutter, S.; Pennypacker, C.; Marvin, H.; Muller, R. A.; Couch, W.; Boyle, B.

    1990-11-01

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring {Omega}. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper.

  15. Progress report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory high-redshift supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring Ω. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper. 3 refs., 18 figs

  16. Radioactive and mixed waste management plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Plan for the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is written to meet the requirements for an annual report of radioactive and mixed waste management activities outlined in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive and mixed waste management activities during FY 1994 listed here include principal regulatory and environmental issues and the degree to which planned activities were accomplished

  17. Jornalero: the life and work of Latin American Day Laborers in Berkeley, California

    OpenAIRE

    Ordonez, Juan Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is an ethnographic exploration of the everyday life of Latin American day laborers -jornaleros- in Berkeley, California. Based on more than two years of fieldwork consisting of participant observation on the streets and neighborhoods these men inhabit, my research follows the daily experience of marginalization of two-dozen immigrants. Working informally on street hiring sites day laborers actively participate in the US economy while they are marginalized through the very na...

  18. An Introduction to the 2001 Issue of the Berkeley Planning Journa

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, David

    2001-01-01

    Planners have always been deeply interested in and concerned about the effects of technology on human settlements. There is a rich and var­ ied literature on technics and civilization, to borrow from Mumford's brilliant account ( 193 4). Whether looking at machines, autos, comput­ ers or the Internet, this literature provides a rich treasure-trove of social and historical analysis. This issue of the Berkeley Planningjournal makes a contribution to this topic by examining the effects of techno...

  19. Status of the Berkeley small cyclotron AMS [accelerator mass spectrometry] project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small, low-energy cyclotron has been designed and built at Berkeley for direct detection dating of 14C. The system combines the use of a negative ion source to reject 14N with the high resolution of a cyclotron to reject other background ions. In order to allow the dating of old and small samples, the present system incorporates a high-current external ion source and injection beamline. The system is expected to be operational by mid-1987

  20. La critique du réalisme leibnizien dans le De Motu de Berkeley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Peterschmitt

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available L’objet de Berkeley dans le De Motu est de marquer l’autonomie de la mécanique (ou dynamique et de la métaphysique, en montrant que le concept de force tel qu’on l’utilise en mécanique ne peut servir à déterminer ce qu’il en est de la nature des choses. Pour établir cette distinction entre ces deux domaines du savoir, Berkeley à la fois s’appuie sur et critique la notion leibnizienne de force : Leibniz assure la réalité de la force dérivative (concept mécanique en la fondant sur la forme substantielle des corps, ou force primitive (concept métaphysique, qui permet d’attribuer aux corps une efficace causale. En récusant la forme substantielle comme inconcevable, Berkeley ruine alors le réalisme leibnizien, en vertu du lien posé par Leibniz lui-même entre sa métaphysique et sa dynamique. Mais du coup, cela permet à Berkeley d’instaurer un nouveau rôle à la métaphysique face à la mécanique : non plus un rôle fondateur comme celui que lui assigne Leibniz, mais un rôle critique, celui d’une instance qui dit les conditions sous lesquelles l’usage des concept est valide en science.

  1. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed.

  2. Strategic Plan for Loss Reduction and Risk Management: University of California, Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Office of the Vice Provost, University of California, Berkeley; Disaster-Resistant University Steering Committee, University of California, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    In the nearly three years since Chancellor Berdahl announced the creation of the Seismic Action plan for Facilities Enhancement and Renewal (SAFER), the UC Berkeley campus has intensified its attention to seismic safety issues. SAFER Program initiatives have changed the organizational structure, altered the landscape, and increased our understanding of the complex operational needs of the campus. This Strategic Risk Management Plan grows out of the SAFER Program, and advances its twin goals o...

  3. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed

  4. The design and implementation of Berkeley Lab's linuxcheckpoint/restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duell, Jason

    2005-04-30

    This paper describes Berkeley Linux Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a linux kernel module that allows system-level checkpoints on a variety of Linux systems. BLCR can be used either as a stand alone system for checkpointing applications on a single machine, or as a component by a scheduling system or parallel communication library for checkpointing and restoring parallel jobs running on multiple machines. Integration with Message Passing Interface (MPI) and other parallel systems is described.

  5. Remote operation of DOE-1 on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC 7600, 6600, and 6400 computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    How to run the DOE-1 building energy analysis program on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC computers is described. An overview of the LBL operating system and how to run a job on the 7600 are presented. The DOE-1 program, a control card sequence for running the program, and how to store input, output, and intermediate files are discussed. A detailed description is given of the DOE-1 Weather Package.

  6. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory

  7. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  8. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  9. Hayward Fault rate constraints at Berkeley: Evaluation of the 335-meter Strawberry Creek offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    At UC Berkeley the active channel of Strawberry Creek is offset 335 meters by the Hayward fault and two abandoned channels of Strawberry Creek are laterally offset 580 and 730 meters. These relationships record the displacement of the northern Hayward fault at Berkeley over a period of tens of millennia. The Strawberry Creek site has a similar geometry to the central San Andreas fault's Wallace Creek site, which arguably provides the best geological evidence of "millennial" fault kinematics in California (Sieh and Jahns, 1984). Slip rate determinations are an essential component of overall hazard evaluation for the Hayward fault, and this site is ripe to disclose a long-term form of this parameter, to contrast with geodetic and other geological rate evidence. Large offsets at the site may lower uncertainty in the rate equation relative to younger sites, as the affect of stream abandonment age, generally the greatest source of rate uncertainty, is greatly reduced. This is helpful here because it more-than-offsets uncertainties resulting from piercing projections to the fault. Strawberry Creek and its ancestral channels suggest west-side-up vertical deformation across the Hayward fault at this location. The development of the vertical deformation parameter will complement ongoing geodetic measurements, particularly InSAR, and motivate testing of other geological constraints. Up-to-the-west motion across the Hayward fault at Berkeley has important implications for the partitioning of strain and kinematics of the northern Hayward fault, and may explain anomalous up-on-the-west landforms elsewhere along the fault. For example, geological features of the western Berkeley Hills are consistent with rapid and recent uplift to the west of the fault. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of the offset channels of Strawberry Creek, up-to-the-west uplift is about 0.5mm/yr across the Hayward fault at Berkeley. If this is in fact the long-term rate, the 150 m height of the Hills

  10. How Many Democrats per Republican at UC-Berkeley and Stanford? Voter Registration Data Across 23 Academic Departments

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Daniel B.; Western, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Using the records of the seven San Francisco Bay Area counties that surround University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University, we conducted a systematic and thorough study of the party registration of the Berkeley and Stanford faculty in 23 academic departments. The departments span the social sciences, humanities, hard sciences, math, law, journalism, engineering, medicine, and the business school. Of the total of 1497 individual names on the cumulative list, we obtained readings o...

  11. Costs, Culture, and Complexity: An Analysis of Technology Enhancements in a Large Lecture Course at UC Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Harley, Diane; Henke, Jonathan; Lawrence, Shannon; McMartin, Flora; Maher, Michael; Gawlik, Marytza; Muller, Parisa

    2003-01-01

    As colleges and universities nationwide anticipate enrolling more than two million new students over the next decade, UC Berkeley is exploring options for serving more students, more cost effectively, in large lecture courses. This research project analyzes economic and pedagogical questions related to the use of on-line lecture and laboratory material in a large introductory chemistry course at UC Berkeley. We undertook a quasi-experimental two-year study to determine if the utilization of o...

  12. Chemical properties of the trans-actinide elements studied in liquid phase with SISAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omtvedt, J.P.; Alstad, J.; Bjornstad, T.; Opel, K.; Polakova, D.; Samadani, F.; Schulz, F.; Stavsetra, L.; Zheng, L. [Oslo Univ., Centre for Accelerator based Research and Energy Physics (SAFE) (Norway); Dullmann, Ch.E; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H.; Sudowe, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Nuclear Science Div., One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dullmann, Ch.E.; Hoffman, D.C.; Nitsche, H. [California Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Berkeley, CA (United States); Skarnemark, G. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Chemistry, Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    This article starts with a review of the current SISAK liquid-liquid extraction system, as used after the physical pre-separator BGS (Berkeley Gas-filled Separator) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for chemical studies of trans-actinide elements. Emphasis will be on new additions and developments. Then the possibilities offered by the new TASCA (Trans-Actinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) separator at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and the use of actinide targets at both GSI and LBNL are discussed with respect to future SISAK trans-actinide experiments. Finally, current and future liquid-liquid extraction systems for studying elements Rutherfordium up to Hassium are discussed. (authors)

  13. Chemical properties of the trans-actinide elements studied in liquid phase with SISAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article starts with a review of the current SISAK liquid-liquid extraction system, as used after the physical pre-separator BGS (Berkeley Gas-filled Separator) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for chemical studies of trans-actinide elements. Emphasis will be on new additions and developments. Then the possibilities offered by the new TASCA (Trans-Actinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) separator at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and the use of actinide targets at both GSI and LBNL are discussed with respect to future SISAK trans-actinide experiments. Finally, current and future liquid-liquid extraction systems for studying elements Rutherfordium up to Hassium are discussed. (authors)

  14. Separations chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studies on the photochemistry of aqueous Pu solutions and the stability of iodine in liquid and gaseous CO2 are reported. Progress is reported in studies on: the preparation of macroporous bodies filled with oxides and sulfides to be used as adsorbents; the beneficiation of photographic wastes; the anion exchange adsorption of transition elements from thiosulfate solutions; advanced filtration applications of energy significance; high-resolution separations; and, the examination of the separation agents, octylphenylphosphoric acid (OPPA) and trihexyl phosphate (THP)

  15. Product separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  16. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  17. High energy nucleus--nucleus studies at the Berkeley Bevalac. [Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A survey of high-energy nucleus--nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac Facility is presented. Experimental results are divided into the general areas of peripheral and central collisions. Results on projectile and target fragmentation, total cross-section measurements, pion and photon production, and charged-particle multiplicities are stressed. Recently, there have been theoretical predictions concerning the possibility of observing new phenomena such as shock waves, pion condensates, or collapsed nuclear matter. Existing data relevant to some of these speculations are discussed. A brief discussion of future developments with high-energy nuclear beams is also presented. 27 figures, 1 table.

  18. Mixed waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of mixed waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. Mixed waste is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  19. Nuclear Structure Measurements of Fermium-254 and Advances in Target Production Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Gothe, Oliver Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS) has been upgraded with a new gas control system. It allows for accurate control of hydrogen and helium gas mixtures. This greatly increases the capabilities of the separator by reducing background signals in the focal plane detector for asymmetric nuclear reactions. It has also been shown that gas mixtures can be used to focus the desired reaction products into a smaller area, thereby increasing the experimental efficiency.A new electrodeposition cell h...

  20. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  1. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime

  2. Searching for multiple stellar populations in the massive, old open cluster Berkeley 39

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; D'Orazi, V; Sneden, C; Lucatello, S

    2012-01-01

    The most massive star clusters include several generations of stars with a different chemical composition (mainly revealed by an Na-O anti-correlation) while low-mass star clusters appear to be chemically homogeneous. We are investigating the chemical composition of several clusters with masses of a few 10^4 Msun to establish the lower mass limit for the multiple stellar population phenomenon. Using FLAMES@VLT spectra we determine abundances of Fe, O, Na, and several other elements (alpha, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements) in the old open cluster Berkeley 39. This is a massive open cluster: M~10^4 Msun, approximately at the border between small globular clusters and large open clusters. Our sample size of about 30 stars is one of the largest studied for abundances in any open cluster to date, and will be useful to determine improved cluster parameters, such as age, distance, and reddening when coupled with precise, well-calibrated photometry. We find that Berkeley 39 is slightly metal-poor, =-0.20, in ag...

  3. NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81: three BOCCE clusters of intermediate age

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Bragaglia, A; Cignoni, M; Tosi, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the evolutionary status of three open clusters: NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81. They are all of intermediate age, two are located in the Galactic anti-centre direction while the third one is located in the Galactic centre direction. All of them were observed with LBC@LBT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that NGC 1817 has subsolar metallicity, age between 0.8 and 1.2 Gyr, reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.21 and 0.34, and distance modulus (m-M)_0 of about 10.9; NGC 2141 is older, with age in the range 1.25 and 1.9 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.36 and 0.45, (m-M)_0 between 11.95 and 12.21, and subsolar metallicity; Berkeley~81 has metallicity about solar, with age between 0.75 and 1.0 Gyr, has reddening E(B-V)~0.90...

  4. A New Center for Science Education at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley has established a new Center for Science Education through the Laboratory's Senior Fellow program. The Center has a two-fold mission: (1) science education research through collaborations with UCB Graduate School of Education faculty, and (2) education and outreach projects that bring NASA research to the K-14 and general public communities. The Center is the host of two major education and outreach programs funded by NASA - The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) and the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) Project. The SECEF - a collaborative between UC Berkeley and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center - is one of four Forums that have been funded through the Office of Space Science as part of their Education Ecosystem. SEGway is a partnership between science research centers, science museums, and teachers, for the purpose of developing Internet-based, inquiry activities for the K-12 classroom that tap NASA remote sensing data. We will describe the Center for Science Education's history and vision, as well as summarize our core programs.

  5. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  6. GPS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  7. HRS Separator

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 90 and 60 degree ISOLDE HRS separator magnets in the HRS separator zone. In the two vacuum sectors HRS20 and HRS30 equipment such as the HRS slits SL240, the HRS faraday cup FC300 and wiregrid WG210 can be spotted. Vacuum valves, turbo pumps, beamlines, quadrupoles, water and compressed air connections, DC and signal cabling can be seen throughout the video. The HRS main and user beamgate in the beamline between MAG90 and MAG60 and its switchboxes as well as all vacuum bellows and flanges are shown. Instrumentation such as the HRS scanner unit 482 / 483, the HRS WG470 wiregrid and slits piston can be seen. The different quadrupoles and supports are shown as well as the RILIS guidance tubes and installation at the magnets and the different radiation monitors.

  8. Environmental assessment for the recycling of slightly activated copper coil windings from the 184-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-02

    The proposed action is to recycle slightly activated copper that is currently stored in a warehouse leased by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to a scrap metal dealer. Subsequent reutilization of the copper would be unrestricted. This document addresses the potential environmental effects of recycling and reutilizing the activated copper. In addition, the potential environmental effects of possible future uses by the dealer are addressed. Direct environmental effects from the proposed action are assessed, such as air emissions from reprocessing the activated copper, as well as indirect beneficial effects, such as averting air emissions that would result from mining and smelting an equivalent quantity of copper ore. Evaluation of the human health impacts of the proposed action focuses on the pertinent issues of radiological doses and protection of workers and the public. Five alternatives to the proposed action are considered, and their associated potential impacts are addressed. The no-action alternative is the continued storage of the activated copper at the LBL warehouse. Two recycling alternatives are considered: recycling the activated copper at the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) facility for re-use at a DOE facility and selling or giving the activated copper to a foreign government. In addition, two disposal alternatives evaluate the impacts attributable to disposing of the activated copper either at a local sanitary landfill or at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Site. The proposed project and alternatives include no new construction or development of new industry.

  9. Component Separations

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H.; Ramirez, Oscar M.

    2012-01-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-...

  10. Component separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  11. Magnetic separator

    OpenAIRE

    Křupka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Cílem bakalářské práce je návrh konstrukčního řešení magnetického separátoru určeného k separaci drobného průmyslového odpadu. Tato zpráva obsahuje přehled zařízení světových výrobců, která slouží k magnetické separaci ocelového odpadu. Dále pak posouzení variant technických řešení konstrukčních uzlů magnetického separátoru a následný výběr konkrétního řešení. Dle vstupních parametrů jsou vypočteny všechny parametry potřebné ke správnému návrhu stroje. Ve výpočtech jsou zahrnuty i odůvodnění ...

  12. Fifty Years of Progress, 1937-1987 [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL, LBNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet was prepared for the 50th anniversary of medical and biological research at the Donner Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. The intent is to present historical facts and to highlight important facets of fifty years of accomplishments in medical and biological sciences. A list of selected scientific publications from 1937 to 1960 is included to demonstrate the character and lasting importance of early pioneering work. The organizational concept is to show the research themes starting with the history, then discoveries of medically important radionuclides, then the use of accelerated charged particles in therapy, next human physiology studies then sequentially studies of biology from tissues to macromolecules; and finally studies of the genetic code.

  13. Photometric study of W UMa type binaries in the old open cluster Berkeley 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of W UMa binary systems gives a wealth of information about their nature as well as their parent bodies (if any), like clusters. In this paper, we present the I passband photometric solutions of four W UMa binaries in the open cluster Berkeley 39 using the latest version of the W-D program. The result shows that two binary systems are W-subtype W UMa binary systems and the other two systems are H-subtype W UMa binary systems. No third body has been found in any of the four systems. We found a correlation between the period and mass-ratio as well as temperature and mass-ratio for the respective variables, which is similar to the relationship between mass ratio and total mass of the contact binaries as shown by van't Veer and Li et al.

  14. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  15. UC Berkeley's Adaptations to the Crisis of Public Higher Education in the US: Privatization? Commercialization? or Hybridization? Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.17.13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, George W.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley now delivers more to the public of California than it ever has, and it does this on the basis of proportionally less funding by the State government than it has ever received. This claim may come as a surprise, since it is often said that Berkeley is in the process of privatizing, becoming less of a public…

  16. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  17. Electron cloud sizes in gas-filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron cloud sizes have been calculated for gas mixtures containing Ar, Xe, CO2, CH4, and N2 for drifts through a constant electric field. The transport coefficients w and D/μ are in good agreement with experimental data of various sources for pure gases. Results of measurements, also performed in this work, for Ar+CO2, Ar+CH4, and Ar+Xe+CO2 mixtures are in fair agreement with the calculated cloud sizes. For a large number of useful gas mixtures calculated electron cloud sizes are presented and discussed, most of which are given for the first time. A suggestion is made for an optimal gas mixture for an X-ray position sensitive proportional counter for medium and low energies. (orig.)

  18. Beam cooling using a gas-filled RFQ ion guide

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, S; De Saint-Simon, M; Jacotin, M; Képinski, J F; Lunney, M D

    1999-01-01

    A radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter is being developed for use as a high-transmission beam cooler by operating it in buffer gas at high pressure. Such a device will increase the sensitivity of on-line experiments that make use of weakly produced radioactive ion beams. We present simulations and some preliminary measurements for a device designed to cool the beam for the MISTRAL RF mass spectrometer on- line at ISOLDE. The work is carried out partly within the frame of the European Community research network: EXOTRAPS. (9 refs).

  19. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  20. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  1. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and future directions for improvements. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  2. Design, Analysis, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and the future directions for improvements. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  3. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals

  4. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  5. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  6. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET pushing EUV development beyond 22-nm half pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, P.; Anderson, C. N.; Backlea-an, L.-M.; Chan, D.; Denham, P.; George, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Hoef, B.; Jones, G.; Koh, C.; La Fontaine, B.; McClinton, B.; Miyakawa, R.; Montgomery, W.; Rekawa, S.; Wallow, T.

    2010-03-18

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) play a crucial role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists and masks, One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) MET, Using conventional illumination this tool is limited to approximately 22-nm half pitch resolution. However, resolution enhancement techniques have been used to push the patterning capabilities of this tool to half pitches of 18 nm and below, This resolution was achieved in a new imageable hard mask which also supports contact printing down to 22 nm with conventional illumination. Along with resolution, line-edge roughness is another crucial hurdle facing EUV resists, Much of the resist LER, however, can be attributed to the mask. We have shown that intenssionally aggressive mask cleaning on an older generation mask causes correlated LER in photoresist to increase from 3.4 nm to 4,0 nm, We have also shown that new generation EUV masks (100 pm of substrate roughness) can achieve correlated LER values of 1.1 nm, a 3x improvement over the correlated LER of older generation EUV masks (230 pm of substrate roughness), Finally, a 0.5-NA MET has been proposed that will address the needs of EUV development at the 16-nm node and beyond, The tool will support an ultimate resolution of 8 nm half-pitch and generalized printing using conventional illumination down to 12 nm half pitch.

  7. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET: extending EUV learning to 16-nm half pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Denham, Paul E.; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Michael; Smith, Nathan; Wallow, Thomas; Montgomery, Warren; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-18

    Several high-performing resists identified in the past two years have been exposed at the 0.3-numerical-aperture (NA) SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (BMET) with an engineered dipole illumination optimized for 18-nm half pitch. Five chemically amplified platforms were found to support 20-nm dense patterning at a film thickness of approximately 45 nm. At 19-nm half pitch, however, scattered bridging kept all of these resists from cleanly resolving larger areas of dense features. At 18-nm half pitch, none of the resists were are able to cleanly resolve a single line within a bulk pattern. With this same illumination a directly imageable metal oxide hardmask showed excellent performance from 22-nm half pitch to 17-nm half pitch, and good performance at 16-nm half pitch, closely following the predicted aerial image contrast. This indicates that observed limitations of the chemically amplified resists are indeed coming from the resist and not from a shortcoming of the exposure tool. The imageable hardmask was also exposed using a Pseudo Phase-Shift-Mask technique and achieved clean printing of 15-nm half pitch lines and modulation all the way down to the theoretical 12.5-nm resolution limit of the 0.3-NA SEMATECH BMET.

  8. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    François Pépin

    2012-01-01

    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  9. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    OpenAIRE

    Pépin, François

    2014-01-01

    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  10. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  11. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  12. Comparison of Complementary Reactions in the Production of Mt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Sarah; Gregorich, Kenneth; Dragojevic, Irena; Ellison, Paul; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Gates, Jacklyn; Stavsetra, Liv; Ali, Mazhar; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-01-21

    The new reaction 208Pb(59Co,n)266Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7+5.2-3.3 pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of 266Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied 209Bi(58Fe,n)266Mt reaction.

  13. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lightest isotope of Bh was produced in the new 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. 260Bh decays with a 35-9+19 ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59-20+29 pb is compared to model predictions. The influence of the N=152 and Z=108 shells on alpha decay properties is discussed

  14. Transportation Periodicals And Newsletters Currently Received At The Institute Of Transportation Studies Library, University Of California At Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a convenient reference to selected transportation periodicals and newsletters currently (2000) received by UC Berkeley's Harmer E. Davis Transportation Li-brary. This latest version of Transportation Periodicals and Newsletters represents a thourough revision of earlier editions (1989, 1993, and 1995) published under the same (or similar) title. The subject content of this listing reflects the subject strengths of the H.E. Davis Transportation Library:...

  15. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to ...

  16. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Watthanai; Muangruen, Panya; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Mairiang, Dumrong

    2016-01-01

    Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC) is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST) to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software. PMID:27547555

  17. Brief History of Herpetology in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, with a List of Type Specimens of Recent Amphibians and Reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Robles, Javier A; Good, David A; Wake, David B

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the herpetological program of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ), University of California, Berkeley, is presented. The history of herpetological activities in the MVZ and more generally at Berkeley is summarized. Although the MVZ has existed since 1908, until 1945 there was no formal curator for the collection of amphibians and nonavian reptiles. Since that time Robert C. Stebbins, David B. Wake, Harry W. Greene, Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles (in an interim capacity), and Cra...

  18. Ferrofluid separator for nonferrous scrap separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, R.; Mir, L.

    1974-01-01

    Behavior of nonmagnetic objects within separator is essentially function of density, and independent of size or shape of objects. Results show close agreement between density of object and apparent density of ferrofluid required to float it. Results also demonstrate that very high separation rates are achievable by ferrofluid sink-float separation.

  19. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  20. Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

    2009-03-15

    As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been

  1. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  2. Fictional Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Buhrkal; Birkedal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Separation logic formalizes the idea of local reasoning for heap-manipulating programs via the frame rule and the separating conjunction P * Q, which describes states that can be split into \\emph{separate} parts, with one satisfying P and the other satisfying Q. In standard separation logic......, separation means physical separation. In this paper, we introduce \\emph{fictional separation logic}, which includes more general forms of fictional separating conjunctions P * Q, where "*" does not require physical separation, but may also be used in situations where the memory resources described by P and Q...... overlap. We demonstrate, via a range of examples, how fictional separation logic can be used to reason locally and modularly about mutable abstract data types, possibly implemented using sophisticated sharing. Fictional separation logic is defined on top of standard separation logic, and both the meta...

  3. Separation Anxiety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Separation Anxiety KidsHealth > For Parents > Separation Anxiety Print A A ... both of you get through it. How Separation Anxiety Develops Babies adapt pretty well to other caregivers. ...

  4. Validity and Reliability of Preschool, First and Second Grade Versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Tajeri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The purpose of this study is to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting self-efficacy scale. "nMethod:  The subjects were 317 mothers: (102 mothers of preschool children, 111 mothers of first grade children and 104 mothers of second grade children who were randomly selected from schools in Tehran. They completed Berkeley parenting self-efficacy and Rotter `s locus of control scales. Factor analysis using the principle component method was used to identify the factor structure of parenting self-efficacy scale. Cronbach`s alpha coefficient was used to identify the reliability of parenting self efficacy scale. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that the cronbach`s alpha coefficient was 0.84, 0.87, 0.64 for preschool, first grade and second grade versions respectively. Based on the scree test ,,factor analysis produced two factors of maternal strategy and child outcome, and it also produced the highest level of total variance explained by these 2 factors. The Parenting self-efficacy scale was negatively associated with measure of locus of control(r=-0.54 for the preschool version, -0.64 for the first grade version and -0.54 for the second grade version. "nConclusion: Due to relatively high reliability and validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy scale, this scale could be used as a reliable and valid scale in other research areas

  5. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  6. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J.; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V.; Kong, Jason J.; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G.; Steele, Thea N.; Barris, Brian J.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have...

  7. Results of a monitoring programme in the environs of Berkeley aimed at collecting Chernobyl data for foodchain model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a fallout measurement programme which was carried out in the environs of Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom following the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 are presented in this report. The programme was aimed at establishing a time-dependent data base of concentrations of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in selected agricultural products. Results were obtained for milk, grass, silage, soil and wheat over an eighteen month period from May 1986. It is intended to use the data to validate the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, which is incorporated in the FOODWEB module of the NECTAR environmental code. (author)

  8. Proceedings of the sixth Berkeley workshop on distributed data management and computer networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various Authors

    1982-01-01

    A distributed data base management system allows data to be stored at multiple locations and to be accessed as a single unified data base. In this workshop, seventeen papers were presented which have been prepared separately for the energy data base. These items deal with data transfer, protocols and management. (GHT)

  9. Path Separability of Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Emilie; Gavoille, Cyril

    In this paper we investigate the structural properties of k-path separable graphs, that are the graphs that can be separated by a set of k shortest paths. We identify several graph families having such path separability, and we show that this property is closed under minor taking. In particular we establish a list of forbidden minors for 1-path separable graphs.

  10. Magnetic Separation in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Rezlescu, Nicolae; Bradu, Elena-Brandusa; Iacob, Gheorghe; Badescu, Vasile; Iacob, Lavinia

    1986-01-01

    The utilization of the magnetic separators of foreign and Romanian source is presented and the most important achievements in research, engineering design and manufacturing activity concerning the magnetic separation in Romania are reviewed.

  11. Magnetic Separation in Czechoslovakia

    OpenAIRE

    Hencl, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The use of magnetic separation in various mineral processing facilities in Czechoslovakia is described. The manufacture of assorted types of magnetic separation machines is highlighted. Potential applications and research and development activities are discussed.

  12. Ionene membrane battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moacanin, J.; Tom, H. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Ionic transport characteristics of ionenes, insoluble membranes from soluble polyelectrolyte compositions, are studied for possible application in a battery separator. Effectiveness of the thin film of separator membrane essentially determines battery lifetime.

  13. Separation anxiety in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001542.htm Separation anxiety in children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Separation anxiety in children is a developmental stage during which ...

  14. Magnetic separation of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  15. A preliminary assessment of individual doses in the environs of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment has been made of the individual doses to critical group members of the public in the environs of Berkeley arising from fallout resulting from the Chernobyl accident. The assessment was based on measurements of airborne radionuclide concentrations, ground deposition and nuclide concentrations in rainwater, tapwater, grass, milk and green vegetables. The committed effective dose-equivalent was found to be as follows:- Adult - 200 μSv, 1 year old child - 500 μSv, the 10 year old child receiving a dose intermediate between these two values. The estimate accounts only for the nuclides measured and the specific exposure routes considered namely ingestion of milk and vegetables, inhalation and external exposure. However, it is believed that the inclusion of a range of other nuclides of potential significance, which may have been present but not measured, and potential intakes from additional routes is unlikely to increase the above estimates by more than a factor of 2. (author)

  16. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects

  17. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  18. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  20. Decontamination and decommissioning of rooms 62-248 and 62-250 at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, G.

    1996-05-01

    This document details the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process of Rooms 248 and 250 of Building 62 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The document describes the D&D efforts for the rooms, their contents, and adjacent areas containing ancillary equipment. The rooms and equipment, before being released, were required to meet the unrestricted release criteria and requirements set forth in DOE orders 5400.5 and 5480.11, LBNL`s internal release-criteria procedure (EH&S Procedure 708), and the LBNL Radiological Control Manual. The radioactive material and items not meeting the release criteria were either sent to the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) for disposal or transferred to other locations approved for radioactive material. The D&D was undertaken by the Radiation Protection Group of LBNL`s Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division at the request of the Materials Sciences Division. Current and past use of radioactive material in both Rooms 248 and 250 necessitated the D&D in order to release both rooms for nonradioactive work. (1) Room 248 was designated a {open_quotes}controlled area.{close_quotes} There was contained radioactive material in some of the equipment. The previous occupants of Room 248 had worked with radioactive materials. (2) Room 250 was designated a {open_quotes}Radioactive Materials Management Area{close_quotes} (RMMA) because the current occupants used potentially dispersible radioisotopes. Both laboratories, during the occupancy of U.C. Berkeley Professor Leo Brewer and Ms. Karen Krushwitz, were kept in excellent condition. There was a detailed inventory of all radioactive materials and chemicals. All work and self surveys were documented. The labs were kept extremely orderly, clean, and in compliance. In October 1993 Ms. Krushwitz received an award in recognition of her efforts in Environmental Protection, Health, and Safety at LBNL.

  1. Safety shutdown separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley; Farrell, Greg Robert

    2015-06-30

    The present invention pertains to electrochemical cells which comprise (a) an anode; (b) a cathode; (c) a solid porous separator, such as a polyolefin, xerogel, or inorganic oxide separator; and (d) a nonaqueous electrolyte, wherein the separator comprises a porous membrane having a microporous coating comprising polymer particles which have not coalesced to form a continuous film. This microporous coating on the separator acts as a safety shutdown layer that rapidly increases the internal resistivity and shuts the cell down upon heating to an elevated temperature, such as 110.degree. C. Also provided are methods for increasing the safety of an electrochemical cell by utilizing such separators with a safety shutdown layer.

  2. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  3. Maternal Factors That Influence Children's Positive Behavior: Demonstration of a Structural Equation Analysis of Selected Data from the Berkeley Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crano, William D.; Mendoza, Jorge L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis using data drawn from Nancy Bayley's Berkeley Growth Study is performed for didactic purposes to illustrate the use of structural equation modeling on a child development data set. Alternatives to standard latent factor approaches are demonstrated for use in research situations in which the subject-to-variable ratio is less than…

  4. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  5. Laser isotope separation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having examined the high cost and low efficiency of existing processes for separating uranium isotopes in comparison with the encouraging assessed figures for laser separation processes and having considered the high potential separation factors which make possibly very low 235U concentrations in the depleted tailings from laser separation processes, the design of such a system is considered. There are two essential features. Firstly, only one isotope must absorb laser radiation, and secondly that absorption must lead to a successful physical or chemical separation of that species which has been optically excited. Such a scheme is illustrated and discussed. The important aspect of loss mechanisms which can depopulate the selectively excited levels and the ways in which isotopes may exhibit differences in optical absorption frequencies are considered. Examples are given to illustrate techniques used in the separation stage. Finally a summary is presented of those elements in which some enrichment has been achieved by optical techniques. (U.K.)

  6. Water separators - reheaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the commencement of construction of light water reactors the need arose, because of the steam condition, for water separators and reheaters. In a brief chronological summary the various stages of development according to designs and specific performance data are compared and the advantages and disadvantages are contrasted. This paper describes cyclone separators and baffle plate separators and plain surface tube reheaters and finned tube elements in many different arrangements. (orig.)

  7. Radiochemical separation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separations make use of the traditional methods of separating elements: precipitation, ion exchange and solvent extraction, of which precipitation has been employed from the very beginning. A new method, accepted into wide use in the 1990s, is extraction chromatography, which combines solvent extraction as the separation method with column chromatography technology earlier used in ion exchange. These four methods are discussed in the paper. (author)

  8. Stem Cell Separation Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Beili; Murthy, Shashi K

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and translational stem cell research require large-scale supply of stem cells at high purity and viability, thus leading to the development of stem cell separation technologies. This review covers key technologies being applied to stem cell separation, and also highlights exciting new approaches in this field. First, we will cover conventional separation methods that are commercially available and have been widely adapted. These methods include Fluorescence-activated cell so...

  9. Graph separators, with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Arnold L

    2001-01-01

    This text is devoted to techniques for obtaining upper and lower bounds on the sizes of graph separators - upper bounds being obtained via decomposition algorithms. The book surveys the main approaches to obtaining good graph separations, while its main focus is on techniques for deriving lower bounds on the sizes of graph separators. This asymmetry in focus reflects the perception that the work on upper bounds, or algorithms, for graph separation is much better represented in the standard theory literature than is the work on lower bounds, which we perceive as being much more scattered throug

  10. Particle separation by dielectrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Gascoyne, Peter R.C.; Vykoukal, Jody

    2002-01-01

    The application of dielectrophoresis to particle discrimination, separation, and fractionation is reviewed, some advantages and disadvantages of currently available approaches are considered, and some caveats are noted.

  11. Separation of flow

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary and Advanced Topics in Science and Engineering, Volume 3: Separation of Flow presents the problem of the separation of fluid flow. This book provides information covering the fields of basic physical processes, analyses, and experiments concerning flow separation.Organized into 12 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the flow separation on the body surface as discusses in various classical examples. This text then examines the analytical and experimental results of the laminar boundary layer of steady, two-dimensional flows in the subsonic speed range. Other chapt

  12. Entrainment separator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clean and dust-loaded ACS entrainment separators mounted upstream of HEPA filters were exposed to a combination of fine water mist and steam at about 700C from one to four hours. In every trial, the ACS entrainment separator prevented measurable deterioration of performance in the following HEPA filter. Droplet size-efficiency evaluation of the ACS entrainment separators showed that, within the accuracy of the measurements, they meet all service requirements and are fully equal to the best separator units available for service on pressurized water reactors

  13. The separation of adult separation anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Gordon, Robert; Abelli, Marianna; Pini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) categorization of mental disorders places "separation anxiety disorder" within the broad group of anxiety disorders, and its diagnosis no longer rests on establishing an onset during childhood or adolescence. In previous editions of DSM, it was included within the disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence, with the requirement for an onset of symptoms before the age of 18 years: symptomatic adults could only receive a retrospective diagnosis, based on establishing this early onset. The new position of separation anxiety disorder is based upon the findings of epidemiological studies that revealed the unexpectedly high prevalence of the condition in adults, often in individuals with an onset of symptoms after the teenage years; its prominent place within the DSM-5 group of anxiety disorders should encourage further research into its epidemiology, etiology, and treatment. This review examines the clinical features and boundaries of the condition, and offers guidance on how it can be distinguished from other anxiety disorders and other mental disorders in which "separation anxiety" may be apparent. PMID:27503572

  14. Vertical separation for TCF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied an insertion for electrostatic separation of the electron and positron beams with the aims of: increasing luminosity by decreasing the minimum bunch spacing, matching the vertical dispersion function (not done in the Jowett lattice). The authors looked at three possibilities for the start of the insertion: a quadrupole doublet followed by the electrostatic separator (Jowett), a quadrupole doublet with the electrostatic separator between the two quadrupoles (Kamada), a separator followed by a quadrupole doublet. The third possibility was immediately discharged. Although possible for a B-factor with magnetic separation it is impractical for use with electrostatic separation because of the length and cross section of separator required. The Kamada scheme looked promising for getting very short inter-bunch spacing, but suffered from the disadvantage of requiring a very large ratio of beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (βx*/βy* = 100). (They would rather have a β* ratio closer to 20 to 1). They decided to persue the doublet scheme to see whether it could match the performance of Kamada insertion. They assumed superconducting magnets could be used for the insertion quadrupoles, and they used as strong an electrostatic field for the separator as Kamada

  15. Separation of ionic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings contain 44 papers of which 19 were incorporated in INIS. The subject of these is the use of solvent extraction or emulsion membrane extraction for separation of fission products, rare earth compounds and actinide compunds; the sorption of radionuclides; and the use of adsorbents and chelating agents in separation processes. (J.P.)

  16. Nonterminal Separating Macro Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendorp, Jan Anne; Asveld, P.R.J.; Nijholt, A.; Verbeek, Leo A.M.

    1987-01-01

    We extend the concept of nonterminal separating (or NTS) context-free grammar to nonterminal separating $m$-macro grammar where the mode of derivation $m$ is equal to "unrestricted". "outside-in' or "inside-out". Then we show some (partial) characterization results for these NTS $m$-macro grammars.

  17. Method for separating isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  18. Studies of ion species separation in ICF-relevant plasmas at OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Hans; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Ross, Steve; Park, Hye-Sook; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; Rosenberg, Michael; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig; Zylstra, Alex; Hoffman, Nelson; Kwan, Tom; Larroche, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas produced in high-energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments generally contain multiple ion species, which allows for multiple-ion species dynamics that are not simulated in typical single-ion fluid hydro codes. In implosions of D3He-gas filled thin-glass spheres on the OMEGA laser facility, comprehensive nuclear diagnostics were used to infer the composition of the fuel during nuclear production, demonstrating that the deuterium fraction was reduced during the implosion of the fuel. Hydrodynamic simulations including an ion diffusion model indicate that pressure, temperature, and potential gradients drive diffusive separation of the ion species, producing better agreement with the experiments than standard hydrodynamic codes. The results of fully kinetic (Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and PIC) simulations confirm the importance of multi-species dynamics to the evolution of these experiments. Implications for multi-species (DT) cryogenic implosions on the National Ignition Facility will be addressed. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  19. The MR-TOF-MS isobar separator for the TITAN facility at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesch, Christian; Dickel, Timo, E-mail: t.dickel@gsi.de; Plaß, Wolfgang R. [Justus-Liebig-University (Germany); Short, Devin [Simon Fraser University (Canada); Ayet San Andres, Samuel [Justus-Liebig-University (Germany); Dilling, Jens [TRIUMF (Canada); Geissel, Hans; Greiner, Florian; Lang, Johannes [Justus-Liebig-University (Germany); Leach, Kyle G. [Simon Fraser University (Canada); Lippert, Wayne; Scheidenberger, Christoph [Justus-Liebig-University (Germany); Yavor, Mikhail I. [Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    At TRIUMF’s Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear Science (TITAN) a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) will extend TITAN’s capabilities and facilitate mass measurements and in-trap decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei that so far have not been possible due to strong isobaric contamination. This MR-TOF-MS will also enable mass measurements of very short-lived nuclides (half-life > 1 ms) that are produced in very low quantities (a few detected ions overall). In order to allow the installation of an MR-TOF-MS in the restricted space on the platform, on which the TITAN facility is located, novel mass spectrometric methods have been developed. Transport, cooling and distribution of the ions inside the device is done using a buffer gas-filled RFQ-based ion beam switchyard. Mass selection is achieved using a dynamic retrapping technique after time-of-flight analysis in an electrostatic isochronous reflector system. Only due to the combination of these novel methods the realization of an MR-TOF-MS based isobar separator at TITAN has become possible. The device has been built, commissioned off-line and is currently under installation at TITAN.

  20. The MR-TOF-MS isobar separator for the TITAN facility at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At TRIUMF’s Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear Science (TITAN) a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) will extend TITAN’s capabilities and facilitate mass measurements and in-trap decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei that so far have not been possible due to strong isobaric contamination. This MR-TOF-MS will also enable mass measurements of very short-lived nuclides (half-life > 1 ms) that are produced in very low quantities (a few detected ions overall). In order to allow the installation of an MR-TOF-MS in the restricted space on the platform, on which the TITAN facility is located, novel mass spectrometric methods have been developed. Transport, cooling and distribution of the ions inside the device is done using a buffer gas-filled RFQ-based ion beam switchyard. Mass selection is achieved using a dynamic retrapping technique after time-of-flight analysis in an electrostatic isochronous reflector system. Only due to the combination of these novel methods the realization of an MR-TOF-MS based isobar separator at TITAN has become possible. The device has been built, commissioned off-line and is currently under installation at TITAN

  1. Separators for flywheel rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  2. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V; Kong, Jason J; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G; Steele, Thea N; Barris, Brian J; Bloom, Joshua S; Cobb, Bethany E; Coil, Alison L; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Gates, Elinor L; Ho, Luis C; Jha, Saurabh W; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Li, Weidong; Mandel, Kaisey S; Modjaz, Maryam; Moore, Matthew R; Mostardi, Robin E; Papenkova, Marina S; Park, Sung; Perley, Daniel A; Poznanski, Dovi; Reuter, Cassie A; Scala, James; Serduke, Franklin J D; Shields, Joseph C; Swift, Brandon J; Tonry, John L; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wong, Diane S

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z < 0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilizing our newly constructed set of SNID ...

  3. Influence of copper recovery on the water quality of the acidic Berkeley Pit lake, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Nicholas J; Gammons, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    The Berkeley Pit lake in Butte, Montana, formed by flooding of an open-pit copper mine, is one of the world's largest accumulations of acidic, metal-rich water. Between 2003 and 2012, approximately 2 × 10(11) L of pit water, representing 1.3 lake volumes, were pumped from the bottom of the lake to a copper recovery plant, where dissolved Cu(2+) was precipitated on scrap iron, releasing Fe(2+) back to solution and thence back to the pit. Artificial mixing caused by this continuous pumping changed the lake from a meromictic to holomictic state, induced oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+), and caused subsequent precipitation of more than 2 × 10(8) kg of secondary ferric compounds, mainly schwertmannite and jarosite, which settled to the bottom of the lake. A large mass of As, P, and sulfate was also lost from solution. These unforeseen changes in chemistry resulted in a roughly 25-30% reduction in the lake's calculated and measured total acidity, which represents a significant potential savings in the cost of lime treatment, which is not expected to commence until 2023. Future monitoring is needed to verify that schwertmannite and jarosite in the pit sediment do not convert to goethite, a process which would release stored acidity back to the water column. PMID:25723275

  4. Materials separation by dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, A. D.; Rose, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of vacuum dielectrophoresis as a method for particulate materials separation in a microgravity environment was investigated. Particle separations were performed in a specially constructed miniature drop-tower with a residence time of about 0.3 sec. Particle motion in such a system is independent of size and based only on density and dielectric constant, for a given electric field. The observed separations and deflections exceeded the theoretical predictions, probably due to multiparticle effects. In any case, this approach should work well in microgravity for many classes of materials, with relatively simple apparatus and low weight and power requirements.

  5. Deuterium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium-containing molecules are separated and enriched by exposing commercially available ethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane or propylene to the radiation of tuned infrared lasers to selectively decompose these compounds into enriched molecular products containing deuterium atoms. The deuterium containing molecules can be easily separated from the starting material by absorption, distillation or other simple chemical separation techniques and methods. After evaporation such deuterium containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content or pyrolyzed to form hydrogen gas with an enriched deuterium content. (author)

  6. On separable Pauli equations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhalij, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    We classify (1+3)-dimensional Pauli equations for a spin-1/2 particle interacting with the electro-magnetic field, that are solvable by the method of separation of variables. As a result, we obtain the eleven classes of vector-potentials of the electro-magnetic field A(t,x) providing separability of the corresponding Pauli equations. It is established, in particular, that the necessary condition for the Pauli equation to be separable into second-order matrix ordinary differential equations is...

  7. Rotary drum separator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Michael R. (Inventor); Murdoch, Karen (Inventor); Scull, Timothy D. (Inventor); Fort, James H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A rotary phase separator system generally includes a step-shaped rotary drum separator (RDS) and a motor assembly. The aspect ratio of the stepped drum minimizes power for both the accumulating and pumping functions. The accumulator section of the RDS has a relatively small diameter to minimize power losses within an axial length to define significant volume for accumulation. The pumping section of the RDS has a larger diameter to increase pumping head but has a shorter axial length to minimize power losses. The motor assembly drives the RDS at a low speed for separating and accumulating and a higher speed for pumping.

  8. Monitored separation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George William (Inventor); Willson, Richard Coale (Inventor); Fox, George Edward (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A device for separating and purifying useful quantities of particles comprises: a. an anolyte reservoir connected to an anode, the anolyte reservoir containing an electrophoresis buffer; b. a catholyte reservoir connected to a cathode, the catholyte reservoir also containing the electrophoresis buffer; c. a power supply connected to the anode and to the cathode; d. a column having a first end inserted into the anolyte reservoir, a second end inserted into the catholyte reservoir, and containing a separation medium; e. a light source; f. a first optical fiber having a first fiber end inserted into the separation medium, and having a second fiber end connected to the light source; g. a photo detector; h. a second optical fiber having a third fiber end inserted into the separation medium, and having a fourth fiber end connected to the photo detector; and i. an ion-exchange membrane in the anolyte reservoir.

  9. On Separate Universes

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Liang; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    The separate universe conjecture states that in General Relativity a density perturbation behaves locally (i.e. on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the mode) as a separate universe with different background density and curvature. We prove this conjecture for a spherical compensated tophat density perturbation of arbitrary amplitude and radius in $\\Lambda$CDM. We then use Conformal Fermi Coordinates to generalize this result to scalar perturbations of arbitrary configuration and scale in a general cosmology with a mixture of fluids, but to linear order in perturbations. In this case, the separate universe conjecture holds for the isotropic part of the perturbations. The anisotropic part on the other hand is exactly captured by a tidal field in the Newtonian form. We show that the separate universe picture is restricted to scales larger than the sound horizons of all fluid components. We then derive an expression for the locally measured matter bispectrum induced by a long-wavelength mode of arbitrary...

  10. Laser-Beam Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermid, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Train of prisms and optical stop separate fundamental beam of laser from second and higher order harmonics of beam produced in certain crystals and by stimulated Raman scattering in gases and liquids.

  11. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  12. Separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method for separating uranium isotopes comprising the steps of selectively irradiating a photochemically-reactive uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope of uranium at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 K, further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the selectively irradiated source material to selectively photochemically reduce the selectively excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  13. Separating isotopes by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope separation by laser radiation is proving a very promising method for obtaining large scale isotope production at low cost and is particularly relevant to the enrichment of 235U for the nuclear power industry. Various methods for laser separation, differing mainly in the way the selectively excited atoms or molecules are extracted, are discussed. The efficiency of the various methods, which is the controlling factor in determining their practical viability and some of the problems encountered are examined. (UK)

  14. Chiral separation in microflows

    OpenAIRE

    Kostur, Marcin; Schindler, Michael; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecules that only differ by their chirality, so called enantiomers, often possess different properties with respect to their biological function. Therefore, the separation of enantiomers presents a prominent challenge in molecular biology and belongs to the ``Holy Grail'' of organic chemistry. We suggest a new separation technique for chiral molecules that is based on the transport properties in a microfluidic flow with spatially variable vorticity. Because of their size the thermal fluctua...

  15. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  16. On separable Pauli equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We classify (1+3)-dimensional Pauli equations for a spin-(1/2) particle interacting with the electro-magnetic field, that are solvable by the method of separation of variables. As a result, we obtain the 11 classes of vector-potentials of the electro-magnetic field A(t,x(vector sign))=(A0(t,x(vector sign)), A(vector sign)(t,x(vector sign))) providing separability of the corresponding Pauli equations. It is established, in particular, that the necessary condition for the Pauli equation to be separable into second-order matrix ordinary differential equations is its equivalence to the system of two uncoupled Schroedinger equations. In addition, the magnetic field has to be independent of spatial variables. We prove that coordinate systems and the vector-potentials of the electro-magnetic field providing the separability of the corresponding Pauli equations coincide with those for the Schroedinger equations. Furthermore, an efficient algorithm for constructing all coordinate systems providing the separability of Pauli equation with a fixed vector-potential of the electro-magnetic field is developed. Finally, we describe all vector-potentials A(t,x(vector sign)) that (a) provide the separability of Pauli equation, (b) satisfy vacuum Maxwell equations without currents, and (c) describe non-zero magnetic field

  17. DISCURSO E VERDADE: SEIS CONFERÊNCIAS DADAS POR MICHEL FOUCAULT, EM BERKELEY, ENTRE OUTUBRO E NOVEMBRO DE 1983, SOBRE A PARRHESIA - APRESENTAÇÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Os Editores da Prometeus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é a tradução, produzida pela equipe de tradutores daPrometeus, de O Discurso e a Verdade: a problematização da parrhesia, seisconferências de Michel Foucault proferidas em inglês na Universidade daCalifórnia, em Berkeley, entre outubro e novembro de 1983. A transcrição que nosserviu de base para a tradução foi editada em inglês em 1985 por Joseph Pearson ecompilada a partir das gravações das conferências, disponíveis para download no sítiodo Media Resources Center da Moffitt Library (UC Berkeley1. Essa transcrição foireeditada em 1999 por www.repb.net.

  18. The Physical Model of Magnetic Separation in a Plate Separator

    OpenAIRE

    Brożek, M.

    1999-01-01

    The results of magnetic separation depend on many factors, such as physical properties of particles of the separated mixture, magnetic intensity, particle sizes, separation conditions (constant or alternating field, dry or wet separation) and others. The formulae representing the dependence of separation results on the above mentioned factors are obtained from the model. The mathematical model presents only some general dependences of separations results on time or length of the separation pa...

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Jackson State University, Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation Consortium: Progress report, October 1985-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Seventeen student papers are included, treating various topics in computer languages and software, physics, combustion and atmosphere, and biology. All are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  20. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source] Booster Dipole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs

  1. Separably injective Banach spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Avilés, Antonio; Castillo, Jesús M F; González, Manuel; Moreno, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    This monograph contains a detailed exposition of the up-to-date theory of separably injective spaces: new and old results are put into perspective with concrete examples (such as l∞/c0 and C(K) spaces, where K is a finite height compact space or an F-space, ultrapowers of L∞ spaces and spaces of universal disposition). It is no exaggeration to say that the theory of separably injective Banach spaces is strikingly different from that of injective spaces. For instance, separably injective Banach spaces are not necessarily isometric to, or complemented subspaces of, spaces of continuous functions on a compact space. Moreover, in contrast to the scarcity of examples and general results concerning injective spaces, we know of many different types of separably injective spaces and there is a rich theory around them. The monograph is completed with a preparatory chapter on injective spaces, a chapter on higher cardinal versions of separable injectivity and a lively discussion of open problems and further lines o...

  2. Organic Separation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  3. Investigation of Beam Instability Under the Effects of Long-Range Transverse Wake Fields in the Berkeley Future Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultra-relativistic charged particle bunch moving through a resonator cavity leaves behind a wake field that will affect subsequent bunches (if the bunch is not ultra-relativistic, the wake field will not be exclusively behind it). If the initial bunch enters the cavity off-axis, it will produce a transverse wake field that can then kick later bunches off the axis. Thus, even bunches that were initially traveling on axis could be displaced and, in turn, produce their own transverse wake fields, affecting following bunches. The offsets obtained by bunches could increase along the bunch train, leading to the so-called multi-bunch beam break-up instability [1]. The purpose of our investigation is to see whether such instability will occur in the superconducting, 1.3 GHz, 2.5GeV linac (see Table 1) planned for the Berkeley future light source (BFLS). We assume an initial steady-state situation established for machine operation; i.e. a continuous process where every bunch follows the same trajectory through the linac, with only small deviations from the axis of the rf structures. We will look at a possible instability arising from a bunch having a small deviation from the established trajectory. Such a deviation would produce a wake field that is slightly different from the one produced by the bunches following the established trajectory. This could lead to subsequent bunches deviating further from the established trajectory. We will assume the deviations are small (at first) and so the difference in the wake field caused by a bunch not traveling along the established trajectory is well approximated by a long-range transverse dipole wake. We are concerned only with deviations from the established trajectory; thus, in our models, a transverse position of zero corresponds to the bunch traveling along the established trajectory. Under this assumption, only the additional long-range transverse dipole wake remains in our models

  4. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  5. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Out-of-band exposure characterization with the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA microfield exposure tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi A.; Nauleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Gullikson, Eric; Kemp, Charles D.

    2009-02-23

    For the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), discharge or laser produced, pulsed plasma light sources are being considered. These sources are known to emit into a broad range of wavelengths that are collectively referred to as the out-of-band (OOB) radiation by lithographers. Multilayer EUV optics reflect OOB radiation emitted by the EUV sources onto the wafer plane resulting in unwanted background exposure of the resist (flare) and reduced image contrast. The reflectivity of multilayer optics at the target wavelength of 13.5 nm is comparable to that of their reflectivity in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) and UV regions from 100-350 nm. The aromatic molecular backbones of many of the resists used for EUV are equally absorptive at specific DUV wavelengths as well. In order to study the effect of these wavelengths on imaging performance in a real system, we are in the process of integrating a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Microfield Exposure Tool (MET). The MET plays an active role in advanced research in resist and mask development for EUVL and as such, we will utilize this system to systematically evaluate the imaging impact of DUV wavelengths in a EUV system. In this paper, we present the optical design for the new DUV component and the simulation-based imaging results predicting the potential impact of OOB based on known resist, mask, and multilayer conditions. It should be noted that because the projection optics work equally well as imaging optics at DUV wavelengths, the OOB radiation cannot be treated simply as uniform background or DC flare.

  7. Immunoassay separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for effecting the immunoassay of a multiplicity of samples, each possibly containing an antigen or an antibody to be assayed, is discussed. Each sample is incubated with a solution containing a detectable antigen or antibody to form a multiplicity of mixtures, each mixture containing as components antigen-antibody, non-complexed antigen and non-complexed antibody. At least one of the components of the said mixture is separated by adsorption. There after, quantity of detectable antigen or antibody is detected in one of the non-adsorbed portions of the mixture. An improvement, compared to other techniques, is the continuous and sequential separation of at least one component, which is intended to be separated from each said multiplicity of mixtures

  8. Method for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inventor proposes a method for separating isotopes from gaseous compounds by selective excitation by means of laser beams for such cases where the reaction partners each consist of several isotopes. For example, separation of 235U and 238U in the form of UCl6 is mentioned with 35Cl and 37Cl existing in the natural composition of 76:24. According to the invention, after isolating the reaction product obtained in a way already known, the remaining fraction of the compound mixture is brought together with the reaction partner present in the natural isotope composition, in a heated flow path. Thereby by isotope exchange of the latter regeneration will take place, and the mixture can pass again through the separation plant in initial composition. (orig./PW)

  9. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  10. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices.

  11. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  12. Separation membrane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.W. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A ceramic membrane has been developed to separate hydrogen from other gases. The method used is a sol-gel process. A thin layer of dense ceramic material is coated on a coarse ceramic filter substrate. The pore size distribution in the thin layer is controlled by a densification of the coating materials by heat treatment. The membrane has been tested by permeation measurement of the hydrogen and other gases. Selectivity of the membrane has been achieved to separate hydrogen from carbon monoxide. The permeation rate of hydrogen through the ceramic membrane was about 20 times larger than Pd-Ag membrane.

  13. Spiral Flow Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed liquid-separating device relies on centrifugal force in liquid/liquid or liquid/solid mixture in spiral path. Operates in continuous flow at relatively high rates. Spiral tubes joined in sequence, with outlet tubes connected to joints. Cross-sectional areas of successive spiral tubes decreases by cross-sectional areas of outlet tubes. Centrifugal force pushes denser particles or liquids to outer edge of spiral, where removed from flow. Principle exploited to separate solids from wastewater, oil from fresh or salt water, or contaminants from salt water before evaporation. Also used to extract such valuable materials as precious metals from slurries.

  14. Spiral fluid separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fluid separator for separating particulate matter such as contaminates is provided which includes a series of spiral tubes of progressively decreasing cross sectional area connected in series. Each tube has an outlet on the outer curvature of the spiral. As fluid spirals down a tube, centrifugal force acts to force the heavier particulate matter to the outer wall of the tube, where it exits through the outlet. The remaining, and now cleaner, fluid reaches the next tube, which is smaller in cross sectional area, where the process is repeated. The fluid which comes out the final tube is diminished of particulate matter.

  15. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beginning in the 1930's, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs

  16. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-07-26

    Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

  17. A New Cryogenic Air Separation Process with Flash Separator

    OpenAIRE

    Barakat, Taj Alasfia M.; Rabah, Ali A.; Khalel, Zeinab A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A new cryogenic air separation process with flash separator is developed. A flash separator is added to the conventional double-column cryogenic air separation process. The flash separator is used to replace the turbine required to recover a portion of the energy in the double-column air separation process. The flash separator served dual purposes of throttling and separation. Both the conventional and the new processes are simulated using Aspen Plus version 11.1 the model air flow rate and c...

  18. Gas centrifugal separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To enhance separating performance by jointly using separating action of impulse wave without increasing peripheral speed of a gas centrifugal separator and lengthening a cylindrical portion thereof. Structure: A mixed gas is introduced into a rotating cylinder from a mixed gas pipe and is separated into gas rich in light component and gas decreased in light component, these gases being taken outside the rotating cylinder through a product opening and a fixed waste pipe, respectively. A fixed product recycling pipe is disposed between an upper end plate and an upper buffer plate of the rotating cylinder the recycling pipe having an opening formed at the leading end so as to oppose to the rotating mixed gas, and the gas introduced from the opening is re-introduced into the central portion of the rotating cylinder for recirculation. A waste pipe is disposed between a lower end plate and a lower buffer plate of the rotating cylinder, and the gas not introduced into the opening of the waste pipe is circulated within the rotating cylinder. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Separation of Concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Separation of concerns is a crucial concept in discussions about software engineering consequences of programming language design decisions, especially in AOSD. This paper proposes a way to formalize this concept, and argues that the given formalization is useful even if it is used primarily in an...

  20. Fathering After Marital Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Harry Finkelstein; Rosenthal, Kristine M.

    1978-01-01

    Deals with experiences of a group of separated or divorced fathers who chose to remain fully involved in the upbringing of their children. As they underwent transition from married parenthood to single fatherhood, these men learned that meeting demands of child care contributed to personal stability and growth. (Author)

  1. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  2. Unity Through Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Hans B.

    This PhD thesis asks how we can conceptualize the current separation doctrine of religion and politics in a country like Denmark, where the structure of the established church and peoplehood overlap. In order to answer this question, Hans Bruun Dabelsteen maps the current discussion of secularism...

  3. Mixed gas separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To separate xenon and krypton from cover gas in a reactor. Structure: The gas to be separated from a source of mixed gas is increased in pressure by a compressor and introduced into a first cell chamber. The gas to be separated passes through a silicon rubber film and a cellulose acetate film and is separated into the enriching side and the diluting side. The gas on the enriching side is introduced into a successive first cell. On the other hand, the gas on the doluting side is introduced into a second cell passing through pipe. The second cell has its discharge side divided into two ways, one of which is connected to a bypass flow pipe circulated to the fourth compressor passing through a flow and pressure regulator, while the other is connected to a flow pipe to be fed to the third compressor. Likewise operation is carried out in each stage to take out the gas as the pure enriching system gas from the enriching side of the seventh cell. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Separation problems and forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2013), s. 1350002. ISSN 0219-0613 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : separation * set of uniqueness * forcing Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2012 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0219061313500025

  5. diffusive phase separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kenmochi

    1996-01-01

    w is constrained to have double obstacles σ*≤w≤σ* (i.e., σ* and σ* are the threshold values of w. The objective of this paper is to discuss the semigroup {S(t} associated with the phase separation model, and construct its global attractor.

  6. Superconducting magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initially high hopes of a speedy replacement of conventional magnetic separators by superconducting ones have not been realised. The reasons for this are complex, ranging from the conservative nature of the mineral processing industry to insufficient cryogenic reliability and poor magnet design. The major systems delivered to industry will be described and some possible future developments will be outlined

  7. Lunar Soil Particle Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Soil Particle Separator (LSPS) beneficiates soil prior to in situ resource utilization (ISRU). It can improve ISRU oxygen yield by boosting the concentration of ilmenite, or other iron-oxide-bearing materials found in lunar soils, which can substantially reduce hydrogen reduction reactor size, as well as drastically decreasing the power input required for soil heating

  8. Electrostatically Enhanced Vortex Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed device removes fine particles from high-pressure exhaust gas of chemical reactor. Negatively charged sectors on rotating disks in vortex generator attracts positively charged particles from main stream of exhaust gas. Electrostatic charge enhances particle-separating action of vortex. Gas without particles released to atmosphere.

  9. Separation science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this project is the demonstration and advancement of membrane-based separation and destruction technologies. The authors are exploring development of membrane systems for gas separations, selective metal ion recovery, and for separation or destruction of hazardous organics. They evaluated existing polymers and polymer formulations for recovery of toxic oxyanionic metals such as chromate and arsenate from selected waste streams and developed second-generation water-soluble polymeric systems for highly selective oxyanion removal and recovery. They optimized the simultaneous removal of radioactive strontium and cesium from aqueous solutions using the new nonhazardous separations agents, and developed recyclable, redox-active extractants that permitted recovery of the radioactive ions into a minimal waste volume. They produced hollow fibers and fabricated prototype hollow-fiber membrane modules for applications to gas separations and the liquid-liquid extraction and recovery of actinides and nuclear materials from process streams. They developed and fabricated cyclodextrin-based microporous materials that selectively absorb organic compounds in an aqueous environment; the resultant products gave pure water with organics at less than 0.05 parts per billion. They developed new, more efficient, membrane-based electrochemical reactors for use in organic destruction in process waste treatment. They addressed the need for advanced oxidation technologies based on molecular-level materials designs that selectively remove or destroy target species. They prepared and characterized surface-modified TiO2 thin films using different linking approaches to attach ruthenium photosensitizers, and they started the measurement of the photo-degradation products generated using surface modified TiO2 films in reaction with chlorophenol

  10. Separation science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.F.; Sauer, N.; Chamberlin, R.M.; Gottesfeld, S.; Mattes, B.R.; Li, D.Q.; Swanson, B.

    1998-12-31

    The focus of this project is the demonstration and advancement of membrane-based separation and destruction technologies. The authors are exploring development of membrane systems for gas separations, selective metal ion recovery, and for separation or destruction of hazardous organics. They evaluated existing polymers and polymer formulations for recovery of toxic oxyanionic metals such as chromate and arsenate from selected waste streams and developed second-generation water-soluble polymeric systems for highly selective oxyanion removal and recovery. They optimized the simultaneous removal of radioactive strontium and cesium from aqueous solutions using the new nonhazardous separations agents, and developed recyclable, redox-active extractants that permitted recovery of the radioactive ions into a minimal waste volume. They produced hollow fibers and fabricated prototype hollow-fiber membrane modules for applications to gas separations and the liquid-liquid extraction and recovery of actinides and nuclear materials from process streams. They developed and fabricated cyclodextrin-based microporous materials that selectively absorb organic compounds in an aqueous environment; the resultant products gave pure water with organics at less than 0.05 parts per billion. They developed new, more efficient, membrane-based electrochemical reactors for use in organic destruction in process waste treatment. They addressed the need for advanced oxidation technologies based on molecular-level materials designs that selectively remove or destroy target species. They prepared and characterized surface-modified TiO{sub 2} thin films using different linking approaches to attach ruthenium photosensitizers, and they started the measurement of the photo-degradation products generated using surface modified TiO{sub 2} films in reaction with chlorophenol.

  11. Eddy current separation apparatus, separation module, separation method and method for adjusting an eddy current separation apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Rem, P.C.; Bakker, M.C.M.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Rahman, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy current separation apparatus (1) for separating particles (20) from a particle stream (w), wherein the apparatus (1) comprises a separator drum (4) adapted to create a first particle fraction (21) and a second particle fraction (23), a feeding device (2) upstream of the separator drum (4) for supplying particles (20) to said separator drum (4), and a splitter element (14) provided downstream of the separator drum (4) for splitting the respective fractions (21,23), wherein the apparatus (...

  12. Separation of UO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with theoretical approach to separation process and describes the constructed separator with liquid medium. The separator was calibrated and tested with Al3O3 and UO2. it has been concluded that it can be used for separation of powders with sufficient accuracy if the separation is performed for a longer period of time. The separated fractions were characterised by microscopic method and the UO2 fraction additionally by sedimentation method

  13. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of elements 99 and 100. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. , January 23, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Webb, C. (eds.)

    1979-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for five of the contributions to this symposium. The four remaining ones have already been cited in ERA and may be located by reference as the entry CONF-780134-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  14. A multiple-reflection time-of-flight isobar separator and mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) for the LEB at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the LEB of the Super-FRS at FAIR, precision measurements of very short-lived nuclei will be performed. For these experiments (MATS, LASPEC), the nuclei have to be stopped, cooled, separated and measured fast and efficiently. To achieve this goal, a multi-purpose, non-scanning mass spectrometer with single-ion sensitivity, a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer, has been developed. It will be positioned behind the gas-filled stopping cell at the LEB, where it can be used as a broadband mass spectrometer, an isobar separator or a high-precision mass spectrometer. The broadband mode will be used for optimization of the range and range-compression in the Super-FRS and the stopping and extraction from the gas cell. Isobaric contamination that is produced by secondary reactions in the degraders or by charge-exchange reactions in the gas cell can be orders of magnitude larger than the ions of interest. To remove these ions, the isobar separator mode is required, in which up to 107 isobaric ions/s can be handled. The high-precision mode enables measurements with an accuracy of 10-6 to 10-7 in about 2 ms. In this contribution the basic characteristics and performance of the device are presented.

  15. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface

  16. High gradient magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a process in which magnetic material is trapped in a filter disposed in a magnetic field, and is unloaded by passing a fluid through the filter in the absence of the initial magnetic field, the magnetic field is first reduced to an intermediate value to allow unloading of the more weakly magnetic particles, the more strongly magnetic particles being retained and subsequently unloaded by further reduction of the magnetic field. Stage by stage reduction of the magnetic field during unloading allows separation of different species from the mixture. As an example the method can be applied to the separation of uranium compounds from mine ores. The uranium compounds are magnetic, while most of the other constituents of the ore are non-magnetic. The starting material is a suspension of the ore. Water is used for unloading. The filter material in this case is stainless steel balls. (author)

  17. HRS Separator HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 90 and 60 degree ISOLDE HRS separator magnets in the HRS separator zone. In the two vacuum sectors HRS20 and HRS30 equipment such as the HRS slits SL240, the HRS faraday cup FC300 and wiregrid WG210 can be spotted. Vacuum valves, turbo pumps, beamlines, quadrupoles, water and compressed air connections, DC and signal cabling can be seen throughout the video. The HRS main and user beamgate in the beamline between MAG90 and MAG60 and its switchboxes as well as all vacuum bellows and flanges are shown. Instrumentation such as the HRS scanner unit 482 / 483, the HRS WG470 wiregrid and slits piston can be seen. The different quadrupoles and supports are shown as well as the RILIS guidance tubes and installation at the magnets and the different radiation monitors.

  18. GPS Separator HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Footage of the 70 degree ISOLDE GPS separator magnet MAG70 as well as the switchyard for the Central Mass and GLM (GPS Low Mass) and GHM (GPS High Mass) beamlines in the GPS separator zone. In the GPS20 vacuum sector equipment such as the long GPS scanner 482 / 483 unit, faraday cup FC 490, vacuum valves and wiregrid piston WG210 and WG475 and radiation monitors can also be seen. Also the RILIS laser guidance and trajectory can be seen, the GPS main beamgate switch box and the actual GLM, GHM and Central Beamline beamgates in the beamlines as well as the first electrostatic quadrupoles for the GPS lines. Close up of the GHM deflector plates motor and connections and the inspection glass at the GHM side of the switchyard.

  19. Selective separation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the selective separation of uranium from elements accompanying it in a uranium-containing ore is claimed. It comprises preparing a uranium-containing solution; adding hydrochloric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type (UO2Clsub(n))sup(2-n) where n is 3 or 4, or sulfuric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type UO2(SO4)sub(m)sup(2-2m) where m is 2 or 3; adding a cationic surface active agent which forms a difficultly soluble precipitate with the complex anion; subjecting the solution to a gas flotation step to produce a foam fraction containing the pecipitate and a liquid fraction; separating the two fractions; and recovering uranium from the foam fraction

  20. Battery separator manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, N.I.; Sugarman, N.

    1974-12-27

    A battery with a positive plate, a negative plate, and a separator of polymeric resin having a degree of undesirable hydrophobia, solid below 180/sup 0/F, extrudable as a hot melt, and resistant to degradation by at least either acids or alkalies positioned between the plates is described. The separator comprises a nonwoven mat of fibers, the fibers being comprised of the polymeric resin and a wetting agent in an amount of 0.5 to 20 percent by weight based on the weight of the resin with the amount being incompatible with the resin below the melting point of the resin such that the wetting agent will bloom over a period of time at ambient temperatures in a battery, yet being compatible with the resin at the extrusion temperature and bringing about blooming to the surface of the fibers when the fibers are subjected to heat and pressure.

  1. Steam separator latch assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  2. Composite battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor); Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A composite battery separator comprises a support element (10) having an open pore structure such as a ribbed lattice and at least one liquid permeable sheet (20,22) to distribute the compressive force evenly onto the surfaces of the layers (24, 26) of negative active material and positive active material. In a non-flooded battery cell the compressible, porous material (18), such as a glass mat which absorbs the electrolyte, is compressed into a major portion of the pores or openings (16) in the support element. The unfilled pores in the material (18) form a gas diffusion path as the channels (41) formed between adjacent ribs in the lattice element (30,36). Facing two lattice elements (30, 31) with acute angled cross-ribs (34, 38) facing each other prevents the elements from interlocking and distorting a porous, separator (42) disposed between the lattice elements.

  3. Lithium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published methods for 6Li-7Li lithium isotope separation have been reviewed. Future demand for 6Li, whose main use will be as a tritium breeder in blankets surrounding the core of DT fusion power reactors, is likely to exceed 5 Mg/a in the next century. The applicability of the various available methods to such a large scale production rate has been assessed. Research on improving the effectiveness of current lithium isotope separation processes has been carried out worldwide in several major areas during the past decade; these include two-phase chemical exchange systems, ion exchange resin chromatography, highly isotope-selective techniques like laser photoactivation and radiofrequency spectroscopy. Chemical exchange systems appear to offer good potential in the near term for 6Li enrichment

  4. Nuclear isomer separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure specimens of nuclear isomers are required for gamma-ray lasers. The author has selectively photoionized atoms containing isomeric nuclei of 197Hg. The isomers were produced by the 197Au(d, 2n)197Hg reaction and distilled. Three pulsed dye lasers were used to selectively ionize mercury atoms by double resonant three-step photoionization. Other isomer separation techniques and their limitations are discussed. (author)

  5. Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentrati...

  6. Separation of light lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plan is presented for separating the ternary mixture of La, Nd and Pr at a joint utilization of the methods of fractional counter-current extraction and of ammonia barbotage (Trombe method) carried out by the applied Trombe method. At concentrations of lanthanides of the order of 100 g/l La and Nd concentrates were achieved this were further processed by the method of fractional counter-current extraction. (author)

  7. Photochemical separation of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the photochemical separation of carbon 13 and oxygen 18 uses 123.54 nm resonance radiation from a gaseous discharge containing Kr and an inert gas to excite selectively 13C16O, 12C18O, or both with no significant excitation of 12C16O. The excited molecules react with ground state CO to yield CO2 and C3O2. The isotopically-enriched products are removed from the reactants by condensation

  8. Separation of enantiomers

    CERN Document Server

    Todd , Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    In one handy volume this handbook summarizes the most common synthetic methods for the separation of racemic mixtures, allowing an easy comparison of the different strategies described in the literature.Alongside classical methods, the authors also consider kinetic resolutions, dynamic kinetic resolutions, divergent reactions of a racemic mixture, and a number of ""neglected"" cases not covered elsewhere, such as the use of circularly polarized light, polymerizations, ""ripening"" processes, dynamic combinatorial chemistry, and several thermodynamic processes. The result is a thorough introdu

  9. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  10. Materials separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume supplies information in 16 individual contributions on projects sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) with regard to the above mentioned topic, on the state of the art, on new technologies, and on international cooperation; two of the contributions have been recorded separately for the databases INIS and ENERGY. The contributions are supplemented by a survey of the projects sponsored and by a list of publications which have resulted from the sponsored projects. (EF)

  11. Electronic coffee grains separator

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Uribe, Juan Rodrigo; Pabón Usaquén, Jenny Paola; Cardona Duque, Julián Andrés; Ramos Giraldo, Paula Jimena; Oliveros Tascón, Carlos Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Accurate coffee sorting is a response to pressures for product quality and to a growing market for specialty coffees. One of the major challenges in this regard is to prepare the raw coffee fruits for sorting in one-by-one electronic machines. In this paper, we present a mechanical device developed to separate clusters and impurities from the main process. The mechanical device consists of two inclined belt conveyors with upward motion, working in series. This arrangement conveys upwards any ...

  12. Apparatus for electrophoresis separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Norman L.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously performing electrophoresis separations on a plurality of slab gels containing samples of protein, protein subunits or nucleic acids. A reservoir of buffer solution is divided into three compartments by two parallel partitions having vertical slots spaced along their length. A sheet of flexible, electrically insulative material is attached to each partition and is provided with vertical slits aligned with the slots. Slab-gel holders are received within the slots with the flexible material folded outwardly as flaps from the slits to overlay portions of the holder surfaces and thereby act as electrical and liquid seals. An elongated, spaghetti-like gel containing a sample of specimen that was previously separated by isoelectric focusing techniques is vertically positioned along a marginal edge portion of the slab gel. On application of an electrical potential between the two outer chambers of buffer solution, a second dimensional electrophoresis separation in accordance with molecular weight occurs as the specimen molecules migrate across the slab gel.

  13. Separation of gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus is described for the separation of a gaseous plasma mixture into components in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, comprising: a source for converting the gaseous mixture into a train of plasma packets; an open-ended vessel with a main section and at least one branch section, adapted to enclose along predetermined tracks the original plasma packets in the main section, and the separated plasma components in the branch sections; drive means for generating travelling magnetic waves along the predetermined tracks with the magnetic flux vector of the waves transverse to each of the tracks; and means for maintaining phase coherence between the plasma packets and the magnetic waves at a value needed for accelerating the components of the packets to different velocities and in such different directions that the plasma of each packet is divided into distinctly separate packets in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, and which plasma packets are collected from the branch sections of the vessels. (author)

  14. Innovative Separations Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

    2011-05-01

    Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

  15. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  16. Separation of contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separating the contaminated parts from the non-contaminated parts from decommissioned nuclear facilities may strongly reduce the amount of contaminated concrete. The reduction in volume of the radioactive contaminated concrete is dependent on how much cementstone is in the concrete. This research program shows that the radioactive contamination is mostly in the cementstone. However the choice that the cementstone parts, (or better said the radioactive parts) are smaller than 1 mm may not always be true. Normally the cementstone takes about 30% of the total concrete volume. A separation procedure composed by a combination of milling and thermal shock has been assessed. Both the cold and hot thermal shock in combination with milling are not able to separate the cementstone from the larger aggregates completely. However, the cementstone from the concrete with a low nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination cold thermal shock/milling, while the cementstone from the concrete with a high nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination hot thermal shock/milling. After both methods a layer of cementstone was still visible on the aggregates. Washing followed by a nitric acid treatment removed each 2 wt% of cementstone

  17. Airborne rotary separator study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drnevich, R. F.; Nowobilski, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several air breathing propulsion concepts for future earth-to-orbit transport vehicles utilize air collection and enrichment, and subsequent storage of liquid oxygen for later use in the vehicle mission. Work performed during the 1960's established the feasibility of substantially reducing weight and volume of a distillation type air separator system by operating the distillation elements in high 'g' fields obtained by rotating the separator assembly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various fuels and fuel combinations with the objective of minimizing the weight and increase the ready alert capability of the plane. Fuels will be used to provide energy as well as act as heat sinks for the on-board heat rejection system. Fuel energy was used to provide power for air separation as well as to produce refrigeration for liquefaction of oxygen enriched air, besides its primary purpose of vehicle propulsion. The heat generated in the cycle was rejected to the fuel and water which is also carried on board the vehicle.The fuels that were evaluated include JP4, methane, and hydrogen. Hydrogen served as a comparison to the JP4 and methane cases.

  18. Eddy current separation apparatus, separation module, separation method and method for adjusting an eddy current separation apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Bakker, M.C.M.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Rahman, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy current separation apparatus (1) for separating particles (20) from a particle stream (w), wherein the apparatus (1) comprises a separator drum (4) adapted to create a first particle fraction (21) and a second particle fraction (23), a feeding device (2) upstream of the separator drum (4) for s

  19. ITER isotope separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results of a study that examined the technical operating and economic viability of an alternative Isotope Separation System (ISS) design based on the distributed design concept. In the distributed design, the ISS is broken up into local independently operable subsystems matched to local processing requirements. The distributed design accepts the same feeds and produces essentially the same products as the reference design. The distributed design consists of two separate, independent subsystems. The first, called ISS-H, receives only protium-dominated streams and waste water from tritium extraction. It has two cryogenic distillation columns and can produce a 50 percent D, 50 percent T product since it lacks D/T separation capability. A final 80 percent T2 concentration product can be obtained by blending the 50 percent T2 stream from ISS-H with the more than 99 percent T2 stream from the second subsystem, ISS-D. The second subsystem receives only deuterium-dominated feeds, which also contain some protium. ISS-D is as complex as the reference design, but smaller. Although each subsystem has some advantages, such as only two cryogenic distillation columns in ISS-H and better than 99 percent steady state T2 product in ISS-D, the combined subsystems do not offer any real advantage compared to the reference IISS. The entire distributed ISS design has been simulated using Ontario Hydro's FLOSHEET steady state process simulator. Dynamic analysis has not been done for the distributed design. (10 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.)

  20. Mass independent isotope separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass independent separations between isotopes of an element were first observed by Clayton on 17 O and 18 O from the Allende meteorite and attributed then to nucleosynthesis. Anomalous ratios of isotope abundance known at that time were due to nuclear processes. Later, atmospheric ozone and stratospheric CO2 were shown to exhibit mass independent isotope composition of oxygen. Several formation mechanisms of these 'anomalous' molecules have been proposed, none being completely satisfactory. In the laboratory, these mass independent chemical separation effects were eventually reproduced. Anomalous separations were also obtained between isotopes of uranium, and even of light elements such as magnesium. These were first connected with irregularities in atomic nucleus volumes. Such effects are not recorded on natural terrestrial samples. Two main reasons prevent such observations from having been made. Firstly, laboratories investigating isotope compositions of elements, publish almost exclusively deltas of one isotope only. But, to look for possible anomalies, one needs to compare each isotope abundance in a sample similar to that in the standard used as origin of deltas. An example of such calculation will be given. Secondly, deltas of isotopes published by different laboratories are usually not comparable to better than a few per mil. The reason is that, to calculate deltas, most laboratories use working standards whose absolute values may not be exactly established as they are not crucial to their work. Several per mil differences will be shown to be implied between the 'absolute' isotope abundance of 13 C of standards, reputedly the same, used by different laboratories. Laboratories making surveys of natural samples should be encouraged, e.g. by IUPAC, to cover every isotope of multiple isotope elements, and to make, at not infrequent intervals, a close comparison of their working standards with internationally distributed ones. (author)

  1. The separation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Edward M; Spitz, Lewis

    2015-10-01

    The various stages of the separation are carefully planned but despite this, variations which will change the schedule of the procedure may exist. In general the operation commences on the opposite side from the main procedure and then the twins are turned for the remainder of the operation. Each type of conjoined twin is different but basically thoracopagus involves the hearts, omphalopagus involves the liver and small intestine and ischiopagus involves the large intestine and genito-urinary system. Our results are presented together with interesting cases from which lessons have been learned. PMID:26382263

  2. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  3. NIOBIUM-TANTALUM SEPARATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Foos, R.A.

    1959-01-27

    The usual method for the separation of tantalum and niobium consists of a selective solvent extraction from an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution of the metals. A difficulty encountered in this process is the fact that the corrosion problems associated with hydrofluoric acid are serious. It has been found that the corrosion caused by the hydrofluoric acid may be substantially reduced by adding to the acidic solution an amine, such as phenyl diethanolamine or aniline, and adjusting pH value to between 4 and 6.

  4. Jane Eyre de Michael Berkeley et de David Malouf : La transposition opératique d’un grand classique de la littérature anglaise Jane Eyre by Michael Berkeley and David Malouf: The Operatic Rewriting of a Great Classic English Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Michael Berkeley’s opera Jane Eyre. Premiered on June 30, 2000 by Music Theatre Wales at the Cheltenham International Festival of Music, this opera is based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë and the libretto is written by the Australian poet, novelist, playwright and librettist, David Malouf. It was risky and daring to try to adapt this famous and long novel for the stage. We will particularly focus on the similarities and differences between the novel and the opera as well as on the strategies used both by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley to adapt it. Through the analysis of the similarities we will see how Michael Berkeley set to music some of the great themes and elements of the novel: passion, a sense of entrapment, the “Gothic” atmosphere. On the other hand, the analysis of the discrepancies between the novel and the opera as they appear in both the libretto and the music will lead us to a modern apprehension of the characterization of madness as well as of the metafictional dimension of the rewriting of Jane Eyre by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley.  

  5. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffuser separator apparatus is described which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage. Each of said channels has an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports. At least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels is a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels is a different cross sectional area. Means are provided for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series. Also provided are a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area

  6. Fast separable nonlocal means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Chaudhury, Kunal N.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple and fast algorithm called PatchLift for computing distances between patches (contiguous block of samples) extracted from a given one-dimensional signal. PatchLift is based on the observation that the patch distances can be efficiently computed from a matrix that is derived from the one-dimensional signal using lifting; importantly, the number of operations required to compute the patch distances using this approach does not scale with the patch length. We next demonstrate how PatchLift can be used for patch-based denoising of images corrupted with Gaussian noise. In particular, we propose a separable formulation of the classical nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that can be implemented using PatchLift. We demonstrate that the PatchLift-based implementation of separable NLM is a few orders faster than standard NLM and is competitive with existing fast implementations of NLM. Moreover, its denoising performance is shown to be consistently superior to that of NLM and some of its variants, both in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio/structural similarity index and visual quality.

  7. Gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Zendelska, Afrodita; Krstev, Boris; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the applications of gravity separation for oil wastewater treatment are presented. Described is operation on conventional gravity separation and parallel plate separation. Key words: gravity separation, oil, conventional gravity separation, parallel plate separation.

  8. An advanced educational program for nuclear professionals with social scientific literacy. A collaborative initiative by UC Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo on the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have collaborated for over three years in developing an advanced educational program to cultivate leading engineers who can productively interact with other stakeholders. The program is organized under a partnership between the Nuclear Engineering Department of University of California, Berkeley (UCBNE) and the Global COE Program 'Nuclear Education and Research Initiative' (GoNERI) of the University of Tokyo, and is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), Japan. We conducted two 'summer schools' in 2009 and 2010 as trial cases of the educational program. This year, in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, we decided to make our third summer school a venue for preliminary, yet multi-dimensional learning from that event. This school was held in Berkeley, CA, in the first week of August, with 12 lecturers and 18 students from various fields and countries. In this paper, we will explain the concept, aim, and design of our program; do a preliminary assessment of its effectiveness; introduce a couple of intriguing discussions held by participants; and discuss the program's implications for the post-Fukushima nuclear context. (author)

  9. Oil/water separation in a novel cyclone separator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Andrew Colin

    2007-01-01

    Conventional bulk oil-water separation is performed in large gravity separators that take up large areas and potentially contain large volumes of hazardous material. An intensified bulk separator has the potential to provide significant benefit in saving space, especially where this is at a premium, and in improving safety. The I-SEP, a novel geometry of Axial-Flow Cyclone (also known as Uniflow or straight-through) separator, has been tested as an intensified bulk oil-water se...

  10. Russian separation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small contract signed in FY92 with the Khlopin Radium Institute marked the beginning of the Russian Separations program. Under this contract the Khlopin Radium Institute performed laboratory and dynamic hot-cell testing using cobalt dicarbollide technology on simulated radioactive wastes similar to those found at DOE sites in the United States. The current scope of investigation has been extended to identify prospective technologies for application to other United States needs. The Khlopin Radium Institute project served as a model for three other pilot scale technology development projects. The premise of the pilot scale projects is to enable Russian scientists to demonstrate their technology in the context of DOE needs, using Russian technical expertise has proven to be a cost-effective means of screening Russian technologies

  11. Block copolymer battery separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  12. Actinide separative chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide separative chemistry has focused very heavy work during the last decades. The main was nuclear spent fuel reprocessing: solvent extraction processes appeared quickly a suitable, an efficient way to recover major actinides (uranium and plutonium), and an extensive research, concerning both process chemistry and chemical engineering technologies, allowed the industrial development in this field. We can observe for about half a century a succession of Purex plants which, if based on the same initial discovery (i.e. the outstanding properties of a molecule, the famous TBP), present huge improvements at each step, for a large part due to an increased mastery of the mechanisms involved. And actinide separation should still focus R and D in the near future: there is a real, an important need for this, even if reprocessing may appear as a mature industry. We can present three main reasons for this. First, actinide recycling appear as a key-issue for future nuclear fuel cycles, both for waste management optimization and for conservation of natural resource; and the need concerns not only major actinide but also so-called minor ones, thus enlarging the scope of the investigation. Second, extraction processes are not well mastered at microscopic scale: there is a real, great lack in fundamental knowledge, useful or even necessary for process optimization (for instance, how to design the best extracting molecule, taken into account the several notifications and constraints, from selectivity to radiolytic resistivity?); and such a need for a real optimization is to be more accurate with the search of always cheaper, cleaner processes. And then, there is room too for exploratory research, on new concepts-perhaps for processing quite new fuels- which could appear attractive and justify further developments to be properly assessed: pyro-processes first, but also others, like chemistry in 'extreme' or 'unusual' conditions (supercritical solvents, sono-chemistry, could be

  13. Advanced isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems

  14. Special isotope production and separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and production of transuranium elements (Cf, Es) at the Transuranium Processing Plant (TRU) are reported. Isotopic separations of Pu, Tl, Zn, Te, and Pb are reported. Separator R and D were conducted for Xe, Ti, Hg, and Tl

  15. Determine separations process strategy decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides a summary level comparative analysis of selected, top-level, waste treatment strategies. These strategies include No Separations, Separations (high-level/low-level separations), and Deferred Separations of the tank waste. These three strategies encompass the full range of viable processing alternatives based upon full retrieval of the tank wastes. The assumption of full retrieval of the tank wastes is a predecessor decision and will not be revisited in this study

  16. Composite separators and redox flow batteries based on porous separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-12

    Composite separators having a porous structure and including acid-stable, hydrophilic, inorganic particles enmeshed in a substantially fully fluorinated polyolefin matrix can be utilized in a number of applications. The inorganic particles can provide hydrophilic characteristics. The pores of the separator result in good selectivity and electrical conductivity. The fluorinated polymeric backbone can result in high chemical stability. Accordingly, one application of the composite separators is in redox flow batteries as low cost membranes. In such applications, the composite separator can also enable additional property-enhancing features compared to ion-exchange membranes. For example, simple capacity control can be achieved through hydraulic pressure by balancing the volumes of electrolyte on each side of the separator. While a porous separator can also allow for volume and pressure regulation, in RFBs that utilize corrosive and/or oxidizing compounds, the composite separators described herein are preferable for their robustness in the presence of such compounds.

  17. Dielectrophoretic separation of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous isotopes are separated from a mixture in a vertically elongated chamber by subjecting the mixture to a nonuniform transverse electric field. Dielectrophoretic separation of the isotopes is effected, producing a transverse temperature gradient in the chamber, thereby enhancing the separation by convective countercurrent flow. In the example given, the process and apparatus are applied to the production of heavy water from steam

  18. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260BhReaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Sarah L.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Dragojevic, Irena; Garcia, Mitch A.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Nitsche, Heino

    2007-05-07

    The lightest isotope of Bh known was produced in the new {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. {sup 260}Bh decays with a 35{sub -9}{sup +19} ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59{sub -20}{sup +29} pb is approximately a factor of four larger than compared to recent model predictions. The influences of the N = 152 and Z = 108 shells on alpha decay properties are discussed.

  19. Laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas mixture of 235UF6, and carrier gas is pushed through a converging - diverging nozzle with supersonic speed and is than adiabatically expanded in order to produce an oversaturated gas cooled down to about 125 K. According to the two-photon method the oversaturated mixture is a) irradiated with infrared laser light of a frequency selectively exciting only UF6 molecules containing 235U and at the same time b) irradiated with ultraviolet laser light of a frequency producing photodissociation of those UF6 molecules being selectively excited by the infrared laser light. The products of photodissociation containing 235U are separated from the non-excited UF6 according to a known method. The application of the method according to the invention is not limited to the uranium isotopes mentioned above, but extends to all uranium isotopes. The application further is not limited to fluorides of uranium. The method may be extended to all halides of uranium. (GG) 891 GG

  20. Physical Separation in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physical separation is pervasive in organizations, and has powerful effects on employee motivation and organizational behaviors. However, research shows that workplace separation is characterized by a variety of tradeoffs, tensions, and challenges that lead to both positive and negative outcomes....... We develop new theory on the nature, antecedents, and motivational implications of separation awareness - a psychological state in which people are aware of their physical separation from others—and proffer a model of the mechanisms that link separation and motivation. We distinguish between control...... and autonomy affirmation as psychological states that are triggered by physical separation in the workplace, and discuss individual and context specific moderators, as well as motivational implications of separation awareness. In doing so, we reconcile the seemingly contradicting findings that have...

  1. WASTE PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS SEPARATION IN ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR

    OpenAIRE

    Branimir Fuk

    2012-01-01

    Printed circuit boards from electronic waste are very important source of precious metals by recycling. The biggest challenge is liberation and separation of useful components; thin film which contains copper, zinc, tin, lead and precious metals like silver, gold and palladium from non useful components; polymers, ceramics and glass fibbers. The paper presents results for separation of shredded printed circuit boards from TV sets in electrostatic separator. Testing where conducted with materi...

  2. Gas liquid separation within a novel axial flow cyclone separator

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Philip James

    1998-01-01

    Cyclone separators have been described in detail and, although substantial research has been performed on solid / gas devices, the use of cyclones for gas / liquid separation has been comparatively ignored; this is particularly true for higher concentrations of liquid and for degassing applications. Consequently no generic models are available which will predict separation efficiency or pressure drop for all designs of cyclone. A novel design of axial flow cyclone called WELLSE...

  3. Separation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Palladium Alloy Membranes Separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Separation of hydrogen isotope with palladium alloy membranes is one of the promising methods for hydrogen isotope separation. It has several advantages, such as high separation efficiency, smaller tritium inventory, simple separation device, ect. Limited by the manufacture of membrane and cost of gas transportation pump, this method is still at the stage of conceptual study. The relationship between separation factors and temperatures, feed gas components, split ratios have not been researched in detail, and the calculated results of cascade separation have not been validated with experimental data. In this thesis, a palladium alloy membrane separator was designed to further study its separation performance between H2 and D2. The separation factor of the single stage was affected by the temperature, the feed gas component, the split ratio and the gas flow rate, etc. The experimental results showed that the H2-D2 separation factor decreased with the increasing of temperature. On the temperature from 573 K to 773 K, when the feed rate was 5 L/min, the separation factor of 66.2%H2 - 33.8%D2 decreased from 2.09 to 1.85 when the split ratio was 0.1 and from 1.74 to 1.52 when the split ratio was 0.2.The separation factor also decreased with the increasing of split ratio. At 573 K and the feed rate of 5 L/min, the separation factor of 15.0%H2 and 85.0%D2 decreased from 2.43 to 1.35 with the increasing of split ratio from 0.050 to 0.534,and for 66.2%H2-33.8%D2, the separation factor decreased from 2.87 to 1.30 with the increasing of split ratio from 0.050 to 0.688. When the separation factor was the biggest, the flow rate of feed gas was in a perfect value. To gain a best separation performance, perfect flow rate, lower temperature and reflux ratio should be chosen. (authors)

  4. Technical feasibility of advanced separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced separation aims at reducing the amount and toxicity of high-level and long lived radioactive wastes. The Purex process has been retained as a reference way for the recovery of the most radio-toxic elements: neptunium, technetium and iodine. Complementary solvent extraction processes have to be developed for the separation of americium, curium and cesium from the high activity effluent of the spent fuel reprocessing treatment. Researches have been carried out with the aim of demonstrating the scientifical and technical feasibility of advanced separation of minor actinides and long lived fission products from spent fuels. The scientifical feasibility was demonstrated at the end of 2001. The technical feasibility works started in the beginning of 2002. Many results have been obtained which are presented and summarized in this document: approach followed, processes retained for the technical feasibility (An/Ln and Am/Cm separation), processes retained for further validation at the new shielded Purex installation, technical feasibility of Purex adaptation to Np separation, technical feasibility of Diamex (first step: (An+Ln)/other fission products) separation), technical feasibility of Sanex process (second step: An(III)/Ln(III) separation), technical feasibility of Am(III)/Cm(III) separation, cesium separation, iodine separation, technical-economical evaluation, conclusions and perspectives, facilities and apparatuses used for the experiments. (J.S.)

  5. Physics on your feet Berkeley graduate exam questions : or ninety minutes of shame but a PhD for the rest of your life!

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry; Demas, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Physics on Your Feet gives a collection of physics problems covering the broad range of topics in classical and modern physics that were, or could have been, asked at oral PhD exams at Berkeley. The questions are easy to formulate, but some of them can only be answered using an out-of-the-box approach. Detailed solutions are provided, from which the reader is guaranteed to learn a lot about the physicists' way of thinking. The book is also packed full of cartoons and dry humour to help take the edge off the stress and anxiety surrounding exams. This is a helpful guide to students preparing for their exams, as well as to University lecturers looking for good instructive problems. No exams are necessary to enjoy the book!

  6. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  7. Separators - Technology review: Ceramic based separators for secondary batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestler, Tina; Schmid, Robert; Münchgesang, Wolfram; Bazhenov, Vasilii; Meyer, Dirk C. [Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Leipziger Str. 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Schilm, Jochen [Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien und Systeme IKTS, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Fraunhofer-Technologiezentrum Halbleitermaterialien THM, Am St.-Niclas-Schacht 13, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2014-06-16

    Besides a continuous increase of the worldwide use of electricity, the electric energy storage technology market is a growing sector. At the latest since the German energy transition ('Energiewende') was announced, technological solutions for the storage of renewable energy have been intensively studied. Storage technologies in various forms are commercially available. A widespread technology is the electrochemical cell. Here the cost per kWh, e. g. determined by energy density, production process and cycle life, is of main interest. Commonly, an electrochemical cell consists of an anode and a cathode that are separated by an ion permeable or ion conductive membrane - the separator - as one of the main components. Many applications use polymeric separators whose pores are filled with liquid electrolyte, providing high power densities. However, problems arise from different failure mechanisms during cell operation, which can affect the integrity and functionality of these separators. In the case of excessive heating or mechanical damage, the polymeric separators become an incalculable security risk. Furthermore, the growth of metallic dendrites between the electrodes leads to unwanted short circuits. In order to minimize these risks, temperature stable and non-flammable ceramic particles can be added, forming so-called composite separators. Full ceramic separators, in turn, are currently commercially used only for high-temperature operation systems, due to their comparably low ion conductivity at room temperature. However, as security and lifetime demands increase, these materials turn into focus also for future room temperature applications. Hence, growing research effort is being spent on the improvement of the ion conductivity of these ceramic solid electrolyte materials, acting as separator and electrolyte at the same time. Starting with a short overview of available separator technologies and the separator market, this review focuses on ceramic

  8. Separators - Technology review: Ceramic based separators for secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides a continuous increase of the worldwide use of electricity, the electric energy storage technology market is a growing sector. At the latest since the German energy transition ('Energiewende') was announced, technological solutions for the storage of renewable energy have been intensively studied. Storage technologies in various forms are commercially available. A widespread technology is the electrochemical cell. Here the cost per kWh, e. g. determined by energy density, production process and cycle life, is of main interest. Commonly, an electrochemical cell consists of an anode and a cathode that are separated by an ion permeable or ion conductive membrane - the separator - as one of the main components. Many applications use polymeric separators whose pores are filled with liquid electrolyte, providing high power densities. However, problems arise from different failure mechanisms during cell operation, which can affect the integrity and functionality of these separators. In the case of excessive heating or mechanical damage, the polymeric separators become an incalculable security risk. Furthermore, the growth of metallic dendrites between the electrodes leads to unwanted short circuits. In order to minimize these risks, temperature stable and non-flammable ceramic particles can be added, forming so-called composite separators. Full ceramic separators, in turn, are currently commercially used only for high-temperature operation systems, due to their comparably low ion conductivity at room temperature. However, as security and lifetime demands increase, these materials turn into focus also for future room temperature applications. Hence, growing research effort is being spent on the improvement of the ion conductivity of these ceramic solid electrolyte materials, acting as separator and electrolyte at the same time. Starting with a short overview of available separator technologies and the separator market, this review focuses on ceramic-based separators

  9. Gas-filled cell as a narrow bandwidth bandpass filter in the VUV wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method for spectrally filtering radiation in the VUV wavelength range by means of a monochromator constituted by a cell filled with a resonantly absorbing rare gas. Around particular wavelengths, the gas exhibits narrow-bandwidth absorbing resonances following the Fano profile. In particular, within the photon energy range 60 eV-65 eV, the correlation index of the Fano profiles for the photoionization spectra in Helium is equal to unity, meaning that the minimum of the cross-section is exactly zero. For sufficiently large column density in the gas cell, the spectrum of the incoming radiation will be attenuated by the background cross-section of many orders of magnitude, except for those wavelengths close to the point where the cross-section is zero. Remarkable advantages of a gas monochromator based on this principle are simplicity, efficiency and narrow-bandwidth. A gas monochromator installed in the experimental hall of a VUV SASE FEL facility would enable the delivery of a single-mode VUV laser beam. The design is identical to that of already existing gas attenuator systems for VUV or X-ray FELs. We present feasibility study and exemplifications for the FLASH facility in the VUV regime. (orig.)

  10. Gas filled prototype of a CdZnTe pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdZnTe pixel structures are currently the most promising detectors for the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes, for astronomical observation in the range 5-100 keV. In Sharma et al. (Proc. SPIE 3765 (1999) 822) and Ramsey et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 458 (2001) 55) we presented preliminary results on the development of prototype 4x4 CdZnTe imaging detectors operated under vacuum. These pixel detectors were installed inside vacuum chambers on three-stage Peltier coolers providing detector temperatures down to -40 deg. C. A miniature sputter ion pump inside each chamber maintained the necessary vacuum of 10-5 Torr. At a temperature of -20 deg. C we achieved an FWHM energy resolution of between 2% and 3% at 60 keV and ∼15% at 5.9 keV; however, the dependency on temperature was weak and at +20 deg. C the respective resolutions were 3% and 20%. As the detectors could be operated at room temperature without loss of their good characteristics it was possible to exclude the sputter ion pump and fill the chamber with dry nitrogen instead. We have tested a nitrogen-filled CdZnTe (5x5x1 mm3) prototype having 0.65x0.65 mm2 readout pads on a 0.75 mm pitch. The interpixel resistance at an applied voltage of 10 V was higher than 50 GΩ and the pixel leakage currents at room temperature with a bias of 200 V between each pad and the common electrode did not exceed 0.8 nA. The pixel detector inside the microassembly, which also contained the input stages of the preamplifiers, was installed on a Peltier cooler to maintain the detector temperature at +20 deg. C. To define real leakage currents of the pixels in their switched-on state we have checked the voltage on the preamplifiers feedback resistors. The resulting currents were 10-50 pA at a detector bias of 500 V. Under test, the typical energy resolution per pixel at +20 deg. C was ∼3% at energy 59.6 keV and ∼20% at energy 5.9 keV, which are similar to the values obtained in the vacuum prototype at room temperature (Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 458 (2001) 55). Using the three stage Peltier cooler it is possible to cool the pixel detector in the nitrogen atmosphere to 0 deg. C which would slightly improve these spectrometric characteristics. Thus the conclusion here is that the use of a nitrogen environment instead of a vacuum one did not cause any deterioration of the characteristics of the CdZnTe imaging detector

  11. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. A penetrator for making thermal measurements in a gas-filled planetary regolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Paton

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a general purpose penetrator, fitted with a heater, for measuring temperature and thermal diffusivity. Due to its simplicity of deployment and operation the thermal penetrator is well suited for remote deployment by spacecraft into a planetary regolith. Thermal measurements in planetary regoliths are required to determine the surface energy balance and to measure their thermal properties. If the regolith is on a planet with an atmosphere a good understanding of the role of convection is required to properly interpret the measurements. This could also help to identify the significant heat and mass exchange mechanisms between the regolith and the atmosphere. To understand the role of convection in our regolith analogues we use a network of temperature sensors placed in the target. In practical applications a penetrator will push material out of the way as it enters a target possible changing its thermal properties. To investigate this effect a custom built test rig, that precisely controls and monitors the motion of the penetrator, is used. The thermal diffusivity of limestone powder and sand is derived by fitting a numerical thermal model to the temperature measurements. Convection seems to play an important role in the transfer of heat in this case. Firstly a diffusion-convection model fits the laboratory data better than a diffusivity-only model. Also the diffusivity derived from a diffusivity-convection model was found to be in good agreement with diffusivity derived using other methods published in the literature. Thermal diffusivity measurements, inspection of the horizontal temperature profiles and visual observations suggests that limestone powder is compacted more readily than sand during entry of the penetrator into the target. For both regolith analogues the disturbance of material around the penetrator was determined to have an insignificant effect on the diffusivity measurements in this case.

  13. Optical design and characterization of a gas filled MEMS Fabry-Perot filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerden, N. Pelin; Ghaderi, Mohammadamir; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2015-05-01

    A concept for a highly integrated and miniaturized gas sensor based on infrared absorption, a Fabry-Perot type linear variable optical filter with integrated gas cell, is presented. The sample chamber takes up most of the space in a conventional spectrometer and is the only component that has so far not been miniaturized. In this concept the gas cell is combined with the resonator cavity of the filter. The optical design, fabrication, and characterization results on a MEMSbased realization are reported for a 24-25.5 μm long tapered resonator cavity. Multiple reflections from highly reflective mirrors enable this optical cavity to also act as a gas cell with an equivalent optical absorption path length of 8 mm. Wideband operation of the filter is ensured by fabrication of a tapered mirror. In addition to the functional integration and significant size reduction, the filter contains no moving parts, thus enables the fabrication of a robust microspectrometer

  14. Gas filled prototype of a CdZnTe pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, B.; Sharma, D.; Sipila, H.; Gostilo, V. E-mail: bsi@bsi.lv; Loupilov, A

    2001-06-01

    CdZnTe pixel structures are currently the most promising detectors for the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes, for astronomical observation in the range 5-100 keV. In Sharma et al. (Proc. SPIE 3765 (1999) 822) and Ramsey et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 458 (2001) 55) we presented preliminary results on the development of prototype 4x4 CdZnTe imaging detectors operated under vacuum. These pixel detectors were installed inside vacuum chambers on three-stage Peltier coolers providing detector temperatures down to -40 deg. C. A miniature sputter ion pump inside each chamber maintained the necessary vacuum of 10{sup -5} Torr. At a temperature of -20 deg. C we achieved an FWHM energy resolution of between 2% and 3% at 60 keV and {approx}15% at 5.9 keV; however, the dependency on temperature was weak and at +20 deg. C the respective resolutions were 3% and 20%. As the detectors could be operated at room temperature without loss of their good characteristics it was possible to exclude the sputter ion pump and fill the chamber with dry nitrogen instead. We have tested a nitrogen-filled CdZnTe (5x5x1 mm{sup 3}) prototype having 0.65x0.65 mm{sup 2} readout pads on a 0.75 mm pitch. The interpixel resistance at an applied voltage of 10 V was higher than 50 G{omega} and the pixel leakage currents at room temperature with a bias of 200 V between each pad and the common electrode did not exceed 0.8 nA. The pixel detector inside the microassembly, which also contained the input stages of the preamplifiers, was installed on a Peltier cooler to maintain the detector temperature at +20 deg. C. To define real leakage currents of the pixels in their switched-on state we have checked the voltage on the preamplifiers feedback resistors. The resulting currents were 10-50 pA at a detector bias of 500 V. Under test, the typical energy resolution per pixel at +20 deg. C was {approx}3% at energy 59.6 keV and {approx}20% at energy 5.9 keV, which are similar to the values obtained in the vacuum prototype at room temperature (Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 458 (2001) 55). Using the three stage Peltier cooler it is possible to cool the pixel detector in the nitrogen atmosphere to 0 deg. C which would slightly improve these spectrometric characteristics. Thus the conclusion here is that the use of a nitrogen environment instead of a vacuum one did not cause any deterioration of the characteristics of the CdZnTe imaging detector.

  15. A comparative study of naturally ventilated and gas filled windows for hot climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of absorbing gases filling the gap between glass sheets appears to be an alternative solution for thermally insulated glass windows. Fluid flow in the gap between the glass sheets either forced or natural offers other options for thermally efficient windows. In this work, the thermal efficiencies of glass windows filled with an absorbing gas exposed to solar radiation in hot climate is compared with both a simple glass window and a double glass window naturally ventilated. The two-dimensional transient energy equations with radiation absorption in the internal domain are used to model the simple glass window. The cumulative wavenumber model (CW) for real gas modeling together the discrete ordinates method is used to model double glass window filled with infrared absorbing gases. The numerical simulations were realized with three mixtures of gases, a strongly absorbing gas mixture, an intermediate absorbing gas mixture and a transparent to infrared radiation mixture. To model a double glass window naturally ventilated, a two-dimensional transient laminar incompressible flow formulation is used and the buoyancy effects are accounting for by the Bussinesq approximation. Heat transfer through the windows is calculated and the total heat gain coefficient is compared for the three types of windows.

  16. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of ∼3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of ∼1.0 E + 21 cm-3. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of ∼0.01 cm3 in volume at ∼ 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL

  17. Fabrication and testing of gas filled targets for large scale plasma experiments on Nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, G.F.; Spragge, M.; Wallace, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Rivers, C.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-03-06

    An experimental campaign on the Nova laser was started in July 1993 to study one st of target conditions for the point design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The targets were specified to investigate the current NIF target conditions--a plasma of {approximately}3 keV electron temperature and an electron density of {approximately}1.0 E + 21 cm{sup {minus}3}. A gas cell target design was chosen to confine as gas of {approximately}0.01 cm{sup 3} in volume at {approximately} 1 atmosphere. This paper will describe the major steps and processes necessary in the fabrication, testing and delivery of these targets for shots on the Nova Laser at LLNL.

  18. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  19. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ∼17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ∼200 g/cm3 and ∼20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ∼350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios

  20. A penetrator for making thermal measurements in a gas-filled planetary regolith

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Paton; A.-M. Harri; Mäkinen, T.; Green, S.F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a general purpose penetrator, fitted with a heater, for measuring temperature and thermal diffusivity. Due to its simplicity of deployment and operation the thermal penetrator is well suited for remote deployment by spacecraft into a planetary regolith. Thermal measurements in planetary regoliths are required to determine the surface energy balance and to measure their thermal properties. If the regolith is on a planet with an atmosphere a good understanding of the role of convec...

  1. Investigating thermal properties of gas-filled planetary regoliths using a thermal probe

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Paton; Harri, A.-M.; Mäkinen, T.; Green, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a general purpose penetrator, fitted with a heater, for measuring temperature and thermal diffusivity. Due to its simplicity of deployment and operation the penetrator is well suited for remote deployment by spacecraft into a planetary regolith. Thermal measurements in planetary regoliths are required to determine the surface energy balance and to measure their thermal properties. If the regolith is on a planet with an atmosphere a good understanding of the role...

  2. Microcontroller based system for electrical breakdown time delay measurement in gas-filled devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Denić, Dragan B.; Pejović, Momčilo M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Vasović, Nikola

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents realization of a digital embedded system for measuring electrical breakdown time delay. The proposed system consists of three major parts: dc voltage supply, analog subsystem, and a digital subsystem. Any dc power source with the range from 100 to 1000 V can be used in this application. The analog subsystem should provide fast and accurate voltage switching on the testing device as well as transform the signals that represent the voltage pulse on the device and the device breakdown into the form suitable for detection by a digital subsystem. The insulated gate bipolar transistor IRG4PH40KD driven by TC429 MOSFET driver is used for high voltage switching on the device. The aim of a digital subsystem is to detect the signals from the analog subsystem and to measure the elapsed time between their occurrences. Moreover, the digital subsystem controls various parameters that influence time delay and provides fast data storage for a large number of measured data. For this propose, we used the PIC18F4550 microcontroller with a full-speed compatible universal serial bus (USB) engine. Operation of this system is verified on different commercial and custom made gas devices with different structure and breakdown mechanisms. The electrical breakdown time delay measurements have been carried out as a function of several parameters, which dominantly influence electrical breakdown time delay. The obtained results have been verified using statistical methods, and they show good agreement with the theory. The proposed system shows good repeatability, sensitivity, and stability for measuring the electrical breakdown time delay.

  3. Standard practice for examination of seamless, Gas-Filled, pressure vessels using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of seamless pressure vessels (tubes) of the type used for distribution or storage of industrial gases. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to a level greater than normal use. Pressurization medium may be gas or liquid. 1.3 This practice does not apply to vessels in cryogenic service. 1.4 The AE measurements are used to detect and locate emission sources. Other nondestructive test (NDT) methods must be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDT techniques are beyond the scope of this practice. See Note 1. Note 1—Shear wave, angle beam ultrasonic examination is commonly used to establish circumferential position and dimensions of flaws that produce AE. Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD), ultrasonic examination is also commonly used for flaw sizing. 1.5 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standa...

  4. Strong Raman-induced noninstantaneous soliton interactions in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Armaroli, Andrea; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    We have developed an analytical model based on the perturbation theory to study the optical propagation of two successive solitons in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with Raman-active gases. Based on the time delay between the two solitons, we have found that the trailing soliton dynamics can experience unusual nonlinear phenomena, such as spectral and temporal soliton oscillations and transport toward the leading soliton. The overall dynamics can lead to a spatiotemporal modulation of the refractive index with a uniform temporal period and a uniform or chirped spatial period. PMID:26368711

  5. Electrical compensation method of mechanically induced disturbances in gas-filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years ionization chambers could be improved in many properties such as accuracy and speed. Rise time values of about 1 ms could be realized by the implementation of high sophisticated inner electrode configurations reducing the free length between the electrodes of about 10 mm distance, so that the slow gas-ions generate a displacement current only over a short time interval. These improvements are combined with the disadvantage of increasing sensitivity to mechanical loads as vibrations and shocks. These effects reduce the good applicability of ionization chambers specially in a rough industrial environment. The solution for this problem can be found by using improved mechanical constructions enclosed damped mounting and stabilized construction elements. This paper describes an electrical compensation method of mechanically induced disturbing signals. The implementation is independent of a special detector and can be applied for the suppression of interference signals caused by the 'microphony' effect, comparable with the known operation of a condenser microphone. (orig.)

  6. Strong Raman-induced non-instantaneous soliton interactions in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an analytical model based on the perturbation theory in order to study the optical propagation of two successive intense solitons in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with Raman-active gases. Based on the time delay between the two solitons, we have found that the trailing soliton dynamics can experience unusual nonlinear phenomena such as spectral and temporal soliton oscillations and transport towards the leading soliton. The overall dynamics can lead to a spatiotemporal modulation of the refractive index with a uniform temporal period and a uniform or chirped spatial period.

  7. Supernova Feedback and the Hot Gas Filling Fraction of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Miao; Cen, Renyue; Bryan, Greg L; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Supernovae are the most energetic among stellar feedback processes, and are crucial for regulating the interstellar medium (ISM) and launching galactic winds. We explore how supernova remnants (SNRs) create a multiphase medium by performing high resolution, 3D hydrodynamical simulations at various SN rates, $S$, and ISM average densities, $n$. We find that the evolution of a SNR in a self-consistently generated three-phase ISM is qualitatively different from that in a uniform or a two-phase warm/cold medium. By traveling faster and further in the cooling-inefficient hot phase, the spatial-temporal domain of a SNR is enlarged by $>10^{2.5}$ in a hot-dominated multiphase medium (HDMM) compared to the uniform case. We then examine the resultant ISM as we vary $n$ and $S$, finding that a steady state can only be achieved when the hot gas volume fraction \\fvh $\\lesssim 0.6\\pm 0.1$. Above that, overlapping SNRs render connecting topology of the hot gas, and such a HDMM is subjected to thermal runaway with growing p...

  8. Supernova Feedback and the Hot Gas Filling Fraction of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Cen, Renyue; Bryan, Greg L.; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Supernovae (SNe), the most energetic stellar feedback mechanism, are crucial for regulating the interstellar medium (ISM) and launching galactic winds. We explore how supernova remnants (SNRs) create a multiphase medium by performing three-dimentional hydrodynamical simulations at various SN rates, S, and ISM average densities, \\bar{n}. The evolution of an SNR in a self-consistently generated three-phase ISM is qualitatively different from that in a uniform or a two-phase warm/cold medium. By traveling faster and further in the low-density hot phase, the domain of an SNR increases by >102.5. Varying \\bar{n} and S, we find that a steady state can only be achieved when the hot gas volume fraction {f}{{V,hot}}≲ 0.6+/- 0.1. Above that level, overlapping SNRs render connecting topology of the hot gas, and the ISM is subjected to thermal runaway. Photoelectric heating (PEH) has a surprisingly strong impact on {f}{{V,hot}}. For \\bar{n}≳ 3 {{cm}}-3, a reasonable PEH rate is able to suppress the thermal runaway. Overall, we determine the critical SN rate for the onset of thermal runaway to be {S}{{crit}}=200{(\\bar{n}/1 {{cm}}-3)}k{({E}{{SN}}/{10}51 {{erg}})}-1 {{{kpc}}}-3 {{Myr}}-1, where k = (1.2, 2.7) for \\bar{n}≤slant 1 and \\gt 1 {{cm}}-3, respectively. We present a fitting formula of the ISM pressure P(\\bar{n},S), which can be used as an effective equation of state in cosmological simulations. Despite the five orders of magnitude span of (\\bar{n},S), the average Mach number varies little: {M} ≈ 0.5 ± 0.2, 1.2 ± 0.3, and 2.3 ± 0.9 for the hot, warm, and cold phases, respectively.

  9. Digitized signal acquisition of gas-filled, multiwire, neutron detector with delay-line readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwire counters are likely to remain a reliable and cost-efficient option for a large class of instruments. Delay-line position encoding is widely used in multiwire position sensitive particle detectors. Improvement of several detector parameters is a continuous demand such as count rate or position resolution. Digitization of the analog detector signals retains all information about the detected events at the highest count rate. Neutronic measurement results on our standard detector with 200 mm × 200 mm active area are presented with different acquisition algorithms. The analog signals were digitized by a high speed, multichannel Acqiris digitizer with 1 ns sampling resolution.

  10. Frequency Response of a Gas-filled Tube with Minor Losses

    OpenAIRE

    West, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    A thesis on the study of the frequency response of a pneumatic system designed to provide pulsed flow for flow control applications is presented. The system consists of a high pressure air source, a high-frequency solenoid valve, a length of tube and a minor loss. The experiment mimics the pneumatic drive for our Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation actuator and applies to many flow control applications involving pulsed flow. Square wave signals of various frequency are fed to the solenoid valv...

  11. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Tao [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Zheng, Jian, E-mail: jzheng@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  12. Rimfire: A six megavolt laser-triggered gas-filled switch for PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new multiple-stage laser-triggered SF/sub 6/ spark gap, which has performed well in tests at nearly 6 megavolts and half a megampere. It has survived many hundreds of shots between 5 and 5.7 MV, the highest voltage tested. A 25 millijoule ultraviolet laser pulse arriving in its trigger gap reliably closes the whole switch in 20 nanoseconds with 0.4 ns 1-sigma jitter. The closing time has a low dependence on the applied voltage, about 0.9 ns/% of self-break voltage. For a 10 mJ laser pulse, the jitter is 1.5 ns and the slope is 1.0 ns/%. No prefires have occurred; the estimated prefire rate at 90% of self-breaking voltage is less than 0.1%. The switch inductance is 400 nanohenries, of which about 100 nh comes from the spark channels. The switch is 68 cm long and 61 cm in diameter

  13. Raman-free nonlinear optical effects in high pressure gas-filled hollow core PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M; Wong, G K L; Chang, W; Joly, N Y; Russell, P St J

    2013-02-25

    The effective Kerr nonlinearity of hollow-core kagomé-style photonic crystal fiber (PCF) filled with argon gas increases to ~15% of that of bulk silica glass when the pressure is increased from 1 to 150 bar, while the zero dispersion wavelength shifts from 300 to 900 nm. The group velocity dispersion of the system is uniquely pressure-tunable over a wide range while avoiding Raman scattering-absent in noble gases-and having an extremely high optical damage threshold. As a result, detailed and well-controlled studies of nonlinear effects can be performed, in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes, using only a fixed-frequency pump laser. For example, the absence of Raman scattering permits clean observation, at high powers, of the interaction between a modulational instability side-band and a soliton-created dispersive wave. Excellent agreement is obtained between numerical simulations and experimental results. The system has great potential for the realization of reconfigurable supercontinuum sources, wavelength convertors and short-pulse laser systems. PMID:23481974

  14. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  15. Investigating thermal properties of gas-filled planetary regoliths using a thermal probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Paton

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a general purpose penetrator, fitted with a heater, for measuring temperature and thermal diffusivity. Due to its simplicity of deployment and operation the penetrator is well suited for remote deployment by spacecraft into a planetary regolith. Thermal measurements in planetary regoliths are required to determine the surface energy balance and to measure their thermal properties. If the regolith is on a planet with an atmosphere a good understanding of the role of convection is required to properly interpret the measurements. This could also help to identify the significant heat and mass exchange mechanisms between the regolith and the atmosphere. To understand the role of convection in our regolith analogues we use a network of temperature sensors placed in the target. In practical applications a penetrator will push material out of the way as it enters a target possible changing its thermal properties. To investigate this effect a custom built test rig, that precisely controls and monitors the motion of the penetrator, is used. The thermal diffusivity of limestone powder and sand is derived by fitting a numerical thermal model to the temperature measurements. Convection seems to play an important role in the transfer of heat in this case. Firstly a diffusion-convection model fits the laboratory data better than a diffusivity-only model. Also the diffusivity derived from a diffusivity-convection model was found to be in good agreement with diffusivity derived using other methods published in the literature. Thermal diffusivity measurements, inspection of the horizontal temperature profiles and visual observations suggests that limestone powder is compacted more readily than sand during entry of the penetrator into the target. For both regolith analogues the disturbance of material around the penetrator was determined to have an insignificant effect on the diffusivity measurements in this case.

  16. Investigating thermal properties of gas-filled planetary regoliths using a thermal probe

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Paton; Harri, A.-M.; Mäkinen, T.; Green, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a general purpose penetrator, fitted with a heater, for measuring temperature and thermal diffusivity. Due to its simplicity of deployment and operation the penetrator is well suited for remote deployment by spacecraft into a planetary regolith. Thermal measurements in planetary regoliths are required to determine the surface energy balance and to measure their thermal properties. If the regolith is on a planet with an atmosphere a good understanding of the role of convection is ...

  17. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  18. Preparation of optical frequency references based on gas filled hollow core photonics crystal fibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, Miroslava; Mikel, Břetislav; Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2015, 95254L:1-8. ISBN 9781628416855. ISSN 0277-786X. [Optical Measurement Systems for Industrial Inspection /9./. Munich (DE), 22.06.2015-25.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010835; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-18430S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR040 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : HC-PCF * laser standard * optical frequency reference * absorption cell * fiber splicing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  19. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  20. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude

  1. Separable programming theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, Stefan M

    2001-01-01

    In this book, the author considers separable programming and, in particular, one of its important cases - convex separable programming Some general results are presented, techniques of approximating the separable problem by linear programming and dynamic programming are considered Convex separable programs subject to inequality equality constraint(s) and bounds on variables are also studied and iterative algorithms of polynomial complexity are proposed As an application, these algorithms are used in the implementation of stochastic quasigradient methods to some separable stochastic programs Numerical approximation with respect to I1 and I4 norms, as a convex separable nonsmooth unconstrained minimization problem, is considered as well Audience Advanced undergraduate and graduate students, mathematical programming operations research specialists

  2. Separation process using microchannel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Perry, Steven T.; Arora, Ravi; Qiu, Dongming; Lamont, Michael Jay; Burwell, Deanna; Dritz, Terence Andrew; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Rogers, Jr.; William A.; Silva, Laura J.; Weidert, Daniel J.; Simmons, Wayne W.; Chadwell, G. Bradley

    2009-03-24

    The disclosed invention relates to a process and apparatus for separating a first fluid from a fluid mixture comprising the first fluid. The process comprises: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator in contact with a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the first fluid is sorbed by the sorption medium, removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing first fluid from the sorption medium and removing desorbed first fluid from the microchannel separator. The process and apparatus are suitable for separating nitrogen or methane from a fluid mixture comprising nitrogen and methane. The process and apparatus may be used for rejecting nitrogen in the upgrading of sub-quality methane.

  3. Magnetic Separation in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Corrans, Ian James; Svoboda, Jan

    1985-01-01

    The use of magnetic separators in the various mineral processing facilities in South Africa is described. A large number are used to recover medium in dense medium plants. The manufacture of various types of magnetic separation machines by three local suppliers is highlighted. The potential use of highgradient and/or high–intensity magnetic separation in the recovery of gold, uranium, and phosphate minerals is discussed.

  4. Dielectrophoretic separation of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a process for the separation of gaseous isotopes by electrophoresis assisted by convective countercurrent flow and to an apparatus for use in the process. The invention is especially applicable to heavy water separation from steam; however, it is to be understood that the invention is broadly applicable to the separation of gaseous isotopes having different dipole moments and/or different molecular weights. (author)

  5. Regular Totally Separable Sphere Packings

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The topic of totally separable sphere packings is surveyed with a focus on regular constructions, uniform tilings, and contact number problems. An enumeration of all regular totally separable sphere packings in $\\mathbb{R}^2$, $\\mathbb{R}^3$, and $\\mathbb{R}^4$ which are based on convex uniform tessellations, honeycombs, and tetracombs, respectively, is presented, as well as a construction of a family of regular totally separable sphere packings in $\\mathbb{R}^d$ that is not based on a convex...

  6. Component separation in abdominal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J.; Fallis, Simon A.; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and t...

  7. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated as...

  8. Fast Monaural Separation of Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Dyrholm, Mads

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of separating signals from a single mixture of sources. This problem is termed the Monaural Separation Problem. Lars Kai Hansen has argued that this problem is topological tougher than problems with multiple recordings. Roweis has shown that inference from a...... Factorial Hidden Markov Model, with non-stationary assumptions on the source autocorrelations modelled through the Factorial Hidden Markov Model, leads to separation in the monaural case. By extending Hansens work we find that Roweis' assumptions are necessary for monaural speech separation. Furthermore we...

  9. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  10. Nickel-hydrogen separator development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1986-01-01

    The separator technology is a critical element in the nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) systems. Previous research and development work carried out at NASA Lewis Research Center has determined that separators made from zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and potassium titanate (PKT) fibers will function satisfactorily in Ni-H2 cells without exhibiting the problems associated with the asbestos separators. A program has been established to transfer the separator technology into a commercial production line. A detailed plan of this program will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  11. Three phase downhole separator process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognata, Louis John

    2008-06-24

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  12. Relational Parametricity and Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Yang, Hongseok

    2008-01-01

    Separation logic is a recent extension of Hoare logic for reasoning about programs with references to shared mutable data structures. In this paper, we provide a new interpretation of the logic for a programming language with higher types. Our interpretation is based on Reynolds's relational...... parametricity, and it provides a formal connection between separation logic and data abstraction. Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  13. Parental separation and pediatric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Sally; Carlsen, Kathrine; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk for separation (ending cohabitation) of the parents of a child with a diagnosis of cancer.......The purpose of this study was to determine the risk for separation (ending cohabitation) of the parents of a child with a diagnosis of cancer....

  14. Laser isotope separation of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic studies on laser isotope separation of gadolinium were performed. Spectroscopic data were obtained such as isotope shifts and hyperfine structures using an atomic beam. Enrichment of 157Gd up to 80% was observed by three-step photoionization experiment using linearly polarized dye lasers. Design of an separation system was discussed by the help of computer calculation of excitation dynamics. (author)

  15. Vision 2020: 2000 Separations Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Stephen [Center for Waster Reduction Technologies; Beaver, Earl [Practical Sustainability; Bryan, Paul [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watson, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the results of four workshops on the technology barriers, research needs, and priorities of the chemical, agricultural, petroleum, and pharmaceutical industries as they relate to separation technologies utilizing adsorbents, crystallization, distillation, extraction, membranes, separative reactors, ion exchange, bioseparations, and dilute solutions.

  16. Separator material for electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Wendy R.; Storz, Leonard J.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical cell characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

  17. Liquid/Gas Vortex Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid/gas separator vents gas from tank of liquid that contains gas randomly distributed in bubbles. Centrifugal force separates liquid and gas, forcing liquid out of vortex tube through venturi tube. Gas vented through exhaust port. When liquid detected in vent tube, exhaust port closed, and liquid/gas mixture in vent tube drawn back into tank through venturi.

  18. First on-line applications of multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator at ISOLTRAP and the mass measurement of $^{82}$Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Robert

    This thesis describes the implementation and first on-line application of a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-ToF) mass analyzer for high-resolution mass separation at the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. On the one hand, the major objective was to improve ISOLTRAPs mass-measurement capabilities with respect to the ratio of delivered contaminating ions to ions of interest. On the other hand, the time necessary to purify wanted from unwanted species should be reduced as much as possible to enable access to even more exotic nuclei. The device has been set up, optimized and tested at the University of Greifswald before its move to ISOLTRAP. The achieved performance comprises mass resolving powers of up to 200000 reached at observation times of 30ms and a contamination suppression of about four orders of magnitude by use of a Bradbury-Nielsen gate. With the characteristics, it outperforms clearly the so far state-of-the-art purification method of a gas-filled Penning trap. To improve the utilization o...

  19. Separating Underdetermined Convolutive Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan;

    2006-01-01

    A limitation in many source separation tasks is that the number of source signals has to be known in advance. Further, in order to achieve good performance, the number of sources cannot exceed the number of sensors. In many real-world applications these limitations are too restrictive. We propose a...... method for underdetermined blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. The proposed framework is applicable for separation of instantaneous as well as convolutive speech mixtures. It is possible to iteratively extract each speech signal from the mixture by combining blind source separation...... techniques with binary time-frequency masking. In the proposed method, the number of source signals is not assumed to be known in advance and the number of sources is not limited to the number of microphones. Our approach needs only two microphones and the separated sounds are maintained as stereo signals....

  20. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis presents theory, modeling, design, fabrication, experiments and results for microfluidic magnetic separators. A model for magnetic bead movement in a microfluidic channel is presented, and the limits of the model are discussed. The effective magnetic field gradient is defined, and...... it is argued that it is a good measure, when comparing the performance of magnetic bead separators. It is described how numeric modelling is used to aid the design of microfluidic magnetic separation systems. An example of a design optimization study is given. A robust fabrication scheme has been...... separation. It is shown conceptually how such a system can be applied for parallel biochemical processing in a microfluidic system. ’Passive’ magnetic separators are presented, where on-chip soft magnetic elements are magnetized by an external magnetic field and create strong magnetic fields and gradients...