WorldWideScience

Sample records for bereavement

  1. Bereavement Care Provision in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Murphy, Irene; Keegan, Orla;

    2015-01-01

    The Bereavement Care Taskforce of the EAPC has conducted a survey on bereavement care service provision in Europe. Mai-Britt Guldin, Irene Murphy, Orla Keegan, Barbara Monroe, Maria Antonia Lacasta Reverte and Inger Benkel report on the results. One of the key findings is that not all palliative ...... care services seem to prioritise bereavement care as an integral part of their offer.......The Bereavement Care Taskforce of the EAPC has conducted a survey on bereavement care service provision in Europe. Mai-Britt Guldin, Irene Murphy, Orla Keegan, Barbara Monroe, Maria Antonia Lacasta Reverte and Inger Benkel report on the results. One of the key findings is that not all palliative...

  2. PTSD in older bereaved people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-08-01

    Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was an important issue in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently bereaved older people compared with married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety-six Danish older bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and assessed two months postbereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married older people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES = 0.35; Cohen's d = 0.74). Additionally, 37% of the bereaved and 22% of the control group had mild to severe depression (ES = 0.19; Cohen's d = 0.37). The results suggested that late life spousal bereavement result in PTSD with equal frequency to general samples of bereaved persons. Furthermore, the prevalence of PTSD in the first months after bereavement was more elevated than the level of depression. This makes PTSD an important factor when studying late life bereavement reactions. PMID:20686978

  3. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview ... a resource to help caregivers of cancer patients. Bereavement and Grief Key Points Bereavement is the period ...

  4. Bereavement after Caregiving

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Richard; Hebert, Randy; Boerner, Kathrin

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20% of bereaved caregivers will experience a variety of psychiatric symptoms including depression and/or complicated grief, a disorder characterized by persistently high levels of distress that impair functioning in important life domains. We identify prebereavement risk factors for poor adjustment after the death of a loved one along with preventive strategies that can be implemented prior to death as well as diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies that can be used to ...

  5. The Phenomenology and Course of Depression in Parentally Bereaved and Non-Bereaved Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Sami; Melhem, Nadine M.; Porta, Giovanna; Payne, Monica Walker; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the phenomenology and course of bereavement-related depression to depression that occurred later in the course of bereavement and to depression in non-bereaved youth. Method: This sample is drawn from a cohort of parentally bereaved youth and non-bereaved controls followed for approximately 5 years. Three groups of depressed…

  6. Parents bereaved by offspring suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Leslie, William D;

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Suicide bereavement remains understudied and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES To examine outcomes of parents bereaved by the suicide death of their offspring and to compare these with both nonbereaved parent controls and parents who had offspring die in a motor vehicle crash (MVC). DESIGN...... Population-based case-control study. Suicide-bereaved parents were compared with nonbereaved matched control parents in the general population (n = 1415) and with MVC-bereaved parents (n = 1132) on the rates of physician-diagnosed mental and physical disorders, social factors, and treatment use in the 2...... years after death of the offspring. Adjusted relative rates (ARRs) were generated by generalized estimating equation models and adjusted for confounding factors. SETTING Manitoba, Canada. PARTICIPANTS All identifiable parents who had an offspring die by suicide between 1996 and 2007 (n = 1415). MAIN...

  7. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    OpenAIRE

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and di...

  8. Caregiving, bereavement and complicated grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Most deaths are preceded by chronic illness and disability and the provision of support by family caregivers. The purpose of this article is to describe how the caregiving experience affects bereavement, with an emphasis on the relationship between challenging caregiving situations and difficult grieving processes – often referred to as `complicated grief'. The article starts with a brief summary of the general literature on caregiving and bereavement. It then defines complicated grief and discusses why some caregivers may struggle with the death of their loved one. Finally, it offers practical suggestions for what professionals can do to help caregivers both before and after the death has occurred. PMID:20463850

  9. Outdoor Education for Bereaved Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    For many outdoor education providers, bereaved children and young people at first appear to be a new target audience. A new target audience naturally raises questions of programme planning and can give the provider a pressurised need to succeed: "Do I as the organiser have to develop a whole new programme?", "May I be required to provide some form…

  10. PTSD in older bereaved people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

      Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was an important issue to investigate in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently ber...

  11. Mediators between bereavement and somatic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konkolÿ Thege Barna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our research we examined the frequency of somatic symptoms among bereaved (N = 185 and non-bereaved men and women in a national representative sample (N = 4041 and investigated the possible mediating factors between bereavement status and somatic symptoms. Methods Somatic symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15, anxiety with a four-point anxiety rating scale, and depression with a nine-item shortened version of the Beck Depression Inventory. Results Among the bereaved, somatic symptoms proved to be significantly more frequent in both genders when compared to the non-bereaved, as did anxiety and depression. On the multivariate level, the results show that both anxiety and depression proved to be a mediator between somatic symptoms and bereavement. The effect sizes indicated that for both genders, anxiety was a stronger predictor of somatic symptoms than depression. Conclusions The results of our research indicate that somatic symptoms accompanying bereavement are not direct consequences of this state but they can be traced back to the associated anxiety and depression. These results draw attention to the need to recognize anxiety and depression looming in the background of somatic complaints in bereavement and to the importance of the dissemination of related information.

  12. Death and Dying Anxiety among Bereaved and Nonbereaved Elderly Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Tinsky-Roimi, Tal

    2011-01-01

    This study examines differences in death and dying anxiety between bereaved and nonbereaved elderly Israeli parents, as well as correlates of these factors among bereaved parents. A total of 97 parents (49 bereaved, 48 nonbereaved) completed measures of death and dying anxiety and religiosity. Bereaved parents reported significantly higher dying…

  13. Bereavement outcomes: a quantitative survey identifying risk factors in family carers bereaved through cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Roulston, Audrey; Campbell, Anne; Cairnduff, Victoria; Fitzpatrick, Deirdre; Donnelly, Conan; Gavin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enabling patients to die in their preferred place is important but achieving preferred place of death may increase the informal carer’s risk into bereavement. Aim: to determine risk factors of family carers bereaved through cancer in Northern Ireland. Design: These results form part of a larger QUALYCARE-NI study which used postal questionnaires to capture quantitative data on carer’s bereavement scores using the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Setting/participants: Participants...

  14. Who needs bereavement support? A population based survey of bereavement risk and support need.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Aoun

    Full Text Available This study identifies and describes the profiles of bereavement risk and support needs of a community sample in Australia and tests the fit of the data with the three-tiered public health model for bereavement support. Family members who were bereaved 6-24 months prior to the survey and who were clients of four funeral providers participated (May-July 2013. A postal survey was used to collect information about bereaved people's experience of caring and perceived satisfaction with any bereavement support provided. The questionnaire included a validated risk assessment screening measure for Prolonged Grief Disorder (PG-13. A total of 678 bereaved people responded. The model predicted that 60% of the sample would be low risk, 30% moderate risk, and 10% high risk. Actual figures were very close at 58.4%, 35.2% and 6.4% respectively. The analysis of the demographic characteristics, experience and impact of caring and bereavement, and satisfaction with support received from a variety of sources revealed differential experiences and needs that align with the expectation of low, moderate, and high bereavement support need, as articulated in the public health model. This is the first empirical test of the public health model of bereavement support. As there is a lack of clear evidence to guide development and allocation of bereavement support programs, the findings have the potential to inform the ability of services, community organizations and informal networks to prioritize care according to each level of bereavement need. This is essential to achieve cost-effective and equitable resource allocation.

  15. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  16. Parents Bereaved by Infant Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentiallytraumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic...... posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)´symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Methods: Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study......, female sex, attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping, rational coping, feeling let down and social support satisfaction accounted for 42% of the variance in PTSD severity. Conclusions: The study highlights the long-term impact of infant loss and points to attachment, coping...

  17. Parents bereaved by infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentially traumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic posttraumatic...... stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study. Participants...... avoidance, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping, avoidant coping, feeling let down and social support satisfaction accounted for 44% of the variance in PTSD severity. The study highlights the long-term impact of infant loss and points to attachment, coping and social support as important contributors...

  18. Psychosomatic Status, Personality Traits, and Coping Styles of Bereaved and Non-Bereaved Survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Yan-hui; Chi, Xinli; Jiang, Yi-qi; Wang, Rui-fang; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined personality, coping styles, and psychosomatic characteristics and their relationships in bereaved and non-bereaved earthquake survivors. Study design Cross-sectional survey. Methods A survey was conducted with a sample of 102 non-bereaved survivors and 79 bereaved survivors from Mianyang, Anyang, and similar districts 2 weeks after Wenchuan earthquake. Survivors completed questionnaires, including items about demographics, personality characteristics, coping sty...

  19. Psychosomatic Status, Personality Traits, and Coping Styles of Bereaved and Non-Bereaved Survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Yan-hui; Chi, Xinli; Jiang, Yi-qi; Wang, Rui-fang; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined personality, coping styles, and psychosomatic characteristics and their relationships in bereaved and non-bereaved earthquake survivors. Study design Cross-sectional survey. Methods A survey was conducted with a sample of 102 non-bereaved survivors and 79 bereaved survivors from Mianyang, Anyang, and similar districts 2 weeks after Wenchuan earthquake. Survivors completed questionnaires, including items about demographics, personality characte...

  20. Early Life Bereavement and Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Hong; Olsen, Jørn; Yuan, Wei; Cnattingus, Sven; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten; Gissler, Mika; Li, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether early life bereavement, as indicator of severe stress, was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life.Based on population registers, we established a cohort of all children born in Denmark (N = 1 686 416) and Sweden (N = 2 563 659) from 1973 to 1997....... Children were categorized as exposed if they lost a first-degree relative during the first 18 years of life. Outcome is the first diagnosis of schizophrenia as either inpatient or outpatient. Log-linear Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs).A total of 188,850 children...... (4.6%) experienced death of a first-degree relative from birth to 18 years of age. Compared with unexposed children, those exposed had overall a 39% higher risk of schizophrenia (= 1.39, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.32-1.47). The IRR was particularly high if the family member committed suicide (a...

  1. Is bereavement-related depression different than non-bereavement-related depression?

    OpenAIRE

    ZISOOK, SIDNEY; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2007-01-01

    Background. This review tackles the question: 'Is bereavement related depression (BRD) the same or different from standard (non-bereavement-related) major depression (SMD)?' To answer this question, we examined published data on key characteristics that define and characterize SMD to assess whether they also characterize BRD. Method. We searched all English-language reports in Medline up to November 2006 to identify relevant studies. Bibliographies of located articles were searched f...

  2. Assumptive Worldviews and Problematic Reactions to Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M.; Holland, Jason M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Forty-two individuals who had lost an immediate family member in the prior 2 years and 42 nonbereaved matched controls completed the World Assumptions Scale (Janoff-Bulman, 1989) and the Symptom Checklist-10-Revised (Rosen et al., 2000). Results showed that bereaved individuals were significantly more distressed than nonbereaved matched controls,…

  3. College Students' Grief and Coping Strategies in Bereavement and Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Naomi; Kodama, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to clarify the characteristics of college students' bereavement and separation and the relationship between coping strategies and grief reactions in bereavement and separation. 212 college students completed questionnaires. The results indicated that the majority of the respondents have experienced some bereavement or separation, in particular, separation from the lover. Multiple regression analyses showed that coping strategies such as "avoidance", "abandonment...

  4. Influences on grief among parentally bereaved adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kellye S; Hayslip, Bert; Gilley, Angela; Watts, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Although the parent-child relationship is significant throughout life, many changes occur as children grow, particularly during young adulthood. Parental loss and resulting grief during adulthood is likely influenced by many variables, including age, gender, relationship quality, and sex roles. In the present study, parentally bereaved adults completed measures assessing parental involvement, personal grief and adjustment, and sex role preferences. Analyses of covariance indicated that gender of the bereaved child was significant in predicting some aspects of grief, wherein females were more strongly impacted by the loss of a parent, irrespective of that parent's sex. However, the interaction of sex of parent and sex of child was also significant, suggesting that maternal loss may be particularly difficult for daughters. Results suggested that women may have a stronger emotional experience of grief and maintain closer bonds with a deceased mother. This may result from deeper emotional connections, feeling excluded by age peers, or vulnerability for rumination. PMID:25223308

  5. Oedipal determinants in differential outcome of bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, H S

    1986-03-01

    According to psychoanalytic theory, a bereaved individual's prior relationship with the lost person affects his vulnerability to bereavement. Freud attributed the vulnerability to the intensity of ambivalence, and Fenichel saw Oedipal rivalry as one example of that ambivalence. It is argued that, after the death of a parent, reality testing, crucial to the resolution of the Oedipus complex, is disrupted differently for children of the same sex, from those of the opposite sex. Based on Freud's and Fenichel's clinical observations, the effects of disrupted reality testing were transformed into a testable hypothesis. The predictions were validated by testing them against the data supplied by patients before they had any professional contact, when two-thirds of bereaved psychotherapy patients exhibited different effects when the deceased parent was of the same sex, from when he/she was of the opposite sex. A majority of the same-sex children develop an unconscious sense of guilt, which blocks their expression of Oedipal attitudes towards both parents and which attacks their capacity to function adequately at work, and in their sex-linked roles; while the opposite-sex children maintain their preference for the dead parent, aversion to the alive one, and have idealized expectations of their lovers or spouses. PMID:3964582

  6. Grief, Depressive Symptoms, and Physical Health among Recently Bereaved Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Rebecca L.; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Widowhood is among the most distressing of all life events, resulting in both mental and physical health declines. This paper explores the dynamic relationship between physical health and psychological well-being among recently bereaved spouses. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 328 bereaved persons who participated in the "Living…

  7. Locus of Control and Helplessness: Gender Differences among Bereaved Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated locus of control (LC) and hopelessness (H) among 25 pairs of bereaved parents, who lost their children in the Arab--Israeli conflict, and 25 pairs of demographically matched non-bereaved parents (mean age 53). Four of the 5 hypotheses were supported by results. LC was significantly more external and H was significantly…

  8. Early Parental Adjustment and Bereavement after Childhood Cancer Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Maru; O'connor, Kathleen; D'Agostino, Norma Mammone; Spencer, Lynlee; Nicholas, David; Jovcevska, Vesna; Tallet, Susan; Schneiderman, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This study comprehensively explored parental bereavement and adjustment at 6 months post-loss due to childhood cancer. Interviews were conducted with 18 mothers and 13 fathers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed based on qualitative methodology. A model describing early parental bereavement and adaptation emerged with 3 domains:…

  9. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life.......The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life....

  10. Religion and Spirituality in Adjustment Following Bereavement: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Jennifer H.; Park, Crystal L.

    2008-01-01

    Surprisingly little research has examined the widely held assumption that religion and spirituality are generally helpful in adjusting to bereavement. A systematic literature search located 73 empirical articles that examined religion/spirituality in the context of bereavement. The authors describe the multidimensional nature of…

  11. A Longitudinal Study of PTSD in the Elderly Bereaved: Prevalence and Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the PTSD-frequency in elderly bereaved people across the first 18 months of bereavement. Additionally, risk factors for the prediction of bereavement outcome in relation to four domains of the bereavement process were investigated. Data was collected via self-repor...

  12. Effects of suicide bereavement on mental health and suicide risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitman, Alexandra; Osborn, David; King, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Between 48 million and 500 million people are thought to experience suicide bereavement every year. Over the past decade, increased policy attention has been directed towards suicide bereavement, but with little evidence to describe the effect of exposure or to provide appropriate responses. We...... used a systematic approach to carry out a narrative review of studies of the effect of suicide bereavement on mortality, mental health, and social functioning, and compared them with effects from other bereavements. We found 57 studies that satisfied strict inclusion criteria. Results from these...... studies suggested that exposure to suicide of a close contact is associated with several negative health and social outcomes, depending on an individual's relationship to the deceased. These effects included an increased risk of suicide in partners bereaved by suicide, increased risk of required admission...

  13. Long-Term Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on Multiple Indicators of Grief in Parentally Bereaved Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene; Kennedy, Cara; Millsap, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article reports on results from a randomized experimental trial of the effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on multiple measures of grief experienced by parentally bereaved children and adolescents over a 6-year period. Method: Participants were 244 youths (ages 8-16, mean age = 11.4 years) from 156 families that had…

  14. Managing bereavement in the classroom: a conspiracy of silence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowton, Karen; Higginson, Irene J

    2003-10-01

    The ways in which teachers in British schools manage bereaved children are underreported. This article reports the impact of students' bereavement and their subsequent management in primary and secondary school classrooms in Southeast London. Thirteen school staff working in inner-city schools took part in in-depth interviews that focused on the impact of bereaved children on the school and how teachers responded to these children.All respondents had previously had contact with a local child bereavement service that aims to provide support, advice, and consultancy to children, their parents, and teachers. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using ATLAS-ti. Three main themes were identified from analysis of interview data. Firstly, British society, culture, local communities, and the family were significant influences in these teachers' involvement with bereaved students. Secondly, school staff managed bereaved students through contact with other adults and using practical classroom measures such as "time out" cards and contact books. Lastly, teachers felt they had to be strong, even when they were distressed. Surprise was expressed at the mature reaction of secondary school students to deaths of others. The article recommends that future research needs to concentrate on finding the most effective way of supporting routinely bereaved children, their families, and teachers. PMID:14535279

  15. Bereavement by suicide as a risk factor for suicide attempt: a cross-sectional national UK-wide study of 3432 young bereaved adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pitman, A. L.; Osborn, D. P.; Rantell, K; King, M B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: US and UK suicide prevention strategies suggest that bereavement by the suicide of a relative or friend is a risk factor for suicide. However, evidence is lacking that the risk exceeds that of any sudden bereavement, is specific to suicide, or applies to peer suicide. We conducted the first controlled UK-wide study to test the hypothesis that young adults bereaved by suicide have an increased risk of suicidal ideation and suicide attempt compared with young adults bereaved by othe...

  16. Bereavement in early life and later childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Vestergaard, Mogens;

    2012-01-01

    . Bereavement during the first 6 years of life was not associated with an increased risk of overweight at 7-13 years of age. Conclusion: This study did not support that stress induced by bereavement during the first 6 years of life has significant influence on overweight in later childhood. Copyright © 2012 S......Objective: The rise in the occurrence of childhood obesity during the last decades in many populations indicates an important role of environmental exposures, which may operate very early in life. We aimed to examine the association between bereavement during the first 6 years of life, as a stress...

  17. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Bereavement: Early Psychological Sequelae of Losing a Close Relative Due to Terminal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T. E.; Elklit, A.; Karstoft, K. I.

    2012-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a consequence of bereavement from terminal illness. Therefore, knowledge on the traumatizing effects of bereavement and risk factors for traumatization from bereavement is rather sparse. This study investigated prevalence...

  18. Spiritual Distress in Bereavement: Evolution of a Research Program

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Laurie A.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Many mourners turn to their spiritual beliefs and traditions when confronted by the death of a loved one. However, prior studies have either focused primarily on the benefits of faith following loss or studied spiritual struggle outside the context of bereavement. Moreover, scales to measure bereavement-related crises of faith and interventions specifically designed for spiritually inclined, distressed grievers are virtually non-existent. Our program of research, which to date has consisted o...

  19. War and bereavement: consequences for mental and physical distress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexhmedin Morina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term impact of the killing of a parent in childhood or adolescence during war on distress and disability in young adulthood. This study assessed current prevalence rates of mental disorders and levels of dysfunction among young adults who had lost their father due to war-related violence in childhood or adolescence. METHODS: 179 bereaved young adults and 175 non-bereaved young adults were interviewed a decade after experiencing the war in Kosovo. Prevalence rates of Major Depressive Episode (MDE, anxiety, and substance use disorders, and current suicide risk were assessed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The syndrome of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD was assessed with the Prolonged Grief Disorder Interview (PG-13. Somatic symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire. General health distress was assessed with the General Health Questionnaire. FINDINGS: Bereaved participants were significantly more likely to suffer from either MDE or any anxiety disorder than non-bereaved participants (58.7% vs. 40%. Among bereaved participants, 39.7% met criteria for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, 34.6% for PGD, and 22.3% for MDE. Bereaved participants with PGD were more likely to suffer from MDE, any anxiety disorder, or current suicide risk than bereaved participants without PGD. Furthermore, these participants reported significantly greater physical distress than bereaved participants without PGD. CONCLUSION: War-related loss during middle childhood and adolescence presents significant risk for adverse mental health and dysfunction in young adulthood in addition to exposure to other war-related traumatic events. Furthermore, the syndrome of PGD can help to identify those with the greatest degree of distress and dysfunction.

  20. Rumination following bereavement : Assessment, working mechanisms and intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Eisma, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to gain better understanding of rumination, a risk factor for poor bereavement outcome, so it can be targeted more effectively in therapeutic interventions. We defined grief-related rumination as thinking repetitively and recurrently about the causes and consequences of a loss and loss-related negative emotions. Although many researchers regarded rumination after bereavement as a maladaptive confrontation strategy, others have recently claimed that rumination could serve as cognitive...

  1. Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Denderen, Mariëtte; de Keijser, Jos; Kleen, Marco; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    In the literature on bereavement, claims are made that homicidal loss is associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, depression, and other severe mental health problems. It is surprising that only a few studies have investigated the nature and prevalence of emotional symptoms following homicidal bereavement and a reference to systematic, empirical research is seldom provided. This article reviews the available literature to investigate whether these claims have empirical evidence. Three databases were searched to identify relevant studies. This approach was supplemented with a bibliography search. Eligible studies included English-language peer-reviewed articles that assessed psychopathology in the homicidally bereaved, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Of the 360 potentially relevant articles, 8 studies (13 references) met predefined inclusion criteria. Homicide-related psychopathology among the bereaved assessed in these studies includes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, complicated grief, and substance abuse. Prevalence of lifetime homicide-related PTSD varied from 19.1% to 71% across studies. Current PTSD varied between 5.2% and 6%. The reviewed literature was inconclusive regarding the course of symptoms over time and the severity of psychopathology among the homicidally bereaved, compared to individuals bereaved by other causes of death. A comparison of the nature and prevalence of psychopathology between studies was complicated by unequal sample sizes and type, recruitment strategy, study design, and time since loss. Limitations of the included studies are discussed, as well as implications for clinical practice, policy, and future research. PMID:24346707

  2. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression among bereaved and non-bereaved survivors following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, CLW; Ran, MS; Wang, CW; Qu, ZY; Wang, XY; Mao, WJ; Lu, BQB; Zhang, BQ; Zhang, XL; Ho, AHY

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that unexpected death of a loved one is an important risk factor of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among disaster survivors, but few have examined the magnitude of psychiatric morbidities among bereaved survivors. This study examined the prevalence rates of clinically significant PTSD and depressive symptoms and their associated risk factors among Chinese adult survivors following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Two hundred and fifty-one bereaved ...

  3. Alcohol use in the first three years of bereavement: a national representative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilling János

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier results concerning alcohol consumption of bereaved persons are contradictory. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between bereavement and alcohol consumption accounting for time and gender differences on a nationally representative sample from Hungary ("Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey", N = 4457 Methods Drinking characteristics of mourning persons (alcohol consumption, dependence symptoms, and harmful consequences of alcohol use in the first three years of grief were examined among persons between 18-75 years using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. Results Men bereaved for one year scored higher on two dimensions of AUDIT (dependence symptoms and harmful alcohol use, while men bereaved for two years scored higher on all three dimensions of AUDIT compared to the non-bereaved. The rate of men clinically at-risk concerning alcohol consumption among the non-bereaved is 12.9%, and among men bereaved for one year is 18.4% (a non-significant difference, while 29.8% (p Conclusion Among bereaved men, the risk of alcohol related problems tends to be higher, which can be shown both among men bereaved for one year as well as men bereaved for two years. Considering the higher morbidity and mortality rates of bereaved men, alcohol consumption might play a mediator role. These facts draw attention to the importance of prevention, early recognition, and effective therapy of hazardous drinking in bereaved men.

  4. The Two-Track Model of Bereavement Questionnaire (TTBQ): Development and Validation of a Relational Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Simon Shimshon; Nadav, Ofri Bar; Malkinson, Ruth; Koren, Dan; Goffer-Shnarch, Moran; Michaeli, Ella

    2009-01-01

    The Two-Track Model of Bereavement Questionnaire (TTBQ) was designed to assess response to loss over time. Respondents were 354 persons who completed the 70-item self-report questionnaire constructed in accordance with the Two-Track Model of Bereavement. Track I focuses on the bereaved's biopsychosocial functioning and Track II concerns the…

  5. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare Professionals’ Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  6. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression among bereaved and non-bereaved survivors following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia L W; Wang, Chong-Wen; Ho, Andy H Y; Qu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Xi-Ying; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Mao, Wen-Jun; Lu, Ben Qi-Bin; Zhang, Braven Qiang; Zhang, Xiu-Lan

    2012-08-01

    Many studies have suggested that unexpected death of a loved one is an important risk factor of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among disaster survivors, but few have examined the magnitude of psychiatric morbidities among bereaved survivors. This study examined the prevalence rates of clinically significant PTSD and depressive symptoms and their associated risk factors among Chinese adult survivors following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Two hundred and fifty-one bereaved adults were compared with 1474 non-bereaved adult survivors. The estimated rates of PTSD and depressive symptoms were 65.6% and 64.8% for those who lost first-degree family members, 34.1% and 45.5% for those who lost second-degree relatives, and 27.1% and 37.5% for non-bereaved survivors respectively. Loss of a child was a significant predictor of psychopathological symptoms. The results suggested that effective and sustainable mental health services were required, especially for bereaved single-child parents. PMID:22721751

  7. The future of bereavement care in British general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, W R

    1997-06-01

    This paper discusses the future of bereavement care in British general practice by providing an insight into existing practice and then speculating on influences that may shape developments. There have been calls for the specialty to build on this traditional role and expand its bereavement service. Specific suggestions for the content of such a service are summarised. This emphasis reflects the increasing awareness in bereavement by other health organisations. This image of an expanding service needs to be contextualised within a primary care system that is feeling more pressurised due to increasing workload. This will continue to inhibit extensive service development. In addition it is important for the profession to consider the appropriateness of this activity. This complex debate has received little attention and research is required to inform and provide the necessary direction. PMID:9233164

  8. Cognitive schemata and processing among parents bereaved by infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jind, Lise; Elklit, Ask; Christiansen, Dorte

    2010-12-01

    The present prospective study examined cognitive schemata and processing among 93 parents bereaved by infant death. The Trauma Constellation Identification Scale (TCIS) was used to assess maladaptive cognitive schemata associated with the loss. The impact of pre-, peri-, and post-trauma factors on the TCIS scores was assessed. Compared to parents who had not lost an infant, bereaved parents displayed significantly higher TCIS scores. High TCIS scores were significantly associated with PTSD as well as general symptomatology. Although interesting gender differences were found, the variables most strongly related to TCIS scores were posttraumatic emotional coping and cognitive processing. PMID:21110073

  9. The impact of practical support on parental bereavement: Reflections from a study involving parents bereaved through military death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Liz; Harper, Mairi

    2016-02-01

    This article, drawing on data from a wider study, describes the impact that U.K. bereaved military parents ascribe to the practical support (help with home and garden maintenance) that they received following the death of their son. The type of practical support offered to parents has had a wide-ranging and significant impact on them. In addition to helping them find meaning and maintain continuing bonds, this form of support contributed to their capacity to engage in restoration-focused coping. As a symbolic resource, this type of practical support may be a significant moderator of distress in the psychosocial transition of bereavement. PMID:26207673

  10. Solace and Immortality: Bereaved Parents' Continuing Bond with Their Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klass, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Considers death of child and bereaved parents. Examines nature of solace, reviews literature on inner representation of the dead, examines ways parents find solace connected with interaction with inner representation, explores shared inner representation as significant element in social support, discusses solace in terms of psychosocial meaning of…

  11. Adolescent Bereavement Following Suicide: An Examination of Relevant Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sharon M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined existing literature on links between bereavement after suicide and the subsequent development of adolescents including increased suicide risks. Found inconsistent definitions of adolescence in literature, samples of adolescents were drawn from those in psychotherapy, and other methodological problems. (Author/ABL)

  12. Rumination following bereavement : Assessment, working mechanisms and intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to gain better understanding of rumination, a risk factor for poor bereavement outcome, so it can be targeted more effectively in therapeutic interventions. We defined grief-related rumination as thinking repetitively and recurrently about the causes and consequences of a loss and loss-rela

  13. Is prolonged grief distinct from bereavement-related posttraumatic stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Ann-Marie J; Dalgleish, Tim

    2010-07-30

    Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) (previously called complicated grief (CG)) is proposed as a distinct post loss syndrome, with its own core symptoms. A key issue concerning the diagnostic validity of PGD is whether it can reliably be distinguished from related psychiatric outcomes following bereavement. This study therefore sought to determine whether the core symptoms of PGD could be distinguished from those of bereavement-related anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were derived from a community sample of 223 bereaved adults in Croatia. PGD symptomatology was measured using the Revised Inventory of Complicated Grief. Depression and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, respectively. The intrusion and avoidance symptoms of PTSD were assessed using the Revised Impact of Event Scale. The distinctiveness of the five symptom clusters was examined using principal component analysis (PCA). Symptoms of prolonged grief, depression, anxiety, PTSD-intrusion, and PTSD-avoidance clustered together into five distinct factors. These results support the phenomenological distinctiveness of prolonged grief symptoms, from those of bereavement-related anxiety, depression and, for the first time, PTSD. PMID:20493535

  14. Music Therapy with Bereaved Teenagers: A Mixed Methods Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina; Roberts, Melina; O'Grady, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative investigations have indicated that music therapy groups may be beneficial for bereaved teenagers. The existing relationship between young people and music serves as a platform for connectedness and emotional expression that is utilised within a therapeutic, support group format. This investigation confirms this suggestion through…

  15. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  16. Developing and Implementing a Bereavement Support Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Cynthia L.; Greer, Joseph A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia; Todd, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The death of a loved one can be particularly difficult for college students, as significant losses are not anticipated during this time. Bereavement experiences are, however, not uncommon among college students, and campus environments can be isolating and nonconducive to recovery. To date, few interventions have been developed to meet bereaved…

  17. "DSM-5" and Bereavement: The Loss of Normal Grief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jesse; Jones, K. Dayle

    2013-01-01

    The mood disorder work group has proposed to eliminate the bereavement exclusion criterion from the diagnosis of major depression in the 5th edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (2012) "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders." The proposal would break tradition with the long-held distinction between…

  18. ATTEND: Toward a Mindfulness-Based Bereavement Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Flint, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Few, if any, mindfulness-based bereavement care models exist. The ATTEND (attunement, trust, touch, egalitarianism, nuance, and death education) model is an interdisciplinary paradigm for providers, including physicians, social workers, therapists, nursing staff, and others. Using a case example to enhance the breadth and depth of understanding,…

  19. The Grief Grapevine: Facebook Memorial Pages and Adolescent Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Mardi

    2014-01-01

    How adolescents use the social networking site Facebook to express grief is a growing area of research. In reviewing current literature, it is evident that many questions still remain unanswered. Additionally, this ever-evolving platform for grief, mourning and bereavement may hold many implications for educators, policy developers and school…

  20. Personal Fear of Death and Grief in Bereaved Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the relation of fear of death (Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) to maternal grief (Perinatal Grief Scale-33) following miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, or infant/child death. The 400 women participants were recruited from the website, e-mail lists, and parent groups of an organization that supports bereaved parents.…

  1. Bereavement: Applying Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development to College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Debra S.

    One of the developmental challenges that a college student may have to face is the death of a significant other, friend, spouse, relative, child, or parent. This article reviews the literature on the potential effects of bereavement on a college student with respect to Erik Erikson's stage six of psychosocial development (intimacy versus…

  2. Improving the Efficacy of Intervention for Bereaved Individuals: Toward a Process-Focused Psychotherapeutic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Zech

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Professional psychotherapeutic intervention programs for bereaved individuals are not highly effective. We explore the range of possible reasons for this, based on arguments made in the literature and on further key considerations that have so far been neglected. Limited efficacy may be due to inclusion of bereaved individuals who do not need help; inappropriate types of intervention; inadequate quantity (too much or too little; or incorrect timing of the intervention (too soon or too late. Accordingly, we propose that effective intervention will require (1 motivated bereaved persons, (2 identifying and working on processes that cause or maintain the difficulties presented by the bereaved person, and (3 flexibility on the part of the therapist. We describe a number of processes underlying the difficulties encountered by bereaved people, which need consideration in therapy. In addition to these process-focused interventions, working on the therapeutic relationship will be a fundamental factor in helping bereaved individuals cope with their difficult grief.

  3. Posttraumatic stress disorder among bereaved relatives of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elklit, Ask; Reinholt, Nina; Nielsen, Louise Hjort; Blum, Alon; Lasgaard, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD in individuals who experienced the loss of a close relative to cancer. A total of 251 bereaved relatives ages 14 to 76 (M = 41.3, SD = 16.8) were recruited at a counseling service for cancer patients and their relatives. The prevalence of current probable PTSD was 40% in the bereaved sample. A hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that full-time employment, perceived control, and a secure attachment style moderated the risk for PTSD. Moreover, a long period of caretaking, high levels of somatization, and dissociation were all associated with an increased risk of PTSD. PMID:20623415

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder among bereaved relatives of cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, A.; Reinholt, Nina; Nielsen, Louise Hjort;

    2010-01-01

    and their relatives. The prevalence of current probable PTSD was 40% in the bereaved sample. A hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that full-time employment, perceived control, and a secure attachment style moderated the risk for PTSD. Moreover, a long period of caretaking, high levels......The aim of this study was to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD in individuals who experienced the loss of a close relative to cancer. A total of 251 bereaved relatives ages 14 to 76 (M = 41.3, SD = 16.8) were recruited at a counseling service for cancer patients...... of somatization, and dissociation were all associated with an increased risk of PTSD. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC....

  5. Do anticipatory grief and preparedness affect distress in bereaved caregivers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjærgaard

    Objective Family caregivers of terminally ill patients are in a vulnerable position, and previous studies show that bereaved caregivers are at risk of psychological distress. Pre-loss grief symptoms seem to predict post-loss psychological distress, while preparedness for a looming loss tends to...... decrease distress. The aim of this nation-wide study was to investigate the association of both anticipatory grief symptoms and preparedness with psychological distress in bereaved family caregivers. Methods A list of all adult patients in Denmark receiving drug reimbursement for terminal illness was...... months after the loss. The baseline questionnaire included a pre-loss version of the Prolonged Grief-13 and one question regarding caregiver preparedness, while the follow-up questionnaire contained the Prolonged Grief-13 and Beck’s Depression Inventory II. Results Of the contacted 9,512 patients 3...

  6. Spiritual Distress in Bereavement: Evolution of a Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Burke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Many mourners turn to their spiritual beliefs and traditions when confronted by the death of a loved one. However, prior studies have either focused primarily on the benefits of faith following loss or studied spiritual struggle outside the context of bereavement. Moreover, scales to measure bereavement-related crises of faith and interventions specifically designed for spiritually inclined, distressed grievers are virtually non-existent. Our program of research, which to date has consisted of working with Christian grievers and is outlined below, elucidates complicated spiritual grief (CSG—a spiritual crisis following the loss of a loved one. For example, our longitudinal examination of 46 African American homicide survivors established the relation between positive religious coping, CSG, and complicated grief (CG, to clarify whether religious coping more strongly predicted bereavement distress or vice versa, with a follow-up study that determined the relation between religious coping and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. We replicated and expanded these findings with a diverse sample of 150 grievers to explore the complex relation between CSG, CG, and meaning making in a comparison study of mourners who had experienced traumatic-versus natural death losses. In a companion study, we qualitatively analyzed 84 grievers’ narratives and interviewed a 5-member focus group to capture and learn from their firsthand experiences of spiritual distress. To close the gap in terms of CSG assessment, we also developed and validated the Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief (ICSG. Currently, our ongoing CSG investigation extends in several directions: first, to a sample of family members anticipating the loss of their hospice-eligible loved one in palliative care; and, second, to the development and testing of a writing-intensive intervention for newly bereaved, spiritually inclined grievers.

  7. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  8. Resilience Rather than Recovery: A Contextual Framework on Adaptation Following Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.

    2008-01-01

    Using a contextual resilience framework, the authors examine the processes whereby bereaved persons change over time. Rather than the concept recovery, the authors propose that the concept adaptation best captures the process of change following bereavement and that the desired outcome of such adaptation is denoted by the term resilience.…

  9. Implications of Parental Suicide and Violent Death for Promotion of Resilience of Parentally-Bereaved Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ana C.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Liu, Xianchen; Haine, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the implications of suicide and violent deaths (including suicide, homicide, and accidents) for the development of interventions for parentally bereaved children. Analyses of data from the Family Bereavement Program find minimal differences in children's mental health problems, grief or risk and protective factors based on…

  10. Setting up and Running a Loss and Bereavement Support Group for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Paul; Freeman, Adele; Offen, Liz

    2010-01-01

    Following evidence based literature, the Birmingham Clinical Psychology Service for People with Learning Disabilities ran a Loss and Bereavement Psychotherapy Group. The group consisted of five adults with mild learning disabilities, who met for 8 consecutive weeks. This paper reports the process of setting up a bereavement group for people with…

  11. Mediating processes in bereavement : the role of rumination, threatening grief interpretations, and deliberate grief avoidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Houwen, Karolijne; Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang; van den Bout, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Limited research so far has examined coping processes that mediate between risk factors and bereavement outcome. Knowledge of these pathways is important, since it helps establish why some bereaved persons are more vulnerable than others and suggests possibilities for intervention. In this internati

  12. Initiation of psychotropic medication after partner bereavement: a matched cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil M Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent changes to diagnostic criteria for depression in DSM-5 remove the bereavement exclusion, allowing earlier diagnosis following bereavement. Evaluation of the potential effect of this change requires an understanding of existing psychotropic medication prescribing by non-specialists after bereavement. AIMS: To describe initiation of psychotropic medication in the first year after partner bereavement. METHODS: In a UK primary care database, we identified 21,122 individuals aged 60 and over with partner bereavement and no psychotropic drug use in the previous year. Prescribing (anxiolytic/hypnotic, antidepressant, antipsychotic after bereavement was compared to age, sex and practice matched controls. RESULTS: The risks of receiving a new psychotropic prescription within two and twelve months of bereavement were 9.5% (95% CI 9.1 to 9.9% and 17.9% (17.3 to 18.4% respectively; an excess risk of initiation in the first year of 12.4% compared to non-bereaved controls. Anxiolytic/hypnotic and antidepressant initiation rates were highest in the first two months. In this period, the hazard ratio for initiation of anxiolytics/hypnotics was 16.7 (95% CI 14.7 to 18.9 and for antidepressants was 5.6 (4.7 to 6.7 compared to non-bereaved controls. 13.3% of those started on anxiolytics/hypnotics within two months continued to receive this drug class at one year. The marked variation in background family practice prescribing of anxiolytics/hypnotics was the strongest determinant of their initiation in the first two months after bereavement. CONCLUSION: Almost one in five older people received a new psychotropic drug prescription in the year after bereavement. The early increase and trend in antidepressant use after bereavement suggests some clinicians did not adhere to the bereavement exclusion, with implications for its recent removal in DSM-5. Family practice variation in use of anxiolytics/hypnotics suggests uncertainty over their role in

  13. Bereavement, gender, and cyberspace: a content analysis of parents' memorials to their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musambira, George W; Hastings, Sally O; Hoover, Judith D

    The study investigated how two distinct perspectives apply to the role of gender in parents' memorials on The Compassionate Friends (TCF) electronic bulletin board; cyberspace as merely a mirror of societal gendered patterns of bereavement, and cyberspace as a medium or context in which societal gendered patterns of bereavement are neutralized. Data were evaluated to determine to what extent gender differences exist concerning instrumental versus intuitive styles of bereavement. Analytic categories used in assessing gender differences in parental bereavement style included the following: invoking spirituality, directing messages to the deceased, artistic expressions, and special powers accorded to the deceased. With some exceptions, the findings supported the perspective emphasizing the gender neutralizing aspects of cyberspace parental bereavement for the population studied. PMID:18186423

  14. Factors Related to Complicated Grief among Bereaved Individuals after the Wenchuan Earthquake in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lin Hu; Xiao-Lin Li; Xin-Man Dou; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:The Wenchuan earthquake in China caused shock and grief worldwide.Sudden bereavement caused by the earthquake led to physical disorders as well as psychological disturbances in the bereaved individuals.The bereaved had a high risk for complicated grief (CG),which may have led to significant distress and impairment in their health.However,there was few available studies on CG among disaster-bereaved individuals in China after the disaster.The aim of this study was to identify factors (demographic characteristics and disaster-related variables) associated with symptoms of CG among the bereaved 18 months after the Wenchuan earthquake.Methods:This study was conducted with a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample of 27 1 bereaved individuals from three of the hardest hit areas.Data were collected by questionnaires and the instruments used in the study were:General questionnaire and Inventory ofCG (ICG).Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with symptoms of CG.Results:The mean score on ICG was 52.77 (standard deviation:10.00).Being female and loss of a child were related to higher level of CG while having another child after the disaster and receiving psychological counseling experience were associated with lower level of CG.Forty-nine percent of the variance of CG was explained by these identified factors.Conclusions:Eighteen months after the Wenchuan earthquake,the symptoms of CG among the bereaved were higher than the previous studies with bereaved individuals.This study uncovers a vulnerable population of the bereaved at high risk for CG.Early assessments,targeted interventions,and policy support tailored for the disaster-bereaved individuals are necessary to identify and alleviate symptoms of CG and to improve their well-being.

  15. A missional perspective on funerals and bereavement counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kotze

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the importance of a missional approach to the funeral and bereavement counselling process in congregational praxis in the midst of a context of secularisation. The creation of a missional perspective on the funeral and bereavement counselling could support the nature and praxis of a congregation in a secular society, especially if the congregation finds its relevance in the expression of the missio Dei. The basic theoretical research for missional ecclesiology, which is the systematic study directed toward greater knowledge of the fundamental aspects of missional ecclesiology (National Science Foundation 1953:38, is based on the premise that God is the source of all missions. The expression missio Dei means to join God in the mission he is already busy with in the world. As the one who sends, God the Father sends the Son, the Son sends the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit sends the church. The church only participates in the mission God is already busy with. It is a mission that uses both words and deeds and brings hope in the midst of tragedy. It is the hope of the kingdom of God and the incarnation of Christ that can already be experienced and expressed in the present. It is also the hope of the transformation of everything to form a new heaven and earth. Hope and mission can therefore not be separated. The concretisation of the expression of the kingdom of Christ in the world is hope, and a strong emphasis is therefore placed on mission as action in hope. Hope must be present where tragedy reigns, and the funeral and bereavement counselling can be used as a vehicle for this hope. Hope can then become an instrument of healing. The church can thus participate in God’s mission in the midst of tragedy and make an impact on society by taking on a missional character of hope.

  16. A new model of Social Support in Bereavement (SSB): An empirical investigation with a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Sheying

    2016-01-01

    Bereavement can be an extremely stressful experience while the protective effect of social support is expected to facilitate the adjustment after loss. The ingredients or elements of social support as illustrated by a new model of Social Support in Bereavement (SSB), however, requires empirical evidence. Who might be the most effective providers of social support in bereavement has also been understudied, particularly within specific cultural contexts. The present study uses both qualitative and quantitative analyses to explore these two important issues among bereaved Chinese families and individuals. The results show that three major types of social support described by the SSB model were frequently acknowledged by the participants in this study. Aside from relevant books, family and friends were the primary sources of social support who in turn received support from their workplaces. Helping professionals turned out to be the least significant source of social support in the Chinese cultural context. Differences by gender, age, and bereavement time were also found. The findings render empirical evidence to the conceptual model of Social Support in Bereavement and also offer culturally relevant guidance for providing effective support to the bereaved. PMID:26678537

  17. The role of religious affiliation in Christian and unaffiliated bereaved emerging adults' use of religious coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Elizabeth A; Gramling, Sandra E; Lord, Benjamin D

    2016-01-01

    Though research on bereavement has grown, few studies have focused on emerging adults. To add to the literature, the authors administered the RCOPE to a sample of bereaved college students (analyzed sample N = 748) and explored the relationship between self-reported religious affiliation and religious coping strategies used and endorsed as "most helpful." Results highlight the rich topography of bereavement previously unexamined in understudied populations (i.e., emerging adults, religiously unaffiliated). Specifically, the Christians/affiliated used "negative" religious coping strategies most often, yet identified "positive" strategies as "most helpful," whereas the unaffiliated instead used "positive" strategies most often and identified "negative" strategies as "most helpful." PMID:26313501

  18. Bereavement: Contemporary Scientific Perspectives for Researchers and Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Zech

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The death rate within the European Union is 9.6/1000, which is about the same as it is in North America (8.4 for 2009 in the Unites States of America, see CIA World Factbook, 2010. In concrete terms, this means that about 100,000 of the total population of 10 million Belgian people die each year (in fact, the death rate in Belgium is a bit higher, 10.5/1000. The 2001 the Belgian Health Interview Survey indicated that the relationship or social support network of Belgian citizens is composed of a mean number of 9 persons (Gisle, Buziarsist, Van der Heyden, Demarest, Miermans, Sartor et al., 2002. As a consequence, a rough estimation of the number of persons who become bereaved each year in Belgium is 945,000 (i.e., 9.5% of the Belgian population. In fact, the death of a loved one is an experience that occurs some time or other in nearly everyone’s life. Many of us will suffer multiple losses long before we reach old age, when such events occur with increasing frequency. We will lose our grandparents, parents, siblings, or close friends and romantic partners through death. Bereavement is a very frequent phenomenon, and as the contributions to this Special Issue will make amply clear, it is a personally impactful life event for most people.

  19. Preparedness for Death and Adjustment to Bereavement among Caregivers of Recently Placed Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Richard; Boerner, Kathrin; KLINGER, JULIE; Rosen, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preparedness for death as a predictor of post-bereavement adjustment has not been studied prospectively. Little is known about pre-death factors associated with feeling prepared prior to the death of a loved one.

  20. Bereavement support for couples following death of a baby: program development and 14-year exit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly-Smorawski, Bernadette; Armstrong, Anne V; Catlin, Elizabeth A

    2002-01-01

    Program development, implementation, and a 14-year exit analysis of a bereavement support program for couples whose baby died in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is presented. A closed, hospital-based, time-limited (12 weeks) format was used. Team leadership was used and 54% of bereaved NICU parents participated. Each group was structured with a 2-week introductory period, open format grief-focused weekly discussions,evaluation in Week 11, and summary session with termination in Week 12. The exit analysis details program strengths, weaknesses, and recommendations. Bereavement support groups are one part of what we contend should be a comprehensive bereavement program,organized to care for families prior to, during, and after a baby's death. A sensitive, spiritually aware, supportive environment should be maintained throughout with relationship building as a cornerstone of the program. PMID:11865881

  1. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? : Evidence from eye-tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Eisma, Maarten C; Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Margaret; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Paul A Boelen

    2014-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful ...

  2. Improving the Efficacy of Intervention for Bereaved Individuals: Toward a Process-Focused Psychotherapeutic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Zech; Anne-Sophie Ryckebosch-Dayez; Emily Delespaux

    2010-01-01

    Professional psychotherapeutic intervention programs for bereaved individuals are not highly effective. We explore the range of possible reasons for this, based on arguments made in the literature and on further key considerations that have so far been neglected. Limited efficacy may be due to inclusion of bereaved individuals who do not need help; inappropriate types of intervention; inadequate quantity (too much or too little); or incorrect timing of the intervention (too soon or too late)....

  3. Changes in Routine Health Behaviors Following Late-life Bereavement: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Sarah T.; Schulz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review examines the relationship between late-life spousal bereavement and changes in routine health behaviors. We review six behavioral domains/modifiable risk factors that are important for maintaining health among elderly populations: physical activity, nutrition, sleep quality, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and body weight status. Thirty-four articles were identified, derived from 32 studies. We found strong evidence for a relationship between bereavement and nutrition...

  4. Experiences of cultural bereavement amongst refugees from Zimbabwe living in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    During the resettlement journey, refugees can experience war trauma, violence, and loss. Research has consistently linked these experiences with mental health difficulties, such as PTSD and depression. An alternative perspective is the phenomenon of cultural bereavement. Cultural bereavement is known as a type of grief reaction that can result from the considerable losses that refugees experience during displacement. Refugees come to the UK from all over the world. However, in recent years, d...

  5. Peer Relationships of Bereaved Siblings and Comparison Classmates After a Child's Death from Cancer*

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Grossenbacher, Julie C.; Barrera, Maru; Jo Gilmer, Mary; Foster, Terrah L.; Compas, Bruce E.; Davies, Betty; Hogan, Nancy S.; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To compare peer relationships among bereaved siblings and matched classmates, and to examine gender, grade level, and time since death as moderators. Methods Families were recruited from cancer registries at four hospitals 3–12 months after a child's death. Measures of social behavior and peer acceptance were completed by children in the classrooms of 105 bereaved siblings (ages 8 –17 years). Teachers also reported on children's social behavior. Three classmates were matched for ge...

  6. Insights into the processes of suicide contagion: Narratives from young people bereaved by suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Jo; Stanley, Nicky; Mallon, Sharon; Manthorpe, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Death by suicide can have a profound and long lasting impact on the people left behind. Research has demonstrated that, in comparison to the general population, those bereaved by suicide, particularly young people, are at increased risk for suicide. However, the process of suicide contagion, as it has now become widely known, is poorly understood. This paper examines the phenomenon of suicide contagion amongst young people who have been bereaved by suicide with data from research...

  7. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. PMID:25852202

  8. Positive Outcomes Following Bereavement: Paths to Posttraumatic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence G Calhoun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent theory and research have drawn attention to the need to better understand the positive changes, termed posttraumatic growth, that often occur in bereaved individuals; even as negative emotions related to grief persist. We describe five dimensions of posttraumatic growth and present a model for understanding how the loss of a close other can eventually lead to a recognition of important positive personal changes. Loss, especially unexpected loss, disrupts an individual's beliefs about the world and initiates a process of rebuilding an understanding. During this process, many people come to realise their own strengths, appreciate the impact of their relationships, and have new spiritual insights. A strategy for facilitating growth during clinical work also is described.

  9. Adult attachment styles and the psychological response to infant bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shevlin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on Bowlby's attachment theory, Bartholomew proposed a four-category attachment typology by which individuals judged themselves and adult relationships. This explanatory model has since been used to help explain the risk of psychiatric comorbidity. Objective: The current study aimed to identify attachment typologies based on Bartholomew's attachment styles in a sample of bereaved parents on dimensions of closeness/dependency and anxiety. In addition, it sought to assess the relationship between the resultant attachment typology with a range of psychological trauma variables. Method: The current study was based on a sample of 445 bereaved parents who had experienced either peri- or post-natal death of an infant. Adult attachment was assessed using the Revised Adult Attachment Scale (RAAS while reaction to trauma was assessed using the Trauma Symptom Checklist (TSC. A latent profile analysis was conducted on scores from the RAAS closeness/dependency and anxiety subscales to ascertain if there were underlying homogeneous attachment classes. Emergent classes were used to determine if these were significantly different in terms of mean scores on TSC scales. Results: A four-class solution was considered the optimal based on fit statistics and interpretability of the results. Classes were labelled “Fearful,” “Preoccupied,” “Dismissing,” and “Secure.” Females were almost eight times more likely than males to be members of the fearful attachment class. This class evidenced the highest scores across all TSC scales while the secure class showed the lowest scores. Conclusions: The results are consistent with Bartholomew's four-category attachment styles with classes representing secure, fearful, preoccupied, and dismissing types. While the loss of an infant is a devastating experience for any parent, securely attached individuals showed the lowest levels of psychopathology compared to fearful, preoccupied, or dismissing

  10. Transitions from Clinical Experiences to Clinical Questions and then Research: Songwriting with Bereaved Pre-adolescent Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Roberts

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to describe the author’s personal transition from her clinical experiences working with bereaved children and adolescents, to clinical questions that arose during this time, and then to her current phase whereby she has commenced research to examine songwriting with bereaved children. This article includes relevant literature that discusses bereavement in childhood, songwriting in music therapy, and music therapy support for bereaved children and adolescents. A description about the author’s current research, that integrates the three areas highlighted in the literature, is also discussed.

  11. Strengthening Effective Parenting Practices over the Long Term: Effects of a Preventive Intervention for Parentally Bereaved Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Melissa J.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Luecken, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effect of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for bereaved families, on effective parenting (e.g., caregiver warmth, consistent discipline) 6 years after program completion. Families (n = 101; 69% female caregivers; 77% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic) with children between ages 8 and 16 who had…

  12. Comparing Cognitive, Relational and Stress Mechanisms Underlying Gender Differences in Recovery from Bereavement-Related Internalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Michelle; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.

    2009-01-01

    Four putative mediators underlying gender differences in youths' recovery from bereavement-related internalizing problems were examined in a sample (N = 109; age range = 8-16 years at the initial assessment) of parentally bereaved youth: intrusive thoughts about grief, postdeath stressors, negative appraisals of postdeath stressors, and fear of…

  13. Resilience and vulnerability: prolonged grief in the bereaved spouses of marital partners who died of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nancy Xiaonan; Chan, Cecilia L W; Zhang, Jianxin; Stewart, Sunita M

    2016-04-01

    Spousal bereavement is closely linked to prolonged grief, that is, significant adjustment symptoms that last for more than six months after the loss. This article focused on potential risk and protective factors that may influence bereavement outcomes. Participants in this study were surviving spouses of individuals who died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These participants were themselves living with human immunodeficiency syndrome. In this cross-sectional study, 120 bereaved participants completed measures of grief, quality of dying and death of the deceased, negative conceptions of death resulting from AIDS, death attitudes, and personal resilience. The results showed that one-third (35.0%) of the bereaved participants reported grief levels above the prolonged grief cut-off scores, and can be categorized as the "prolonged grief" group. Although quality of dying and death was not associated with the intensity of grief, negative conceptions of death from AIDS, fear of death and resilience independently predicted grief symptoms in the regression models. Our findings provide insight into the grief process for the surviving spouse of AIDS victims in rural China. Since resilience is malleable, developing resilience interventions to enhance adjustment to bereavement may be a promising direction in grief counselling and therapies. PMID:26573556

  14. Mortality following conjugal bereavement, Belgium 1991-96: the unexpected effect of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusyne, P; Page, H; Lievens, J

    2001-11-01

    This paper examines excess mortality following spousal bereavement by time since bereavement, sex, age, and education. The main hypothesis challenged is that higher education buffers the harmful effects of spousal loss. Using a log-rate model, death-rate ratios (widowed/married) are estimated for 49,849 and 126,746 Belgian widowers and widows and an equal number of non-bereaved controls matched to the bereaved on their socio-demographic characteristics. The hypothesis that the more educated suffer less excess mortality is not supported. Although higher educational levels are associated with lower mortality in general, they do not alleviate the effects of bereavement. On the contrary, in the period immediately following spousal loss, the more highly educated seem to have more, rather than less, excess mortality. Three possible arguments are suggested to account for this: education-related differences in the partner-relationship, structural differences in the availability of appropriate social support, and cultural differences in potential support networks. PMID:11778620

  15. Trajectories of depression following spousal and child bereavement: A comparison of the heterogeneity in outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccallum, Fiona; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of how individuals react to the loss of a close loved one comes largely from studies of spousal bereavement. The extent to which findings are relevant to other bereavements is uncertain. A major methodological limitation of current studies has been a reliance on retrospective reporting of functioning and use of samples of individuals who have self-selected for participant in grief research. To address these limitations, in the current study we applied Latent Growth Mixture Modelling (LGMM) in a prospective population-based sample to identify trajectories of depression following spousal and child bereavement in later life. The sample consisted of 2512 individual bereaved adults who were assessed once before and three times after their loss. Four discrete trajectories were identified: Resilience (little or no depression; 68.2%), Chronic Grief (an onset of depression following loss; 13.2%), Depressed-Improved (high pre-loss depression that decreased following loss; 11.2%), and Pre-existing Chronic Depression (high depression at all assessments; 7.4%). These trajectories were present for both child and spousal loss. There was some evidence that child loss in later life was associated more strongly with the Chronic Grief trajectory and less strongly with the Resilience trajectory. However these differences disappeared when covariates were included in the model. Limitations of the analyses are discussed. These findings increase our understanding of the variety of outcomes following bereavement and underscore the importance of using prospective designs to map heterogeneity of response outcomes. PMID:26343597

  16. Emotion regulation in bereavement: searching for and finding emotional support in social network sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döveling, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    In an age of rising impact of online communication in social network sites (SNS), emotional interaction is neither limited nor restricted by time or space. Bereavement extends to the anonymity of cyberspace. What role does virtual interaction play in SNS in dealing with the basic human emotion of grief caused by the loss of a beloved person? The analysis laid out in this article provides answers in light of an interdisciplinary perspective on online bereavement. Relevant lines of research are scrutinized. After laying out the theoretical spectrum for the study, hypotheses based on a prior in-depth qualitative content analysis of 179 postings in three different German online bereavement platforms are proposed and scrutinized in a quantitative content analysis (2127 postings from 318 users). Emotion regulation patterns in SNS and similarities as well as differences in online bereavement of children, adolescents and adults are revealed. Large-scale quantitative findings into central motives, patterns, and restorative effects of online shared bereavement in regulating distress, fostering personal empowerment, and engendering meaning are presented. The article closes with implications for further analysis in memorialization practices.

  17. Bereavement and reactions to job loss: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, J; Rhodes, V

    1987-09-01

    An assessment is made of the applicability of the grief framework for understanding reactions to job loss. Jahoda's 'deprivation view' of unemployment is introduced as a statement of what is lost, with the grief model describing the process of adjustment to loss. The main features of grief are described: it is an active process, changing over time, consisting of a number of episodic components combined with a background of chronic emotional disturbance. Parkes' concept of psychosocial transitions is then outlined; this provides a theoretical link between grieving and reactions to other forms of loss, including job loss. An assessment is made of how the grief process has been applied to job loss in existing research. Evidence for most of the components of the grief process is apparent in accounts of reactions to unemployment, but there is little evidence on their frequency, changes over time or their relationship to one another. Variables which are likely to affect the occurrence, extent and precise course of any grief-like process are examined by comparing reactions to bereavement and job loss. The family and social contexts of reactions to loss are then considered in relation to both grief and unemployment. Finally, the advantages and limitations of the grief model are briefly discussed. PMID:3307988

  18. Behavioral activation and therapeutic exposure for bereavement in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acierno, Ron; Rheingold, Alyssa; Amstadter, Ananda; Kurent, Jerome; Amella, Elaine; Resnick, Heidi; Muzzy, Wendy; Lejuez, Carl

    2012-02-01

    The development and clinical trial of a 5-session behavioral intervention for complicated bereavement (CB) is presented. We conceptualized CB in terms of Major Depression (MDD) and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and consequently applied treatment components of Behavioral Activation and Therapeutic Exposure (BA-TE). In order to assure standardization of treatment, control costs, and engage patients, a multi-media, multi-context format was adopted to address avoidance and withdrawal behaviors conceptualized as central pathogenic responses in CB. Participants (N = 26) were assessed before and after BA-TE treatment via structured clinical interview and standardized questionnaires in terms of PTSD, MDD, CB, and health concerns. The number of days since the death of the loved one was widely variable and served as a covariate for all outcome analyses. ANCOVAS revealed statistically significant improvement, irrespective of how many days since death had elapsed prior to initiation of intervention, on structured interviews and self-report measures for most outcome variables. PMID:21685428

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Bereavement and Childbirths in the Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Olsen, Jørn; Andersen, Per Kragh;

    2014-01-01

    having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94-0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04-1.14]), the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12-1.48]) or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01-1.27]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested no...... from humans. We aimed to examine the association between prenatal stress due to maternal bereavement following the death of a relative and childbirths in the offspring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This population-based cohort study included all subjects born in Denmark after 1968 and in Sweden after 1973...... and follow-up started at the age of 12 years. Subjects were categorized as exposed if their mothers lost a close relative during pregnancy or the year before and unexposed otherwise. The main outcomes were age at first child and age-specific mean numbers of childbirths. Data was analyzed using Cox...

  20. Changes in Routine Health Behaviors Following Late-life Bereavement: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Sarah T.; Schulz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines the relationship between late-life spousal bereavement and changes in routine health behaviors. We review six behavioral domains/modifiable risk factors that are important for maintaining health among elderly populations: physical activity, nutrition, sleep quality, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and body weight status. Thirty-four articles were identified, derived from 32 studies. We found strong evidence for a relationship between bereavement and nutritional risk and involuntary weight loss, and moderate evidence for impaired sleep quality and increased alcohol consumption. There was mixed evidence for a relationship between bereavement and physical activity. We identify several methodological shortcomings, and describe the clinical implications of this review for the development of preventive intervention strategies. PMID:23881308

  1. Youth and wellbeing: experiencing bereavement and ill health in marginalised young people's transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Robert; Shildrick, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Research that explores youth transitions, health, bereavement and wellbeing is rare. Rarer still is research that does this on the basis of long-term, longitudinal, qualitative research with socioeconomically disadvantaged young people. This article draws upon biographical interviews undertaken with 186 young adults in some of England's poorest neighbourhoods (in Teesside, North East England) to examine how experiences of health, wellbeing and bereavement interact with processes of youth transition and social exclusion. Depression was the most widespread health problem arising from the multiple pressures and hardships encountered in contexts of severe socioeconomic deprivation. Unpredictable 'critical moments' (for example, of bereavement) were common and had unpredictable consequences for youth transitions. It is argued that research of this sort, particularly with a close, qualitative and biographical focus on critical moments, has value for research about youth, health and wellbeing that seeks to better understand how spatially concentrated, class-based inequalities are lived by young people and play out in their lives. PMID:22742572

  2. Long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program on spousally bereaved parents: Grief, mental health problems, alcohol problems, and coping efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Cham, Heining; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim

    2016-08-01

    This study reports on the findings from a 6-year follow-up of a randomized trial of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on the outcomes for spousally bereaved parents. Spousally bereaved parents (N = 131) participated in the trial in which they were randomly assigned to receive the FBP (N = 72) or literature control (N = 59). Parents were assessed at four time points: pretest, posttest, and 11-month and 6-year follow-up. They reported on mental health problems, grief, and parenting at all four time periods. At the 6-year follow-up, parents reported on additional measures of persistent complex bereavement disorder, alcohol abuse problems, and coping efficacy. Bereaved parents in the FBP as compared to those in the literature control had lower levels of symptoms of depression, general psychiatric distress, prolonged grief, and alcohol problems, and higher coping efficacy (for mothers) at the 6-year follow-up. Multiple characteristics of the parent (e.g., gender, age, and baseline mental health problems) and of the spousal death (e.g., cause of death) were tested as moderators of program effects on each outcome, but only 3 of 45 tests of moderation were significant. Latent growth modeling found that the effects of the FBP on depression, psychiatric distress, and grief occurred immediately following program participation and were maintained over 6 years. Mediation analysis found that improvement in positive parenting partially mediated program effects to reduce depression and psychiatric distress, but had an indirect effect to higher levels of grief at the 6-year follow-up. Mediation analysis also found that improved parenting at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated by program effects to reduce depression and that program effects to increase coping efficacy at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated through reduced depression and grief and improved parenting. FBP reduced mental health problems, prolonged grief, and alcohol abuse, and increased coping

  3. Suicidality and Bereavement: Complicated Grief As Psychiatric Disorder Presenting Greatest Risk For Suicidality

    OpenAIRE

    Latham, Amy E.; Prigerson., Holly G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study examined the influence of Complicated Grief (CG) on suicidality among bereaved adults. Methods: The Yale Evaluation of Suicidality scale and the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised were administered to 309 bereaved adults in face-to-face interviews conducted at baseline (6.2 months post-loss) and at follow-up (10.8 months post-loss). Results: Cross-sectionally, CG was associated with a 6.58 (95% CI: 1.74-18.0) times greater likelihood of “high suicidality” at baselin...

  4. The Effects of the Family Bereavement Program to Reduce Suicide Ideation and/or Attempts of Parentally Bereaved Children Six and Fifteen Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim S

    2016-04-01

    Findings concerning the long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts of parentally bereaved children and adolescents are presented. Parental death is a significant risk factor for suicide among offspring (Guldin et al., 2015). This study is a long-term follow-up of 244 children and adolescents who had participated in a randomized trial of the FBP, examining the intervention effects on suicide ideation and/or attempts as assessed through multiple sources. Results indicate a significant effect of the FBP to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts at the 6- and 15-year follow-up evaluation. The findings support the potential benefits of further research on "upstream" suicide prevention. PMID:27094109

  5. Bereavement and mental health after sudden and violent losses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pål; Weisæth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the psychological consequences of sudden and violent losses, including disaster and military losses. It also reviews risk and resilience factors for grief and mental health and describes the effects and possible benefit of psychosocial interventions. The review shows gaps in the literature on grief and bereavement after sudden and violent deaths. Still, some preliminary conclusions can be made. Several studies show that a sudden and violent loss of a loved one can adversely affect mental health and grief in a substantial number of the bereaved. The prevalence of mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and prolonged grief disorder (PGD, also termed complicated grief) varies widely, however, from study to study. Also, mental health disorders are more elevated after sudden and violent losses than losses following natural deaths, and the trajectory of recovery seems to be slower. Several factors related to the circumstances of the loss may put the bereaved at heightened risk for mental distress. These factors may be differentially related to different outcomes; some increase the risk for PTSD, others for PGD. Given the special circumstances, bereavement following sudden and violent death may require different interventions than for loss from natural death. Recommendations for future research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:22397543

  6. Concept of Death and Perceptions of Bereavement in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, J.; MacHale, R.; Tierney, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bereavement is potentially a time of disruption and emotional distress. For individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), a limited understanding of the concept of death may exacerbate this distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate how individuals with ID understand and explain death and make sense of life without…

  7. Concept of death and perceptions of bereavement in adults with intellectual disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, J

    2012-02-01

    Bereavement is potentially a time of disruption and emotional distress. For individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), a limited understanding of the concept of death may exacerbate this distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate how individuals with ID understand and explain death and make sense of life without the deceased.

  8. Prevalence and Severity of College Student Bereavement Examined in a Randomly Selected Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, David E.; Walker, Andrea C.; Baker, Ardith

    2010-01-01

    The authors used stratified random sampling to assess the prevalence and severity of bereavement in college undergraduates, providing an advance over findings that emerge from convenience sampling methods or from anecdotal observations. Prior research using convenience sampling indicated that 22% to 30% of college students are within 12 months of…

  9. Uncomplicated Depression, Suicide Attempt, and the DSM-5 Bereavement Exclusion Debate: An Empirical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Jerome C.; Schmitz, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the claim, made repeatedly during "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", Fifth Edition debates over eliminating the bereavement exclusion (BE), that ''uncomplicated'' depressive reactions have elevated suicidality like other major depressive disorder (MDD), so exclusions risk…

  10. The Bereavement Exclusion for the Diagnosis of Major Depression: To be, or not to be

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Kristy; Pies, Ronald; Zisook, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews studies bearing on the validity of the bereavement exclusion for the diagnosis of major depression. It concludes that the exclusion is not supported by the best available data, and the authors propose revisions for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition.

  11. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  12. Parents' Death and Adult Well-being: Gender, Age, and Adaptation to Filial Bereavement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Leopold; C.M. Lechner

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated how filial bereavement affects the subjective well-being of adult children. They used data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study to examine temporal profiles of life satisfaction in 2,760 adult children ages 17-70 who moved through the stages of anticipation of, reactio

  13. Dreams of Deceased Children and Countertransference in the Group Psychotherapy of Bereaved Mothers: Clinical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group…

  14. Empowering People at Work in the Face of Death and Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Edwards, David

    2009-01-01

    How people respond at work may have a critical part to play in how bereaved or terminally ill colleagues manage their grief and their lives. Although counselors, human resources, occupational health staff, and others may have an important back-up role to play, pivotal support needs to come from line managers, colleagues, and, where they exist,…

  15. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  16. An Investigation of the Relationship of Personality, Coping, and Grief Intensity among Bereaved Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tristan; Marwit, Samuel J.

    2006-01-01

    A mediational model of grief intensity (Meuser & Marwit, 2000) was examined in a population at risk for complicated grief. Coping strategies (emotion-oriented, task-oriented, and avoidance-oriented coping) were hypothesized to mediate the influence of personality factors (neuroticism and extraversion) on grief. Bereaved mothers (N =138) completed…

  17. Bereavement and Loss: Developing a Memory Box to Support a Young Woman with Profound Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah; Garrard, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Supporting bereaved people with profound learning disabilities still remains an under-researched area. Moreover, the barriers of communication and disenfranchised grief mean that they often do not receive the support they require, leading to emotional and behavioural difficulties. This article describes research using a case study design, which…

  18. Ruminative coping as avoidance : a reinterpretation of its function in adjustment to bereavement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, Margaret; Boelen, Paul A; van den Hout, Marcel; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Salemink, Elske; van den Bout, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The paper argues for a reconceptualization of ruminative coping with the death of a loved one as an avoidant rather than a confrontational strategy. Ruminative coping has been characterized within the bereavement field as persistent, repetitive and passive focus on negative emotions and symptoms. It

  19. Parental Bereavement and the Loss of a Child with Intellectual Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Deirdre E.; Hastings, Richard P.; Vaughan, Frances L.; Huws, Jaci C.

    2008-01-01

    Inequalities in health care and other risk factors mean that children with intellectual disabilities are more likely to predecease their parents. Research on the effects on family members when a child with intellectual disability dies is sparse. In the present review, the authors describe 5 studies of bereavement in intellectual disability and…

  20. Prenatal stress exposure related to maternal bereavement and risk of childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten; Baker, Jennifer L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that prenatal stress contributes to the risk of obesity later in life. In a population-based cohort study, we examined whether prenatal stress related to maternal bereavement during pregnancy was associated with the risk of overweight in offspring during school age....

  1. Grief Experience of Bereaved Malay/Muslim Youths in Singapore: The Spiritual Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Murshidah; Mehta, Kalyani

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study conducted in Singapore which examined different coping mechanisms engaged by Malay/Muslim bereaved youths following parental death. The research applied the revised Transactional Model of Stress and Coping as well as the Adolescent Coping Scale as a theoretical framework for analysing findings. Of the…

  2. A Delphi Study on Staff Bereavement Training in the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer A.; Truesdale, Jesslyn

    2015-01-01

    The Delphi technique was used to obtain expert panel consensus to prioritize content areas and delivery methods for developing staff grief and bereavement curriculum training in the intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) field. The Delphi technique was conducted with a panel of 18 experts from formal and informal disability caregiving,…

  3. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms. Design and Methods: Alzheimer's caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly…

  4. The Relationship between Explanatory Style and Posttraumatic Growth after Bereavement in a Non-Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Chu, Kwung Wing; Yiu, Jessie

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between explanatory style and self-perceived posttraumatic growth was examined among 105 undergraduates in Hong Kong who had experienced bereavement in the past 6 years. Individuals who tended to attribute positive events to internal, global, and stable factors reported more posttraumatic growth than individuals who tended to…

  5. Prenatal exposure to bereavement and type-2 diabetes: a Danish longitudinal population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasveer Virk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of type-2 diabetes is only partly known, and a possible role of prenatal stress in programming offspring for insulin resistance has been suggested by animal models. Previously, we found an association between prenatal stress and type-1 diabetes. Here we examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement during preconception and pregnancy and development of type-2 diabetes in the off-spring. METHODS: We utilized data from the Danish Civil Registration System to identify singleton births in Denmark born January 1(st 1979 through December 31(st 2008 (N = 1,878,246, and linked them to their parents, grandparents, and siblings. We categorized children as exposed to bereavement during prenatal life if their mothers lost an elder child, husband or parent during the period from one year before conception to the child's birth. We identified 45,302 children exposed to maternal bereavement; the remaining children were included in the unexposed cohort. The outcome of interest was diagnosis of type-2 diabetes. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs from birth using log-linear poisson regression models and used person-years as the offset variable. All models were adjusted for maternal residence, income, education, marital status, sibling order, calendar year, sex, and parents' history of diabetes at the time of pregnancy. RESULTS: We found children exposed to bereavement during their prenatal life were more likely to have a type-2 diabetes diagnosis later in life (aIRR: 1.31, 1.01-1.69. These findings were most pronounced when bereavement was caused by death of an elder child (aIRR: 1.51, 0.94-2.44. Results also indicated the second trimester of pregnancy to be the most sensitive period of bereavement exposure (aIRR:2.08, 1.15-3.76. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that fetal exposure to maternal bereavement during preconception and the prenatal period may increase the risk for developing type-2 diabetes in

  6. Viewing the body after bereavement due to suicide: a population-based survey in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Omerov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research on the assumed, positive and negative, psychological effects of viewing the body after a suicide loss is sparse. We hypothesized that suicide-bereaved parents that viewed their childs body in a formal setting seldom regretted the experience, and that viewing the body was associated with lower levels of psychological morbidity two to five years after the loss. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified 915 suicide-bereaved parents by linkage of nationwide population-based registries and collected data by a questionnaire. The outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. In total, 666 (73% parents participated. Of the 460 parents (69% that viewed the body, 96% answered that they did not regret the experience. The viewing was associated with a higher risk of reliving the child's death through nightmares (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.32 and intrusive memories (RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38, but not with anxiety (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.40 and depression (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.83. One limitation of our study is that we lack data on the informants' personality and coping strategies. CONCLUSIONS: In this Swedish population-based survey of suicide-bereaved parents, we found that by and large everyone that had viewed their deceased child in a formal setting did not report regretting the viewing when asked two to five years after the loss. Our findings suggest that most bereaved parents are capable of deciding if they want to view the body or not. Officials may assist by giving careful information about the child's appearance and other details concerning the viewing, thus facilitating mental preparation for the bereaved person. This is the first large-scale study on the effects of viewing the body after a suicide and additional studies are needed before clinical recommendations can be made.

  7. Normal Grief and Complicated Bereavement among Traumatized Cambodian Refugees: Cultural Context and the Central Role of Dreams of the Dead

    OpenAIRE

    Hinton, Devon E.; Peou, Sonith; Joshi, Siddharth; Nickerson, Angela; Simon, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    This article profiles bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees and explores the validity of a model of how grief and PTSD interact in this group to form a unique bereavement ontology, a model in which dreams of the dead play a crucial role. Several studies were conducted at a psychiatric clinic treating Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide. Key findings included that Pol Pot deaths were made even more deeply disturbing owing to cultural ideas about “bad death” and the ...

  8. Comparing Cognitive, Relational and Stress Mechanisms Underlying Gender Differences in Recovery from Bereavement-related Internalizing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    LITTLE, MICHELLE; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.

    2009-01-01

    Four putative mediators underlying gender differences in youths’ recovery from bereavement-related internalizing problems were examined in a sample (N = 109; age range of 8 to 16 years at the initial assessment) of parentally-bereaved youth: intrusive thoughts about grief, post-death stressors, negative appraisals of post-death stressors and fear of abandonment. A three-wave parallel process longitudinal growth model design was employed. Changes in internalizing problems and mediators were me...

  9. CAN A FUNCTION-BASED THERAPY FOR SPOUSALLY BEREAVED SENIORS ACCRUE BENEFITS IN BOTH FUNCTIONAL AND EMOTIONAL DOMAINS?

    OpenAIRE

    Pfoff, Marissa K.; Zarotney, Joette R.; MONK, TIMOTHY H.

    2013-01-01

    Late-life spousal bereavement has detrimental effects in daily functioning and emotional distress. This study tested the hypothesis that a therapy based exclusively upon functioning issues (sleep and daily lifestyle regularity) would accrue benefits in both functional and emotional domains. A comparison was made with a control therapy which concentrated on emotional issues, and specifically avoided discussing sleep or lifestyle regularity. Thirty-eight spousally bereaved seniors were randomly...

  10. From Body to Mind and Spirit: Qigong Exercise for Bereaved Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bereavement may bring negative impacts on the mind, body, and spiritual well-being of grieving persons. Some bereaved persons with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- illness experience a dual burden of distress. This study investigated the effects of bereavement on CFS-like illness by comparing bereaved and nonbereaved participants. It also adopted a random group design to investigate the effectiveness of Qigong on improving the well-being of bereaved participants. The Qigong intervention comprised 10 group sessions delivered twice a week for 5 weeks and home-practice for at least three times a week lasting 15–30 minutes each. The participants’ fatigue, anxiety, and depression, quality of life (QoL, and spiritual well-being were measured at baseline and 3 months after treatment. The bereaved participants experienced significantly greater mental fatigue (16.09 versus 14.44, p=0.017 and lower physical QoL (34.02 versus 37.17, p=0.011 than their nonbereaved counterparts. After 3 months, the mental fatigue (−8 versus −4, p=0.010 and physical fatigue (−10 versus −5, p=0.007 experienced by intervention group had declined significantly, and improvements on their spirituality (14 versus −2, p=0.013 and psychological QoL (8.91 versus 0.69, p=0.002 scores exceeded those of the control group.

  11. From Body to Mind and Spirit: Qigong Exercise for Bereaved Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chan, Jessie S M; Chow, Amy Y M; Yuen, Lai Ping; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2015-01-01

    Bereavement may bring negative impacts on the mind, body, and spiritual well-being of grieving persons. Some bereaved persons with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) illness experience a dual burden of distress. This study investigated the effects of bereavement on CFS-like illness by comparing bereaved and nonbereaved participants. It also adopted a random group design to investigate the effectiveness of Qigong on improving the well-being of bereaved participants. The Qigong intervention comprised 10 group sessions delivered twice a week for 5 weeks and home-practice for at least three times a week lasting 15-30 minutes each. The participants' fatigue, anxiety, and depression, quality of life (QoL), and spiritual well-being were measured at baseline and 3 months after treatment. The bereaved participants experienced significantly greater mental fatigue (16.09 versus 14.44, p = 0.017) and lower physical QoL (34.02 versus 37.17, p = 0.011) than their nonbereaved counterparts. After 3 months, the mental fatigue (-8 versus -4, p = 0.010) and physical fatigue (-10 versus -5, p = 0.007) experienced by intervention group had declined significantly, and improvements on their spirituality (14 versus -2, p = 0.013) and psychological QoL (8.91 versus 0.69, p = 0.002) scores exceeded those of the control group. PMID:26504478

  12. 'They all look as if they're coping, but I'm not': the relational power/lessness of 'youth' in responding to experiences of bereavement

    OpenAIRE

    Ribbens McCarthy, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Experience of significant bereavement is reported by the majority of young people in contemporary western societies, but it receives little attention from mainstream services or academics, and this marginality is paralleled in young people's everyday bereavement experiences. Existing academic and professional work concerned with children and young people's experiences of bereavement largely centres on cognitive understandings of death, and individual intra-psychic processes and responses in t...

  13. Bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Grocke, Denise; McFerran, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child. In-depth interviews were conducted with 7 bereaved parents who were recruited through a community-based palliative care program. The parent participants' experiences varied as their children who received music therapy ranged in ages from 5 months to 12 years old. The interview transcripts were analyzed using phenomenological strategies. Five global themes emerged from the analysis. These included (a) music therapy was valued as a means of altering the child's and family's perception of their situation in the midst of adversity, (b) music therapy was a significant component of remembrance, (c) music therapy was a multifaceted experience for the child and family, (d) music therapy enhanced communication and expression, and (e) parents shared perceptions of and recommendations for improving music therapy services. These emergent themes yield knowledge into the relevance of music therapy within pediatric palliative care. PMID:18959454

  14. Predicting chronic posttraumatic stress disorder in bereaved relatives: a 6-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Tina E; Elklit, Ask; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Palic, Sabina

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to identify predicative risk factors for PTSD in bereaved people after a terminal illness. Fifty-four persons (mean age 60 years) participated in the study. Demographic, peritraumatic, and psychosocial factors were assessed in order to identify variables that affected PTSD severity. Six months after the loss, 21.6 % of the subjects had PTSD, an 8.6 % decrease from PTSD measured one month after the loss. Intake of medicine after the loss, place of death, not having a close intimate, negative affectivity, and the A2 criterion predicted 65 % of PTSD severity. A considerable number of the bereaved were still at great risk for developing PTSD six months after loss. PMID:23687214

  15. The forgotten people in British public health: a national neglect of the dying, bereaved and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapliagou, Aliki; Kellehear, Allan

    2016-06-01

    The clinical and social epidemiology of living with a life-threatening or life-limiting illness, frail ageing, long-term caregiving, and grief and bereavement is well documented in the palliative care, psycho-oncology and psychiatric literature but this investigation asks what interest exists from the mainstream public health sector in these health and illness experiences. This paper reports a content analysis of 7 key British public health journals, 14 major public health textbooks and 3 public health websites employing key word and synonym searches to assess the size and quality of interest in populations related to ageing, dying, caregiving, and grief and bereavement. Compared with other public health issues, such as obesity and tobacco use, for examples, interest in the social experience and epidemiology of end-of-life experiences is extremely low. Reasons for this lack of interest are explored. PMID:26892871

  16. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? Evidence from eye-tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten C Eisma

    Full Text Available Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful aspects of the loss, thereby contributing to complicated grief. To examine if rumination is linked with loss avoidance, an eye-tracking study was conducted with 54 bereaved individuals (27 high and 27 low ruminators. On 24 trials, participants looked for 10 seconds at a picture of the deceased and a picture of a stranger, randomly combined with negative, neutral or loss-related words. High ruminators were expected to show initial vigilance followed by subsequent disengagement for loss stimuli (i.e., picture deceased with a loss word in the first 1500 ms. Additionally, we expected high ruminators to avoid these loss stimuli and to show attentional preference for non-loss-related negative stimuli (i.e., picture stranger with a negative word on longer exposure durations (1500-10000 ms. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for an effect of rumination on vigilance and disengagement of loss stimuli in the first 1500 ms. However, in the 1500-10000 ms interval, high ruminators showed shorter gaze times for loss stimuli and longer gaze times for negative (and neutral non-loss-related stimuli, even when controlling for depression and complicated grief symptom levels. Effects of rumination on average fixation times mirrored these findings. This suggests that rumination and loss avoidance are closely associated. A potential clinical implication is that rumination and grief complications after bereavement may be reduced through the use of exposure and acceptance

  17. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? Evidence from eye-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisma, Maarten C; Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Margaret S; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Boelen, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful aspects of the loss, thereby contributing to complicated grief. To examine if rumination is linked with loss avoidance, an eye-tracking study was conducted with 54 bereaved individuals (27 high and 27 low ruminators). On 24 trials, participants looked for 10 seconds at a picture of the deceased and a picture of a stranger, randomly combined with negative, neutral or loss-related words. High ruminators were expected to show initial vigilance followed by subsequent disengagement for loss stimuli (i.e., picture deceased with a loss word) in the first 1500 ms. Additionally, we expected high ruminators to avoid these loss stimuli and to show attentional preference for non-loss-related negative stimuli (i.e., picture stranger with a negative word) on longer exposure durations (1500-10000 ms). Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for an effect of rumination on vigilance and disengagement of loss stimuli in the first 1500 ms. However, in the 1500-10000 ms interval, high ruminators showed shorter gaze times for loss stimuli and longer gaze times for negative (and neutral) non-loss-related stimuli, even when controlling for depression and complicated grief symptom levels. Effects of rumination on average fixation times mirrored these findings. This suggests that rumination and loss avoidance are closely associated. A potential clinical implication is that rumination and grief complications after bereavement may be reduced through the use of exposure and acceptance

  18. Terminal care: evaluation of effects on surviving family of care before and after bereavement.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J; Parkes, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the effects on the family of a comprehensive programme of terminal cancer care, 20 close relatives of patients who had died in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU) were compared with a matched group of 20 relatives of patients who had died of cancer in other wards of the same teaching hospital. Interviewed by telephone 1 year and 2 weeks after bereavement, relatives of PCU patients report significantly fewer psychological symptoms and less lasting grief and anger than relatives of patient...

  19. In-Utero Exposure to Bereavement and Offspring IQ: A Danish National Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Virk, Jasveer; Obel, Carsten; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    Background Intelligence is a life-long trait that has strong influences on lifestyle, adult morbidity and life expectancy. Hence, lower cognitive abilities are therefore of public health interest. Our primary aim was to examine if prenatal bereavement measured as exposure to death of a close family member is associated with the intelligence quotient (IQ) scores at 18-years of age of adult Danish males completing a military cognitive screening examination. Methods We extracted records for the ...

  20. Examining Cognitive Impairments in Bereaved Adults With and Without Complicated Grief

    OpenAIRE

    Robinaugh, Donald John

    2015-01-01

    Grief is a syndrome of cognitions, emotions, and behaviors that commonly arise together following the death of a loved one. It includes intense pangs of emotional pain, yearning for the deceased, emotional numbness, subjective difficulty imagining the future without the deceased, and preoccupation with thoughts related to the death and the deceased. In the initial months following loss, the majority of bereaved adults will experience some or even many elements of this syndrome. For most, the ...

  1. Bereaved Parents’ and Siblings’ Reports of Legacies Created by Children With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Davies, Betty; Barrera, Maru; Fairclough, Diane; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study explored bereaved parents’ and siblings’ reports of legacies created by children with advanced cancer. Participants included 40 families of children who died from cancer, with 36 mothers, 27 fathers, and 40 siblings (ages 8–18 years). Individual interviews were completed at home approximately 10.68 months (SD = 3.48) after the child’s death. Content analysis of interviews indicated that many children living with cancer did specific things to be remembered, such as makin...

  2. Systematic Review of Psychosocial Morbidities among Bereaved Parents of Children with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Abby R.; Baker, K. Scott; Syrjala, Karen; Wolfe, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review was to comprehensively summarize existing studies utilizing validated instruments to measure psychosocial outcomes among bereaved parents of children with cancer. This population has increased risks of anxiety, depression, prolonged grief, and poor quality of life. Parental morbidity is associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, prior loss, economic hardship, duration and intensity of child’s cancer-therapy, perceptions of medical care, child’s quality of life, p...

  3. In-utero exposure to bereavement and offspring IQ: a Danish national cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasveer Virk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intelligence is a life-long trait that has strong influences on lifestyle, adult morbidity and life expectancy. Hence, lower cognitive abilities are therefore of public health interest. Our primary aim was to examine if prenatal bereavement measured as exposure to death of a close family member is associated with the intelligence quotient (IQ scores at 18-years of age of adult Danish males completing a military cognitive screening examination. METHODS: We extracted records for the Danish military screening test and found kinship links with biological parents, siblings, and maternal grandparents using the Danish Civil Registration System (N = 167,900. The prenatal exposure period was defined as 12 months before conception until birth of the child. We categorized children as exposed in utero to severe stress (bereavement during prenatal life if their mothers lost an elder child, husband, parent or sibling during the prenatal period; the remaining children were included in the unexposed cohort. Mean score estimates were adjusted for maternal and paternal age at birth, residence, income, maternal education, gestational age at birth and birth weight. RESULTS: When exposure was due to death of a father the offsprings' mean IQ scores were lower among men completing the military recruitment exam compared to their unexposed counterparts, adjusted difference of 6.5 standard IQ points (p-value = 0.01. We did not observe a clinically significant association between exposure to prenatal maternal bereavement caused by death of a sibling, maternal uncle/aunt or maternal grandparent even after stratifying deaths only due to traumatic events. CONCLUSION: We found maternal bereavement to be adversely associated with IQ in male offspring, which could be related to prenatal stress exposure though more likely is due to changes in family conditions after death of the father. This finding supports other literature on maternal adversity during fetal

  4. Bereaved relatives’ experiences during the incurable phase of cancer: a qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnhoven, Marleen N; Terpstra, Wim E.; van Rossem, Ronald; Haazer, Carolien; Gunnink-Boonstra, Nicolette; Sonke, Gabe S; Buiting, Hilde M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine bereaved relatives’ experiences from time of diagnosis of incurable cancer until death with specific emphasis on their role in the (end-of-life) decision-making concerning chemotherapy. Design Qualitative interview study. Setting Hospital-based. Participants and methods In-depth interviews with 15 close relatives of patients who died from non-small cell lung cancer or pancreatic cancer, using a thematic content analysis. Results All relatives reported that patients’ main ...

  5. Parental divorce and parental death - An integrative systematic review of children’s double bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Poul; Marcussen, Jette; Hounsgaard, Lise;

    2015-01-01

    and practice for nurses and other health professionals, so they can intervene with these children and adolescents more efficaciously. An integrative systematic review was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. The results show four major themes: Complexity in their experiences of double bereavement......; challenges in both custodial and non-custodial parental death; risk of mental health problems, and the need of support and interventions....

  6. Caregiver Responsiveness to the Family Bereavement Program: What predicts responsiveness? What does responsiveness predict?

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Berkel, Cady; Ayers, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The study developed a multi-dimensional measure to assess participant responsiveness to a preventive intervention, and applied this measure to study how participant baseline characteristics predict responsiveness and how responsiveness predicts program outcomes. The study was conducted with caregivers who participated in the parenting-focused component of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a prevention program for families that have experienced parental death. The sample consisted of 89 ca...

  7. Request for organ donation without donor registration: a qualitative study of the perspectives of bereaved relatives

    OpenAIRE

    De Groot, Jack; van Hoek, Maria; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia; Hoitsma, Andries; Schilderman, Hans; Smeets, Wim; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; van Leeuwen, Evert

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands, consent from relatives is obligatory for post mortal donation. This study explored the perspectives of relatives regarding the request for consent for donation in cases without donor registration. Methods A content analysis of narratives of 24 bereaved relatives (14 in-depth interviews and one letter) of unregistered, eligible, brain-dead donors was performed. Results Relatives of unregistered, brain-dead patients usually refuse consent for donation, even if the...

  8. In-Utero Exposure to Bereavement and Offspring IQ: A Danish National Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jasveer Virk; Carsten Obel; Jiong Li; Jørn Olsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intelligence is a life-long trait that has strong influences on lifestyle, adult morbidity and life expectancy. Hence, lower cognitive abilities are therefore of public health interest. Our primary aim was to examine if prenatal bereavement measured as exposure to death of a close family member is associated with the intelligence quotient (IQ) scores at 18-years of age of adult Danish males completing a military cognitive screening examination. METHODS: We extracted records for th...

  9. Entrepreneurial and Sustainable Business Strategies in Bereavement Industry : Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Business Practices and Consumers Views)

    OpenAIRE

    Grgas, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate dimensions of Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) business practices in bereavement industry (BI) in Kuala Lumpur and how these practices, with focus on sustainability issues, relate to consumers views. The study will evaluate business practices in BI based on Ireland’s (2003) model of SE with particular focus on sustainable entrepreneurial practices as they relate to constraint of availability of interment space in funeral homes in Kuala Lumpur. Information from re...

  10. The prevalence, comorbidity and risks of prolonged grief disorder among bereaved Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Tang, Suqin; Yu, Wei; Xu, Wei; Xie, Qiuyuan; Wang, Jianping

    2014-10-30

    Few epidemiological studies have investigated prolonged grief disorder (PGD) in the general population of Asian countries, including China. The aim of this study was to explore the rates and risks of PGD, and the association between PGD, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety in bereaved Chinese adults. The PG-13, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) were administered to 445 subjects. Prevalence within the general population of China was 1.8% (i.e., 8/445). Among the eight subjects who met the PGD diagnosis, 75%, 87.5% and 75% scored above the cut-off point on the PCL-C, SDS and SAS, respectively, although a portion remained free from comorbidity. ANOVA, correlation analysis and stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that kinship to deceased, age of the deceased, religion belief and cause of death were predictive of prolonged grief. A small proportion of bereaved persons may exhibit PGD. There is a substantial but far from complete overlap between PGD and the other three diagnoses. Bereaved parents and the widowed have high risk of PGD. These findings highlight the need for prevention, diagnosis and treatment for PGD patients. PMID:24924526

  11. Maternal bereavement in the antenatal period and oral cleft in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Liang, H.; Olsen, J.;

    2013-01-01

    children. Overall, maternal bereavement due to the death of a close relative from 1 year before conception to the end of the first trimester was associated with a significantly increased risk of oral cleft [odds ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01; 1.61). When mothers lost a relative due...... registers in Denmark from 1978 to 2008. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Our final study population consisted of 1 771 663 children. Of these 35 118 (2%) were born to mothers who experienced bereavement in the exposure window from 1 year before pregnancy to the end of the first trimester. MAIN...... to a sudden death, the risk of oral cleft in the offspring was higher (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.06; 2.94). Losing a relative in the time period before pregnancy and during the first trimester showed a tendency to an increased risk. The risk increase was 77% when the mother was bereaved due to sudden death...

  12. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Bereaved People with Loss-Related Distress: a Controlled Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connor, Maja; Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    2014-01-01

    of elderly bereaved people (mean age=77 years) with long-term bereavement-related distress. Results were compared between MBCT intervention group completers (n=12), intervention group intention to treat (n=18), and wait list controls (n=18) at pre- and postintervention and at a 5-month follow...

  13. A Comparative Study of the Child Bereavement and Loss Responses and Needs of Schools in Hull, Yorkshire and Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Anne; Holland, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of schools' responses to child bereavement in Hull, Yorkshire and Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland. In order to gain an insight and compare how schools in both geographical areas respond to and manage bereavement, the questionnaire "Loss in schools" was selected as an appropriate tool. It has been…

  14. Bereavement Is Associated with an Increased Risk of HPV Infection and Cervical Cancer: An Epidemiological Study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Donghao; Sundström, Karin; Sparén, Pär; Fall, Katja; Sjölander, Arvid; Dillner, Joakim; Helm, Nathalie Ylitalo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Grief over the loss of a family member may cause physical and mental illness, but an association between bereavement and cancer risk has not been established. Based on the Swedish National Cervical Screening Register (1969-2011) including 14,011,269 smears from 2,466,107 women, we conducted two nested case-control studies to examine the associations of bereavement (i.e., loss of a family member due to death) with abnormal cytology (390,310 first abnormal and 1,951,319 normal smears) and in situ/invasive cervical cancer (75,128 case and 375,640 control women), both individually matched on year of birth and screening adherence. Among 1,696 of the control women, we further investigated bereavement in association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, both HPV16 and other HPV types. Bereavement was consistently associated with a 4% to 9% increased risk for first abnormal cytology, in situ and invasive cervical cancer (all P viral load, and recurrent infection, and was also more strongly associated with HPV infections designated as high-risk compared with low-risk determinants of cervical carcinogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that bereavement is associated with an increased risk of developing cervical cancer. Further, they suggest that this association may be attributed to stress-induced oncogenic HPV infections. PMID:26634926

  15. Efficacy of writing for recovery on traumatic grief symptoms of Afghani refugee bereaved adolescents: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Mehrdad; Yule, William; Dyregrov, Atle; Neshatdoost, Hamidtaher; Ahmadi, S J

    2012-01-01

    Effective evidence-based intervention for traumatic bereavement is one of the current major research issues in the field of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents. The "Writing for Recovery" group intervention is a new treatment approach developed by the Children and War Foundation for traumatized and bereaved children and adolescents after disasters. The purpose of this project was an empirical examination of this intervention with 12- to 18-year-old war bereaved Afghani refugees. Eighty-eight war bereaved Afghani refugees were screened using the Traumatic Grief Inventory for Children (TGIC). From those with the highest total score, 61 were randomly assigned to either an experimental (n = 29) or control group (n = 32). The experimental group received six sessions of group training on 3 consecutive days in their school. The difference of TGIC scores between the experimental group in pretest and posttest was significant (p = 0.001). Results of analysis of covariance also showed a significant effect of Writing for Recovery on the experimental group (p bereaved children and adolescents after disasters. PMID:22953510

  16. Bereavement healing ministry amongst Abaluyia: Towards a ‘circle for pastoral concern’ as a healing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Shikwati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article formulates a new integrated pastoral care approach to bereavement healing ministry in Africa, termed a circle for pastoral concern. In pursuit of this, the article highlights the pastoral challenge brought about by the occurrence of death and bereavement within the cultural and Christian intermix. Using the example of the Abaluyia of western Kenya, traditional cultural bereavement healing approaches are assessed against the backdrop of Christian influence on the understanding and response to death and bereavement healing and the resultant tension. The article juxtaposes the Abaluyia cultural concept of okhukura[to encircle with loving care] with the biblical koinōnia[fellowship, communion] as springboard for building culturally sensitive and biblically sound Christian caring communities. It is hoped that the juxtaposition helps to establish and promote meaningful engagement between therapeutic traditional beliefs and practices, and the gospel. The gospel-culture engagement within a local church setting provides the context in which bereavement healing and individual growth after the death of a significant other takes place. The juxtaposition is necessitated by the rampant practice in African pluralistic societies where Christians consciously, or otherwise, lurch back to cultural approaches in their effort to provide or find healing when faced with death and bereavement. The ‘circle for pastoral concern’ model encourages inclusiveness by enlisting the means and talents of the community of believers, both ordained and lay. The principle of inclusion ensures that the load of pastoral care is shared and assumes a deeper response due to diversity of gifts and talents within the caring community.

  17. Distinctiveness of symptoms of prolonged grief, depression, and post-traumatic stress in bereaved children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Spuij, Mariken; Reitz, Ellen; Prinzie, Peter; Stikkelbroek, Yvonne; de Roos, Carlijn; Paul A Boelen

    2012-01-01

    Studies among adults have shown that symptoms of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) are distinct from those of bereavement-related depression and post-traumatic stress-disorder (PTSD). This study was an attempt to replicate this finding in two distinct samples of bereaved children (N = 197; aged 8–12 years) and adolescents (N = 135; 13–18 years), confronted with the death of a parent, sibling or other close relative. Using confirmatory factor analyses, we compared the fit of a one-factor model wi...

  18. The temporal relationship between change in symptoms of prolonged grief and posttraumatic stress following old age spousal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connor, Maja; Nickerson, Angela; Aderka, Idan M.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: High levels of both prolonged grief symptoms (PGS) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) are relatively common following bereavement, and the two types of bereavement complications share some of the same features. Little research has studied which of the two precedes the other...... during the year of 2006 lost their spouse. Participants completed self-report questionnaires at six months (n = 237), 13 months (n = 198), 18 months (n = 192), and 48 months (n = 213) post-loss. Main outcome measures were Inventory of Complicated Grief–Revised and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire...

  19. How personality, coping styles, and perceived closeness influence help-seeking attitudes in suicide-bereaved adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Christopher W; Cerel, Julie; Moore, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the impact of personality, coping, and perceived closeness on help-seeking attitudes in suicide bereaved adults. Participants (n = 418; mean age = 49.50; 90% women, 89.7% Caucasian) completed measures of personality (neuroticism, extraversion, openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness), coping, and attitudes toward seeking mental health services. Regression analyses revealed neuroticism as the strongest predictor of help-seeking attitudes. Relatively neurotic adult women bereaved by suicide may be at-risk for developing unhealthy coping styles, low stigma indifference, and more negative help-seeking attitudes. PMID:26745343

  20. Predictors of grief in bereaved family caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Melissa M; Ott, Carol H; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to identify factors in 66 spouses and adult child caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's disease prior to the death that predicted higher levels of grief in bereavement. A hierarchical regression model was tested. Predeath grief, dysfunctional coping, depression, social support, and decreased positive states of mind explained 54.7% of the variance in postdeath grief. Factors that contributed significantly to postdeath grief included predeath grief and depression. Results from this study indicate that risk factors for postdeath grief can be predicted prior to the death. PMID:24666146

  1. A community for grieving: affordances of social media for support of bereaved parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstad, Ylva Hård Af; Kasperowski, Dick

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study bereaved parents' use of a closed peer grief support community on Facebook and the features of the community that are important to them. The death of a child is an uncomfortable subject in most contemporary societies. This limits the exploration of experiences and possibilities for coping with grief. However, with the introduction of social media, this has changed. Theoretical perspectives on parental grief recognizing the importance of continued relational bonds with the lost child are used, together with the ontological assumption that social media enhance the dissolving of private/public and time/space. This study is based on questionnaire, interviews, and content from the closed peer grief support community, to which the research team has insider access. The community encompasses a diverse range of experiences and stages of grief, independent of the time elapsed since the loss of a child. Bereavement of children of all ages and from all conceivable causes of death is distributed among the members. The results show how the affordances of social media become vital resources for coping with grief in ways not available previously, comprising aspects of the closed nature of the group, shared experiences, time, and accessibility.

  2. Maternal bereavement in the antenathal period and Neural tube defect in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer;

    2013-01-01

    Title: Maternal bereavement after death of a close relative and neural tube defect in the offspring Background: Neural tube defects are the second most common and often lethal congenital anomaly in the world leaving surviving children with life-long severe disabilities. A low intake of folic acid...... including all children born in Denmark from 1978-2008 and their mothers (n=1,734,190). In the time window of one year before pregnancy or during the first trimester of pregnancy 34,407 mothers were exposed to bereavement. Results: A total of 5,031 cases of neural tube defects were identified: 889 with spina...... seen (OR 1.61, 95% CI: 1.07; 2.41). Discussion: We only studied live born children but about 2/3 of children with spina bifida survive the birth or longer with corrective surgery. We did not adjust for folic acid, but a sub-analysis of approximately 85,000 mothers showed no difference in intake during...

  3. Guilt in bereavement: the role of self-blame and regret in coping with loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Stroebe

    Full Text Available Despite the apparent centrality of guilt in complicating reactions following bereavement, scientific investigation has been limited. Establishing the impact of specific components associated with guilt could enhance understanding. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between two guilt-related manifestations, namely self-blame and regret, with grief and depression. A longitudinal investigation was conducted 4-7 months, 14 months and 2 years post-loss. Participants were bereaved spouses (30 widows; 30 widowers; their mean age was 53.05 years. Results showed that self-blame was associated with grief at the initial time-point and with its decline over time. Such associations were not found for depression. Initial levels of regret were neither associated with initial levels of grief and depression, nor were they related to the decline over time in either outcome variable. These results demonstrate the importance of examining guilt-related manifestations independently, over time, and with respect to both generic and grief-specific outcome variables. A main conclusion is that self-blame (but not regret is a powerful determinant of grief-specific difficulties following the loss of a loved one. Implications for intervention are considered.

  4. Social Constraints are Associated with Negative Psychological and Physical Adjustment in Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juth, Vanessa; Smyth, Joshua M; Carey, Michael P; Lepore, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Losing a loved one is a normative life event, yet there is great variability in subsequent interpersonal experiences and adjustment. The Social-Cognitive Processing (SCP) model suggests that social constraints (i.e. limited opportunities to disclose thoughts and feelings in a supportive context) impede emotional and cognitive processing of stressful life events, which may lead to maladjustment. This study investigates personal and loss-related correlates of social constraints during bereavement, the links between social constraints and post-loss adjustment, and whether social constraints moderate the relations between loss-related intrusive thoughts and adjustment. A community sample of bereaved individuals (n = 238) provided demographic and loss-related information and reported on their social constraints, loss-related intrusions, and psychological and physical adjustment. Women, younger people, and those with greater financial concerns reported more social constraints. Social constraints were significantly associated with more depressive symptoms, perceived stress, somatic symptoms, and worse global health. Individuals with high social constraints and high loss-related intrusions had the highest depressive symptoms and perceived life stress. Consistent with the SCP model, loss-related social constraints are associated with poorer adjustment, especially psychological adjustment. In particular, experiencing social constraints in conjunction with loss-related intrusions may heighten the risk for poor psychological health. PMID:25708231

  5. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in bereaved children and adolescents: factor structure and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A; Spuij, Mariken

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the factor structure and correlates of posttraumatic stress-disorder (PTSD) symptoms among children and adolescents confronted with the death of a loved one. Three hundred thirty-two bereaved children and adolescents (aged 8-18; 56.9 % girls) who all received some form of psychosocial support after their loss, completed self-report measures of PTSD, together with measures tapping demographic and loss-related variables, depression, prolonged grief, and functional impairment. Parent-rated indices of impairment were also collected. We first evaluated the fit of six alternative models of the factor structure of PTSD symptoms, using confirmatory factor analyses. Outcomes showed that the 4-factor numbing model from King et al. (Psychological Assessment 10, 90-96, 1998), with distinct factors of reexperiencing, avoidance, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal fit the data best. Of all participants, 51.5 % met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD. PTSD-status and scores on the PTSD factors varied as a function of age and gender, but were unrelated to other demographic and loss-related variables. PTSD-status and scores on the PTSD factors were significantly associated symptom-levels of depression, prolonged grief, and functional impairment. Findings complement prior evidence that the DSM-IV model of the factor structure of PTSD symptoms may not represent the best conceptualization of these symptoms and highlight the importance of addressing PTSD symptoms in children and adolescents seeking help after bereavement. PMID:23612882

  6. Meaning-Making through Psychological Autopsy Interviews: The Value of Participating in Qualitative Research for Those Bereaved by Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyregrov, Kari Madeleine; Dieserud, Gudrun; Hjelmeland, Heidi Marie; Straiton, Melanie; Rasmussen, Mette Lyberg; Knizek, Birthe Loa; Leenaars, Antoon Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Too often ethical boards delay or stop research projects with vulnerable populations, influenced by presumed rather than empirically documented vulnerability. The article investigates how participation is experienced by those bereaved by suicide. Experiences are divided into 3 groups: (a) overall positive (62%), (b) unproblematic (10%), and (c)…

  7. The Role of Rumination in the Coexistence of Distress and Posttraumatic Growth among Bereaved Japanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taku, Kanako; Calhoun, Lawrence G.; Cann, Arnie; Tedeschi, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between rumination, distress and posttraumatic growth (PTG). Seventy-one bereaved Japanese university students completed the PTG Inventory, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and a rumination scale. Three models, with variables including intrusive rumination, deliberate rumination, distress, and PTG, were…

  8. Getting Unstuck: The Roles of Hope, Finding Meaning, and Rumination in the Adjustment to Bereavement among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Scott T.; Snyder, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between hope, bereavement-related rumination, and finding meaning (making sense and benefit finding) were examined in 158 college students who experienced the death of a loved one within the latter half of their lives. Greater rumination was related significantly to lessened psychological well-being, and it mediated the…

  9. Effects of Support, Counselling and Therapy Before and After the Loss: Can we Really Help Bereaved People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Schut

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Can other persons, personally or professionally, help bereaved individuals deal with the loss of a loved one? An increasing number of empirical studies, as well as qualitative and quantitative reviews, have addressed this question. Here, the main findings are summarised and implications for researchers and practitioners considered. First, provision of help from the informal social network and volunteers/professionals in the post-loss period is examined. Second, and uniquely in this research area, examination is extended to the efficacy of intervention for family members prior to their bereavement (i.e., in the context of palliative/end-of-life care. To what extent do the pre-loss patterns mirror those for post-bereavement intervention efficacy? A main conclusion is that intervention is not effective for bereaved persons in general, either when this is provided before or after the actual loss. It is important to identify and target high-risk persons. Further scientific and clinical implications of the patterns of results are discussed.

  10. Sound Continuing Bonds with the Deceased: The Relevance of Music, Including Preloss Music Therapy, for Eight Bereaved Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C.; McDermott, Fiona; Hudson, Peter; Zalcberg, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines music's relevance, including preloss music therapy, for 8 informal caregivers of people who died from cancer. The design was informed by constructivist grounded theory and included semistructured interviews. Bereaved caregivers were supported or occasionally challenged as their musical lives enabled a connection with the…

  11. Bereavement Experiences of Mothers and Fathers over Time after the Death of a Child due to Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rifat; Barrera, Maru; D'Agostino, Norma; Nicholas, David B.; Schneiderman, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated longitudinally bereavement in mothers and fathers whose children died of cancer. Thirty-one parents were interviewed 6 and 18 months post-death. Analyses revealed parental differences and changes over time: (a) employment--fathers were more work-focused; (b) grief reactions--mothers expressed more intense grief reactions…

  12. Public hazards or private tragedies? An exploratory study of the effect of coroners' procedures on those bereaved by suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Lucy

    2003-03-01

    This study in the UK examined how the suicide inquest can affect bereaved relatives and impact upon their grief. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with a sample of 16 individuals bereaved by suicide in order to explore their experiences of the inquest. Thematic analysis was used to identify recurrent problems and their effects. Several interviewees had been significantly traumatised by the inquest process. They were particularly disturbed by the judicial atmosphere, media activity, the invasion of privacy, and giving evidence. Exposure to graphic evidence, delayed inquests, confiscated suicide notes and the inquest's failure to provide explanation and deal with blame also presented problems. Difficulties were compounded by a widespread lack of preparation and communication prior to the event. The inquest adversely affected resolution of grief in two main ways: by exacerbating common grief reactions associated with bereavement by suicide, such as, shame, guilt and anger; and, by interfering with necessary grief work, most notably, the task of arriving at a meaningful and acceptable account of the death. Other interviewees described more positive experiences, one of whom regarded the inquest as helpful to their resolution of grief. Whereas these results may not typify all inquest experiences, the findings do suggest that a number of reforms are necessary to avoid the possibility of the inquest distressing this vulnerable group. Ideally, there should be a clear protocol for dealing with bereaved relatives. This is currently lacking in the coroners' system. PMID:12593876

  13. Teaching a Combined Course on Grief and Bereavement for BSW and MSW Students: Strategies, Content, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethel, Joyous C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will address the development and offering of two combined (BSW and MSW) courses in Grief and Bereavement. This is a description of the purposes, educational units, and assignments for both courses. In addition, there is discussion of the learning environment to include educational strategies to promote both didactic and experiential…

  14. Prolonged grief disorder, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder among bereaved Kosovar civilian war survivors: a preliminary investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Morina; V. Rudari; G. Bleichhardt; H. Prigerson

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study aimed at examining diagnostic concordance between Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD), Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among bereaved war survivors who had lost relatives due to war-related violence. Method: We investigated the rates of PGD

  15. The Experience of Carers in Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities through the Process of Bereavement: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Emily; Hutchinson, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study explored the personal experiences of family carers and residential care staff in supporting adults with intellectual disabilities through the process of bereavement. Method: A semi-structured interview was used to interview 11 carers on their experience of supporting adults with intellectual disabilities through the process…

  16. Cancer bereavement grief reactions of children%癌症丧亲儿童哀伤反应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向峰儀

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解儿童在丧亲前后生理、情绪、行为等方面发生的变化,从而得出丧亲儿童哀伤反应资料。方法:2012.5-2013.4宁养居家服务过程中对9名年龄分别为2岁以下、3至5岁、5至9岁、大于9岁的癌症丧亲儿童本人及其主要照顾者进行深度访谈。结果:9名丧亲儿童出现多种哀伤反应。结论:丧亲儿童哀伤反应的表现复杂多样,其主要照顾者应及时发现并正确引导儿童度过哀伤反应期。%Objective:Understanding of children's physical, emotional, behavioral changes before and after the bereavement, to arrive at some grief reactions of bereaved children. Methods:Hospice home care, in-depth interviews of five cancer bereaved children themselves and their primary caregivers.Results:Five bereaved children there are a variety of grief reactions. Conclusion:Performance of bereaved children's grief reactions are complex and diverse, and their primary caregivers should be to detect and correct guide children through the grief reactions of.

  17. Probable Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Its Predictors in Disaster-Bereaved Survivors: A Longitudinal Study After the Sichuan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiuying; Cao, Xiaoyi; Wang, Heng; Chen, Qian; Liu, Maoqiong; Yamamoto, Aiko

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the trajectory of probable PTSD prevalence and severity, and analyzed the predictors for PTSD severity in bereaved survivors at 6months and 18months after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. This was a longitudinal study with 226 bereaved survivors sampled at 6months and 18months post-earthquake. The instrument used in the study was the revised version of the Impact of Event Scale. The results showed that the prevalence of probable PTSD in bereaved survivors decreased significantly from 38.9% at 6months to 16.8% at 18months post-earthquake. Loss of a child, being directly exposed to the death of family members and property loss during the earthquake, and mental health services utilization after the earthquake were significant predictors for PTSD severity at both assessments. These findings can contribute to post-disaster psychological rescue work. The bereaved survivors at high risk for more severe PTSD should be particularly targeted. PMID:26992870

  18. Course of bereavement over 8-10 years in first degree relatives and spouses of people who committed suicide : longitudinal community based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Marieke; Kollen, Boudewijn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors predicting the long term course of complicated grief, depression, and suicide ideation in a community based sample of relatives bereaved through suicide. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Included in the multilevel regression models were sociodemographic and personality

  19. Severe stress following bereavement during pregnancy and risk of pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Parner, Erik; Olsen, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    between 1995 and 2008. We categorised women as exposed to severe stress if they lost a child, sibling or parent during pregnancy. Cox Proportional Hazards models were used to study the association between exposure and rate of fetal death, starting with the follow-up on the day of completion of week 4 of......BACKGROUND: Previous findings on the association between stress during pregnancy and pregnancy loss are inconsistent. We aimed to estimate this association using a large prospective cohort. METHODS: This population-based study included all 1 303 660 clinically recognised pregnancies in Denmark...... significant associations (aHR=1.83, 95% CI 1.49 to 2.25). All the analyses indicated a stronger effect of bereavement when the mother lost a child or when the death was unexpected. CONCLUSIONS: Our main results suggested no strong association between severe stress during pregnancy and risk of pregnancy loss...

  20. A nationwide study on the risk of autism after prenatal stress exposure to maternal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    children were in the unexposed group. All children were followed up from birth until their death, migration, onset of autism, or the end of 2006. Information on autism was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. We used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios in the exposed group...... conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study of all 1492709 singletons in Denmark born from 1978 to 2003. A total of 37275 children were born to women who lost a close relative during pregnancy or up to 1 year before pregnancy. These children were included in the exposed group, and the remaining...... compared with those in the unexposed group. RESULTS: Maternal bereavement during the prenatal period was not associated with an increased risk of autism in the offspring. The hazard ratios did not differ by the nature of the exposure (maternal relationship to the deceased or cause of death). The hazard...

  1. The factor structure of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder symptoms among bereaved individuals: a confirmatory factor analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A; van den Hout, Marcel A; van den Bout, Jan

    2008-12-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is defined in DSM-IV as an anxiety disorder that encompasses symptom-clusters of reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal. Several studies have examined the factor structure of PTSD symptoms. To our knowledge, no studies have yet examined the factor structure of loss-related PTSD symptoms in samples exclusively comprised of bereaved individuals. Such an examination is important because it can advance our understanding of the stability of the structure of PTSD symptoms across groups confronted with different aversive life-events and of processes underlying the occurrence of PTSD symptoms after loss. In this study, five alternative models of the factor structure of PTSD symptoms were examined in a sample of 347 mourners. Results showed that, in this group, PTSD symptoms are best conceptualized as forming four factors: reexperiencing, avoidance, dysphoria, and hyperarousal. Patterns of correlations with depression and complicated grief supported the validity of the model. PMID:18342486

  2. Does bereavement-related first episode depression differ from other kinds of first depressions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla;

    2009-01-01

    consecutively sampled from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. Patients participated in an extensive interview including the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and the Interview of Recent Life Events (IRLE). RESULTS: Among 301 patients with a first depression, 26 patients...... (4.7%) had experienced death of a first degree relative (parent, sibling, child) or a near friend, 163 patients (54.2%) had experienced other moderate to severe stressful life events and 112 patients had not experienced stressful life events in a 6 months period prior to the onset of depression....... Patients who had experienced bereavement did not differ from patients with other stressful life events or from patients without stressful life events in socio-demographic variables or in the phenomenology of the depression, psychiatric comorbidity, family history or response to antidepressant treatment...

  3. Deconstructing Death – Changing Cultures of Death, Dying, Bereavement and Care in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deconstructing Death is a book dealing with some of the most recent changes and transformations within the realms of death, dying, bereavement and care in contemporary Nordic countries. The book deals with some of the major as well as some of the less conspicuous changes in our cultural and social...... engagement with the phenomenon of death. Among the themes touched specifically upon in the book are: organ transplantation, death education, communication with the dead, changes in commemorative rituals, mourning practices on the internet, parental responses to children’s suicide, death control, practice...... and ethics of end-of-life care, and the lonely death. Deconstructing Death contains contributions written by researchers and practitioners from Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland with professional and academic backgrounds within areas such as sociology, anthropology, religious studies and palliative care...

  4. Prenatal stress exposure related to maternal bereavement and risk of childhood overweight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that prenatal stress contributes to the risk of obesity later in life. In a population-based cohort study, we examined whether prenatal stress related to maternal bereavement during pregnancy was associated with the risk of overweight in offspring during school age. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We followed 65,212 children born in Denmark from 1970-1989 who underwent health examinations from 7 to 13 years of age in public or private schools in Copenhagen. We identified 459 children as exposed to prenatal stress, defined by being born to mothers who were bereaved by death of a close family member from one year before pregnancy until birth of the child. We compared the prevalence of overweight between the exposed and the unexposed. Body mass index (BMI values and prevalence of overweight were higher in the exposed children, but not significantly so until from 10 years of age and onwards, as compared with the unexposed children. For example, the adjusted odds ratio (OR for overweight was 1.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-2.61 at 12 years of age and 1.63 (95% CI 1.00-2.61 at 13 years of age. The highest ORs were observed when the death occurred in the period from 6 to 0 month before pregnancy (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.71-6.42 at age 12, and OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08-4.97 at age 13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that severe pre-pregnancy stress is associated with an increased risk of overweight in the offspring in later childhood.

  5. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...... care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where a...... need to optimize was found. 2) Shared care, which was lacking. 3) The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion: Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs...

  6. Lay theories of successful aging after the death of a spouse: a network text analysis of bereavement advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, M J; Holmes, M E

    2000-01-01

    Social theories of successful aging attempt to explain how individuals adapt to changes characteristically associated with aging and to predict whether older adults' adaptations will lead to successful aging. The death of a spouse and the accompanying bereavement process entail dramatic changes to personal networks and experience to which individuals must adapt to age successfully. Network text analysis (including word frequencies, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling) of advice for adjusting to, and coping with, the loss of a spouse given by a sample of 60 bereaved spouses (mean age = 68) at 6 points in time after the death of their marital partner (3-4 weeks to 24 months) reveal respondents' lay theories of successful aging. Thematic clusters address social positioning and qualifiers, activity, communication, time, and spousal characteristics. Results indicate respondents frame their advice as unique to their context of social relationships while providing support for activity theory and negatively addressing disengagement theory. PMID:11063287

  7. Facing bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjærgaard

    2016-01-01

    Hvilke faktorer har sammenhæng med psykiske komplikationer hos pårørende til alvorligt syge patienter under et sygdomsforløb og i tiden efter patientens dødsfald? Det har Mette Kjærgaard Nielsen undersøgt i en ny sundhedsvidenskabelig ph.d.-afhandling. Resultaterne viser, at mange pårørende oplev...

  8. Effects of Support, Counselling and Therapy Before and After the Loss: Can we Really Help Bereaved People?

    OpenAIRE

    Henk Schut; Margaret Stroebe

    2010-01-01

    Can other persons, personally or professionally, help bereaved individuals deal with the loss of a loved one? An increasing number of empirical studies, as well as qualitative and quantitative reviews, have addressed this question. Here, the main findings are summarised and implications for researchers and practitioners considered. First, provision of help from the informal social network and volunteers/professionals in the post-loss period is examined. Second, and uniquely in this research a...

  9. Challenges for the implementation of World Health Organization guidelines for acute stress, PTSD, and bereavement: a qualitative study in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Jeremy C.; Adaku, Alex; Nakku, Juliet; Odokonyero, Raymond; Okello, James; Musisi, Seggane; Augustinavicius, Jura; Greene, M. Claire; Alderman, Steve; Tol, Wietse A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) published new guidelines for the management of conditions specifically related to stress, including symptoms of acute stress, bereavement, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is important to evaluate potential challenges for the implementation of these guidelines in low-resource settings, however, there is a dearth of research in this area. The current qualitative study aimed to assess perspectives on the feasibility and accept...

  10. When are bereaved family members approached for consent to organ donation? commentary from 10 European member states

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Nichon; McDonald, Maryon; Haase-Kromwijk, Bernadette; Sque, Magi; Long-Sutehall, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Background - To scope the timing of the approach to bereaved family members and request for organ donation in DBD and DCD potential donors, in 10 European member states. Are there changes in established practice regarding when family members are asked to consider organ donation? Methods – Representatives from 10 member states responded to a survey seeking information about: how death is diagnosed in the DBD and DCD potential donor; the legal consent system and law on organ donation; the e...

  11. Bereavement help-seeking following an 'expected' death: a cross-sectional randomised face-to-face population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoun Samar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines the prevalence and nature of bereavement help-seeking among the population who experienced an "expected" death in the five years before their survey response. Such whole population data are not limited by identification through previous access to specific services nor practitioners. Methods In a randomised, cross-sectional, state-wide population-based survey, 6034 people over two years completed face-to-face interviews in South Australia by trained interviewers using piloted questions (74.2% participation rate. Respondent demographics, type of grief help sought, and circumstantial characteristics were collected. Uni- and multi-variate logistic regression models were created. Results One in three people (1965/6034 had experienced an 'expected' death of someone close to them in the last five years. Thirteen per cent sought help for their grief from one or more: friend/family members (10.7%; grief counselors (2.2%; spiritual advisers (1.9%; nurses/doctors (1.5%. Twenty five respondents (1.3% had not sought, but would have valued help with their grief. In multi-variate regression modeling, those who sought professional help (3.4% of the bereaved had provided more intense care (OR 5.39; CI 1.94 to14.98; p 2 = 0.33. Conclusion These data provide a whole-of-population baseline of bereavement help-seeking. The uniquely identified group who wished they had sought help is one where potentially significant health gains could be made as we seek to understand better any improved health outcomes as a result of involving bereavement services.

  12. A survey of Dutch GPs’ attitudes towards help seeking and follow-up care for relatives bereaved by suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, Marieke; Van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2009-01-01

    Background. Relatives who are bereaved by suicide likely consult their GP when they feel the need for professional help. GPs may play a key role in establishing who is at risk for adverse consequences of the loss as they are familiar with relatives’ possible psychiatric vulnerabilities. The availability of evidence-based services for relatives of suicide victims is limited. Successful implementation of services needs analysis of key factors considered critical in the achievement of changes. W...

  13. Distinctiveness of symptoms of prolonged grief, depression, and post-traumatic stress in bereaved children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuij, Mariken; Reitz, Ellen; Prinzie, Peter; Stikkelbroek, Yvonne; de Roos, Carlijn; Boelen, Paul A

    2012-12-01

    Studies among adults have shown that symptoms of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) are distinct from those of bereavement-related depression and post-traumatic stress-disorder (PTSD). This study was an attempt to replicate this finding in two distinct samples of bereaved children (N = 197; aged 8-12 years) and adolescents (N = 135; 13-18 years), confronted with the death of a parent, sibling or other close relative. Using confirmatory factor analyses, we compared the fit of a one-factor model with the fit of a three-factor model in which symptoms formed three distinct, correlated factors. In both samples, findings showed that the model in which symptoms of PGD, depression, and PTSD loaded on separate factors was superior to a one-factor model and displayed excellent model fit. Summed scores on the PGD, depression, and PTSD items were significantly associated with functional impairment, attesting to the concurrent validity of the PGD, depression, and PTSD factors. The current findings complement prior evidence from adult samples that PGD is a distinct syndrome and suggest that PGD symptoms should be addressed in the assessment and treatment of bereaved children and adolescent seeking help following their loss. PMID:22791348

  14. Normal grief and complicated bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees: cultural context and the central role of dreams of the dead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Peou, Sonith; Joshi, Siddharth; Nickerson, Angela; Simon, Naomi M

    2013-09-01

    This article profiles bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees and explores the validity of a model of how grief and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) interact in this group to form a unique bereavement ontology, a model in which dreams of the dead play a crucial role. Several studies were conducted at a psychiatric clinic treating Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide. Key findings included that Pol Pot deaths were made even more deeply disturbing owing to cultural ideas about "bad death" and the consequences of not performing mortuary rites; that pained recall of the dead in the last month was common (76 % of patients) and usually caused great emotional and somatic distress; that severity of pained recall of the dead was strongly associated with PTSD severity (r = .62); that pained recall was very often triggered by dreaming about the dead, usually of someone who died in the Pol Pot period; and that Cambodians have a complex system of interpretation of dreams of the deceased that frequently causes those dreams to give rise to great distress. Cases are provided that further illustrate the centrality of dreams of the dead in the Cambodian experiencing of grief and PTSD. The article shows that not assessing dreams and concerns about the spiritual status of the deceased in the evaluation of bereavement results in "category truncation," i.e., a lack of content validity, a form of category fallacy. PMID:23868080

  15. Testing for Plausibly Causal Links Between Parental Bereavement and Child Socio-Emotional and Academic Outcomes: A Propensity-Score Matching Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leslie D; Lawrence Aber, J

    2016-05-01

    The extant literature on parentally bereaved children has focused almost exclusively on the presence of negative mental health and socio-emotional outcomes among these children. However, findings from this literature have been equivocal. While some authors have found support for the presence of higher levels of internalizing and externalizing problems or mental health problems among this population, others have not found such a relationship. Additionally, study designs in this body of literature have limited both the internal and external validity of the research on parentally bereaved children. The present study seeks to address these issues of internal and external validity by utilizing propensity-score matching analyses to make plausibly causal inferences about the relationship between bereavement and internalizing and externalizing problems among children from a nearly nationally representative sample. This study also extends examination of the influence of parental bereavement to other domains of child development: namely, to academic outcomes. Findings suggest a lack of support for causal relationships between parental bereavement and either socio-emotional or academic outcomes among U.S. children. The plausibility of assumptions necessary to draw causal inferences is discussed. PMID:26340883

  16. Continuing social presence of the dead: exploring suicide bereavement through online memorialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Louis; Bell, Jo; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    The last 10 years have seen a rise in Internet sites commemorating those lost to suicide. These sites describe the life of the deceased and the afterlife of relatives, parents, friends or siblings who have been termed the "forgotten bereaved". It is clear that such sites have implications for continuing bonds and for what many commentators refer to as the continuing social presence of the dead. This paper presents interim findings from ongoing research which focuses on two aspects of suicide memorial websites. First, we explore the extent to which such sites help us understand how the Internet is enabling new ways of grieving and is, in effect, making new cultural scripts. Second, although there is a large body of writing on the management of trauma there is little evidence-based research. The paper draws on face-to-face interviews with owners of suicide memorial sites (family members and friends) and explores how the establishment and maintenance of such a site is an important part of the therapeutic process and how, for grieving relatives, making or contributing to such sites provides ways of managing trauma in the aftermath of a death by suicide.

  17. Features of Prolonged Grief Symptoms in Chinese and Swiss Bereaved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Daiming; Maercker, Andreas; Woynar, Stefanie; Geirhofer, Bettina; Yang, Yuting; Jia, Xiaoming

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates clinical expressions of prolonged grief in samples of 32 Chinese and 33 Swiss bereaved parents, according to the proposed International Classification of Diseases, 11th Revision model of prolonged grief disorder (PGD). Sex differences and predictors (cultural attitudes, sense of coherence, and posttraumatic growth) of PGD were analyzed. In result, after controlling for sociodemographic and loss-related sample differences, both samples showed similar PGD symptom profiles, with Swiss parents exhibiting more severe grief-related preoccupation and Chinese parents exhibiting some accessory symptoms and functional impairment to a greater extent. Multivariate analyses revealed for the Chinese sample primary predictions of PGD by life satisfaction, general health and one's world view (social cynicism) and for the Swiss sample by female sex, sense of coherence, and life satisfaction. The findings substantiate the basic appropriateness of the International Classification of Diseases, 11th Revision PGD in distinct cultural groups and may contribute to a better understanding of grief expression and its potential predictors across different cultures. PMID:27253073

  18. Parental understanding and self-blame following sudden infant death: a mixed-methods study of bereaved parents' and professionals' experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Frances; Sidebotham, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Improvements in our understanding of the role of modifiable risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) mean that previous reassurance to parents that these deaths were unpreventable may no longer be appropriate. This study aimed to learn of bereaved parents' and healthcare professionals' experiences of understanding causes of death following detailed sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) investigations. The research questions were: How do bereaved parents understand the cause of death and risk factors identified during detailed investigation following a sudden unexpected infant death? What is the association between bereaved parents' mental health and this understanding? What are healthcare professionals' experiences of sharing such information with families? Design This was a mixed-methods study using a Framework Approach. Setting Specialist paediatric services. Participants Bereaved parents were recruited following detailed multiagency SUDI investigations; 21/113 eligible families and 27 professionals participated giving theoretical saturation of data. Data collection We analysed case records from all agencies, interviewed professionals and invited parents to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and questionnaires or in-depth interviews. Results Nearly all bereaved parents were able to understand the cause of death and several SIDS parents had a good understanding of the relevant modifiable risk factors even when these related directly to their actions. Paediatricians worried that discussing risk factors with parents would result in parental self-blame and some deliberately avoided these discussions. Over half the families did not mention blame or blamed no one. The cause of death of the infants of these families varied. 3/21 mothers expressed overwhelming feelings of self-blame and had clinically significant scores on HADS. Conclusions Bereaved parents want detailed information about their child's death. Our study

  19. Testing the anniversary reaction: causal effects of bereavement in a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostila, Mikael; Saarela, Jan; Kawachi, Ichiro; Hjern, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Lingering grief associated with the death of a loved one has been hypothesized to precipitate acute health events among survivors on anniversary dates. We sought to study excess mortality risk in parents around the death date and birth date of a deceased child as an indication of a "bereavement effect". We conducted a population based follow-up study using Swedish registries including links between children and parents. All biological and Swedish-born parents who experienced the death of a minor child born were observed during the period 1973-2008 (n = 48,666). An increased mortality risk was found during the week of a child's death among mothers who lost a child aged 0-17 years (SMRR = 1.46, 95% CI 0.98-2.17). The association was stronger among mothers who lost a child aged 1-17 years (SMRR = 1.89, 95% CI 0.97-3.67) as compared to those who lost an infant (SMRR = 1.29, 95% CI 0.78-2.12). Cardiovascular diseases and suicides were overrepresented as causes of death in mothers who died around the anniversary. We found no significant increase in the mortality risk around the date of child's birth, nor any suggestion of excess mortality risk among fathers, but rather a depression of paternal death (SMRR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.34-1.03). Our study indicates an anniversary reaction among mothers who lost a young child. These results suggest that bereavement per se could have an effect on health and mortality which should be acknowledged by public health professionals working with bereaved people. PMID:25595319

  20. Development and pilot testing of a questionnaire to determine the ability and willingness of health personnel accompanying perinatal bereavement

    OpenAIRE

    Mª José Domínguez Santarén

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The care that parents receive around the time of a loss has a huge impact on their perception of what happened and on their ability to cope. Good care cannot remove the pain and devastation that the loss of a pregnancy or the death of a baby can bring, but can promote healing.Methodology: Creation and pilot study for a questionnaire to determinate the capacity and willingness of perinatal bereavement support from staff in hospitalization and delivery room services in Zaragoza an...

  1. Attitudes towards those bereaved by a suicide: a population-based, cross-sectional study in rural Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaji Masako

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family or friends bereaved by suicide are at risk of experiencing complications because of attitudes regarding suicide. It is important that individuals close to those grieving after a death by suicide demonstrate adequate knowledge and compassionate attitudes. To this end, we examined the factors that contribute to attitudes toward persons bereaved by the suicide of a family member or friend, and perceptions of suicide prevention and the promotion of mental health. Methods A total of 5154 residents of a rural town in northern Japan aged 30–69 years completed a cross-sectional questionnaire. The questionnaire gathered data about demographic variables, depressive symptoms, and issues related to suicide including personal experience of an acquaintance's suicide, attitudes towards those bereaved by suicide, and perceptions regarding suicide prevention. Factors related to these attitudes and perceptions were analysed using logistic regression models. Results Overall, 67.5% of respondents demonstrated appropriate attitudes towards those bereaved by suicide; 30.4% of responses were undetermined, and 2.1% were inappropriate. Undetermined attitudes were associated with male gender (adjusted OR 1.42, 95%CI = 1.26–1.61, younger age (2.64, 2.12–3.29, lower education level (1.32, 1.07–1.62, greater severity of depression (3.81, 2.80–5.20, and lack of personal experience of an acquaintance's suicide (1.39, 1.22–1.57. Inappropriate attitudes were associated with male gender (adjusted OR 1.98, 95%CI = 1.33–2.94, lower education level (2.55 1.34–4.83, and greater severity of depression (6.93, 3.52–13.67. Overall, 16.0% demonstrated passive thoughts regarding suicide prevention and the promotion of mental health in the community, and were associated with male gender (1.22, 1.04–1.42, younger age (2.72, 2.03–3.65, lower education level (1.32, 1.02–1.71, and greater severity of depression (4.94, 3.58–6.82. Conclusion

  2. Bereavement, cognitive-emotional processing, and coping with the loss: a study of Indian and Japanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Braj; Kumar, Surender; Harizuka, Susumu

    2011-01-01

    Campus suicides have increased manifold across academic institutions, often leaving unresolved bereavement issues in these institutions, primarily because students are supposed to carry on with their daily activities with little or no time and attention paid to this necessary process. In this study, the role of cognitive-emotional processes in coping, especially when one is grieving a death, was investigated through a comparison between 40 bereaved Japanese and Indian female college students. The participants were assessed for resilience, cognitive-emotional regulation, posttraumatic cognition, and coping strategies in the aftermath of the suicide death of someone close. Positive reappraisal mediated the relationship between resilience and proactive coping, whereas negative cognitions about the self mediated the relationship between resilience and proactive as well as reflective coping. The participants from the two cultures differed significantly on resilience, with Indians scoring higher than Japanese young adults. The findings are analyzed in light of the coping with distressful life events model and could have possible implications for social workers and/or mental health professionals in terms of acceptability of interventions. PMID:21895440

  3. Stability and change: the role of keepsakes and family homes in the lives of parentally bereaved young adults in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Visser; F.R. Parrott

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the loss of a parent in young adulthood, showing how this emergent and distinctive life stage shapes Dutch young people’s experience of bereavement. Youth material cultures have commonly been analysed in terms of the construction and expression of youth identities, for example, t

  4. Parentally Bereaved Children's Grief: Self-System Beliefs as Mediators of the Relations between Grief and Stressors and Caregiver-Child Relationship Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Ayers, Tim S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether 3 self-system beliefs--fear of abandonment, coping efficacy, and self-esteem--mediated the relations between stressors and caregiver-child relationship quality and parentally bereaved youths' general grief and intrusive grief thoughts. Cross-sectional (n = 340 youth) and longitudinal (n = 100 youth) models were tested. In…

  5. Grief Processing and Deliberate Grief Avoidance: A Prospective Comparison of Bereaved Spouses and Parents in the United States and the People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, George A.; Papa, Anthony; Lalande, Kathleen; Zhang, Nanping; Noll, Jennie G.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors measured grief processing and deliberate grief avoidance and examined their relationship to adjustment at 4 and 18 months of bereavement for 2 types of losses (spouse, child) in 2 cultures (People's Republic of China, United States). Three hypotheses were compared: the traditional grief work assumption, a conditional…

  6. Can Individuals Who Are Specialists in Death, Dying, and Bereavement Contribute to the Prevention and/or Mitigation of Armed Conflicts and Cycles of Violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death Studies, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Specialists in death, dying, and bereavement and their consequences for individuals, families, and communities have experience and research findings that are relevant to an understanding of the reactions of individuals faced by deadly violence. At such times, powerful emotions and ingrained patterns of thought and behavior can given rise to…

  7. Grief and Bereavement Issues and the Loss of a Companion Animal: People Living with a Companion Animal, Owners of Livestock, and Animal Support Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Companion animals play various roles in people's lives and these roles can impact on loss, grief, bereavement and mourning when the animal has been lost, whether that is through death, when missing, or when relinquished. This paper considers not only companion animal owners, but also those who own farm animals and those who work in animal service…

  8. A qualitative research about adolescent's bereavement process%丧亲青少年哀伤过程的定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐洁; 陈顺森; 张日昇; 张雯

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore adolescent's bereavement process in order to pivide basis for the grief consulting of bereaved adolescence. Methods: According to the idea of theoretical sampling, 18 persons who lost their father or mather during 9-18 year-old were interviewed in-depth. Theme analysis and Atlas, ti 5.0 software were used for data processing. Results: Bereaved adolescence's bereavement process had 4 common themes, namely facing life's big changes (strong reactions; denying and avoiding; life order's sudden changes; involvement in the reorganization of the family system), experience of suffering and loss (bearing the pain of farewell, regretting for unfinished business, strong yearning and missing, bearing the death's truth), continuing to live in grief (the needs to bereave lonely, reflection with grief, finding the coping strategies, the repeated bereavement), re-interpretation of death ( rationalization of death, establishing links with the deceased, establishing the meaning of death, bereavement's transformation and transcendence). Conclusion: Bereaved adolescents will experience 4-phrase grief processes before rehabilitation from grief, which has adolescent's special age characteristic. In grief counseling for adolescence, it is important to guide the adolescence to accept their bereavement process, respect the uniqueness ofadolescence'bereavement process, and cope with family grief at the same time.%目的:探讨丧亲青少年的哀伤过程,为青少年的哀伤咨询提供依据.方法:据理论抽样原则选取18名在青少年时期丧亲(父或母去世)的被访者进行深度访谈.采用主题分析方法分析数据,运用编码分析软件Atlas.ti 5.0对访谈资料进行分析.结果:丧亲青少年的哀伤过程有4个共同主题,即面对生活的巨变、体验丧亲的痛苦与失落、在哀伤中继续生活、重新诠释死亡.共同主题还分别有4个次级主题,即强烈的反应、否认与逃避、生活秩序的骤变、

  9. Trabalho em grupo com enlutados Trabajo en grupo con enlutados Work group with bereaved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Pascoal

    2012-12-01

    positivos e inspiradores y su divulgación es importante para ampliar horizontes y crear nuevas posibilidades.Every day we have more families experiencing mourning generated by homicides, accidents and violence, and this has caused some psychological problems for people in this situation. This study is a report of the professional experience at Hospital Mauá with a self-help group for bereaved patients, aiming to share the experience and disseminate this work. Through fifteen meetings pre-structured according to the demand of the group was possible to work various topics related to the loss, which have influenced the participants and at the same time provided comfort and a possibility of identification and exchange, and hence the resurgence of self-confidence in the participants. By means of the link theory with practice, it is evident that the group care for people in grief is a viable alternative that has brought positive and inspiring results, and its dissemination is important to broaden horizons and create new possibilities.

  10. Parentally Bereaved Children’s Grief: Self-system Beliefs as Mediators of the Relations between Grief and Stressors and Caregiver-child Relationship Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Ayers, Tim S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether three self-system beliefs -- fear of abandonment, coping efficacy, and self-esteem -- mediated the relations between stressors and caregiver-child relationship quality and parentally bereaved youths’ general grief and intrusive grief thoughts. Cross-sectional (n=340 youth) and longitudinal (n=100 youth) models were tested. In the cross-sectional model, fear of abandonment mediated the effects of stressors and relationship quality on both measures of grief and coping ef...

  11. The Influence of Personality Disorder Indication, Social Support, and Grief on Alcohol and Cocaine Use among HIV-Positive Adults Coping with AIDS-Related Bereavement

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Nathan B.; Cavanaugh, Courtenay E.; Vaughan, Ellen L.; Connell, Christian M.; Tate, David C.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2007-01-01

    Substance use is prevalent among HIV-positive adults and linked to a number of adverse health consequences; however little is known about risk and protective factors that influence substance use among HIV-positive adults coping with AIDS-related bereavement. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), male gender, diagnostic indications of antisocial and borderline personality disorders (PD), and grief severity were tested as risk factors, and social support as a protective factor, for alcohol ...

  12. ‘We do it to keep him alive’: bereaved individuals’ experiences of online suicide memorials and continuing bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jo; Bailey, Louis; Kennedy, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents draws on interviews with individuals who have experience of creating, maintaining and utilising Facebook sites in memory of a loved one who has died by suicide. We argue that Facebook enables the deceased to be an on-going active presence in the lives of the bereaved. We highlight the potential of the Internet (and Facebook in particular) as a new and emerging avenue for the continuation of online identities and continuing bonds. Our study offers unique insight into survivors’ experiences of engaging with the virtual presence of their deceased loved one: how mourners come and go online, how this evolves over time and how the online identity of the deceased evolves even after death. We discuss how Facebook provides new ways for people to experience and negotiate death by suicide and to memorialise the deceased, highlighting the positive impact of this for survivors’ mental health. Finally, we describe the creation of tension amongst those who manage their grief in different ways. PMID:26692812

  13. Development and pilot testing of a questionnaire to determine the ability and willingness of health personnel accompanying perinatal bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª José Domínguez Santarén

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The care that parents receive around the time of a loss has a huge impact on their perception of what happened and on their ability to cope. Good care cannot remove the pain and devastation that the loss of a pregnancy or the death of a baby can bring, but can promote healing.Methodology: Creation and pilot study for a questionnaire to determinate the capacity and willingness of perinatal bereavement support from staff in hospitalization and delivery room services in Zaragoza and Jaca who care for couples with a perinatal death.Statistical analysis. Qualitative analysis is made of the difficulties and limitations of this support staff is performing. Psychometric tests were conducted to determine the reliability and validity of the questionnaire by calculating Cronbach´s alpha and the intraclass correlation coefficient. For the analysis of construct validity, we performed the principal components factorial analysis (PCFA through the Varimax rotation system.Results. The qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicates a lack of knowledge about this type of mourning and social and communication tools that often precludes effective accompaniment. We obtained a Cronbach alpha value of 0.835 overall questionnaire, which indicates high internal consistency or coherence among the items and relatively high CCI indicates good stability over time with significance p<,001. Making appropriate modifications could assess the ability and willingness of workers.

  14. Predictors of Mental Health Resilience in Children who Have Been Parentally Bereaved by AIDS in Urban South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collishaw, Stephan; Gardner, Frances; Lawrence Aber, J; Cluver, Lucie

    2016-05-01

    Children parentally bereaved by AIDS experience high rates of mental health problems. However, there is considerable variability in outcomes, and some show no mental health problems even when followed over time. Primary aims were to identify predictors of resilient adaptation at child, family and community levels within a group of AIDS-orphaned children, and to consider their cumulative influence. A secondary aim was to test whether predictors were of particular influence among children orphaned by AIDS relative to non-orphaned and other-orphaned children. AIDS-orphaned (n = 290), other-orphaned (n = 163) and non-orphaned (n = 202) adolescents living in informal settlements in Cape Town, South Africa were assessed on two occasions 4 years apart (mean age 13.5 years at Time 1, range = 10-19 years). Self-report mental health screens were used to operationalise resilience in AIDS-orphaned children as the absence of clinical-range symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and suicidality. A quarter of AIDS-orphaned children (24 %) showed no evidence of mental health problems at either wave. Child physical health, better caregiving quality, food security, better peer relationship quality, and lower exposure to community violence, bullying or stigma at baseline predicted sustained resilience. There were cumulative influences across predictors. Associations with mental health showed little variation by child age or gender, or between orphaned and non-orphaned children. Mental health resilience is associated with multiple processes across child, family and community levels of influence. Caution is needed in making causal inferences. PMID:26329481

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Self-Rated Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Complicated Grief in a Community-Based Sample of Homicidally Bereaved Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Denderen, Mariëtte; de Keijser, Jos; Huisman, Mark; Boelen, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    People confronted with homicidal loss have to cope with separation distress, related to their loss, and traumatic distress, associated with the circumstances surrounding the death. These reactions are related to complicated grief (CG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The psychological effects for people who have lost someone through homicide, in terms of PTSD and CG, are largely unclear. This cross-sectional study (a) examined the prevalence of self-rated PTSD and self-rated CG in a community-based sample of 312 spouses, family members, and friends of homicide victims and (b) aimed to identify socio-demographic, loss-related, and perpetrator-related correlates of PTSD and CG. Participants were recruited via support organizations for homicidally bereaved individuals in the Netherlands (i.e., support group), and by casemanagers of a governmental organization, which offers practical, non-psychological, support to bereaved families (i.e., casemanager group). Prevalence of self-rated PTSD was 30.9% (support group) and 37.5% (casemanager group), prevalence of CG was 82.7% (support group) and 80.6% (casemanager group). PTSD and CG severity scores varied as a function of the relationship with the victim; parents were at greater risk to develop emotional problems, compared with other relatives of the victim. Time since loss was negatively associated with PTSD and CG scores. PMID:25389188

  16. Severe Maternal Stress Exposure Due to Bereavement before, during and after Pregnancy and Risk of Overweight and Obesity in Young Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwü, Lena; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal stress may programme overweight and obesity. We examined whether maternal pre- and post-natal bereavement was associated with overweight and obesity in young men. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted including 119,908 men born from 1976 to 1993 and examined for military...... service between 2006 and 2011. Among them, 4,813 conscripts were born to mothers bereaved by death of a close relative from 12 months preconception to birth of the child (exposed group). Median body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of overweight and obesity were estimated. Odds ratio of overweight (BMI≥25...... kg/m2) and obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusted for maternal educational level. RESULTS: Median BMI was similar in the exposed and the unexposed group but the prevalence of overweight (33.3% versus 30.4%, p = 0.02) and obesity (9.8% versus 8.5%, p = 0.06) was...

  17. Impact of a Bereavement and Donation Service incorporating mandatory 'required referral' on organ donation rates: a model for the implementation of the Organ Donation Taskforce's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F; Cochran, D; Thornton, S

    2009-08-01

    In 2008 the Organ Donation Taskforce published its recommendations for increasing organ donation in the UK by 50% over 5 years. Bolton NHS Trust has addressed the problem of low rates of organ donation by amalgamating Bereavement and Donation Services and introducing a trigger to refer automatically all potential organ donors to the regional transplant donor co-ordinators. We audited the ability of the new service to deliver the aims and recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce. Following the changes in service provision the number of tissue donors rose from six in 2002 to 246 in 2007. In the same period solid organ donation rates remained unchanged. The introduction of an automatic trigger for referral of potential donors in 2007 resulted in 31 referrals and 11 successful multi-organ donors. The current service exceeds the aims of the Taskforce and offers the potential to meet UK organ donation targets without resorting to an 'opt out' system of presumed consent. PMID:19604184

  18. The concept of shalōm as a constructive bereavement healing framework within a pluralist health seeking context of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Absence of health, that is, sickness in Africa is viewed in personalistic terms. A disease is explained as effected by ‘the active purposeful intervention of an agent, who may be human’, non-human (a ghost, an ancestor, an ‘evil spirit, or supernatural (a deity or other very powerful being’ (Foster. Illness is thus attributed to breaking of taboos, offending God and/ or ancestral spirits; witchcraft, sorcery, the evil eye, passion by an evil spirit and a curse from parents or from an offended neighbour. In view of these personalistic theories of ill health, treatment is through ritual purification, exorcism or sacrifices. For an appropriate diagnosis and intervention, it is imperative to determine ‘who’ caused the illness and then ‘why’ it was caused, to which answers are offered through divination by a healer. This interpretive framework, is applicable to all types of sickness, facilitates co-existence of African traditional healing and biomedical treatment, that is, plurality of health seeking practices. The approach fails to offer a constructive approach and contradicts the biblical healing framework whereby one may not have explanatory causes to a situation of ill health. This article engaged the biblical concept of shalōm as a relevant constructive framework. The Hebrew concept of shalōm, though distinctly salvific, is inclusive of holistic and personalistic healing aspects. The concept encompasses constructive aspects of completeness, wholeness, health, peace, welfare, safety, soundness, tranquillity, prosperity, perfectness, fullness, rest, harmony and the absence of agitation or discord, which provides a useful holistic healing theological framework. It therefore provides a health and well-being framework that is relational, sensitive and applicable to healing patterns in Africa. Using the case study of the Abaluyia people of East Africa, this article discussed bereavement as a state that requires healing and how the

  19. Bereavement Support for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auman, Mary Jo

    2007-01-01

    The death of a parent is one of the most significant and stressful events children can encounter. Surviving children may experience psychiatric problems and social dysfunction during their childhood and possibly throughout their adult lives. Children surviving a sibling's death may develop behavioral problems, because no one can fill the emptiness…

  20. Qualitative Research of Grief Reactions of Chinese Rural Bereaved Persons%农村丧亲个体哀伤反应的质性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐信峰; 贾晓明

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the grief reactions of Chinese rural bereaved persons.Methods:Nine rural citizens in the southern region of Jiangxi Province who experienced the death of a loved one participated in the study.Data was collected by semi-structured interviews and analyzed by thematic analysis.Results:Findings were divided into four main aspects:①Emotional reactions:including sadness,missing/yearning,attachment,pain,anger,helplessness,loneliness,guilt,regret,sense of loss,and calmness.②Cognitive reactions:including disbelief,unfairness,injustice,envy,counterfactual thinking,intrusive thoughts,sense of presence of the dead,changes in attitude towards life and material things.③Behavioral reactions:including social withdrawed,avoidance of familiar stimulus and relationships with others.④Physical reactions:including fatigue,memory disturbance,appetite disturbance,sleeping disturbance.Conclusion:The grief reactions of rural bereaved persons have universality and show unique characteristics.%目的:研究中国农村丧亲个体的哀伤反应.方法:选取9名江西东北部某农村丧亲个体进行半结构化的访谈,采用主题分析法对资料进行分析.结果:丧亲者的哀伤反应主要为四个方面,情感反应有伤心、想念、舍不得、痛苦、愤怒、无助感、孤独感、内疚、后悔、失落感和平静,认知反应有不相信、不公平、羡慕、反事实思维、闯入性思想、感觉逝者存在和对生命和物质的态度的转变,行为反应有退缩、人际冲突增加或减少以及回避提醒物,生理反应有疲倦、记忆力减退、食欲不振和失眠.结论:农村丧亲者的哀伤反应有其普遍性和独特性.

  1. The perspectives of bereaved family carers on dying at home: the study protocol of ‘unpacking the home: family carers’ reflections on dying at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Sheila

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent end of life care policy prioritises patient choice over place of care and in particular promotes dying at home. This policy is predicated on the assumption that there are family carers able and willing to provide care for the dying person. Through the accounts of bereaved family members, the ‘Unpacking the home’ study aims to gain an in-depth understanding of ‘home’ and the issues faced by family members caring for a dying older person at home; it also aims to examine the way the home is transformed in the process of providing end of life care, and offer a critical analysis of policies that aim to increase home deaths. This paper presents the protocol for this study. Methods/design A cross-sectional qualitative study has been designed to achieve the study aims. In-depth interviews will be conducted in the north and south of England with 50 bereaved family carers to elicit their accounts of witnessing the dying in the home of an older person (50+ years. All interviews will be subjected to thematic analysis, and narrative analysis will be undertaken on a subset of 30 interview transcripts. A final phase of integration and policy analysis will be conducted towards the end of the study. User involvement is integral to this study, with service users actively engaged at every stage. Discussion This study will seek to take a qualitative approach by explicitly recognising that family carers are central to the experience of dying at home for older people, and they have needs that may be amenable to support and anticipatory planning. The strengths of this study, which include its interdisciplinary and participatory approach, and in-depth data collection and analysis methods, will be explored. The limitations and challenges of this research will also be considered. This study seeks to make recommendations that will ensure that family carers receive appropriate and adequate support in caring for their loved ones at the end

  2. Assessing posttraumatic stress disorder's latent structure in elderly bereaved European trauma survivors: evidence for a five-factor dysphoric and anxious arousal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-10-01

    The three-factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, is not supported in the empirical literature. Two alternative four-factor models have received a wealth of empirical support. However, a consensus regarding which is superior has not been reached. A recent five-factor model has been shown to provide superior fit over the existing four-factor models. The present study investigated the fit of the five-factor model against the existing four-factor models and assessed the resultant factors' association with depression in a bereaved European trauma sample (N = 325). The participants were assessed for PTSD via the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and depression via the Beck Depression Inventory. The five-factor model provided superior fit to the data compared with the existing four-factor models. In the dysphoric arousal model, depression was equally related to both dysphoric arousal and emotional numbing, whereas depression was more related to dysphoric arousal than to anxious arousal. PMID:24080678

  3. Bereavement and depression: possible changes to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: a report from the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Association for Death Education and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, David E; Noppe, Illee; Sandler, Irwin; Werth, James

    2011-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is being revised. A proposed revision hotly debated is to remove what is known as the exclusionary criterion and allow clinicians to diagnose a person with a major depressive episode within the early days and weeks following a death. The Executive Committee of the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) commissioned its Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) to examine the debate over removing the exclusionary criterion and provide a written report. The DSM-IV-TR classifies bereavement as a clinical condition that is not a mental disorder. The exclusionary criterion states that within the first 2 months of the onset of bereavement a person should not be diagnosed as having major depression unless certain symptoms not characteristic of a normal grief reaction are present. We note these symptoms when discussing the exclusionary criterion. In the report we identify the features that comprise the exclusionary criterion, examine reasons (including research conclusions and clinical concerns) given for retaining and for eliminating the exclusionary criterion, offer extensive comments from experienced licensed clinicians about the issues involved, discuss diagnostic and treatment implications, and offer specific recommendations for ADEC to implement. PMID:21928596

  4. Online Dating and Conjugal Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dannagal Goldthwaite; Caplan, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-presentation in the online dating profiles of 241 widowed and 280 divorced individuals between 18 and 40 years old. A content analysis of open-ended user-generated profiles assessed the presence or absence of various themes, including the user's marital status, the backstory of their lost relationship, and whether they…

  5. Bereaved Employee: Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very real; setting up an appointment with your company’s EAP (Employee Assistance Professional), contacting your local hospice, ... step in the journey. Share this: Twitter Facebook Google Search for: Choosing a Hospice: 16 Questions to ...

  6. Bereavement care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Vedsted, Peter; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2013-01-01

    I dette studie testes effekten af en klinisk intervention over for håndtering af sorg i almen praksis. Interventionen handlede om, at tidlig identifikation af komplicerede sorgreaktioner via praktiserende læge kan være med til at sikre behandling til behandlingskrævende sorgreaktioner, der volder...

  7. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heide Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study, which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve

  8. Infant death and interpretive violence in Northeast Brazil: taking bereaved Cearense mothers' narratives to heart Mortes infantis e violência interpretativa no Nordeste brasileiro: levando em conta as narrativas de mães cearenses enlutadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn K. Nations

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates bereaved mothers' ethnoetiologies of avoidable infant deaths in Northeast Brazil. It critically examines the anthropological debate concerning "selective maternal negligence" as a relevant explanation for high infant mortality, based on an analysis of preexisting data. From 2003 to 2006, 316 ethnographic interviews collected by the author from 1979 to 1989 in six communities in Ceará State were retrieved. Forty-five narratives of fatal illness and death of 56 children Investiga a etnoetiologia de óbitos infantis evitáveis na óptica da mãe em luto no Nordeste brasileiro. Refina o debate antropológico sobre a "negligência materna seletiva" como relevante explicação de alta mortalidade infantil. Trata-se de uma análise crítica de dados preexistentes. Entre 2003-2006, foram resgatadas 316 entrevistas etnográficas coletadas pela autora durante 1979-1989, em seis comunidades no Ceará, Brasil. Identificaram-se 45 narrativas de mães sobre a doença fatal e morte de 56 filhos < 5 anos para aprofundamento. Apesar da baixa renda e escolaridade, as mães construíram explicações próprias para a morte precoce. Causas maiores são doenças infecto-contagiosas (37,9% e cuidados desumanizados do profissional de saúde (24,1%. Nenhuma mãe acusa o descuido, desapego ou negligência materna. Nesse contexto de pobreza, argumenta-se que se existe "desprezo" é do sistema econômico-político e social injusto e da prática da saúde pública desumana que violentam os direitos da mulher-cidadã. Caracterizar essa mãe em luto como "negligente", ou, pior, cúmplice na morte do filho, é uma violência interpretativa que injustamente culpabiliza e desmoraliza a mãe-cuidadosa nordestina.

  9. Luto pela morte de um filho: utilização de um protocolo de terapia cognitivo-comportamental Bereavement for a child: a cognitive-behavioral treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira e Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar um caso de tratamento de luto, decorrente da perda de um filho, com protocolo cognitivista comportamental. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino, 28 anos, casada, que perdeu seu filho mais velho em um acidente 6 semanas antes do primeiro atendimento. A terapia, composta por 12 sessões, envolveu o trabalho das alterações emocionais e cognitivas, a aprendizagem de novas habilidades, o desenvolvimento de estratégias para lidar com as principais queixas somáticas e o treinamento para manejo dos problemas comportamentais. Os resultados foram avaliados utilizando-se os seguintes instrumentos: Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, os testes de atenção concentrada (AC e sustentada (AS e o Questionário de Saúde Geral de Goldberg (QSG. COMENTÁRIOS: paciente apresentou redução do quadro de depressão, ansiedade e desesperança. Todos os fatores do QSG apresentaram decréscimo, e houve aumento nas medidas de atenção concentrada e sustentada. O tratamento se mostrou efetivo em relação aos fatores apresentados.OBJECTIVE: To describe the case of a patient treated for grief and bereavement for a child using a cognitive-behavioral treatment protocol. CASE DESCRIPTION: Female patient, 28 years old, married, who had lost her older son in an accident 6 weeks prior to the first treatment session. The protocol comprised 12 sessions and involved treatment of cognitive and emotional symptoms, the learning of new abilities, development of strategies to deal with the main somatic complaints and training aimed at the handling of behavioral problems. Results were evaluated using the following instruments: Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, concentrated and sustained attention tests, and Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GGHQ. COMMENTS: The patient presented an improvement of depression, anxiety and hopelessness

  10. Teachers' Perception of Bereaved Children's Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyregrov, Atle; Dyregrov, Kari; Endsjø, Mathilde; Idsoe, Thormod

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that loss and trauma may lead to a reduction in school grades and an increase in the school dropout rate among school children. However, in order for the schools to support students in the best way after trauma and loss, it is of great importance that teachers are aware of these problems. In this study, we investigated the…

  11. 地震重灾区丧失子女者的创伤后应激症状2年随访%Post-traumatic stress symptoms among bereaved parents in severely damaged earthquake area: A 2-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳武妹; 范方; 周翠玲; 梅雯

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解地震重灾区丧失子女者创伤后应激症状( PTSS)变化情况及相关因素.方法:汶川地震后1.5年和2年时,对极重灾区155名丧失子女者(研究组)和35名未丧失子女者(对照组),采用心理创伤后应激障碍自评量表( PTSD-SS)和一般人口学资料调查表进行评估与调查.结果:震后1.5年时,研究组的PTSS检出率和PTSD-SS总分高于对照组(均P<0.001).震后2年时,研究组的PTSS检出率和PTSD-SS总分仍高于对照组(均P<0.001),研究组的PTSD-SS总分低于震后1.5年(P<0.05).研究组中,尚未再孕者的PTSS检出率和PTSD-SS总分均仅在震后2年时高于已孕或已育者(均P<0.05);受教育程度低者的PTSD-SS总分仅在震后2年时高于受教育程度高者(P<0.01);与震后1.5年时相比,震后2年时男性的PTSD-SS总分上升,女性总分下降(P<0.01).结论:本研究显示,与震后1.5年时相比,丧失子女者的PTSS检出率在震后2年时下降,且症状减轻;但丧失子女者中尚未再孕再育者、受教育程度低者以及男性的症状呈加重趋势.%Objective: To understand changes and related factors of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in bereaved parents in the severely damaged earthquake area. Methods: Totally 155 parents whose child died in the earthquake (study group) and 35 non-bereaved parents (control group) were visited and interviewed with the Postt-raumtic Stress Disorder-Self Rating Scale (PTSD-SS) and general demographic data questionnaire 1.5 years after the earthquake, and they were re-visited 2 years after the earthquake. Results: In the two investigations, the rates of PTSS(67.7% vs. 17.1%, 56. 8% vs. 14.3%) and total scores of PTSD-SS [(56.1 ± 15.1) vs. (42.6 ± 10.7), (53. 8 ± 14.0) vs. (40.0 ±11.1)] were both higher in the study group than in the control group (Ps <0.05). The scores of PTSD-SS in study group decreased two years after the quake comparing to 1.5 years after the quake (P < 0

  12. Experiences of bereaved former carers: issues from the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaye, Joyce; Watts, Jacqueline H.

    2016-01-01

    Although unpaid carers provide the majority of care for older, ill and disabled people in the UK, they are members of a marginalised population (Hash and Cramer, 2003: 50). Whilst caregiving is a dynamic process that changes over time, it has some key components as outlined by Stetz and Brown’s (1997) overarching term taking care and defined by them as the guiding, giving and doing for the ill person to meet his or her needs. This encompasses a very wide range of tasks and processes including...

  13. Prenatal exposure to maternal stress following bereavement and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Liu, Xiaoqin; Momen, Natalie C;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is among the leading determinants of mortality and morbidity, and causation may begin in the early intrauterine environment. Prenatal exposures to glucocorticoids or stress are potential risk factors of CVD later in life, but empirical evidence from large......% confidence interval) of having a CVD was 1.13 (1.06-1.20); the estimate was 1.24 (1.11-1.38) for heart disease and 1.27 (1.01-1.60) for hypertension. Additional sibling-matched analyses showed an overall attenuated association (1.08 (0.94-1.24)). CONCLUSION: Our results suggested a modest association between...

  14. The Grief Account: Dimensions of a Contemporary Bereavement Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2008-01-01

    The genre of the grief account is identified to include published narratives of surviving grief. Thematic analysis of Andrew Holleran's (2006) "Grief: A Novel," Lolly Winston's (2004) "Good Grief: A Novel," Joan Didion's (2005) "The Year of Magical Thinking," and J. Canfield and M. V. Hansen's (2003) "Chicken Soup for the Grieving Soul: Stories…

  15. Death and Bereavement on the Internet in Sweden and Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gustavsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Memorial websites on the Internet constitute a new form for expressing grief and for remembering deceased relatives and friends. In my sample of memorial websites, I have studied those that are open to the public. Such memorial sites have had an explosive development during the 2000s. The messages become a virtual, social meeting place by giving mourners an opportunity to express themselves and avoid remaining alone with their grief. In this study the all-inclusive issue has been how mourners express their emotions and concepts of belief regarding the deceased person. The question focused upon is the belief in something posthumously supernatural. Memorial sites on the Internet are also set up for dead pets. The boundary between humans and animals as spiritual beings is discussed in the study. In Norway the vision is primarily directed backwards, relating to traditions, and in Sweden forwards, in the direction of changes. In Sweden there is a greater tendency to adopt innovations and to leave the long-standing. This study can, in addition, play a part in the contemporary discussion about greater outspokenness concerning death, compared to the prevalent silence and taboos of the 1900s.

  16. Positive effects of Religious and Spiritual Coping on Bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yoffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonovsky (1987 coined the term “salutogenesis” in opposition to “pathogenesis”, with the intention to point out to cientific researchers ways and mechanisms that could promote health, well -being and life satisfaction. The area of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality began both in Europe and in the United States at the beginning of the twenth century. The research done in this field -since the last two decades- has focused on the relationships between religion, spirituality and health; and on the ways in which religious people cope with negative life events. We could think this area as a complementary one to the Positive Psychology; as both share certain common points of view about health, coping and well-being. In the field of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Pargament and Koenig (1997 used the term “coping” -coined by Lazarus and Folkman (1986- referring to different styles of “religious coping” as “ways and mechanism by which religious people apply their religious beliefs and behaviours to prevent and /or moderate negative consequences of stressful life events, in order to solve their problems as well”. Each religion promotes ways to overcome negative life events, such as the death of loved ones. By using faith, prayers, meditations, religious rituals and beliefs about life, death and afterlife, religious persons try to cope with their grief and enhance positive feelings of emotional ,mental and spiritual well-being. Clergy of different religions are trained in religious practices, knowledge and skills to provide social support to those ones who face pain and loss. Religious groups can provide different types of emotional, practical, intelectual and spiritual support that can help diminish feelings of loneliness and grief. Being and feeling part of a religious community can promote ways to reconect to life and positive feelings that can help to overcome the grief of the death of loved ones and make new projects into the future.

  17. Perinatal bereavement: grieving pregnancy loss in miscarriage and stillbirth

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, CHY

    2011-01-01

    Many couples have experienced the death of a baby. It could happen during pregnancy, during delivery, shortly after birth, or during infancy. Some are unexpected: in spite of medical advances, more than one-fifth of all expectant parents will at some time experience miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. For some other couples, early termination, whether of unwanted pregnancies due to personal choice or of wanted pregnancies due to medical reasons, is carried out at their own decision. A co...

  18. The risk of multiple sclerosis in bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J; Johansen, C; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited.......Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited....

  19. Culture as an Influencing Factor in Adolescent Grief and Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Culture is a complex and important consideration in the process of helping others. In clinical practice, we must view the individual within the context of their culture in order for assessment or treatment to be effective. Further, to overlook or negate culture, a practitioner may possibly operate from faulty cultural assumptions or…

  20. Sex Differences in Medication and Primary Healthcare Use before and after Spousal Bereavement at Older Ages in Denmark: Nationwide Register Study of over 6000 Bereavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Jacobsen, Rune; Glaser, Karen; Tomassini, Cecilia; Vaupel, James W; Christensen, Kaare

    2011-01-01

    Background. The study aimed to examine sex differences in healthcare use before and after widowhood to investigate whether reduced healthcare use among widowers compared with widows may partially explain excess mortality and more adverse health outcomes among men than women after spousal loss...... use and the average annual number of visits to general physicians (GPs). Results. The average daily use of all-cause and major system-specific medications, as well as the number of GP visits increased over the period from 1 year before and up to 5 years after a spouse's death, but there were no sex...

  1. Parents bereaved by infant death: Sex differences and moderation in PTSD, attachment, coping, and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Olff, Miranda; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    lost an infant either late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life. Participants filled out questionnaires between 1.2 months and 18 years after the loss (M=3.4 years). Results: Mothers reported significantly more PTSD symptoms, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping and feeling let...... down, but significantly lower levels of attachment avoidance than fathers. Attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and emotion-focused coping were significantly more strongly associated with PTSD severity in mothers than fathers, but only when examined alone. When all variables and time since the loss...

  2. Sources of support received by pregnant women in prenatal bereavement1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zully Araya Cubero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of research conducted in the canton of San Ramón, Costa Rica are presented, with 2012 data provided by the Local Committee on Maternal and Infant Mortality Review ( COLAMMI . The goal was to identifysources of support received by pregnant women, during pregnancy, after learning that the fetus had, malformations incompatible with life outside the womb, this support is provided in the process of mourning and sought to know the impact of that support with regard to mental health. From a qualitative approach the retrospective case study methodology was developed. The population was composed of three pregnant women who participated voluntarily and informed, the loss occurred between 3 months and a year prior to the study. Interview technique and review of the reports prepared by the COLAMMI was applied. The results indicate thatinterventions received by the first level of care are scarce and very late. It is concluded that the support provided by health personnel in the third level of health helped the pregnant to receive information about the grieving process and take more favorably decision. In this case, the intervention of first level of care was delayed and was difficult to access.

  3. [Risc factors for assisted suicide for cancer patients - mental burden of bereaved].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Caroline; Müller-Busch, H Christof

    2015-12-01

    Chronic and progressive disease represents a significant risk factor for suicidal behavior. Cancer patients have almost twice the rate of suicides compared to the general population. Based on a case report, the suicidal risk factors for cancer patients are presented. It is further investigated to what extent professional support by a mobile palliative care team can affect the wish for assisted suicide or the suicidal behavior generally among patients receiving palliative care. In addition, the mental impact on individuals, who were witnesses of assisted suicide of relatives or close friends are presented. The occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depressions, anxiety disorders and complicated grief (CG) in close family members is shown. However, further research will be necessary to develop adequate support for patients (and their relatives), who plan an assisted suicide. PMID:26620467

  4. Pilot study on traumatic grief treatment program for Japanese women bereaved by violent death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asukai, Nozomu; Tsuruta, Nobuko; Saito, Azusa

    2011-08-01

    This pilot study aimed to refine a treatment approach for traumatic grief due to violent loss. Our Traumatic Grief Treatment Program, a modification of Shear's complicated grief treatment (Shear et al., 2005), comprises psychoeducation, in vivo exposure, imaginal exposure, discussion of memories about and imaginal conversation with the deceased. Thirteen of 15 Japanese women suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to traumatic grief completed 12 to 16 weekly individual sessions based on their therapists' recommendations. Assessment scales included the Inventory of Complicated Grief, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. There was significant reduction in symptom severity at treatment end, and symptom levels remained low throughout the 12-month follow-up period. Based on Jacobson's Reliable Change Index, 46% showed change on all 3 measures. These findings suggest that our treatment model may be feasible for treating traumatic grief with PTSD in non-Western settings. PMID:21780192

  5. Narrative Focus Predicts Symptom Change Trajectories in Group Treatment for Traumatized and Bereaved Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassetti, Stevie N; Herres, Joanna; Williamson, Ariel A; Yarger, Heather A; Layne, Christopher M; Kobak, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the effectiveness of Trauma and Grief Component Therapy for Adolescents (TGCT-A) in reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and maladaptive grief (MG) reactions. This pilot study explored whether the specific focus of students' narratives (i.e., focus on trauma vs. focus on loss) as shared by TGCT-A group members would predict initial pretreatment levels, as well as pre- to posttreatment change trajectories, of PTSD symptoms and MG reactions. Thirty-three adolescents from three middle schools completed a 17-week course of group-based TGCT-A. PTSD and MG symptoms were assessed at pretreatment, twice during treatment, and at posttreatment. The focus (trauma vs. loss) of each student's narrative was coded using transcripts of members' narratives as shared within the groups. The reliable change index showed that 61% of students reported reliable pre-post improvement in either PTSD symptoms or MG reactions. Students whose narratives focused on loss both reported higher starting levels and showed steeper rates of decline in MG reactions than students whose narratives focused on trauma. In contrast, students whose narratives focused on trauma reported higher starting levels of PTSD than students who narrated loss experiences. However, narrative focus was not significantly linked to the rate at which PTSD symptoms declined over the course of treatment. This study provides preliminary evidence that TGCT-A treatment components are associated with reduced PTSD symptoms and MG reactions. Loss-focused narratives, in particular, appear to be associated with greater decreases in MG reactions. PMID:24927497

  6. Bereaved parents' online grief communities: de-tabooing practices or grief-ghettos?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Hård af Segerstad, Ylva;

    compared with people who have lost an old relative. Moreover, the traditional view for socially accepted grief and mourning (at least in protestant Nordic countries) is often that you should not to grieve for too long, not too intensely or not to publicly. A taboo can be said to be a rule against something....... A ghetto if labelled from the outside is a negative term. it is superimposed on a community by those who are not afflicted or part of that community onto those who are. The wall themselves in a perform weird things. When it comes to grieving for the death of a child a common conception is that online...

  7. Play Therapy for Bereaved Children: Adapting Strategies to Community, School, and Home Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nancy Boyd

    2011-01-01

    Play therapy is a highly adaptable treatment method that can be modified according to children's ages, circumstances, and settings in which counseling occurs. Play therapy may be used in schools, community settings, and homes to help children following the death of a significant other. After reviewing basic developmental factors that affect…

  8. Evidence-Based Practices for Parentally Bereaved Children and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Haine, Rachel A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    2008-01-01

    Parental death is one of the most traumatic events that can occur in childhood, and several reviews of the literature have found that the death of a parent places children at risk for a number of negative outcomes. This article describes the knowledge base regarding both empirically-supported, malleable factors that have been shown to contribute to or protect children from mental health problems following the death of a parent and evidence-based practices to change these factors. In addition,...

  9. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  10. Complicated grief – a challenge in bereavement support in palliative care: an update of the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt

    2014-01-01

    Når livet slutter, påvirker det ikke blot den døende, men hele familien. Derfor omfatter den palliative behandling også støtte til de nærmeste gennem sygdomsforløbet og efter patientens død. Alligevel er der først for nylig udarbejdet forslag til kliniske guidelines om, hvordan man bedst støtter ...

  11. Violent Deaths and Traumatic Bereavement: The Importance of Appropriate Death Notification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego de Leo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The communication of a death due to unexpected and traumatic causes is considered a very sensitive issue that can deeply affect both operators responsible for reporting the incident and the mourning process of family members, relatives, and other survivors. By focusing particularly on cases of traumatic death, this article tries to explain how inadequate communication of death may adversely affect the course of mourning. The article also illustrates the basic principles of correct notification of death. In this way, we hope to contribute to the ongoing dialogue on this topic and the promotion of new studies aimed at setting best practices for those professionally involved in the challenging task of communicating that a life has ended. This would be important in order to safeguard the emotional integrity of notifiers whilst effectively helping the survivors to cope with the early stages of their difficult mourning process.

  12. Caregiver Grief in Terminal Illness and Bereavement: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Deborah P.

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers experience multiple losses during the downhill trajectory of a loved one's terminal illness. Using mixed methods, this two-stage study explored caregiver grief during a terminal illness and after the care recipient's death. Caregiver grief was a state of heightened responsiveness during end-stage care: anxiety, hostility, depression,…

  13. Six-Year Longitudinal Predictors of Posttraumatic Growth in Parentally Bereaved Adolescents and Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Coxe, Stefany; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Ayers, Tim S.

    2008-01-01

    Using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, we examined posttraumatic growth in a sample of 50 adolescents and young adults who had experienced parental death in childhood or adolescence. Prospective longitudinal relations over a six year period were examined between measures of demographics, youth’s intrusive grief-related thoughts, appraisals, intrapersonal coping processes, interpersonal coping processes, mental health problems and social adaptation outcomes, and the growth subscales (i.e., ...

  14. Investigation of a Developmental Model of Risk for Depression and Suicidality Following Spousal Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Zhang, Baohui; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2008-01-01

    Data from a community-based multi-wave investigation were used to examine a developmental model of risk for depression and suicidality following the death of a spouse. Measures of perceived parental affection and control during childhood were administered to 218 widowed adults 11 months after the death of the spouse. Self-esteem, spousal…

  15. Coping Mediates Outcome Following a Randomized Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Bereaved Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial psychological effects of a coping-focused group intervention for HIV-positive individuals who had lost loved ones to AIDS. Data from 235 HIV-positive men and women enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial testing a coping-focused group intervention were analyzed using a multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation model. Results revealed that the effects of the intervention on dec...

  16. Assessing a Buddhist treatment for bereavement and loss: the mustard seed project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimeyer, Robert A; Young-Eisendrath, Polly

    2015-01-01

    From a Buddhist perspective, grief becomes complicated because mourners have trouble accommodating the reality of impermanence in the face of deep and unwelcome change, as they struggle to make sense of the "event story" of their loss and to revise their life story and identity accordingly. Joining this perspective with a constructivist emphasis on grieving as meaning reconstruction, we developed a distinctive group intervention to help people reflect on the natural conditions of impermanence and limitation in a compassionate environment in which they were encouraged to cultivate a new self-narrative in the wake of loss. Integrating meditative interludes, dyadic sharing, dharma lessons, and informal didactics on the human quest for meaning, we used expressive arts exercises to engage the existential dilemmas of loss from a self-distancing perspective. Evidence from an open trial on 41 participants in 2 groups documents that the intervention is both feasible and acceptable to clients, and that they display significant decreases in grief related suffering, and corresponding increases in meaning making and personal growth, across the brief course of the workshop experience. PMID:25365540

  17. Using Action Research to Design Bereavement Software: Engaging People with Intellectual Disabilities for Effective Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sue; Nte, Sol; Corcoran, Patsy; Stephens, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background: Loss is a universal experience and death is perceived as the ultimate loss. The overarching aim of this research is to produce a qualitative, flexible, interactive, computerised tool to support the facilitation of emotional expressions around loss for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores the process of using…

  18. Trauma and bereavement : symptomatology, aetiology and interventions : a case of young survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Sezibera, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to traumatic events has deleterious effect resulting in considerable psychological (cognitive and affective/emotional), physical and social impairments. In contrast to natural disasters, victims of man-made disasters have been reported to be vulnerable to severe psychological and psychiatric disorders affecting a large number of abilities and lasting for many years. Among the most common psychiatric diagnosis associated with violence exposure is the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTS...

  19. World Health organization guidelines for management of acute stress, PTSD, and bereavement: key challenges on the road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Wietse A; Barbui, Corrado; Bisson, Jonathan; Cohen, Judith; Hijazi, Zeinab; Jones, Lynne; de Jong, Joop T V M; Magrini, Nicola; Omigbodun, Olayinka; Seedat, Soraya; Silove, Derrick; Souza, Renato; Sumathipala, Athula; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Weissbecker, Inka; Zatzick, Douglas; van Ommeren, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Wietse Tol and colleagues discuss some of the key challenges for implementation of new WHO guidelines for stress-related mental health disorders in low- and middle-income countries. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. PMID:25514024

  20. World Health organization guidelines for management of acute stress, PTSD, and bereavement: key challenges on the road ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Tol, W.A.; C. Barbui; Bisson, J.; J. Cohen; Hijazi, Z.; Jones, L; Jong, de, Franciska; N. Magrini; Omigbodun, O.; Seedat, S.; Silove, D; de Souza, R.; Sumathipala, A.; Vijayakumar, L.; Weissbecker, I

    2014-01-01

    - The implementation of new WHO mental health guidelines for conditions and disorders specifically related to stress is likely to face obstacles, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. - Formulation of evidence-based guidelines is complicated by limited knowledge regarding (a) the effectiveness of commonly implemented interventions, (b) the effectiveness of established evidence-based interventions when used in situations of ongoing adversity, and (c) the effectiveness of widely use...

  1. Giving Birth to Life--Again!: Bereaved Parents' Experiences with Children Born Following the Death of an Adult Son

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Rosenfeld, Sarah; Buchbinder, Eli

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study examining the experiences of parents that lost a son during military service in Israel and consequently choose to give birth to another child. Seven couples and 3 mothers were interviewed for the study, and their interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Three main themes…

  2. Healthcare utilization of bereaved relatives of patients who died from cancer. A national population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Zachariae, Robert; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Tidligere studier har påpeget, at tabet af en nærtstående kan medføre øget forbrug af sundheds-ydelser i perioden med sorg. Der vides imidlertid ikke meget om sammenhængen mellem sorg og forbrug af sundhedsydelser. Denne viden ville eventuelt ville kunne bistå i planlægningen af sundhedsydelser e...

  3. The role of sensorial processes in Q'eqchi' Maya healing: A case study of depression and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Andrew R; Waldram, James B

    2016-02-01

    Theory and research on the healing practices of Indigenous communities around the globe have often been influenced by models of "symbolic healing" that privilege the way patients consciously interpret or derive meaning from a healing encounter. In our work with a group of Q'eqchi' Maya healers in southern Belize, these aspects of "symbolic healing" are not always present. Such empirical observations force us to reach beyond models of symbolic healing to understand how healing might prove effective. Through the extended analysis of a single case study of rahil ch'ool or "depression," we propose to advance understanding of forms of healing which are not dependent on a shared "mythic" or "assumptive world" between patient and healer or where therapeutic efficacy does not rely on the patient's ability to "believe" in or consciously "know" what is occurring during treatment. In this we demonstrate how the body, as a site of experience, transformation, and communication, becomes the therapeutic locus in healing encounters of this kind and argue that embodied mediums of sensorial experience be considered central in attempts to understand healing efficacy. PMID:26337478

  4. It is the “starting over” part that is so hard

    OpenAIRE

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Shaunfield, Sara; Gage, L. Ashley; Mooney, Megan; Lewis, Alexandria

    2014-01-01

    Although hospices are required to provide caregivers with formal bereavement support when their loved one passes, most bereavement interventions lack standardization and remain untested. The Dual Processing Model of Bereavement was used as a theoretical framework for assessing the potential of a Secret Facebook Group for bereaved hospice caregivers. Online communication was analyzed and reported outcome measures were compared pre and post intervention. Bereaved caregivers shared abrupt and an...

  5. Tradução portuguesa, adaptação e validação da Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS em mulheres com perda de gravidez Traducción portuguesa, adaptación y validación de la Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS en mujeres con pérdida gestacional Portuguese translation, adaptation and validation of the Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS in women with pregnancy loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida Koch

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A perda precoce de uma gravidez, para muitas mulheres, pode constituir um significativo stressor psicossocial. Fazer o luto deste tipo de perda pode ser complexo e uma avaliação precoce pode permitir intervenções mais eficazes. São poucos os instrumentos existentes para esta avaliação. Assim, neste estudo pretendeu-se traduzir, adaptar, validar e avaliar a aplicabilidade da PBGS em mulheres em situação de perda involuntária da gravidez, analisando as suas capacidades de mensuração. A amostra constituiu-se por 100 mulheres entre as quatro e as seis semanas pós-perda. A análise de componentes principais permitiu confirmar a estrutura dimensional única da escala, proposta pelo autor. O nível de confiabilidade da escala evidenciado no nosso estudo (coeficiente Alpha de Cronbach 0,81, embora um pouco inferior ao apresentado originalmente, é igualmente bom. Apresenta uma boa estabilidade temporal (r = 0,98, p La pérdida precoz del embarazo para muchas mujeres, puede ser un factor estresante psicosocial significativo. Hacer el duelo de este tipo de pérdida puede ser complejo y una evaluación temprana puede permitir intervenciones más eficaces. Existen pocos instrumentos para esta evaluación. Asimismo, en este estudio se ha pretendido traducir, adaptar, validar y evaluar la aplicabilidad de la PBGS en mujeres en situación de pérdida involuntaria del embarazo, analizando sus capacidades de mensuración. La muestra está constituida por 100 mujeres entre las cuatro a seis semanas tras la pérdida. El análisis de componentes principales permitió confirmar la estructura dimensional única de la escala, propuesta por el autor. El nivel de fiabilidad de la escala evidenciado en nuestro estudio (coeficiente Alpha de Cronbach 0,81, aunque un poco inferior al presentado originalmente, es igualmente bueno. Presenta una buena estabilidad temporal (r = 0,98, p The early loss of pregnancy for many women may be a significant psychosocial stressor. To mourn a loss of this type can be complex and early evaluation can allow more effective interventions. Few instruments exist for this assessment. Therefore in this study we sought to translate, adapt, and evaluate the applicability of the PBGS to women in situations of involuntary pregnancy loss, examining its measurement capabilities. The sample consisted of 100 women between four and six weeks after their respective losses. The analysis of the scale’s primary components confirmed its unique dimensional structure as proposed by the author. Although slightly lower than originally presented, the scale’s level of reliability, as evidenced in our study (Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient 0.81, is also satisfactory. The scale shows good temporal stability (r = 0.98, p <0.01. The scale, applied in this study, was found to be both reliable and valid, and may constitute an important tool to be used by nurses in evaluating women at risk of developing complications while adapting to pregnancy loss.

  6. Postpartum Blues

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  7. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

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  8. Gestational Diabetes

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  9. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  10. At Least 39 Weeks

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  11. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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  12. Folic Acid

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  13. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  14. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  15. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  16. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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  17. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  18. Gestational Diabetes

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  19. Postpartum Blues

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  20. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

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  1. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  2. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  3. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  4. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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  5. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  6. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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  7. Folic Acid

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  8. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  9. An exploratory investigation of the impact of conjugal bereavement on selected consumer behaviour and lifestyle dimensions of women over 60 in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Turley, Darach

    1993-01-01

    Many segmentation variables have been employed to differentiate groups of senior consumers. This thesis focuses on an unresearched though sizeable subsegment of this senior market - older widows. The effect of role transition on consumer behaviour has been investigated for a number of roles, however, the transition to widowhood, one of the most significant transitions in a woman’s life, has been largely ignored. The theoretical backdrop to this thesis is twofold. First, the senior consume...

  10. With and With"out": The Bereavement Experiences of Gay Men Who Have Lost a Partner to Non-AIDS-Related Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornjatkevyc, Nina L.; Alderson, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    This study gives voice to the experiences of gay men who have lost a partner to non-AIDS-related causes, a subject that has received little attention in the psychological literature. Interviews were conducted with 8 gay men. An analysis informed by hermeneutic phenomenology generated themes and contextualized meanings regarding the participants'…

  11. Emergency calls and need for emergency care in patients looked after by a palliative care team: Retrospective interview study with bereaved relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graf Bernhard M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last stage of life, palliative care patients often experience episodes of respiratory distress, bleeding, pain or seizures. In such situations, caregivers may call emergency medical services leading to unwanted hospital admissions. The study aims to show the influence of our palliative care team to reducing emergency calls by cancer patients or their relatives during the last six month of life. Methods Fifty relatives of deceased patients who had been attended by our palliative care team were randomly selected. Data was obtained retrospectively during a structured interview. In addition to demographic data, the number of emergency calls made during the final six months of the patient's life, the reason for the call and the mental compound score (MCS-12 of the caregivers was registered. Results Forty-six relatives agreed to the interview. Emergency calls were placed for 18 patients (39% during the final six months of their lives. There were a total of 23 emergency calls. In 16 cases (70% the patient was admitted to the hospital. Twenty-one (91% of the calls were made before patients had been enrolled to receive palliative care from the team, and two (9% were made afterwards. The mean mental compound score of the caregivers at the time of the interview was 41 (range 28–57. There was a lack of correlation between MCS-12 and number of emergency calls. Conclusion Emergency calls were more likely to occur if the patients were not being attended by our palliative care team. Because of the lack of correlation between MCS-12 and the number of emergency calls, the MCS-12 cannot indicate that acutely stressful situations triggered the calls. However, we conclude that special palliative care programs can reduce psychosocial strain in family caregivers. Therefore, the number of emergency calls may be reduced and this fact allows more palliative patients to die at home.

  12. Sharing experiences to improve bereavement support and clinical care after stillbirth : report of the 7th annual meeting of the international stillbirth alliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heazell, Alexander E. P.; Leisher, Susannah; Cregan, Mairie; Flenady, Vicki; Froen, J. Frederik; Gravensteen, Ida K.; De Groot-Noordenbos, Mariette; De Groot, Paul; Hale, Sue; Jennings, Belinda; Mcnamara, Karen; Millard, Caron; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Stillbirth remains a global health challenge which is greatly affected by social and economic inequality, particularly the availability and quality of maternity care. The International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA) exists to raise awareness of stillbirth and to promote global collaboration in the preven

  13. Midlife suicide risk, partner's psychiatric illness, spouse and child bereavement by suicide or other modes of death: a gender specific study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe gender specific suicide rates associated with partner's psychiatric disorder, loss of a spouse, or child by suicide or other causes, being a parent, and marital status. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital...... status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who committed suicide; 180 220 age-gender matched controls; 111 172 marital partners; 174 672 children. MAIN RESULTS: The suicide risk in women whose partner had...... been first admitted with a psychiatric disorder after 31 December two years earlier was 6.9 (95% CI 3.6 to 13.0), whereas their male counterpart experienced a risk of 3.9 (2.7 to 5.6); p value gender difference = 0.39. Men who had lost their partner by suicide or other causes of death experienced a...

  14. Does time heal all wounds? A longitudinal study of the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents of survivors of childhood cancer and bereaved parents

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungman, Lisa; Hovén, Emma; Ljungman, Gustaf; Cernvall, Martin; von Essen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Background: A lack of longitudinal studies has hampered the understanding of the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in parents of children diagnosed with cancer. This study examines level of PTSS and prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from shortly after diagnosis up to 5 years after end of treatment or child’s death, in mothers and fathers. Methods: A design with seven assessments (T1–T7) was used. T1–T3 were administered during treatment and T4–T7 after end o...

  15. The concept of shalōm as a constructive bereavement healing framework within a pluralist health seeking context of Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Vhumani Magezi; Keya, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Absence of health, that is, sickness in Africa is viewed in personalistic terms. A disease is explained as effected by ‘the active purposeful intervention of an agent, who may be human’, non-human (a ghost, an ancestor, an ‘evil spirit), or supernatural (a deity or other very powerful being)’ (Foster). Illness is thus attributed to breaking of taboos, offending God and/ or ancestral spirits; witchcraft, sorcery, the evil eye, passion by an evil spirit and a curse from parents or from an of...

  16. The concept of shalōm as a constructive bereavement healing framework within a pluralist health seeking context of Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Vhumani Magezi; Keya, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Absence of health, that is, sickness in Africa is viewed in personalistic terms. A disease is explained as effected by ‘the active purposeful intervention of an agent, who may be human’, non-human (a ghost, an ancestor, an ‘evil spirit), or supernatural (a deity or other very powerful being)’ (Foster). Illness is thus attributed to breaking of taboos, offending God and/ or ancestral spirits; witchcraft, sorcery, the evil eye, passion by an evil spirit and a curse from parents or from an offen...

  17. Actitudes psicológicas ante la muerte y el duelo: Una revisión conceptual Psychological attitudes toward death and bereavement: One conceptual review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Gala León

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la muerte siempre ha sido objeto de profundas reflexiones filosóficas, religiosas y, actualmente, científicas; sin embargo en las sociedades postindustriales es difícil aceptar su mera idea, de modo que las actitudes hacia ella han sufrido una evolución desadaptativa, retrocediendo de la mano del "progreso" de las actitudes saludables del afrontamiento y la aceptación, a las prefóbicas del sinvivir por su temor y a las fóbicas de su negación. Cambios socioculturales: podemos diferenciar en Occidente dos momentos en la vivencia de la muerte: uno previo a su Institucionalización Hospitalaria, en el que es aceptada como parte natural de la existencia y otro, desde que el Hospital pasa a ser la Institución reservada para morir, traduciéndose en un cambio radical en la consciencia e información sobre la propia muerte. Actitudes del Personal Sanitario: estos cambios también han alcanzado al PS. generándole muchas veces actitudes distorsionadas tales como no querer nombrar a la muerte o a las patologías "que las atraen", no mirar cara a cara al enfermo terminal, incongruencias y disonancias entre la Comunicación Verbal y la No Verbal y aumento de la atención tecnológica en detrimento de la empático-afectiva, con el riesgo del encarnizamiento terapéutico, empeorándose las condiciones de la muerte. Conclusión: el Marco Sanitario precisa de componendas éticas y estéticas para afrontar integralmente el proceso de morir, dotándose de medios, conocimientos y actitudes adecuadas para atender las necesidades biopsicosociales del moribundo con el objetivo de morir con dignidad.Introduction: Death has always been the object of deep philosophical, religious, and currently scientific reflections; however in post-industrial societies it is difficult to accept the very idea of it, so that attitudes to death have undergone maladaptive evolution, drawing back in the name of "progress" from the healthy attitudes of confrontation and acceptance, to the pre-phobic attitude of living in constant worry for fear of death, and the phobic attitude of its denial. Socio-cultural changes: In the West we can differentiate two periods in the experience of dying: one prior to institutionalization in hospital where it is accepted as a natural part of existence and the other, from when the hospital becomes the institution reserved for dying, bringing about a radical change in the consciousness of and information on ones own death. Attitudes of medical personnel: These changes have also reached medical personnel, frequently generating distorted attitudes such as not wanting to name death or the pathologies leading to it, not dealing face-to-face with the terminal patient, incongruities and discord between verbal and non-verbal communication and an increase in technological attention in detriment of affective empathy , with the risk of therapeutic cruelty, worsening the conditions of death. Conclusion: The medical framework needs ethical and aesthetic arrangements to integrally face the process of dying, endowing it with adequate means, knowledge and attitudes to attend the biopsychosocial needs of the dying, with the object of dying with dignity.

  18. Assessing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Latent Structure in Elderly Bereaved European Trauma Victims: Evidence for a Five Factor Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask;

    2013-01-01

    The three-factor structure of PTSD specified by the DSM-IV is not supported in the empirical literature. Two alternative four-factor models have received a wealth of empirical support. However, a consensus regarding which is superiorhas not been reached. A recent five-factor model has been shown ...

  19. The grieving adult and the general practitioner: a literature review in two parts (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, W R; Carter, Y H

    1997-08-01

    In part 1 of this review, published last month, literature exploring the psychological bereavement theories and the health consequences of bereavement are summarized. The second part builds on this to outline the debate surrounding the characteristics of abnormal bereavement, while also focusing on risk factors for this morbidity. This leads on to a summary of the literature on bereavement care, particularly from a general practice point of view. Finally, areas for further research are highlighted. PMID:9302794

  20. The grieving adult and the general practitioner: a literature review in two parts (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, W R; Carter, Y H

    1997-07-01

    This article is the first of a two-part literature review on bereavement. In part 1, those psychological theories that have improved the understanding of the bereavement process are summarized. In addition, the research examining the mortality and morbidity following a bereavement is critically analysed. PMID:9281874

  1. Grandparental Death: Through the Lens of an Asian Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Bereavement has been extensively studied over the years, yet scholarly work depicting, with the first-person perspective, the experience of childhood bereavement is severely lacking. The research question I set out to answer here is: What is it like as an Asian child to experience bereavement following grandparental death? As such,…

  2. 大学生の対人関係喪失における対処方略と悲嘆反応の関連 <研究論文>

    OpenAIRE

    中嶋, 直美; 兒玉, 憲一

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to clarify the characteristics of college students' bereavement and separation and the relationship between coping strategies and grief reactions in bereavement and separation. 212 college students completed questionnaires. The results indicated that the majority of the respondents have experienced some bereavement or separation, in particular, separation from the lover. Multiple regression analyses showed that coping strategies such as "avoidance", "abandonment...

  3. The denial of death: A three-decade long case of absent grief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bereavement reactions are associated with numerous physical and mental complications. Atypical bereavement reactions have been described but their place in the classificatory system has not been established. We present the case of an eighty-year-old woman who came with the belief that her deceased son was alive. We discuss the diagnostic dilemma she posed and conclude that it may be difficult to differentiate atypical bereavement from other psychiatric illnesses.

  4. 心理剧疗法在震后丧恸者心灵重建中的应用%Psychodrama and Its Application in Post-earthquake Psychological Rehabilitation of the Bereaved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江琴; 林大熙

    2009-01-01

    通过对"5·12"汶川地震后的心理援助实践,得出心理剧疗法是对震后丧恸者缓解忧伤、恐惧、愤怒、自责等不良情绪,以及帮助他们重塑生活的信心、重构生活的意义有良好的效果.主要治疗步骤包括建立安全信任感、引导情绪宣泄、举行告别仪式、与新生活联结.

  5. Does "grief work" work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, M; Stroebe, W

    1991-01-01

    This article challenges the long-standing belief in the necessity of "grief work" for adjustment to bereavement. Evidence is offered from a prospective study of 30 widows and 30 widowers that indicates that grief work is not always as essential for adjustment to bereavement as theorists and clinicia

  6. Learning about Grief from Normal Families: SIDS, Stillbirth, and Miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrain, John

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 10 common questions, gleaned from qualitative analysis of data from nearly 850 bereaved family members who participated in 9 distinct studies, asked by people whose lives are directly affected by the death of a baby. Offers guidelines for family therapists serving families bereaved by an infant death. (Author/NB)

  7. Post-Trauma: Is Evidence-Based Practice a Fantasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburger, Karola; Akhonzada, Rym; Fargas, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    Trauma, bereavement, and loss are universal human experiences. Much has been written about the process that the bereaved go through following the loss of a loved one. Recent events such as 9/11, earthquakes in Turkey, genocides in Rwanda, community conflict in Northern Ireland, and the Asian Tsunami Disaster have drawn unprecedented public…

  8. What parents of children who have received emergency care think about deferring consent in randomised trials of emergency treatments: postal survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrol Gamble

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate parents' views about deferred consent to inform management of trial disclosure after a child's death. METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey was sent to members of the Meningitis Research Foundation UK charity, whose child had suffered from bacterial meningitis or meningococcal septicaemia within the previous 5 years. Main outcome measures were acceptability of deferred consent; timing of requesting consent; and the management of disclosure of the trial after a child's death. RESULTS: 220 families were sent questionnaires of whom 63 (29% were bereaved. 68 families responded (31%, of whom 19 (28% were bereaved. The majority (67% was willing for their child to be involved in the trial without the trial being explained to them beforehand; 70% wanted to be informed about the trial as soon as their child's condition had stabilised. In the event of a child's death before the trial could be discussed the majority of bereaved parents (66% 12/18 anticipated wanting to be told about the trial at some time. This compared with 37% (18/49 of non-bereaved families (p = 0.06. Parents' free text responses indicated that the word 'trial' held strongly negative connotations. A few parents regarded gaps in the evidence base about emergency treatments as indicating staff lacked expertise to care for a critically ill child. Bereaved parents' free text responses indicated the importance of individualised management of disclosure about a trial following a child's death. DISCUSSION: Deferred consent is acceptable to the majority of respondents. Parents whose children had recovered differed in their views compared to bereaved parents. Most bereaved parents would want to be informed about the trial in the aftermath of a child's death, although a minority strongly opposed such disclosure. Distinction should be drawn between the views of bereaved and non-bereaved parents when considering the acceptability of different consent processes.

  9. Teenagers losing a parent to cancer : experiences, modifiable risk-factors and long-term outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Bylund Grenklo, Tove

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the experiences of cancer-bereaved teenagers. The goal was to identify potentially modifiable risk-factors for long-term psychological consequences and thus be able to guide health-care providers in ways to support bereaved-to-be teenagers. Subjects and Methods: A study-specific questionnaire was made based on semi-structured interviews with cancer-bereaved youths and tested for face-to-face validity. Through population-based registers, we identified cancer-bere...

  10. Self-worth mediates the effects of violent loss on PTSD symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Anthony D; Prati, Gabriele; Black, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    Although research has confirmed that violent losses can exacerbate grief reactions, few investigations have explored underlying mechanisms. In this study, the authors used a dataset on bereaved spouses and bereaved parents at 4- and 18-months postloss to examine the mediating effects of self-worth and worldviews (benevolence and meaningfulness beliefs). Persons bereaved by violent causes had significantly more posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), grief, and depression symptoms at 4- and 18-months postloss than persons bereaved by natural causes. Moreover, self-worth but not worldviews mediated the effects of violent loss on PTSD and depression symptoms cross sectionally and PTSD symptoms longitudinally. Findings underscore that self-views are a critical component of problematic reactions to violent loss, but fail to support the role of "shattered" worldviews. PMID:21351170

  11. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  12. Adjustment disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Fava ...

  13. Adjustment disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum ...

  14. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... questions Ask our health experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement ...

  15. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  16. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

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  17. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  18. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  19. Postpartum Blues

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  20. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  1. Folic Acid

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  2. Gestational Diabetes

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  3. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  4. At Least 39 Weeks

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    Full Text Available ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... questions Ask our health experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement ...

  5. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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    Full Text Available ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... questions Ask our health experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement ...

  6. Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Tips for the Caregivers from Doctors Diet, Exercise & Health Caregivers in Training Home Modification Continuing Care Bereavement and Grief Legal & Financial Planning Ask The Experts Article Finder News Videos Research About Our Research Our Research Team Progress Reports ...

  7. Dealing with Your Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grief > Dealing with your grief Dealing with your grief E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... can do to help you feel better. Order bereavement materials Order our resources for grieving families , including ...

  8. Regret resolution, aging, and adapting to loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torges, Cynthia M; Stewart, Abigail J; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2008-03-01

    Both theory and empirical evidence suggest that people who have unresolved regrets experience lower levels of well-being than do those who resolve their regrets. In this study, the authors examined the role of regret resolution during bereavement by assessing whether (a) regret resolution would aid in adapting to the death of a loved one and (b) older adults would be more successful at resolving their bereavement-related regrets than would younger adults. Mixed models were run with longitudinal data from an age-heterogeneous sample of 147 men and women who were eventually bereaved after providing care for a loved one through a hospice. As expected, regret resolution contributed to adjustment as indicated by postloss patterns of depressive symptoms, well-being, and rumination; further, older adults were more likely to resolve their regrets than were younger adults. Implications for encouraging regret resolution early in bereavement are discussed. PMID:18361664

  9. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  10. At Least 39 Weeks

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  11. Gestational Diabetes

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  12. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  13. Folic Acid

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  14. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  15. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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  16. Postpartum Blues

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  17. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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  18. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  19. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

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  20. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  1. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  2. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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  3. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  4. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  5. At Least 39 Weeks

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  6. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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  7. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  8. Gestational Diabetes

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  9. Folic Acid

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  10. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  11. Posttraumatic stress disorder and prolonged grief in refugees exposed to trauma and loss

    OpenAIRE

    Nickerson, Angela; Liddell, Belinda J.; MacCallum, Fiona; Steel, Zachary; Silove, Derrick; Bryant, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While a large proportion of conflict-affected populations have been dually exposed to trauma and loss, there is inadequate research identifying differential symptom profiles related to bereavement and trauma exposure in these groups. The objective of this study were to (1) determine whether there are distinct classes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and prolonged grief disorder (PGD) symptoms in bereaved trauma survivors exposed to conflict and persecution, and (2) examine w...

  12. Organ donation in the accident and emergency department: a study of relatives' views.

    OpenAIRE

    Wellesley, A.; Glucksman, E.; Crouch, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether recently bereaved people would object to being asked about organ donation immediately after the death of their relative. METHODS: A telephone interview of 78 recently bereaved relatives of people who had died in an inner city accident and emergency (A&E) department; 68 (87%) agreed to participate in the study and were sent a questionnaire. Outcome measures were views on being asked about organ donation in the A&E department immediately after the death of a rela...

  13. Measuring Meaning: Searching For and Making Sense of Spousal Loss in Late-Life

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Rachel A.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite much recent theorizing, evidence regarding the temporal relationship of sense-making to adjustment following bereavement remains relatively sparse. This study examined the role of searching for and making sense of loss in late-life spousal bereavement, using prospective, longitudinal data from the Changing Lives of Older Couples1 (CLOC) project (N=250). Searching at 6 and 18 months post-loss predicted both contemporaneous and subsequent grief. Sense-making was not related to grief for...

  14. “The Worst Thing About Hospice Is That They Talk About Death”: Contrasting Hospice Decisions and Experience among Immigrant Central and South American Latinos to US-born White, Non-Latino Cancer Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Kreling, Barbara; Selsky, Claire; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Huerta, Elmer E.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2010-01-01

    Hospice care is promoted as a model for improving end of life care and decreasing burden on caregivers. However, hospice use is low in Latinos and little is known about how Latinos make hospice decisions and experience hospice once enrolled. We used qualitative methods to conduct in-depth interviews and focus groups with 15 Latino bereaved hospice family caregivers and 15 White Non-Latino bereaved hospice family caregivers to describe hospice experiences and evaluate whether cultural factors ...

  15. Prenatal stress and risk of febrile seizures in children: a nationwide longitudinal study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Obel, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether exposure to prenatal stress following maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed 1,431,175 children born in Denmark. A total of 34,777 children were born to women who lost a...... timing of bereavement. Our data do not suggest any causal link between exposure to prenatal stress and febrile seizures in childhood....

  16. Health transitions in recently widowed older women: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiacomo, Michelle; Lewis, Joanne; Nolan, Marie T.; Phillips, Jane; Davidson, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    Background Older recently widowed women are faced with increased health risks and chronic conditions associated not only with bereavement, but also, older age. Loss and grief, adjusting to living alone, decreased income, and managing multiple chronic conditions can impact on older women’s ability to transition following recent spousal bereavement. Providing appropriate, timely, and effective services to foster this life transition is of critical importance, yet few services directed towards t...

  17. Factors associated with grief and depression following the loss of a child: a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mairi; O'Connor, Rory C; O'Carroll, Ronan E

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to explore the factors which are associated with grief and depression outcomes in a group of bereaved parents in the first few years following the loss of a child. Sixty-four participants were recruited from bereavement support organisations, between two and 59 months post loss, mean 30 months (SD = 15). They completed a questionnaire packet which comprised standard instruments measuring grief, depression, coping styles, continuing bonds and optimism/pessimism, as well as a number of specific bereavement-related questions. Univariate analyses were conducted to establish which factors were associated with grief and depression. Those which were statistically significant were then entered into multivariate analyses to establish their relative importance. High levels of avoidance and depression and lower levels of cognitive restructuring (benefit finding) were associated with higher grief symptoms, whereas higher levels of avoidance and alcohol/substance use were associated with higher depression symptoms. The present study highlights the relative importance of different coping strategies adopted by this group of bereaved parents, compared to the relative unimportance of circumstances around the loss, e.g. sudden or violent death. The use of alcohol and other substances by bereaved parents requires urgent attention as a potentially life-threatening maladaptive coping strategy. The call for further research into risk factors for bereaved parents is emphasised. PMID:23802736

  18. La mort du prince Henri (†1612 : éthique et rhétorique du deuil dans un cycle de sermons funèbres anglais The prince Henry’s death (†1612 : ethics and rhetoric of bereavement in a cycle of English funeral sermons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barros

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article examine les spécificités thématiques et rhétoriques d’un cycle de sermons de deuil de Daniel Price, prononcés en 1612 à l’occasion de la mort du prince Henri, le fils aîné du roi d’Angleterre, Jacques Ier. Le premier volet expose les caractéristiques du sermon funèbre anglais, un genre de discours fortement codifié, dont les conventions se fixèrent dans la seconde moitié du XVIe siècle, alors même que le clergé s’efforçait de démontrer la légitimité de la prédication funèbre dans un contexte protestant. À l’aube du XVIIe siècle, les sermons funèbres imprimés se conforment en majorité à un modèle rhétorique bien défini et poursuivent un objectif pastoral double : la commémoration des morts et l’édification des vivants. Vis-à-vis de cette norme, les sermons de Daniel Price présentent des écarts considérables. En effet, ils se consacrent pour l’essentiel à la prise en charge du deuil des fidèles, un choix thématique qui implique une stratégie rhétorique spécifique. Se focalisant sur l’examen de ces caractéristiques, le deuxième volet de l’article montrera que ces textes, s’ils sont peu représentatifs de la pratique homilétique du clergé anglais au moment des funérailles, sont symptomatiques d’un changement culturel qui se dessine en Angleterre à l’aube du XVIIe siècle, et qui se traduit par la valorisation du deuil humain à des fins dévotionnellesThis article examines the thematic and rhetorical specificities of a cycle of funeral sermons preached in 1612 by Daniel Price on the occasion of the death of prince Henry, the eldest son of James I. It begins by describing the conventions of the English funeral sermon, which took shape in the second half of the sixteenth century, at a time when the clergy aimed at legitimizing the act of preaching over the dead in a Protestant context. It will be shown that at the beginning of the seventeenth century, the majority of printed funeral sermons conformed to a well-defined rhetorical pattern and pursued a two-fold pastoral aim : the commemoration of the dead and the edification of the living. Focusing on the grief of the audience, the sermons of Daniel Price significantly differ from this pattern, both rhetorically and thematically. The second part of the article will focus on the analysis of these idiosyncrasies, which will be shown to be symptomatic of a wider cultural change occurring in England at the beginning of the seventeenth century : the valuing of human grief in a devotional context.

  19. Efficacy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder due to Bereavement:A Control Study%丧亲创伤后应激障碍患者眼动脱敏和再加工治疗与认知行为治疗的对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玲; 张桂青; 胡敏; 时若欢

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨眼动脱敏和再加工治疗( EMDR)与认知行为治疗( CBT)对丧亲所致创伤后应激障碍( PTSD)疗效的优劣性。方法将2013年1—12月在石河子大学医学院第一附属医院诊断为PTSD的丧亲者随机分为EMDR组与CBT组,分别于治疗前后评价两组患者PTSD症状及焦虑、抑郁情况。结果共纳入34例患者,两组各17例。治疗前两组创伤后应激障碍量表平民版( PCL-C)总分及3个症状群得分、汉密顿焦虑量表( HAMA)和汉密顿抑郁量表(HAMD)得分间差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);而治疗后EMDR组PCL-C总分及再体验症状群、易激惹症状群得分和 HAMA 得分均低于 CBT 组,差异有统计学意义( P 0. 05)in the total score of PCL-C, the scores of three syndromes,and scores of HAMA and HAMD. After treatment,EMDR group Was loWer(P<0. 05)than CBT group in the total score of PCL-C,the scores of flashback and hyperarousal and the score of HAMA. Conclusion EMDR and CBT are all effective in the treatment of PTSD,While EMDR is more effective in alleviating PTSD symptoms and anxiety.

  20. 'People look down on you when you tell them how he died': Qualitative insights into stigma as experienced by suicide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kath; Cunningham, Colleen; Murphy, Gillian; Jackson, Debra

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to present findings that convey how people felt stigmatized after the loss of a loved one to suicide. A qualitative design was used for the purpose of this study. Data were collected using in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Audio-recordings of the interviews were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Ten people bereaved by suicide participated in the study. Four themes emerged from the data namely: Feeling blamed, shamed and judged; Feeling isolated/rejected by friends and community; Feeling silenced and Feeling the burden of others' discomfort. Findings show that stigmatization of the bereaved by suicide had detrimental effects on their relationships and their help seeking behaviours. Further, due to stigma imposed on them by others, participants were denied the opportunity to tell their stories which further complicated their grieving process. Further education and training is required for health professionals to enhance understanding of the specific needs of those bereaved by suicide. PMID:26889754

  1. The relation among variables of mental health and cognition in widowed elders / A relação entre variáveis de saúde mental e cognição em idosos viúvos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Marceli Trentini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the cognitive abilities of widowed elders, a total sample of 34 elders (who have lost their spouses in the last 12 months was identified among elders in Veranópolis-RS and 30 of them accepted to participate in the study. The control group was composed by 30 married subjects paired according to gender, age and level of education. The instruments used were: Measure Questionnaire of Memory Loss Complaints; Verbal Fluency - animal category; Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test; Digit subtest; Geriatric Depression Scales and Bereavement Phenomenology Questionnaire. Widowed elders had significantly more depressive symptoms and more points on the bereavement scale. However, there was no significant difference between the means of cognitive performance of widowed or married elders. In the census, the choice of widowhood as a selection criterion instead of bereavement (self reported might have influenced the lack of association between widowhood and cognitive dysfunction, among other aspects.

  2. Ældre efterladte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    TSC and HTQ. Degree of strain, helplessness and fear of death or illness in relation to the loss was significantly related to level of symptoms. Four independent vaiables can predict 47% og the variance in the TSC-scores and 93%  in the HTQ-scores.  Conclusions. Loosing a spouse in old age is often a...... significant increase in mortality rate, use of alcohol and medicine, visits to the local physician, hospitalization, physical and mental problems etc.. Social support and preventive work with the widowed is generally considered to reduce the psychological effect of stress and traumatization. This thesis...... includes an introduction to and a discussion of the subject "Elderly bereaved" and focusses on traumatization, social support and preventive work in this group. Following this a psychological survey of elderly bereaved in Denmark has been done.Method. A questionnaire syrvey of  54 bereaved Danes over the...

  3. Death ends a life, not a relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Sandvik, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    In the final chapter, “Death Ends a Life, not a Relationship: objects as media on children’s graves”, Dorthe Refslund Christensen and Kjetil Sandvik investigate the relational affordances offered by objects as media in practices of death and commemoration on children’s graves. The authors argue...... that when it comes to bereavement practices as they materialize on children’s graves, it is the accommodation and decoration of the grave itself that function as media with their variety of physical objects as ritual and relational tools for communication. The bereaved perform practices on children’s...

  4. Jak se pozůstalí vyrovnávají se smrtí svých blízkých a jak jim při tom pomoci?

    OpenAIRE

    URBÁNEK, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    The thesis deals with the topic of how the bereaved cope with the death of their loved ones and how one could help them in their crisis situation. It aims to compare the information gathered in a research carried out in the Strakonice district with the results known in scientific literature. The bachelor?s thesis focuses particularly on the mourning of the bereaved; however, it also outlines the issues of death and funeral which are closely related to the death of a loved one. It takes into a...

  5. The influence of unreconciled grief in the family on the functioning and development of a child [Wpływ nieprzeżytej żałoby w rodzinie na funkcjonowanie i rozwój dziecka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz, Bernadetta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to present the influence of unreconciled grief in a family for functioning and growth of a child. The paper is based on some examples of clinical work from the field of family therapy, where developmental problems of children followed their carer’sinability to cope with death and bereavement. Presented cases from family therapy serve as examples of possible therapeutic interventions in such situations. They show examples of developmental disturbances and psychopathology of the child who stays in relationship with deeply bereaved intimates.

  6. Internet-based exposure and behavioral activation for complicated grief and rumination: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Eisma; P.A. Boelen; J. van den Bout; W. Stroebe; H.A. Schut; J. Lancee; M.S. Stroebe

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to th

  7. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

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  8. Gestational Diabetes

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  9. At Least 39 Weeks

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  10. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

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  11. Alcohol and Pregnancy

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  12. Labor and Delivery: At the Hospital

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  13. Healthy Choices: What to Eat during Pregnancy

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  14. Cesarean Section: The Operation

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  15. Complicated spiritual grief II: a deductive inquiry following the loss of a loved one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laurie A; Neimeyer, Robert A; Young, Amanda J; Bonin, Elizabeth Piazza; Davis, Natalie L

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an association between complicated grief-a severe, prolonged response to the loss of a loved one-and complicated spiritual grief-a spiritual crisis following loss. Furthermore, bereavement research has benefitted from a number of studies using qualitative inquiry as a means of examining the experiences of individuals grieving a variety of types of losses. However, a gap in the literature remains in terms of the qualitative investigation of spiritual struggle following loss. Thus, using participants' written responses to open-ended questions along with systematic exploration of this topic with a five-member focus group, we designed this qualitative study to better understand the firsthand experiences of bereaved individuals who have suffered a crisis of faith after the death of a loved one. Specifically, our directed content analysis of bereaved focus group members' responses revealed 17 different common and salient themes subsumed in an overarching narrative of resentment and doubt toward God, dissatisfaction with the spiritual support received, and substantial changes in the bereaved person's spiritual beliefs and behaviors. Thus, our study clarified the construct of complicated spiritual grief, and laid the groundwork for development of more specific assessment and treatment of this condition. PMID:24524590

  16. Massive Violent Death and Contested National Mourning in Post-Authoritarian Chile and Argentina : A Sociocultural Application of the Dual Process Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, Antonius C G M

    2014-01-01

    This article uses the dual process model (DPM) in an analysis of the national mourning of tens of thousands of disappeared in Chile and Argentina by adapting the model from the individual to the collective level where society as a whole is bereaved. Perpetrators are also involved in the national mou

  17. Cognitive-behavioral variables mediate the impact of violent loss on post-loss psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A; de Keijser, Jos; Smid, Geert

    2015-07-01

    Research has shown that violent losses lead to more severe emotional distress than do nonviolent losses. Little is known about the psychological mechanisms underlying the debilitating impact of violent loss. In the current study, the authors used self-reported data of 496 bereaved individuals, bereaved in the last 3 years, to examine the role of seven cognitive-behavioral variables in mediating the impact of violent loss: (a) a sense of "unrealness" about the irreversibility of the separation, negative cognitions about (b) the self, (c) life, (d) the future, and (e) catastrophic misinterpretations of grief-reactions, and indices of (f) anxious avoidance and (g) depressive avoidance behavior. Outcomes showed that people bereaved by violent losses (due to homicide, suicide, or accident) had significantly higher symptom-levels of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression than persons bereaved by nonviolent losses. Indices of unrealness, negative cognitions about the self, the future, catastrophic misinterpretations, and depressive avoidance were all significant independent mediators of the linkages between violent loss and symptom-levels of PGD and depression. Negative cognitions about the future, catastrophic misinterpretations, and depressive and anxious avoidance emerged as unique mediators of the association between violent loss and elevated PTSD severity. Findings underscore that cognitive-behavioral variables are a critical component of elevated emotional distress following violent loss. PMID:26147521

  18. Childhood Traumatic Grief: A Multi-Site Empirical Examination of the Construct and Its Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elissa J.; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa; Cohen, Judith; Handel, Stephanie; De Bocanegra, Heike Thiel; Zatta, Eileen; Goodman, Robin F.; Mannarino, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the construct of childhood traumatic grief (CTG) and its correlates through a multi-site assessment of 132 bereaved children and adolescents. Youth completed a new measure of the characteristics, attributions, and reactions to exposure to death (CARED), as well as measures of CTG, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD),…

  19. Death-Related versus Fond Memories of a Deceased Attachment Figure: Examining Emotional Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Grieving is infused by memories and emotions. In this study, bereaved participants recalled either death-related or fond memories of their loved ones. Their emotional arousal was examined via physiologic and voice analytic measures. Both death-related and fond memories generated an acoustic profile indicative of sadness (reflected by voice quality…

  20. Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

  1. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) : toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, Geert E; Kleber, Rolf J; de la Rie, Simone M; Bos, Jannetta B A; Gersons, Berthold P R; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of

  2. Prenatal stress and cerebral palsy: a nationwide cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to prenatal stress may affect neurodevelopment of the fetus, but whether this exposure increases the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) later in life is unknown. We aimed to examine the association between maternal bereavement during the prenatal time period and CP in childhood...

  3. When a Child Dies: A Critical Analysis of Grief-Related Controversies in "DSM-5"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieleman, Kara; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" has incited vociferous debate among academics, clinicians, and the general public. Two contested changes are eliminating the bereavement exclusion from the major depressive disorder diagnosis and creating a…

  4. A Teenager Revisits Her Father's Death during Childhood: A Study in Resilience and Healthy Mourning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Russell C.

    2004-01-01

    "Debbie," 14, was 8 when her father died. During 4 interviews over 3 months, Debbie described the impact of his death as she progressed from childhood to adolescence. Themes drawn from her experience were related to theories of development, bereavement, and resilience. Triangulating interviews with her mother and brother established validity.…

  5. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

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  6. Exercise during Pregnancy

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  7. Postpartum Blues

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  8. Folic Acid

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  9. Exploring Responses to Transformative Group Therapy for Orphaned Children in the Context of Mass Orphaning in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamuku, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    In the context of AIDS, the Botswana Government has adopted a group therapy program to help large numbers of orphaned children cope with bereavement. This study explores the effectiveness of the therapy and examines how it interacts with cultural attitudes and practices concerning death. Ten orphaned children were involved in five rounds of data…

  10. How Schools Can Support Children Who Experience Loss and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John

    2008-01-01

    Scenes of public grieving such as followed the death of Princess Diana bear little resemblance to the "taboo" status of death and bereavement at an individual level. For schools and the support services with whom they work, responding to pupils' experiences of loss and death, especially of parents, is challenging. This paper draws on research and…

  11. Couples at risk following the death of their child : predictors of grief versus depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaards-de Meij, Leoniek; Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang; van den Bout, Jan; van der Heijden, Peter; Dijkstra, Iris

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relative impact of major variables for predicting adjustment (in terms of both grief and depression) among bereaved parents following the death of their child. Couples (N = 219) participated 6, 13, and 20 months postloss. Use of multilevel regression analyses ena

  12. Talking about death with children with incurable cancer: perspectives from parents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerst, I.M.M. van der; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den; Vliet, L.M. van; Pluijm, S.M.F.; Streng, I.C.; Michiels, E.M.C.; Pieters, R.; Darlington A.S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the rationale and consequences associated with a parent's decision to discuss death with a child with incurable cancer. Study design: We present data from a larger retrospective study involving bereaved parents of a child who died of cancer. Parents were asked whether they

  13. "When Your Child Dies You Don't Belong in that World Any More"--Experiences of Mothers Whose Child with an Intellectual Disability Has Died

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Deirdre E.; Huws, Jaci C.; Hastings, Richard P.; Vaughan, Frances L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability are at higher risk of premature death compared with individuals without intellectual disability, and therefore parents of people with intellectual disability are more likely to outlive their children. However, there has been relatively little research investigating the bereavement experiences of…

  14. Impact of Elderly Mother's Death on Middle Age Daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Miriam S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined middle aged daughters' (n=107) responses to death of their mother. In first six months of bereavement, many daughters experienced themes of holding on and letting go. Depression, grief, somatic reactions, impact on sense of self, acceptance of death, and ways in which ties with mother endure were differentially associated with…

  15. Sexuality Following the Loss of a Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyregrov, Atle; Gjestad, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    The aim of study was to increase our understanding of sexuality and intimacy following the loss of a child. A questionnaire on intimacy and sexuality was sent to 1,027 members of the 2 major bereavement support organizations for parents who have lost children in Norway. A total of 321 (33%) were returned. In addition, 10 couples were interviewed…

  16. When Father Kills Mother: Guiding Children through Trauma and Grief. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Hendriks, Jean; Black, Dora; Kaplan, Tony

    Children bereaved by the death of one parent at the hands of the other, almost always the father, in effect lose both parents, and are often forgotten in the midst of such dramatic situations. Reflecting the increased interest in child protection and child law systems, this book brings to public knowledge information about the effects of…

  17. Men in the Triangle: Grief, Inhibition, and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of emotional experience is a widely acknowledged characteristic of many Western-raised men. While this affective inhibition may impact men chronically in many ways, it becomes particularly salient when men are bereaved or otherwise grieving and are unable fully to experience normative emotional responses to loss. This article briefly…

  18. Virtual Mourning and Memory Construction on Facebook: Here Are the Terms of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Rhonda N.; Scheaffer, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the online information practices of persons grieving and mourning via Facebook. It examines how, or whether, these practices and Facebook's terms of use policies have implications for the bereaved and/or the memory of the deceased. To explore these questions, we compared traditional publicly recorded asynchronous…

  19. Measuring Experiential Avoidance: Reliability and Validity of the Dutch 9-item Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, P.A.; Reijntjes, A.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Three studies evaluated psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the 9-item Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ)—a self-report measure designed to assess experiential avoidance as conceptualized inAcceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Study 1, among bereaved adults, showed that a one-

  20. Exposure Therapy for Fear of Spiders in an Adult with Learning Disabilities: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Felicity A.; Walz, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The evidence-base for exposure therapy in people with learning disabilities experiencing specific phobias is sparse. This case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of spider phobia in a woman with learning disabilities using an exposure-based intervention augmented with mindfulness practice and bereavement work. To evaluate…

  1. Factors associated with preference for dying at home among terminally ill patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Andersen, Marianne; Ullersted, Maria P; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2015-01-01

    relatives of deceased patients who died of cancer in Denmark in 2006. Bereaved relatives were asked to state patient's preference concerning place of death at the beginning and end of the palliative period. These data were recently combined with updated, extensive demographic and socio-economic data from...

  2. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims : The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Neeleman, J.; van der Meer, K.; Burger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n =122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therap

  3. Continuing relationships with the deceased : disentangling bonds and grief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, Henk A W; Stroebe, Margaret S; Boelen, Paul A; Zijerveld, Annemieke M

    2006-01-01

    Some studies of the relationship between continuing bonds and grief intensity have claimed that continuing bonds lead to poor adaptation to bereavement. However, operationalizations of continuing bonds and grief intensity appear to overlap conceptually. Thus, it is still unclear what character the c

  4. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised: Are we measuring complicated grief or posttraumatic stress?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja; Lasgaard, Mathias Kamp; Shevlin, Mark;

    2010-01-01

      The Inventory of Complicated Grief Revised (ICG-R) assesses symptoms of complicated grief in bereaved individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the factorial structure of Complicated Grief (CG) and investigate the relationship between CG and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder through the...

  5. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  6. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims: The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Marieke; Neeleman, Jan; van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n = 122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, the effect of suicide ideation on the…

  7. Suicide Survivors' Mental Health and Grief Reactions: A Systematic Review of Controlled Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Carl-Aksel; Walby, Fredrik A.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a debate over several decades whether suicide survivors experience more severe mental health consequences and grief reactions than those who have been bereaved through other causes of death. This is the first systematic review of suicide survivors' reactions compared with survivors after other modes of death. Studies were identified…

  8. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief…

  9. Parental Grief Responses and Personal Growth Following the Death of a Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Linda P.; LaMontagne, Lynda L.; Hepworth, Joseph T.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptualizing parental grief as a psychosocial transition, this cross-sectional study of bereaved mothers (N = 35) examined the relationship of dispositional factors, grief reactions, and personal growth. More optimistic mothers reported less intense grief reactions and less distress indicative of complicated grief. Additionally, mothers who…

  10. Grief: Lessons from the Past, Visions for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Murray Parkes

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last millennium patterns of mortality have changed and have determined who grieves and how. At all times grief has been recognised as a threat to physical and mental health. More recently the scientific study of bereavement has enabled us to quantify such effects and to develop theoretical explanations for them. This paper reviews our evolving understanding of grief, focusing especially on the developments in research, theory and practice that have taken place during the twentieth century. Wars and similar conflicts are associated with repression of grief but methods of helping by facilitating its expression, which were introduced during the two World Wars are less needed and effective at other times. In recent years more attention has been paid to the social context in which grief arises and, particularly, to the nature of the attachments which precede and influence the reaction to bereavement and to other traumatic life events. At the same time a range of caring resources have become available and acceptable to bereaved people and the results of scientific evaluation of these give promise that we are moving towards an era in which more sensitive and appropriate care will be provided to the bereaved by both voluntary and professional caregivers.

  11. Innovative Moments in Grief Therapy: Reconstructing Meaning Following Perinatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniela; Mendes, Ines; Goncalves, Miguel M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an intensive analysis of a good outcome case of constructivist grief therapy with a bereaved mother, using the Innovative Moments Coding System (IMCS). Inspired by M. White and D. Epston's narrative therapy, the IMCS conceptualizes therapeutic change as resulting from the elaboration and expansion of unique outcomes (or as we…

  12. Observing a Client's Grieving Process: Bringing Logical Positivism into Qualitative Grief Counselling Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John; Gabriel, Lynne; James, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    This positional paper originates from our need as researcher/practitioners to establish a meaningful epistemological framework for research into bereaved people's journey through loss and grief over time. We describe how the field of grief research has a long and established biological basis, in keeping with a positivist epistemology.…

  13. Continuing Relationships with the Deceased: Disentangling Bonds and Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Henk A. W.; Stroebe, Margaret S.; Boelen, Paul A.; Zijerveld, Annemieke M.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies of the relationship between continuing bonds and grief intensity have claimed that continuing bonds lead to poor adaptation to bereavement. However, operationalizations of continuing bonds and grief intensity appear to overlap conceptually. Thus, it is still unclear what character the connection between continuing bonds and grief…

  14. Predictors of Complicated Grief after a Natural Disaster: A Population Study Two Years after the 2004 South-East Asian Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pal; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined predictors of complicated grief (CG) in Norwegians 2 years after bereavement in the 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. A cross-sectional postal survey retrospectively covering disaster experiences and assessing CG according to the Inventory of Complicated Grief yielded 130 respondents (35 directly disaster-exposed and 95 not…

  15. Dream Content in Complicated Grief: A Window into Loss-Related Cognitive Schemas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Anne; Shear, Katherine M.; Walsh, Colleen; Buysse, Daniel J.; Monk, Timothy H.; Reynolds, Charles F., III; Frank, Ellen; Silowash, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement and its accompanying psychological response (grief) constitute potent experiences that necessitate the reorganization of cognitive-affective representations of lost significant attachment figures during both wakefulness and dreaming. The goals of this preliminary study were to explore whether the dream content of 77 adults with…

  16. Heterotopic relation between media and materiality in children's online memorials and on children's graves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    In this paper we analyze how bereaved parents make use of various media-strategies on online memorial sites and on children’s graves when performing processes of grief and commemoration for their stillborns and infants, and how these processes are not just linked to one particular media but take...

  17. A Study of Complicated Grief Symptoms in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, P.; Guerin, S.; McEvoy, J.; Buckley, S.; Tyrrell, J.; Hillery, J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have shown a significant association between familial bereavement and the onset of challenging behaviours and psychopathology in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, little work has been done to accurately describe the specific symptoms of grief, in particular symptoms of complicated grief in this…

  18. Do Grief Self-Help Books Convey Contemporary Perspectives on Grieving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2012-01-01

    Grief therapy and psychology literatures of the modern Western world conceptualized bereavement and grief as processes to be "worked through" so that other relationships could be pursued. In the last decade or so, however, grief theorists have endorsed the value of attaining new meaning(s) and continuing bonds with our lost loved ones instead of…

  19. Associations between stress and quality of life: differences between owners keeping a living dog or losing a dog by euthanasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Tzivian

    Full Text Available The loss of a pet may be stressful to the owner. The main objectives of this study were to compare the levels of stress and to explore the correlates of QOL of healthy adults who currently own or who have just lost their dog.The study sample contained 110 current, and 103 bereaved dog owners, all females, who lost their dogs due to euthanasia. QOL was assessed with the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and divided into four major domains-Physical, Psychological, Relationship, and Environmental. Demographic variables, stress, health behaviors, and social support from family, friends, and significant other were included in multivariate analysis.Stress levels were significantly higher in bereaved owners. QOL in three of the four domains (Physical, Psychological, and Relationship of current owners were significantly better than among bereaved owners. Stress was significantly associated with these three domains of QOL. Quality of life was found to be positively associated with social support. Age was related directly only to current owners' QOL.The results suggest that a loss of a dog is associated with stress for the bereaved owner and reduced physical, psychological, and relationship QOL. Lack of social support in the case of death of a companion animal has a strong effect on owners' grief reactions.

  20. Tweeting Prayers and Communicating Grief over Michael Jackson Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Jimmy; Cheong, Pauline Hope

    2010-01-01

    Death and bereavement are human experiences that new media helps facilitate alongside creating new social grief practices that occur online. This study investigated how people's postings and tweets facilitated the communication of grief after pop music icon Michael Jackson died. Drawing on past grief research, religion, and new media studies, a…

  1. Addressing Peer Death by Suicide: The School's Role in the Aftermath of Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Sarah A.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent suicide devastates family, friends, and the larger community of the deceased. This dissertation seeks to explore the impact of peer death by suicide on students in the school system, and the policies that schools have put in place to address these effects. This work will critically evaluate current suicide bereavement interventions, and…

  2. Parenthood, Stress, and Mental Health in Late Midlife and Early Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2009-01-01

    Using 2 waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I examine psychological consequences of potentially stressful, non-normative, or "off-time" aspects of the parental role in late midlife and early old age, including coresidence with adult children, stepparenthood, and parental bereavement. Additionally, I analyze gender differences in…

  3. 38 CFR 17.98 - Mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mental health services... Outpatient Treatment § 17.98 Mental health services. (a) Following the death of a veteran, bereavement... mental health services in connection with treatment of the veteran under 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1712,...

  4. And Then the Dog Died

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2006-01-01

    Childhood grief and mourning of family and friends may have immediate and long-lasting consequences including depression, anxiety, social withdrawal, behavioral disturbances, and school underachievement. Childhood pet bereavement is no less important, because the pet is often considered a member of the family by the child. However, society does…

  5. Predicting Social Support for Grieving Persons: A Theory of Planned Behavior Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Debra M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has consistently reported that social support from family, friends, and colleagues is an important factor in the bereaved person's ability to cope after the loss of a loved one. This study used a Theory of Planned Behavior framework to identify those factors that predict a person's intention to interact with, and support, a grieving…

  6. Development of a Scale to Assess Knowledge about Suicide Postvention Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Ingo W.; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Schild, Anne H. E.; Koller, Ingrid; Tran, Ulrich S.; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Sonneck, Gernot; Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about suicide postvention (KSPV) is an important distal outcome in the evaluation of suicide prevention programs that focus on the bereaved. However, most scales are specifically tailored to the evaluation study in question and psychometric properties are often unsatisfactory. Therefore, we developed the KSPV scale. Scale properties were…

  7. Effects of Parental Suicide on the Adolescent Survivors' Lives When They Are Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative inquiry, phenomenology, purported to provide insight into the role of parental suicide on the adolescent survivors' adult lives between 18 and 40. This study described the survivors' coping strategies, self-esteem, and effects of their grief and bereavement as a result of parental suicide on their emotional wellness or…

  8. Exploring Hospice Decisions: The Road from the Institute on Aging and Social Work to an ARRA Challenge Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Decisions about treatment and options for care at the end stage of an advanced chronic illness are important determinants of the quality of a person's death and of how family members adapt in bereavement. This article describes the steps taken to secure federal funding to study how people make the decision to enroll in hospice. The National…

  9. Bailey House Nursing Home, Killenaule, Thurles, Tipperary.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, J

    2012-02-01

    Bereavement is potentially a time of disruption and emotional distress. For individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), a limited understanding of the concept of death may exacerbate this distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate how individuals with ID understand and explain death and make sense of life without the deceased.

  10. Risk and Resilience in Orphaned Adolescents Living in a Community Affected by AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Lauren G.; Flisher, Alan J.; Robertson, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic has resulted in a dramatic rise in the number of orphans in South Africa. This study was designed to investigate the associations between family, peer, and community factors and resilience in orphaned adolescents. Self-report questionnaires were administered verbally to 159 parentally bereaved adolescents (aged 10-19) in an…

  11. Complicated Grief in the Aftermath of Homicide: Spiritual Crisis and Distress in an African American Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Burke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Both grieving the loss of a loved one and using spirituality or religion as an aid in doing so are common behaviors in the wake of death. This longitudinal examination of 46 African American homicide survivors follows up on our earlier study that established the relation between positive and negative religious coping on the one hand and complicated grief (CG on the other. In the current report, we broadened this focus to determine the relation between religious coping and other bereavement outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression, to establish whether religious coping more strongly predicted bereavement distress or vice versa. We also sought to determine if the predictive power of CG in terms of religious coping over time exceeded that of PTSD and depression. Our results suggested a link between negative religious coping (NRC and all forms of bereavement distress, whereas no such link was found between positive religious coping (PRC and bereavement outcomes in our final analyses. Significantly, only CG prospectively predicted high levels of spiritual struggle six months later. Clinical implications regarding spiritually sensitive interventions are noted.

  12. Associations between Prolonged Grief Disorder, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Anxiety in Rwandan Genocide Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Susanne; Dusingizemungu, Jean-Pierre; Jacob, Nadja; Neuner, Frank; Elbert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that symptoms of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) represent a symptom cluster distinct from bereavement-related depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of the present study was to confirm and extend these findings using the most recent criteria defining PGD. The authors interviewed…

  13. Postpartum Blues

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... our bilingual (English/Spanish) fact sheet. GO News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign- ... 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media News & Media News Videos ...

  14. Time to Eat! What Will You Feed Your Baby?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reach out to our health educators. GO News Moms Need Blog Read about what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO "My 9 ... 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media News & Media News Videos ...

  15. Stepping Back to Gain Perspective: Pregnancy Loss History, Depression, and Parenting Capacity in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2008-01-01

    Previous empirical studies of pregnancy loss have predominantly focused on complex grief response and emergent problems associated with future parenting in self-selected samples of bereaved women. This article presents findings from a retrospective secondary data analysis conducted with a racially and ethnically diverse sample of currently…

  16. Psychological Distress amongst AIDS-Orphaned Children in Urban South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background: South Africa is predicted to have 2.3 million children orphaned by Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by 2020 (Actuarial Society of South Africa, 2005). There is little knowledge about impacts of AIDS-related bereavement on children, to aid planning of services. This study aimed to investigate psychological consequences of AIDS…

  17. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  18. The BRACELET Study: surveys of mortality in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subject of death and bereavement in the context of randomised controlled trials in neonatal or paediatric intensive care is under-researched. The objectives of this phase of the Bereavement and RAndomised ControlLEd Trials (BRACELET Study were to determine trial activity in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care (2002-06; numbers of deaths before hospital discharge; and variation in mortality across intensive care units and trials and to determine whether bereavement support policies were available within trials. These are essential prerequisites to considering the implications of future policies and practice subsequent to bereavement following a child's enrolment in a trial. Methods The units survey involved neonatal units providing level 2 or 3 care, and paediatric units providing level II care or above; the trials survey involved trials where allocation was randomized and interventions were delivered to intensive care patients, or to parents but designed to affect patient outcomes. Results Information was available from 191/220 (87% neonatal units (149 level 2 or 3 care; and 28/32 (88% paediatric units. 90/177 (51% eligible responding units participated in one or more trial (76 neonatal, 14 paediatric and 54 neonatal units and 6 paediatric units witnessed at least one death. 50 trials were identified (36 neonatal, 14 paediatric. 3,137 babies were enrolled in neonatal trials, 210 children in paediatric trials. Deaths ranged 0-278 (median [IQR interquartile range] 2 [1, 14.5] per neonatal trial, 0-4 (median [IQR] 1 [0, 2.5] per paediatric trial. 534 (16% participants died post-enrolment: 522 (17% in neonatal trials, 12 (6% in paediatric trials. Trial participants ranged 1-236 (median [IQR] 21.5 [8, 39.8] per neonatal unit, 1-53 (median [IQR] 11.5 [2.3, 33.8] per paediatric unit. Deaths ranged 0-37 (median [IQR] 3.5 [0.3, 8.8] per neonatal unit, 0-7 (median [IQR] 0.5 [0, 1.8] per paediatric unit. Three trials had a

  19. Cost-utility of a visiting service for older widowed individuals: Randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemse Godelief

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a growing understanding of the effectiveness of bereavement interventions and the groups that benefit most from them, we know little about the cost-effectiveness of bereavement interventions. Methods We conducted a cost-utility analysis alongside a randomized clinical trial on a visiting service for older widowed individuals (n = 110 versus care as usual (CAU; n = 106. The visiting service is a selective bereavement intervention that offers social support to lonely widows and widowers by a trained volunteer. Participants were contacted 6–9 months post-loss. Eleven percent of all contacted persons responded and eight percent participated in the trial. The primary outcome measure was quality adjusted life years (QALYs gained (assessed with the EQ-5D, which is a generic measure of health status. Costs were calculated from a societal perspective excluding costs arising from productivity losses. Using the bootstrap method, we obtained the incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR, projected these on a cost-utility plane and presented as an acceptability curve. Results Overall, the experimental group demonstrated slightly better results against slightly higher costs. Whether the visiting service is acceptable depends on the willingness to pay: at a willingness to pay equal to zero per QALY gained, the visiting service has a probability of 31% of being acceptable; beyond €20,000, the visiting service has a probability of 70% of being more acceptable than CAU. Conclusion Selective bereavement interventions like the visiting service will not produce large benefits from the health economic point of view, when targeted towards the entire population of all widowed individuals. We recommend that in depth analyses are conducted to identify who benefits most from this kind of interventions, and in what subgroups the incremental cost-utility is best. In the future bereavement interventions are then best directed to these groups. Trial

  20. 箱庭疗法应用于儿童哀伤咨询的临床实践和理论%The Theoretic Basis and Clinical Practice of Sandplay Therapy Applied to Grief Counseling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐洁; 张日昇

    2011-01-01

    In order to integrate the practice and research of counseling and psychotherapy, research topic why sandplay therapy could heal the bereaved children was explored from sandplay therapy practice for a bereaved children.A case study of sandplay therapy for a child with complicated grief was done to prove the possibility and feasibility of sandplay therapy applied to counseling for bereaved children.Theory of sandplay therapy and grief counseling for children was summarized to explain the effective mechanism of sandplay therapy applied to counseling for bereaved ehildren:①Non-verbal setting could provide the safe space for expressing bereavement; ②Sandtrays could be the transitional object; ③Sandplay process could trigger bereavement; ④Sandplay could promote self-growth; ⑤The idea between sandplay therapy with grief counseling was correspondent; ⑥Family sandplay helped family members complete their grief tasks.%为尝试将心理咨询与治疗实践和研究统一起来,首先对一名复杂哀伤儿童进行箱庭治疗实践,从中提取了研究的主题一箱庭疗法用于儿童哀伤咨询的机制;接着对复杂哀伤儿童进行箱庭治疗个案研究验证箱庭疗法与儿童哀伤咨询结合的可能性与可行性;最后将箱庭疗法和儿童哀伤咨询的理论背景进行梳理和总结获得箱庭疗法应用于儿童哀伤咨询的有效机制:①箱庭疗法的非言语特性可以提供安全表达哀伤的空间;②箱庭疗法为丧亲者提供过渡性客体;③箱庭制作能引发哀伤;④箱庭疗法能促进自我成长;⑤箱庭疗法与哀伤咨询的治疗理念相符;⑥箱庭疗法能促进家庭哀伤的完成.

  1. Maternal stress before and during pregnancy and subsequent infertility in daughters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Li, Jiong; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler;

    2016-01-01

    sibling during pregnancy or in the year before conception. Infertility was defined as any record of infertility treatment or diagnosis of female infertility. We considered the date of onset as the date of the first appearance of any such record. The association between exposure and outcome was examined......STUDY QUESTION: Is maternal stress following the death of a close relative before or during pregnancy associated with the risk of infertility in daughters? SUMMARY ANSWER: Compared with unexposed women, women whose mothers had experienced bereavement stress during, or in the year before, pregnancy...... had a similar risk of infertility overall, but those exposed to maternal bereavement during the first trimester had a higher risk of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Animal studies have shown that prenatal maternal stress results in reduced offspring fertility. In humans, there is evidence that...

  2. Transforming Losses―A Major Task of Spiritually Integrated Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckhard Frick

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Since Freud’s “Mourning and Melancholia”, bereavement encompasses the dilemma between continuing versus relinquishing bonds to deceased persons. Mourning is the process of symbolizing the loss, of making sense by facing the conflict between the absence of the lost object and the continuing presence of an emotional relationship to that which is lost. Furthermore, mourning is not limited to bereaved persons but also concerns dying persons and, in a broader sense, our whole symbolic life which is playful coping with a rhythm of absence and presence. True consolation connects the individual and the archetypical mourning. Spiritually integrated psychotherapy may accompany this process by amplification. Christian mysticism takes its starting point from the experience of Jesus Christ’s lost body, and this may be understood as a model of spiritual transformation.

  3. Does the work role of Catholic clergy in Ireland contribute to the disenfranchisement of their grief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Dearbhla

    2015-09-01

    While bereavement-related compassion fatigue and burnout have been studied in many helping professions, this researcher has found no peer-reviewed articles based specifically on bereavement experiences of Roman Catholic (RC) clergy in Ireland and only a handful on experiences of other religious ministers worldwide. There is a clear gap in research with regard to clergy experiences of personal or professional grief, the possible effects this may have on them, or the supports they use to help them cope. Peer support, some form of mentoring/supervision, and debriefing may help clergy to recognize their own grief, have it acknowledged by others, and recognize their personal strengths and limitations. While prevention of burnout is important to individual clergy, it is also vital for the health of the wider Church and formal support structures may be necessary as part of the Church's duty of care towards its clergy. PMID:26463852

  4. An internet tool to normalize grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Sally A; Irvine, A Blair; Beauchamp, Natasha; Seeley, John R; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Doka, Kenneth J; Bonanno, George A

    This research evaluated the efficacy of a psycho-educational Internet self-help tool to educate and support recently (1-6 months) bereaved individuals. The goal of the website was to help users normalize their grief to enhance their adaptive adjustment. A randomized controlled trial evaluated the gains in social cognitive theory constructs and state anxiety. Compared to the control group (N = 34), treatment participants (N = 33) reported significant multivariate gains (eta-square = .191). Significant program effects were obtained on all three outcome measures: attitude (eta-square = .177), self-efficacy (eta-square = .106), and state anxiety (eta-square = .083). These findings suggest the potential efficacy of an Internet-based grief support tool to enhance adaptive adjustment of the bereaved. PMID:20039532

  5. Who leaves suicide notes? A six-year population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerel, Julie; Moore, Melinda; Brown, Margaret M; van de Venne, Judy; Brown, Sabrina L

    2015-06-01

    Popular culture insists on the significance of suicide notes, but research has yielded conflicting results about who leaves notes. Utilizing 6 years of suicides from a comprehensive statewide data surveillance system, differences were examined between cases with suicide notes and those without in terms of demographics, circumstances of the suicide, and precipitating circumstances. Of the 2,936 suicides, 18.25% included a note. Demographics and circumstances did not differ for cases with a note compared to cases with no note. Results have implications for working with people bereaved by suicide in helping understand that the notes are uncommon and not systematic. However, it is also possible that for some individuals, the content of a note is meaningful and can help or hinder their course of bereavement. PMID:25308893

  6. Mortality in parents after death of a child in Denmark: A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Mortensen, Preben Bo;

    2003-01-01

    a child who had died (exposed cohort), and 293745 controls--ie, parents whose children were alive, and whose family structure matched that of the exposed cohort. Natural deaths were defined with ICD8 codes 0000-7969 and ICD10 codes A00-R99, and unnatural deaths with codes 8000-9999 and V01-Y98. We used......BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of parental bereavement on physical health. We investigated whether the death of a child increased mortality in parents. METHODS: We undertook a follow-up study based on national registers. From 1980 to 1996, we enrolled 21062 parents in Denmark who had...... Cox's proportional-hazards regression models to assess the mortality rate of parents up to 18 years after bereavement. FINDINGS: We observed an increased overall mortality rate in mothers whose child had died (hazards ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.24-1.64; p

  7. Suicide survivors' mental health and grief reactions: a systematic review of controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Carl-Aksel; Walby, Fredrik A

    2008-02-01

    There has been a debate over several decades whether suicide survivors experience more severe mental health consequences and grief reactions than those who have been bereaved through other causes of death. This is the first systematic review of suicide survivors' reactions compared with survivors after other modes of death. Studies were identified by searching the PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases. Forty-one studies met the eligibility criteria. A qualitative data analysis was performed. There were no significant differences between survivors of suicide and other bereaved groups regarding general mental health, depression, PTSD symptoms, anxiety, and suicidal behavior. The results regarding the overall level of grief are less clear, depending on whether general grief instruments or suicide-specific instruments are used. Considering specific grief variables, suicide survivors report higher levels of rejection, shame, stigma, need for concealing the cause of death, and blaming than all other survivor groups. PMID:18355105

  8. The "moment of death".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The "moment of death," once a dominant concept in preparing for a "good death", has been eclipsed by a focus on the wider concept of the "dying trajectory". However, findings from interviews with 25 bereaved individuals suggest that dying loved ones' final moments may still be experienced as highly significant in their own right. In some accounts the dying individual's final moments did not feature or made little impression, either because the survivor was not present, or there was no obviously definable moment, or because other, usually medical factors, such as whether to resuscitate the person, took precedence. However, in six cases such moments were constructed as profound, special, and memorable occasions. These constructions are explored in relation to achieving a good death, the dying trajectory as a whole, and making sense of the bereavement experience. Their implications for sociological theories of identity and embodiment are also considered. PMID:18214069

  9. "A sound track of your life": music in contemporary UK funerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Sue; Holloway, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the role that music plays in contemporary UK funerals and the meaning that the funeral music has for bereaved families. It is based on findings from a recently completed study of 46 funerals funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. Music contributes to the public ceremony and the personal existential quest of the bereaved. It is important to both the content and process of the contemporary funeral, an event of deep cultural significance in our response as individuals and communities to death and the loss of a significant relationship. There is evidence that for many people, the music chosen and used also evokes and conveys their spirituality. Spirituality may not be intrinsic to the music but spiritual experience may result from the meaning that the music has for that particular person. PMID:22852420

  10. The Relationship between Attitudes toward Suicide and Family History of Suicide in Nagano Prefecture, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    TSUKAHARA, Teruomi; Arai, Hiroaki; Kamijo, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Yoshikiyo; Washizuka, Shinsuke; Arito, Heihachiro; Nomiyama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Certain attitudes toward suicide may be a risk factor for suicide among the bereaved. To explore this possibility, we examined the relationship between attitudes toward suicide and family history of suicide. We focused on two specific attitudes indicating resignation in a survey: #1 “When a person chooses to die by suicide, the suicide is inevitable” (i.e., inevitability belief); and #2 “A suicide cannot be stopped by any person, because suicide is unpreventable” (i.e., unpreventable belief)....

  11. The younger sibling of PTSD: similarities and differences between complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Maercker, Andreas; Znoj, H

    2010-01-01

    Just as traumatic experiences may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in some individuals, grief may also be a serious health concern for individuals who have experienced bereavement. At present, neither the DSM-IV nor the ICD-10 recognizes any form of grief as a mental disorder. The aim of this review is to summarize recent advances in definition, assessment, prevention, and treatment of complicated grief disorder (CGD) and to compare CGD with PTSD. Four areas are id...

  12. [A Clinical Case of Grief Hallucination through the Mourning Work Normal Grief and Spiritual Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotori, Isaku; Kato, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Auditory or visual hallucinations of a deceased person are well known in the normal course of the bereavement process. According to DSM-5, this symptom is included in the associated features supporting diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder. In Japan, however, little is known about these hallucinatory experiences during grieving, and few reports on their prevalence are available. Here, we have reported a clinical case of such experiences following the loss of a spouse. A 66-year-old patient presented to the outpatient department with insomnia after her husband's death. She was preoccupied with a sense of loss and absolute loneliness. One day, she confessed to regularly encountering her husband's ghost at night; the ghost was distinguishable from a dream and provided the bereaved wife with some degree of comfort. The appearances lasted for 15 months and occurred several times a week without disturbing her social functioning. She gradually became aware that her husband was returning from the spirit world to give her solace. Her treatment was focused on resolving her conflicting feelings concerning her grief at his death and her relief at his no longer suffering from disease. While accepting her experiences, she started to review the days they spent together and appreciated his attachment. Therefore she completed the work of mourning and the ghost no longer appeared. One year after the departure of the ghost, she still attends the hospital regularly and there has been no recurrence. A reconstruction of her internal world leads us to conclude that the support of normal grief with such hallucinations prevents the intense experience of loss from generating pathological grief. Furthermore, we suggest reconsidering the importance of the mourning work and the inclusion of both the bereaved and deceased person in the medical context. PMID:26642726

  13. Examination of Complicated Grief, Posttraumatic Stress, and Other Psychological Reactions among Student Survivors of the April 16th Shootings at Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Scott Robert

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Complicated Grief (CG) is being proposed for inclusion in DSMâ 5. As such, it has been the focus of several studies purporting to build evidence of its validity and its conceptual and statistical distinction from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression (Bonanno et al., 2007; Golden & Dalgleish, 2010; Prigerson et al., 1995b). However, previous research has focused predominantly on bereavement caused by non-violent means (e.g., prolonged terminal illness). This st...

  14. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised: Are we measuring complicated grief or posttraumatic stress?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Maja; Lasgaard, Mathias Kamp; Shevlin, Mark; Guldin, Mai-Britt

    2010-01-01

      The Inventory of Complicated Grief Revised (ICG-R) assesses symptoms of complicated grief in bereaved individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the factorial structure of Complicated Grief (CG) and investigate the relationship between CG and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder through the assessment of models which combine both constructs. A secondary aim was to test the construct validity of the Danish version of ICG-R. The questionnaire was completed by respondents who were elderly and m...

  15. Mothers’ accounts of their stillbirth experiences and of their subsequent relationships with their living infant: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Üstündağ – Budak, A. Meltem; LARKIN, Michael; Harris, Gillian; Blissett, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to contradictory findings regarding the effects of seeing and holding stillborn infants on women’s worsening mental health symptoms, there is a lack of clear of guidance in stillbirth bereavement care. Although some current research examines this phenomenon we are still not certain of the meaning of such experiences to women and what effects there may be on her subsequent parenting. Thus the present study focuses on the meaning of the stillbirth experience to women and its infl...

  16. Framework of the outreach after a school shooting and the students perceptions of the provided support

    OpenAIRE

    Turunen, Tuija; Haravuori, Henna; Pihlajamäki, Jaakko J.; Marttunen, Mauri; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    Background: A large number of bereaved family members, surviving students, and their relatives as well as school staff and the wider community were in need of psychosocial support as a result of a school shooting in Kauhajoki, Finland, 2008. A multilevel outreach project provided psychosocial care to the trauma-affected families, students, schools staff, and wider community for 2 years and 4 months.Objective: This article is twofold. First, it presents the theoretical rationale behind the psy...

  17. Suicide and violence in parents : risk factors and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lysell, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Suicide and deadly violence directed towards other people are two different expressions of aggression. In family life, lethal violent behaviour may have devastating consequences, obviously for the victims but also for the surviving and bereaved children. In this thesis, focus is on violent behaviour related to parenthood; violence in the form of suicide as well as violent behaviour directed towards others. The aim has been to identify risk factors of violent expression, for...

  18. An exploration of the coping strategies of early adolescents in two Gauteng schools / Anneté Nel

    OpenAIRE

    Nel, Anneté

    2014-01-01

    In the South African context adolescents need to cope with societal and family-related stressors seen as everyday stressors, such as parental divorce, violence in communities, bereavement and pressure in schools. Research has shown that these everyday stressors could have negative effects on their well-being. It was further seen that such a high exposure to everyday stress like school-based stressors leads to an increase in unhealthy behaviour, such as smoking and alcohol use in early adolesc...

  19. Ecopsychosocial Aspects of Human–Tiger Conflict: An Ethnographic Study of Tiger Widows of Sundarban Delta, India

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Arabinda N.; Ranajit Mondal; Arabinda Brahma; Biswas, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS Human–tiger conflict (HTC) is a serious public health issue in Sundarban Reserve Forest, India. HTC is a continued concern for the significant mortality and morbidity of both human and tiger population. This is the first comprehensive report on Sundarban tiger–human conflicts and its impact on widows whose husbands were killed by tigers. The study attempts to explore the situation analysis of HTC and the aftermath of the incident including bereavement and coping, the cultural stigma rela...

  20. Stillbirth : a loss for the whole family

    OpenAIRE

    Avelin, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stillbirth loss is a profound experience affecting around 450 families every year in Sweden. Method: Two questionnaires, one postal with three measurements over a two-year period with 55 parents (I), and a web questionnaire answered by 411 parents (III), five focus groups with a total of 25 parents (II), and individual face-to-face interviews with 13 bereaved adolescent siblings of a stillborn baby (IV) constitute the data collection. The qualitative data wer...

  1. The Spectrum of Grief: Identification and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Daphne

    1989-01-01

    Loss is a common human experience, and grief is frequently seen in a physician's office. Grief occurs not only after a death, but also during chronic or serious illness, infertility, divorce, job changes, surgery, rape, and so forth. Some patients somatize distress, presenting with physical symptoms rather than acknowledging their grief. Bereavement increases the risk of both psychiatric and physical disease and can exacerbate pre-existing illness. In the majority, grief resolves normally, bu...

  2. Death in the Modern Greek Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Pentaris, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Each culture recognizes and identifies death, dying and bereavement in unique ways. Commonly, aculture may be seen through the lens of death rituals; how those are shaped, interpreted and used by the society. This paper aims to look at the Modern Greek culture and depict its ‘visualization’ of death, as well as capture the rituals that mostly identify this specific culture. The Greek culture in overall is strongly influenced by the Greek Orthodox Church. Hence, the experiences of death, dyi...

  3. Development of a mobile health application for those who have experienced pregnancy loss

    OpenAIRE

    Aoife Lynch; Sarah Meaney; Rachel Rice; Noirin Russell; Keelin O'Donoghue

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pregnancy Loss Research Group at Cork University Maternity Hospital (CUMH) is a multidisciplinary team including doctors, midwives and researchers working collaboratively to provide support and information to patients bereaved by pregnancy loss, promote their emotional and physical well-being, as well as improving professional practice and facilitating research in this area. The group have developed a set of applications to disseminate professional information on pregnancy l...

  4. “I Was Just Trying To Stick It Out Until I Realized That I Couldn't”: A Phenomenological Investigation of Support Seeking Among Older Adults With Complicated Grief*

    OpenAIRE

    Ghesquiere, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Complicated Grief (CG) is a prolonged, impairing mental health condition affecting about 7% of the bereaved. CG may be especially prevalent in older adults. Though evidence-based treatments for CG have been developed, little is known about support-seeking in older adults with CG. This study used the descriptive phenomenological approach to explore the CG support-seeking process. In-depth interviews were conducted with 8 CG-positive older adults who had completed participation in a randomized ...

  5. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    OpenAIRE

    Smid, Geert E; Kleber, Rolf J.; de la Rie, Simone M; Jannetta B. A. Bos; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Paul A Boelen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds...

  6. Validity and reliability of the structured clinical interview for the trauma and loss spectrum (SCI-TALS)

    OpenAIRE

    Conversano Ciro; Perris Francesco; Carpiniello Bernardo; Altamura A Carlo; Endicott Jean; Lorettu Liliana; Frank Ellen; Maser Jack D; Rucci Paola; Carmassi Claudia; Shear M Katherine; dell'Osso Liliana; Ciapparelli Antonio; Carlini Marina; Sarno Nannina

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background DSM-IV identifies three stress response disorders (acute stress Disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress Disorder (PTSD) and adjustment disorders (AD)) that derive from specific life events. An additional condition of complicated grief (CG), well described in the literature, is triggered by bereavement. This paper reports on the reliability and validity of the Structured Clinical Interview for Trauma and Loss Spectrum (SCI-TALS) developed to assess the spectrum of stress resp...

  7. The younger sibling of PTSD: similarities and differences between complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Maercker, Andreas; Znoj, Hansjörg

    2010-01-01

    Just as traumatic experiences may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in some individuals, grief may also be a serious health concern for individuals who have experienced bereavement. At present, neither the DSM-IV nor the ICD-10 recognizes any form of grief as a mental disorder. The aim of this review is to summarize recent advances in definition, assessment, prevention, and treatment of complicated grief disorder (CGD) and to compare CGD with PTSD. Four areas are identified to be o...

  8. Complicated Grief in the Aftermath of Homicide: Spiritual Crisis and Distress in an African American Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Laurie A.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Both grieving the loss of a loved one and using spirituality or religion as an aid in doing so are common behaviors in the wake of death. This longitudinal examination of 46 African American homicide survivors follows up on our earlier study that established the relation between positive and negative religious coping on the one hand and complicated grief (CG) on the other. In the current report, we broadened this focus to determine the relation between religious coping and other bereavement o...

  9. Diagnostic and clinical considerations in prolonged grief disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Maercker, Andreas; Lalor, John

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the similarities and differences between prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It highlights how a PTSD-related understanding aids the investigation and clinical management of PGD. Grief has long been understood as a natural response to bereavement, as serious psychological and physiological stress has been regarded as a potential outcome of extreme or traumatic stress. PTSD was first included in DSM-III in 1980. In the mid-1980s, the...

  10. Talking about death with children with incurable cancer: perspectives from parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Geerst, I.M.M. van der; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den; Vliet, L.M. van; Pluijm, S. M. F.; Streng, I.C.; Michiels, E.M.C.; Pieters, R; Darlington A.S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the rationale and consequences associated with a parent's decision to discuss death with a child with incurable cancer. Study design: We present data from a larger retrospective study involving bereaved parents of a child who died of cancer. Parents were asked whether they had discussed the impending death with their child, whether they reflected on this discussion positively, their reasons for not discussing death with their child, and the manner in which the conver...

  11. Comparison of Continuing Bonds Reported by Parents and Siblings After a Child's Death from Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Davies, Betty; Dietrich, Mary S.; Barrera, Maru; Fairclough, Diane L.; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have distinguished similarities and differences between continuing bonds as they appear in various bereaved populations, particularly parent versus sibling cohorts following a child's death. This mixed-method study compared how parents and siblings experienced continuing bonds in 40 families who lost a child to cancer. Thirty-six mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings were recruited 3-12 months post-loss (M = 10.7, SD = 3.5). Nearly all participants (97%) reported engaging in purpos...

  12. Do divorcing couples become happier by breaking up?

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Jonathan; Oswald, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Divorce is a leap in the dark. This paper investigates whether people who split up actually become happier. Using the British Household Panel Survey, we are able to observe an individual's level of psychological wellbeing in the years before and after divorce. Our results show that divorcing couples reap psychological gains from the dissolution of their marriages. Men and women benefit equally. The paper also studies the effects of bereavement, of having dependent children, and of remarriage....

  13. Psychological stress and rheumatoid arthritis in parents after death of a child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Olsen, J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in parents after the death of a child. METHODS: All 21,062 parents whose child had died (younger than 18 years) between 1980 and 1996 in Denmark were included in the bereaved (exposed) cohort, and 293 745 parents matched on family.......63-1.24]. The RR was close to 1 throughout the 18 years of follow-up. CONCLUSION: Our findings do not support an association between severe psychological stress and RA....

  14. Hubungan Coping Style dan Anticipatory Grief pada Orangtua Anak yang Didiagnosis Kanker

    OpenAIRE

    Putri Lenggo Geni; Qisthi Rahmania

    2013-01-01

    Everyone copes with stressful events in his/her life differently. Three strategies in dealing with stress include problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping, and religious-focused coping. Death of loved ones has been considered one of the major sources of stress in individuals and poses threat to their well-being and adjustment if ones failed to cope with the grief. Interestingly, previous studies show that families and caregivers of terminally ill patients suffered bereavement prior to t...

  15. Experiences of African American Parents Following Perinatal or Pediatric Death: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Boyden, Jackelyn Y.; Kavanaugh, Karen; Issel, L. Michele; Eldeirawi, Kamal; Meert, Kathleen L.

    2013-01-01

    A child’s death is one of life’s most difficult experiences. Little is known about the unique factors that influence the grief experience for bereaved African American parents. Through an integrative review of 10 publications, the authors describe the grief responses, outcomes, and implications for African American parents who experience the death of a child. Four themes emerged: (a) emotional response to loss; (b) factors that added to the burden of loss; (c) coping strategies; and (d) healt...

  16. The management of family conflict in palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    LICHTENTHAL, WENDY G.; Kissane, David W.

    2008-01-01

    We review the literature on family conflict in palliative care. The prevalence and common sources of conflict are discussed, including historical issues of tension, differing coping styles, the division of labour, and the presence of acute or chronic mental illness within the family. Assessment and intervention strategies used in Family Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a family-centred preventive intervention that begins during palliative care and continues during bereavement, are presented, wit...

  17. Prolonged grief disorder: Psychometric validation of criteria proposed for DSM-V and ICD-11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly G Prigerson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bereavement is a universal experience, and its association with excess morbidity and mortality is well established. Nevertheless, grief becomes a serious health concern for a relative few. For such individuals, intense grief persists, is distressing and disabling, and may meet criteria as a distinct mental disorder. At present, grief is not recognized as a mental disorder in the DSM-IV or ICD-10. The goal of this study was to determine the psychometric validity of criteria for prolonged grief disorder (PGD to enhance the detection and potential treatment of bereaved individuals at heightened risk of persistent distress and dysfunction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 291 bereaved respondents were interviewed three times, grouped as 0-6, 6-12, and 12-24 mo post-loss. Item response theory (IRT analyses derived the most informative, unbiased PGD symptoms. Combinatoric analyses identified the most sensitive and specific PGD algorithm that was then tested to evaluate its psychometric validity. Criteria require reactions to a significant loss that involve the experience of yearning (e.g., physical or emotional suffering as a result of the desired, but unfulfilled, reunion with the deceased and at least five of the following nine symptoms experienced at least daily or to a disabling degree: feeling emotionally numb, stunned, or that life is meaningless; experiencing mistrust; bitterness over the loss; difficulty accepting the loss; identity confusion; avoidance of the reality of the loss; or difficulty moving on with life. Symptoms must be present at sufficiently high levels at least six mo from the death and be associated with functional impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The criteria set for PGD appear able to identify bereaved persons at heightened risk for enduring distress and dysfunction. The results support the psychometric validity of the criteria for PGD that we propose for inclusion in DSM-V and ICD-11. Please see later in the article for

  18. A Model of Caregiving Through the End of Life: Seeking Normal

    OpenAIRE

    Penrod, Janice; Hupcey, Judith E.; Shipley, Peggy Z.; Loeb, Susan J.; Baney, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Informal family caregivers provide significant contributions to end-of-life (EOL) care. A theoretical model of the phases and transitions of EOL caregiving was explicated using grounded theory methods to explore the experiences of 46 family caregivers of adults suffering a variety of life-limiting conditions. The derived model describes four phases of caregiving spanning prediagnosis through bereavement. Phases are demarcated by key transitions experienced when the illness progression manifes...

  19. Perception of depressive symptoms by the Sardinian public: results of a population study

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Matschinger, Herbert; Holzinger, Anita; Floris, Francesca; Moro, Maria Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Background With the exception of bereavement, the diagnosis of major depressive disorder in the DSM-IV does not take into account the context in which symptoms occur. Recent criticism has maintained that common sense suggests making a distinction between depression as mental disorder and sorrow as ‘normal’ reaction to social stress. Results of a study from Vienna support this view. This study sets out to examine whether these results can be replicated in a different cultural setting. Methods ...

  20. AN INTERNET TOOL TO NORMALIZE GRIEF*

    OpenAIRE

    Dominick, Sally A.; Irvine, A. Blair; BEAUCHAMP, NATASHA; SEELEY, JOHN R.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; DOKA, KENNETH J.; Bonanno, George A.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated the efficacy of a psycho-educational Internet self-help tool to educate and support recently (1–6 months) bereaved individuals. The goal of the website was to help users normalize their grief to enhance their adaptive adjustment. A randomized controlled trial evaluated the gains in social cognitive theory constructs and state anxiety. Compared to the control group (N = 34), treatment participants (N = 33) reported significant multivariate gains (eta-square = .191). Sig...

  1. Prolonged Grief Disorder: Psychometric Validation of Criteria Proposed for DSM-V and ICD-11

    OpenAIRE

    Prigerson, Holly G.; Horowitz, Mardi J; Jacobs, Selby C.; Parkes, Colin M.; Mihaela Aslan; Karl Goodkin; Beverley Raphael; Marwit, Samuel J.; Camille Wortman; Neimeyer, Robert A.; Bonanno, George A.; Block, Susan D; David Kissane; Paul Boelen; Andreas Maercker

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Virtually everyone loses someone they love during their lifetime. Grief is an unavoidable and normal reaction to this loss. After the death of a loved one, bereaved people may feel sadness, anger, guilt, anxiety, and despair. They may think constantly about the deceased person and about the events that led up to the person's death. They often have physical reactions to their loss—problems sleeping, for example—and they may become ill. Socially, they may find it dif...

  2. A comparison of strategies to recruit older patients and carers to end-of-life research in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, B; Lowson, E.; Holmes, L.; Addington-Hall, J.; Arthur, A.; Grande, G.; Payne, S.; Seymour, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Older adults receive most of their end-of-life care in the community, but there are few published data to guide researchers on recruitment to studies in primary care. The aim of this study was to compare recruitment of patients and bereaved carers from general practices in areas with different research network support, and identify challenges in obtaining samples representative of those in need of end-of-life care. Methods: Comparative analysis of recruitment from gene...

  3. The Differential Impact of Suicide Type on Provision of Social Support: A Qualitative Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Daniel Paul

    2009-01-01

    AbstractThe Differential Impact of Suicide Type on Provision of Social Support: A Qualitative Comparisonby Daniel Paul VillaDoctor of Philosophy in Social WelfareUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Andrew Scharlach, ChairThe objective of this exploratory study was to examine how various modes of death impact the availability, perception, and allocation of social support to bereaved survivors. Specifically, case vignettes describing different types of suicide were utilized to address ...

  4. The self-murderer from Orminge

    OpenAIRE

    Silvén Hagström, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Moral discourses, which operate to create difference among people, construct and reconstruct a "suicide stigma" whereby the suicide-bereaved are stigmatized in their social contexts and thus prevented from communicating their experience of loss. Departing from a performance-based pragmatic approach, this article uses Bambergs (1997) positioning theory to analyze a young womans performed memoir as her way of resisting this stigmatizing position. Following her mothers suicide, the daughter-narr...

  5. This is what 'caring for the carers' looks like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Bereavement affects each of us differently, and few of us can anticipate how we will react when we lose a loved one. We can also never be sure how those around us will be affected, especially younger children experiencing death for the first time. This week's Nursing Standard features a nurse who has developed a service that offers holistic care in the aftermath of death and should serve as a blueprint for commissioners to follow. PMID:27224587

  6. Empirical Essays on the Effects of Early Life Conditions on Health Later in Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schoch, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation analyses a topic that is nowadays widely studied in economics and other social sciences, but originated from the medical literature: The long-run health effects of early life conditions. Chapter 2 starts out by using business cycle fluctuations around the time of birth of individuals as exogenous variation in early life conditions. Specifically, it asks the question how such shocks influence the quantitative impact of later life events such as bereavement or the onset of dis...

  7. A study of the structure and dynamics of symptoms of PTSD after the loss of a loved one

    OpenAIRE

    Kuskova A.A.; Lukovtseva Z.V.

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on the experience of structural and dynamic analysis of the manifestations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by death of a loved one. On a survey of 53 adult subjects who have lost relatives and friends in the conditions of daily life (i.e., outside of war and emergencies), we show the relationship of the severity of PTSD symptoms with different individual biographical characteristics of grieving persons. We describe the specificity of bereavement depending...

  8. Narrative reconstruction therapy for prolonged grief disorder - rationale and case study

    OpenAIRE

    Peri, Tuvia; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Garber, Sharon; Tuval-Mashiach, Rivka; Paul A Boelen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) is a potentially disabling condition affecting approximately 10% of bereaved people. It has been suggested that the impaired integration of the loss memory, as expressed in recurrent memories of the loss and disorganization of memory, is involved in the development of PGD. Narrative reconstruction (NR), originally designed for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in an integrative therapy module, and consisting of exposure to the los...

  9. Shela koma na mizimu mema - remembering our ancestors

    OpenAIRE

    Mahazi, Jasmin Anna-Karima

    2012-01-01

    Vave is generally defined as a corpus of agricultural songs as they are sung and performed by Bajuni farmers - an ethnic subgroup of the Swahili - on the eve of burning the bush, a stage of slash and burn cultivation. Although the song’s main theme is agriculture and each cultivation step in particular is given attention, an analysis of the aesthetics of Vave from the viewpoint of oral literature unearths the secret and sacred dimension of Vave performance. Death, bereavement, resurrection, a...

  10. Reflections on Doing Research Grounded in My Experience of Perinatal Loss: From Auto/biography to Autoethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Davidson

    2011-01-01

    This article, derived from my doctoral dissertation (Davidson 2007) examining the emergence of hospital protocols for perinatal bereavement during the last half of the twentieth century in Canada, focuses on the methodological complexities – the draw, the drain, and the delight of doing qualitative research grounded in my own experience of perinatal loss. With my dissertation now a fait a complete, reflecting back on my research, my use of autoethnography at this point allows a return to a ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palli...

  12. How mothers experience personal growth after a perinatal loss

    OpenAIRE

    Thomadaki, Olga

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, babies are considered stillborn when they are born dead after the 24th week of gestation. Death within the first four weeks of life is defined as a neonatal death. Both stillbirths and neonatal deaths comprise perinatal deaths. This type of bereavement constitutes a traumatic loss and although there is a plethora of research focusing on the resulting parental psychopathology, research on adaptive grief resolution and posttraumatic growth is scarce. Qualitative methodologies explori...

  13. In bits, bytes and stone:Making sense of digital afterlife, remembrance and heritage designs

    OpenAIRE

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The digital spheres of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Social Network Services (SNS) are influencing 21st. century death. Today the dying and the bereaved attend mourning and remembrance both online and offline. Combined, the cemeteries, web memorials and social network sites constitute parts of an intricately weaved and interrelated network of practices dealing with death, mourning, memorialization and remembrance. Design pioneering company IDEO'S recent failed attempt t...

  14. Primary care palliative and supportive care services: Experiences and perceptions of patients with advanced progressive disease and their informal carers

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Palliative care can be defined as the active, holistic care of patients with advanced progressive illness, and incorporates symptom management with psychological, social and spiri-tual care (WHO, 1990). Palliative care is for patients in the advanced stages of illness. Supportive care follows people throughout the process of their disease, from pre-diagnosis, treatment, cure, continuing illness, death and into bereavement. The aim of supportive care is to maximise benefits of treatment and...

  15. To hold or not to hold: medicolegal death investigation practices during unexpected child death investigations and the experiences of next of kin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Rebecca A; Marain, Lisa Capizzi; Crandall, Laura

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the current practices within the medicolegal death investigation system, as well as the experience of bereaved parents due to sudden unexpected child death with regard to viewing, memorial keepsakes, and communication during the death investigation. Convenience samples of 197 professionals and 156 bereaved parents participated. Respondents were asked to participate in an online survey. Results show that the majority of professional respondents (96.5%) allow the next of kin (NOK) to view his/her child before transport to the morgue while holding the infant/child was somewhat less commonplace (68.9%). The majority of professional respondents (70.4%) would also permit memorial keepsakes to be made. Additional factors are explored that both hinder and promote these common family requests. Furthermore, professional practices and NOK experiences in regard to communicating preliminary and final cause of death information to the NOK were highly variable. This article provides a snapshot at the current death investigative practices in the United States, as well as how these practices are received by NOK along with their recommendations for change. These results may be used to further inform future guidelines to improve comprehensive and efficient death investigations that support the emotional needs of the newly bereaved. PMID:24781400

  16. Revenge and psychological adjustment after homicidal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Denderen, Mariëtte; de Keijser, Jos; Gerlsma, Coby; Huisman, Mark; Boelen, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of revenge are a common human response to being hurt by others. Among crime victims of severe sexual or physical violence, significant correlations have been reported between revenge and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Homicide is one of the most severe forms of interpersonal violence. It is therefore likely that individuals bereaved by homicide experience high levels of revenge, which may hamper efforts to cope with traumatic loss. The relationship between revenge and psychological adjustment following homicidal loss has not yet been empirically examined. In the current cross-sectional study, we used self-report data from 331 spouses, family members and friends of homicide victims to examine the relationships between dispositional revenge and situational revenge on the one hand and symptom-levels of PTSD and complicated grief, as well as indices of positive functioning, on the other hand. Furthermore, the association between revenge and socio-demographic and offense-related factors was examined. Participants were recruited from a governmental support organization, a website with information for homicidally bereaved individuals, and members of support groups. Levels of both dispositional and situational revenge were positively associated with symptoms of PTSD and complicated grief, and negatively with positive functioning. Participants reported significantly less situational revenge in cases where the perpetrator was a direct family member than cases where the perpetrator was an indirect family member, friend, or someone unknown. Homicidally bereaved individuals reported more situational revenge, but not more dispositional revenge than a sample of students who had experienced relatively mild interpersonal transgressions. PMID:24910007

  17. How People Who Are Dying or Mourning Engage with the Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Walter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Though death and loss are recognized as significant themes in fine and popular arts forms, we know virtually nothing about how people who themselves are dying or bereaved use the arts - unless they are practising artists or under therapeutic supervision. This article first reviews how established artists have used death/loss themes in their work, along with the work of arts practitioners in palliative and bereavement care and the role of the arts in death education. These literatures tend to privilege the production of artworks over their consumption, and reveal the absence of research into the arts practices of lay people who are dying or grieving. The article goes on to advocate ethnographic research into lay practices, using the author's own personal experiences and observations to indicate the kind of findings that ethnography may produce, in particular the likely importance - at the end as in the rest of life - of meaningful arts consumption. The article then suggests avenues for researching lay arts practices at the end of life, before concluding with some possible implications for professional care of dying and bereaved people.

  18. Narrative reconstruction therapy for prolonged grief disorder—rationale and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Tuvia; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Garber, Sharon; Tuval-Mashiach, Rivka; Boelen, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) is a potentially disabling condition affecting approximately 10% of bereaved people. It has been suggested that the impaired integration of the loss memory, as expressed in recurrent memories of the loss and disorganization of memory, is involved in the development of PGD. Narrative reconstruction (NR), originally designed for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in an integrative therapy module, and consisting of exposure to the loss memory, detailed written reconstruction of the loss memory narrative and an elaboration of the personal significance of that memory for the bereaved, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of intrusion symptoms. Objective In light of findings that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), including cognitive restructuring and exposure, is effective in the treatment of PGD, we suggest the implementation of a somewhat novel therapy module, NR, for the treatment of intrusive phenomena in bereaved patients. Method The rationale for the implementation of NR for PGD and a case study of the treatment of a woman suffering from PGD after the death of her father are presented. Therapy took place in a university outpatient training clinic. Results Evaluations conducted before and after treatment and at a 3-month follow-up demonstrated the effectiveness of NR in reducing symptoms of PGD and depression. The analysis of spontaneous narratives recorded before and after treatment showed an increased organization of the narratives. Conclusions This case report demonstrates an adaptation of NR for the treatment of PGD. The results provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of NR for PGD. The significance of the study and its limitations are discussed. Highlights of the article Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) affects approximately ten percent of bereaved people. Narrative Reconstruction (NR), an integrative therapy module originally used for PTSD patients, was adapted for PGD. NR consists

  19. Autobiographical memory specificity and symptoms of complicated grief, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder following loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A; Huntjens, Rafaele J C; van Deursen, Denise S; van den Hout, Marcel A

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the specificity and content of autobiographical memories among bereaved individuals. Self-report measures of bereavement-related distress and a standard and trait version of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were administered to 109 bereaved people. We examined associations of memory specificity with (a) demographic and loss-related variables and with (b) symptom-levels of complicated grief (CG), depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), (c) associations of the content of memories (related vs. unrelated to the loss/lost person) with symptoms, and (d) the degree to which associations of symptom-levels with memory specificity and content differed between the standard and trait version of the AMT. Findings showed that (a) memory specificity varied as a function of age, education, and kinship; (b) reduced memory specificity was significantly associated with symptom-levels of CG, but not depression and PTSD; (c) symptom-levels of CG and PTSD were associated with a preferential retrieval of specific memories that were related to the loss/lost person on the standard AMT, whereas all three symptom-measures were associated with preferential retrieval of loss-related specific memories on the trait AMT; and (d) on the trait AMT, but not the standard AMT, symptom-measures remained significantly associated with a preferential retrieval of loss-related specific memories, when controlling for relevant background variables. Among other things, these results show that reduced memory specificity is associated with self-reported CG-severity but not depression and PTSD following loss. Moreover, the results are consistent with recent research findings showing that memories tied to the source of an individual's distress (e.g., loss) are immune to avoidant processes involved in the standard reduced specificity effect. PMID:20394916

  20. In the aftermath of teenage suicide: A qualitative study of the psychosocial consequences for the surviving family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Lars

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of family reactions following teenage suicide are hampered by the psychological difficulties of approaching families and recruiting an unbiased sample of study subjects. By using a small but consecutive series of cases, we examined the qualitative aspects of loosing a teenage family member due to suicide. Such an understanding is important for future organisation of proper programs that provide professional support in the grief process. Methods From a large project on teenage unnatural death in northern Sweden 1981–2000 (including 88 suicides, 13 cases from 1995 through 1998 were retrospectively identified and consecutively analysed. Ten families agreed to participate. The open interviews took place 15 to 25 months after the suicide. The information gathered was manually analysed according to a grounded theory model, resulting in allocation of data into one of three domains: post-suicidal reactions, impact on daily living, and families' need for support. Results Teenager suicide is a devastating trauma for the surviving family and the lack of sustainable explanations for the suicide is a predominant issue in the grief process. The prolonged social and psychological isolation of the families in grief should be challenged. At the time of the interview, the families were still struggling with explaining why the suicide occurred, especially since most suicides had occurred without overt premonitory signs. The bereaved family members were still profoundly affected by the loss, but all had returned to an ostensibly normal life. Post-suicide support was often badly timed and insufficient, especially for younger siblings. Conclusion Family doctors can organise a long-term, individually formulated support scheme for the bereaved, including laymen who can play a most significant role in the grief process. There is also a need for better understanding of the families who have lost a teenager whom committed suicide and for the