WorldWideScience

Sample records for bereavement

  1. Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a mental, physical, social or emotional reaction. Mental reactions can include anger, guilt, anxiety, sadness and despair. Physical reactions can include sleeping problems, changes in appetite, physical problems or illness. How long bereavement lasts can depend on how ...

  2. Bereaved children.

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the unique aspects of childhood grief. To provide a framework for family physicians to use in assisting children to grieve. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from 1966 to 1999 using the key words children, childhood, grief, mourning, and bereavement revealed mainly expert opinion articles, some non-randomized observational studies, and retrospective case-control studies. MAIN MESSAGE: Although children are influenced by similar factors and need to work through the s...

  3. The Phenomenology and Course of Depression in Parentally Bereaved and Non-Bereaved Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Sami; Melhem, Nadine M.; Porta, Giovanna; Payne, Monica Walker; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the phenomenology and course of bereavement-related depression to depression that occurred later in the course of bereavement and to depression in non-bereaved youth. Method: This sample is drawn from a cohort of parentally bereaved youth and non-bereaved controls followed for approximately 5 years. Three groups of depressed…

  4. Bereavement Care Provision in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Murphy, Irene; Keegan, Orla

    2015-01-01

    The Bereavement Care Taskforce of the EAPC has conducted a survey on bereavement care service provision in Europe. Mai-Britt Guldin, Irene Murphy, Orla Keegan, Barbara Monroe, Maria Antonia Lacasta Reverte and Inger Benkel report on the results. One of the key findings is that not all palliative...

  5. Parents bereaved by offspring suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Leslie, William D

    2013-01-01

    OUTCOME MEASURES Mental and physical disorders, social factors, and treatment use. RESULTS Suicide bereavement was associated with an increased rate of depression (ARR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.88-2.43), anxiety disorders (ARR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.24-1.60), and marital breakup (ARR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.13-1.23) in the 2...... years after the suicide of an offspring, as compared with the 2 years prior to the death. Suicide-bereaved and MVC-bereaved parents had very few differences on predeath to postdeath outcomes. Depression rate increases were greater for MVC-bereaved parents (19.9%) compared with suicide-bereaved parents...... (15.9%; P = .005), whereas suicide-bereaved parents had higher rate increases of hospitalization for mental illness (P = .049). Suicide-bereaved parents were more likely than their MVC-bereaved counterparts to have depression (ARR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.06-1.61), physical disorders (ARR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1...

  6. Internet Forums for Suicide Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Eleanor; Krysinska, Karolina; O'Dea, Bridianne; Robinson, Jo

    2017-11-01

    Bereavement by suicide is associated with a number of consequences including poor mental health outcomes and increased suicide risk. Despite this, the bereaved by suicide may be reluctant to seek help from friends, family, and professionals. Internet forums and social networking sites are a popular avenue of support for the bereaved, but to date there is a lack of research into their use and efficacy. To survey users of suicide bereavement Internet forums and Facebook groups regarding their help-seeking behaviors, use of forums, and perceived benefits and limitations of such use. This study employed a cross-sectional design in which users of suicide bereavement Internet forums and Facebook groups completed an anonymous online survey. Participants were 222 users of suicide bereavement Internet forums. Most participants (93.2%) had sought face-to-face help from sources other than Internet forums, but were more likely to seek help in the near future from informal rather than formal sources. Forums were perceived as highly beneficial and there were few limitations. The generalizability of these results to other internet forums may be limited. Additionally, we were not able to examine differences between forums in terms of quality or user-reported efficacy. Finally, the data reflects the subjective views of forum users, which may differ from the views of moderators or experts. Internet forums, including Facebook groups, appear to be a useful adjunct to face-to-face help-seeking for supporting those who have been bereaved by suicide.

  7. The Bereavement Guilt Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Stroebe, Magaret; Chan, Cecilia L W; Chow, Amy Y M

    2017-06-01

    The rationale, development, and validation of the Bereavement Guilt Scale (BGS) are described in this article. The BGS was based on a theoretically developed, multidimensional conceptualization of guilt. Part 1 describes the generation of the item pool, derived from in-depth interviews, and review of the scientific literature. Part 2 details statistical analyses for further item selection (Sample 1, N = 273). Part 3 covers the psychometric properties of the emergent-BGS (Sample 2, N = 600, and Sample 3, N = 479). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a five-factor model fit the data best. Correlations of BGS scores with depression, anxiety, self-esteem, self-forgiveness, and mode of death were consistent with theoretical predictions, supporting the construct validity of the measure. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were also supported. Thus, initial testing or examination suggests that the BGS is a valid tool to assess multiple components of bereavement guilt. Further psychometric testing across cultures is recommended.

  8. Bereaved Employee: Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Working Through Grief About Us The Bereaved Employee: Returning to Work By Helen Fitzgerald, CT After ... One employer called a grief therapist to help employees after a co-worker reported the death of ...

  9. Sibling bereavement and continuing bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy; Horsley, Heidi; Davies, Betty; Kramer, Robin

    2006-11-01

    Historically, from a Freudian and medical model perspective, emotional disengagement from the deceased was seen as essential to the successful adaptation of bereavement. A major shift in the bereavement literature has occurred and it is now generally accepted that despite the permanence of physical separation, the bereaved remains involved and connected to the deceased and can be emotionally sustained through continuing bonds. The majority of literature has focused on adults and on the nature of continuing bonds following the death of a spouse. In this article, the authors demonstrate how the continuing bonds concept applies to the sibling relationship. We describe the unique continued relationship formed by bereaved children and adolescents following a sibling loss, highlight the factors that influence the siblings continuing bonds expressions, and offer clinical interventions. In our view, mental health professionals can play an important role in helping parents encourage activities that may facilitate the creation and maintenance of continuing bonds in their children.

  10. Continuing Bonds after Suicide Bereavement in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lindsey; Byram, Victoria; Gosling, A. Sophie; Stokes, Julie

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that the grieving process after suicide bereavement has unique properties (e.g., J. R. Jordan, 2001). A qualitative study was conducted to explore one aspect of the grieving process--continuing bonds--after suicide bereavement in childhood. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 10 suicide-bereaved children…

  11. Recovery Following Bereavement: Metaphor, Phenomenology, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of recovery following bereavement can be both useful and misleading. As a metaphor, the concept of recovery highlights some aspects of bereavement and obscures others. Bereaved people interviewed in 3 different studies typically did not bring up the term recovery so it did not seem to be a term that described their experience. Across…

  12. An exploratory study of drawings by bereaved children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, M; Thomas, G V

    1991-11-01

    Bereaved and non-bereaved children made drawings of a person, themselves, their family, and a topic of their choice; the drawings were then analysed to investigate whether the experience of bereavement was expressed in drawing in any reliable way. Bereaved children were no more likely than non-bereaved children to include indicators of emotional disturbance in their human figure drawings. Bereaved children, however, were reliably more likely than non-bereaved children to include themselves in a drawing of their family.

  13. Holocaust memory reconstruction among bereaved parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Louck, Keren; Saka, Yael

    2017-02-01

    Many studies have examined the trauma bereaved parents experience. The current study focuses on the role that the Holocaust's memory plays in the bereavement experience of parents who have lost a child in a terrorist attack in Israel. Forty bereaved parents were interviewed, using semistructured in-depth interviews. Bereaved parents related to the Holocaust memory as a meaningful experience in their private bereavement. The parents expressed dialectic feelings concerning their loss, personal victimization on the one hand and personal strength, and growth on the other hand. It seems that memory reconstruction of the Holocaust can be used as a coping resource.

  14. Outdoor Education for Bereaved Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    For many outdoor education providers, bereaved children and young people at first appear to be a new target audience. A new target audience naturally raises questions of programme planning and can give the provider a pressurised need to succeed: "Do I as the organiser have to develop a whole new programme?", "May I be required to provide some form…

  15. Parents bereaved by infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study. Participants...

  16. The meaning and experience of bereavement support: A qualitative interview study of bereaved family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Emma; Kenny, Katherine; Broom, Alex; MacArtney, John; Good, Phillip

    2017-06-21

    Experiences of bereavement can be stressful and are frequently complicated by emotional, familial, and financial issues. Some-though not all-caregivers may benefit from bereavement support. While considered standard within palliative care services in Australia, bereavement support is not widely utilized by family caregivers. There is little research focused on the forms of bereavement support desired or required by family caregivers, how such care is viewed, and/or how bereavement support is experienced. This study examined the experiences of bereaved family caregivers and their impressions of and interactions with bereavement support. This paper reports on one aspect of a broader study designed to explore a range of experiences of patients and caregivers to and through palliative care. Focusing on experiences of bereavement, it draws on qualitative semistructured interviews with 15 family caregivers of palliative care patients within a specialist palliative care unit of an Australian metropolitan hospital. The interviews for this stage of the study were initiated 3-9 months after an initial interview with a family caregiver, during which time the palliative patient had died, and they covered family caregivers' experiences of bereavement and bereavement support. Interviews were digitally audiotaped and transcribed in full. A thematic analysis was conducted utilizing the framework approach wherein interview transcripts were reviewed, key themes identified, and explanations developed. The research identified four prevalent themes: (1) sociocultural constructions of bereavement support as for the incapable or socially isolated; (2) perceptions of bereavement support services as narrow in scope; (3) the "personal" character of bereavement and subsequent incompatibility with formalized support, and (4) issues around the timing and style of approaches to being offered support. Systematic pre-bereavement planning and careful communication about the services offered by

  17. PTSD in older bereaved people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

      Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was an important issue to investigate in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently...... bereaved elderly people compared to married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety six Danish elderly bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and were...... subsequently assessed two months post-bereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married elderly people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES=.35...

  18. Multiple social contexts in qualitative bereavement research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Miriam S.; Moss, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Little research focuses on the ways that bereaved family members react to and make meaning of their experience of the death of an elderly father and husband. In a qualitative, ethnographic study of 34 bereaved families we examined how family members respond to two inter-related social contexts: 1. Social-cultural values and attitudes such as attitudes toward grieving for old persons, and 2. The inter-personal dyadic relationship between interviewer and interviewee. An underlying theme of uncertainty pervades the study participants’ views of what is normal and expected in their own process of bereavement. Implications for future bereavement research are suggested. PMID:22939542

  19. Mediators between bereavement and somatic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konkolÿ Thege Barna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our research we examined the frequency of somatic symptoms among bereaved (N = 185 and non-bereaved men and women in a national representative sample (N = 4041 and investigated the possible mediating factors between bereavement status and somatic symptoms. Methods Somatic symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15, anxiety with a four-point anxiety rating scale, and depression with a nine-item shortened version of the Beck Depression Inventory. Results Among the bereaved, somatic symptoms proved to be significantly more frequent in both genders when compared to the non-bereaved, as did anxiety and depression. On the multivariate level, the results show that both anxiety and depression proved to be a mediator between somatic symptoms and bereavement. The effect sizes indicated that for both genders, anxiety was a stronger predictor of somatic symptoms than depression. Conclusions The results of our research indicate that somatic symptoms accompanying bereavement are not direct consequences of this state but they can be traced back to the associated anxiety and depression. These results draw attention to the need to recognize anxiety and depression looming in the background of somatic complaints in bereavement and to the importance of the dissemination of related information.

  20. Death and Dying Anxiety among Bereaved and Nonbereaved Elderly Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Tinsky-Roimi, Tal

    2011-01-01

    This study examines differences in death and dying anxiety between bereaved and nonbereaved elderly Israeli parents, as well as correlates of these factors among bereaved parents. A total of 97 parents (49 bereaved, 48 nonbereaved) completed measures of death and dying anxiety and religiosity. Bereaved parents reported significantly higher dying…

  1. Bereavement care interventions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feudtner Chris

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite abundant bereavement care options, consensus is lacking regarding optimal care for bereaved persons. Methods We conducted a systematic review, searching MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, EBMR, and other databases using the terms (bereaved or bereavement and (grief combined with (intervention or support or counselling or therapy and (controlled or trial or design. We also searched citations in published reports for additional pertinent studies. Eligible studies had to evaluate whether the treatment of bereaved individuals reduced bereavement-related symptoms. Data from the studies was abstracted independently by two reviewers. Results 74 eligible studies evaluated diverse treatments designed to ameliorate a variety of outcomes associated with bereavement. Among studies utilizing a structured therapeutic relationship, eight featured pharmacotherapy (4 included an untreated control group, 39 featured support groups or counselling (23 included a control group, and 25 studies featured cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic, psychoanalytical, or interpersonal therapies (17 included a control group. Seven studies employed systems-oriented interventions (all had control groups. Other than efficacy for pharmacological treatment of bereavement-related depression, we could identify no consistent pattern of treatment benefit among the other forms of interventions. Conclusions Due to a paucity of reports on controlled clinical trails, no rigorous evidence-based recommendation regarding the treatment of bereaved persons is currently possible except for the pharmacologic treatment of depression. We postulate the following five factors as impeding scientific progress regarding bereavement care interventions: 1 excessive theoretical heterogeneity, 2 stultifying between-study variation, 3 inadequate reporting of intervention procedures, 4 few published replication studies, and 5 methodological flaws of study design.

  2. Bereaved parents’ online grief communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Hård af Segerstad, Ylva; Kasperowski, Dick

    2017-01-01

    This article presents results from case studies of online grief communities for bereaved parents in Denmark and Sweden (Christensen & Sandvik 2013, 2015a; Hård af Segerstad & Kasperowski, 2015), analyzing how development of practices and norms for grieving and mourning online are related...... to the conditions for participation in the online forums, and to dominant ideas of grief in society as such. Rooted in contemporary research on grief and mourning, we discuss practices of tabooization, de-tabooization or even re-tabooization in the different online forums and how norms and traditions are performed...

  3. [Are oppressive dreams indicators in bereavement?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purebl, György; Pilling, János; Konkolÿ, Thege Barna; Bódizs, Róbert; Kopp, Mária

    2012-07-30

    It is widely believed that oppressive dreams are frequent in bereavement--despite the lack of scientific investigations of the subject. The aims of our study were the analysis of dream quality as well as the correlates of oppressive dreams in bereavement. Participants with (N = 473) and without bereavement were compared upon the database of a national representative study (Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey 2006, N = 4329). Dream contents were assessed with the Dream Quality Questionnaire (DQQ). Depressive symptoms (BDI-S) and the presence anxiety were also investigated. Oppressive dreams occurred significantly higher frequency in the first year of bereavement (men: F = 17.525, p dreams were significantly associated with anxiety (F = 37.089, p dreams are significantly more frequent in the first year of bereavement, and may act as indicators of bereavement-linked mental health consequences like depression and anxiety. These are often masked by the symptoms of grief and therefore remain untreated. Our preliminary results could be a starting point for the development of further research aiming to clarify the relationship amongst dream contents, anxiety, and depression in bereavement.

  4. Meaning Making in Wartime Bereavement: Lessons Learned From Bereaved Parents and Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Christina

    2017-12-01

    Wartime deaths are traumatic and leave many grieving families in their wake. Yet, the unique, nuanced bereavement needs and experiences of those who remain are largely unknown. This Canadian, qualitative study examined the bereavement experiences of family of origin, bereaved during the mission to Afghanistan. The findings provide rich data on the predominant ways in which family members found and made meaning following the death and the ways in which military culture influenced the meanings made.

  5. Bereavement: a postgraduate training design for psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Peña Villamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: death is a fact that impacts the lives of all human beings, so that it can neither be ignored nor distanced from its subsequent bereavement period, even if being wished. The grief reaction is one of the problems that most frequently demand the assistance of health staff, especially psychologists in all health care areas.Objective: to devise a system of activities that contributes to increase the psychologists’ knowledge about bereavement and its management.Methods: a multiple cases study was carried out with the application of two research instruments (questionnaire and interview to those psychologists who work in primary and secondary health care in Las Tunas municipality to diagnose their needs related to the management of bereavement. Qualitative methodology was used, based on the method of participatory action research, and workshops were designed as forms of educational intervention.Results: it was proved that psychologists have insufficient theoretical and methodological training in relation to care for the bereaved. Consequently, psychotherapeutic workshops were designed, offering the general methodology and procedures to be followed by the professional who assists the bereaved.Conclusions: psychotherapeutic workshops constitute a referential theoretical and practical model very useful for the preparation of psychologists to deal with bereavement.

  6. Effects of suicide bereavement on mental health and suicide risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitman, Alexandra; Osborn, David; King, Michael

    2014-01-01

    to psychiatric care for parents bereaved by the suicide of an offspring, increased risk of suicide in mothers bereaved by an adult child's suicide, and increased risk of depression in offspring bereaved by the suicide of a parent. Some evidence was shown for increased rejection and shame in people bereaved......Between 48 million and 500 million people are thought to experience suicide bereavement every year. Over the past decade, increased policy attention has been directed towards suicide bereavement, but with little evidence to describe the effect of exposure or to provide appropriate responses. We...... used a systematic approach to carry out a narrative review of studies of the effect of suicide bereavement on mortality, mental health, and social functioning, and compared them with effects from other bereavements. We found 57 studies that satisfied strict inclusion criteria. Results from...

  7. Grieving Together and Apart: Bereaved Parents' Contradictions of Marital Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Paige W.; Braithwaite, Dawn O.

    2009-01-01

    The researchers adopted relational dialectics theory (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996) to examine the discourse of 37 bereaved parents. Research questions guiding the study were what dialectical contradictions do bereaved parents experience when communicating with their marital partner after their child's death and how do bereaved parents and their…

  8. Impact of partner bereavement on quality of cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunil M; Carey, Iain M; Harris, Tess; Dewilde, Stephen; Victor, Christina R; Cook, Derek G

    2013-12-24

    Bereavement is a period of increased risk of cardiovascular death. There is limited understanding of the potential contribution of quality of cardiovascular disease management to this increased risk. In a UK primary-care database, 12 722 older individuals with preexisting cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, stroke) and a partner bereavement were matched with a non-bereaved control group (n=33 911). We examined key routine annual process measures of care in the year before and after bereavement and cardiovascular medication prescribing (lipid-lowering, antiplatelet, renin-angiotensin system drugs). Odds ratios for change after bereavement compared with the change in non-bereaved matched controls are presented. In the bereaved, uptake of all annual measures was lower in the year before bereavement, with improvement in the year after, whereas in the controls, uptake was relatively stable. The odds ratio for change was 1.30 (95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.46) for cholesterol measurement and 1.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.61) for blood pressure measurement. For all medication, there was a transient fall in prescribing in the peri-bereavement period lasting until about 3 months after bereavement. The odds ratio for at least 80% prescription coverage in the 30 days after bereavement was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.88) for lipid-lowering medication and 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.91) for antiplatelet medication compared with the change in non-bereaved individuals. Lower uptake of key cardiovascular care measures in the year before bereavement and reduced medication coverage after bereavement may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. Clinicians need to ensure that quality of cardiovascular care is maintained in the pre- and post-bereavement periods.

  9. Cultural perspectives of death, grief, and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Paul T; Vigil, Gloria J; Manno, Martin S; Henry, Gloria C; Wilks, Jonathan; Das Sarthak; Kellywood, Rosie; Foster, Wil

    2003-07-01

    The cultural makeup of the United States continues to change rapidly, and as minority groups continue to grow, these groups' beliefs and customs must be taken into account when examining death, grief, and bereavement. This article discusses the beliefs, customs, and rituals of Latino, African American, Navajo, Jewish, and Hindu groups to raise awareness of the differences health care professionals may encounter among their grieving clients. Discussion of this small sample of minority groups in the United States is not intended to cover all of the degrees of acculturation within each group. Cultural groups are not homogeneous, and individual variation must always be considered in situations of death, grief, and bereavement. However, because the customs, rituals, and beliefs of the groups to which they belong affect individuals' experiences of death, grief, and bereavement, health care professionals need to be open to learning about them to better understand and help.

  10. Meaning of bereavement among older African American widows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Laura S

    2004-01-01

    In spite of the increase in research on spousal bereavement, researchers have not specifically addressed the impact that ethnicity may have on the bereavement experience. The results of this descriptive phenomenological study increase the understanding of spousal bereavement among older African American widows. Storytelling was at the heart of every participant's description of her bereavement experience. Six themes were identified: awareness of death, care giving, getting through, moving on, changing feelings, and financial security. For nurses to effectively intervene in the lives of bereaved older African American widows, they must consider each widow's culture, heritage, and lived experiences, which can be ascertained through eliciting and listening to the widow's life stories.

  11. Maternal bereavement and cryptorchidism in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Olsen, Jørn; Wu, Chunsen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryptorchidism (undescended testis) is a common anomaly with largely unexplained etiology. Animal studies have suggested maternal emotional stress as a potential risk factor, but this has not been studied in humans. We aimed to investigate whether maternal bereavement due to the death...... interval = 0.92-1.14]). Results were similar when the diagnosis was verified with surgery. We adjusted for maternal and paternal age, birth year, and family history of cryptorchidism. CONCLUSION: We observed no association between maternal bereavement before and during pregnancy and the occurrence...

  12. Building bridges in American Indian bereavement research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    Due to the severity of the risks involved in violation of ethical principles with research of American Indian populations, more attention in literature is needed on the topic. This article reviews discussions of ethical and methodological issues, uses Muscogee Creeks' responses from the author's prior study (Walker, 2008; Walker & Balk, 2007) as an example and application, and specifically focuses on the research of death and bereavement. The article provides ethical reflection and recommendations for designing death and bereavement research as an outsider to the culture, as well as for building trust with participants in American Indian populations.

  13. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families. © 2014 AWHONN.

  14. A qualitative study of recently bereaved people's beliefs about death: implications for bereavement care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Peter; Holloway, Margaret; Adamson, Susan

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the beliefs of recently bereaved people about death and to explore the implications of these beliefs for bereavement care. Little is known about recently bereaved people's beliefs about death, although there is evidence that these beliefs may have an impact on health. The funeral provides an opportunity for bereaved people to reflect on their beliefs about death. A qualitative approach. This paper describes one aspect of an interdisciplinary study of the spirituality of contemporary funerals. We obtained access to 46 funerals through funeral directors and other contacts, and interviewed principal mourners to explore their beliefs. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Three themes emerged that reflected the beliefs and experiences of bereaved people. The first theme describes people's understanding of death in terms of five positions: religious, dualist, eco-spiritualist, materialist and death-as-transition. The second theme addresses a range of views about the possibility of life after death: resurrection, reuniting and reincarnation. The third theme describes ways in which people felt that their relationship with the deceased person continues after death: continuity as sense of presence and continuity as memory, legacy and love. Some people were reluctant to express a firm view about death. People express a spectrum of beliefs about death. Their beliefs are infrequently linked to formal religious or spiritual perspectives but seem to have an important role in coping with bereavement. This is a unique study illustrating the complexity of bereaved people's beliefs about death. The study provides a research-based framework within which to understand contemporary beliefs about death, and contributes to our understanding of how health professionals can support recently bereaved people. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. College Students' Grief and Coping Strategies in Bereavement and Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Naomi; Kodama, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to clarify the characteristics of college students' bereavement and separation and the relationship between coping strategies and grief reactions in bereavement and separation. 212 college students completed questionnaires. The results indicated that the majority of the respondents have experienced some bereavement or separation, in particular, separation from the lover. Multiple regression analyses showed that coping strategies such as "avoidance", "abandonment...

  16. Bereavement rituals in the Muscogee Creek tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrea C; Balk, David E

    2007-08-01

    A qualitative, collective case study explores bereavement rituals in the Muscogee Creek tribe. Data from interviews with 27 participants, all adult members of the tribe, revealed consensus on participation in certain bereavement rituals. Common rituals included: (a) conducting a wake service the night before burial; (b) never leaving the body alone before burial; (c) enclosing personal items and food in the casket; (d) digging graves by hand; (e) each individual throwing a handful of dirt into the grave before covering, called giving a "farewell handshake"; (f) covering the grave completely by hand; (g) building a house over the grave; (h) waiting 4 days before burial; (i) using medicine/purification; and (j) adhering to socialized mourning period. Cultural values of family, community, religion, importance of the number 4, Indian medicine, and the meaning of death contributed to the development of these rituals.

  17. Bereavement dream? Successful antidepressant treatment for bereavement-related distressing dreams in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mayumi; Onishi, Hideki; Wada, Mei; Wada, Tomomi; Wada, Makoto; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Nomura, Shinobu

    2010-03-01

    The death of a person is a stressful event. Such stress affects the physical and psychological well-being of the bereaved. As an associated mental disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD) is common. Some dream of the deceased, and these dreams are called bereavement dreams. Some MDD patients also experience dreams. These two types of dreams are sometimes difficult to differentiate. The dream of the bereaved might be only a bereavement-related dream, yet it might be a symptom of MDD. Herein, we report one patient who had distressing dreams after the death of her mother. A 63-year-old woman was referred for psychiatric consultation because of generalized fatigue and insomnia. Questioning her about recent events, she said that her mother had died of colonic carcinoma 5 months previously. Two months after the death, she suddenly started dreaming of her mother, getting angry with her almost every night. Generalized fatigue, insomnia, and distressing dreams appeared simultaneously. The dream caused much distress, making her afraid to fall asleep. Her psychiatric features fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD, single episode. The death of her mother was considered to be one of the causes of MDD. She was administered 25 mg/day of sertraline hydrochloride. After that, her symptoms gradually disappeared, and the frequency of distressing dreams was reduced. Five months later, physical and psychiatric symptoms of MDD were completely resolved. Subsequently, she has not suffered from any distressing dreams of her mother. This case indicates that dreams experienced after the death of a loved one should not be regarded simply as bereavement dreams. Some of the dreams may be symptoms of MDD. If the dreams are the symptoms of MDD, antidepressant treatment as well as psychotherapy may be useful. Therefore, we should avoid regarding symptoms of MDD as reactions to bereavement.

  18. Grief, Depressive Symptoms, and Physical Health among Recently Bereaved Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Rebecca L.; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Widowhood is among the most distressing of all life events, resulting in both mental and physical health declines. This paper explores the dynamic relationship between physical health and psychological well-being among recently bereaved spouses. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 328 bereaved persons who participated in the "Living…

  19. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life.......The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life....

  20. An assessment of hospice bereavement programs for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Martin, Shadi S; Csikai, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, numbering over 42 million and comprising 15% of the total population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 ). Hispanics are a heterogeneous group that experience disparities in accessing health care, including at the end of life. Specific gaps can be identified in the care of bereaved Hispanic individuals and families. This exploratory study examined bereavement services available and perceived needs for Hispanics in Florida. Hospice bereavement coordinators indicated that limited services were available specifically for Spanish-speakers and that language and cultural barriers were challenges when communicating, offering, and delivering bereavement services to Hispanics. Implications for social workers include the need to increase access to and evaluate the effectiveness of bereavement services for Hispanics.

  1. Losing a child: finding meaning in bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bogensperger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Confronting the loss of a loved one leads us to the core questions of human existence. Bereaved parents have to deal with the rupture of a widely shared concept of what is perceived to be the natural course of life and are forced into meaning reconstruction. Objective: This study aims to expand upon existing work concerning specific themes of meaning reconstruction in a sample of bereaved parents. More specifically, the relationship between meaning reconstruction, complicated grief, and posttraumatic growth was analyzed, with special attention focused on traumatic and unexpected losses. Method: In a mixed methods approach, themes of meaning reconstruction (sense-making and benefit-finding were assessed in in-depth interviews with a total of 30 bereaved parents. Posttraumatic growth and complicated grief were assessed using standardized questionnaires, and qualitative and quantitative results were then merged using data transformation methods. Results: In total 42 themes of meaning reconstruction were abstracted from oral material. It was shown that sense-making themes ranged from causal explanations to complex philosophical beliefs about life and death. Benefit-finding themes contained thoughts about personal improvement as well as descriptions about social actions. Significant correlations were found between the extent of sense-making and posttraumatic growth scores (rs=0.54, rs=0.49; p<0.01, especially when the death was traumatic or unexpected (rs=0.67, rs=0.63; p<0.01. However, analysis revealed no significant correlation with complicated grief. Overall results corroborate meaning reconstruction themes and the importance of meaning reconstruction for posttraumatic growth.

  2. The existential realities of grief and bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, Allan; Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte

    Our poster outlines the basic analytical and methodological strategy of a pending 3-year investigation into the existential dimensions of grief. The project is divided into two main foci: 1) a retrospective investigation into how bereavement of a parent in childhood/adolescence shapes the various....... Methodologically our design stands out by including a strong focus on the embodied and prereflective dimension of personal existences and connecting this with narrative accounts. The theoretical basis for this approach has been presented in recent publications by the authors (Køster & Winther-Lindqvist 2017...... and Køster 2016, 2017) and will be explicated in the poster session....

  3. Managing bereavement in the classroom: a conspiracy of silence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowton, Karen; Higginson, Irene J

    2003-10-01

    The ways in which teachers in British schools manage bereaved children are underreported. This article reports the impact of students' bereavement and their subsequent management in primary and secondary school classrooms in Southeast London. Thirteen school staff working in inner-city schools took part in in-depth interviews that focused on the impact of bereaved children on the school and how teachers responded to these children.All respondents had previously had contact with a local child bereavement service that aims to provide support, advice, and consultancy to children, their parents, and teachers. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using ATLAS-ti. Three main themes were identified from analysis of interview data. Firstly, British society, culture, local communities, and the family were significant influences in these teachers' involvement with bereaved students. Secondly, school staff managed bereaved students through contact with other adults and using practical classroom measures such as "time out" cards and contact books. Lastly, teachers felt they had to be strong, even when they were distressed. Surprise was expressed at the mature reaction of secondary school students to deaths of others. The article recommends that future research needs to concentrate on finding the most effective way of supporting routinely bereaved children, their families, and teachers.

  4. Bereavement in early life and later childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    indicator, and subsequent risk of overweight in school-aged children. Methods: We followed 46,401 singletons born in Denmark who underwent annual health examinations at 7-13 years of age in school of Copenhagen. A total of 492 children experienced bereavement by death of a parent during the first 6 years...... of life. We compared BMI levels, changes in BMI, and the prevalence of overweight at 7-13 years of age between bereaved and non-bereaved children. Results: Between bereaved children and non-bereaved children, there were no differences in average BMI levels at any age or changes in BMI at 7-13 years of age....... Bereavement during the first 6 years of life was not associated with an increased risk of overweight at 7-13 years of age. Conclusion: This study did not support that stress induced by bereavement during the first 6 years of life has significant influence on overweight in later childhood. Copyright © 2012 S...

  5. Bereavement process of people with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia MUÑIZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is focused on detecting the support needs of people with intellectual disabilities during the bereavement process in order to guide about professional interventions and practices aimed to provide more adequate individualized support to their real needs. The sample consists of 93 adults with ID, with ages ranging from 21 to 72 years old (M = 49.9; SD = 11.79, who have suffered the loss of a significant person. The professionals who worked with them and knew them well completed two questionnaires: Staff Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ and Bereavement Needs Assessment (BNAT. Beside descriptive analyses, results were analyzed according to several variables (i.e., gender, age, level of intellectual disability, and level of dependency. Level of intellectual disability and level of dependency were the ones that resulted significant. In order to provide the best answer to their needs, good practices are suggested such as facilitating the understanding of loss, helping them express feelings and emotions, dealing with each case individually, and encouraging to continue education about death.

  6. Guilt in bereavement: a review and conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Stroebe, Margaret; Chan, Cecilia L W; Chow, Amy Y M

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-four quantitative and 9 qualitative studies are reviewed to indicate current understanding of the nature and impact of guilt in bereavement. This overview suggests that guilt is especially prevalent among some vulnerable subgroups, and it is associated with maladaptive health outcomes. Being male, longer bereavement time, and good end-of life experience seem to be associated with less guilt feelings. However, definition ambiguity, measurement difficulties, and cultural insensitivity are evident in studies. Therefore, a multidimensional conceptualization of guilt and a structural model to guide future investigation of this phenomenon in the bereavement context is proposed.

  7. Parents' mental health after the birth of an extremely preterm child: a comparison between bereaved and non-bereaved parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenewein, J; Moergeli, H; Fauchère, J-C; Bucher, H U; Kraemer, B; Wittmann, L; Schnyder, U; Büchi, S

    2008-03-01

    To assess the impact of extremely preterm birth (24-26 weeks of gestation) on the mental health of parents two to six years after delivery, and to examine potential differences in post-traumatic growth between parents whose newborn infant died and those whose child survived. A total of 54 parents who had lost their newborn and 38 parents whose preterm child survived were assessed by questionnaires with regard to depression and anxiety (HADS) and post-traumatic growth (PTGI). Neither group of parents had clinically relevant levels of depression and anxiety. Mothers showed higher levels of anxiety than fathers. Bereaved parents with no other, living child reported higher levels of depression than bereaved parents with one or more children. Mothers reported higher post-traumatic growth compared to fathers. In particular, bereaved mothers experienced the value and quality of their close social relationships more positively compared to the non-bereaved parents. In the long term, bereaved and non-bereaved parents cope reasonably well with an extremely preterm birth of a child. Post-traumatic growth appears to be positively related to bereavement, particularly in mothers.

  8. Living with loss: middle-aged men face spousal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, Luann M

    2002-05-01

    Spousal bereavement is one of the most profoundly disturbing events encountered in the human life span. Research has shown that conjugal bereavement has significant physical and psychological consequences for the surviving spouse. In American culture, men and women experience bereavement in different ways. The author used in-depth interviews in the tradition of phenomenology to collect data from 8 men aged 41 to 54 years who had experienced the death of their spouse within the previous 8 months to 6 years. The research revealed the lived experience of spousal bereavement to be a journey from the realization of irreconcilable loss through themes of responding to the loss and living through the loss toward reclamation and reconstruction of a life.

  9. Do religious or spiritual beliefs influence bereavement? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gerhild; Xander, Carola J; Blum, Hubert E; Lutterbach, Johannes; Momm, Felix; Gysels, Marjolein; Higginson, Irene J

    2007-04-01

    Responses to bereavement may be influenced by characteristics such as age or gender, but also by factors like culture and religion. A systematic review was undertaken to assess whether spiritual or religious beliefs alter the process of grief and/or bereavement. Fifteen computerized databases were searched. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Evidence was graded according to the standard grading system of the Clinical Outcomes Group and by the SIGNAL score. In total, 5715 persons were examined: 69% women, 87% white, 83% protestant. Ninety-four percent of studies show some positive effects of religious/spiritual beliefs on bereavement, but there was a great heterogeneity regarding included populations and outcome measurements. Available data do not allow for a definite answer on whether religious/spiritual beliefs effectively influence bereavement as most studies suffer from weaknesses in design and methodological flaws. Further research is needed. Recommendations for further research are given.

  10. War and bereavement: consequences for mental and physical distress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexhmedin Morina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term impact of the killing of a parent in childhood or adolescence during war on distress and disability in young adulthood. This study assessed current prevalence rates of mental disorders and levels of dysfunction among young adults who had lost their father due to war-related violence in childhood or adolescence. METHODS: 179 bereaved young adults and 175 non-bereaved young adults were interviewed a decade after experiencing the war in Kosovo. Prevalence rates of Major Depressive Episode (MDE, anxiety, and substance use disorders, and current suicide risk were assessed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The syndrome of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD was assessed with the Prolonged Grief Disorder Interview (PG-13. Somatic symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire. General health distress was assessed with the General Health Questionnaire. FINDINGS: Bereaved participants were significantly more likely to suffer from either MDE or any anxiety disorder than non-bereaved participants (58.7% vs. 40%. Among bereaved participants, 39.7% met criteria for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, 34.6% for PGD, and 22.3% for MDE. Bereaved participants with PGD were more likely to suffer from MDE, any anxiety disorder, or current suicide risk than bereaved participants without PGD. Furthermore, these participants reported significantly greater physical distress than bereaved participants without PGD. CONCLUSION: War-related loss during middle childhood and adolescence presents significant risk for adverse mental health and dysfunction in young adulthood in addition to exposure to other war-related traumatic events. Furthermore, the syndrome of PGD can help to identify those with the greatest degree of distress and dysfunction.

  11. Survey of Bereaved Relatives: VOICES MaJam

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-06-01

    The report presents findings and recommendations from the largest survey of bereaved relatives undertaken by two adult acute hospitals in Ireland in conjunction with their academic partners TCD and UCD. The findings provide significant insight into the quality of care delivered at end of life from the perspective of bereaved relatives. This report will be of interest to all healthcare staff involved in improving end-of-life care in acute hospitals and other healthcare settings.

  12. Adapting the transtheoretical model of change to the bereavement process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Kimberly A

    2011-04-01

    Theorists currently believe that bereaved people undergo some transformation of self rather than returning to their original state. To advance our understanding of this process, this article presents an adaptation of Prochaska and DiClemente's transtheoretical model of change as it could be applied to the journey that bereaved individuals experience. This theory is unique because it addresses attitudes, intentions, and behavioral processes at each stage; it allows for a focus on a broader range of emotions than just anger and depression; it allows for the recognition of two periods of regression during the bereavement process; and it adds a maintenance stage, which other theories lack. This theory can benefit bereaved individuals directly and through the increased awareness among counselors, family, friends, employers, and society at large. This theory may also be used as a tool for bereavement programs to consider whether they are meeting clients' needs throughout the transformation change bereavement process rather than only focusing on the initial stages characterized by intense emotion.

  13. Bereavement, multimorbidity and mortality: a population-based study using bereavement as an indicator of mental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, A; Fenger-Grøn, M; Davydow, D S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental stress is associated with higher mortality, but it remains controversial whether the association is causal or a consequence of a higher physical disease burden in those with a high mental stress load. Understanding causality is important when developing targeted interventions. We...... with bereavement rose with increasing number of physical diseases (1.33 v. 7.00 excess death per 1000 person-months for individuals with 0 v. ⩾3 physical conditions during the first month) and was exacerbated by the presence of mental illness. The excess mortality among bereaved individuals was primarily due...... aimed to estimate the effect of mental stress on mortality by performing a 'natural' experiment using spousal bereavement as a disease-independent mental stressor. METHODS: We followed a population-based matched cohort, including all individuals in Denmark bereaved in 1997-2014, for 17 years...

  14. The forgotten children of Africa: Voicing HIV and Aids orphans’ stories of bereavement: a narrative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Richter; Julian Müller

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at the bereavement of children left orphaned by the HIV and Aids pandemic that is crippling the continent of Africa. Their bereavement is examined by means of the narrative approach and by integrating this approach with the traditional African art of storytelling. By listening to the stories of three Zulu children, the article gives them the opportunity to express their own unique stories of bereavement: stories that would otherwise have been silenced by the wave of bereave...

  15. Alcohol use in the first three years of bereavement: a national representative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilling János

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier results concerning alcohol consumption of bereaved persons are contradictory. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between bereavement and alcohol consumption accounting for time and gender differences on a nationally representative sample from Hungary ("Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey", N = 4457 Methods Drinking characteristics of mourning persons (alcohol consumption, dependence symptoms, and harmful consequences of alcohol use in the first three years of grief were examined among persons between 18-75 years using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. Results Men bereaved for one year scored higher on two dimensions of AUDIT (dependence symptoms and harmful alcohol use, while men bereaved for two years scored higher on all three dimensions of AUDIT compared to the non-bereaved. The rate of men clinically at-risk concerning alcohol consumption among the non-bereaved is 12.9%, and among men bereaved for one year is 18.4% (a non-significant difference, while 29.8% (p Conclusion Among bereaved men, the risk of alcohol related problems tends to be higher, which can be shown both among men bereaved for one year as well as men bereaved for two years. Considering the higher morbidity and mortality rates of bereaved men, alcohol consumption might play a mediator role. These facts draw attention to the importance of prevention, early recognition, and effective therapy of hazardous drinking in bereaved men.

  16. Piloting a Therapeutic Residential for Children, Young People and Families Bereaved through Suicide in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braiden, Hannah Jane; McCann, Monica; Barry, Helen; Lindsay, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Families bereaved by suicide can experience an extremely intense and complicated grieving process. This can be associated with a range of difficulties and can put bereaved family members at risk of a range of problems. In recognition of this, Barnardo's Child Bereavement Service piloted a two-day residential programme (integrating separate…

  17. The Experience of Chinese Bereaved Persons: A Preliminary Study of Meaning Making and Continuing Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia L. W.; Chow, Amy Y. M.; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Tsui, Yenny K. Y.; Tin, Agnes F.; Koo, Brenda W. K.; Koo, Elaine W. K.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process of Chinese persons in Hong Kong, with the focus on how they make meaning of the death as well as how they maintain a bond with the deceased. A review of video- and audiotapes of 52 bereaved persons in bereavement counseling pointed to how these concepts are reflected in key themes that appeared…

  18. Belief in Afterlife as a Buffer in Suicidal and Other Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peggy C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined belief in afterlife and bereavement recovery following death by suicide, homicide, accident, or natural causes. Bereaved persons (n=121) completed scales measuring belief in afterlife, impact of event, perceived recovery, spiritual well-being, emotional pain, and social support. Feeling of recovery following bereavement appeared enhanced…

  19. Perceived Stigma of Sudden Bereavement as a Risk Factor for Suicidal Thoughts and Suicide Attempt: Analysis of British Cross-Sectional Survey Data on 3387 Young Bereaved Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Pitman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The sudden death of a friend or relative, particularly by suicide, is a risk factor for suicide. People who experience sudden bereavement report feeling highly stigmatised by the loss, potentially influencing access to support. We assessed whether perceived stigma following sudden bereavement is associated with suicidal thoughts and suicide attempt. We analysed cross-sectional survey data on 3387 young adults bereaved by the sudden death of a close contact. We tested the association of high versus low perceived stigma (on the stigma sub-scale of the Grief Experience Questionnaire with post-bereavement suicidal ideation and suicide attempt, using random effects logistic regression, adjusting for socio-demographic factors, pre-bereavement psychopathology, and mode of sudden bereavement (natural causes/unnatural causes/suicide. Subjects with high perceived stigma scores were significantly more likely to report post-bereavement suicidal thoughts (adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 2.74; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.93–3.89 and suicide attempt (AOR = 2.73; 95% CI = 2.33–3.18 than those with low stigma scores. People who feel highly stigmatised by a sudden bereavement are at increased risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempt, even taking into account prior suicidal behaviour. General practitioners, bereavement counsellors, and others who support people bereaved suddenly, should consider inquiring about perceived stigma, mental wellbeing, and suicidal thoughts, and directing them to appropriate sources of support.

  20. The impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzum, Daniel; Meaney, Sarah; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2018-01-01

    To explore the lived experiences and personal impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents. Semi-structured in-depth interviews analysed by Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) on a purposive sample of parents of twelve babies born following fetal death at a tertiary university maternity hospital in Ireland with a birth rate of c8,500 per annum and a stillbirth rate of 4.6/1000. Stillbirth had a profound and enduring impact on bereaved parents. Four superordinate themes relating to the human impact of stillbirth emerged from the data: maintaining hope, importance of the personhood of the baby, protective care and relationships (personal and professional). Bereaved parents recalled in vivid detail their experiences of care following diagnosis of stillbirth and their subsequent care. The time between diagnosis of a life-limiting anomaly or stillbirth and delivery is highlighted as important for parents as they find meaning in their loss. The impact of stillbirth on bereaved parents is immense and how parents are cared for is recalled in precise detail as they revisit their experience. Building on existing literature, these data bring to light the depth of personal experience and impact of stillbirth for parents and provides medical professionals with valuable insights to inform their care of bereaved parents and the importance of clear and sensitive communication.

  1. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare Professionals’ Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  2. The Impact of Suicide Bereavement on Educational and Occupational Functioning: A Qualitative Study of 460 Bereaved Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Alexandra; Khrisna Putri, Adelia; De Souza, Tanisha; Stevenson, Fiona; King, Michael; Osborn, David; Morant, Nicola

    2018-03-31

    People bereaved by suicide are at an increased risk of suicide and of dropping out of education or work. Explanations for these associations are unclear, and more research is needed to understand how improving support in educational or work settings for people bereaved by suicide might contribute to reducing suicide risk. Our objective was to explore the impact of suicide on occupational functioning. We conducted a cross-sectional online study of bereaved adults aged 18-40, recruited from staff and students of British higher educational institutions in 2010. We used thematic analysis to analyse free text responses to two questions probing the impact of suicide bereavement on work and education. Our analysis of responses from 460 adults bereaved by suicide identified three main themes: (i) specific aspects of grief that impacted on work performance, cognitive and emotional domains, and social confidence; (ii) structural challenges in work or educational settings including a lack of institutional support, the impact of taking time off, and changes to caring roles; and (iii) new perspectives on the role of work, including determination to achieve. Institutional support should be tailored to take account of the difficulties and experiences described.

  3. Do anticipatory grief and preparedness affect distress in bereaved caregivers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjærgaard

    Objective Family caregivers of terminally ill patients are in a vulnerable position, and previous studies show that bereaved caregivers are at risk of psychological distress. Pre-loss grief symptoms seem to predict post-loss psychological distress, while preparedness for a looming loss tends...... to decrease distress. The aim of this nation-wide study was to investigate the association of both anticipatory grief symptoms and preparedness with psychological distress in bereaved family caregivers. Methods A list of all adult patients in Denmark receiving drug reimbursement for terminal illness...... was retrieved from the Danish Health and Medicines Authority on a weekly basis during 2012. All newly registered patients were requested by letter to pass on an enclosed baseline questionnaire to their closest relative. Responding caregivers bereaved within six months received a follow-up questionnaire six...

  4. Extending the construct validity of dependency among conjugally bereaved adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denckla, Christy A; Bornstein, Robert F; Mancini, Anthony D; Bonanno, George A

    2015-06-01

    The Relationship Profile Test is a widely used measure of dependency, detachment, and healthy dependency that has been examined in both clinical and nonclinical settings, though researchers have yet to validate this measure among conjugally bereaved adults. The present study examines the construct validity of a three-facet model of dependency-detachment by comparing relationships among self-report, semistructured interview-rated, and knowledgeable informant-rated functioning among conjugally bereaved adults. Participants (N = 112) included bereaved adults (M = 51.1 years; SD = 9.7) who had experienced the loss of a spouse 1.5 to 3 years prior to taking part in this study. Findings indicate adequate psychometric properties and theoretically expected associations with various measures of wellness and health including satisfaction with life, coping flexibility, somatic complaints, and ego resiliency. Results draw attention to adaptive correlates of dependency, suggesting potentially beneficial mental health interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Childhood bereavement services: a survey of UK provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, L; Payne, S

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the location, range and type of childhood bereavement service provision in the UK. A questionnaire was mailed to 127 services who were either solely dedicated to childhood bereavement or who offered a service within the range of work of a host organization and for which there was a supporting organizational structure. Responses were received from 108 services (a response rate of 85%). The findings identified that 85% of childhood bereavement services are located in the voluntary sector; 14% are dedicated childhood bereavement services, while 86% are offered as part of a host organization. Forty-four per cent of host organizations are hospices. The majority of services (73%) relied on both paid and unpaid staff, with 11% relying entirely on paid staff and 14% of services relying entirely on unpaid staff. The interventions offered ranged from individual family work (86%), individual child work (62%), groupwork with families (53%) and groupwork with children (45%). In addition, services offered prebereavement support (64%), a 'drop-in' service (17%), information and advice (95%), training (32%) and the provision of resources (88%). As well as offering a service to children and their families, 74% of childhood bereavement services provided a service to 'secondary users', such as schools (66%), the emergency services (28%) and other professionals (63%). In terms of funding, 12% of services relied solely on external sources of funding, including donations, legacies, revenue from the host organization or grants, while 12% of services relied solely on internal sources of funding, including fundraising and training. The majority of services (73%), however, gained income from a range of sources. The study identifies the diversity of provision that has implications for the evaluation of childhood bereavement services.

  6. Cultural manifestations of grief and bereavement: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy-Bougere, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform the reader that a commonality in grief and bereavement exists even though it is highly individualized. Health care providers and consumers of health care should realize and understand the potential for bias and miscommunication when there is delivery of care from non-similar cultures. Grief and bereavement are two of many issues existing in the health care delivery system which can result in substandard delivery of care as a result of cultural insensitivity and cultural incompetence.

  7. Bereaved caregivers of patients with high-grade glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Nordentoft, Sara; Larsen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    )) experience and manage their life situation after the death of the patient. METHODS: A systematic literature search was carried out in December 2016 and revised in September 2017. The following six databases were searched: PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica...... and their role as caregiver. Moreover, they experienced depressive symptoms and fatigue, resulting in a reduced work capability and social network. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that bereaved informal caregivers experience psychosocial consequences and emotional reactions after bereavement, resulting in feelings...

  8. The case for a sociology of dying, death, and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil; Allan, June; Carverhill, Philip A; Cox, Gerry R; Davies, Betty; Doka, Kenneth; Granek, Leeat; Harris, Darcy; Ho, Andy; Klass, Dennis; Small, Neil; Wittkowski, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dying, death, and bereavement do not occur in a social vacuum. How individuals and groups experience these phenomena will be largely influenced by the social context in which they occur. To develop an adequate understanding of dying, death, and bereavement we therefore need to incorporate a sociological perspective into our analysis. This article examines why a sociological perspective is necessary and explores various ways in which sociology can be of practical value in both intellectual and professional contexts. A case study comparing psychological and sociological perspectives is offered by way of illustration.

  9. Perceived Stigma of Sudden Bereavement as a Risk Factor for Suicidal Thoughts and Suicide Attempt: Analysis of British Cross-Sectional Survey Data on 3387 Young Bereaved Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pitman, Alexandra; Rantell, Khadija; Marston, Louise; King, Michael; Osborn, David

    2017-01-01

    The sudden death of a friend or relative, particularly by suicide, is a risk factor for suicide. People who experience sudden bereavement report feeling highly stigmatised by the loss, potentially influencing access to support. We assessed whether perceived stigma following sudden bereavement is associated with suicidal thoughts and suicide attempt. We analysed cross-sectional survey data on 3387 young adults bereaved by the sudden death of a close contact. We tested the association of high v...

  10. The impact of spousal bereavement on hospitalisations: Evidence from the Scottish Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Fu-Min; Petrie, Dennis; Wang, Shaolin; Macduff, Colin; Stephen, Audrey I

    2018-02-01

    This paper estimates the impact of spousal bereavement on hospital inpatient use for the surviving bereaved by following the experience of 94,272 married Scottish individuals from 1991 until 2009 using a difference-in-difference model. We also consider the sample selection issues related to differences in survival between the bereaved and non-bereaved using a simple Cox Proportional-Hazard model. Before conducting these estimations, propensity score approaches are used to re-weight the non-bereaved to generate a more random-like comparison sample for the bereaved. We find that those bereaved who survive are both more likely to be admitted and to stay longer in hospital than a comparable non-bereaved cohort. Bereavement is estimated to induce on average an extra 0.24 (95% CI [0.15, 0.33]) hospital inpatient days per year. Similar to previous studies, we estimate the bereaved have a 19.2% (95% CI [12.5%, 26.3%]) higher mortality rate than the comparable non-bereaved cohort. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anita; Lee, Susan F; Bloomer, Melissa J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate nurses' roles and responsibilities in providing bereavement care during the care of dying patients within acute care hospitals. Bereavement within acute care hospitals is often sudden, unexpected and managed by nurses who may have limited access to experts. Nurses' roles and experience in the provision of bereavement care can have a significant influence on the subsequent bereavement process for families. Identifying the roles and responsibilities, nurses have in bereavement care will enhance bereavement supports within acute care environments. Mixed-methods systematic review. The review was conducted using the databases Cumulative Index Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CareSearch and Google Scholar. Included studies published between 2006-2015, identified nurse participants, and the studies were conducted in acute care hospitals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and the research results were extracted and subjected to thematic synthesis. Nurses' role in bereavement care included patient-centred care, family-centred care, advocacy and professional development. Concerns about bereavement roles included competing clinical workload demands, limitations of physical environments in acute care hospitals and the need for further education in bereavement care. Further research is needed to enable more detailed clarification of the roles nurse undertake in bereavement care in acute care hospitals. There is also a need to evaluate the effectiveness of these nursing roles and how these provisions impact on the bereavement process of patients and families. The care provided by acute care nurses to patients and families during end-of-life care is crucial to bereavement. The bereavement roles nurses undertake are not well understood with limited evidence of how these roles are measured. Further education in bereavement care is needed for acute care nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Bereaved Relatives of Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Ask; Reinholt, N.; Nielsen, Louise Hjort

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD in individuals who experienced the loss of a close relative to cancer. A total of 251 bereaved relatives ages 14 to 76 (M = 41.3, SD = 16.8) were recruited at a counseling service for cancer patients...

  13. Acknowledging sexual bereavement: a path out of disenfranchised grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosh, Alice; Simkin, Linda

    2016-11-01

    Despite increasing awareness of the importance of sexuality for older adults, research and popular literature rarely acknowledge what we term "sexual bereavement" - mourning the loss of sexual intimacy when predeceased. The reluctance to acknowledge sexual bereavement may create "disenfranchised grief" leaving the bereaved unsupported in coping with this aspect of mourning. This preliminary study focuses on women in the United States and sought to determine whether they anticipate missing sex if predeceased, whether they would want to talk about this loss, and identified factors associated with communicating about sexual bereavement. Findings from our survey of 104 women, 55 years and older, most of whom were heterosexual, revealed that a large majority (72%) anticipates missing sex with their partner and 67% would want to initiate a discussion about this. An even higher percentage would want friends to initiate the topic. Yet, 57% of participants report it would not occur to them to initiate a discussion with a widowed friend about the friend's loss. Disenfranchised grief can have negative emotional and physical consequences. This paper suggests a role for friends and professionals in addressing this neglected issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The social relations of bereavement in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ronald; Sutherland, Patsy

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to discuss the various types of behaviors associated with grief and bereavement, and to examine the relationships, consequences, and outcomes of bereavement practices among the various religious and ethnic groups in the English-speaking Caribbean Islands of Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada, and Barbados. The rituals associated with death and grief differs across cultures and is greatly influenced by religious beliefs and traditions. How these rituals are played out depend on the culture of origin and level of acculturation of the various groups into mainstream society. In the Caribbean region, expressions of grief represent religious and cultural traditions that may have a significant impact on social relations, particularly in multi-ethnic and multicultural societies. In the English-speaking Caribbean Islands of Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada, and Barbados, mourning follows the patterns of traditional religious practices which have remained consistent over time. While families and friends may offer social support before and after burial or cremation, the social aspects of bereavement may also have implications for inter-group relations. Insights into bereavement practices and what it holds for ethnic and religious groups in contemporary Caribbean are presented.

  15. "DSM-5" and Bereavement: The Loss of Normal Grief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jesse; Jones, K. Dayle

    2013-01-01

    The mood disorder work group has proposed to eliminate the bereavement exclusion criterion from the diagnosis of major depression in the 5th edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (2012) "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders." The proposal would break tradition with the long-held distinction between…

  16. The Bereavement Guilt Scale : Development and preliminary validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jie; Stroebe, Margaret; Chan, Cecilia L.W.; Chow, Amy Y.M.

    The rationale, development, and validation of the Bereavement Guilt Scale (BGS) are described in this article. The BGS was based on a theoretically developed, multidimensional conceptualization of guilt. Part 1 describes the generation of the item pool, derived from in-depth interviews, and review

  17. Understanding Bereavement in a Christian University: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrea C.; Gewecke, Rachelle; Cupit, Illene N.; Fox, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological study, based on ecological systems theory, examined the college student bereavement experience in a Christian university. Undergraduate students (N = 127) from a small Christian university provided answers to open-ended questions about their experiences regarding college following a death loss. Results indicate that students…

  18. Music Therapy with Bereaved Teenagers: A Mixed Methods Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina; Roberts, Melina; O'Grady, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative investigations have indicated that music therapy groups may be beneficial for bereaved teenagers. The existing relationship between young people and music serves as a platform for connectedness and emotional expression that is utilised within a therapeutic, support group format. This investigation confirms this suggestion through…

  19. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  20. Psychopathology Among Homicidally Bereaved Individuals : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Denderen, Mariëtte; de Keijser, Jos; Kleen, Marco; Boelen, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    In the literature on bereavement, claims are made that homicidal loss is associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, depression, and other severe mental health problems. It is surprising that only a few studies have investigated the nature and prevalence of emotional symptoms following homicidal

  1. Bereavement: Applying Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development to College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Debra S.

    One of the developmental challenges that a college student may have to face is the death of a significant other, friend, spouse, relative, child, or parent. This article reviews the literature on the potential effects of bereavement on a college student with respect to Erik Erikson's stage six of psychosocial development (intimacy versus…

  2. Models of Coping with Bereavement : An Updated Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, M.S.; Stroebe, W.; Schut, H.A.W.; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Bereavement research is reaching the hundred-year landmark of the publication of Freud’s classic 1917 ‘Mourning and Melancholia’, an essay of great significance for subsequent theoretical developments, particularly — in the current context — with regard to the centrality placed on ‘grief work’ in

  3. Guilt in Bereavement : A Review and Conceptual Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jie; Stroebe, Margaret; Chan, Cecilia L. W.; Chow, Amy Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-four quantitative and 9 qualitative studies are reviewed to indicate current understanding of the nature and impact of guilt in bereavement. This overview suggests that guilt is especially prevalent among some vulnerable subgroups, and it is associated with maladaptive health outcomes. Being

  4. Offspring psychopathology following preconception, prenatal, and postnatal maternal bereavement stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Quetzal A.; Abel, Kathryn M.; Khashan, Ali S.; Rickert, Martin E.; Dalman, Christina; Larsson, Henrik; Hultman, Christina M.; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul; D’Onofrio, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preconception, prenatal, and postnatal maternal stress are associated with increased offspring psychopathology, but findings are inconsistent and need replication. We estimated associations between maternal bereavement stress and offspring autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, suicide attempt, and completed suicide. Methods Using Swedish registers, we conducted the largest population-based study to date examining associations between stress exposure in 738,144 offspring born 1992–2000 for childhood outcomes and 2,155,221 offspring born 1973–1997 for adult outcomes with follow-up through 2009. Maternal stress was defined as death of a first degree relative during 6 months before conception, across pregnancy, or the first two postnatal years. Cox proportional survival analyses were used to obtain hazard ratios (HR) in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Results Marginal increased risk of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia following preconception bereavement stress was not significant. Third trimester prenatal stress increased risk of ASD (adjusted HR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.15–2.17) and ADHD (adjusted HR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.04–1.66). First postnatal year stress increased risk for offspring suicide attempt (adjusted HR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.02–1.25) and completed suicide (adjusted HR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.08–2.11). Bereavement stress during the second postnatal year increased risk of ASD (adjusted HR=1.30, 95% CI: 1.09–1.55). Conclusions Further research is needed on associations between preconception stress and psychopathological outcomes. Prenatal bereavement stress increases risk of offspring ASD and ADHD. Postnatal bereavement stress moderately increases risk of offspring suicide attempt, completed suicide, and ASD. Smaller previous studies may have overestimated associations between early stress and psychopathological outcomes. PMID:23591021

  5. College student bereavement, scholarship, and the university: a call for university engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, D E

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of bereavement among traditional-aged college students should impel universities to assist bereaved students on their campuses. Dealing with bereavement can not only challenge a college student's completing the developmental tasks that our society sets for the later adolescent years, but also imperil the student's remaining in school and graduating. It is in the best interests of the university to develop and implement a variety of effective interventions to assist bereaved students. The author argues that universities are communities devoted to scholarly endeavors and should explicitly incorporate the dimension of compassion and caring. An abbreviated case study is used to illustrate the situations in which one grieving student found herself when she returned to school following the death of her father. A call is made for greater university engagement by forming a university-based bereavement center to coordinate and conduct coherent inquiry that fulfills the scholarly functions of discovery, application, and instruction. Four specific actions for a bereavement center are to train nonbereaved students to provide peer support, to provide structured interventions for college students at risk of bereavement complications, to raise consciousness about bereavement on the university campus, and to conduct research into various bereavement populations and bereavement topics.

  6. Mutual partners' support in the process of the bereavement after the death of the child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Ozbič

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The death of a close person is one of the hardest situations which individuals face several times in their lifetimes. The death of a child is especially stressful. The partnership can be either mutually supportive or stressful; this is significantly related to coping with the loss. The purpose of the research was to study the mutual support of partners while grieving their child's loss. We conducted in-depth guided interviews with fourteen bereaved parents. We used a grounded theory to determine three main topics: the expectations of the bereaved from their partner; the characteristics of the mutual partners' support; and the relationship between partners in the process of bereavement. On the basis of these data the following categories prevailed: collective bereavement, individual bereavement with occasional collective bereavement, and isolated bereavement. Regardless of gender, the individuals with the first two patterns typically experience mutual understanding and the feeling of support in the process of bereavement. Those with the pattern of isolated bereavement have characteristically dysfunctional partnerships, which make mutual support difficult even when desired. Research showed a new finding in Slovenia: bereaved parents in functional partnerships often grieve individually and occasionally collectively, which they identify as adequate mutual support.

  7. Adverse outcomes in bereaved mothers: The importance of household income and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Cacciatore

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intense and enduring psychological distress has been well-documented in numerous studies on bereaved parents including anxious, depressive, and traumatic stress symptoms. A state of poverty is also known to increase the risk of psychological distress in the general population, yet this variable has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in outcomes specifically for bereaved parents. This study is the first to investigate poverty, education, and parental bereavement while examining the relative risk of other variables as informed by the literature. The findings reveal that poverty was the strongest predictor of psychological distress when compared to others factors which have traditionally been considered significant in parental bereavement. Bereaved parents living in poverty may be less likely to seek support and have fewer available resources. Practice and policy implications are discussed. Keywords: Poverty, Deprivation, Bereavement, Trauma, Grief, Anxiety, Depression

  8. A Longitudinal Study of PTSD in the Elderly Bereaved: Prevalence and Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the PTSD-frequency in elderly bereaved people across the first 18 months of bereavement. Additionally, risk factors for the prediction of bereavement outcome in relation to four domains of the bereavement process were investigated. Data was collected via self...... one significant loss (N=276, Mean=70 years). The PTSD-frequency within the sample was high (16%) compared to the control group (4%) and remained stable across time. Individually analyzed each domain was a predictor of PTSD 18 months post loss. Most predictors remained stable across time......, remains so over the first 18 months post bereavement, and underline the importance of further investigation of PTSD in the elderly bereaved....

  9. Traditional and Contemporary Lakota Death, Dying, Grief, and Bereavement Beliefs and Practices: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Joseph B.

    1998-01-01

    Bereavement beliefs and practices in the modern, American culture have been well documented. However, virtually no research has been conducted on traditional and contemporary death, dying, grief, and bereavement beliefs and practices among native tribes, such as the Lakota. The present study was conducted with the Lakota, and fulfilled two goals. iii First, the contemporary and traditional death, dying, grief, and bereavement beliefs and practices of the Lakota were documented and summariz...

  10. Understanding bereavement, grief, and mourning: implications for donation and transplant professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Charles A; Coolican, Margaret B

    2010-06-01

    This article surveys recent literature on bereavement, grief, and mourning. It offers a review of the state of the art of current understandings of those topics to assist professionals who work in the field of organ and tissue donation and transplantation. The article's goal is to provide well-developed and up-to-date education and knowledge about bereavement, grief, and mourning to supplement the natural skills and experience of donation and transplant professionals in their work with bereaved persons.

  11. Meaning-based group counseling for bereavement: bridging theory with emerging trends in intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Christopher J; Smith, Nathan Grant; Henry, Melissa; Berish, Mel; Milman, Evgenia; Körner, Annett; Copeland, Laura S; Chochinov, Harvey M; Cohen, S Robin

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of scholarship has evaluated the usefulness of meaning-based theories in the context of bereavement counseling. Although scholars have discussed the application of meaning-based theories for individual practice, there is a lack of inquiry regarding its implications when conducting bereavement support groups. The objective of this article is to bridge meaning-based theories with bereavement group practice, leading to a novel intervention and laying the foundation for future efficacy studies. Building on recommendations specified in the literature, this article outlines the theoretical paradigms and structure of a short-term meaning-based group counseling intervention for uncomplicated bereavement.

  12. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  13. Effects on life satisfaction of older adults after child and spouse bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Anna Sofia; Stenström, Ulf; Rennemark, Mikael

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have compared the impact of different familial losses on life satisfaction (LS). Furthermore, there is a lack of research on the effect of having lost both a child and a spouse among older adults. A random sample of 1402 individuals, 817 women and 585 men, aged 60-96 years from the Blekinge part of the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care (SNAC-B) participated in this cross-sectional study. The first aim was to compare the effects of child or spouse or both child and spouse bereavement on LS and, the second aim, to investigate if there were gender differences within the bereaved groups. The results showed that having lost a child, spouse or both child and spouse had a negative association with LS, although this effect was small. Having experienced multiple losses did not predict more variance than a single child or spouse loss. Gender differences were found within all the bereaved groups with bereaved men having lower LS than bereaved women. Longer time since the loss was associated with higher LS. Bereaved older adults have somewhat lower LS than non-bereaved and bereaved men seem more affected than bereaved women. Future research needs to address older men´s experiences after the loss of a loved one.

  14. The Perceived Experience of Children Bereaved by Parental Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jennifer K; Sands, Diana C; Jordan, John R

    2017-06-01

    Children whose parent died by suicide are a vulnerable and underserved population. This phenomenon will be described, as well as implications for practice and research. "Double Whammy," a conceptualization of the overall experience of this marginalized group, emerged through two in-depth interviews from a phenomenological qualitative study with professionals who facilitate support groups for children bereaved by parental suicide. It was corroborated with current literature and practice experiences of the authors and their colleagues. Stigma was the largest contributor to the "Double Whammy," and the following themes emerged as well: feeling isolated, feeling abandoned, and feeling responsible. The self-volition of suicide challenges how bereaved children make meaning and internalize feelings about the deceased parent, one's self, and others. Developmentally appropriate education about suicide grief, depression, and normalizing the grief process is pivotal in helping children to effectively cope and manage their feelings.

  15. Facial expressions of emotion and the course of conjugal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, G A; Keltner, D

    1997-02-01

    The common assumption that emotional expression mediates the course of bereavement is tested. Competing hypotheses about the direction of mediation were formulated from the grief work and social-functional accounts of emotional expression. Facial expressions of emotion in conjugally bereaved adults were coded at 6 months post-loss as they described their relationship with the deceased; grief and perceived health were measured at 6, 14, and 25 months. Facial expressions of negative emotion, in particular anger, predicted increased grief at 14 months and poorer perceived health through 25 months. Facial expressions of positive emotion predicted decreased grief through 25 months and a positive but nonsignificant relation to perceived health. Predictive relations between negative and positive emotional expression persisted when initial levels of self-reported emotion, grief, and health were statistically controlled, demonstrating the mediating role of facial expressions of emotion in adjustment to conjugal loss. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Spiritual Distress in Bereavement: Evolution of a Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Burke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Many mourners turn to their spiritual beliefs and traditions when confronted by the death of a loved one. However, prior studies have either focused primarily on the benefits of faith following loss or studied spiritual struggle outside the context of bereavement. Moreover, scales to measure bereavement-related crises of faith and interventions specifically designed for spiritually inclined, distressed grievers are virtually non-existent. Our program of research, which to date has consisted of working with Christian grievers and is outlined below, elucidates complicated spiritual grief (CSG—a spiritual crisis following the loss of a loved one. For example, our longitudinal examination of 46 African American homicide survivors established the relation between positive religious coping, CSG, and complicated grief (CG, to clarify whether religious coping more strongly predicted bereavement distress or vice versa, with a follow-up study that determined the relation between religious coping and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. We replicated and expanded these findings with a diverse sample of 150 grievers to explore the complex relation between CSG, CG, and meaning making in a comparison study of mourners who had experienced traumatic-versus natural death losses. In a companion study, we qualitatively analyzed 84 grievers’ narratives and interviewed a 5-member focus group to capture and learn from their firsthand experiences of spiritual distress. To close the gap in terms of CSG assessment, we also developed and validated the Inventory of Complicated Spiritual Grief (ICSG. Currently, our ongoing CSG investigation extends in several directions: first, to a sample of family members anticipating the loss of their hospice-eligible loved one in palliative care; and, second, to the development and testing of a writing-intensive intervention for newly bereaved, spiritually inclined grievers.

  17. Cultural influences on parental bereavement in Chinese families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sio-Wa; Brotherson, Sean E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the bereavement experiences of parents who had experienced the death of a child in Chinese families. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 bereaved parents in Macau, China. Narrative accounts of Chinese parents' experience in the loss of a child were explored to understand how their connection to the deceased child and their worldview were influenced by cultural beliefs and values. Study themes related to parental connections with the deceased child included the use of object linking, memorializing acts, and avoidance of traditional funeral processes, with clear patterns of Chinese cultural influence. Additionally, themes related to impacts on parental worldview included use of the concept of fate as a rationale for child loss and influences on religious orientation. The influence of cultural beliefs and background on Chinese parents as they deal with the issue of a child's death was apparent. Further research is needed and will benefit our understanding of parental bereavement in Chinese families.

  18. Communication Disparity Between the Bereaved and Others: What Hurts Them and What Is Unhelpful? A Nationwide Study of the Cancer Bereaved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mayumi; Onishi, Hideki; Morita, Tatsuya; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Shimizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2018-04-01

    The importance of communication between the cancer bereaved and others has been emphasized, but little is known about the more problematic aspects of this communication such as "unhelpful communication." The aim of this study was to establish which types of communication are perceived by the bereaved to be unhelpful. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, nationwide survey at 103 certified hospice facilities/palliative care units in Japan. A total of 630 (63%) bereaved responded. Over 60% of the bereaved experiencing such communication considered it to be unhelpful, with the most unhelpful communication being "They emphasized the positive aspects of death." Thirteen items related to communication were separated into two factors ("advice for recovery" and "comments on cancer") by factor analysis. "Comments on cancer" were more unhelpful to them and were more often provided by those around them. With regard to "advice for recovery," losing a spouse was a stronger predictor with a higher odds ratio for communication distress than losing a parent (odds ratio, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.63-17.57). A number of the bereaved have experienced unhelpful communication regarding advice on dealing with bereavement and cancer. To prevent putting an unnecessary burden on the bereaved with such unhelpful communication, it is essential to understand problematic aspects. Even when people have no intention of hurting the bereaved, some communication may do so. Communication with the bereaved is also a core clinical skill required by health professionals, and further efforts are required to support the grieving process. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Mental Health Support on the Grief of Bereaved People Caused by Sewol Ferry Accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Hyesung; Noh, Jin-Won; Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji-Young; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    Few studies have assessed the overall effects of multi-centered, complicated mental health support on the grief process. This study investigated the broader influence of mental health support provided practically to the bereaved family on the severity of complicated grief. Ninety-three bereaved

  20. Implications of Parental Suicide and Violent Death for Promotion of Resilience of Parentally-Bereaved Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ana C.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Liu, Xianchen; Haine, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the implications of suicide and violent deaths (including suicide, homicide, and accidents) for the development of interventions for parentally bereaved children. Analyses of data from the Family Bereavement Program find minimal differences in children's mental health problems, grief or risk and protective factors based on…

  1. Happy to Talk...To a Point: Bereaved Young Men and Emotional Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNess, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses upon the social experiences of bereaved young men, with particular emphasis on the social costs of bereavement-related personal disclosure. Their experiences of regulating their social behaviour were suggestive of the persistence of "traditional" notions of masculine identity (e.g. hegemonic masculinity). While this…

  2. Recovery in Context: Bereavement, Culture, and the Transformation of the Therapeutic Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletti, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The concept of recovery is integral to the work of bereavement professionals, though there remains considerable debate as to the precise definition and applicability of the term. A number of factors have contributed to the controversy; competing bereavement models, for instance, have given rise to fundamental differences in the way that recovery…

  3. Conjugal bereavement and well-being of elderly men and women : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, A.P.; Lindenberg, S.M.; Ormel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Considerable variation in the effects of the loss of the spouse have been reported, and there is lack of agreement regarding the effects of gender and bereavement on well-being. The objective of this article is to examine time-differences in the consequences of bereavement for men and women.

  4. Effectiveness of bereavement counselling through a community-based organization : A naturalistic, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newsom, Catherine; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Margaret S.; Wilson, Stewart; Birrell, John; Moerbeek, Mirjam; Eisma, Maarten C.

    2017-01-01

    This controlled, longitudinal investigation tested the effectiveness of a bereavement counselling model for adults on reducing complicated grief (CG) symptoms. Participants (N = 344; 79% female; mean age: 49.3 years) were adult residents of Scotland who were bereaved of a close relation or partner,

  5. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? : Evidence from eye-tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, Maarten C.; Schut, Henk A.W.; Stroebe, Margaret; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Boelen, Paul A.

    Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on

  6. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  7. Post traumatic stress symptoms in the first years of conjugal bereavement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, Henk; de Keijser, Adrianus; van den Bout, Jan; Dijkhuis, Jos

    1990-01-01

    Bereavement is generally regarded as one of the most stressful events one can encounter. Yet, bereavement research and the study of post-traumatic stress seem to be mainly developing along separate lines. Strictly speaking, post-traumatic stress disorder can only occur after encountering events

  8. Humor, Laughter & Happiness in the Daily Lives of Recently Bereaved Spouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Dale A.; Utz, Rebecca; Caserta, Michael S.; de Vries, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The positive psychology movement has created more interest in examining the potential value of experiencing positive emotions (e.g. humor, laughter and happiness) during the course of bereavement. This study of 292 recently widowed (5-24 weeks) men (39%) and women (61%) age 50 and over examined both the perceived importance of and actual experience of having positive emotions in their daily lives and how they might impact bereavement adjustments. We found that most of the bereaved spouses rated humor and happiness as being very important in their daily lives and that they were also experiencing these emotions at higher levels than expected. Experiencing humor, laughter and happiness was strongly associated with favorable bereavement adjustments (lower grief and depression) regardless of the extent to which the bereaved person valued having these positive emotions. PMID:19227000

  9. A missional perspective on funerals and bereavement counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kotze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the importance of a missional approach to the funeral and bereavement counselling process in congregational praxis in the midst of a context of secularisation. The creation of a missional perspective on the funeral and bereavement counselling could support the nature and praxis of a congregation in a secular society, especially if the congregation finds its relevance in the expression of the missio Dei. The basic theoretical research for missional ecclesiology, which is the systematic study directed toward greater knowledge of the fundamental aspects of missional ecclesiology (National Science Foundation 1953:38, is based on the premise that God is the source of all missions. The expression missio Dei means to join God in the mission he is already busy with in the world. As the one who sends, God the Father sends the Son, the Son sends the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit sends the church. The church only participates in the mission God is already busy with. It is a mission that uses both words and deeds and brings hope in the midst of tragedy. It is the hope of the kingdom of God and the incarnation of Christ that can already be experienced and expressed in the present. It is also the hope of the transformation of everything to form a new heaven and earth. Hope and mission can therefore not be separated. The concretisation of the expression of the kingdom of Christ in the world is hope, and a strong emphasis is therefore placed on mission as action in hope. Hope must be present where tragedy reigns, and the funeral and bereavement counselling can be used as a vehicle for this hope. Hope can then become an instrument of healing. The church can thus participate in God’s mission in the midst of tragedy and make an impact on society by taking on a missional character of hope.

  10. Case-Mix Adjustment of the Bereaved Family Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Carpenter, Joan; Smith, Dawn; Thorpe, Joshua; Tudose, Alina; Ersek, Mary

    2018-01-01

    Surveys of bereaved family members are increasingly being used to evaluate end-of-life (EOL) care and to measure organizational performance in EOL care quality. The Bereaved Family Survey (BFS) is used to monitor EOL care quality and benchmark performance in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health-care system. The objective of this study was to develop a case-mix adjustment model for the BFS and to examine changes in facility-level scores following adjustment, in order to provide fair comparisons across facilities. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of medical record and survey data from veterans and their family members across 146 VA medical centers. Following adjustment using model-based propensity weighting, the mean change in the BFS-Performance Measure score across facilities was -0.6 with a range of -2.6 to 0.6. Fifty-five (38%) facilities changed within ±0.5 percentage points of their unadjusted score. On average, facilities that benefited most from adjustment cared for patients with greater comorbidity burden and were located in urban areas in the Northwest and Midwestern regions of the country. Case-mix adjustment results in minor changes to facility-level BFS scores but allows for fairer comparisons of EOL care quality. Case-mix adjustment of the BFS positions this National Quality Forum-endorsed measure for use in public reporting and internal quality dashboards for VA leadership and may inform the development and refinement of case-mix adjustment models for other surveys of bereaved family members.

  11. Continuing bonds in bereavement: an attachment theory based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Gao, Beryl; Paderna, Lisa

    2005-05-01

    An attachment theory based perspective on the continuing bond to the deceased (CB) is proposed. The value of attachment theory in specifying the normative course of CB expression and in identifying adaptive versus maladaptive variants of CB expression based on their deviation from this normative course is outlined. The role of individual differences in attachment security on effective versus ineffective use of CB in coping with bereavement also is addressed. Finally, the moderating influence of type of loss (e.g., death of a spouse vs. child), culture, and religion on type of CB expression within an overarching attachment framework is discussed.

  12. Family-centered bereavement practices in Danish intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Kaldan, Gudrun; Coombs, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    : Self-administered computerized cross-sectional nation-wide survey of Danish ICUs. RESULTS: Nurses at 46 of 48 (96%) ICUs in Denmark responded. Bereavement care at the time of patient death included viewing the patient in ICU (100%), and in the hospital mortuary (59%). Information about hospital...... of death, a letter of condolence, a phone call to the family, referral to a priest or clergyman, or referral to other counseling. Although many interventions were common, there were variations within the elements offered. Nurses and physicians were the most consistent health care staff involved...

  13. Music therapy with bereaved teenagers: a mixed methods perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina; Roberts, Melina; O'Grady, Lucy

    2010-07-01

    Qualitative investigations have indicated that music therapy groups may be beneficial for bereaved teenagers. The existing relationship between young people and music serves as a platform for connectedness and emotional expression that is utilised within a therapeutic, support group format. This investigation confirms this suggestion through grounded theory analysis of focus group interviews. Changes in self-perception were not found as a result of participation, however practically significant results were found on adolescent coping. These cannot be generalized because of the small sample size. Grief specific tools are recommended for use in future investigations in order to capture the emotional impact of music therapy grief work with adolescents.

  14. A new model of Social Support in Bereavement (SSB): An empirical investigation with a Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Sheying

    2016-01-01

    Bereavement can be an extremely stressful experience while the protective effect of social support is expected to facilitate the adjustment after loss. The ingredients or elements of social support as illustrated by a new model of Social Support in Bereavement (SSB), however, requires empirical evidence. Who might be the most effective providers of social support in bereavement has also been understudied, particularly within specific cultural contexts. The present study uses both qualitative and quantitative analyses to explore these two important issues among bereaved Chinese families and individuals. The results show that three major types of social support described by the SSB model were frequently acknowledged by the participants in this study. Aside from relevant books, family and friends were the primary sources of social support who in turn received support from their workplaces. Helping professionals turned out to be the least significant source of social support in the Chinese cultural context. Differences by gender, age, and bereavement time were also found. The findings render empirical evidence to the conceptual model of Social Support in Bereavement and also offer culturally relevant guidance for providing effective support to the bereaved.

  15. The impact of dreams of the deceased on bereavement: a survey of hospice caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott T; Kerr, Christopher W; Doroszczuk, Nicole M; Kuszczak, Sarah M; Hang, Pei C; Luczkiewicz, Debra L

    2014-03-01

    Many recently bereaved persons experience vivid and deeply meaningful dreams featuring the presence of the deceased that may reflect and impact the process of mourning. The present study surveyed 278 bereaved persons regarding their own perspective of the relationship between dreams and the mourning process. Fifty eight percent of respondents reported dreams of their deceased loved ones, with varying levels of frequency. Most participants reported that their dreams were either pleasant or both pleasant and disturbing, and few reported purely disturbing dreams. Prevalent dream themes included pleasant past memories or experiences, the deceased free of illness, memories of the deceased's illness or time of death, the deceased in the afterlife appearing comfortable and at peace, and the deceased communicating a message. These themes overlap significantly with previous models of bereavement dream content. Sixty percent of participants felt that their dreams impacted their bereavement process. Specific effects of the dreams on bereavement processes included increased acceptance of the loved one's death, comfort, spirituality, sadness, and quality of life, among others. These results support the theory that dreams of the deceased are highly prevalent among and often deeply meaningful for the bereaved. While many counselors are uncomfortable working with dreams in psychotherapy, the present study demonstrates their therapeutic relevance to the bereaved population and emphasizes the importance for grief counselors to increase their awareness, knowledge, and skills with regards to working with dreams.

  16. The Understanding Bereavement Evaluation Tool (UBET) for midwives: factor structure and clinical research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins Martin, Caroline J; Forrest, Eleanor; Wylie, Linda; Martin, Colin R

    2013-10-01

    The NMSF (2009) survey reported that bereavement midwife care was inadequate in a number of UK NHS Trusts. Using a small grant from the Scottish government, 3 experienced midwifery lecturers designed an interactive workbook called "Shaping bereavement care for midwives in clinical practice" for the purpose of improving delivery of bereavement education to student midwives. An instrument called the Understanding Bereavement Evaluation Tool (UBET) was designed to measure effectiveness of the workbook at equipping students with essential knowledge. To assess validity and reliability of the UBET at measuring midwives' self-perceptions of knowledge surrounding delivery of bereavement care to childbearing women, partners and families who have experienced childbirth related bereavement. An evaluative audit using the UBET was undertaken to explore student midwives' (n=179) self perceived knowledge levels before and after the workbook intervention. Validity tests have shown that the UBET, (6-item version), could be considered a psychometrically robust instrument for assessing students' knowledge gain. PCA identified that the UBET comprised two sub-scales (theoretical knowledge base - Q 1, 2 & 3 and psychosocial elements of care delivery - Q 4, 5 & 6). Data has shown that the easy to administer and short 6-item UBET is a valid and reliable tool for educators to measure success at delivering education using the "Shaping bereavement care for midwives in clinical practice" work book. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. General practitioners’ beliefs and attitudes about how to respond to death and bereavement: qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunderson, Eric M; Ridsdale, Leone

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the perceptions of general practitioners when they are notified or hear of a death or bereavement in their practice; to explore doctors’ accounts of their relationships with their patients in the context of bereavement; and to explore the concerns of general practitioners in managing themselves and bereaved patients. Design Semistructured interviews followed by qualitative content analysis. Setting London borough of Redbridge. Participants 25 general practitioners. Results Almost all the doctors had felt guilty about issues relating to the death of patients. These feelings were based on their expectations of not making mistakes and diagnostic precision. They described a culture gap existing between hospital and general practice and a need to develop new models and methods to explain and manage the causes of illness presented to them. In the absence of useful teaching on bereavement, many devised strategies which relied more on their personal experiences. General practitioners used various methods to contact bereaved patients, especially if they had been involved in the terminal care or if the death was particularly shocking. The doctor was also bereaved by the death of well known patients and sometimes needed to grieve and express emotion. Conclusion General practitioners may need support and learning methods to manage their own and their patients’ bereavement. Key messagesMost general practitioners fear making mistakes because they have a model of diagnostic precision based on their initial professional medical socialisationDoctors differ in their approaches to bereavement managementThe techniques developed by doctors to manage the immediate phase of bereavement stem from personal experience rather than medical trainingGeneral practitioners may need to express their own grief at the loss of a patient and a relationshipGeneral practice needs to develop its own models to reduce the stress felt by practitioners PMID:10426743

  18. Service failures and challenges in responding to people bereaved through drugs and alcohol: An interprofessional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Christine; McKell, Jennifer; Ford, Allison

    2018-05-01

    This article reports findings from the first two stages of a three-stage qualitative study which considered the role of services, including public, private and charitable organisations, in responding to the needs of adults bereaved following the drug and/or alcohol-related death of someone close. The study, the first of its kind to explore the landscape and role of services in substance use deaths, was conducted over two sites: south west England and Scotland. In stage 1 of the research, adopting both convenience and purposive sampling, data were collected via semi-structured interviews on experiences and support needs of bereaved individuals (n = 106). In stage 2, six focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of practitioners (n = 40), including those working for the police, coroner's service, procurator fiscal depute (Scotland), health service, funeral service, press, clergy, Public Health England, Drugs Policy Unit, bereavement counselling/support and alcohol and drug treatment services, to investigate how services may better respond to this bereavement. Thematic analysis from both data-sets identified two overarching themes. The first, focusing on practitioner responses, captures how these bereaved people may meet with inadequate, unkind, and discriminatory responses from services. Having to navigate unfamiliar, fragmented, and time-consuming procedures compounds the bereaved's distress at an already difficult time, illustrated by a 'mapping' of relevant services. The second relates to challenges and opportunities for those responding. Service failures reflect practitioners' poor understanding of both substance use bereavement and the range of other practitioners and services involved. Those bereaved are a poorly understood, neglected and stigmatised group of service users. There is a need for services to respond without judgement or insensitive language, and provide information about, communicate and work closely with, other services despite

  19. Risk factors for suicide in offspring bereaved by sudden parental death from external causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Lisa Victoria; Mehlum, Lars; Qin, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Parentally bereaved offspring have an increased suicide risk as a group, but the ability to identify specific individuals at risk on the basis of risk and protective factors is limited. The present study aimed to investigate to what degree different risk factors influence suicide risk in offspring bereaved by parental death from external causes. Based on Norwegian registers, individual-level data were retrieved for 375 parentally bereaved suicide cases and 7500 parentally bereaved gender- and age-matched living controls. Data were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Bereaved offspring with low social support, indicated by offspring's single status and repeated changes in marital status and residence, had a significantly increased suicide risk compared to bereaved offspring with high social support. Moreover, low socioeconomic status, having an immigration background, having lost both parents and loss due to suicide significantly increased suicide risk. Several variables relevant to bereavement outcome, such as coping mechanisms and the quality of the parent-offspring relationship are impossible to examine by utilizing population registers. Moreover, the availability of data did not enable the measurement of marital stability and residence stability across the entire lifespan for older individuals. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the additional risk posed by the identified risk factors and incorporate this knowledge into existing practice and risk assessment in order to identify individuals at risk and effectively target bereaved family and friends for prevention and intervention programs. Ideal follow-up for bereaved families should include a specific focus on mobilizing social support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Embitterment and bereavement: The Sewol ferry accident example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jeong-Ho; Huh, Hyu Jung; Choi, Won Joon

    2018-01-01

    On Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 261 high school students on a field trip died in the sinking of the Sewol ferry. The bereaved family of the Sewol ferry accident experienced one of the most painful traumatic losses such as the sudden death of one's child through an accident. This article reviewed and discussed embitterment related to traumatic loss through the example of the Sewol ferry accident. Embitterment-related issues and problems in coping with the accident that is caused by societal factors were described. In addition, embitterment-related findings of several previous studies based on bereaved families' mental health cohort study were reviewed. Traumatic loss of the human-made ferry accident was accompanied with feelings of being cheated, injustice, incompetence, wrongdoing by a perpetrator, and the destruction of one's belief and value system, causing severe embitterment. Embitterment was related to other mental health problems including depression, anxiety, and complicated grief. Social support and positive individual resource including optimism and wisdom can be helpful for recovery from posttraumatic embitterment. The goal of grief is to remember the decedent, understand the changes created by the loss, and determine how to reinvest in life. Embitterment may disturb the process of grief. Without the management of the embitterment, true grief may not be possible. The breakdown of value systems and severe embitterment should get more attention in future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Neuropsychological correlates of complicated grief in older spousally bereaved adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Arizmendi, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Across many research domains, evidence for complicated grief as a distinct psychopathology continues to grow. Previous research from neuropsychology has shown an increased attentional bias to emotionally relevant stimuli in those suffering from complicated grief. This study furthers our understanding of the characteristics that distinguish complicated grief. We expand on previous research by (a) testing older adults, (b) excluding those with comorbid major depressive disorder, (c) using participant-chosen grief-related stimuli, and (d) using a married, nonbereaved control group. We recruited 76 older adults in 3 groups: spousally bereaved with complicated grief, spousally bereaved with noncomplicated grief, and nonbereaved controls. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Digit Span Backwards, and the emotional counting Stroop was examined. Results indicate longer reaction time across 3 blocks of grief-related words in the complicated grief group but no difference across 3 blocks of the neutral words. The 3 groups performed comparably on the other neurocognitive tasks, indicating no cognitive differences in working memory or set shifting between groups. Furthermore, these effects of complicated grief generalize to older adults and appear independent of major depression. Complicated grief has cognitive interference as a neuropsychological component highlighting it as distinct from noncomplicated grief.

  2. The Impact of Supporting Family Caregivers Before Bereavement on Outcomes After Bereavement: Adequacy of End-of-Life Support and Achievement of Preferred Place of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M; Ewing, Gail; Grande, Gunn; Toye, Chris; Bear, Natasha

    2018-02-01

    The investigation of the situation of bereaved family caregivers following caregiving during the end-of-life phase of illness has not received enough attention. This study investigated the extent to which using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention during the caregiving period has affected bereaved family caregivers' perceptions of adequacy of support, their grief and well-being, and achievement of their preferred place of death. All family caregivers who participated in a stepped-wedge cluster trial of the CSNAT intervention in Western Australia (2012-2014) and completed the pre-bereavement study (n = 322) were invited to take part in a caregiver survey by telephone four to six months after bereavement (2015). The survey measured the adequacy of end-of-life support, the level of grief, the current physical and mental health, and the achievement of the preferred place of death. The response rate was 66% (152, intervention; 60, control). The intervention group perceived that their pre-bereavement support needs had been adequately met to a significantly greater extent than the control group (d = 0.43, P death more often according to their caregivers (79.6% vs. 63.6%, P = 0.034). There was also a greater agreement on the preferred place of death between patients and their caregivers in the intervention group (P = 0.02). The results from this study provide evidence that the CSNAT intervention has a positive impact on perceived adequacy of support of bereaved family caregivers and achievement of preferred place of death according to caregivers. The benefits gained by caregivers in being engaged in early and direct assessment of their support needs before bereavement reinforce the need for palliative care services to effectively support caregivers well before the patient's death. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How adults with an intellectual disability experience bereavement and grief: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRitchie, Robyn; McKenzie, Karen; Quayle, Ethel; Harlin, Margaret; Neumann, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of bereavement of 13 adults with an intellectual disability and found that their experiences could be situated within the concept of disenfranchised grief. The latter mediated participants' meaning making of the grieving process illustrated in the themes of intra- and interpersonal bereavement experiences, core beliefs about life and death, level of inclusion, and maintaining a continuing relationship with the deceased. The results suggest that participants experience bereavement and grief in a manner similar to that of the general population and suggest the need for open communication, facilitation of informed choice, and a culture of inclusion.

  4. Creating philanthropic foundations to deal with grief: case studies of bereaved parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    The current study involves the analysis of six bereaved parents' stories and argues that the development of philanthropic foundations helped these parents make meaning of their children's deaths and find purpose in the midst of their grief. Furthermore, philanthropy, as a way of making meaning and finding purpose, is a mutually beneficial process because it helps both the bereaved founders and the communities the organizations reach. Connections between these narratives and the bereavement literature help us better understand the individual/family grief process and meaning making, as well as how internal grief states intersect with communities.

  5. Voices that want to be heard: Using bereaved Danish students suggestions to update school bereavement response plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytje, Martin

    2018-04-01

    This study explored how Danish students experienced returning to school following parental bereavement. Eighteen focus group interviews were conducted with 39 participants aged 9 to 17. All participants had experienced the loss of a primary caregiver. Data collection was divided into two phases. In Phase I, 22 participants from four grief groups were interviewed 4 times over the course of a year. During Phase II, confirmatory focus groups were undertaken with the 17 participants. This article explores the findings related to ideas and suggestions made by the students about how the Danish school response could be improved to better meet their needs. The presentation of data is divided into seven themes, which are: Desired school response; Desired support from teachers; Desired boundaries between students and teachers; Desired collaboration; Desired support from peers; Desired rules and structure, and; Desires related to gifts and rituals. Study findings indicate that most students want to be included and have a say when the school plans how to respond to their loss. Students further highlight a need for teacher support when having to reconnect with the class; a need for set rules in relation to leaving the class when feeling sad, and; a need for schools to see the loss as a life-changing event, and grief as something that does not simply disappear after a few months. The article concludes by discussing the ways in which the recommendations provided by the participants can be incorporated into a modern revision of Danish school bereavement response plans.

  6. The concept of shalōm as a constructive bereavement healing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-05

    Mar 5, 2013 ... intriguing comparative study with Native American views on health promotion, Lazarus (2004) sees the South ... smart phone or mobile device ..... that could easily be harmful to the health of the bereaved. Culturally, the ...

  7. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Bereaved University Students' Hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Nahid Hosseininezhad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to study the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT on bereaved students' hope. This is an applied research of quasi-experimental type and pretest and posttest design with control group. We selected 30 bereaved university students using stratified sampling method. We used Schneider Hope Questionnaire as the pretest-posttest in the research and analyzed using the statistical method of covariance analysis. The data analysis results indicate that cognitive-behavioral therapy increases bereaved students' hope and there is a significant difference between the two groups. The results of this study show that cognitive-behavioral group therapy influences hope and increases bereaved students' hope by helping them in their emotional discharge and acceptance of death.

  8. Support groups for children and adolescents bereaved by suicide: Lots of interventions, little evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journot-Reverbel, Katia; Raynaud, Jean-Philippe; Bui, Eric; Revet, Alexis

    2017-04-01

    Though many different interventions are proposed for suicide-bereaved children and adolescents, few data exist concerning their efficiency. This literature review focused on psychosocial interventions specifically targeting children and adolescents bereaved by suicide to try to provide some validate therapeutic guidelines propositions for clinicians. We only found two articles specifically targeting children or adolescents: both of them seemed to show some efficacy in reducing some psychosocial variables (anxiety, depression…) in suicide-bereaved children but results were limited by methodological problems. This review failed to provide evidence-based guidelines propositions for suicide-bereaved children and underline the crucial need for research in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The forgotten children of Africa: Voicing HIV and Aids orphans’ stories of bereavement: a narrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Richter

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the bereavement of children left orphaned by the HIV and Aids pandemic that is crippling the continent of Africa. Their bereavement is examined by means of the narrative approach and by integrating this approach with the traditional African art of storytelling. By listening to the stories of three Zulu children, the article gives them the opportunity to express their own unique stories of bereavement: stories that would otherwise have been silenced by the wave of bereavement in the wake of countless deaths worldwide as a result of HIV and Aids infection. It looks at the losses these children have suffered, their greatest fears and how their Zulu culture and customs influence their emotional experience of losing their parents. The article shows how they can – by means of storytelling – reformulate the story of their lives and find the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

  10. Maternal Antenatal Bereavement and Neural Tube Defect in Live-Born Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Wu, Chun Sen; Olsen, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal emotional stress during pregnancy has previously been associated with congenital neural malformations, but most studies are based on data collected retrospectively. The objective of our study was to investigate associations between antenatal maternal bereavement due to death...

  11. Perinatal death: bereavement interventions used by US and Spanish nurses and midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sue E

    2015-02-01

    Little research has been published from a global perspective regarding needs of nurses and midwives related to perinatal bereavement. To identify needs and concerns of US and Spanish nurses and midwives who have worked with perinatal death and to identify the bereavement interventions they use to help families with this experience. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were collected in 2011 from US (n=44) and Spanish (n=15) nurses and midwives via a questionnaire. Statistically significant differences between the nurses/midwives in each country were found regarding needs relating to knowledge, communication skills and managing personal feelings. Interventions of accompanying, listening, offering keepsakes, baptism discussion, and funeral planning were also found to be significantly different between the two groups. These findings demonstrate a continued need to increase the standard and consistency of perinatal bereavement care worldwide. Bereavement education in nursing curricula and practice settings in both cultures is essential to increase the standard of care.

  12. Bereaved parents’ online grief communities: de-tabooing practices or relationbuilding grief-ghettos?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Hård af Segerstad, Ylva

    their loss as well as their ability to establish and continue their role as parents. However, with new practices on children’s graves, the growing use of memory tattoos and especially the use of online media as platform for various communities for bereaved parents, this seem to be changing and strengthen...... both the interpersonal communication and social interactions about and with the deceased child. This study presents results from case studies of both open and closed online grief communities for bereaved parents in Denmark and Sweden (Refslund Christensen & Sandvik 2013, Hård af Segerstad & Kasperowski...... media, casting online communities for bereaved parents as grief-ghettos? Studying bereaved parents’ grief work in dynamic communities online enhances our understanding of contemporary and contributes to a nuancing of theoretical understanding of parental grief. References Christensen, D. R., & Sandvik...

  13. Living Disconnected: Building a Grounded Theory View of Bereavement for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clute, Mary Ann

    2017-11-01

    This grounded theory study gathered descriptions the bereavement experience for adults with intellectual disabilities (IDD) through the eyes and voices of a small sample of grief counselors. The counselors described bereaved adults with IDD as individuals who faced potentially heightened effects of the broken attachment bonds, increased risk of coping obstacles, long histories of unrecognized losses, and disenfranchised grief. The participants described bereaved adults with IDD (who sought treatment) as getting pushed to the sidelines to deal with their losses in isolation and confusion. It became evident that though there are many similarities between how all people cope with loss and how people with IDD cope with loss, differences exist. Subtle variations in the experience of loss and grief appear to be driven by culture and beliefs about disability and protection for those with IDD. The participants in this dissertation study contributed foundation data for a theoretical explanation of grief for adults with IDD grounded in data from bereavement counselors.

  14. How do adults with mild learning disabilities experience bereavement and grief? A qualitative exploration.

    OpenAIRE

    McRitchie, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: The vast majority of research into the experiences of people with learning disabilities (LD) in regard to bereavement and grief involves the collection of data from second-hand sources, or via quantitative measures. This qualitative study aimed to explore the lived experiences of bereavement and grief in a group of adults with mild LD. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 adults (aged 20-72 years) with mild LD who had experienced bereaveme...

  15. How Adults With an Intellectual Disability Experience Bereavement and Grief: A Qualitative Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    McRitchie, Robyn; McKenzie, Karen; Quayle, Ethel; Harlin, Margaret; Neumann, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of bereavement of 13 adults with an intellectual disability and found that their experiences could be situated within the concept of disenfranchised grief. The latter mediated participants' meaning making of the grieving process illustrated in the themes of intra- and interpersonal bereavement experiences, core beliefs about life and death, level of inclusion, and maintaining a continuing relationship with the deceased. The results suggest...

  16. Literary representations of death, dying and bereavement in children´s literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schroth, Klara Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Death, dying and bereavement are universal human concerns and yet never fully compre-hensible or knowable. In order to find an approach to the topic, this paper examines and analyses literary representations of death, dying and bereavement in Anglophone literature for children. Scholars such as Kathryn James or Roberta Seelinger Trites have argued for a shift from objective and realistic representations in pre-1980 children’s novels towards an increasing use of narrative devices and fantastic...

  17. Effects of Mental Health Support on the Grief of Bereaved People Caused by Sewol Ferry Accident

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hyesung; Noh, Jin-Won; Huh, Hyu jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji-Young; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the overall effects of multi-centered, complicated mental health support on the grief process. This study investigated the broader influence of mental health support provided practically to the bereaved family on the severity of complicated grief. Ninety-three bereaved family members of the Sewol ferry accident were recruited. Severity of complicated grief, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive disorder was assessed through self-reporting questionnaire...

  18. The potential therapeutic value for bereaved relatives participating in research: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Alison; Mayland, Catriona R; Jack, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    Conducting research with the bereaved presents an immediate ethical challenge, as they are undoubtedly a vulnerable group, associated with high levels of distress and susceptible to both physical and mental health issues. A comprehensive understanding of the potential therapeutic benefits for bereaved relatives participating in palliative care research is limited, and therefore the ethics of engaging this group remain questionable. This paper describes a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected in the Care of the Dying Evaluation (CODE) project, examining the experiences of patients who died at home. It explores the motivations and potential benefits for bereaved relatives participating in research with reference to the recently developed concepts in bereavement theory. Cognitive interviews were conducted with 15 bereaved relatives and secondary analysis using a content analysis framework was employed to classify the data. The results center around six recurring concepts identified as adaptive in current bereavement theory: an opportunity to share the narrative accounts of the final hours of their relative's life; a search for sense and meaning in loss; an ongoing bond/attachment with the deceased; altruistic motivations; oscillation between loss and restorative orientations; and a sense of resilience. Overall, the participants found that taking part in the research was valuable and that it could be described as offering therapeutic benefits. The need for bereaved relatives to take part in research studies should be encouraged, as they provide an accurate proxy for the patient's experience of end-of-life care while also providing a valuable account of their own perspective as family member and carer. In addition, we highlight the need for ethics committees to be aware of the potential benefits for bereaved relatives participating in research of this kind.

  19. The psychological aftermath of bereavement : Risk factors, mediating processes, and intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Houwen, H.K.

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation some of the major facets associated with the psychological effects of bereavement were the subject of investigation: risk factors, mediating processes and intervention. Previous research on risk factors is limited because of a number of methodological shortcomings: a focus on only one or a few factors (which increases the chances of reporting spurious results) and reliance on use of a single measure of bereavement outcome. We avoided these pitfalls by simultaneously exami...

  20. Suicidal Ideation and Distress in Family Members Bereaved by Suicide in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Sara; Campos, Rui; Tavares, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of suicide and distress on suicidal ideation in a sample of 93 Portuguese family members bereaved by suicide. A control community sample of 102 adults also participated. After controlling for educational level, those bereaved by the suicide of a family member were found to have higher levels of suicidal ideation. Forty-two percent of family members had Suicide Ideation Questionnaire scores at or above the cutoff point. General distress, dep...

  1. Positive Outcomes Following Bereavement: Paths to Posttraumatic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence G Calhoun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent theory and research have drawn attention to the need to better understand the positive changes, termed posttraumatic growth, that often occur in bereaved individuals; even as negative emotions related to grief persist. We describe five dimensions of posttraumatic growth and present a model for understanding how the loss of a close other can eventually lead to a recognition of important positive personal changes. Loss, especially unexpected loss, disrupts an individual's beliefs about the world and initiates a process of rebuilding an understanding. During this process, many people come to realise their own strengths, appreciate the impact of their relationships, and have new spiritual insights. A strategy for facilitating growth during clinical work also is described.

  2. Giving birth to death.Life professionals managing the bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Hernández Garre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the main representations, experiences and coping strategies developed by health professionals involved in perinatal bereavement care. A qualitative and phenomenological approach was used conducting a series of semi-structured interviews to professionals of different categories of obstetric areas of three public hospitals in the region of Murcia. The stories talk about of professionals trained for the life they have to face death, talk about of a lack of institutional training to the professionals react drawing on the experience, empathy or self-taught. They talk about painful situations that are experienced by clinicians with hints of tragedy, speak of care directed to the psychological management of mourning, talks about the transition from coping models duels based on avoidance and emotional detachment to others centered on the verbalization of experience and contact with the stillborn.

  3. A survey comparing the attitudes toward perinatal bereavement care of nurses from three Asian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moon Fai; Lou, Feng-lan; Arthur, David Gordon

    2010-12-01

    Caring for parents whose infant has died is extremely demanding, difficult, and stressful. In some situations, nurses may experience personal failure, feel helpless, and need to distance themselves from bereaved parents because they are unable to deal with the enormity of the parental feelings of loss. The aim of the study was to describe and compare attitudes toward perinatal bereavement care across a sample of nurses working in five obstetrics and gynecology settings from three Asian cities, as well as the factors associated with these attitudes. A survey was conducted, and 573 nurses were recruited from 2006 to 2007. The data were collected using the perinatal bereavement attitudes scale, which involves an 11-item self-report questionnaire. Nurses' attitudes were mainly positive, but differed across cities, with the attitude of Jinan nurses being significantly more positive than nurses from the other two cities, and the attitude of Hong Kong nurses being significantly the lowest. Positive attitudes were associated with position, and nurses who were well informed of hospital policy and received training for bereavement care were statistically significantly more likely to have a positive attitude toward perinatal bereavement care. Although nurses' attitudes to prenatal bereavement care differ significantly across the three Asian cities, they are generally similar. The differences observed could be related to the wider social, cultural, and organizational circumstances of nursing practice.

  4. The influence of bereavement on body mass index: results from a national Swedish survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldair J Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous findings suggest that the loss of a family member is associated with health and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between bereavement experiences and BMI, and whether there are socio-demographic differences in this association. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data with retrospective questions from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU of 2000, including 5,142 individuals. The bereavement experiences examined in the study include the loss of a sibling, a parent or a spouse, and time since the death of a parent. BMI (kg/m2 was calculated using self-reported measurements of weight and height. The association between bereavement and BMI was evaluated through linear regressions. RESULTS: After controlling for possible confounders, most of the models detected an association between bereavement and BMI. The fully-adjusted model showed that loss of parents was associated with a 0.45 increase in BMI (SE = 0.20. The effect also seemed to be dependent on time since the loss and social class position. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to examine associations between different types of familial losses and BMI. We find an association between the death of a family member and BMI, but it appears to be related to time since the death, type of bereavement experience and social class.

  5. Parents’ Experiences of Suicide-Bereavement: A Qualitative Study at 6 and 12 Months after Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ross

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The death of a child by suicide is a severe trauma, placing parents at greater risk of psychological morbidity and physical health problems compared to other causes of death. However, few studies have examined the aftermath and bereavement experience for parents following the death of a child to suicide, limiting the ability to guide effective postvention services through empirical research. The current study, which was part of a larger longitudinal investigation of suicide bereavement in Queensland, Australia, examined the individual experiences of both mothers and fathers bereaved by suicide over time, specifically at the six month and 12 month time points after their loss. Bereaved parents who had provided written consent to be contacted for research purposes were identified through the Queensland Suicide Register, and took part in individual, semi-structured interviews. Generic qualitative analysis identified three key themes: searching for answers and sense-making, coping strategies and support, and finding meaning and purpose. Some participants showed indications of meaning-making and post-traumatic growth at 12 months after the suicide. According to the dual process model of bereavement, it is likely that participants were still oscillating between sense-making and meaning making, indicating that adapting to bereavement is a dynamic and fluctuating process.

  6. Suicide bereavement and postvention in major suicidology journals: lessons learned for the future of postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Since the seminal publications of Shneidman (1969) and Cain (1972), suicide bereavement and postvention have attracted increasing research interest. To examine the topics of suicide bereavement and postvention in the core international suicidology journals, since their inception until mid-2013, in order to reveal the number of postvention articles throughout the years, their geographic distribution, and the topics of suicide bereavement and postvention that have been published. The online databases of four journals (Crisis, The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention; Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior [SLTB]; Archives of Suicide Research; and Suicidology Online) as well as the tables of content of all issues were searched. The number of articles and the countries of origin were quantified, and articles were categorized according to their content. The search identified 144 postvention articles, published during the past 40 years, almost exclusively in two journals (Crisis and SLTB). The majority of articles were (co-)authored by authors from Anglo-Saxon, Western countries. Articles were categorized in three groups: characteristics of suicide bereavement (n = 73), postvention programs (n = 66), and definition/theory and epidemiology of survivors (n = 5). Articles on suicide bereavement and postvention have been published mostly in two suicidology journals, albeit in modest numbers, and from a limited number of mostly Western countries. Our understanding of suicide bereavement and the provision of survivor support might benefit from the development of consensual definitions and from studies in other parts of the world.

  7. Childhood Bereavement and Lower Stress Resilience in Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Beatrice; Chen, Ruoqing; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Montgomery, Scott; Fang, Fang; Fall, Katja

    2018-04-30

    Although childhood traumatic experiences are recognized as important determinants for adolescent psychiatric health in general, our objective was to explore the specific influence of childhood bereavement on the stress resilience development trajectory. In this national register-based cohort study, we identified 407,639 men born in Sweden between 1973 and 1983, who underwent compulsory military enlistment examinations in late adolescence, including measures of psychological stress resilience. We defined exposure as loss of a first-degree family member in childhood, and estimated relative risk ratios (RRRs) for reduced (moderate or low), compared with high, stress resilience with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multinomial logistic regression. Loss of a parent or sibling in childhood conferred a 49% increased risk of subsequent low stress resilience (RRR, 1.49, 95% CI, 1.41-1.57) and an 8% increased risk of moderate stress resilience (RRR, 1.08, 95% CI, 1.03-1.13) in late adolescence. There was also a graded increase in risk with increasing age at loss; teenagers were at higher risk for low resilience (RRR, 1.64, 95% CI, 1.52-1.77) than children aged 7-12 (RRR, 1.47, 95% CI, 1.34-1.61) and ≤6 years (RRR, 1.16 95% CI, 1.02-1.32). The excess risk was observed for all causes of death, including suicide and unexpected deaths as well as deaths due to other illnesses. The associations remained after exclusion of parents with a history of hospitalization for psychiatric diagnoses. The long-term consequences of childhood bereavement may include lower stress resilience in late adolescence. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult attachment styles and the psychological response to infant bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shevlin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on Bowlby's attachment theory, Bartholomew proposed a four-category attachment typology by which individuals judged themselves and adult relationships. This explanatory model has since been used to help explain the risk of psychiatric comorbidity. Objective: The current study aimed to identify attachment typologies based on Bartholomew's attachment styles in a sample of bereaved parents on dimensions of closeness/dependency and anxiety. In addition, it sought to assess the relationship between the resultant attachment typology with a range of psychological trauma variables. Method: The current study was based on a sample of 445 bereaved parents who had experienced either peri- or post-natal death of an infant. Adult attachment was assessed using the Revised Adult Attachment Scale (RAAS while reaction to trauma was assessed using the Trauma Symptom Checklist (TSC. A latent profile analysis was conducted on scores from the RAAS closeness/dependency and anxiety subscales to ascertain if there were underlying homogeneous attachment classes. Emergent classes were used to determine if these were significantly different in terms of mean scores on TSC scales. Results: A four-class solution was considered the optimal based on fit statistics and interpretability of the results. Classes were labelled “Fearful,” “Preoccupied,” “Dismissing,” and “Secure.” Females were almost eight times more likely than males to be members of the fearful attachment class. This class evidenced the highest scores across all TSC scales while the secure class showed the lowest scores. Conclusions: The results are consistent with Bartholomew's four-category attachment styles with classes representing secure, fearful, preoccupied, and dismissing types. While the loss of an infant is a devastating experience for any parent, securely attached individuals showed the lowest levels of psychopathology compared to fearful, preoccupied, or dismissing

  9. Religiosity influences on bereavement adjustments of older widows in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shaw-Nin; Turale, Sue; Shih, Fu-Jin; Tsai, Jen-Chen

    2010-03-01

    To describe difficulties encountered by older widows in Taiwan and the impact of intrinsic or extrinsic religiosity on their coping strategies during early widowhood. There is very limited information about how Taiwan's widows cope with their bereavement and no studies reporting the relationship between religious beliefs and healthy adjustment during this distressing period. Between-method qualitative and quantitative triangulation was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and transcribed data were analysed by critical thematic analysis. Twenty women in Taiwan, >65 years old, (mean = 72.95) were interviewed within three years of being widowed. There were two informant groups: those with intrinsic religious beliefs and those with extrinsic religious beliefs. They all reported intrapersonal and interpersonal problems. Several major coping strategies arose: 'practising positive or negative attitudes for adaptation'; 'using person-focused actions'; and 'taking the initiative or passively seeking help from others or helping others'. Informants with intrinsic religious beliefs reported fewer coping problems by holding positive attitudes and taking multiple actions for adaptation. The extrinsic religious group had more negative adaptation attitudes, such as withdrawal and low self-esteem and practised less faith religious activities in worshipping ancestors, experiencing fatalism and using divination. They reported more coping problems than the intrinsic religious group. Widows in Taiwan have different coping problems and strategies in postbereavement adjustment, affected by their different religious beliefs systems. More research is required to establish the generalisabilty of these findings. Widows in Taiwan need to be assessed for their religious belief systems and how this affects their ability to cope during bereavement. Clinicians should actively provide grief support and encourage new methods of social adaptation, especially with widows with extrinsic

  10. Provision of bereavement care in neonatal units in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Meredith J P; Aldridge, Anne; Curley, Anna E

    2011-05-01

    To establish what bereavement care services are available in neonatal units in the United Kingdom and to establish the availability to staff (doctors, nurses, and chaplains) of bereavement education, training, communication, and multicultural support. For families who lose a baby in the neonatal period, the support they receive from hospital staff can be pivotal in their ability to cope with their grief. Hospital staff are not always trained to provide this support. Limited evidence is available regarding hospital-based bereavement care in neonatology or its impact on outcome. Questionnaire survey of selected doctors, nurses, and chaplains in 200 neonatal units in the United Kingdom. We had responses from 100% of neonatal units surveyed. Of 600 individuals, 320 responded; 11% of doctors had never received any formal training in bereavement care, compared with 0.8% of nurses and 1.2% and chaplains. In addition, 31% of respondents thought the training they received was inadequate. Knowledge of grief theorists was poor. Up to 99% of units were helping parents create memories through photographs or handprints. Parents were uniformly given the chance to be with their baby at the time of death (99% overall). Siblings were encouraged to be present 71% of the time; 75% of respondents felt that information about the needs of different faith groups was available. Formal psychological support was offered to 45% of families after bereavement. Studies have shown that parents value clear communication, education about grieving, and demonstrated emotional support by staff. Our study has shown that there are deficiencies in staff training and education in this area. Educators must promote the inclusion of content on bereavement/end-of-life care. Additional education on cultural issues would be helpful. Managing the bereavement process well to minimize morbidity for families and healthcare providers is an important challenge for the future.

  11. Emotion regulation in bereavement: searching for and finding emotional support in social network sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döveling, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    In an age of rising impact of online communication in social network sites (SNS), emotional interaction is neither limited nor restricted by time or space. Bereavement extends to the anonymity of cyberspace. What role does virtual interaction play in SNS in dealing with the basic human emotion of grief caused by the loss of a beloved person? The analysis laid out in this article provides answers in light of an interdisciplinary perspective on online bereavement. Relevant lines of research are scrutinized. After laying out the theoretical spectrum for the study, hypotheses based on a prior in-depth qualitative content analysis of 179 postings in three different German online bereavement platforms are proposed and scrutinized in a quantitative content analysis (2127 postings from 318 users). Emotion regulation patterns in SNS and similarities as well as differences in online bereavement of children, adolescents and adults are revealed. Large-scale quantitative findings into central motives, patterns, and restorative effects of online shared bereavement in regulating distress, fostering personal empowerment, and engendering meaning are presented. The article closes with implications for further analysis in memorialization practices.

  12. SYMPTOM AND FUNCTIONAL TRAITS OF BRIEF MAJOR DEPRESSIVE EPISODES AND DISCRIMINATION OF BEREAVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Patrick J; Christopher, Paul P

    2016-02-01

    Despite the removal of the bereavement exclusion from DSM-5, clinicians may feel uncertain on how to proceed when caring for a patient who presents with depressive symptoms following the death of someone close. The ability to better distinguish, on a symptom and functional level, between patients who experience depression in the context of bereavement and those with nonbereavement-related depression, could help guide clinical decision making. Individual and clustered depressive symptom and impairment measures were used for modeling bereavement status within a nationally representative longitudinal cohort. Deviance, linear shrinkage factor, and bias-corrected c-statistic were used for identifying a well-calibrated and discriminating final model. Of the 450 (1.2%) respondents with a single brief major depressive episode, 162 (38.4%) reported the episode as bereavement-related. The bereaved were less likely to endorse worthlessness (P depressive episodes following the death of a loved one from other brief episodes. These differences can help guide clinical care of patients who present with depressive symptoms shortly after a loved one's death. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The current status of bereavement follow-up in hospice and palliative care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, T; Akabayashi, A; Nishitateno, K

    2002-03-01

    In order to explore the implementation of bereavement care in hospice/palliative care settings in Japan, a self-administered questionnaire was sent to all 54 government-approved hospice/palliative care units (PCUs) in May of 1999 (recovery rate 93%). Results showed that bereavement follow-up is performed in 37 institutes (74%) and memorial cards and services are most frequently provided. Memorial cards are provided mainly by nurses, and memorial services involve many health care professionals as well as volunteers. Religious workers tended to be involved in memorial services and social group meetings. Individually oriented interventions such as telephone contacts, personal visits and personal counselling were reportedly used less often. The need for individual-oriented programmes was recognized, and many institutes were considering the expansion of their programmes to include them. However, the difficulties of implementing such care at hospice/PCUs were also raised. Two socio-cultural factors possibly affecting bereavement care in Japan, namely, the roles of family and religious (Buddhist) ceremonies were discussed. It was pointed out that the spirit of bereavement care may be embodied in existing religious ceremonies. We conclude that it is necessary to develop bereavement care programmes based on common, basic hospice care tenets while making full use of existing local resources and taking into account regional values.

  14. Maternal Antenatal Bereavement and Neural Tube Defect in Live-Born Offspring: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Glejsted Ingstrup

    Full Text Available Maternal emotional stress during pregnancy has previously been associated with congenital neural malformations, but most studies are based on data collected retrospectively. The objective of our study was to investigate associations between antenatal maternal bereavement due to death of a close relative and neural tube defects (NTDs in the offspring.We performed a register-based cohort study including all live-born children (N = 1,734,190 from 1978-2008. Exposure was bereavement due to loss of a close relative from one year before conception to the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. The outcome was NTDs in the offspring according to the International Classification of Disease. We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios (ORs.A total of 2% children were born to mothers who lost a close relative prenatally. During 30 years of follow-up, 1,115 children were diagnosed with any NTDs: spina bifida (n = 889, anencephaly (n = 85 and encephalocele (n = 164. And 23 children were diagnosed with two types of NTDs. Overall, when comparing bereaved mothers to non-bereaved mothers, no significant increased prevalence of NTDs in the offspring was seen (OR = 0.84; 95% confidence interval: 0.52-1.33.Overall maternal bereavement in the antenatal period was not related to NTDs in liveborn offspring.

  15. The impact of bereaved parents' perceived grief similarity on relationship satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukcan-Tetik, Asuman; Finkenauer, Catrin; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Margaret; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    The present research focused on bereaved parents' perceived grief similarity, and aimed to investigate the concurrent and longitudinal effects of the perceptions that the partner has less, equal, or more grief intensity than oneself on relationship satisfaction. Participants of our longitudinal study were 229 heterosexual bereaved Dutch couples who completed questionnaires 6, 13, and 20 months after the loss of their child. Average age of participants was 40.7 (SD = 9.5). Across 3 study waves, participants' perceived grief similarity and relationship satisfaction were assessed. To control for their effects, own grief level, child's gender, expectedness of loss, parent's age, parent's gender, and time were also included in the analyses. Consistent with the hypotheses, cross-sectional results revealed that bereaved parents who perceived dissimilar levels of grief (less or more grief) had lower relationship satisfaction than bereaved parents who perceived similar levels of grief. This effect remained significant controlling for the effects of possible confounding variables and actual similarity in grief between partners. We also found that perceived grief similarity at the first study wave was related to the highest level of relationship satisfaction at the second study wave. Moreover, results showed that perceived grief similarity was associated with a higher level in partner's relationship satisfaction. Results are discussed considering the comparison and similarity in grief across bereaved partners after child loss. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. DSM-V diagnostic criteria for bereavement-related disorders in children and adolescents: developmental considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Julie B; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert S; Cohen, Judith A; Lieberman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Two bereavement-related disorders are proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V): Adjustment Disorder Related to Bereavement, to be located in the main body of the text as an official diagnostic entity; and Bereavement-Related Disorder, including a Traumatic Death Specifier, to be located in the Appendix as an invitation for further research. These diagnoses currently do not include developmentally informed criteria, despite the importance of developmental processes in the ways children and adolescents grieve. In this article, we draw upon a selective review of the empirical literature and expert clinical knowledge to recommend developmentally informed modifications and specifiers of the proposed criteria for both bereavement disorders and strategies to improve future research. This article is derived from an invited report submitted to the DSM-V Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and Dissociative Disorders Sub-Work Group, and suggested modifications have received preliminary approval to be incorporated into the DSM-V at the time of this writing. Adoption of these proposals will have far-reaching consequences, given that DSM-V criteria will influence both critical treatment choices for bereaved youth and the next generation of research studies.

  17. Excluding parental grief: A critical discourse analysis of bereavement accommodation in Canadian labour standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Kennedy, Kimberly; Moll, Sandra; Pineda, Carolina; Mitchell, Lisa M; Stephenson, Peter H; Cadell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Grief following child loss is profoundly destabilizing with serious long-term repercussions for bereaved parents. Employed parents may need time away from work to deal with this loss. The purpose of this study was to reflect upon the ways labour policies and practices respond to parental bereavement. Critical discourse analysis was used to examine labour policies and practices related to employment leave for bereaved parents in Canada. Results were compared to international labour standards. Universally, employment policies provide only for the practical issues of bereavement. Commonly, leave is three days, unpaid, and meant to enable ceremonial obligations. Policies do not acknowledge the long-term suffering caused by grief or the variable intensity of different kinds of loss. Managerial, moral, normative and neoliberal values embedded in these policies efface the intensely personal experience of grief, thereby leaving employees at risk for serious health and workplace safety issues. Bereavement leave currently understands grief as a generic, time-limited state with instrumental tasks and ceremonial obligations. In contrast, research characterizes responses to child loss as intense, highly personal experiences for which healing and recovery can take years. This disconnect is especially problematic when viewed through the lens of employee wellbeing, reintegration and workplace productivity.

  18. Bereavement photography for children: program development and health care professionals' response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin

    2013-07-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. The authors describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs' reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July 2007 through April 2070, families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n = 34; 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n = 30; 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n = 34; 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n = 37; 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended questions revealed 4 categories: the program's general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs.

  19. Strengthening Effective Parenting Practices over the Long Term: Effects of a Preventive Intervention for Parentally Bereaved Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Melissa J.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Luecken, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effect of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for bereaved families, on effective parenting (e.g., caregiver warmth, consistent discipline) 6 years after program completion. Families (n = 101; 69% female caregivers; 77% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic) with children between ages 8 and 16 who had…

  20. Prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement and childbirths in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Olsen, Jørn; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies but not f......INTRODUCTION: The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies...... Proportional Hazards models stratified by gender and adjusted for several covariates. Subanalyses were performed considering the type of relative deceased and timing of bereavement. RESULTS: A total of 4,121,596 subjects were followed-up until up to 41 years of age. Of these subjects, 93,635 (2.3%) were...... of having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94-0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04-1.14]), the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12-1.48]) or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01-1.27]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested...

  1. The associations between religion, bereavement and depression among Hong Kong nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Teris; Lee, Paul H; Yip, Paul S F

    2017-07-04

    This paper is to examine the associations between religion, bereavement and depression among nursing professionals using a cross-sectional survey design. There is little empirical evidence in Asia suggesting that religion may either increase or lower the likelihood of nursing professionals being depressed. We analyzed the results of a Mental Health Survey soliciting data from 850 Hong Kong nurses (aged 21-59, 178 males) regarding their mental well-being and associated factors, including participants' socio-economic profile and recent life-events. Multiple linear regression analyses examined associations between religion, bereavement and depression. Religious faith is weakly associated with lower self-reported depression in bereavement. Our findings confirm those studies suggesting that religion positively affects mental health and yet healthcare providers have yet to assimilate this insight.

  2. CONCEPTUAL AND DESIGN ISSUES IN INSTRUMENT DEVELOPMENT FOR RESEARCH WITH BEREAVED PARENTS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briller, Sherylyn H.; Schim, Stephanie Myers; Thurston, Celia S.; Meert, Kathleen L.

    2013-01-01

    Many childhood deaths in the United States occur in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) and parents have special needs in this death context. As an interdisciplinary research team, we discuss conceptual and design issues encountered in creating a new instrument, the Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment–PICU, for assessing parents’ needs in this setting. Using a qualitative approach, our team previously explored how the culture and related ways of providing care in one urban Midwestern children’s hospital PICU affected parents’ bereavement needs and experiences. We describe using this qualitative foundation in the development of a new quantitative instrument to more widely validate and measure bereaved parents’ needs around the time of a child’s death across multiple PICUs. We highlight a series of issues that warrant consideration in designing a research instrument for this vulnerable population including setting and context, format and content, temporality, recruitment, and content expertise. PMID:22953511

  3. Preconception maternal bereavement and infant and childhood mortality: A Danish population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Quetzal A.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Dalman, Christina; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Khashan, Ali S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Preconception maternal bereavement may be associated with an increased risk for infant mortality, though these previously reported findings have not been replicated. We sought to examine if the association could be replicated and explore if risk extended into childhood. Methods Using a Danish population-based sample of offspring born 1979–2009 (N=1,865,454), we predicted neonatal (0–28 days), post-neonatal infant (29–364 days), and early childhood (1–5 years) mortality following maternal bereavement in the preconception (6–0 months before pregnancy) and prenatal (between conception and birth) periods. Maternal bereavement was defined as death of a first degree relative of the mother. Analyses were conducted using logistic and log-linear Poisson regression that were adjusted for offspring, mother, and father sociodemographic and health factors. Results We identified 6,541 (0.004%) neonates, 3,538 (0.002%) post-neonates, and 2,132 (0.001%) children between the ages of 1 to 5 years who died. After adjusting for covariates, bereavement during the preconception period was associated with an increased odds of neonatal (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.53–2.30) and post-neonatal infant mortality (aOR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.15–2.02). Associations were timing-specific (6 months prior to pregnancy only) and consistent across sensitivity analyses. Bereavement during the prenatal period was not consistently associated with increased risk of offspring mortality, however this may reflect relatively low statistical power. Conclusions Results support and extend previous findings linking bereavement during the preconception period with increased odds of early offspring mortality. The period immediately prior to pregnancy may be a sensitive period with potential etiological implications and ramifications for offspring mortality. PMID:26374948

  4. Effects of euthanasia on the bereaved family and friends: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarte, Nikkie B; van der Lee, Marije L; van der Bom, Johanna G; van den Bout, Jan; Heintz, A Peter M

    2003-07-26

    To assess how euthanasia in terminally ill cancer patients affects the grief response of bereaved family and friends. Cross sectional study. Tertiary referral centre for oncology patients in Utrecht, the Netherlands. 189 bereaved family members and close friends of terminally ill cancer patients who died by euthanasia and 316 bereaved family members and close friends of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death between 1992 and 1999. Symptoms of traumatic grief assessed by the inventory of traumatic grief, current feelings of grief assessed by the Texas revised inventory of grief, and post-traumatic stress reactions assessed by the impact of event scale. The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia had less traumatic grief symptoms (adjusted difference -5.29 (95% confidence interval -8.44 to -2.15)), less current feeling of grief (adjusted difference 2.93 (0.85 to 5.01)); and less post-traumatic stress reactions (adjusted difference -2.79 (-5.33 to -0.25)) than the family and friends of patients who died of natural causes. These differences were independent of other risk factors. The bereaved family and friends of cancer patients who died by euthanasia coped better with respect to grief symptoms and post-traumatic stress reactions than the bereaved of comparable cancer patients who died a natural death. These results should not be interpreted as a plea for euthanasia, but as a plea for the same level of care and openness in all patients who are terminally ill.

  5. Long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program on spousally bereaved parents: Grief, mental health problems, alcohol problems, and coping efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Cham, Heining; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim

    2016-08-01

    This study reports on the findings from a 6-year follow-up of a randomized trial of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on the outcomes for spousally bereaved parents. Spousally bereaved parents (N = 131) participated in the trial in which they were randomly assigned to receive the FBP (N = 72) or literature control (N = 59). Parents were assessed at four time points: pretest, posttest, and 11-month and 6-year follow-up. They reported on mental health problems, grief, and parenting at all four time periods. At the 6-year follow-up, parents reported on additional measures of persistent complex bereavement disorder, alcohol abuse problems, and coping efficacy. Bereaved parents in the FBP as compared to those in the literature control had lower levels of symptoms of depression, general psychiatric distress, prolonged grief, and alcohol problems, and higher coping efficacy (for mothers) at the 6-year follow-up. Multiple characteristics of the parent (e.g., gender, age, and baseline mental health problems) and of the spousal death (e.g., cause of death) were tested as moderators of program effects on each outcome, but only 3 of 45 tests of moderation were significant. Latent growth modeling found that the effects of the FBP on depression, psychiatric distress, and grief occurred immediately following program participation and were maintained over 6 years. Mediation analysis found that improvement in positive parenting partially mediated program effects to reduce depression and psychiatric distress, but had an indirect effect to higher levels of grief at the 6-year follow-up. Mediation analysis also found that improved parenting at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated by program effects to reduce depression and that program effects to increase coping efficacy at the 6-year follow-up was partially mediated through reduced depression and grief and improved parenting. FBP reduced mental health problems, prolonged grief, and alcohol abuse, and increased coping

  6. Pediatric Oncology Palliative Care: Experiences of General Practitioners and Bereaved Parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Neilson, SJ; Gibson, F; Greenfield, SM

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This qualitative study set in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom, aimed to examine the\\ud role of the general practitioner (GP) in children's oncology palliative care from the perspective of GPs who had cared for a child with cancer receiving palliative care at home and bereaved parents.\\ud Methods: One-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 GPs and 11 bereaved parents\\ud following the death. A grounded theory data analysis was undertaken; identifying...

  7. Life Experience of Bereaved Parents After the 2014 Sewol Ferry Disaster in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Khang, Minsoo; Shin, Jiyoung; Lee, Hwa Jung; Brown, Jacqueline A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the outcomes of parental bereavement and the changes in life experience that follow the traumatic death of a teenage child. The results of the study are aimed to assist counselors and educators who work with themes of grief and loss. From 17 in-depth interviews from parents bereaved by the Sewol ferry disaster of 2014 in South Korea, three main categories were found to capture the reality for parents after the sudden and traumatic death of a teenage child: (a) personal changes, (b) changes in close relationships, and (c) changes in social life. Recommendations for future research and potential implications were discussed.

  8. Service of Remembrance: a comprehensive cancer center's response to bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Louise; Cooper, Rhonda S; Hypki, Cinder

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive cancer centers that offer an array of clinical trials and treatment options often experience significant patient mortality rates. Bereavement resources may not be routinely incorporated into the service delivery model in these specialty hospitals. In response, an interdisciplinary team at one cancer center proposed, planned, and implemented an annual Service of Remembrance. The incorporation of music, poetry, and visual arts was important in designing a program that would provide a meaningful, spiritual experience. A community artist who designed an interactive memorial art piece played a pivotal role. This article outlines the process of institutional culture change and describes future challenges in the implementation of this type of bereavement service.

  9. Sex differences in depressive effects of experiencing spousal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Lee, Sang Gyu; Chun, Sung-Youn; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-02-01

    Spousal death is a significant event that becomes a turning point in an individual's life. Widowed persons experience new circumstances, which might induce depression. However, the effects of spousal death on depression can differ by sex and culture. Thus, the present study examined the association between depressive levels and experience of spousal death in Korean adults aged older than 45 years. The data were from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging from 2010 to 2012. The analysis used frequency analysis to compare the distribution of demographic variables between men and women, and anova to compare 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores as the dependent variable among comparison groups. We also carried out linear mixed model analysis on the association between the 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and experience of spousal death. Among 5481 respondents, 2735 were men and 2741 were women. The number of men and women who experienced spousal death were 43 (1.6%) and 181 (6.6%), respectively. Men had lower depressive levels than women when they had been married (men 2.99, women 3.64). Both men and women experiencing spousal death had significantly higher 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores than married men and women (men β = 0.911, P = 0.003; women β = 0.512, P = 0.001; ref: no experience of spousal death). There was a significant association between experience of spousal death and depressive level for both men and women. We suggest that policy practitioners promote community programs that provide bereaved adults with easy access to meaningful social participation and support the minimum cost of living of the widowed. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 322-329. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. The Effects of the Family Bereavement Program to Reduce Suicide Ideation and/or Attempts of Parentally Bereaved Children Six and Fifteen Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Wolchik, Sharlene; Ayers, Tim S

    2016-04-01

    Findings concerning the long-term effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts of parentally bereaved children and adolescents are presented. Parental death is a significant risk factor for suicide among offspring (Guldin et al., 2015). This study is a long-term follow-up of 244 children and adolescents who had participated in a randomized trial of the FBP, examining the intervention effects on suicide ideation and/or attempts as assessed through multiple sources. Results indicate a significant effect of the FBP to reduce suicide ideation and/or attempts at the 6- and 15-year follow-up evaluation. The findings support the potential benefits of further research on "upstream" suicide prevention. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  11. Do personal conditions and circumstances surrounding partner loss explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, B.; Smit, J.H; Snijders, T.A.B.; Knipscheer, K.P.M.

    This longitudinal study aims to explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults, taking into account personal and circumstantial conditions surrounding the partner's death. A distinction is made between emotional and social loneliness. Data were gathered both before and after partner loss. Results

  12. Do personal conditions and circumstances surrounding partner loss explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, B.; Smit, J.H.; Snijders, T.A.B.; Knipscheer, C.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    This longitudinal study aims to explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults, taking into account personal and circumstantial conditions surrounding the partner's death. A distinction is made between emotional and social loneliness. Data were gathered both before and after partner loss. Results

  13. The therapeutic effectiveness of using visual art modalities with the bereaved: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramling, Sandra E

    2018-01-01

    Bereaved individuals are increasingly considered at risk for negative psychological and physiological outcomes. Visual art modalities are often incorporated into grief therapy interventions, and clinical application of art therapy techniques with the bereaved has been widely documented. Although clinicians and recipients of these interventions advocate for their helpfulness in adapting to bereavement, research investigating the efficacy of visual art modalities has produced equivocal results and has not yet been synthesized to establish empirical support across settings. Accordingly, this review critically evaluates the existent literature on the effectiveness of visual art modalities with the bereaved and offers suggestions for future avenues of research. A total of 27 studies were included in the current review. Meta-analysis was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity and insufficient comparable data on outcome measures across studies. A narrative synthesis reports that therapeutic application of visual art modalities was associated with positive changes such as continuing bonds with the deceased and meaning making. Modest and conflicting preliminary evidence was found to support treatment effectiveness in alleviating negative grief symptoms such as general distress, functional impairment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. PMID:29440940

  14. The therapeutic effectiveness of using visual art modalities with the bereaved: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskittle, Rachel E; Gramling, Sandra E

    2018-01-01

    Bereaved individuals are increasingly considered at risk for negative psychological and physiological outcomes. Visual art modalities are often incorporated into grief therapy interventions, and clinical application of art therapy techniques with the bereaved has been widely documented. Although clinicians and recipients of these interventions advocate for their helpfulness in adapting to bereavement, research investigating the efficacy of visual art modalities has produced equivocal results and has not yet been synthesized to establish empirical support across settings. Accordingly, this review critically evaluates the existent literature on the effectiveness of visual art modalities with the bereaved and offers suggestions for future avenues of research. A total of 27 studies were included in the current review. Meta-analysis was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity and insufficient comparable data on outcome measures across studies. A narrative synthesis reports that therapeutic application of visual art modalities was associated with positive changes such as continuing bonds with the deceased and meaning making. Modest and conflicting preliminary evidence was found to support treatment effectiveness in alleviating negative grief symptoms such as general distress, functional impairment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety.

  15. Pediatric Oncology Palliative Care: Experiences of General Practitioners and Bereaved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Sue J; Gibson, Faith; Greenfield, Sheila M

    2015-03-01

    This qualitative study set in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom, aimed to examine the role of the general practitioner (GP) in children's oncology palliative care from the perspective of GPs who had cared for a child with cancer receiving palliative care at home and bereaved parents. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 GPs and 11 bereaved parents following the death. A grounded theory data analysis was undertaken; identifying generated themes through chronological comparative data analysis. Similarity in GP and parent viewpoints was found, the GPs role seen as one of providing medication and support. Time pressures GPs faced influenced their level of engagement with the family during palliative and bereavement care and their ability to address their identified learning deficits. Lack of familiarity with the family, coupled with an acknowledgment that it was a rare and could be a frightening experience, also influenced their level of interaction. There was no consistency in GP practice nor evidence of practice being guided by local or national policies. Parents lack of clarity of their GPs role resulted in missed opportunities for support. Time pressures influence GP working practices. Enhanced communication and collaboration between the GP and regional childhood cancer centre may help address identified GP challenges, such as learning deficits, and promote more time-efficient working practices through role clarity. Parents need greater awareness of their GP's wide-ranging role; one that transcends palliative care incorporating bereavement support and on-going medical care for family members.

  16. Nurses' Experiences of End-of-life Photography in NICU Bereavement Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Sara; Ives-Baine, Lori

    2018-06-07

    To qualitatively explore neonatal intensive care nurses' experiences with end-of-life photography as part of their bereavement support work with families. An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis with data collected through a focus group (n = 6) and one semi-structured interview (n = 1) with neonatal nurses from a Level 3/4 NICU in a Canadian pediatric hospital. Participants' comfort with EOL photography developed over time through exposure to bereavement scenarios and positive experiences with families. Participants' experienced a feeling of pressure to balance the photography with clinical responsibilities and find the right time to introduce photography while being sensitive to family experiences. Participants experienced EOL photography as something tangible to give families and were satisfied knowing the images might play an important role in the family's healing after the NICU. All participants had come to value EOL photography as a positive and meaningful part of their work with bereaved families. Identified challenges related to balancing the practice with the unpredictable flow and demands of critical care and to developing an appreciation for and comfort with the photography as part of their healing and the families' healing. Findings contribute insight into care-provider experience that can inform best practices, training, and staff support for palliative and bereavement work in neonatal and pediatric settings. The findings suggest a need to support nurses emotionally and clinically in carrying out this photography as part of their care for families. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recruiting bereaved parents for research after infant death in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin R; Roche, Cathy; Christian, Becky J; Bakitas, Marie; Meneses, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Understanding parental experiences following infant death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a high research priority and a necessary first step to improving health services. However, recruiting bereaved parents to discuss their experiences on such an extremely sensitive topic can be challenging and research procedures must be planned carefully in order to get an adequate sample. There is little published in the literature detailing specific strategies for recruiting bereaved parents for grief research, especially strategies for contacting parents and identifying factors that might affect participation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of recruiting bereaved parents into a qualitative research study exploring parental NICU experiences and grief responses following infant death. We describe a successful recruitment plan that led to the enrollment of difficult to recruit participants such as fathers, and individuals representing minorities and those from lower socioeconomic (SES) groups. Bereaved parents of infants after an NICU hospitalization should continue to be recruited for research studies for their unique perspectives and valuable insights about the devastating experience of infant death. Participants in this study reported more benefits than harm and the results addressed a critical gap in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cautioning Health-Care Professionals : Bereaved Persons Are Misguided Through the Stages of Grief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Boerner, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Science and practice seem deeply stuck in the so-called stage theory of grief. Health-care professionals continue to "prescribe" stages. Basically, this perspective endorses the idea that bereaved people go through a set pattern of specific reactions over time following the death of a loved one. It

  19. Perspectives on Aging: Death, Dying, Bereavement. Papers Presented at a Symposium (Provo, Utah, April 12, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Howard R., Ed.; Averett, Claire H., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at a symposium on death, dying, and bereavement. Papers were presented on: (1) "A Psychologist in Hospice Care" (Clifford Morgan and Barbara McCann); (2) "Assessment of the Kubler-Ross Stages in Counseling" (G. Michael Averett and Claire H. Averett); (3) "Making the Road Less Lonely: Role of Volunteers in…

  20. Ghosts, Meaning, and Faith: After-Death Communications in Bereavement Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwilecki, Susan

    2011-01-01

    After-death communications (ADCs) are reported encounters with a deceased loved one, a contemporary type of ghost experience heralded as therapeutic in coping with bereavement. Pertinent literature generally illustrates the healing power of ADCs with brief, self-contained episodes. The functions of ADCs over the course of grief need exploration.…

  1. Bereavement and Coping of South Asian Families Post 9/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Arpana G.; Yeh, Christine J.; Madan-Bahel, Anvita; Nath, Shivani

    2007-01-01

    Eleven first-generation South Asian family members who lost a relative in the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, were interviewed about their loss and their coping strategies. Data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology. Participant responses clearly delineated bereavement reactions and coping within a…

  2. Parents bereaved by infant death: Sex differences and moderation in PTSD, attachment, coping, and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Olff, Miranda; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Parents bereaved by infant death experience a wide range of symptomatology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may persist for years after the loss. Little research has been conducted on PTSD in fathers who have lost an infant. Mothers report most symptoms to a greater...

  3. Parents bereaved by infant death: sex differences and moderation in PTSD, attachment, coping and social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Olff, Miranda; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Parents bereaved by infant death experience a wide range of symptomatology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may persist for years after the loss. Little research has been conducted on PTSD in fathers who have lost an infant. Mothers report most symptoms to a greater extent than

  4. Culturally Diverse Beliefs Concerning Dying, Death, and Bereavement: A School Psychologist's Intervention Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    School psychologists need to employ a multicultural perspective in the areas of death, dying, and bereavement. To develop multicultural sensitivity and competency requires setting aside one's personal beliefs in an attempt to adopt another's perspective. Consequently, school psychologists first need to explore their own attitudes about death and…

  5. Prenatal stress exposure related to maternal bereavement and risk of childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that prenatal stress contributes to the risk of obesity later in life. In a population-based cohort study, we examined whether prenatal stress related to maternal bereavement during pregnancy was associated with the risk of overweight in offspring during school age....

  6. Grief Experience of Bereaved Malay/Muslim Youths in Singapore: The Spiritual Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Murshidah; Mehta, Kalyani

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study conducted in Singapore which examined different coping mechanisms engaged by Malay/Muslim bereaved youths following parental death. The research applied the revised Transactional Model of Stress and Coping as well as the Adolescent Coping Scale as a theoretical framework for analysing findings. Of the…

  7. Bereaved mothers' and fathers' perceptions of a legacy intervention for parents of infants in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akard, T F; Duffy, M; Hord, A; Randall, A; Sanders, A; Adelstein, K; Anani, U E; Gilmer, M J

    2018-01-01

    Legacy-making, actions or behaviors aimed at being remembered, may be one strategy to enhance coping and improve grief outcomes for bereaved parents and siblings. While legacy interventions have been developed and tested in pediatric and adult populations, legacy activities specific to bereaved parents in the neonatal intensive care unit remain unexplored. This study explored bereaved parents' perceptions of a digital storytelling legacy-making intervention for parents after the death of an infant. Six bereaved mothers and fathers participated in a focus group interview three to 12 months after the death of an infant in the NICU. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions was used to obtain parent self-reports. Qualitative content analysis identified emerging themes. Four major themes emerged regarding participants' perceptions of a legacy intervention: (a) parents' willingness to participate in a legacy intervention, (b) parents' suggestions for a feasible intervention, (c) parents' suggestions for an acceptable intervention, and (d) parents' perceived benefits of legacy-making. Participants reported that a legacy-making intervention via digital storytelling would be feasible, acceptable, and beneficial for NICU parents. Study results support the need and desire for legacy-making services to be developed and offered in the NICU.

  8. Concept of death and perceptions of bereavement in adults with intellectual disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, J

    2012-02-01

    Bereavement is potentially a time of disruption and emotional distress. For individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), a limited understanding of the concept of death may exacerbate this distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate how individuals with ID understand and explain death and make sense of life without the deceased.

  9. The impact of bereaved parents' perceived grief similarity on relationship satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buyukcan-Tetik, Asuman; Finkenauer, Catrin; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Margaret; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The present research focused on bereaved parents' perceived grief similarity, and aimed to investigate the concurrent and longitudinal effects of the perceptions that the partner has less, equal, or more grief intensity than oneself on relationship satisfaction. Participants of our longitudinal

  10. The Impact of Bereaved Parents' Perceived Grief Similarity on Relationship Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buyukcan-Tetik, Asuman; Finkenauer, Catrin; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Margaret; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    The present research focused on bereaved parents' perceived grief similarity, and aimed to investigate the concurrent and longitudinal effects of the perceptions that the partner has less, equal, or more grief intensity than oneself on relationship satisfaction. Participants of our longitudinal

  11. Bereavement and Loss: Developing a Memory Box to Support a Young Woman with Profound Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hannah; Garrard, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Supporting bereaved people with profound learning disabilities still remains an under-researched area. Moreover, the barriers of communication and disenfranchised grief mean that they often do not receive the support they require, leading to emotional and behavioural difficulties. This article describes research using a case study design, which…

  12. What Do the Bereaved by Suicide Communicate in Online Support Groups? A Content Analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus-Dijkstra, M.; Havinga, P.; van Ballegooijen, W.; Delfosse, L.; Mokkenstorm, J.; Boon, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Every year, more than six million people lose a loved one through suicide. These bereaved by suicide are at relatively high risk for mental illnesses including suicide. The social stigma attached to suicide often makes it difficult to talk about grief. Participating in online forums may

  13. The psychological aftermath of bereavement : Risk factors, mediating processes, and intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Houwen, H.K.

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation some of the major facets associated with the psychological effects of bereavement were the subject of investigation: risk factors, mediating processes and intervention. Previous research on risk factors is limited because of a number of methodological shortcomings: a focus on

  14. Concept of Death and Perceptions of Bereavement in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, J.; MacHale, R.; Tierney, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bereavement is potentially a time of disruption and emotional distress. For individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), a limited understanding of the concept of death may exacerbate this distress. The aim of the present study was to investigate how individuals with ID understand and explain death and make sense of life without…

  15. Pengaruh Bereavement Life Review terhadap Kesejahteraan Spiritual pada Keluarga Pasien Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Zulfatul A’la

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spiritualitas adalah faktor protektif dalam proses berduka pada keluarga pasien kronis. Bereavement life review adalah salah satu intervensi dalam penguatan spiritual keluarga pasien penyakit kanker. Stroke dan kanker adalah penyakit kronis. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui pengaruh bereavement life review pada kesejahteraan spiritual keluarga pasien stroke. Desain penelitian ini adalah quasi-eksperimental dengan pretest posttest control group. Sampel yang digunakan adalah salah satu keluarga pasien stroke yang merawat pasien di rumah sakit. Sehingga didapatkan sampel sebanyak 28 responden dengan 14 kelompok kontrol dan 14 kelompok intervensi. Pengambilan sampel dilakukan dengan menggunakan consecutive sampling. Kelompok intervensi mendapatkan bereavement life review dengan dua sesi yang dilakukan oleh spesialis keperawatan jiwa. Kesejahteraan spiritual diukur menggunakan instrumen SWBS (spiritual well-being scale. Analisis data menggunakan dependent t-test, Mann Whitney dan Wilcoxon. Uji homogenitas memerlihatkan tidak satupun karekteristik responden antara kelompok intervensi dan kontrol berbeda secara signifikan (p > 0,05. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan adanya perbedaan skor rerata postest kesejahteraan spiritual pada kelompok kontrol dengan kelompok intervensi (98,71 ± 3,65 dan 106,5 ± 1,83; p = 0,000. Terdapat perbedaan skor rerata kesejahteraan spiritual pada pretest dengan posttest pada kelompok intervensi (99,07 ± 2,95 dan 106,5 ± 1,83; p = 0,001. Proses bereavement life review merupakan proses peningkatan spiritual melalui proses rekontekstualisasi, memaafkan terhadap diri, dan refleksi yang membentuk penguatan koping sehingga muncul pemaknaan terhadap diri sendiri. Dapat disimpulkan bereavement life review berpengaruh positif terhadap peningkatan kesejahteraan spiritual keluarga pasien stroke. Bereavement life review dapat digunakan sebagai intervensi perawatan pasien stroke dan keluarga. Saran untuk penelitian selanjutnya

  16. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  17. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms. Design and Methods: Alzheimer's caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly…

  18. Complicated grief and bereavement in young adults following close friend and sibling loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberman Mash, Holly B; Fullerton, Carol S; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the association between types of loss (i.e., sibling or close friend) and relationship quality (i.e., depth and conflict) with complicated grief, depression, somatic symptoms, and world assumptions in bereaved young adults. Participants were 107 young adults aged 17-29 years who were either bereaved or had never experienced a loss. Among bereaved participants, 66 lost a close friend and seven lost a sibling within the past 3 years (M = 1.63 years). Nineteen percent of the young adults met criteria for complicated grief and 31% had mild to severe depression. Participants with a deceased sibling reported greater depth in the relationship as compared to those who lost a friend. They were also more likely to have complicated grief (57% versus 15%) and report significantly higher levels of grief, depression, and somatic symptoms. Those who lost a sibling reported a lower sense of meaningfulness and benevolence of the world and self-worth as compared with those who lost a close friend or had not experienced a loss. Complicated grief and depression are common among bereaved young adults. Sibling loss is particularly distressing to young adults, due in part to the high level of relationship depth, and is associated with increased psychological and physical symptoms postloss. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Delphi Study on Staff Bereavement Training in the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer A.; Truesdale, Jesslyn

    2015-01-01

    The Delphi technique was used to obtain expert panel consensus to prioritize content areas and delivery methods for developing staff grief and bereavement curriculum training in the intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) field. The Delphi technique was conducted with a panel of 18 experts from formal and informal disability caregiving,…

  20. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  1. Uncomplicated Depression, Suicide Attempt, and the DSM-5 Bereavement Exclusion Debate: An Empirical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Jerome C.; Schmitz, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the claim, made repeatedly during "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders", Fifth Edition debates over eliminating the bereavement exclusion (BE), that ''uncomplicated'' depressive reactions have elevated suicidality like other major depressive disorder (MDD), so exclusions risk…

  2. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  3. A Study among Bereaved Persons in Oyo and Oke-Ogun Areas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Mobile Phone: +2348034670349. Abstract ... relationships which will help them to cope successfully with bereavement crisis and recover quickly ... The study established that social support had a significant impact on symptoms of ... One of such support is social support which has been defined as interpersonal interactions ...

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Bereavement: Early Psychological Sequelae of Losing a Close Relative Due to Terminal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T. E.; Elklit, A.; Karstoft, K. I.

    2012-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a consequence of bereavement from terminal illness. Therefore, knowledge on the traumatizing effects of bereavement and risk factors for traumatization from bereavement is rather sparse. This study investigated prevalence...... and predictors of PTSD in a group of people who had recently lost a close relative due to incurable cancer. The participants were 132 persons who were assessed with the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist, and the Crisis Support Scale. One month after the loss, 29.5% of the subjects had...

  5. Prenatal exposure to bereavement and type-2 diabetes: a Danish longitudinal population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasveer Virk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of type-2 diabetes is only partly known, and a possible role of prenatal stress in programming offspring for insulin resistance has been suggested by animal models. Previously, we found an association between prenatal stress and type-1 diabetes. Here we examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement during preconception and pregnancy and development of type-2 diabetes in the off-spring. METHODS: We utilized data from the Danish Civil Registration System to identify singleton births in Denmark born January 1(st 1979 through December 31(st 2008 (N = 1,878,246, and linked them to their parents, grandparents, and siblings. We categorized children as exposed to bereavement during prenatal life if their mothers lost an elder child, husband or parent during the period from one year before conception to the child's birth. We identified 45,302 children exposed to maternal bereavement; the remaining children were included in the unexposed cohort. The outcome of interest was diagnosis of type-2 diabetes. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs from birth using log-linear poisson regression models and used person-years as the offset variable. All models were adjusted for maternal residence, income, education, marital status, sibling order, calendar year, sex, and parents' history of diabetes at the time of pregnancy. RESULTS: We found children exposed to bereavement during their prenatal life were more likely to have a type-2 diabetes diagnosis later in life (aIRR: 1.31, 1.01-1.69. These findings were most pronounced when bereavement was caused by death of an elder child (aIRR: 1.51, 0.94-2.44. Results also indicated the second trimester of pregnancy to be the most sensitive period of bereavement exposure (aIRR:2.08, 1.15-3.76. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that fetal exposure to maternal bereavement during preconception and the prenatal period may increase the risk for developing type-2 diabetes in

  6. General Practitioners’ experiences of bereavement care and their educational support needs: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background General Practitioners (GPs) are well-positioned to provide grief support to patients. Most GPs view the provision of bereavement care as an important aspect of their role and the GP is the health professional that many people turn to when they need support. We aimed to explore GPs’ understandings of bereavement care and their education and professional development needs in relation to bereavement care. Methods An in-depth qualitative design was adopted using a social constructionist approach as our aims were exploratory and applied. Nineteen GPs (12 women and 7 men) living in Western Australia were interviewed; 14 were based in metropolitan Perth and 5 in rural areas. GPs were invited, via a letter, to participate in a semi-structured interview. The interviews occurred within each GP’s workplace or, for the rural GPs, via telephone, and all interviews were digitally audio-recorded and transcribed. Results Analysis was based upon constant comparison and began as soon as possible after each interview. The data revealed four tensions or opposing views concerning bereavement and bereavement care. These were (1) whether grief is a standardised versus an individual process, (2) the role of the GP in intervening versus promoting resilience, (3) the GP as a broker of services versus a service provider, and (4) the need for formal education and professional development versus ‘on-the-job’ experiential learning. Conclusions GPs have a critical role in exploring distress, including grief. However, changes need to be made to ensure GPs have up-to-date knowledge of contemporary theories and approaches. GPs urgently need education both at the undergraduate and postgraduate degree levels, and in continuing professional development. Otherwise GPs will rely on out-dated theories and constructions of grief, which may be detrimental to patient care. PMID:24670040

  7. Bereavement and behavioral changes as risk factors for cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Melaine Cristina; de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto, Laura Maria; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrao; Bottino, Cássio Mc

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease often affect older adults with Down syndrome (DS) much earlier than those in the general population. There is also growing evidence of the effects of negative life events on the mental health and behavior of individuals with intellectual disability. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study investigating objective cognitive decline following bereavement in aging individuals with DS. The objective of this study was to determine whether cognitive decline correlates with bereavement following the recent loss of a caregiver or with behavioral changes in a sample of adult individuals with DS who do not meet the criteria for dementia or depression, using the longitudinal assessment of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG), together with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). We evaluated 18 subjects at baseline and over a follow-up period of 14-22 months, attempting to determine whether cognitive decline correlates with bereavement following the recent loss of the main caregiver or with behavioral changes (as assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory). The mean rate of change in CAMCOG was -1.83 (standard deviation 4.51). Behavioral changes had a significant direct influence on cognitive decline. When bereavement was accompanied by behavioral changes, the probability of cognitive decline was 87% (odds ratio 3.82). The occurrence of behavioral changes attributed to bereavement following the loss of the primary caregiver significantly increases the probability of cognitive decline in individuals with DS. Longitudinal comparison of the CAMCOG and use of the IQCODE appear to enrich the analysis of cognitive decline in individuals with DS. Further studies involving larger samples are needed in order to corroborate and expand upon our findings, which can have implications for the clinical management of older adults with DS.

  8. Viewing the body after bereavement due to suicide: a population-based survey in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Omerov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research on the assumed, positive and negative, psychological effects of viewing the body after a suicide loss is sparse. We hypothesized that suicide-bereaved parents that viewed their childs body in a formal setting seldom regretted the experience, and that viewing the body was associated with lower levels of psychological morbidity two to five years after the loss. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified 915 suicide-bereaved parents by linkage of nationwide population-based registries and collected data by a questionnaire. The outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. In total, 666 (73% parents participated. Of the 460 parents (69% that viewed the body, 96% answered that they did not regret the experience. The viewing was associated with a higher risk of reliving the child's death through nightmares (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.32 and intrusive memories (RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38, but not with anxiety (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.40 and depression (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.83. One limitation of our study is that we lack data on the informants' personality and coping strategies. CONCLUSIONS: In this Swedish population-based survey of suicide-bereaved parents, we found that by and large everyone that had viewed their deceased child in a formal setting did not report regretting the viewing when asked two to five years after the loss. Our findings suggest that most bereaved parents are capable of deciding if they want to view the body or not. Officials may assist by giving careful information about the child's appearance and other details concerning the viewing, thus facilitating mental preparation for the bereaved person. This is the first large-scale study on the effects of viewing the body after a suicide and additional studies are needed before clinical recommendations can be made.

  9. The experiences of staff who support people with intellectual disability on issues about death, dying and bereavement: A metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Ailsa J; Field, Stephen; Smith, Ian C

    2017-11-01

    Historically, people with intellectual disabilities have tended to be excluded from knowing about death, dying and bereavement. Staff in intellectual disability services can play a valuable role in improving understanding of these issues in those they support. This qualitative metasynthesis aimed to understand the experiences of staff supporting adults with intellectual disabilities with issues of death, dying and bereavement. Thirteen papers were identified following a systematic review of six databases. Three themes were developed following a lines-of-argument synthesis: (i) talking about death is hard: negotiating the uncertainty in death, dying and bereavement; (ii) the commitment to promoting a "good death"; and (iii) the grief behind the professional mask. "A cautious silence: The taboo of death" was an overarching theme. A more open culture around issues of death, dying and bereavement in intellectual disability settings is essential and could be promoted through staff training and support. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Strengthening Effective Parenting Practices over the Long-Term: Effects of a Preventive Intervention for Parentally Bereaved Families

    OpenAIRE

    Hagan, Melissa J.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Luecken, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effect of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a preventive intervention for bereaved families, on effective parenting (e.g. caregiver warmth, consistent discipline) six years after program completion. Families (n=101; 69% female caregivers; 77% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic) with children between ages 8–16 who had experienced the death of one parent were randomized to the FBP (n=54) or a literature control condition (n=47). Multiple regression analyses conducted within a mul...

  11. Unresolved Bereavement and Other Mental Health Problems in Parents of the Sewol Ferry Accident after 18 Months

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Lee, So Hee; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study examined the overall mental health consequences of the bereaved parents after the Sewol ferry accident. Methods Eighty-four bereaved parents participated in the study. Self-report scales assessing the severity of psychiatric symptoms and other related psychosomatic problems were used at 18 months following the accident. Univariate descriptive statistics and regression analyses were performed to report the prevalence, severity, and correlates of psychiatric symptoms. Resul...

  12. From Body to Mind and Spirit: Qigong Exercise for Bereaved Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bereavement may bring negative impacts on the mind, body, and spiritual well-being of grieving persons. Some bereaved persons with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- illness experience a dual burden of distress. This study investigated the effects of bereavement on CFS-like illness by comparing bereaved and nonbereaved participants. It also adopted a random group design to investigate the effectiveness of Qigong on improving the well-being of bereaved participants. The Qigong intervention comprised 10 group sessions delivered twice a week for 5 weeks and home-practice for at least three times a week lasting 15–30 minutes each. The participants’ fatigue, anxiety, and depression, quality of life (QoL, and spiritual well-being were measured at baseline and 3 months after treatment. The bereaved participants experienced significantly greater mental fatigue (16.09 versus 14.44, p=0.017 and lower physical QoL (34.02 versus 37.17, p=0.011 than their nonbereaved counterparts. After 3 months, the mental fatigue (−8 versus −4, p=0.010 and physical fatigue (−10 versus −5, p=0.007 experienced by intervention group had declined significantly, and improvements on their spirituality (14 versus −2, p=0.013 and psychological QoL (8.91 versus 0.69, p=0.002 scores exceeded those of the control group.

  13. A Theoretical Model of Resource-Oriented Music Therapy with Informal Hospice Caregivers during Pre-Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Noah; Bradt, Joke; Ghetti, Claire

    2018-03-09

    Over the past decade, caregiver pre-bereavement has received increased scholarly and clinical attention across multiple healthcare fields. Pre-bereavement represents a nascent area for music therapy to develop best practices in and an opportunity to establish clinical relevancy in the interdisciplinary team. This study was an exploratory inquiry into the role of music therapy with pre-bereaved informal hospice caregivers. This study intended to articulate (a) what pre-bereavement needs are present for informal hospice caregivers, (b) which of those needs were addressed in music, and (c) the process by which music therapy addressed those needs. A constructivist grounded theory methodology using situational analysis was used. We interviewed 14 currently bereaved informal hospice caregivers who had participated in music therapy with the care recipient. Analysis resulted in a theoretical model of resource-oriented music therapy promoting caregiver resilience. The resource, caregivers' stable caring relationships with care recipients through their pre-illness identities (i.e., spouse, parent, or child), is amplified through music therapy. Engagement with this resource mediates the risk of increased care burden and results in resilience fostering purposefulness and value in caregiving. Resource-oriented music therapy provides a unique clinical avenue for supporting caregivers through pre-bereavement, and was acknowledged by caregivers as a unique and integral hospice service. Within this model, caregivers are better positioned to develop meaning from the experience of providing care through the death of a loved one.

  14. A Comparative Study of the Situation of Bereavement Care for Children with Cancer in Iran with Selected Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Pakseresht

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Death of a child with cancer is one of the most painful events that results in traumatic reactions of bereavement. Care should be taken into account during the bereavement period. The present study aimed to develop bereavement care in Iran and comparing it with Jordan, England, Australia and Canada, which have achieved the desired situation in the above area. Materials and Methods In this comparative study, the necessary data was made to databases of reputable and sovereign centers of the countries and palliative care programs. After accessing the pioneering patterns of world-wide palliative care, Iran's palliative care program, which came from children's service centers and access to the databases of those centers, was also examined. Results In the developed countries of Canada, England and Australia, a wide range of bereavement care is provided in care facilities. for example following the death of a child, in Canada family members are covered by all the bereavement care, in Australia formal caregivers increase their relationship with parents and are available to listen to feelings and in England all family members are supported. Jordan provides significant services in this regard such as visits at the bereavement ceremony, however, it is provided limitedly only in one center in Iran. Conclusion In the developed countries, pediatric palliative care is well developed. But in some developing countries, including Iran, there are only a few of these services for dying children and their families. As a result, the traumatic results emerge in social and family life activities.

  15. Bereavement and behavioral changes as risk factors for cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca LM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Luciana Mascarenhas Fonseca,1 Melaine Cristina de Oliveira,2 Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira Guilhoto,3,4 Esper Abrao Cavalheiro,3,4 Cássio MC Bottino1 1Old Age Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, 2Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of São Paulo, 3Association of Parents and Friends of People with Intellectual Disability of São Paulo, 4Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease often affect older adults with Down syndrome (DS much earlier than those in the general population. There is also growing evidence of the effects of negative life events on the mental health and behavior of individuals with intellectual disability. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study investigating objective cognitive decline following bereavement in aging individuals with DS.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether cognitive decline correlates with bereavement following the recent loss of a caregiver or with behavioral changes in a sample of adult individuals with DS who do not meet the criteria for dementia or depression, using the longitudinal assessment of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG, together with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE.Methods: We evaluated 18 subjects at baseline and over a follow-up period of 14–22 months, attempting to determine whether cognitive decline correlates with bereavement following the recent loss of the main caregiver or with behavioral changes (as assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory.Results: The mean rate of change in CAMCOG was -1.83 (standard deviation 4.51. Behavioral changes had a significant direct influence on cognitive decline. When bereavement was accompanied by behavioral changes, the probability of cognitive decline was 87% (odds ratio 3.82. Conclusion: The occurrence of behavioral changes attributed to bereavement following the loss of

  16. Development of a Short-Form of the RCOPE for Use with Bereaved College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Benjamin D; Collison, Elizabeth A; Gramling, Sandra E; Weiskittle, Rachel; Weisskittle, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Bereavement is being increasingly recognized as a key issue in college populations (Balk in Mortality 2:207-220, 1997; Balk et al. in Death Stud 34:459-468, 2010). However, there is currently a dearth of research on the impact that the loss of a loved one has on college students and the ways that college students cope during the grieving process. This lack of research, particularly among younger groups, is problematic as researchers have shown that emerging adults experience a surprisingly high number of losses and are an at-risk group for poor post-loss outcomes (Servaty-Seib and Taub 2010; Servaty-Seib and Hamilton 2006; Arnett in Am Psychol 55(5):469, 2000). Religion is a common way that individuals cope with bereavement (Frantz et al. in Pastor Psychol 44(3):151-163, 1996) and may also be commonly used by college students to manage everyday stress (Merrill et al. 2009). The RCOPE (Pargament et al. in J Clin Psychol 56(4):519-543, 2000; J Health Psychol 9:713-730, 2004) is a frequently used measure of religious coping that has recently been evaluated for use with a bereaved undergraduate population. Lord and Gramling (2014) examined the factor structure of the RCOPE and concluded that overlap between the positive and negative religious coping subscales when used with a bereaved undergraduate sample detracted from the predictive utility of the instrument. The researchers provided evidence for the use of a new 2-factor, 39-item version of the RCOPE with the bereaved college student population. The current study replicated Lord and Gramling (2014) with a large follow-up sample of bereaved undergraduates. Participants (N = 677) consisted of individuals who had lost a loved one within the past 2 years, had a mean age of 19.1, and were predominantly female (62%) underclassmen (84% freshman or sophomore status). A majority of participants (68%) were identified as Christian. Exploratory factor analyses closely mimicked the results of the previous study, and the number

  17. What are the physical and psychological health effects of suicide bereavement on family members? Protocol for an observational and interview mixed-methods study in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spillane, Ailbhe

    2017-03-30

    Research indicates that experiencing the suicide of a relative can have a significant impact on family members\\' emotional health. However, research incorporating the impact of suicide bereavement on family members\\' physical health is sparse. This paper details the protocol for a mixed-methods study of suicide-bereaved family members. The study will primarily examine the physical and mental health needs of those bereaved by suicide. A secondary objective of the study is to describe the support service needs of family members bereaved by suicide.

  18. A nationwide study on the risk of autism after prenatal stress exposure to maternal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prenatal stress has been linked to several adverse neurobehavioral outcomes, which may share a common pathophysiology with autism. We aimed to examine whether prenatal stress exposure after maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of autism later in life. METHODS: We...... compared with those in the unexposed group. RESULTS: Maternal bereavement during the prenatal period was not associated with an increased risk of autism in the offspring. The hazard ratios did not differ by the nature of the exposure (maternal relationship to the deceased or cause of death). The hazard...... ratios were comparable between the 5 prenatal exposure periods under study (7-12 months before pregnancy, 0-6 months before pregnancy, first trimester, second trimester, and third trimester). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first population-based cohort study to examine the effect of prenatal stress on autism...

  19. Chinese cultural dimensions of death, dying, and bereavement: focus group findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yick, Alice G; Gupta, Rashmi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe Chinese immigrants and Chinese Americans' attitudes and practices about death, dying, and bereavement. To this end, three focus groups were conducted with social work graduate students, pastors and religious leaders, and service providers working in the Chinese American community in New York City. The United States is becoming increasingly multicultural, and Chinese Americans are the most rapidly growing Asian American group. Findings from this study revealed that many Chinese attitudes and practices about death and dying are rooted in Asian cultural values such as filial piety, centrality of the family, and emphasis of hierarchy. In addition, strains of Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and local folklore are embedded in these death attitudes and practices. Based on themes extrapolated from the focus groups, recommendations are delineated for service providers in order to implement culturally-sensitive bereavement practices.

  20. Empowering people at work in the face of death and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Edwards, David

    2009-05-01

    How people respond at work may have a critical part to play in how bereaved or terminally ill colleagues manage their grief and their lives. Although counselors, human resources, occupational health staff, and others may have an important back-up role to play, pivotal support needs to come from line managers, colleagues, and, where they exist, trade union or other staff representatives. If bereavement is seen exclusively as a specialist area, managers and others can be discouraged and feel disabled from intelligently supporting the staff with whom they work. Alternatively it can be a reason for ignoring the issue. A workplace culture is needed where people are inspired and empowered to be human and humane for the sake of the motivation and indirectly the effectiveness of the people who work there.

  1. Mothers Coping With Bereavement in the 2008 China Earthquake: A Dual Process Model Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Fu, Fang; Sha, Wei; Chan, Cecilia L W; Chow, Amy Y M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the grief experiences of mothers after they lost their children in the 2008 China earthquake. Informed by the Dual Process Model, this study conducted in-depth interviews to explore how six bereaved mothers coped with such grief over a 2-year period. Right after the earthquake, these mothers suffered from intensive grief. They primarily coped with loss-oriented stressors. As time passed, these mothers began to focus on restoration-oriented stressors to face changes in life. This coping trajectory was a dynamic and integral process, which bereaved mothers oscillated between loss- and restoration-oriented stressors. This study offers insight in extending the existing empirical evidence of the Dual Process Model.

  2. Recommendations for palliative and bereavement care in the NICU: a family-centered integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, C; Press, J; Ryan, D

    2015-12-01

    Technological advances have increased our ability to detect a life-threatening, life-limiting or lethal problem early in pregnancy, leaving parents months to anticipate a death or a prematurely born infant. Babies can also be born with unanticipated problems that could lead to death. In either scenario, perinatal palliative care should be offered as a strategy for family support. Since the preponderance of professional training focuses on saving lives, many health professionals are uncomfortable with palliative care. This article's purpose is to define best practices for the provision of family-centered perinatal and neonatal palliative care and provision of support to bereaved families experiencing anticipated and unanticipated life-limiting conditions or death of their infant. An overview of core concepts and values is presented, followed by intervention strategies to promote an integrated family-centered approach to palliative and bereavement care. The concluding section presents evidence-based recommendations.

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Therapy in Advanced Cancer Continued Into Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissane, David W; Zaider, Talia I; Li, Yuelin; Hichenberg, Shira; Schuler, Tammy; Lederberg, Marguerite; Lavelle, Lisa; Loeb, Rebecca; Del Gaudio, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Systematic family-centered cancer care is needed. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of family therapy, delivered to families identified by screening to be at risk from dysfunctional relationships when one of their relatives has advanced cancer. Eligible patients with advanced cancer and their family members screened above the cut-off on the Family Relationships Index. After screening 1,488 patients or relatives at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center or three related community hospice programs, 620 patients (42%) were recruited, which represented 170 families. Families were stratified by three levels of family dysfunction (low communicating, low involvement, and high conflict) and randomly assigned to one of three arms: standard care or 6 or 10 sessions of a manualized family intervention. Primary outcomes were the Complicated Grief Inventory-Abbreviated (CGI) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Generalized estimating equations allowed for clustered data in an intention-to-treat analysis. On the CGI, a significant treatment effect (Wald χ(2) = 6.88; df = 2; P = .032) and treatment by family-type interaction was found (Wald χ(2) = 20.64; df = 4; P families. Low-communicating families improved by 6 months of bereavement. In the standard care arm, 15.5% of the bereaved developed a prolonged grief disorder at 13 months of bereavement compared with 3.3% of those who received 10 sessions of intervention (Wald χ(2) = 8.31; df = 2; P =.048). No significant treatment effects were found on the BDI-II. Family-focused therapy delivered to high-risk families during palliative care and continued into bereavement reduced the severity of complicated grief and the development of prolonged grief disorder. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Same-sex partner bereavement in older women:an interpretative phenomenological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ingham, Charlotte; Eccles, Fiona Juliet Rosalind; Armitage, Jocelyn Rebecca; Murray, Craig David

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Due to the lack of existing literature, the current research explored experiences of same-sex partner bereavement in women over the age of 60. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight women. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results: Three themes were identified which elaborated the experiences of older women who had lost a same-sex partner: (1) being left alone encapsulated feelings of isolation and exclusion; (2) naviga...

  5. Losing a partner: the varying financial and practical impacts of bereavement in different sociodemographic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Harriet; Johnson, Tom

    2017-04-27

    The purpose of this study was to describe the financial and practical impacts of the death of a life partner, up to 5 years after bereavement. The study compared the impact felt by different sociodemographic groups and evaluated the role of financial and caring organisations in improving these impacts. An evidence review of the subject area was conducted and a qualitative assessment of the target population (individuals whose partner had died in the past 3 years) was carried out using a semistructured interview (n=6). Subsequently, a multiple choice survey was constructed to collect data from a wider target population (individuals whose partner had died in the past 5 years) and covered topics including finances, interaction with organisations and management of daily tasks (n=500). The results of the multiple choice survey have been interpreted here using basic descriptive statistical analysis. 69% of people who lost a partner were unprepared, either financially or practically, for bereavement. Women and those under the age of 50 experienced the most significant financial impact and practical changes continued beyond 3 years postbereavement. To manage this disruption, 61% of participants reported that they felt they needed more help from financial and caring organisations postbereavement. The results of this survey demonstrate some of the key struggles each demographic group faces immediately after bereavement and into the future. It is clear that preparation and bereavement support have a profound effect on mitigating the negative impacts seen here. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Caregiver Responsiveness to the Family Bereavement Program: What predicts responsiveness? What does responsiveness predict?

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Berkel, Cady; Ayers, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The study developed a multi-dimensional measure to assess participant responsiveness to a preventive intervention, and applied this measure to study how participant baseline characteristics predict responsiveness and how responsiveness predicts program outcomes. The study was conducted with caregivers who participated in the parenting-focused component of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP), a prevention program for families that have experienced parental death. The sample consisted of 89 ca...

  7. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? Evidence from eye-tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten C Eisma

    Full Text Available Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful aspects of the loss, thereby contributing to complicated grief. To examine if rumination is linked with loss avoidance, an eye-tracking study was conducted with 54 bereaved individuals (27 high and 27 low ruminators. On 24 trials, participants looked for 10 seconds at a picture of the deceased and a picture of a stranger, randomly combined with negative, neutral or loss-related words. High ruminators were expected to show initial vigilance followed by subsequent disengagement for loss stimuli (i.e., picture deceased with a loss word in the first 1500 ms. Additionally, we expected high ruminators to avoid these loss stimuli and to show attentional preference for non-loss-related negative stimuli (i.e., picture stranger with a negative word on longer exposure durations (1500-10000 ms. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for an effect of rumination on vigilance and disengagement of loss stimuli in the first 1500 ms. However, in the 1500-10000 ms interval, high ruminators showed shorter gaze times for loss stimuli and longer gaze times for negative (and neutral non-loss-related stimuli, even when controlling for depression and complicated grief symptom levels. Effects of rumination on average fixation times mirrored these findings. This suggests that rumination and loss avoidance are closely associated. A potential clinical implication is that rumination and grief complications after bereavement may be reduced through the use of exposure and acceptance

  8. Maternal bereavement and childhood asthma-analyses in two large samples of Swedish children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    Full Text Available Prenatal factors such as prenatal psychological stress might influence the development of childhood asthma.We assessed the association between maternal bereavement shortly before and during pregnancy, as a proxy for prenatal stress, and the risk of childhood asthma in the offspring, based on two samples of children 1-4 (n = 426,334 and 7-12 (n = 493,813 years assembled from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Exposure was maternal bereavement of a close relative from one year before pregnancy to child birth. Asthma event was defined by a hospital contact for asthma or at least two dispenses of inhaled corticosteroids or montelukast. In the younger sample we calculated hazards ratios (HRs of a first-ever asthma event using Cox models and in the older sample odds ratio (ORs of an asthma attack during 12 months using logistic regression. Compared to unexposed boys, exposed boys seemed to have a weakly higher risk of first-ever asthma event at 1-4 years (HR: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98, 1.22 as well as an asthma attack during 12 months at 7-12 years (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.24. No association was suggested for girls. Boys exposed during the second trimester had a significantly higher risk of asthma event at 1-4 years (HR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.02 and asthma attack at 7-12 years if the bereavement was an older child (OR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.25. The associations tended to be stronger if the bereavement was due to a traumatic death compared to natural death, but the difference was not statistically significant.Our results showed some evidence for a positive association between prenatal stress and childhood asthma among boys but not girls.

  9. In-utero exposure to bereavement and offspring IQ: a Danish national cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasveer Virk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intelligence is a life-long trait that has strong influences on lifestyle, adult morbidity and life expectancy. Hence, lower cognitive abilities are therefore of public health interest. Our primary aim was to examine if prenatal bereavement measured as exposure to death of a close family member is associated with the intelligence quotient (IQ scores at 18-years of age of adult Danish males completing a military cognitive screening examination. METHODS: We extracted records for the Danish military screening test and found kinship links with biological parents, siblings, and maternal grandparents using the Danish Civil Registration System (N = 167,900. The prenatal exposure period was defined as 12 months before conception until birth of the child. We categorized children as exposed in utero to severe stress (bereavement during prenatal life if their mothers lost an elder child, husband, parent or sibling during the prenatal period; the remaining children were included in the unexposed cohort. Mean score estimates were adjusted for maternal and paternal age at birth, residence, income, maternal education, gestational age at birth and birth weight. RESULTS: When exposure was due to death of a father the offsprings' mean IQ scores were lower among men completing the military recruitment exam compared to their unexposed counterparts, adjusted difference of 6.5 standard IQ points (p-value = 0.01. We did not observe a clinically significant association between exposure to prenatal maternal bereavement caused by death of a sibling, maternal uncle/aunt or maternal grandparent even after stratifying deaths only due to traumatic events. CONCLUSION: We found maternal bereavement to be adversely associated with IQ in male offspring, which could be related to prenatal stress exposure though more likely is due to changes in family conditions after death of the father. This finding supports other literature on maternal adversity during fetal

  10. Long-term psychosocial outcomes among bereaved siblings of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Postier, Andrea; Osenga, Kaci; Kreicbergs, Ulrika; Neville, Bridget; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The death of a child from cancer affects the entire family. Little is known about the long-term psychosocial outcomes of bereaved siblings. To describe 1) the prevalence of risky health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support among bereaved siblings and 2) potentially modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes. Bereaved siblings were eligible for this dual-center, cross-sectional, survey-based study if they were 16 years or older and their parents had enrolled in one of three prior studies about caring for children with cancer at the end of life. Linear regression models identified associations between personal perspectives before, during, and after the family's cancer experience and outcomes (health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support). Fifty-eight siblings completed surveys (62% response rate). They were approximately 12 years bereaved, with a mean age of 26 years at the time of the survey (SD 7.8). Anxiety, depression, and illicit substance use increased during the year after their brother/sister's death but then returned to baseline. Siblings who reported dissatisfaction with communication, poor preparation for death, missed opportunities to say goodbye, and/or a perceived negative impact of the cancer experience on relationships tended to have higher distress and lower social support scores (P siblings reported that their loss still affected them; half stated that the experience impacted current educational and career goals. How siblings experience the death of a child with cancer may impact their long-term psychosocial well-being. Sibling-directed communication and concurrent supportive care during the cancer experience and the year after the sibling death may mitigate poor long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Past personal history of dysphoria, social support, and psychological distress following conjugal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, J C; Kasl, S; Jacobs, S

    1994-07-01

    This study describe the course and risk factors of psychological distress following bereavement, controlling for factors often omitted from studies of grief: psychiatric history, social support, and coping choices of the bereaved. Spouses of patients hospitalized for serious illness or elective surgery were systematically screened and followed longitudinally through the recovery or death of the hospitalized patient. Of 440 respondents, 154 were bereaved within 2 months. Spouses were interviewed in their homes by trained interviewers at intake and 2, 6, 13, and 25 months postintake. Dependent variables were measured with the CES-D (depressive symptoms) and the PERI (general anxiety and hopelessness/helplessness) scales. Independent variables were measured with the SADS-L (past personal history of dysphoria) and the Lazarus' Ways of Coping scale as well as sociodemographic measures. Lifetime prevalence of a brief period of dysphoric mood among spouses before the patient's illness was 22%; past personal history of dysphoric mood was related to female sex, smaller networks, and more depression and anxiety during the hospitalization of their spouses. Newly widowed persons with a past history of dysphoria perceived their networks to be relatively nonsupportive, but devoted similar amounts of coping effort to seeking social support and reported similar amounts of social interaction compared with persons with no history of dysphoria. Persons with a past history of dysphoria reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms, general anxiety, and hopelessness/helplessness through 25 months postbereavement, yet their recovery trajectory was similar to those without a past history of dysphoria. It was concluded that a past history of subsyndromal symptomatology in conjunction with a stressful life event such as bereavement increases one's vulnerability to excess psychological distress.

  12. Bereavement-related depression in the older adult population: a distinct disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, Natalia; Preville, Michel; Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria

    2013-12-01

    Bereavement is a phenomenon that shares many symptoms with depression, and that a great number of older adults experience following the loss of a close relative. The objectives of the present study were to (1) determine whether the symptoms of depression reported by bereaved individuals differ from those with non-bereavement minor/major depression (NBRD), (2) assess whether BRD is as persistent during a one year follow-up as compared to NBRD, and (3) identify factors and consequences associated with BRD. The data used for this study came from the Longitudinal Study ESA (Study Health of Elders), conducted between 2005 and 2008, using a representative sample (n=2811) of community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 and over. To test our hypothesis, an exploratory latent class analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used. BRD prevalence among older adults suffering from depression was 39%. BRD individuals report all symptoms of depression, but in lower probabilities, and BRD is as persistent as MDD over 12 months, suggesting that it does not differ from NBRD. The principal factors associated with BRD were widowhood and lower level of education. Individuals with BRD are less likely to consult medical services and be dispensed an antidepressant, compared to NBRD. We have to be cautious when generalizing our findings to individuals with major depression alone, since our results included both minor and major depressions in the same group. No evidence was found that BRD differed from non BRD in terms of depressive symptoms and persistence. The bereavement exclusion criterion in the DSM-IV should be reconsidered. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolutionizing Grief: Viewing Photographs of the Deceased Predicts the Misattribution of Ambiguous Stimuli by the Bereaved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire White

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a cognitive-evolutionary model of grief where the function of grief is to reunite a person with an absent partner where this is possible, and where it is not, to disengage and reorientate the individual from the lost agent. The present study investigates the potential factors that affect reunion-promoting symptoms by focusing on the misattribution of external stimuli to the deceased by the bereaved - which we term ‘false recognitions’. We propose three factors that relate to false recognitions: First, we propose that strong attachment to the deceased predisposes one to false recognitions; second, we predict that viewing photographs of the deceased (that were taken when the individual was alive perpetuates false recognitions; and third, we propose that time elapsing since the death diminishes the frequency of false recognitions. In a survey of 164 recently bereaved (<25 months pet owners in the U.S. and U.K., predictions concerning the association of the predictor and outcome variables were confirmed. The strongest predictor was the frequency of viewing photographic images of the deceased, a pattern consonant with our premise that, being evolutionarily novel, realistic photographs are treated as reliable cues that the agent remains a viable relationship partner. This research demonstrates the potential of evolutionary theory to inform mainstream bereavement research.

  14. Pilot evaluation of a group therapy program for children bereaved by suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Marc S; Labelle, Réal J

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of children are bereaved each year by suicide, yet there exists very little literature specifically on the psychological care, programs, and interventions available to help them. (1) To build and validate theoretical models for the Group Therapy Program for Children Bereaved by Suicide (PCBS); (2) to test these models in a preliminary evaluation. In the first part, we built theoretical models, which were then validated by scientists and clinicians. In the second part, the sessions of the PCBS were observed and rated. The participating children were tested pre- and postprogram. Positive changes were observed in the participating children in terms of basic safety, realistic understanding and useful knowledge, inappropriate behaviors, physical and psychological symptoms, child-parent and child-child communication, capacity for social and affective reinvestment, actualization of new models of self and the world, self-esteem, awareness and use of tools, cognitive, verbal, written and drawing abilities, cognitive dissonance, ambivalence, antagonism, and isolation. The changes reported in the bereaved children show that the PCBS has some efficacy.

  15. Immigrants Coping with Transnational Deaths and Bereavement: The Influence of Migratory Loss and Anticipatory Grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesteruk, Olena

    2017-12-14

    This study examines immigrants' experiences of bereavement and coping with the deaths of family members in a transnational context. Data were collected through in-depth personal interviews with middle-aged and older immigrants from different countries of origin, who have been living in the United States for a majority of their adult lives. Thematic analysis of participants' narratives showed that immigrants' geographic distance from family complicated caregiving circumstances and rituals surrounding burial, and impacted the grieving process. At the same time, this distance also served as an emotional barrier and provided protection from prolonged grief. Immigrants' U.S.-based family and work responsibilities served as buffers from prolonged grief. Over time, immigrants became Americanized in their attitudes toward coping with death and favored a fast return to productive activities. Finally, immigrants' experience of migratory loss and anticipatory grief early in immigration, along with their personal growth and resilience developed over time, impacted their bereavement experiences later in life. Considering the limitations and the exploratory nature of the present study, further research is needed to investigate the specifics of coping with loss and bereavement among immigrants. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  16. Death, bereavement and traumatic loss in Israel: a historical and cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witztum, E; Malkinson, R; Rubin, S S

    2001-01-01

    In the present article, we focus on the experience of bereavement and traumatic loss in Israel and examine the main influences that continue to shape them. For the Jewish population the main features are: religious aspects stemming from Jewish tradition and its variants; the secular and contemporary traditions, the ethos of the Israeli state, and the influence of the struggle to reestablish the Jewish people in its homeland. In an increasingly multicultural society, significant changes are occurring. A series of vignettes of grief and mourning illustrate current issues and practices among religious, secular, kibbutz, Russian and Ethiopian segments of society. The remainder of the article discusses emerging patterns of response to bereavement that are socially constructed and historically situated. We follow the variations in these patterns, from shifting forms of memorialization on the collective level to changes in expressive mood on the individual level, which are mediated by the cultural mosaic of the society. Mental health professionals would benefit from an understanding of the multifaceted fabric of beliefs and cultural-specific customs that shape the mourning rituals and their meanings for the bereaved.

  17. Same-sex partner bereavement in older women: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Charlotte F A; Eccles, Fiona J R; Armitage, Jocelyn R; Murray, Craig D

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lack of existing literature, the current research explored experiences of same-sex partner bereavement in women over the age of 60. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight women. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three themes were identified which elaborated the experiences of older women who had lost a same-sex partner: (1) being left alone encapsulated feelings of isolation and exclusion; (2) navigating visibility centred on how homophobia led to a lack of recognition of the women's grief; and (3) finding new places to be authentic related women's need for new relationships in which they could be themselves. The findings indicate that existing models of partner bereavement may provide useful frameworks when seeking to understand the experiences of older women who have lost their same-sex partners. The findings indicate that in addition to the experiences of partner bereavement noted in research with heterosexual widows, older women who lose same-sex partners may face particular challenges, which can impact upon psychological well-being and adjustment to loss. These challenges appear to result from past and current homophobic and heterosexist attitudes within the UK culture. A range of interventions at individual, group, health service, and societal levels may be beneficial in improving the psychological well-being of older women who lose a same-sex partner.

  18. Perceived timeliness of referral to hospice palliative care among bereaved family members in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Hyun Jung; Chang, Yoon Jung; Song, Hye Young; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Yeol; Park, Eun Jung; Paek, Soo Jin; Choi, Hee Jae

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to explore the perceived timeliness of referral to hospice palliative care unit (HPCU) among bereaved family members in Korea and factors associated therewith. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed for bereaved family members of patients who utilized 40 designated HPCUs across Korea. The questionnaire assessed whether admission to the HPCU was "too late" or "appropriate" and the Good Death Inventory (GDI). A total of 383 questionnaires were analyzed. Of participants, 25.8 % replied that admission to HPCU was too late. Patients with hepatobiliary cancer, poor performance status, abnormal consciousness level, and unawareness of terminal status were significantly related with the too late perception. Family members with younger age and being a child of the patient were more frequently noted in the too late group. Ten out of 18 GDI scores were significantly lower in the too late group. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed patients' unawareness of terminal status, shorter stay in the HPCU, younger age of bereaved family, and lower scores for two GDI items (staying in a favored place, living without concerning death or disease) were significantly associated with the too late group. To promote timely HPCU utilization and better quality of end of life care, patients need to be informed of the terminal status and their preference should be respected.

  19. Communication skills in Obstetrics: what can we learn from bereaved parents?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nuzum, D

    2017-02-01

    Communicating bad news in obstetrics is challenging. This study explores the impact of how bad news was communicated to parents following a diagnosis of stillbirth. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 mothers and 5 fathers, bereaved following stillbirth at a tertiary maternity hospital where the perinatal mortality rate is 5.2\\/1000. Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. How the diagnosis of stillbirth was communicated had a profound and lasting impact on parents. Dominant superordinate themes were Language used, Sensitivity and Diversionary techniques. Parents recalled in detail where and how bad news was broken and language used. Diversionary techniques created a sense of mistrust especially when parents felt information was being withheld. Bereaved parents valued privacy at the time of diagnosis of stillbirth.This study highlights the importance of language, sensitivity and environment where clinicians can learn from the experiences of bereaved parents who value open, sensitive and honest communication. The results of this study highlight the importance of patient-focused communication training for clinicians.

  20. Optimizing Visits to the Site of Death for Bereaved Families After Disasters and Terrorist Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pål; Dyregrov, Atle; Weisæth, Lars; Straume, Marianne; Dyregrov, Kari; Heir, Trond; Bugge, Renate Grønvold

    2017-09-13

    In recent years it has been common after disasters and terrorist events to offer bereaved families the opportunity to visit the place where their loved ones died. Many report that such visits are beneficial in processing their loss. Various factors, both cognitive (eg, counteracting disbelief) and existential or emotional (eg, achieving a sense of closeness to the deceased), are associated with the experienced benefit. Nonetheless, exacerbations of trauma and grief reactions (eg, re-enactment fantasies) are common, with some of the bereaved also reporting adverse reactions after the visit. Subsequently, proper preparations are a prerequisite before such visits take place. This article describes how to optimize collective visits to the site of death after disasters or terrorist events for bereaved families. Important questions-for example, concerning those who should be responsible for organizing a visit and those who should be invited, the timing of the visit, what can be done at the site, the need for support personnel, and other practical issues-are discussed and general guidelines are recommended. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 5).

  1. Family functioning and its predictors among disaster bereaved individuals in China: eighteen months after the Wenchuan Earthquake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China resulted in great loss of life and property, and previous studies have focused on psychopathological symptoms in survivors after disasters. This study examined perceived family functioning and its predictors in disaster bereaved individuals eighteen months after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 264 bereaved individuals. The instruments used in the study included Family APGAR Index, Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation ScaleãÀ, Emotional and Social Loneliness Scale, and a range of items eliciting demographic characteristics and disaster-related variables. The results indicated that the rates of moderate family dysfunction and severe family dysfunction in bereaved individuals were 37.1% and 12.9%, respectively. Less financial loss during the earthquake was a significant predictor for positive family function. Better self-rated health status after the earthquake was significantly related to positive family function, cohesion, and adaptability. Scores on family cohesion and adaptability in bereaved individuals from extended or nuclear families were significantly higher than those from single-parent families. The ability to give birth to another baby of bereaved parents was a significant predictor for positive family function and cohesion. Poorer family function, cohesion and adaptability were significantly related to greater loneliness. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study found a high prevalence of family dysfunction in bereaved individuals eighteen months after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Strategies can be designed to facilitate post-disaster recovery, particularly for the bereaved at high risk for family dysfunction. The study provides useful information for post-disaster rebuilding and relief work.

  2. Helping parents live with the hole in their heart: The role of health care providers and institutions in the bereaved parents' grief journeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Kaye, Erica C; Torres, Carlos; Gibson, Deborah V; Baker, Justin N

    2016-09-01

    Bereaved parents experience significant psychosocial and health sequelae, suggesting that this population may benefit from the ongoing extension of support and resources throughout the grief journey. The interaction of hospital staff with patients and families at the end of a child's life and after death profoundly affects parental grief, offering a unique opportunity for the medical community to positively impact the bereavement experience. The current study was conducted to explore the role of the health care team and medical institutions in the grief journeys of parents whose child died a cancer-related death. Eleven bereaved parents participated in 2 focus groups. Responses to each of the 3 main prompts were coded and analyzed independently using semantic content analysis techniques. Four main concepts were identified within the parental narratives, including the importance of strong and ongoing relationships between providers and bereaved families, the importance of high-quality communication, the effect of negative experiences between providers and families on parental grief, and the importance of the institution's role in the grief journeys of bereaved parents. Bereaved parents consistently identified the critical role played by medical staff and medical institutions throughout the grief journey. Key components of bereavement support identified by parents should serve to guide the actions of providers as well as provide a template for the development of a comprehensive bereavement program within an institution. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2757-2765. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Bereaved People with Loss-Related Distress: a Controlled Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connor, Maja; Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on symptom severity of depression, complicated grief, posttraumatic stress, and working memory in elderly bereaved people with long-term bereavement-related distress. A non-randomized, controlled pilot design was used in a sample...

  4. Assessing the quality of bereavement care after perinatal death: development and piloting of a questionnaire to assess parents' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyelaagbe, Esther; Scott, Rebecca E; Holmes, Victoria; Lane, Emma; Heazell, Alexander E P

    2017-10-01

    Understanding parents' experience of care is essential to develop high-quality perinatal bereavement services. This study aimed at developing a questionnaire to identify parents' needs and record their experience of care. The patient experience questionnaire was developed by professionals and parents, and piloted in a tertiary maternity unit. Responses were received from 58 parents. Sensitivity and kindness of staff and time spent with their baby were ranked as 'very important' by 95% of parents. Care in these areas largely met their needs (90%), although 5% of respondents stated that partners could have been more involved. Between 8% and 15% of respondents did not feel that language used at the diagnosis of fetal death was sensitive, clear and unambiguous. Parents did not always receive written information about their care (5%) or post-mortem (13%). Analysis of bereaved parents' responses identified areas for improvement including greater involvement of partners and a need for timely information. Impact statement What is already known on this subject?: Good quality bereavement care after perinatal death reduces the negative emotional, psychological and social effects for parents. Description of parents' experiences is a potential means to improve the quality of perinatal bereavement care. What do the results of this study add?: Parents' needs and experiences of care after perinatal death were recorded using a patient-experience questionnaire designed by a multi-professional team and parents. Staff behaviour, particularly sensitivity and kindness was highly valued by parents. Giving both verbal and written information could be improved. Training is needed for professionals, particularly those who come into contact with bereaved parents less frequently. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research?: Description of parents' priorities and views can be used to identify areas for improvement in perinatal bereavement care

  5. Exploring the experiences of bereaved families involved in assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamondi, Claudia; Pott, Murielle; Forbes, Karen; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    In Switzerland, helping with assisted suicide under certain conditions is not prosecuted. With approximately 300 cases annually, this leaves behind a large group of bereaved people where its consequences are mostly unknown. The study aimed to explore family involvement in decision making prior to assisted suicide, and to examine their ways of coping during the bereavement period. A qualitative interview study used the principles of Grounded Theory analysis. Eleven relatives of eight patients, who died in Southern Switzerland after assisted suicide, participated in semistructured interviews. The large majority of family members faced moral dilemmas during the decision-making phase. Their respect for patient's autonomy was a key justification to resolve dilemmas. Two types of involvement were identified: categorised as 'passive' when the decision making was located with the patient, and 'active' when assisted suicide was proposed by the family member and/or the relative was involved in some way. The relatives reported feelings of isolation during and after assisted suicide. Family members reported fear of social stigma and did not openly disclose assisted suicide as the cause of death. None of those interviewed received formal psychological support. Bereaved families express moral dilemmas, feelings of isolation and secrecy in the management of assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland. These features seem underestimated and not sufficiently recognised by the healthcare professionals. Management of assisted suicide requests should include consideration of family members' needs, in addition to those of the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Analysis of Lyrics from Group Songwriting with Bereaved Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Songwriting is a group intervention that is often used to help bereaved children and adolescents express thoughts and feelings associated with grief experiences. Few studies have examined the lyrical content of songs written by bereaved children/adolescents and how thematic content may vary by age and developmental understanding of death. The purpose of this study was to determine whether experiences of songwriting and lyrical content of songs written by children and adolescents participating in a bereavement camp vary by age. Thirty-three participants, ages 6-16, were grouped according to age (child, tween, or teen) and asked to write a group song. Analysis of song lyrics was based on both inductive and deductive content analysis processes. A seven-item questionnaire was also used with the tween and teen groups to gather descriptive information about the songwriting process, including participant views on benefits, enjoyment, and preferences. Analyses revealed a total of five different themes among the three age groups, with two of the five themes present across the age groups. A majority of the participants enjoyed the songwriting process, but no clear indication of preference for verbal or written contribution was determined based on age or gender. The lyric content of the songs varied across the age groups, with the older groups providing more diverse content and demonstrating growth in their understanding of death. Providing participants both written and verbal options to contribute to the songwriting process allows for individual preferences among tweens and teens. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Restoration and loss after disaster: Applying the dual-process model of coping in bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Ruth; Walter, Tony; Claridge, Leon

    2018-08-01

    The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focusing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration/rebuilding. After comparing memorials to New Zealand's Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavor may be grassroots, organized from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

  8. Death and bereavement in the First World War: the Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalland, Pat

    2014-06-01

    The First World War was a turning point in the cultural history of death and bereavement in Australia. The mass deaths of some 60,000 soldiers overseas led to communal rituals of mourning for the war dead and minimal public expressions of private grief. The mass slaughter of so many young men and the interminable grief of so many families devalued the deaths of civilians at home and helped to create a new cultural model of suppressed and privatised grieving which deeply constrained the next two generations. Emotional and expressive grieving became less common, mourning ritual was minimised and sorrow became a private matter. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Bereavement after sibling death: a population‐based longitudinal case‐control study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, James M.; Au, Wendy; Chateau, Dan; Walld, Randy; Leslie, William D.; Enns, Jessica; Martens, Patricia J.; Katz, Laurence Y.; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine mental disorders and treatment use among bereaved siblings in the general population. Siblings (N=7243) of all deceased children in the population of Manitoba, Canada who died between 1984 and 2009 were matched 1:3 to control siblings (N=21,729) who did not have a sibling die in the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the two sibling groups in the two years before and after the index child's death on physician‐diagnose...

  10. A mixed methods analysis of songs written by bereaved preadolescents in individual music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Melina; McFerran, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    Providing opportunities for children to process loss and express grief in response to the loss of a loved one has been shown to assist with successful coping (Worden, 1996). Songwriting may be a relevant method that fosters the expression of thoughts and feelings related to the loss. The purpose of this study was to analyse lyrics written by bereaved children during individual music therapy and to determine if they did use the opportunity to address grief through songwriting. Participants were 14 bereaved children (13 girls, 1 boy) aged between 7 and 12 years. Children were recruited and participated in individual music therapy in their homes with a credentialed music therapist. Participants wrote a total of 49 songs and their lyrics were analysed using a mixed methods content analysis. An inductive analysis identified categories existing within the lyrics and each lyric was then deductively attributed to one of the categories. Results revealed that the children wrote songs about themselves, their experiences, and their relationships, including, but not limited to the topic of loss. It became apparent that through songwriting these children expressed their experiences of the world based on their developmental capacities and limitations.

  11. Death the great leveller? Towards a transcultural spirituality of dying and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Margaret

    2006-07-01

    This paper aims to provide a critical engagement with the subject of transcultural spirituality and nursing practice in the context of dying and bereavement. There has been considerable interest in the subject of spirituality over the past decade, and a particular association between the study of death and the study of spirituality. The nursing literature has been at the forefront of these developments amongst health and social care professionals. Some of this literature has begun to address the issues raised for culturally competent practice and the significance of patients' belief systems in the diverse cultural contexts with which nurses must engage in contemporary health care. However, the author argues that understanding of the range of contemporary spiritualities and transcultural practice is at an early stage. Transcultural spirituality is explored through a critical review of the literature, including the author's own published research on spiritual and philosophical issues in death, dying and bereavement. The conclusion is drawn that some common themes and approaches can be found which offer a framework to guide nursing practice with the individual patient and family. In the absence of guidance, nurses struggle with implementing spiritual care in the fluid and complex context of contemporary spiritualities and frequently resort to broad categorizations. This paper opens up a way of connecting with the unique spiritual position of each patient.

  12. Dreams of deceased children and countertransference in the group psychotherapy of bereaved mothers: clinical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-09-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group was small, analytically oriented, slow-open, comprised of women bereaved by the death of a child, and conducted by a female therapist. Over more than three years, the group included 20 members in total. This article describes a number of dreams recorded during a period when the group included seven members. Dreams helped the group members access their emotional pain, helplessness, yearning for a relationship with the deceased, guilt, and feelings of survival guilt. The transference-countertransference relationships were characterized by holding. Countertransference feelings of helplessness predominated. The therapist and the group as a whole contained various emotions, allowing the group members to return to the normal mourning processes from the parallel encouragement of group development and interpersonal relationships.

  13. End-of-life parental communication priorities among bereaved fathers due to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eliza M; Deal, Allison M; Yopp, Justin M; Edwards, Teresa; Stephenson, Elise M; Hailey, Claire E; Nakamura, Zev M; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2017-05-01

    To elicit widowed fathers' perspectives on which domains of parenting-related communication they consider most important for dying parents to discuss at the end of life (EOL). Two hundred seventy nine fathers widowed by cancer completed a survey about their own depression and bereavement symptoms, their wife's illness, and EOL parental communication priorities. Chi square and Fisher's exact tests and logistic regression were used to evaluate relationships between maternal EOL characteristics and fathers' responses to parenting-related EOL communication priorities. Fathers identified raising children in a manner that reflected maternal wishes, whether/how to talk with children about their mother's death, and how the mother wanted to be remembered as the most important EOL communication domains. Fathers who reported that their dying wives were worried about the children were more likely to prioritize raising children in ways that reflect her wishes (p=0.01). Other EOL characteristics were not associated with communication domains. Communicating with children and maintaining emotional connection with the deceased parent are important priorities for bereaved fathers who lost a spouse to cancer. Health care providers working with seriously ill parents may improve family outcomes by supporting communication at the EOL between co-parents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictors of article impact in suicidology: the bereavement literature, a research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Karl; Krysinska, Karolina; Stack, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Citation analysis has been neglected in suicidology. The present note applies a mixed-methods approach to both test and suggest hypotheses for the variation in article impact in the bereavement literature. One hundred three articles from three core suicidology journals met the criteria for inclusion in the investigation. Citations to the articles were obtained from the Web of Science. Predictor variables included structural characteristics of the author (e.g., gender) and the article itself (e.g., years since publication). A multivariate regression analysis determined that, controlling for the other variables, the most important predictor of citations was the review article (β = .461), followed by year of publication (β = -.414), the multiauthored article (β = .302), publication in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior (SLTB) (β = .161), and male gender (β = .156). The 12 most cited articles were published between 1979 and 2004 in SLTB. The majority of these papers was written by males, were U.S. authors, and had more than one author. Four of the most cited articles were reviews. The study concludes that structural characteristics of articles and authors explained 41% of the variance in citations. The qualitative analysis determined that review papers, and papers on characteristics of suicide bereavement and psychological autopsies have been most frequently cited. Replication studies are needed for other subfields of suicidology. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  15. A community for grieving: affordances of social media for support of bereaved parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstad, Ylva Hård Af; Kasperowski, Dick

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study bereaved parents' use of a closed peer grief support community on Facebook and the features of the community that are important to them. The death of a child is an uncomfortable subject in most contemporary societies. This limits the exploration of experiences and possibilities for coping with grief. However, with the introduction of social media, this has changed. Theoretical perspectives on parental grief recognizing the importance of continued relational bonds with the lost child are used, together with the ontological assumption that social media enhance the dissolving of private/public and time/space. This study is based on questionnaire, interviews, and content from the closed peer grief support community, to which the research team has insider access. The community encompasses a diverse range of experiences and stages of grief, independent of the time elapsed since the loss of a child. Bereavement of children of all ages and from all conceivable causes of death is distributed among the members. The results show how the affordances of social media become vital resources for coping with grief in ways not available previously, comprising aspects of the closed nature of the group, shared experiences, time, and accessibility.

  16. Maternal bereavement in the antenathal period and Neural tube defect in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2013-01-01

    Title: Maternal bereavement after death of a close relative and neural tube defect in the offspring Background: Neural tube defects are the second most common and often lethal congenital anomaly in the world leaving surviving children with life-long severe disabilities. A low intake of folic acid...... was seen (OR 1.61, 95% CI: 1.07; 2.41). Discussion: We only studied live born children but about 2/3 of children with spina bifida survive the birth or longer with corrective surgery. We did not adjust for folic acid, but a sub-analysis of approximately 85,000 mothers showed no difference in intake during...... all children born in Denmark from 1978-2008 and their mothers (n=1,734,190). In the time window of one year before pregnancy or during the first trimester of pregnancy 34,407 mothers were exposed to bereavement. Results: A total of 5,031 cases of neural tube defects were identified: 889 with spina...

  17. Maternal bereavement in the antenatal period and oral cleft in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, K G; Liang, H; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    did not have the opportunity to adjust for intake of folic acid and use of anti-depressant; however, analysis in a subset of the data showed no difference in these intakes between exposed and unexposed mothers. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: With this study we add a large-scale human cohort study...... registers in Denmark from 1978 to 2008. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Our final study population consisted of 1 771 663 children. Of these 35 118 (2%) were born to mothers who experienced bereavement in the exposure window from 1 year before pregnancy to the end of the first trimester. MAIN...... to a sudden death, the risk of oral cleft in the offspring was higher (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.06; 2.94). Losing a relative in the time period before pregnancy and during the first trimester showed a tendency to an increased risk. The risk increase was 77% when the mother was bereaved due to sudden death...

  18. Still Searching: A Meta-Synthesis of a Good Death from the Bereaved Family Member Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Tenzek

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a good death continues to receive attention in end-of-life (EOL scholarship. We sought to continue this line of inquiry related to a good death by conducting a meta-synthesis of published qualitative research studies that examined a good death from the bereaved family member’s perspective. Results of the meta-synthesis included 14 articles with 368 participants. Based on analysis, we present a conceptual model called The Opportunity Model for Presence during the EOL Process. The model is framed in socio-cultural factors, and major themes include EOL process engagement with categories of healthcare participants, communication and practical issues. The second theme, (discontinuity of care, includes categories of place of care, knowledge of family member dying and moment of death. Both of these themes lead to perceptions of either a good or bad death, which influences the bereavement process. We argue the main contribution of the model is the ability to identify moments throughout the interaction where family members can be present to the EOL process. Recommendations for healthcare participants, including patients, family members and clinical care providers are offered to improve the quality of experience throughout the EOL process and limitations of the study are discussed.

  19. Bereaved Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Combined Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Study of Two Community-Based Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, S.; Hubert, J.; White, S.; Hollins, S.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Bereaved adults with intellectual disabilities are known to experience prolonged and atypical grief which is often unrecognized. The aim of this project was to find an effective way to improve mental health and behavioural outcomes. Methods: Subjects were randomized to two different therapeutic interventions: traditional counselling by…

  20. The Experiences of Staff Who Support People with Intellectual Disability on Issues about Death, Dying and Bereavement: A Metasynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Ailsa J.; Field, Stephen; Smith, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Historically, people with intellectual disabilities have tended to be excluded from knowing about death, dying and bereavement. Staff in intellectual disability services can play a valuable role in improving understanding of these issues in those they support. This qualitative metasynthesis aimed to understand the experiences of staff…

  1. The bereavement process of tissue donors' family members: responses of grief, posttraumatic stress, personal growth, and ongoing attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Nancy; Schmidt, Lee; Coolican, Maggie

    2014-09-01

    Donated tissues can save lives of critically burned patients and those needing a heart valve replacement. Tissues enhance the lives of a million recipients annually through transplants of corneas, bones, tendons, and vein grafts. Unfortunately, the need for some tissues exceeds their availability. The goal of the quantitative component of this mixed methods study was to identify the grief, posttraumatic stress, personal growth, and ongoing attachment response of tissue donors' family members during a 2-year period. Simultaneous mixed methods design. The sample for this study consisted of 52 tissue donors' family members, mostly widows (83%). Data were collected for 2 years to test changes in grief, posttraumatic stress, panic behavior, personal growth, and ongoing attachment. The bereaved participants experienced significantly fewer grief reactions, less posttraumatic stress, and greater personal growth. There was no significant difference in the ongoing attachment to their deceased loved ones. The results of this study may reinforce the positive meaning that tissue donors' family members can find in tissue donation. Findings also demonstrate that the bereavement process corroborates contemporary bereavement and attachment theories. Health professionals are encouraged to seek donations with less worry that tissue donors' family members will experience adverse outcomes during bereavement.

  2. Effects of Support, Counselling and Therapy Before and After the Loss: Can we Really Help Bereaved People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Schut

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Can other persons, personally or professionally, help bereaved individuals deal with the loss of a loved one? An increasing number of empirical studies, as well as qualitative and quantitative reviews, have addressed this question. Here, the main findings are summarised and implications for researchers and practitioners considered. First, provision of help from the informal social network and volunteers/professionals in the post-loss period is examined. Second, and uniquely in this research area, examination is extended to the efficacy of intervention for family members prior to their bereavement (i.e., in the context of palliative/end-of-life care. To what extent do the pre-loss patterns mirror those for post-bereavement intervention efficacy? A main conclusion is that intervention is not effective for bereaved persons in general, either when this is provided before or after the actual loss. It is important to identify and target high-risk persons. Further scientific and clinical implications of the patterns of results are discussed.

  3. Meaning-Making through Psychological Autopsy Interviews: The Value of Participating in Qualitative Research for Those Bereaved by Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyregrov, Kari Madeleine; Dieserud, Gudrun; Hjelmeland, Heidi Marie; Straiton, Melanie; Rasmussen, Mette Lyberg; Knizek, Birthe Loa; Leenaars, Antoon Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Too often ethical boards delay or stop research projects with vulnerable populations, influenced by presumed rather than empirically documented vulnerability. The article investigates how participation is experienced by those bereaved by suicide. Experiences are divided into 3 groups: (a) overall positive (62%), (b) unproblematic (10%), and (c)…

  4. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2008-01-01

    care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...

  5. Sound Continuing Bonds with the Deceased: The Relevance of Music, Including Preloss Music Therapy, for Eight Bereaved Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C.; McDermott, Fiona; Hudson, Peter; Zalcberg, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines music's relevance, including preloss music therapy, for 8 informal caregivers of people who died from cancer. The design was informed by constructivist grounded theory and included semistructured interviews. Bereaved caregivers were supported or occasionally challenged as their musical lives enabled a connection with the…

  6. Parental bereavement during mid-to-later life: pre- to postbereavement functioning and intrapersonal resources for coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Frank J; Mailick Seltzer, Marsha; Greenberg, Jan S; Song, Jieun

    2013-06-01

    The death of a child when parents are in mid-to-late life is a traumatic event for aging parents. In order to evaluate adjustment, the impact of unanticipated versus anticipated deaths, and the effects of internal resources for coping with bereavement, we examined pre- and postbereavement functioning, using the 1992/94 and 2004/06 waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, for parents (M age = 54 and 65 years, respectively) whose adult child died between these dates (n = 175). The results revealed a general pattern of adaptation in which most bereaved parents were functioning as well as a matched comparison group (n = 175), though more depression symptoms were present both before and after the death of the child for the mothers of children who died from long-term illnesses and the fathers of children who committed suicide, suggesting that conditions predating the death were chronic strains for these parents. Intrapersonal resources, including a sense of purpose in life and high levels of agreeableness, were associated with better functioning, particularly for bereaved parents whose children's deaths were not anticipated. The study places parental bereavement in the context of normative aging and the framework of chronic life strain. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. The relative importance of avoidance and restoration-oriented stressors for grief and depression in bereaved parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mairi; O'Connor, Rory C; O'Carroll, Ronan E

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has identified a number of individual risk factors for parental bereavement including the sex of the parent, the sex of the child, avoidance-focussed coping style and time since death. These factors emerged from research where variables were tested univariately and their relative importance is currently unknown. The current research, therefore, aims to investigate which risk factors are important, multivariately, for the outcomes of grief and depression in parents following the death of their child. Psychosocial measures were completed by 106 bereaved parents four years post-loss, recruited from death records in Scotland. The cause of the child's death included long-term illness and stillbirths as well as sudden and violent deaths. In multivariate regression analyses, depression was predicted by higher avoidance-focussed coping and higher number of restoration-oriented stressors such as relationship difficulties, problems at work and financial issues. Grief was predicted by higher avoidance, restoration stressors and level of continuing bonds. The present study adds to the knowledge about the phenomenon of parental bereavement with participants recruited directly from death records rather than through support, clinical or obituary sources. Factors previously found to be associated with outcomes when tested univariately such as sudden, violent death or sex of the parent were not significant when tested multivariately. This study highlights that different vulnerability factors exist for grief and depression in bereaved parents.

  8. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement: a Danish National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life. Population-based cohort study. Denmark. All singleton births in Denmark between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2006 were identified. These newborns were then linked to mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings using individually assigned civil personal registration numbers. We identified that data on childhood injuries were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, which contains data on all hospital stays and outpatient visits. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated from birth using log-linear Poisson regression models, and person-years were used as the offset variable. Age, residence, calendar period, maternal education, maternal income and parental-cohabitation status are treated as time-dependent variables (records were extracted from the offspring's birth year). Exposure to maternal bereavement due to a father's death had the strongest association with childhood injuries, especially when the cause of death was due to a traumatic event (adjusted estimates of IRR (aIRR): 1.25, 95%CI: 0.99 to 1.58). We did not find an association for childhood injuries and maternal bereavement due to grandparent's death, and we only found an association for sibling death when restricting to deaths due to traumatic events (aIRR: 1.20, 95%CI:1.03 to 1.39). The aetiology of childhood injuries is complex and may be related to events that take place during prenatal life. This study suggests that exposure to a stressful life event during gestation may be linked to injury susceptibility in childhood. However, changes in postnatal family conditions related to loss or genetic factors may also play a role. Developmental plasticity related to early life exposures leading to disease programming in offspring is a theory with substantial theoretical and empirical support. Prenatal stress exposure has been

  9. Course of bereavement over 8-10 years in first degree relatives and spouses of people who committed suicide : longitudinal community based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Marieke; Kollen, Boudewijn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors predicting the long term course of complicated grief, depression, and suicide ideation in a community based sample of relatives bereaved through suicide. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Included in the multilevel regression models were sociodemographic and personality

  10. Course of bereavement over 8-10 years in first degree relatives and spouses of people who committed suicide: longitudinal community based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Kollen, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors predicting the long term course of complicated grief, depression, and suicide ideation in a community based sample of relatives bereaved through suicide. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Included in the multilevel regression models were sociodemographic and personality

  11. Analysis of the bereavement effect after the death of a spouse in the Amish: a population-based retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Seifter, Ari; Singh, Sarabdeep; McArdle, Patrick F; Ryan, Kathleen A; Shuldiner, Alan R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the association between bereavement and the mortality of a surviving spouse among Amish couples. We hypothesised that the bereavement effect would be relatively small in the Amish due to the unusually cohesive social structure of the Amish that might attenuate the loss of spousal support. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting The USA. Participants 10 892 Amish couples born during 1725–1900 located in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. All the participant...

  12. An exploratory qualitative analysis of student midwives views of teaching methods that could build their confidence to deliver perinatal bereavement care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caroline J Hollins; Robb, Yvonne; Forrest, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    Equipping student midwives with confidence to deliver bereavement care to childbearing women is a challenge for midwifery lecturers. To explore qualitative data provided by student midwives who evaluated the workbook Bereavement care for childbearing women and their families (Hollins Martin & Forrest, 2013) to explore their views of potential teaching strategies that could build their confidence to deliver real bereavement care. An exploratory qualitative thematic analysis was used to provide, analyse and report themes identified within data collected in a prior study. Participants were student midwives (n=179) in their second/third year of a midwifery degree program at 1 of 3 universities in the UK were included in the study. Data to evaluate effectiveness of the bereavement workbook as a teaching method was collected using a survey instrument. It was the comments written under questions by participants that were analysed in the present study. Three themes emerged: (1) increasing classroom interaction, (2) the importance of reflecting on emotions, and (3) need for experience. Although this study has addressed delivery of education that relates to midwives, the findings are cross transferable to other healthcare educators, practitioners, and students. Several solutions are proposed that could potentially build student confidence to deliver bereavement care: lecturers should (1) encourage group discussion in the classroom to help build student confidence to emotionally cope during real bereavement events; (2) ensure students gain exposure by encouraging qualified midwives to include them in real bereavement events early on in their training, and (3) develop packages of perinatal bereavement scenarios for simulation and rehearsal in the clinical skills laboratory. Post-implementation, it is recommended that these teaching strategies be evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom: exploring wartime death and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington Lamorie, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Military deaths are often sudden, unanticipated, traumatic, and/or violent in nature and involve the death of a young adult. More than 5,500 service members have died as a result of their service in the wars in Afghanistan (2001) and Iraq (2003) in combat- or non-combat- related incidences. As the death toll continues to rise, service members and their families struggle with the visible and invisible wounds of war. This article explores wartime death, trauma, and bereavement experienced by those survivors affected by service members who have died as a result of their military service in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). It recognizes the circumstantial and cultural factors of the death as well as the grief and trauma experiences of survivors. Resources and suggested interventions of support are highlighted.

  14. When the spirit leaves: Childhood death, grieving, and bereavement in Islam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Kamyar

    2006-12-01

    The death of a child has a profound and often long-lasting impact on families. The parent's relationship and their ability to bond with and take care of surviving children may be affected. It is important for healthcare workers to understand the dynamics associated with bereavement, especially when the family comes from a non-Western culture. Islam is one of the three most populous religions along with Christianity and Hinduism and the fastest growing religion in the United States but remains largely misunderstood. This paper seeks to explain what Islam is, who is a Muslim, where they live, and what they believe and practice. It also explains how Islamic beliefs contextualize the meaning of life and death for Muslims and how they are exhorted to grieve upon a child's death. Reading this paper will enable those who care for Muslim families to better attend to the social and emotional needs of Muslim parents and siblings after such a tragic event.

  15. Recovery through reconnection: a cultural design for family bereavement in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Min-Tao; Kahn, David L; Yee, Der-Heuy; Lee, Wei-Lun

    2004-10-01

    Using reanalyzed data from ethnographic research performed in Taiwan during the 1990s, the authors inspect Taiwanese cultural patterns as they affect adaptation to loss in the form of death. The data include participant observations and the narratives of 52 widows and 30 of their children. An analysis of interview transcripts suggests that the most common form of return to a harmony house among the participants was achieving a sense of reconnection with the deceased. According to the narratives, the Taiwanese concept of reconnection entails (a) maintaining the status quo, (b) restoring images of the deceased in family affairs, and (c) communicating with the dead. Each theme represents the efforts of bereaved families to retain a sense of wholeness (a central Chinese goal) and to preserve symbolic images of fathers and husbands. The authors suggest that reconnection is a culturally specific and accepted means of resolving grief among Taiwanese.

  16. Using action research to design bereavement software: engaging people with intellectual disabilities for effective development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sue; Nte, Sol; Corcoran, Patsy; Stephens, Richard

    2013-05-01

     Loss is a universal experience and death is perceived as the ultimate loss. The overarching aim of this research is to produce a qualitative, flexible, interactive, computerised tool to support the facilitation of emotional expressions around loss for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores the process of using Participatory Action Research (PAR) to develop this tool.  Participator Action Research provided the indicative framework for the process of developing a software tool that is likely to be used in practice. People with intellectual disability worked alongside researchers to produce an accessible, flexible piece of software that can facilitate storytelling around loss and bereavement and promote spontaneous expression that can be shared with others. This tool has the capacity to enable individuals to capture experiences in a storyboard format; that can be stored; is easily retrievable; can be printed out; and could feasibly be personalised by the insertion of photographs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Posttraumatic Growth and Bereavement: The Contribution of Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Andrew B; Beaudry, Myriam; Blanchard, Celine

    2017-09-01

    No research drawing from Self-Determination Theory has investigated the bereavement experience of individuals or how motivation can help facilitate posttraumatic growth (PTG) following the death of a loved one. In two cross-sectional studies, university students completed an online survey. Study 1 investigated the contribution of global autonomous and controlled motivation in statistically predicting PTG above and beyond previously researched correlates. Study 2 explored the mediating role of cognitive appraisals and coping in explaining the relationship between global motivation orientations and PTG. Results indicated that in comparison to controlled motivation, autonomous motivation was positively related PTG, even after controlling for previously researched correlates. Mediation results indicated an indirect effect of global autonomous motivation on PTG through task-oriented coping. Collectively, these findings suggest the importance of incorporating motivation into models of PTG. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  18. A study of laughter and dissociation: distinct correlates of laughter and smiling during bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltner, D; Bonanno, G A

    1997-10-01

    Laughter facilitates the adaptive response to stress by increasing the psychological distance from distress and by enhancing social relations. To test these hypotheses, the authors related measures of bereaved adults' laughter and smiling 6 months postloss to measures of their (a) subjective emotion and dissociation from distress, (b) social relations, and (c) responses they evoked in others. Duchenne laughter, which involves orbicularis oculi muscle action, related to self-reports of reduced anger and increased enjoyment, the dissociation of distress, better social relations, and positive responses from strangers, whereas non-Duchenne laughter did not. Lending credence to speculations in the ethological literature, Duchenne laughter correlated with different intrapersonal and interpersonal responses than Duchenne smiles. Discussion focuses on the relevance of these findings to theories of positive emotion.

  19. Seeking Legitimacy for DSM-5: The Bereavement Exception as an Example of Failed Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James E; Daniels, Norman

    2017-02-01

    In 2013 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Even before publication, DSM-5 received a torrent of criticism, most prominently over removal of the "bereavement exclusion" for the diagnosis of major depression. We argue that while the APA can claim legitimate authority for deciding scientific questions, it does not have legitimacy for resolving what is ultimately a question of ethics and public policy. We show how the "accountability for reasonableness" framework for seeking legitimacy in health policy could have been used to achieve a better resolution of the conflict than actually occurred. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Uses of media in everyday practices of grief among bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    continues the bonds (Cf. Walter 1999) to the dead child so that the bereaved can re-integrate the dead into their everyday life. This perspective implies that grieving is not allocated to a specific period of time (a time of mourning) but that grieving and the uses of social technologies like media related...... functionalities that are specifically fit for a certain use) may be understood as a matter of dimensions, as complex systems of communication whether we see this in the use of objects on children’s graves embedded with media affordances (Christensen & Sandvik 2014a) or social media used as communicational tools...... in a one-way cause-and-effect way implying that media produce new practices. The paper argues that at the same time we can observe how people turn objects into media or create new ways of using existing media employing them as new tools for communicating with or about the dead (see Jensen 2010, Christensen...

  1. The incidence and course of depression in bereaved youth 21 months after the loss of a parent to suicide, accident, or sudden natural death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, David; Melhem, Nadine; Donohoe, M Bertille; Walker, Monica

    2009-07-01

    This study examined effects of bereavement 21 months after a parent's death, particularly death by suicide. The participants were 176 offspring, ages 7-25, of parents who died by suicide, accident, or sudden natural death. They were assessed 9 and 21 months after the death, along with 168 nonbereaved subjects. Major depression and alcohol or substance abuse 21 months after the parent's death were more common among bereaved youth than among comparison subjects. Offspring with parental suicide or accidental death had higher rates of depression than comparison subjects; those with parental suicide had higher rates of alcohol or substance abuse. Youth with parental suicide had a higher incidence of depression than those bereaved by sudden natural death. Bereavement and a past history of depression increased depression risk in the 9 months following the death, which increased depression risk between 9 and 21 months. Losing a mother, blaming others, low self-esteem, negative coping, and complicated grief were associated with depression in the second year. Youth who lose a parent, especially through suicide, are vulnerable to depression and alcohol or substance abuse during the second year after the loss. Depression risk in the second year is mediated by the increased incidence of depression within the first 9 months. The most propitious time to prevent or attenuate depressive episodes in bereaved youth may be shortly after the parent's death. Interventions that target complicated grief and blaming of others may also improve outcomes in symptomatic youth with parental bereavement.

  2. Bereaved relatives' decision about deceased organ donation: An integrated psycho-social study conducted in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Jorge S; Martínez, José M; Soria-Oliver, María; Aramayona, Begoña; García-Sánchez, Rubén; Martín, María J; Almendros, Carmen

    2018-05-01

    Family refusal to organ donation of a deceased relative represents one of the most important barriers to organ transplantation. Although a large literature about family decisions has amassed, the existing evidence needs further integration and structuring. This study seeks to analyse relationships between bereaved relatives' decisions and a wide range of factors that converge in the family decision process, including interactions and complex relationship patterns, and taking psychosocial theoretical frameworks as reference to conceptualize empirical findings. This observational study examined 16 Spanish hospitals during a 36-month period. Transplant coordination teams collected data of 421 cases of family decision processes about donation (338 donations/83 refusals) through a previously validated instrument. Indicators of the following factors were collected: deceased's characteristics; circumstances of death; bereaved relatives' characteristics, beliefs, and expressions; behaviour of health and coordination staff; and family's emotional responses. Three global hypotheses related to bivariate and multivariate relations of factors with family decisions and relationships/interactions among factors were tested. Relatives' beliefs about the deceased's wishes concerning donation are the strongest predictor of family decisions. However, family decisions are also related to the deceased's characteristics, relatives' characteristics, satisfaction with medical attention, satisfaction with personal treatment and relatives' emotional responses, and other factors. Relatives' emotional reactions are related to satisfaction with health-staff interventions and condition family decision, even if deceased's will concerning donation is known and positive. Relatives' beliefs about deceased's wishes concerning donation vary as a function of deceased's characteristics and according to relatives' characteristics. Understanding of family decisions underlying organ donation may greatly

  3. Bereavement care interventions and outcome criteria planned by community nurses in the Canary Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Álvaro, Martín; García-Hernández, Alfonso Miguel; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Domingo Ángel

    2018-02-19

    Nursing care in bereavement is complex. Primary health care is the ideal setting to support the bereaved, but we do not know much about the care plans designed by primary health care nurses in the treatment of grief. To identify the outcomes criteria and interventions planned by nurses for mourners with and without complications in the Canary Islands. Retrospective longitudinal study, using the electronic health records of the Canary Islands health service of people with a diagnosis of grieving, risk of complicated grieving and complicated grieving, in the period 2009-2014. NOC outcomes criteria were recorded in 67% of the mourners, and up to 24 different outcomes were identified. The main outcomes measures were Grief resolution; Psychosocial adjustment, Life change; Coping; Family coping; Family social climate and Caregiver emotional health. The remaining outcomes were present in less than 1% of the mourners. Although the outcomes criteria proposed by nurses in the mourners with and without complications were quite homogeneous, differences in interventions were found. In 67% of the cases, NIC interventions were reported. Ninety-nine different interventions were identified in the mourners; the most frequent were Emotional support; Grief work facilitation; Active listening; Coping enhancement and counselling. The remaining identified interventions were present in less than 5% of patients. The main interventions in the mourners with complications were Grief work facilitation; Coping enhancement; Active listening; Counselling and Family integrity promotion. Nurses state that there are more interventions and outcomes in mourners with complications. Given the few methodologically reliable studies that prove their effectiveness, continued research in this area is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Anger toward God: social-cognitive predictors, prevalence, and links with adjustment to bereavement and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exline, Julie J; Park, Crystal L; Smyth, Joshua M; Carey, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Many people see themselves as being in a relationship with God and see this bond as comforting. Yet, perceived relationships with God also carry the potential for experiencing anger toward God, as shown here in studies with the U.S. population (Study 1), undergraduates (Studies 2 and 3), bereaved individuals (Study 4), and cancer survivors (Study 5). These studies addressed 3 fundamental issues regarding anger toward God: perceptions and attributions that predict anger toward God, its prevalence, and its associations with adjustment. Social-cognitive predictors of anger toward God paralleled predictors of interpersonal anger and included holding God responsible for severe harm, attributions of cruelty, difficulty finding meaning, and seeing oneself as a victim. Anger toward God was frequently reported in response to negative events, although positive feelings predominated. Anger and positive feelings toward God showed moderate negative associations. Religiosity and age correlated negatively with anger toward God. Reports of anger toward God were slightly lower among Protestants and African Americans in comparison with other groups (Study 1). Some atheists and agnostics reported anger involving God, particularly on measures emphasizing past experiences (Study 2) and images of a hypothetical God (Study 3). Anger toward God was associated with poorer adjustment to bereavement (Study 4) and cancer (Study 5), particularly when anger remained unresolved over a 1-year period (Study 5). Taken together, these studies suggest that anger toward God is an important dimension of religious and spiritual experience, one that is measurable, widespread, and related to adjustment across various contexts and populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Effects of Mental Health Support on the Grief of Bereaved People Caused by Sewol Ferry Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyesung; Noh, Jin Won; Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji Young; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Chae, Jeong Ho

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have assessed the overall effects of multi-centered, complicated mental health support on the grief process. This study investigated the broader influence of mental health support provided practically to the bereaved family on the severity of complicated grief. Ninety-three bereaved family members of the Sewol ferry accident were recruited. Severity of complicated grief, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive disorder was assessed through self-reporting questionnaire, inventory of complicated grief (ICG), PTSD Check List-5 (PCL-5) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). We also included demographic, socioeconomic, health-related variables, and Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ), which affect the ICG score. Participants were divided into 4 groups based on the experience of psychotherapy or psychiatry clinic service before the accident and mental health support after the disaster. In univariate analysis, these 4 groups showed a significant difference in the mean ICG score (P = 0.020). Participants who received mental health support only after the Sewol ferry accident (group 2) showed a lower mean ICG score than those who received neither psychotherapy or psychiatry clinic service before the disaster nor mental health support after the accident (group 4). There was no significant correlation between the ICG score and other variables except for subjective health status measured 1 month after the disaster (P = 0.005). There was no significant difference in PCL-5 (P = 0.140) and PHQ-9 scores (P = 0.603) among groups, respectively. In conclusion, mental health support significantly reduced the severity of grief only in those participants who had not received any psychotherapy or psychiatry clinic service before the accident. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  6. Bereaved parents' experience of stillbirth in UK hospitals: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downe, Soo; Schmidt, Ellie; Kingdon, Carol; Heazell, Alexander E P

    2013-01-01

    To obtain the views of bereaved parents about their interactions with healthcare staff when their baby died just before or during labour. Qualitative in-depth interview study, following an earlier national survey. All interviews took place during 2011, either face-to-face or on the telephone. Data analysis was informed by the constant comparative technique from grounded theory. Every National Health Service (NHS) region in the UK was represented. Bereaved parents who had completed an e-questionnaire, via the website of Sands (Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Society). Of the 304 survey respondents who gave provisional consent, 29 families were approached to take part, based on maximum variation sampling and data saturation. 22 families (n=25) participated. Births took place between 2002 and 2010. Specific practices were identified that were particularly helpful to the parents. Respondents talked about their interactions with hospital staff as having profound effects on their capacity to cope, both during labour and in the longer term. The data generated three key themes: 'enduring and multiple loss': 'making irretrievable moments precious'; and the 'best care possible to the worst imaginable'. The overall synthesis of findings is encapsulated in the meta-theme 'One chance to get it right.' This pertains to the parents and family themselves, clinical and support staff who care for them directly, and the NHS organisations that indirectly provide the resources and governance procedures that may (or may not) foster a caring ethos. Positive memories and outcomes following stillbirth depend as much on genuinely caring staff attitudes and behaviours as on high-quality clinical procedures. All staff who encounter parents in this situation need to see each meeting as their one chance to get it right.

  7. Parental Bereavement in Young Children Living in South Africa and Malawi: Understanding Mental Health Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, A; Sherr, L; Tomlinson, M; Skeen, S; Roberts, K J

    2018-04-17

    Parental loss is a major stressful event found to increase risk of mental health problems in childhood. Yet, some children show resilient adaptation in the face of adversity across time. This study explores predictors of mental health resilience among parentally bereaved children in South Africa and Malawi, and their cumulative effect. The study also explores whether predictors of resilience differed between orphaned and non-orphaned children. Consecutive attenders of community based organisations (children;4-13 years, and their caregivers) were interviewed at baseline and 15-18 month follow up (n=833). Interviews comprised of inventories on demographic information, family data, child mental health, bereavement experience and community characteristics. Mental health screens were used to operationalise resilience as the absence of symptoms of depression, suicidality, trauma, emotional and behavioural problems. Almost 60% of children experienced parental loss. One quarter of orphaned children showed no mental health problems at either wave and were classified as resilient. There were equal proportions of children classified as resilient within the orphaned (25%) vs. non-orphaned group (22%). Being a quick learner, aiding ill family members, positive caregiving, household employment, higher community support, and lower exposure to domestic violence, physical punishment, or stigma at baseline predicted sustained resilience. There were cumulative influences of resilience predictors among orphaned children. Predictors of resilience did not vary by child age, gender, country of residence or between orphaned and non-orphaned children. This study enhances understanding of resilience in younger children and identifies a number of potential environmental and psychosocial factors for bolstering resilience in orphaned children.

  8. The provision of family-centred intensive care bereavement support in Australia and New Zealand: Results of a cross sectional explorative descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Marion; Coombs, Maureen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-05-01

    Caring for the bereaved is an intrinsic part of intensive care practice with family bereavement support an important aspect of the nursing role at end of life. However, reporting on provision of intensive care family bereavement support at a national level has not been well reported since an Australian paper published ten years ago. The objective was to investigate provision of family bereavement support in intensive care units (ICU) across New Zealand (NZ) and Australia. A cross-sectional exploratory descriptive web-based survey was used. All ICUs [public/private, neonatal/pediatrics/adults] were included. The survey was distributed to one nursing leader from each identified ICU (n=229; 188 in Australia, 41 in NZ). Internal validity of the survey was established through piloting. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Ethical approval was received by the ethics committees of two universities. One-hundred and fifty-three (67%) responses were received from across New Zealand and Australia with 69.3% of respondents from the public sector. Whilst respondents reported common bereavement practices to include debriefing for staff after a traumatic death (87.9%), there was greater variation in sending a sympathy card to families (NZ 54.2%, Australia 20.8%). Fifty percent of responding New Zealand units had a bereavement follow-up service compared to 28.3% of Australian unit respondents. Of those with follow-up services, 92.3% of New Zealand units undertook follow-up calls to families compared to 76.5% of Australian units. Bereavement follow-up services were mainly managed by social workers in Australia and nursing staff in New Zealand. This is the first Australia and New Zealand-wide survey on ICU bereavement support services. Whilst key components of family bereavement support remain consistent over the past decade, there were fewer bereavement follow-up services in responding Australian ICUs in 2015. As a quality improvement initiative, support for this

  9. The temporal relationship between change in symptoms of prolonged grief and posttraumatic stress following old age spousal bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Connor, Maja; Nickerson, Angela; Aderka, Idan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High levels of both prolonged grief symptoms (PGS) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) are relatively common following bereavement, and the two types of bereavement complications share some of the same features. Little research has studied which of the two precedes the other...... following the death of a loved one. The purpose of this study was to examine the temporal relationship between change in high levels of PGS and PTSS during the first four years following old age spousal loss. Methods: Participants were 237 Danes (40% male; mean age = 73 years, SD = 4.4; range 65-81) who....... Results: Lower-level mediation analyses wereas performed. Results indicated that PGS mediated 83% of the relationship between time and PTSS, while PTSS only mediated 17% of the relationship between time and PGS. These results suggest that changes in PGS mediated changes in PTSS following spousal...

  10. When avoiding unpleasant emotions might not be such a bad thing: verbal-autonomic response dissociation and midlife conjugal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, G A; Keltner, D; Holen, A; Horowitz, M J

    1995-11-01

    It has been widely assumed that emotional avoidance during bereavement leads to either prolonged grief, delayed grief, or delayed somatic symptoms. To test this view, as well as a contrasting adaptive hypothesis, emotional avoidance was measured 6 months after a conjugal loss as negative verbal-autonomic response dissociation (low self-rated negative emotion coupled with heightened cardiovascular activity) and compared with grief measured at 6 and 14 months. The negative dissociation score evidenced reliability and validity but did not evidence the assumed link to severe grief. Rather, consistent with the adaptive hypothesis, negative dissociation at 6 months was associated with minimal grief symptoms across 14 months. Negative dissociation scores were also linked to initially high levels of somatic symptoms, which dropped to a low level by 14 months. Possible explanations for the initial cost and long-term adaptive quality of emotional avoidance during bereavement, as well as implications and limitations of the findings, are discussed.

  11. Gender similarities in somatic depression and in DSM depression secondary symptom profiles within the context of severity and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angus H; Bland, Roger C

    2018-02-01

    Most population studies report higher rates of depression among women than men, and some researchers have observed gender differences in depression symptoms overall, or in sub-groupings (e.g. somatic depression). However, gender symptom differences have been inconsistent, prompting this investigation of gender differences in secondary DSM symptom profiles in the context of bereavement status, age, and depression severity. Individuals with symptoms of core depression (flat affect or anhedonia) were selected from a large survey of adults in the Alberta, Canada workforce. Analyses involved the comparison of gender profiles across the seven DSM-IV secondary depressive symptoms plus a MANOVA of sex, bereavement, and age, with secondary symptoms comprising the dependent variable. Gender profiles were very similar, irrespective of depression severity or bereavement. Secondary symptoms were marginally more common among women and more frequent among bereaved young adults, but there was no evidence for a gender-related somatic factor. First, data were gathered only for persons in the workforce and thus may not be generalizable to, for example, stay-at-home parents or those with employment issues. Second, the focus here is restricted to DSM symptoms, leaving risk factors, social roles, and brain functioning for separate investigation. Third, inferences were drawn from associations between groups of persons, rather than between individuals, requiring caution when speculating about individual attributes. Gender differences in depression represent a difference in amount, not kind, suggesting that the range of depressive experiences is similar for men and women. There was no gender difference ascribable to somatic depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Attachment styles, grief responses, and the moderating role of coping strategies in parents bereaved by the Sewol ferry accident

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hyu Jung; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Previous studies on the influence of different types of attachment on grief responses have yielded contradictory outcomes. Little research has been conducted to identify the psychological processes that moderate the relationship between attachment representations and patterns of grief in disaster-related grief. Objective: The present study examines the effects of different attachment types on the grief responses of parents bereaved by loss of a child in a ferry accident, ...

  13. Religious care required for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer from the perspective of bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takuya; Ando, Michiyo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Kawamura, Ryo; Mitsunori, Miyashita; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the most suitable religious care for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer based on the opinions of bereaved family members. A multicenter questionnaire survey on palliative care service was sent to 592 bereaved family members of patients with cancer who were admitted to palliative care units in Japan, and 430 responded by mail. In the section of the questionnaire about religious care, 382 responses were used for quantitative analysis, and 71 responses about religious care for qualitative analysis. In the current study, the 71 responses were grouped into families with and without a religion and were analyzed qualitatively. Families with a religion (N = 28) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care'' such as music or a religious event, ''Freedom of choice of kinds for religious care,'' ''Staff involvement of religious care,'' ''Meeting with a pastoral care workers,'' and ''Burden of offering a different kind of personal religion.'' In contrast, families without a religion (N = 44) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care,'' ''Freedom of choice whether patients receive religious care or not,'' ''Spiritual care,'' ''Not being able to accept religious care,'' and ''Burden of thinking about a religion and nuisance.'' These findings suggest that Japanese bereaved families with a religion generally regard religious care positively and prefer care through their own religion, whereas some families without a religion require religious care but some do not prefer it.

  14. Adding Trauma-Informed Care at a Bereavement Camp to Facilitate Posttraumatic Growth: A Controlled Outcome Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Searles McClatchey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies on posttraumatic growth (PTG among bereaved youth are rare; outcome studies on how to facilitate PTG among this population are even more scarce. Objectives: This study examined the addition of trauma-informed care to bereavement interventions to foster PTG in youth attending a weekend-long bereavement camp. Method: A total of 105 participants completed standardized measures of posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder after which 52 of the participants took part in a camp session. Ninety-five of the participants from both groups were post-tested four weeks after the camp session. Results: Multiple Regression showed that PTG scores were significantly greater at posttest for the treatment group. No significant changes in PTSD were found in either group, although the presence of dissociative symptoms decreased significantly among campers in the treatment group. Conclusions: Findings suggest trauma-informed care may increase posttraumatic growth among youth coping with loss. Implications for future studies and clinical practice are discussed

  15. Normal grief and complicated bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees: cultural context and the central role of dreams of the dead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Peou, Sonith; Joshi, Siddharth; Nickerson, Angela; Simon, Naomi M

    2013-09-01

    This article profiles bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees and explores the validity of a model of how grief and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) interact in this group to form a unique bereavement ontology, a model in which dreams of the dead play a crucial role. Several studies were conducted at a psychiatric clinic treating Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide. Key findings included that Pol Pot deaths were made even more deeply disturbing owing to cultural ideas about "bad death" and the consequences of not performing mortuary rites; that pained recall of the dead in the last month was common (76 % of patients) and usually caused great emotional and somatic distress; that severity of pained recall of the dead was strongly associated with PTSD severity (r = .62); that pained recall was very often triggered by dreaming about the dead, usually of someone who died in the Pol Pot period; and that Cambodians have a complex system of interpretation of dreams of the deceased that frequently causes those dreams to give rise to great distress. Cases are provided that further illustrate the centrality of dreams of the dead in the Cambodian experiencing of grief and PTSD. The article shows that not assessing dreams and concerns about the spiritual status of the deceased in the evaluation of bereavement results in "category truncation," i.e., a lack of content validity, a form of category fallacy.

  16. The influence of multiple birth and bereavement on maternal and family outcomes 2 and 7years after very preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyvaud, Karli; Aldana, Andrea C; Scratch, Shannon E; Ure, Alexandra M; Pace, Carmen C; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Psychological distress has been reported by mothers of infants born very preterm (VPT) and by mothers of multiples (twins and triplets). This study examined the influence of i) multiple birth and ii) bereavement associated with a multifetal pregnancy, on mental health, parenting stress and family functioning for mothers of children born VPT across early childhood. Participants were 162 mothers of 194 infants (129 singletons, 65 multiples) born at family functioning were assessed using the Parenting Stress Index and Family Assessment Device. Maternal mental health, stress and family functioning were similar in mothers of VPT singletons and multiples. However compared with mothers who had not experienced bereavement, mothers who had were 3.6 times [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.05, 12.5] more likely to report elevated anxiety symptoms and 3.6 times [95% CI 1.05, 12.3] more likely to report elevated depressive symptoms when their VPT child was seven years old. The results of this study highlight the need for monitoring and offering ongoing support to bereaved mothers with surviving VPT children. However, within the context of VPT birth, multiple birth does not increase the risk for maternal psychological distress in early childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Attitudes to suicide following the suicide of a friend or relative: a qualitative study of the views of 429 young bereaved adults in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Alexandra; Nesse, Hedvig; Morant, Nicola; Azorina, Valeriya; Stevenson, Fiona; King, Michael; Osborn, David

    2017-12-13

    People bereaved by suicide are at increased risk of suicide attempt and suicide, but explanations for these associations remain theoretical. It is possible that the experience of suicide bereavement modifies personal attitudes towards suicide, but the nature of these changes remains unexplored. There is a need to understand personal attitudes to suicide following suicide bereavement, as this may inform the development of suicide prevention interventions. Our aim was to explore the attitudes of young adults bereaved by suicide towards their own likelihood of dying by suicide. We conducted a cross-sectional study of staff and students aged 18-40 at 37 United Kingdom (UK) higher educational institutions in 2010. Ethical approval was granted by the UCL Research Ethics Committee. Qualitative responses to a question probing attitudes to own suicide were provided by 429 respondents who had experienced bereavement by the suicide of a close contact. We identified key themes in this dataset using thematic analysis. Analysis identified four main themes: suicide as a more tangible option (whether feared or not); identification with the deceased and awareness of shared vulnerabilities to suicide; personal determination to avoid suicide; and beliefs regarding safeguards against suicide. These themes reflected a broad split in participants' views regarding own likelihood of dying by suicide, influenced by the degree to which own suicide was feared and the extent to which they felt in control of determining a suicide death. Whilst the majority described an aversion to the idea of attempting suicide themselves, largely through an awareness of the impact on others, a minority described their experiences as having normalised suicide as a personal option. The views of a sample of UK-based adults bereaved by suicide suggest that exposure to the suicide of a close friend or relative can influence attitudes to suicide in ways that could influence own risk of suicide attempt. The

  18. Dialogical Exposure with Traumatically Bereaved Bosnian Women: Findings from a Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagl, Maria; Powell, Steve; Rosner, Rita; Butollo, Willi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, we compared the relative efficacy of dialogical exposure group treatment using Gestalt empty-chair method with a supportive group in the treatment of symptoms stemming from traumatic loss in a post-war society. One-hundred and nineteen women whose husbands were either killed or registered as missing during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina were quasi-randomized to seven sessions of group treatment with dialogical exposure or to an active control condition. Both interventions resulted in significant improvement from baseline to post-treatment for both kinds of loss, in terms of post-traumatic symptoms, general mental health and grief reactions, with the exception of depression and traumatic grief in the control condition. Regarding mean effect sizes (Cohen's d), pre-treatment to post-treatment improvements were moderate (d = 0.56) for the dialogical exposure group and small (d = 0.34) for the supportive group. Treatment gains were maintained at least until the 1-year follow-up. In controlled comparisons, dialogical exposure was superior concerning traumatic grief (Cohen's d = 0.37) and post-traumatic avoidance (d = 0.73) at post-treatment. Results show that short-term dialogical exposure group treatment was moderately effective in treating traumatically bereaved women. Research attests to high levels of symptoms among post-war civil populations, in particular, when a loved one was killed, which can lead not only to trauma reactions but also to severe separation distress. Grieving the loss of a loved one is hampered if the death remains unconfirmed. Unconfirmed loss could be conceptualized as unfinished business in terms of Gestalt therapy, which offers empty-chair dialogue for resolving unfinished business and grief. Dialogical exposure therapy (DET) supports the client in gaining awareness of and expressing his or her inner dialogues concerning the traumatic event, using Gestalt empty-chair method. Short-term DET was effective in

  19. Prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement and childbirths in the offspring: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Olsen, Jørn; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gómez, Guadalupe; Cnattingius, Sven; Li, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies but not from humans. We aimed to examine the association between prenatal stress due to maternal bereavement following the death of a relative and childbirths in the offspring. This population-based cohort study included all subjects born in Denmark after 1968 and in Sweden after 1973 and follow-up started at the age of 12 years. Subjects were categorized as exposed if their mothers lost a close relative during pregnancy or the year before and unexposed otherwise. The main outcomes were age at first child and age-specific mean numbers of childbirths. Data was analyzed using Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by gender and adjusted for several covariates. Subanalyses were performed considering the type of relative deceased and timing of bereavement. A total of 4,121,596 subjects were followed-up until up to 41 years of age. Of these subjects, 93,635 (2.3%) were exposed and 981,989 (23.8%) had at least one child during follow-up time. Compared to unexposed, the hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval] of having at least one child for exposed males and females were 0.98 [0.96-1.01] and 1.01 [0.98-1.03], respectively. We found a slightly reduced probability of having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94-0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04-1.14]), the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12-1.48]) or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01-1.27]). Our results suggested no overall association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and having a child in early adulthood but a longer time of follow-up is necessary in order to reach a firmer conclusion.

  20. Prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement and childbirths in the offspring: a population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleguer Plana-Ripoll

    Full Text Available The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies but not from humans. We aimed to examine the association between prenatal stress due to maternal bereavement following the death of a relative and childbirths in the offspring.This population-based cohort study included all subjects born in Denmark after 1968 and in Sweden after 1973 and follow-up started at the age of 12 years. Subjects were categorized as exposed if their mothers lost a close relative during pregnancy or the year before and unexposed otherwise. The main outcomes were age at first child and age-specific mean numbers of childbirths. Data was analyzed using Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by gender and adjusted for several covariates. Subanalyses were performed considering the type of relative deceased and timing of bereavement.A total of 4,121,596 subjects were followed-up until up to 41 years of age. Of these subjects, 93,635 (2.3% were exposed and 981,989 (23.8% had at least one child during follow-up time. Compared to unexposed, the hazard ratio (HR [95% confidence interval] of having at least one child for exposed males and females were 0.98 [0.96-1.01] and 1.01 [0.98-1.03], respectively. We found a slightly reduced probability of having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94-0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04-1.14], the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12-1.48] or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01-1.27].Our results suggested no overall association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and having a child in early adulthood but a longer time of follow-up is necessary in order to reach a firmer conclusion.

  1. "It still haunts me whether we did the right thing": a qualitative analysis of free text survey data on the bereavement experiences and support needs of family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Emily; Morgan, Fiona; Byrne, Anthony; Nelson, Annmarie

    2016-11-08

    Research suggests that there may be bereavement experiences and support needs which are specific to family caregivers providing end of life care (EoLC), although this remains an under-researched area. This paper focuses on themes relating to bereavement which were derived from an analysis of free text survey responses collected in a research priority setting exercise for palliative and EoLC. The priority setting exercise involved a public survey, designed to generate research priorities. Rather than identify research topics, many people instead described their experiences and raised more general questions relating to palliative and end of life care. To explore these experiences and perspectives a supplementary thematic analysis was conducted on the survey responses. 1403 respondents took part, including patients, current and bereaved carers, health and social care professionals, volunteers and members of the public. Several grief issues were identified, which seem specific to the experiences of family caregivers. Responses demonstrated a relationship between death experiences, feelings of guilt and bereavement outcomes for some family caregivers, as well as caregiver experiences of a "void" created by the withdrawal of professional support after death. Communication and support needs were also identified by participants. This analysis provides further evidence of some of the specific effects that caring for a loved one at the end of life can have on bereavement experiences. Finding ways of improving communication around the time of death and effective follow up approaches post death could help to address some of these issues.

  2. Bereaved donor families' experiences of organ and tissue donation, and perceived influences on their decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sque, Magi; Walker, Wendy; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Morgan, Myfanwy; Randhawa, Gurch; Rodney, Amanda

    2018-06-01

    To elicit bereaved families' experiences of organ and tissue donation. A specific objective was to determine families' perceptions of how their experiences influenced donation decision-making. Retrospective, qualitative interviews were undertaken with 43 participants of 31 donor families to generate rich, informative data. Participant recruitment was via 10 National Health Service Trusts, representative of five regional organ donation services in the UK. Twelve families agreed to DBD, 18 agreed to DCD, 1 unknown. Participants' responses were contextualised using a temporal framework of 'The Past', which represented families' prior knowledge, experience, attitudes, beliefs, and intentions toward organ donation; 'The Present', which incorporated the moment in time when families experienced the potential for donation; and 'The Future', which corresponded to expectations and outcomes arising from the donation decision. Temporally interwoven experiences appeared to influence families' decisions to donate the organs of their deceased relative for transplantation. The influence of temporality on donation-decision making is worthy of consideration in the planning of future education, policy, practice, and research for improved rates of family consent to donation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of Suicide and Dysfunctional Patterns of Personality among Bereaved Substance Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masferrer, Laura; Caparrós, Beatriz

    2017-03-20

    Background : Research has shown that suicide is a phenomenon highly present among the drug dependent population. Different studies have demonstrated an upraised level of comorbidity between personality disorders (PD) and substance use disorders (SUD). This study aimed to describe which PDs are more frequent among those patients with a risk of suicide. Methods : The study was based on a consecutive non-probabilistic convenience sample of 196 bereaved patients attended to in a Public Addiction Center in Girona (Spain). Sociodemographic data, as well as suicide and drug related characteristics were recorded. The risk of suicide was assessed with the Spanish version of "Risk of suicide". Personality disorders were measured with the Spanish version of Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory. Results : The PDs more associated with the presence of risk of suicide were depressive, avoidant, schizotypal and borderline disorders. However, the histrionic, narcissistic and compulsive PDs are inversely associated with risk of suicide even though the narcissistic scale had no statistical correlation. Conclusions : The risk of suicide is a significant factor to take into account related to patients with SUD and especially with the presence of specific PDs. These findings underline the importance of diagnosing and treating rigorously patients with SUD.

  4. Continuing social presence of the dead: exploring suicide bereavement through online memorialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Louis; Bell, Jo; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    The last 10 years have seen a rise in Internet sites commemorating those lost to suicide. These sites describe the life of the deceased and the afterlife of relatives, parents, friends or siblings who have been termed the "forgotten bereaved". It is clear that such sites have implications for continuing bonds and for what many commentators refer to as the continuing social presence of the dead. This paper presents interim findings from ongoing research which focuses on two aspects of suicide memorial websites. First, we explore the extent to which such sites help us understand how the Internet is enabling new ways of grieving and is, in effect, making new cultural scripts. Second, although there is a large body of writing on the management of trauma there is little evidence-based research. The paper draws on face-to-face interviews with owners of suicide memorial sites (family members and friends) and explores how the establishment and maintenance of such a site is an important part of the therapeutic process and how, for grieving relatives, making or contributing to such sites provides ways of managing trauma in the aftermath of a death by suicide.

  5. Parents bereaved by infant death: PTSD symptoms up to 18 years after the loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Dorte M; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentially traumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study. Participants filled out a questionnaire package including measures of PTSD (the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire), coping (the Coping Style Questionnaire), perceived social support (the Crisis Support Scale) and attachment (the Revised Adult Attachment Scale). Associations between variables were examined through the use of analyses of variance, correlation analyses and a regression analysis. We found an estimated PTSD prevalence of 12.3%. Type of loss (pre-, peri- or postnatal) did not have any effect on PTSD severity, but lower gestational age was associated with more symptoms. Time since the loss, female sex, attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping, rational coping, feeling let down and social support satisfaction accounted for 42% of the variance in PTSD severity. The study highlights the long-term impact of infant loss and points to attachment, coping and social support as important contributors to the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress symptoms. © 2013.

  6. The use of pathological grief outcomes in bereavement studies on African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Peleg-Sagy, Tal

    2017-06-01

    Pathological bereavement outcomes (i.e., complicated grief, traumatic grief, prolonged grief disorder) are a robust and growing research area in the psychological and medical sciences. Although grief is considered to be a universal phenomenon, it is well documented that grieving processes and outcomes are culturally and contextually bound. The objectives of this study were: (a) to examine representations of African Americans in the grief and mourning literature and to assess the extent to which this research utilizes pathological grief outcomes; and (b) to examine the characteristics of pathological grief constructs in the literature to assess their relevance for African American populations. We conducted comprehensive searches of three scientific databases including PsycNET, Medline, and CINAHL, which contain the majority of grief and mourning literature published between January 1998 and February 2014. We found 59 studies addressing grief and mourning in African Americans. Thirteen of these studies used pathological grief outcomes. Pathological grief outcomes that were constructed and validated on White populations were frequently used as outcome variables with African American participants. We discuss the implications for the grief and mourning field and argue that the failure to use culturally sensitive outcome measures in research studies is a form of epistemological violence that may have negative research and clinical implications for African Americans and other ethnic minorities.

  7. The Self Lost, the Self Adjusted: Forming a New Identity in Bereavement Memoirs by American Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małecka Katarzyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most Western cultures place a great value on autonomy. American society in particular has always stressed the need to succeed via self-reliance, a characteristic which, in recent decades, has additionally manifested itself in an increasing inclination for self-examination reflected in the deluge of autobiographical writing, especially memoirs. This analysis focuses on memoirs of spousal loss, a specific subgenre of life writing in which, due to the loss of a loved one, the narrating self realizes how unstable a sense of autonomy is. In their bereavement narratives, Joan Didion, Anne Roiphe, and Joyce Carol Oates admit that after losing a life partner their world crumbled and so did their sense of self. The article examines the following aspects of the grieving self: 1. how grief tests one’s self-sufficiency; 2. how various grief reactions contribute to self-disintegration; 3. the widow as a new and undesirable identity; and 4. writing as a way of regaining one’s sense of self.

  8. Risk of Suicide and Dysfunctional Patterns of Personality among Bereaved Substance Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Masferrer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has shown that suicide is a phenomenon highly present among the drug dependent population. Different studies have demonstrated an upraised level of comorbidity between personality disorders (PD and substance use disorders (SUD. This study aimed to describe which PDs are more frequent among those patients with a risk of suicide. Methods: The study was based on a consecutive non-probabilistic convenience sample of 196 bereaved patients attended to in a Public Addiction Center in Girona (Spain. Sociodemographic data, as well as suicide and drug related characteristics were recorded. The risk of suicide was assessed with the Spanish version of “Risk of suicide”. Personality disorders were measured with the Spanish version of Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory. Results: The PDs more associated with the presence of risk of suicide were depressive, avoidant, schizotypal and borderline disorders. However, the histrionic, narcissistic and compulsive PDs are inversely associated with risk of suicide even though the narcissistic scale had no statistical correlation. Conclusions: The risk of suicide is a significant factor to take into account related to patients with SUD and especially with the presence of specific PDs. These findings underline the importance of diagnosing and treating rigorously patients with SUD.

  9. Bereavement-related depression: Did the changes induced by DSM-V make a difference? Results from a large population-based survey of French residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clesse, Florence; Leray, Emmanuelle; Bodeau-Livinec, Florence; Husky, Mathilde; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2015-08-15

    DSM-V has been criticized for excessively expanding criteria for bereavement-related depression. The aim of this study was to quantify a potential increase in depression prevalence due to changes in diagnostic criteria and to assess the severity, clinical profile and healthcare use of new cases. A cross-sectional telephone survey was performed in 2005-2006 in four French regions. Twelve-month prevalence of psychiatric disorders was measured by CIDI-SF. Bereavement was assessed in those who endorsed the gate question to the depression module. Persons with bereavement-related depression according to DSM-IV and DSM-V diagnosis criteria were compared. Of the 22,138 respondents, 692 were bereaved. The prevalence of depression among those bereaved was 49.9% (95% CI ¼=43.7−56.0) according to DSM-IV and 59.6% (53.1−66.1) according to DSM-V [corrected]. The overall prevalence of major depression increased from 8.6% (8.1–9.1) with DSM-IV to 8.8% (8.3−9.3) with DSM-V . Cases diagnosed using DSM-IV presented more symptoms than cases diagnosed using DSM-V but clinical features were similar except regarding criterion E׳s symptoms. Healthcare use was similar between the two groups regarding consultations and psychotropic drug prescription. Some DSM-IV and DSM-V criteria were difficult to operationalize in the survey. The observed difference in prevalence according to DSM-IV and DSM-V may be reduced when clinical judgment is taken into account. The overall prevalence of major depression is only marginally increased by the new criteria. However, diagnostic changes increase the prevalence by 10 points among those bereaved. Diagnostic changes do not appear to modify service use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. What are the physical and psychological health effects of suicide bereavement on family members? Protocol for an observational and interview mixed-methods study in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Ailbhe; Larkin, Celine; Corcoran, Paul; Matvienko-Sikar, Karen; Arensman, Ella

    2017-03-30

    Research indicates that experiencing the suicide of a relative can have a significant impact on family members' emotional health. However, research incorporating the impact of suicide bereavement on family members' physical health is sparse. This paper details the protocol for a mixed-methods study of suicide-bereaved family members. The study will primarily examine the physical and mental health needs of those bereaved by suicide. A secondary objective of the study is to describe the support service needs of family members bereaved by suicide. A mixed-methods approach, using semistructured interviews and self-report questionnaires, will be used. Interviews will be conducted with a group of 15-20 relatives who experienced suicide bereavement. This protocol will follow the COREQ checklist criteria for the reporting of qualitative research interviews. Thematic analysis will be used to examine experiences and impact of bereavement on psychological and physical health. Self-report quantitative data on well-being will be analysed using descriptive statistics. Ethical approval to conduct this study has been granted from the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals. Pseudonyms will be given to participants to protect anonymity. It will be explained to participants that participation in the study is voluntary and they have to right to withdraw at any time. The findings of this research will be disseminated to regional, national and international audiences through publication in peer-reviewed international journals and presentations at scientific conferences. This research also forms part of a PhD thesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Bereavement healing ministry amongst Abaluyia: Towards a ‘circle for pastoral concern’ as a healing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Shikwati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article formulates a new integrated pastoral care approach to bereavement healing ministry in Africa, termed a circle for pastoral concern. In pursuit of this, the article highlights the pastoral challenge brought about by the occurrence of death and bereavement within the cultural and Christian intermix. Using the example of the Abaluyia of western Kenya, traditional cultural bereavement healing approaches are assessed against the backdrop of Christian influence on the understanding and response to death and bereavement healing and the resultant tension. The article juxtaposes the Abaluyia cultural concept of okhukura [to encircle with loving care] with the biblical koinōnia [fellowship, communion] as springboard for building culturally sensitive and biblically sound Christian caring communities. It is hoped that the juxtaposition helps to establish and promote meaningful engagement between therapeutic traditional beliefs and practices, and the gospel. The gospel-culture engagement within a local church setting provides the context in which bereavement healing and individual growth after the death of a significant other takes place. The juxtaposition is necessitated by the rampant practice in African pluralistic societies where Christians consciously, or otherwise, lurch back to cultural approaches in their effort to provide or find healing when faced with death and bereavement. The ‘circle for pastoral concern’ model encourages inclusiveness by enlisting the means and talents of the community of believers, both ordained and lay. The principle of inclusion ensures that the load of pastoral care is shared and assumes a deeper response due to diversity of gifts and talents within the caring community.’n Nuwe integrale benadering vir pastorale hulpverlening en berading tydens rousmart word voorgestel, naamlik ’n omsirkelingsmodel vir pastorale omgee-uitreiking met die oog op treurbediening binne ’n Afrika-konteks. Die vraagstuk van

  12. Bereavement healing ministry amongst Abaluyia: Towards a ‘circle for pastoral concern’ as a healing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Shikwati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article formulates a new integrated pastoral care approach to bereavement healing ministry in Africa, termed a circle for pastoral concern. In pursuit of this, the article highlights the pastoral challenge brought about by the occurrence of death and bereavement within the cultural and Christian intermix. Using the example of the Abaluyia of western Kenya, traditional cultural bereavement healing approaches are assessed against the backdrop of Christian influence on the understanding and response to death and bereavement healing and the resultant tension. The article juxtaposes the Abaluyia cultural concept of okhukura [to encircle with loving care] with the biblical koinōnia [fellowship, communion] as springboard for building culturally sensitive and biblically sound Christian caring communities. It is hoped that the juxtaposition helps to establish and promote meaningful engagement between therapeutic traditional beliefs and practices, and the gospel. The gospel-culture engagement within a local church setting provides the context in which bereavement healing and individual growth after the death of a significant other takes place. The juxtaposition is necessitated by the rampant practice in African pluralistic societies where Christians consciously, or otherwise, lurch back to cultural approaches in their effort to provide or find healing when faced with death and bereavement. The ‘circle for pastoral concern’ model encourages inclusiveness by enlisting the means and talents of the community of believers, both ordained and lay. The principle of inclusion ensures that the load of pastoral care is shared and assumes a deeper response due to diversity of gifts and talents within the caring community. ’n Nuwe integrale benadering vir pastorale hulpverlening en berading tydens rousmart word voorgestel, naamlik ’n omsirkelingsmodel vir pastorale omgee-uitreiking met die oog op treurbediening binne ’n Afrika-konteks. Die vraagstuk

  13. Effects of sacred music on the spiritual well-being of bereaved relatives: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Araujo da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of instrumental sacred music and sacred music with vocals on the spiritual well-being of bereaved relatives. METHOD This is a randomized clinical trial carried out with family members bereaving the death of loved ones to cancer. Participants were allocated into three groups: Group 1 (control, Group 2 (experimental using sacred music with vocals or Group 3 (experimental using instrumental sacred music. Spiritual well-being was assessed through the Spiritual Well-Being Scale. RESULTS Sixty-nine (69 family members participated. Mean scores before and after the intervention indicated high levels of spiritual well-being (106.4 and 105.5 in Group 1; 103.2 and 105.2 in Group 2; 107.4 and 108.7 in Group 3 and religious well-being (57.9 and 56.9 in Group 1; 56.3 and 56.4 in Group 2; 57.4 and 58.1 in Group 3, and moderate levels of existential well-being (48.5 and 48.6 in Group 1; 46.9 and 48.9 in Group 2; 49.9 and 50.7 in Group 3, with the exception of Group 3 which presented a high level of existential well-being after the intervention. CONCLUSION The results show that there were no statistically significant differences in the spiritual well-being scores between the experimental groups and the control group. We evidence the need for further studies that use music therapy as a Nursing intervention for bereaved families. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-2wtwjz.

  14. Effects of sacred music on the spiritual well-being of bereaved relatives: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vladimir Araujo da; Silva, Rita de Cássia Frederico; Cabau, Nubia Carla Ferreira; Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of instrumental sacred music and sacred music with vocals on the spiritual well-being of bereaved relatives. METHOD This is a randomized clinical trial carried out with family members bereaving the death of loved ones to cancer. Participants were allocated into three groups: Group 1 (control), Group 2 (experimental using sacred music with vocals) or Group 3 (experimental using instrumental sacred music). Spiritual well-being was assessed through the Spiritual Well-Being Scale. RESULTS Sixty-nine (69) family members participated. Mean scores before and after the intervention indicated high levels of spiritual well-being (106.4 and 105.5 in Group 1; 103.2 and 105.2 in Group 2; 107.4 and 108.7 in Group 3) and religious well-being (57.9 and 56.9 in Group 1; 56.3 and 56.4 in Group 2; 57.4 and 58.1 in Group 3), and moderate levels of existential well-being (48.5 and 48.6 in Group 1; 46.9 and 48.9 in Group 2; 49.9 and 50.7 in Group 3), with the exception of Group 3 which presented a high level of existential well-being after the intervention. CONCLUSION The results show that there were no statistically significant differences in the spiritual well-being scores between the experimental groups and the control group. We evidence the need for further studies that use music therapy as a Nursing intervention for bereaved families. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-2wtwjz.

  15. Living with the Dead or Communicating with the dead: media practices of continuing bonds among bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    & Sandvik 2014a: 1). However, we would like to broaden the scope of Durham Peter’s reflections, suggesting that the ways in which parents communicate to/with the dead child are not just a matter of one-way speaking into the air but also a matter of two-way communication implying that the child has...... when getting a memory tattoo. Based on observation studies and qualitative contents analysis performed since 2008 on children’s graves and on online memorial sites (Christensen & Sandvik 2013, 2014a, 2014b, 2015a) and furthermore including interviews with bereaved parents (Christensen & Sandvik...

  16. Attitudes towards those bereaved by a suicide: a population-based, cross-sectional study in rural Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaji Masako

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family or friends bereaved by suicide are at risk of experiencing complications because of attitudes regarding suicide. It is important that individuals close to those grieving after a death by suicide demonstrate adequate knowledge and compassionate attitudes. To this end, we examined the factors that contribute to attitudes toward persons bereaved by the suicide of a family member or friend, and perceptions of suicide prevention and the promotion of mental health. Methods A total of 5154 residents of a rural town in northern Japan aged 30–69 years completed a cross-sectional questionnaire. The questionnaire gathered data about demographic variables, depressive symptoms, and issues related to suicide including personal experience of an acquaintance's suicide, attitudes towards those bereaved by suicide, and perceptions regarding suicide prevention. Factors related to these attitudes and perceptions were analysed using logistic regression models. Results Overall, 67.5% of respondents demonstrated appropriate attitudes towards those bereaved by suicide; 30.4% of responses were undetermined, and 2.1% were inappropriate. Undetermined attitudes were associated with male gender (adjusted OR 1.42, 95%CI = 1.26–1.61, younger age (2.64, 2.12–3.29, lower education level (1.32, 1.07–1.62, greater severity of depression (3.81, 2.80–5.20, and lack of personal experience of an acquaintance's suicide (1.39, 1.22–1.57. Inappropriate attitudes were associated with male gender (adjusted OR 1.98, 95%CI = 1.33–2.94, lower education level (2.55 1.34–4.83, and greater severity of depression (6.93, 3.52–13.67. Overall, 16.0% demonstrated passive thoughts regarding suicide prevention and the promotion of mental health in the community, and were associated with male gender (1.22, 1.04–1.42, younger age (2.72, 2.03–3.65, lower education level (1.32, 1.02–1.71, and greater severity of depression (4.94, 3.58–6.82. Conclusion

  17. Parents bereaved by infant death: sex differences and moderation in PTSD, attachment, coping and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Dorte M; Olff, Miranda; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Parents bereaved by infant death experience a wide range of symptomatology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may persist for years after the loss. Little research has been conducted on PTSD in fathers who have lost an infant. Mothers report most symptoms to a greater extent than fathers, but not much is known about other sex differences following infant death. The present cross-sectional study examined sex differences in PTSD and sex differences in the relationship between PTSD severity and related variables. Subjects were 361 mothers and 273 fathers who had lost an infant either late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life. Participants filled out questionnaires between 1.2 months and 18 years after the loss (M = 3.4 years). Mothers reported significantly more PTSD symptoms, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping and feeling let down, but significantly lower levels of attachment avoidance than fathers. Attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and emotion-focused coping were significantly more strongly associated with PTSD severity in mothers than fathers, but only when examined alone. When all variables and time since the loss were examined together, there were no longer any significant moderation effects of sex. Persistent posttraumatic symptomatology exists in both mothers and fathers long after the loss. There are several sex differences in severity and correlates of PTSD, and a few moderation effects were identified for attachment and emotion-focused coping. Overall, more similarities than differences were found between mothers and fathers in the associations between PTSD and covariates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder and Culture: Early and Prolonged Grief in Nepali Widows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane; Tol, Wietse A; Shrestha, Abina; Kafle, Hari Maya; Rayamajhi, Rajin; Luitel, Nagendra P; Thapa, Lily; Surkan, Pamela J

    2017-01-01

    Persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), has not been well studied in socioculturally diverse populations. Thus, this qualitative study examined (a) how widows in Nepal understand grief, (b) whether a local construct of PCBD exists, and (c) its comparability with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), terminology. Using an adapted Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) framework, semistructured interviews with 25 widows and 12 key informants, as well as three focus-group discussions (n = 20), were conducted between October 2014 and April 2015. Through an inductive grounded theory-based approach, we used the constant comparative method, iteratively coding transcripts to identify themes and patterns in the data. Also, we created two lists of grief responses, one of early reactions and another all reactions to grief, based on the frequency of mention. No single term for grief was reported. Widows reported a local construct of PCBD, which was broadly compatible with DSM-5 terminology but with important variation reflecting societal influence. Surviving torture during conflict, economic and family stressors, and discrimination were mentioned as important determinants that prolong and complicate grief. Suicidal ideation was common, with about 31% and 62% of widows reporting past-year and lifetime suicidality, respectively. Findings may not be generalizable to all Nepali widows; participants were recruited from a non-governmental organization, from Kathmandu and its neighboring districts, and were primarily of reproductive age. While PCBD symptoms proposed in DSM-5 were mentioned as relevant by study participants, some components may need adaptation for use in non-Western settings, such as Nepal.

  19. Bereaved relatives' experiences during the incurable phase of cancer: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnhoven, Marleen N; Terpstra, Wim E; van Rossem, Ronald; Haazer, Carolien; Gunnink-Boonstra, Nicolette; Sonke, Gabe S; Buiting, Hilde M

    2015-11-25

    To examine bereaved relatives' experiences from time of diagnosis of incurable cancer until death with specific emphasis on their role in the (end-of-life) decision-making concerning chemotherapy. Qualitative interview study. Hospital-based. In-depth interviews with 15 close relatives of patients who died from non-small cell lung cancer or pancreatic cancer, using a thematic content analysis. All relatives reported that patients' main reason to request chemotherapy was the possibility to prolong life. Relatives reported that patients receiving chemotherapy had more difficulty to accept the incurable nature of their disease than patients who did not. They mostly followed the patients' treatment wish and only infrequently suggested ceasing chemotherapy (because of side effects) despite sometimes believing that this would be a better option. Relatives continuously tried to support the patient in either approaching the death or in attaining hope to continue life satisfactorily. Most relatives considered the chemotherapy period meaningful, since it sparked patients' hope and was what patients wanted. Cessation of chemotherapy caused a relief but coincided with physical deterioration and an increased caregivers' role; many relatives recalled this latter period as more burdensome. Relatives tend to follow patients' wish to continue or cease chemotherapy, without expressing their own feelings, although they were more inclined to opt cessation. They experience a greater caregiver role after cessation and their feelings of responsibility associated with the disease can be exhausting. More attention is needed to reduce relatives' distress at the end of life, also to fully profit from this crucial form of (informal) healthcare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Randomized controlled trial of SecondStory, an intervention targeting posttraumatic growth, with bereaved adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepke, Ann Marie; Tsukayama, Eli; Forgeard, Marie; Blackie, Laura; Jayawickreme, Eranda

    2018-06-01

    People often report positive psychological changes after adversity, a phenomenon known as posttraumatic growth (PTG). Few PTG-focused interventions have been rigorously tested, and measurement strategies have had significant limitations. This study evaluated the effects of a new group-format psychosocial intervention, SecondStory, aimed at facilitating PTG by helping participants make meaning of the past and plan a purposeful future. In a randomized controlled trial, adults (N = 112, 64% women) bereaved within 5 years were randomly assigned to SecondStory or an active control, expressive writing. The primary outcome, PTG, was measured using two contrasting methods: the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, which asks participants retrospectively how much they believe they have changed due to struggling with adversity, and the Current-Standing Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, which tracks quantifiable change in participants' standing in PTG domains over time. Secondary outcomes included depression symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and life satisfaction. Outcomes were measured at 2-week intervals: pretest, posttest, and three follow-up occasions. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to assess whether SecondStory participants experienced greater gains in primary and/or secondary outcomes over the 8-week trial. Results indicated that SecondStory participants did not show significantly greater improvements than control participants on measures of PTG, posttraumatic stress, or life satisfaction, but they did show greater decreases in depression symptoms by the first follow-up. These findings suggest that SecondStory may not facilitate PTG more effectively than existing interventions but may be promising for addressing depression. Positive interventions may productively be refined to support people experiencing trauma and loss. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The body and ontology: Perinatal death and bereavement in the techno-scientific landscape of hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Richard Cassidy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study takes the body (of mother and child, the technoscientific hospital landscape and professional ritual as the locus of an endeavour to understand the embodied experience of perinatal death, in order to better comprehend how alternate understandings and ontologies of motherhood, personhood and bereavement emerge during care enactments.  Grounded in a descriptive and ethnographic approach the research analyses data from the entries of 22 members of a pregnancy loss support forum and 10 narrative style interviews. The research traces embodied experience from pregnancy, through diagnosis to the spatialised experience of the hospital, including the birth, postmortem contact and disposal of the corpse. Bounded by the sudden destruction of ontological security many of these women experience an existential crisis that results in a destructed stigmatised self. The research explores how overly medicalised obstetric care enacts understandings of perinatal death and bereavement that further problematizes postmortem relationships, creating toxic identities and embodied selves. Conversely, woman-centred midwifery that takes relational and social understandings as a basis for care can create the material conditions of possibility for a restoration of confidence in carnal self and a reconstruction of social bonds and order. Assembled through practice, discourse and policy, these bodies are individually, socially and politically enacted, but they are also multiple, mutable and enfolded assemblages of nature and culture. The research proposes that healthcare practice would benefit by considering natural stillbirths, just as contemporary obstetrics advocates natural childbirth.

  2. Bereavement, cognitive-emotional processing, and coping with the loss: a study of Indian and Japanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Braj; Kumar, Surender; Harizuka, Susumu

    2011-01-01

    Campus suicides have increased manifold across academic institutions, often leaving unresolved bereavement issues in these institutions, primarily because students are supposed to carry on with their daily activities with little or no time and attention paid to this necessary process. In this study, the role of cognitive-emotional processes in coping, especially when one is grieving a death, was investigated through a comparison between 40 bereaved Japanese and Indian female college students. The participants were assessed for resilience, cognitive-emotional regulation, posttraumatic cognition, and coping strategies in the aftermath of the suicide death of someone close. Positive reappraisal mediated the relationship between resilience and proactive coping, whereas negative cognitions about the self mediated the relationship between resilience and proactive as well as reflective coping. The participants from the two cultures differed significantly on resilience, with Indians scoring higher than Japanese young adults. The findings are analyzed in light of the coping with distressful life events model and could have possible implications for social workers and/or mental health professionals in terms of acceptability of interventions.

  3. Unresolved Bereavement and Other Mental Health Problems in Parents of the Sewol Ferry Accident after 18 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Lee, So Hee; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the overall mental health consequences of the bereaved parents after the Sewol ferry accident. Eighty-four bereaved parents participated in the study. Self-report scales assessing the severity of psychiatric symptoms and other related psychosomatic problems were used at 18 months following the accident. Univariate descriptive statistics and regression analyses were performed to report the prevalence, severity, and correlates of psychiatric symptoms. 94% of the participants appeared to suffer from complicated grief based on scores on the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG). Half of the participants were categorized as having severe depression and 70.2% reported clinically significant post-traumatic symptoms according to scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and PTSD Check List-5 (PCL-5). No significant differences by gender were observed in the severity of psychiatric symptoms. A higher educational level was associated with more severe psychiatric symptoms in fathers. The loss of a child due to a disaster caused by human error may continue to have a substantial impact on parental mental health at 18 months after the event. A longitudinal study following parents' mental health state would be necessary to investigate the long-term effects of the traumatic experience in the future.

  4. The European Donor Hospital Education Programme (EDHEP): addressing the training needs of doctors and nurses who break bad news, care for the bereaved, and request donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, G. A.; van Dalen, J.; Jager, K. J.; Ryan, M.; Wijnen, R. M.; Wight, C.; Morton, J. M.; Morley, M.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    The competence of critical care staff when it comes to death and organ donation can make the difference between a family's agreeing to or refusing the latter. Doctors and nurses often feel uncomfortable approaching relatives about donation and attribute this to a lack of training. Bereaved relatives

  5. Grief Processing and Deliberate Grief Avoidance: A Prospective Comparison of Bereaved Spouses and Parents in the United States and the People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, George A.; Papa, Anthony; Lalande, Kathleen; Zhang, Nanping; Noll, Jennie G.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors measured grief processing and deliberate grief avoidance and examined their relationship to adjustment at 4 and 18 months of bereavement for 2 types of losses (spouse, child) in 2 cultures (People's Republic of China, United States). Three hypotheses were compared: the traditional grief work assumption, a conditional…

  6. Effect of palliative care nurse champions on the quality of dying in the hospital according to bereaved relatives: A controlled before-and-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Witkamp (Frederika); L. van Zuylen (Lia); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To improve the quality of end-of-life care, hospitals increasingly appoint palliative care nurse champions. Aim: We investigated the effect of nurse champions on the quality of life during the last 3 days of life and the quality of dying as experienced by bereaved relatives.

  7. Grief and Bereavement Issues and the Loss of a Companion Animal: People Living with a Companion Animal, Owners of Livestock, and Animal Support Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Companion animals play various roles in people's lives and these roles can impact on loss, grief, bereavement and mourning when the animal has been lost, whether that is through death, when missing, or when relinquished. This paper considers not only companion animal owners, but also those who own farm animals and those who work in animal service…

  8. Stability and change: the role of keepsakes and family homes in the lives of parentally bereaved young adults in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.C.; Parrott, F.R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the loss of a parent in young adulthood, showing how this emergent and distinctive life stage shapes Dutch young people’s experience of bereavement. Youth material cultures have commonly been analysed in terms of the construction and expression of youth identities, for example,

  9. The Impact of Staff Training on the Knowledge of Support Staff in Relation to Bereavement and People with an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Laura; McKenzie, Karen; Wright, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether a 1-day training course improved support staff knowledge about bereavement and grief in people with a learning disability. A questionnaire based, mixed design was used. Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to one of two equal groups. A staggered design allowed for group 2 to act both as a control…

  10. The Japan HOspice and Palliative Care Evaluation Study (J-HOPE Study): views about legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia among the bereaved whose family member died at palliative care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okishiro, Nao; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Tsuneto, Satoru; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    There has been a debate in appropriateness of legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia in Japan. To clarify views about these issues, we conducted a large nationwide study of the bereaved whose family member died at palliative care units. The percentages of 429 bereaved family members (response rate 65%) who affirmed legal authorization were 52 for death with dignity and 45 for euthanasia and who affirmed assignment at the discretion of the physician involved were 37 for death with dignity and 38 for euthanasia. In conclusion, views about legalization of death with dignity and euthanasia among the bereaved are inconsistent. No consensus is reached as to legislation of these issues.

  11. The Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment: a new instrument to assess the needs of parents whose children died in the pediatric intensive care unit*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Templin, Thomas N; Michelson, Kelly N; Morrison, Wynne E; Hackbarth, Richard; Custer, Joseph R; Schim, Stephanie M; Briller, Sherylyn H; Thurston, Celia S

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment, a new instrument to measure parents' needs and need fulfillment around the time of their child's death in the pediatric intensive care unit. We hypothesized that need fulfillment would be negatively related to complicated grief and positively related to quality of life during bereavement. Cross-sectional survey. Five U.S. children's hospital pediatric intensive care units. Parents (n = 121) bereaved in a pediatric intensive care unit 6 months earlier. Surveys included the 68-item Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment, the Inventory of Complicated Grief, and the abbreviated version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Each Bereaved Parent Needs Assessment item described a potential need and was rated on two scales: 1) a 5-point rating of importance (1 = not at all important, 5 = very important) and 2) a 5-point rating of fulfillment (1 = not at all met, 5 = completely met). Three composite scales were computed: 1) total importance (percentage of all needs rated ≥4 for importance), 2) total fulfillment (percentage of all needs rated ≥4 for fulfillment), and 3) percent fulfillment (percentage of important needs that were fulfilled). Internal consistency reliability was assessed by Cronbach's α and Spearman-Brown-corrected split-half reliability. Generalized estimating equations were used to test predictions between composite scales and the Inventory of Complicated Grief and World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Two items had mean importance ratings 4. Reliability of composite scores ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. Total fulfillment was negatively correlated with Inventory of Complicated Grief (r = -.29; p Quality of Life questionnaire (r = .21; p education, and loss of an only child, percent fulfillment remained significantly correlated with Inventory of Complicated Grief but not with World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. The

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder and its predictors among bereaved Tibetan adolescents four years after the Yushu earthquake: a cross-sectional survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongling, Liu; Hui, Chen; Ling, Ma; Wenqian, Bie; Zailiang, Liu; Changying, Chen

    2017-04-01

    To examine the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and to explore the predictive factors of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among bereaved adolescents four years after the Yushu earthquake. On 14 April 2010, the 7·1-magnitude Yushu earthquake occurred in the high-altitude, hypoxia-prone regions primarily inhabited by ethnic minorities. Many adolescents lost their parents during the earthquake. This study examined post-traumatic stress disorder and its predictors among bereaved Tibetan adolescents four years after the trauma in China. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. This study used a cross-sectional design with 830 bereaved adolescents. Participant demographic data included gender, age and grade, and the earthquake exposure variables included the deceased relatives, whether they were buried, injured or amputated (non-life-threatening) and whether they witnessed a burial, injury or death. The post-traumatic stress disorder Checklist-Civilian version was used to assess the symptoms and prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder, and the Coping Style Scale assessed coping styles. The results indicated that the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder was 19·3%. Individuals who were buried, injured or amputated (non-life-threatening), who witnessed a burial, injury or death, who suffered severe property loss during the earthquake and who had negative coping skills were the most likely individuals to have post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The presence of post-traumatic stress disorder was very prevalent among adolescents four years after the Yushu earthquake. Effective mental health services should be developed to facilitate postdisaster recovery for bereaved adolescents at high risk for post-traumatic stress disorder. The findings in this study improve our understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder and related risk factors in bereaved adolescents in non-Western communities, providing useful information for

  13. Bereaved families are still embittered after the Sewol ferry accident in Korea: A follow-up study 18 and 30months after the disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ji-Ae; Huh, Hyu-Jung; Han, Hye-Sung; Huh, Seung; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2018-04-01

    The Sewol ferry accident that occurred in April 2014 was one of the most tragic human-made disasters in Korean history. Due to the deaths of hundreds of children, bereaved families likely feel embittered; however, there is little extant research documenting embitterment among those who experienced the disaster. Consequently, we investigated bereaved family members' embitterment and other psychiatric symptoms 18months and 30months after the disaster. Data from a cross-sectional survey were obtained 18months (Time 1) and 30months (Time 2) after the disaster. We ascertained socio-demographic variables and variables obtained from a self-reporting questionnaire (i.e., depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, complicated grief, and embitterment) among 56 bereaved family members. Bereaved families showed substantial embitterment at Time 1 (64.3%), which increased at Time 2 (76.8%, t=1.761, p=0.084). The participants who displayed increased embitterment at Time 2 also increased in anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, and complicated grief (but not depression). Furthermore, participants who displayed decreased embitterment at Time 2 also decreased in all other psychiatric symptoms. (time×group interaction in depression (F 0.644, p=0.426), anxiety (F 4.970, p=0.030), PTSD (F 10.699, p=0.002), and complicated grief (F 8.389, p=0.005)). Embitterment of bereaved families had not ceased after 18months and even increased 1year later. Additionally, as embitterment increased, many other psychiatric symptoms also increased, and vice versa. Our results suggest that embitterment is associated or can even influence other psychiatric symptoms; therefore, embitterment should be examined after disasters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased beta power in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster: A paradoxical compensatory phenomenon? A two-channel electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kuk-In; Shim, Miseon; Lee, Sang Min; Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-11-01

    The Sewol ferry capsizing accident on South Korea's southern coast resulted in the death of 304 people, and serious bereavement problems for their families. Electroencephalography (EEG) beta frequency is associated with psychiatric symptoms, such as insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between frontal beta power, psychological symptoms, and insomnia in the bereaved families. Eighty-four family members of the Sewol ferry victims (32 men and 52 women) were recruited and their EEG was compared with that of 25 (13 men and 12 women) healthy controls. A two-channel EEG device was used to measure cortical activity in the frontal lobe. Symptom severity of insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, complicated grief, and anxiety were evaluated. The bereaved families showed a higher frontal beta power than healthy controls. Subgroup analysis showed that frontal beta power was lower in the individuals with severe insomnia than in those with normal sleep. There was a significant inverse correlation between frontal beta power and insomnia symptom in the bereaved families. This study suggests that increased beta power, reflecting the psychopathology in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster, may be a compensatory mechanism that follows complex trauma. Frontal beta power could be a potential marker indicating the severity of sleep disturbances. Our results suggest that sleep disturbance is an important symptom in family members of the Sewol ferry disaster's victims, which may be screened by EEG beta power. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  15. Attachment styles, grief responses, and the moderating role of coping strategies in parents bereaved by the Sewol ferry accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hyu Jung; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background : Previous studies on the influence of different types of attachment on grief responses have yielded contradictory outcomes. Little research has been conducted to identify the psychological processes that moderate the relationship between attachment representations and patterns of grief in disaster-related grief. Objective : The present study examines the effects of different attachment types on the grief responses of parents bereaved by loss of a child in a ferry accident, along with the moderating role of coping strategies. Methods : Bereaved parents ( n  = 81) completed self-report questionnaires evaluating attachment, coping strategies, complicated grief, and shame/guilt. We performed correlational analyses to examine the associations among variables. We also conducted hierarchical regression analyses and simple slope analyses to examine the moderation effects of coping strategies. Results : Anxious attachment was associated with severe shame/guilt, and avoidant attachment correlated with complicated grief. Anxious attachment was positively associated with all types of coping strategies, and avoidant attachment was negatively related to problem- and emotion-focused coping. The use of problem-focused coping strategies was a significant moderator of the relationship between the avoidant attachment dimension and shame/guilt. Avoidant attachment had a significant effect on shame/guilt in groups with a high level of problem-focused coping. In contrast, none of the coping strategies significantly moderated the relationship between anxious attachment and grief response. Conclusions : The results suggest that people with highly avoidant attachment might be overwhelmed by shame and guilt when they try to use problem-focused coping strategies. This finding suggests that grief interventions should be organized with consideration of individual differences in attachment representations.

  16. Facilitating change and adaptation: the experiences of current and bereaved carers of patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jennifer; Gold, Michelle; Brand, Caroline; Miller, Belinda; Douglass, Jo; Sundararajan, Vijaya

    2014-04-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience substantial symptom burden, psychological and social morbidity. The experience of this illness has an impact beyond the patient. This study seeks to understand the experiences and needs of family carers of people with severe COPD. Semistructured interviews were held with current and bereaved carers of people with severe COPD. Several areas of content were targeted in the interviews, including the experience of caring for someone with COPD, views of treatment and prognosis, information and communication needs, and the understanding of palliative care. Data were analyzed thematically. The carers' and bereaved carers' experiences and needs around COPD are best understood as a dynamic of change, recognition, and adaptation. Carers faced many changes as the patients' general condition deteriorated. These were changes in the nature of caring tasks, in their relationships, and their own expectations. Carers usually recognized change had happened and sought to adapt through new approaches, new equipment, a new stance of thinking, and in most cases, continued caring. Within this theme of change, recognition, and adaptation were a series of subthemes: (1) the impact of caring, (2) recognizing the role of the carer, and (3) the needs of the carer including their needs from palliative care services. The impact of caring borne by family carers is substantial and life changing. Health professionals may assist carers in their role through acknowledgement, facilitating recognition of the changes that have occurred (and their implications), and enabling creative adaptive responses for carers. Such assistance is likely to enhance the ability of carers to continue in this demanding role.

  17. An internet-based self-help intervention for older adults after marital bereavement, separation or divorce: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Jeannette; Berger, Thomas; Znoj, Hans Joerg

    2017-01-13

    Marital bereavement and separation or divorce are among the most stressful critical life events in later life. These events require a dissolution of social and emotional ties, adjustments in daily routine and changes in identity and perspectives for the future. After a normative grief or distress reaction, most individuals cope well with the loss. However, some develop a prolonged grief reaction. Internet-based self-help interventions have proved beneficial for a broad range of disorders, including complicated grief. Based on the task model and the dual-process model of coping with bereavement, we developed a guided internet-based self-help intervention for individuals who experienced marital bereavement, separation or divorce at least 6 months prior to enrolment. The intervention consists of 10 text-based self-help sessions and one supportive email a week. The primary purpose of this study is the evaluation of the feasibility and efficacy of the intervention compared with a waiting control group. The secondary purpose is to compare the effects in bereaved and separated participants. Furthermore, we aim to analyze other predictors, moderators and mediators of the outcome, such as age, psychological distress and intensity of use of the intervention. The design is a randomized controlled trial with a waiting control condition of 12 weeks and a 24-weeks follow-up. At least 72 widowed or separated participants will be recruited via our study website and internet forums. Primary outcomes are reductions in grief symptoms, depression and psychological distress. Secondary outcome measures are related to loneliness, satisfaction with life, embitterment and the sessions. The trial will provide insights into the acceptance and efficacy of internet-based interventions among adults experiencing grief symptoms, psychological distress and adaptation problems in daily life after spousal bereavement, separation or divorce. Findings will add to existing knowledge by (1) evaluating

  18. The bereavement experience of adolescents and early young adults with cancer: Peer and parental loss due to death is associated with increased risk of adverse psychological outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza-Marie Johnson

    Full Text Available Adolescents commonly experience loss due to death, and perceived closeness to the deceased can often increase the intensity of bereavement. Adolescents and early young adult (AeYA oncology patients may recall previous losses or experience new losses, possibly of other children with cancer, while coping with their own increased risk of mortality. The bereavement experiences of AeYA patients are not well described in the literature.This analysis of bereavement sought to describe the prevalence and types of losses, the support following a death, and the impact of loss on AeYAs aged 13-21 years with malignant disease (or a hematologic disorder requiring allogeneic transplant. Participants were receiving active oncologic therapy or had completed therapy within the past 3 years. Participants completed a bereavement questionnaire and inventories on depression, anxiety, and somatization. The cross-sectional study enrolled 153 AeYAs (95% participation, most (88% of whom had experienced a loss due to death. The most commonly reported losses were of a grandparent (58% or friend (37%. Peer deaths were predominantly cancer related (66%. Many participants (39% self-identified a loss as "very significant." As loss significance increased, AeYAs were more likely to report that it had changed their life "a lot/enormously" (P<0.0001, that they were grieving "slowly or never got over it" (P<0.0001, and that they felt a need for more professional help (P = 0.026. Peer loss was associated with increased risk of adverse psychological outcomes (P = 0.029, as was parental loss (P = 0.018.Most AeYAs with serious illness experience the grief process as slow or ongoing. Peer or parental loss was associated with increased risk of negative mental health outcomes. Given the high prevalence of peer loss, screening for bereavement problems is warranted in AeYAs with cancer, and further research on grief and bereavement is needed in AeYAs with serious illness.

  19. Trabalho em grupo com enlutados Trabajo en grupo con enlutados Work group with bereaved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Pascoal

    2012-12-01

    positivos e inspiradores y su divulgación es importante para ampliar horizontes y crear nuevas posibilidades.Every day we have more families experiencing mourning generated by homicides, accidents and violence, and this has caused some psychological problems for people in this situation. This study is a report of the professional experience at Hospital Mauá with a self-help group for bereaved patients, aiming to share the experience and disseminate this work. Through fifteen meetings pre-structured according to the demand of the group was possible to work various topics related to the loss, which have influenced the participants and at the same time provided comfort and a possibility of identification and exchange, and hence the resurgence of self-confidence in the participants. By means of the link theory with practice, it is evident that the group care for people in grief is a viable alternative that has brought positive and inspiring results, and its dissemination is important to broaden horizons and create new possibilities.

  20. Severe maternal stress exposure due to bereavement before, during and after pregnancy and risk of overweight and obesity in young adult men: a Danish National Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Hohwü

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perinatal stress may programme overweight and obesity. We examined whether maternal pre- and post-natal bereavement was associated with overweight and obesity in young men. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted including 119,908 men born from 1976 to 1993 and examined for military service between 2006 and 2011. Among them, 4,813 conscripts were born to mothers bereaved by death of a close relative from 12 months preconception to birth of the child (exposed group. Median body mass index (BMI and prevalence of overweight and obesity were estimated. Odds ratio of overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2 and obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2 were estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusted for maternal educational level. RESULTS: Median BMI was similar in the exposed and the unexposed group but the prevalence of overweight (33.3% versus 30.4%, p = 0.02 and obesity (9.8% versus 8.5%, p = 0.06 was higher in the exposed group. Conscripts exposed 6 to 0 months before conception and during pregnancy had a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.03; 1.27 and odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI: 1.03; 1.25, respectively. Conscripts born to mothers who experienced death of the child's biological father before child birth had a two-fold risk of obesity (odds ratio 2.00, 95% CI: 0.93; 4.31. There was no elevated risk in those who experienced maternal bereavement postnatally. CONCLUSION: Maternal bereavement during the prenatal period was associated with increased risk of overweight or obesity in a group of young male conscripts, and this may possibly be reflected to severe stress exposure early in life. However, not all associations were clear, and further studies are warranted.

  1. Severe maternal stress exposure due to bereavement before, during and after pregnancy and risk of overweight and obesity in young adult men: a Danish National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohwü, Lena; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Obel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal stress may programme overweight and obesity. We examined whether maternal pre- and post-natal bereavement was associated with overweight and obesity in young men. A cohort study was conducted including 119,908 men born from 1976 to 1993 and examined for military service between 2006 and 2011. Among them, 4,813 conscripts were born to mothers bereaved by death of a close relative from 12 months preconception to birth of the child (exposed group). Median body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of overweight and obesity were estimated. Odds ratio of overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusted for maternal educational level. Median BMI was similar in the exposed and the unexposed group but the prevalence of overweight (33.3% versus 30.4%, p = 0.02) and obesity (9.8% versus 8.5%, p = 0.06) was higher in the exposed group. Conscripts exposed 6 to 0 months before conception and during pregnancy had a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03; 1.27 and odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI: 1.03; 1.25, respectively). Conscripts born to mothers who experienced death of the child's biological father before child birth had a two-fold risk of obesity (odds ratio 2.00, 95% CI: 0.93; 4.31). There was no elevated risk in those who experienced maternal bereavement postnatally. Maternal bereavement during the prenatal period was associated with increased risk of overweight or obesity in a group of young male conscripts, and this may possibly be reflected to severe stress exposure early in life. However, not all associations were clear, and further studies are warranted.

  2. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  3. When hope and grief intersect: rates and risks of prolonged grief disorder among bereaved individuals and relatives of disappeared persons in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeke, Carina; Stammel, Nadine; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Forced disappearance is a frequent phenomenon in violent conflicts and regimes, yet little is known about unresolved grief processes as a possible outcome of the disappearance of a loved one. This study investigates prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and its risk factors in a sample of persons who lost a significant other to disappearance as compared with a sample of bereaved individuals, both groups having experienced displacement due to the armed conflict in Colombia. In a cross-sectional study conducted in four Colombian provinces, 73 persons who lost a significant other to disappearance and 222 bereaved individuals completed measures of PGD (PG-13), depression (HSCL-25), and PTSD (PCL-C) via face-to-face interviews. Trauma- and loss-related variables, including the extent to which significant others of disappeared persons hoped that their loved one was still alive, were assessed. Results indicated that 23% of participants who lost a significant other to disappearance met criteria for PGD as compared to 31.5% in bereaved participants. No differences were found between the two groups in terms of symptom severity of PGD, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, or traumatic exposure. Regression analysis indicated that, among relatives and friends of disappeared persons, the extent of hope predicted PGD above and beyond depression severity whereas among bereaved persons, PGD was predicted by time since the loss, the number of traumatic events and symptom severity of PTSD and depression. The instruments were not validated for use in Colombia; generalizability of findings is limited. Forced disappearance is related to prolonged grief reactions, particularly when those left behind maintain hope that the disappeared person is still alive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. WA50 We can't do it alone: hospices and schools working together to educate and support children around death, dying and bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sally; Quinn, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Educating and supporting children around death, dying and bereavement, in schools, frequently relies on the individual interest and expertise of staff (Rowling 2003). Moves to develop such work of ten results in one off projects led by external agencies. Support and education is therefore ad hoc and unequitable. A research study was undertaken between a hospice and school to develop practice in this area from a health promotion perspective. This presentation discusses the design and implementation of two practice innovations arising from this process. The innovations aimed to introduce and educate children on issues related to loss and change, whilst simultaneously ensure that school staff have the skills and confidence to support individual experiences within the school setting. This was from a harm education and early intervention standpoint. Collaborative inquiry, within an action research methodology, was used to advance the innovations. This involved school and hospice staff working together to design and facilitate the activities. A programme of activities for children aged 5 to 11 (the resilience project) was designed and integrated throughout the curriculum. This is currently being piloted. A bereavement training programme was designed and facilitated to all school staff. Evaluations reported an increase in confidence around supporting bereavement issues. The process highlighted that combing the skills and expertise of hospice and school staff was essential in developing sustainable activities, appropriate to the setting. The role of the hospice in engaging with communities to collaboratively develop education and support around death, dying and bereavement was emphasised. Rowling, L. Grief in school communities: effective support strategies. Buckingham and Philadelphia: Open University Press, 2003. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. "Every time that month comes, I remember": using cognitive interviews to adapt grief measures for use with bereaved adolescents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tory M; Thurman, Tonya R; Nogela, Lineo

    2016-07-01

    To assess standard grief measures through cognitive interviews with bereaved adolescents in Free State, South Africa, and make recommendations designed to improve the measurement of grief in this and similar populations. Twenty-one parentally bereaved adolescents participated in semi-structured cognitive interviews about the Core Bereavement Items (CBI) questionnaire, Grief Cognitions Questionnaire for Children (GCQ-C), or Intrusive Griefs Thoughts Scale (IGTS). Interviewees offered valuable insights for improving grief measurement with this population (e.g., consensus that not thinking frequently about a deceased loved one was shameful, aversion to terms including "died"). Participants were better able to apply response options denoting specific frequencies (e.g., "once or twice a week") versus general ones (e.g., "a little bit of the time"). Questions intended to gauge grief commonly elicited responses reflecting the impact of loss on adolescents' basic survival instead of psychological wellbeing. The need for psychological support is high among orphans and vulnerable children. Tools for measuring psychological outcomes can provide evidence of programme effects and guide decision making about investment. Grief measures used with adolescents in South Africa should account for the issues raised by cognitive interviewees in the study, including question and response option complexity, linguistic preferences, and cultural norms.

  6. Analysis of the bereavement effect after the death of a spouse in the Amish: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Ari; Singh, Sarabdeep; McArdle, Patrick F; Ryan, Kathleen A; Shuldiner, Alan R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2014-01-15

    This study investigates the association between bereavement and the mortality of a surviving spouse among Amish couples. We hypothesised that the bereavement effect would be relatively small in the Amish due to the unusually cohesive social structure of the Amish that might attenuate the loss of spousal support. Population-based cohort study. The USA. 10,892 Amish couples born during 1725-1900 located in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. All the participants are deceased. The survival time is 'age'; event is 'death'. Hazard ratios (HRs) of widowed individuals with respect to gender, age at widowhood, remarriage, the number of surviving children and time since bereavement. We observed HRs for widowhood ranging from 1.06 to 1.26 over the study period (nearly all differences significant at pAmish community. Remarriage is associated with a significant decrease in the mortality risk among Amish individuals. Contrary to results from previous studies, an increase in the number of surviving children was associated with decreased survival rate.

  7. Persistent complex bereavement disorder: clinical utility and classification of the category proposed for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Kikuchi, Senichiro; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) was proposed as a bereavement-related clinical category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, which included the disorder among conditions for further study. This is an independent clinical category in which intense yearning for the deceased continues for at least 12 months. However, the diagnostic features are still inconclusive. We suggest a variation of PCBD for making category from our clinical experiences. We presented two representative case studies in which grief caused by bereavement was observed as the root of the pathological condition. We examined the disorder's pathological conditions, diagnoses, and appropriate treatments based on the cases we experienced. Both cases involved elderly women who lost their spouse through illness and experienced prolonged grief for an extended period, resulting in hospital admission. Based on the two cases, we believe that PCBD can also include a psychotic type with hallucinations as a major symptom. While studying PCBD, we took into account specific cultural characteristics of Japanese people and their present day social environment. Such cases would be suggestive when determining the PCBD clinical category in the future. PCBD is considered to be clinically very useful, especially in an extremely aged society as seen in developed countries, including Japan. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  8. Development and pilot testing of a questionnaire to determine the ability and willingness of health personnel accompanying perinatal bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª José Domínguez Santarén

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The care that parents receive around the time of a loss has a huge impact on their perception of what happened and on their ability to cope. Good care cannot remove the pain and devastation that the loss of a pregnancy or the death of a baby can bring, but can promote healing.Methodology: Creation and pilot study for a questionnaire to determinate the capacity and willingness of perinatal bereavement support from staff in hospitalization and delivery room services in Zaragoza and Jaca who care for couples with a perinatal death.Statistical analysis. Qualitative analysis is made of the difficulties and limitations of this support staff is performing. Psychometric tests were conducted to determine the reliability and validity of the questionnaire by calculating Cronbach´s alpha and the intraclass correlation coefficient. For the analysis of construct validity, we performed the principal components factorial analysis (PCFA through the Varimax rotation system.Results. The qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicates a lack of knowledge about this type of mourning and social and communication tools that often precludes effective accompaniment. We obtained a Cronbach alpha value of 0.835 overall questionnaire, which indicates high internal consistency or coherence among the items and relatively high CCI indicates good stability over time with significance p<,001. Making appropriate modifications could assess the ability and willingness of workers.

  9. 'We do it to keep him alive': bereaved individuals' experiences of online suicide memorials and continuing bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jo; Bailey, Louis; Kennedy, David

    2015-10-02

    This paper presents draws on interviews with individuals who have experience of creating, maintaining and utilising Facebook sites in memory of a loved one who has died by suicide. We argue that Facebook enables the deceased to be an on-going active presence in the lives of the bereaved. We highlight the potential of the Internet (and Facebook in particular) as a new and emerging avenue for the continuation of online identities and continuing bonds. Our study offers unique insight into survivors' experiences of engaging with the virtual presence of their deceased loved one: how mourners come and go online, how this evolves over time and how the online identity of the deceased evolves even after death. We discuss how Facebook provides new ways for people to experience and negotiate death by suicide and to memorialise the deceased, highlighting the positive impact of this for survivors' mental health. Finally, we describe the creation of tension amongst those who manage their grief in different ways.

  10. Bereavement, silence and culture within a peer-led HIV/AIDS-prevention strategy for vulnerable children in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heijden, Ingrid; Swartz, Sharlene

    2010-04-01

    In addressing the psychosocial effects of the HIV and AIDS pandemic among vulnerable children, the issue of bereavement appears inadequately addressed. Amid the global discourse on children orphaned and made vulnerable by HIV and AIDS, this paper explores how cultural contexts and social environments in South Africa shape children's experience of grief. The argument draws on a number of qualitative studies and uses empirical evidence from an evaluation of a peer-led HIV/AIDS-prevention strategy aimed at providing psychosocial support for 10- to 13-year-old South African children living in resource-poor communities. The paper reveals a central paradox regarding how the intervention's objective of talking about death and eliciting memories of deceased loved ones with young children is confounded by cultural practices located in notions of silence and the need to protect children. The paper acknowledges the 'culture of silence' surrounding death in some African contexts, but concludes that peer-led strategies have the potential to naturally circumvent these cultural taboos, simultaneously creating a much-needed space for young children to cry and talk among themselves, even if remaining silent at home in the presence of adults.

  11. Decision Making Regarding the Place of End-of-Life Cancer Care: The Burden on Bereaved Families and Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sena; Arao, Harue; Masutani, Eiko; Aoki, Miwa; Kishino, Megumi; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-05-01

    Decision making regarding the place of end-of-life (EOL) care is an important issue for patients with terminal cancer and their families. It often requires surrogate decision making, which can be a burden on families. To explore the burden on the family of patients dying from cancer related to the decisions they made about the place of EOL care and investigate the factors affecting this burden. This was a cross-sectional mail survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were 700 bereaved family members of patients with cancer from 133 palliative care units in Japan. The questionnaire covered decisional burdens, depression, grief, and the decision-making process. Participants experienced emotional pressure as the highest burden. Participants with a high decisional burden reported significantly higher scores for depression and grief (both P decision making without knowing the patient's wishes and values (P making the decision because of a due date for discharge from a former facility or hospital (P = 0.005). Decision making regarding the place of EOL care was recalled as burdensome for family decision makers. An early decision-making process that incorporates sharing patients' and family members' values that are relevant to the desired place of EOL care is important. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Indirect Effect of Positive Parenting on the Relationship Between Parent and Sibling Bereavement Outcomes After the Death of a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Adam T; Gabert-Quillen, Crystal; Friebert, Sarah; Carst, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    Families are referred to pediatric palliative care (PPC) programs when a child is diagnosed with a medical condition associated with less than a full life expectancy. When a child dies, PPC programs typically offer a range of bereavement interventions to these families, often focusing on parents. Currently, it is unclear which factors increase the likelihood that bereaved siblings will experience negative outcomes, limiting the development of empirically supported interventions that can be delivered in PPC programs. The present study explored the relationship between parents' and surviving sibling's mental health symptoms (i.e., post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], prolonged grief disorder (PGD), and depression symptoms) after a child's death. Additionally, the extent to which parent functioning indirectly impacted sibling functioning through parenting behaviors (i.e., positive parenting and parent involvement) was also examined, with a specific focus on differences based on parent gender. Sixty bereaved parents and siblings (aged 8-18) who enrolled in a PPC program from 2008 to 2013 completed measures of PTSD, PGD, and depression related to the loss of a child/sibling. Siblings also completed a measure of general parenting behaviors. Maternal, but not paternal, symptoms of PTSD and PGD were directly associated with sibling outcomes. Paternal symptoms were associated with sibling symptoms indirectly, through parenting behaviors (i.e., via decreasing positive parenting). These results underscore the importance of examining both maternal and paternal influences after the death of a child, demonstrate differential impact of maternal vs. paternal symptoms on siblings, and stress the importance of addressing postloss symptoms from a family systems perspective. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Latent Structure in Elderly Bereaved European Trauma Victims: Evidence for a Five Factor Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    to provide superior fit over the existing four-factor models. The present study investigated the fit of the five-factor model against the existing four-factor models and assessed the resultant factors association with depression in a bereaved European trauma sample (N=325). Participants were assessed...... for PTSD via the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and depression via the Beck Depression Inventory. The five-factor model provided superior fit to the data compared to the existing four-factor models. In the Dysphoric Arousal model depression was equally related to both Dysphoric Arousal and Emotional Numbing...

  14. Predictors of Mental Health Resilience in Children who Have Been Parentally Bereaved by AIDS in Urban South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collishaw, Stephan; Gardner, Frances; Lawrence Aber, J; Cluver, Lucie

    2016-05-01

    Children parentally bereaved by AIDS experience high rates of mental health problems. However, there is considerable variability in outcomes, and some show no mental health problems even when followed over time. Primary aims were to identify predictors of resilient adaptation at child, family and community levels within a group of AIDS-orphaned children, and to consider their cumulative influence. A secondary aim was to test whether predictors were of particular influence among children orphaned by AIDS relative to non-orphaned and other-orphaned children. AIDS-orphaned (n = 290), other-orphaned (n = 163) and non-orphaned (n = 202) adolescents living in informal settlements in Cape Town, South Africa were assessed on two occasions 4 years apart (mean age 13.5 years at Time 1, range = 10-19 years). Self-report mental health screens were used to operationalise resilience in AIDS-orphaned children as the absence of clinical-range symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and suicidality. A quarter of AIDS-orphaned children (24 %) showed no evidence of mental health problems at either wave. Child physical health, better caregiving quality, food security, better peer relationship quality, and lower exposure to community violence, bullying or stigma at baseline predicted sustained resilience. There were cumulative influences across predictors. Associations with mental health showed little variation by child age or gender, or between orphaned and non-orphaned children. Mental health resilience is associated with multiple processes across child, family and community levels of influence. Caution is needed in making causal inferences.

  15. Avoidance of Bereavement-Related Stimuli in Chinese Individuals Experiencing Prolonged Grief: Evidence from a Dot-Probe Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attentional bias refers to a preference for (e.g., vigilance or a shifting away (e.g., avoidance of one’s focus with respect to specific stimuli. Accumulating evidence suggests that an attentional bias toward death/threat-related stimuli exists in bereaved individuals experiencing prolonged grief (PG. Measuring for different processing may reflect different cognitive characteristics. Therefore, this study sought to compare information-processing biases in Chinese individuals with high versus low levels of PG symptomatology at supraliminal and subliminal levels, respectively.Method: A 2 (grief level × 2 (consciousness level × 2 (word type three-factor mixed design with supraliminal and subliminal tasks was utilized in the current study. Based on their Prolonged Grief Questionnaire-13 (PG-13 scores, 38 participants were included in the low-PG group, and 34 individuals were included in the high-PG group. All the participants completed a dot-probe task in which they were primed with death-related and life-related words paired with neutral stimuli.Results: High-PG individuals were slower in reacting to the death-related information in both supraliminal and subliminal tasks. After controlling for other symptoms in the backward deletion regression, PG-13 scores significantly predicted the avoidance tendency to death-related words in the supraliminal task, while anxiety was the best predictor of turning one’s vision away from death-related stimuli in the subliminal trials.Conclusion: The results suggested that high PG is associated with a tendency to avoid death-related words. Future research is needed to explore interventions that address the avoidance of death-related stimuli among individuals with elevated, or diagnosable, levels of PG.

  16. Imagining the absent dead: rituals of bereavement and the place of the war dead in German women's art during the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrecht, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on women's visual responses to the First World War, this article examines female mourning in wartime Germany. The unprecedented death toll on the battlefronts, military burial practices and the physical distance from the remains of the war dead disrupted traditional rituals of bereavement, hindered closure and compounded women's grief on the home front. In response to these novel circumstances, a number of female artists used their images to reimagine funerary customs, overcome the separation from the fallen and express acute emotional distress. This article analyses three images produced during the conflict by the artists Katharina Heise, Martha Schrag and Sella Hasse, and places their work within the civilian experience of bereavement in war. By depicting the pain of loss, female artists contested the historical tradition of proud female mourning in German society and countered wartime codes of conduct that prohibited the public display of emotional pain in response to soldiers’ deaths. As a largely overlooked body of sources, women's art adds to our understanding of the tensions in wartime cultures of mourning that emerged between 1914 and 1918.

  17. Association Between Bereaved Families' Sense of Security and Their Experience of Death in Cancer Patients: Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Sato, Kazuki; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Eguchi, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The sense of security scale was developed to indicate care quality within the community. Bereaved families have perspective to evaluate the quality of the care system. The aim was to examine associations between end-of-life care and sense of security regarding regional cancer care among bereaved families. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted with families of cancer patients who died in regional areas of Japan. A total of 1046 family caregivers of patients responded to surveys (effective response rate of 65%). In multiple regression analyses, the families' higher age (P patients' end of life (P = 0.016), lower caregiving burden (P patient death, including being free from physical distress (P security. Quality of death and lower burden on family caregivers were associated with families' sense of security. This suggests strategies for improving care quality for each patient to improve the sense of security. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  19. Reticence in disclosure of HIV infection and reasons for bereavement: impact on perinatally infected adolescents' mental health and understanding of HIV treatment and prevention in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, Nataly; Black, Vivian; Cluver, Lucie; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2017-07-01

    Survival rates of perinatally infected HIV-positive adolescents (PIA) are increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. There is a gap in understanding how disclosure and bereavement have an impact on PIA beliefs and understanding of their HIV infection and its management. In-depth interviews were conducted with 25 purposively selected adolescents aged 13-19 years from 5 public health clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa. Data were analysed using NVivo 10 using a thematic approach. PIA experience incomplete disclosure both of their HIV status and reasons for their bereavements, which limits their understanding of how they became infected, vertical transmission and prevention options like prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). Most participants were orphaned and were experiencing complicated grieving (i.e., engaged in unresolved tasks of grieving) which had a negative impact on their mental health, and ability to accept their HIV status and adhere to treatment. PIA need improved communication regarding vertical transmission and how they became HIV-positive, as well as reasons for death of their loved ones to properly understand their HIV status and engage effectively in management. Honest communication about how relatives died and truthful engagement in the process of disclosure of HIV status is necessary to reduce stigma and complicated grieving, and improve mental health in this population.

  20. Severe Maternal Stress Exposure Due to Bereavement before, during and after Pregnancy and Risk of Overweight and Obesity in Young Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwü, Lena; Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal stress may programme overweight and obesity. We examined whether maternal pre- and post-natal bereavement was associated with overweight and obesity in young men. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted including 119,908 men born from 1976 to 1993 and examined for military...... service between 2006 and 2011. Among them, 4,813 conscripts were born to mothers bereaved by death of a close relative from 12 months preconception to birth of the child (exposed group). Median body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of overweight and obesity were estimated. Odds ratio of overweight (BMI≥25...... kg/m2) and obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusted for maternal educational level. RESULTS: Median BMI was similar in the exposed and the unexposed group but the prevalence of overweight (33.3% versus 30.4%, p = 0.02) and obesity (9.8% versus 8.5%, p = 0...

  1. Bereavement in very old age: impact on health and relationships of the loss of a spouse, a child, a sibling, or a close friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Epinay, Christian J Lalive; Cavalli, Stefano; Guillet, Luc A

    This article deals with the following two questions: In very old age, which are the main sources of bereavement? And what are the consequences of such losses on health and on relationships? The findings are based on the complete set of data compiled in the course of the Swiss Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study on the Oldest Old (SWILSOO), which provided a 10-year follow-up of a first cohort (1994-2004) and a 5-year follow-up of a second (1999-2004). The data revealed that, in very old age, the great majority of the dear ones who died were either siblings or close friends. Taken as a whole, the bereaved suffered a marked and lasting increase in depressive symptoms, together with a short-term deterioration in their functional status; those bereft of a spouse or a child saw their functional status worsen and exhibited enduring depressive symptoms but they also benefited from support in the form of increased interaction; those bereft of siblings only suffered from a mild, short-term deterioration in functional status; those who had lost a close friend suffered a very significant increase in depressive symptoms. In the medium term, most of these effects disappeared, lending weight to the claim that the survivors manage to cope with the misfortunes of life.

  2. Children bereaved by fatal intimate partner violence: A population-based study into demographics, family characteristics and homicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Groot, Arend; Snetselaar, Hanneke; Stroeken, Tielke; van de Putte, Elise

    2017-01-01

    In the context of violence against women, intimate partner homicide increasingly receives research and policy attention. Although the impact of losing a parent due to intimate partner homicide is intuitively obvious, little is known about the children involved. We aimed to identify all children bereaved by parental intimate partner homicide in the Netherlands in the period 2003-2012, describe their demographics and family circumstances, and assess their exposure to prior violence at home and to the homicide itself. We cross-examined 8 national data sources and extracted data about children's demographics and circumstances prior to, and during the homicide. Our primary outcomes were prior violence at home (child maltreatment, neglect or domestic violence) and homicide witness status (ranging from being at a different location altogether to being present at the scene). During the decade under study, 256 children lost a biological parent due to 137 cases of intimate partner homicide. On average, the children were 7.4 years old at the time of the homicide (51.1% were boys; 95% CI 47.3-54.7) and most lost their mother (87.1%; full population data). Immigrant children were overrepresented (59.4%; 95% CI 52.8-66.0). Of the children for whom information about previous violence at home was gathered, 67.7% (95% CI 59.7-73.7) were certainly exposed and 16.7% (95% CI 11.3-22.2) probably. Of the children who had certainly been exposed, 43.1% (95% CI 41.1-60.9) had not received social services or mental health care. The majority of the children (58.7%; 95% CI 52.1-65.3) were present at the location of the homicide when the killing took place, with varying levels of exposure. Homicide weapons mostly involved cutting weapons and firearms, leading to graphic crime scenes. Care providers need capacity not only to help children cope with the sudden loss of a parent but also with unaddressed histories of domestic violence and exposure to graphic homicide scenes, in a culture

  3. Children bereaved by fatal intimate partner violence: A population-based study into demographics, family characteristics and homicide exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Alisic

    Full Text Available In the context of violence against women, intimate partner homicide increasingly receives research and policy attention. Although the impact of losing a parent due to intimate partner homicide is intuitively obvious, little is known about the children involved. We aimed to identify all children bereaved by parental intimate partner homicide in the Netherlands in the period 2003-2012, describe their demographics and family circumstances, and assess their exposure to prior violence at home and to the homicide itself.We cross-examined 8 national data sources and extracted data about children's demographics and circumstances prior to, and during the homicide. Our primary outcomes were prior violence at home (child maltreatment, neglect or domestic violence and homicide witness status (ranging from being at a different location altogether to being present at the scene. During the decade under study, 256 children lost a biological parent due to 137 cases of intimate partner homicide. On average, the children were 7.4 years old at the time of the homicide (51.1% were boys; 95% CI 47.3-54.7 and most lost their mother (87.1%; full population data. Immigrant children were overrepresented (59.4%; 95% CI 52.8-66.0. Of the children for whom information about previous violence at home was gathered, 67.7% (95% CI 59.7-73.7 were certainly exposed and 16.7% (95% CI 11.3-22.2 probably. Of the children who had certainly been exposed, 43.1% (95% CI 41.1-60.9 had not received social services or mental health care. The majority of the children (58.7%; 95% CI 52.1-65.3 were present at the location of the homicide when the killing took place, with varying levels of exposure. Homicide weapons mostly involved cutting weapons and firearms, leading to graphic crime scenes.Care providers need capacity not only to help children cope with the sudden loss of a parent but also with unaddressed histories of domestic violence and exposure to graphic homicide scenes, in a culture

  4. The impact of personal loss on the experience of health professions: graduate students in end-of-life and bereavement care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Katherine P; Vaughn-Cole, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of prior personal experience with grief on self-reported personal and professional development of graduate students in nursing, social work, counseling, pastoral care, and genetic counseling involved as cofacilitators in bereavement support groups, and of medical students observing interdisciplinary inpatient palliative care. Personal experience with death of a family member or close friend was reported in 80% of the 35 participating students. Findings suggest that grief and the students' construction of the meaning of their loss can mediate the students' developing sense of self as a professional helper. Active engagement with suffering persons, the opportunity for self-disclosure and reflection, and teacher-facilitator provision of emotional guidance and modeling contributed positively to learning.

  5. Welcoming expertise: Bereaved parents' perceptions of the parent-healthcare provider relationship when a critically ill child is admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashleigh E; Copnell, Beverley; Hall, Helen

    2017-11-15

    Entering the paediatric intensive care unit with a critically ill child is a stressful experience for parents. In addition to fearing for their child's well-being, parents must navigate both a challenging environment and numerous new relationships with healthcare staff. How parents form relationships with staff and how they perceive both their own and the healthcare providers' roles in this early stage of their paediatric intensive care journey is currently unknown. This paper explores bereaved parents' perceptions of their role and their relationships with healthcare providers when their child is admitted to the intensive care unit, as part of a larger study exploring their experiences when their child dies in intensive care. A constructivist grounded theory approach was utilised to recruit 26 bereaved parents from 4 Australian intensive care units. Parents participated in audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews lasting 90-150min. All data were analysed using the constant comparative analysis processes, supported by theoretical memos. Upon admission, parents viewed healthcare providers as experts, both of their child's medical care and of the hospital system. This expertise was welcomed, with the parent-healthcare provider relationship developing around the child's need for medical care. Parents engaged in 2 key behaviours in their relationships with staff: prioritising survival, and learning 'the system'. Within each of these behaviours are several subcategories, including 'Stepping back', 'Accepting restrictions' and 'Deferring to medical advice'. The relationships between parents and staff shift and change across the child's admission and subsequent death in the paediatric intensive care unit. However, upon admission, this relationship centres around the child's potential survival and their need for medical care, and the parent's recognition of the healthcare staff as experts of both the child's care and the hospital system. Copyright © 2017 Australian

  6. Why people accept opioids: role of general attitudes toward drugs, experience as a bereaved family, information from medical professionals, and personal beliefs regarding a good death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Takuya; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Shimizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Many surveys have evaluated patient-related barriers to pain management. To explore associations between a preference for opioids and general attitudes toward drugs, the experience and information received as a bereaved family, and beliefs regarding a good death. A cross-sectional survey, performed in 2010, of bereaved families of patients with cancer in palliative care units across Japan. Questionnaires were sent to 997 families. A total of 66% of families responded. Of these, 224 responses were excluded because the family declined to participate in the study (n = 38), the patient was not receiving any opioid analgesics, and there were missing data (n = 164), or data were missing for the primary end points (n = 22). Thus, 432 responses were finally analyzed (43%). In total, 26%, 41%, and 31% of family members stated that they strongly want to receive, want to receive, or slightly want to receive opioids if needed in the future, respectively. Determinants associated with a preference for receiving opioid treatment were the following: a general appreciation of the drugs (P = 0.005), witnessing an improvement in the patient's quality of life as a result of pain relief (P = 0.003), information provided by medical professionals that the opioid could be discontinued if side effects developed (P = 0.042), and the belief that a good death was one that was free from pain and physical distress (P families whose relatives were treated with opioid analgesics reported a preference to receive opioid analgesics for the treatment of cancer pain, if necessary, in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The concept of shalōm as a constructive bereavement healing framework within a pluralist health seeking context of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Absence of health, that is, sickness in Africa is viewed in personalistic terms. A disease is explained as effected by ‘the active purposeful intervention of an agent, who may be human’, non-human (a ghost, an ancestor, an ‘evil spirit, or supernatural (a deity or other very powerful being’ (Foster. Illness is thus attributed to breaking of taboos, offending God and/ or ancestral spirits; witchcraft, sorcery, the evil eye, passion by an evil spirit and a curse from parents or from an offended neighbour. In view of these personalistic theories of ill health, treatment is through ritual purification, exorcism or sacrifices. For an appropriate diagnosis and intervention, it is imperative to determine ‘who’ caused the illness and then ‘why’ it was caused, to which answers are offered through divination by a healer. This interpretive framework, is applicable to all types of sickness, facilitates co-existence of African traditional healing and biomedical treatment, that is, plurality of health seeking practices. The approach fails to offer a constructive approach and contradicts the biblical healing framework whereby one may not have explanatory causes to a situation of ill health. This article engaged the biblical concept of shalōm as a relevant constructive framework. The Hebrew concept of shalōm, though distinctly salvific, is inclusive of holistic and personalistic healing aspects. The concept encompasses constructive aspects of completeness, wholeness, health, peace, welfare, safety, soundness, tranquillity, prosperity, perfectness, fullness, rest, harmony and the absence of agitation or discord, which provides a useful holistic healing theological framework. It therefore provides a health and well-being framework that is relational, sensitive and applicable to healing patterns in Africa. Using the case study of the Abaluyia people of East Africa, this article discussed bereavement as a state that requires healing and how the

  8. WA42 Proving its worth - changing public policy for palliative care, end of life care and bereavement through advocacy and communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edghill, Angela; Donohoe, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    The 2015 palliative care budget is €72 million (Euros) but up to €1.3 billion spent on end of life care annually - much of this larger figure unplanned and uncoordinated. Geographic and other inequities evident in palliative care provision. Build support for the development and implementation of a National Strategy on Palliative Care, End of Life and Bereavement. Multi-layered approach to raising awareness and building consensus: Targeting the correct audience who can make change happen Presenting robust evidence including costs justifying reform and investment Demonstrating that issues affect a significant number of people Sharing experience and knowledge Knowing their policy priorities Staying resilient - advancing and introducing new angles to argument Engaging directly as advocates within the political system at all political levels - developing relationships with politicians Identifying advocates in the public service to promote policy change Using a variety of new and existing projects and programmes Encouraging patients and families to be self-advocates - using a novel project for discussing and recording future care preferences Supporting healthcare professionals to become effective advocates for patients Creating alliances to lobby for policy development Using media opportunities to sell the message The recognition of the importance of a strategic approach to palliative and end of life care acknowledged in Parliamentary Committee Report affords an opportunity to develop further policy and practice. This a long - term exercise, dependent on supporting the implementation plan, building momentum and promoting a public dialogue on sensitive issues around dying, death and bereavement. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Can individuals who are specialists in death, dying, and bereavement contribute to the prevention and/or mitigation of armed conflicts and cycles of violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Colin Murray; Attig, Thomas; Bendiksen, Robert; Cabrera, Fernando; Corr, Charles; Cox, Gerry; Faust, Susanna; Fulton, Robert; Jupp, Peter; Kallenberg, Kjell; Lamers, Elizabeth; Lamers, William; Long, Scott; McKissock, Diane; McKissock, Mal; Morgan, Mary Ann; Papadatou, Danai; Stevenson, Robert; Stoddard, Sandol; Weiss, Robert; Wrenn, Marcy

    2011-01-01

    Specialists in death, dying, and bereavement and their consequences for individuals, families, and communities have experience and research findings that are relevant to an understanding of the reactions of individuals faced by deadly violence. At such times, powerful emotions and ingrained patterns of thought and behavior can given rise to disproportionate responses that may feed into cycles of violence. An extended table shows how professionals helping individuals and families faced with violent death share common aims with those aiming to help larger social units faced with armed attacks. It follows that these professionals should work together to improve death education, to prepare people for possible deadly violence and, where possible, to suggest alternatives, to create secure places and relationships in which communication becomes possible, bad news can be broken and understood, feelings examined, differences reconciled, and people can redirect anger into the prevention of escalation rather than its perpetuation. All of these activities hold out hope that cycles of deadly violence can be broken as well as mitigating the consequences when they are not. The undoubted success of the worldwide palliative care movement resulted from the recognition of serious deficiencies in existing services, the provision of an inclusive, holistic, program that extends across medical, social psychological, and spiritual realms of discourse, providing care for patients and their families, irrespective of wealth, race, religion, and political persuasion, by dedicated leaders and teams backed by education and information services and organized across geographical boundaries. It is argued here that the time is ripe for a similar commitment to bring to an end the scandal of armed conflict by a similarly multidisciplinary, multicultural effort to relieve the suffering that both causes and results from armed conflict. This must remain independent of race, religion, political

  10. Stigmatization and Suicide Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S.; Jordan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With survey data collected primarily from peer support group participants, the authors compared stigmatization responses of 462 parents losing children to suicide with 54 other traumatic death survivors and 24 child natural death survivors. Parents who encountered harmful responses and strained relations with family members and non-kin reported…

  11. Relationship between serum lipid concentrations and posttraumatic stress symptoms in the bereaved after the Sewol ferry disaster: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyejin; Huh, Hyu Jung; Hwang, Jihyun; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2018-05-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum lipid concentrations and PTSD symptoms in the bereaved after a traumatic familial loss. Eighteen months after the Sewol ferry disaster, 107 subjects who experienced traumatic losses as a result of the accident completed a mental and medical survey as well as laboratory tests for lipid profiles. At 30 months after the trauma, a total of 64 individuals completed a follow-up psychometric survey and biochemical measurements. We performed multiple linear regression analyses, examining the association between PTSD symptoms and lipid profiles. Other potential influences on lipid profiles such as metabolic risk factors, demographic risk factors, and underlying medical history were accounted for. Participants reporting clinically significant PTSD symptoms exhibited lower serum HDL-C levels than those without PTSD symptoms. In addition, we found that the severity of PTSD symptoms and sex could explain the changes in lipid profiles independently of other possible risk factors of changes. The results of this study suggest that PTSD symptoms may contribute to an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome via detrimental changes in lipid concentrations. Routine screening and multidisciplinary management to prevent metabolic syndrome in individuals who experience traumatic losses would therefore be valuable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing posttraumatic stress disorder's latent structure in elderly bereaved European trauma survivors: evidence for a five-factor dysphoric and anxious arousal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-10-01

    The three-factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, is not supported in the empirical literature. Two alternative four-factor models have received a wealth of empirical support. However, a consensus regarding which is superior has not been reached. A recent five-factor model has been shown to provide superior fit over the existing four-factor models. The present study investigated the fit of the five-factor model against the existing four-factor models and assessed the resultant factors' association with depression in a bereaved European trauma sample (N = 325). The participants were assessed for PTSD via the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and depression via the Beck Depression Inventory. The five-factor model provided superior fit to the data compared with the existing four-factor models. In the dysphoric arousal model, depression was equally related to both dysphoric arousal and emotional numbing, whereas depression was more related to dysphoric arousal than to anxious arousal.

  13. The impact of awareness of terminal illness on quality of death and care decision making: a prospective nationwide survey of bereaved family members of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunmi; Shin, Dong Wook; Choi, Jin Young; Kang, Jina; Kim, Dae Kyun; Kim, Hyesuk; Lee, Eunil; Hwang, Kwan Ok; Oh, Bumjo; Cho, BeLong

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to assess whether awareness of a terminal illness can affect care decision making processes and the achievement of a good death in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care services. Awareness of terminal illness at the time of palliative care service admission was assessed by the health care professionals during the routine initial comprehensive assessment process and was recorded in the national terminal cancer patient registry. A follow-up nationwide bereavement survey was conducted, which contained questions regarding decision making processes and the Korean version of the Good Death Inventory. Among the 345 patients included in the final analysis, the majority (68.4%) of the patients were aware of the terminal illness. Awareness of the terminal illness tended to reduce discordances in care decision making (adjusted odds ratio = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.29-1.07), and increased the patients' own decision making when there were discordances between patients and their families (adjusted odds ratio = 3.79; 95% CI: 1.31-10.94). The Good Death Inventory score was significantly higher among patients who were aware of their terminal illnesses compared with those who were not (5.04 vs. 4.80; p = 0.013) and especially in the domains of 'control over the future' (5.18 vs. 4.04; p Awareness of the terminal illness had beneficial effect on the harmonious decision making, patient autonomy, and patient's quality of death. Disclosure of terminal illness should be encouraged. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Bereavement and depression: possible changes to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: a report from the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Association for Death Education and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, David E; Noppe, Illee; Sandler, Irwin; Werth, James

    2011-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is being revised. A proposed revision hotly debated is to remove what is known as the exclusionary criterion and allow clinicians to diagnose a person with a major depressive episode within the early days and weeks following a death. The Executive Committee of the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) commissioned its Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) to examine the debate over removing the exclusionary criterion and provide a written report. The DSM-IV-TR classifies bereavement as a clinical condition that is not a mental disorder. The exclusionary criterion states that within the first 2 months of the onset of bereavement a person should not be diagnosed as having major depression unless certain symptoms not characteristic of a normal grief reaction are present. We note these symptoms when discussing the exclusionary criterion. In the report we identify the features that comprise the exclusionary criterion, examine reasons (including research conclusions and clinical concerns) given for retaining and for eliminating the exclusionary criterion, offer extensive comments from experienced licensed clinicians about the issues involved, discuss diagnostic and treatment implications, and offer specific recommendations for ADEC to implement.

  15. Bereavement care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Vedsted, Peter; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2013-01-01

    I dette studie testes effekten af en klinisk intervention over for håndtering af sorg i almen praksis. Interventionen handlede om, at tidlig identifikation af komplicerede sorgreaktioner via praktiserende læge kan være med til at sikre behandling til behandlingskrævende sorgreaktioner, der volder...

  16. Online Dating and Conjugal Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dannagal Goldthwaite; Caplan, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-presentation in the online dating profiles of 241 widowed and 280 divorced individuals between 18 and 40 years old. A content analysis of open-ended user-generated profiles assessed the presence or absence of various themes, including the user's marital status, the backstory of their lost relationship, and whether they…

  17. The affective depth of bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, Allan

    In his mourning diaries, Roland Barthes circles around a distinction between the ‘emotivity’ of grief and what he terms ‘suffering’ in grief. The emotivity of grief, we are told, passes with time. Suffering, however, does not. While emotivity manifests in waves, like brushes of emotional states...

  18. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study), which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a) focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b) a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve interviews with staff and

  19. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heide Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study, which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve

  20. Del dolor al duelo: límites al anhelo frente a la desaparición forzada. // From the bereavement to the grief: limits to the yearning faced with the frorced dissapearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Eugenia Diaz.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article develops the research question about the logic of the grief process when a subject lost is caused by forced disappearance of a loved one. Even though the study of the sources allows to state that the common response to this event is a suspended bereavement, research results allow to propose that there are collective -justice and ritual and individual –grief act- mechanisms which can contribute for a subject to overcome the obstacles and to begin grief resolution. In order to come to this conclusion, the concepts of grief work, reality test, bereavement, and act are discussed to be able to state that the grief for the disappearance does not depend on the reunion with the lost object, nor on the find of a corpse, but on a change of the subject/object relationship where this latter is psychically assumed as radically lost. // El artículo desarrolla la pregunta de investigación en torno a la lógica del proceso de duelo cuando la pérdida de un sujeto es causada por la desaparición forzada de un ser amado. Si bien el estudio de las fuentes permite afirmar que la respuesta común a este evento es la de un dolor suspendido, los resultados de la investigación permiten proponer que existen mecanismo colectivos —la justicia y el ritual— y particulares —el acto de duelo— que pueden contribuir a que un sujeto movilice los obstáculos e inicie la elaboración de su duelo. Se discuten, para llegar a esta conclusión, las nociones de trabajo de duelo, de prueba de realidad, de dolor y de acto, para llegar a afirmar que el duelo por la desaparición no depende del reencuentro con el objeto perdido, ni siquiera bajo la forma de hallazgo del cadáver, sino de un cambio en la relación del sujeto con el objeto donde se instaure psíquicamente este último como radicalmente perdido.

  1. Family's difficulty scale in end-of-life home care: a new measure of the family's difficulties in caring for patients with cancer at the end of life at home from bereaved family's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the family's difficulties in caring for cancer patients at the end of life at home: Family's Difficulty Scale in end-of-life home care (FDS). The draft of the FDS was derived from a pilot interview survey and literature reviews. The questionnaires were sent to 395 bereaved family caregivers whose family members were patients with terminal cancer receiving home service. We obtained 306 responses (response rate, 81%). Factor analysis resulted in 29 items and 8 factors: Burden of Care, Concerns about Home Care Doctor, Balance of Work and Care, Patient's Pain and Condition, Concerns about Visiting Nurse, Concerns about Home Care Service, Relationship between Family Caregivers and their Families, and Funeral Preparations. The cumulative rate of contribution was 71.8%. Cronbach coefficient α for the FDS was 0.73-0.75; the intraclass correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.75-0.85. Evidence for construct validity was confirmed by convergent and divergent validity. Concurrent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between identified factors and concurrent measures. The validity and reliability of this new instrument were confirmed. This scale should help home care providers to assess and focus on family difficulties and provide individualized care for the family who cares for a patient with terminal cancer at home.

  2. Meaningful Communication Before Death, but Not Present at the Time of Death Itself, Is Associated With Better Outcomes on Measures of Depression and Complicated Grief Among Bereaved Family Members of Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Saran; Morita, Tatsuya; Aoyama, Maho; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Shima, Yasuo; Tsuneto, Satoru; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Few studies have explored the clinical significance of the family's presence or absence at the moment of a patient's death and meaningful communication (saying "goodbye") in terms of post-bereavement outcomes. To explore the potential association between the family's depression/complicated grief and their presence at the moment of a patient's death and the patient's communication with the family. A nationwide questionnaire survey was conducted on 965 family members of cancer patients who had died at palliative care units. More than 90% of family members wished to have been present at the moment of death (agree: 40%, n = 217; strongly agree: 51%, n = 280); 79% (n = 393) thereof were present. Families' presence at death was not significantly associated with the occurrence of depression and complicated grief, but the dying patient's ability to say "goodbye" to the family beforehand was (depression: adjusted odds rate, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.26-0.69 adjusted P = 0.001; complicated grief: adjusted odds rate, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.29-0.94 adjusted P = 0.009). Many families wished to be present at the moment of the patient's death; however, meaningful communication (saying "goodbye") between the patient and family members, and not their presence or absence itself, was associated with better outcomes on measures of depression or complicated grief. Health care professionals could consider promoting both mutual communication (relating to preparation for death) between family members and patients before imminent death, as well as the family's presence at the moment of death. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mental distress than those in the counseling group. Depression related to grief is sometimes treated with drugs. ... Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us ...

  4. Migration, cultural bereavement and cultural identity

    OpenAIRE

    BHUGRA, DINESH; BECKER, MATTHEW A

    2005-01-01

    Migration has contributed to the richness in diversity of cultures, ethnicities and races in developed countries. Individuals who migrate experience multiple stresses that can impact their mental well being, including the loss of cultural norms, religious customs, and social support systems, adjustment to a new culture and changes in identity and concept of self. Indeed, the rates of mental illness are increased in some migrant groups. Mental health practitioners need to be ...

  5. Coping with Loss: Bereavement and Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Illness and Work Support an Employee Workplace Bullying & Violence Signs of a Healthy Workplace Clifford Beers Society Social Self-Directed Care Program Take a Screen Mental Health Screening Tools Mental Health Spanish Screening Tools Find ...

  6. Beyond bereavement: the impact of bereavement on the resilience of children and families

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Carol

    2015-01-01

    There are an estimated 300,000 Gypsies and Travellers in Britain. Despite Romany Gypsies, Irish Travellers and Scottish Gypsy-Travellers being recognised as distinct ethnic groups, in re- cent decades these communities have faced increasing challenges to retaining their culture and traditional nomadic lifestyle with significant impacts on their health and wellbeing. In addition to facing inequality and discrimination Gypsies and Travellers experience noteworthy health inequalities and have a ...

  7. Bereaved mothers' attitudes regarding autopsy of their stillborn baby

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aims of the study, using an exploratory and descriptive research design to ... of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, ..... book. 1st ed. Pretoria: Van Schaik Publishers, 2001. 13. Horey D, Flenady V, ...

  8. Anger and Desire for Retribution among Bereaved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenovsky, Cynthia K.

    1994-01-01

    Logit results show suddenness of death contributes to likelihood parent will feel anger while anticipatory socialization to death or recency of death decreases odds of feeling anger toward child. All variables decrease likelihood parents will feel desire to punish someone for death of child. (BF)

  9. An art therapy group for bereaved youth in hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, B B

    1990-09-01

    Through art, music, and drama children can creatively express the feelings of sadness and anger that occur when a family member dies. In so doing, they can often avoid later difficulties resulting from unresolved emotions. Hospices may want to develop an art therapy group to facilitate this process with clients and their families.

  10. Bereavement and Loss Manual: For Administrators and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Education Response Centre.

    This manual is designed as a resource for elementary and secondary school administrators, counselors, and teachers to help develop a crisis management plan for use in the event of death of a staff member or student through illness, accident, or by suicide. The first section discusses the grieving process. Characteristics associated with grieving…

  11. Continuing bonds after bereavement:A cross-cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, Christine A

    2009-01-01

    The ways in which eastern and western cultures grieve for their dead are often contrasted. Eastern cultures are seen to place greater value on traditional ritual and ceremony that, it is argued, serve to create a lasting, and comforting, bond with the deceased. By contrast, western societies are seen to be much more materialist and individualistic. This article takes a cross-cultural look at responses to death and loss in the UK and Japan, both post-industrial societies but with very differen...

  12. Discourses of loss and bereavement in Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanger, Dag

    2007-06-01

    Western trauma frameworks, such as PTSD-focused inventories and interventions, are embedded in a psychosocial discourse saying that highly distressing experiences must be expressed and confronted. This study, which is based on six months of focused ethnographic research in postwar Tigray, Ethiopia, reveals authoritative Tigrayan discourses that encourage people to avoid disclosing and expressing emotional pain. Dogmas of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, saying that grieving and crying would have negative physical and spiritual consequences, were found to have a broad consensus in the society. The ethnography suggests that the Tigrayan psychosocial discourses make sense and may be functional in their context, as the marginal socioeconomic conditions of Tigray force individuals to concentrate on their day-to-day struggle for survival. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for the cross-cultural applicability of conventional frameworks of Western trauma psychology.

  13. The risk of multiple sclerosis in bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J; Johansen, C; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited.......Previous studies have suggested that psychological stress may play a role in the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the evidence is very limited....

  14. Positive effects of Religious and Spiritual Coping on Bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yoffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonovsky (1987 coined the term “salutogenesis” in opposition to “pathogenesis”, with the intention to point out to cientific researchers ways and mechanisms that could promote health, well -being and life satisfaction. The area of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality began both in Europe and in the United States at the beginning of the twenth century. The research done in this field -since the last two decades- has focused on the relationships between religion, spirituality and health; and on the ways in which religious people cope with negative life events. We could think this area as a complementary one to the Positive Psychology; as both share certain common points of view about health, coping and well-being. In the field of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Pargament and Koenig (1997 used the term “coping” -coined by Lazarus and Folkman (1986- referring to different styles of “religious coping” as “ways and mechanism by which religious people apply their religious beliefs and behaviours to prevent and /or moderate negative consequences of stressful life events, in order to solve their problems as well”. Each religion promotes ways to overcome negative life events, such as the death of loved ones. By using faith, prayers, meditations, religious rituals and beliefs about life, death and afterlife, religious persons try to cope with their grief and enhance positive feelings of emotional ,mental and spiritual well-being. Clergy of different religions are trained in religious practices, knowledge and skills to provide social support to those ones who face pain and loss. Religious groups can provide different types of emotional, practical, intelectual and spiritual support that can help diminish feelings of loneliness and grief. Being and feeling part of a religious community can promote ways to reconect to life and positive feelings that can help to overcome the grief of the death of loved ones and make new projects into the future.

  15. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of “excellent” pediatric healthcare providers – a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers. PMID:24244105

  16. The concept of shalom as a constructive bereavement healing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    existence of African traditional healing and biomedical treatment, that is, plurality of health seeking practices. The approach ... The Hebrew concept of shalom, though distinctly salvific, is inclusive of holistic and personalistic healing aspects.

  17. Continuing Bonds in Bereavement: An Attachment Theory Based Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P.; Gao, Beryl; Paderna, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    An attachment theory based perspective on the continuing bond to the deceased (CB) is proposed. The value of attachment theory in specifying the normative course of CB expression and in identifying adaptive versus maladaptive variants of CB expression based on their deviation from this normative course is outlined. The role of individual…

  18. Temporary and long-term consequences of bereavement on happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, J.A.; de Graaf, P.M.

    In this article, we examine the temporary and long-term consequences of the death of a parent or child on happiness. According to set-point theory external conditions are expected to only have a short-term or limited influence on happiness. This directly contradicts the basic assumption of affective

  19. Bereaved Caregivers to Patients With High-Grade Glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Jarden, Mary

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The disease and treatment trajectory of patients with high-grade glioma is a burdensome period for the patients' closest relatives who become informal caregivers. Caregivers experiencing this demanding shift in role are at risk of developing symptoms such as depression. Few studies have...... care planning within neuro-oncology caregiving to establish evidence-based practice guidelines and recommendations....

  20. Bereavement among South African adolescents following a sibling's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV/AIDS stigma as well as the family's daily struggle to survive caused these adolescents to keep their feelings and their grief to themselves. Despite the trauma of losing a beloved sibling and the hardships of their environment, they demonstrated remarkable fortitude as well as concern for others. More research is needed ...

  1. The Grief Account: Dimensions of a Contemporary Bereavement Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2008-01-01

    The genre of the grief account is identified to include published narratives of surviving grief. Thematic analysis of Andrew Holleran's (2006) "Grief: A Novel," Lolly Winston's (2004) "Good Grief: A Novel," Joan Didion's (2005) "The Year of Magical Thinking," and J. Canfield and M. V. Hansen's (2003) "Chicken Soup for the Grieving Soul: Stories…

  2. Culture as an Influencing Factor in Adolescent Grief and Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Culture is a complex and important consideration in the process of helping others. In clinical practice, we must view the individual within the context of their culture in order for assessment or treatment to be effective. Further, to overlook or negate culture, a practitioner may possibly operate from faulty cultural assumptions or…

  3. Teachers Communicating about Life-Limiting Conditions, Death and Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sally; Ekins, Alison; Durrant, Ian; Summers, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    The number of children with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions in England is double what it was at the millennium. These conditions include cystic fibrosis, cancer, organ failure and severe neurological injuries. The Teaching for Life project aimed to explore the needs of teachers working in English schools in relation to working with…

  4. Alexithymia and Grief Reactions in Bereaved Japanese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Yano, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    To examine the relationship between grief reactions and alexithymia, 54 Japanese women (33 outpatients attending a psychosomatic clinic and 21 normal healthy participants) completed the Texas Inventory of Grief (TIG), the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Each woman had experienced the death of a…

  5. "Prolonged grief disorder" and "persistent complex bereavement disorder", but not "complicated grief", are one and the same diagnostic entity : an analysis of data from the Yale Bereavement Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, Paul K; Maercker, Andreas; Boelen, Paul A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/174011954; Prigerson, Holly G

    2016-01-01

    There exists a general consensus that prolonged grief disorder (PGD), or some variant of PGD, represents a distinct mental disorder worthy of diagnosis and treatment. Nevertheless, confusion remains over whether different names and proposed symptom criteria for this disorder identify the same or

  6. Bereaved relatives' perspectives of the patient's oral intake towards the end of life: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, N.J.H.; Clark, J.B.; Zuylen, L. van; Allan, S.G.; Heide, A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients approaching death often have a decreasing oral intake, which can be distressing for relatives. Little is known about the relatives' experiences with and perceptions of oral intake at the end of life. Aim:This study aims to contribute to a more thorough understanding of

  7. Cognitive Development Considerations to Support Bereaved Students: Practical Applications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Comerchero, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of deaths that occur worldwide each year and their negative effects on school-aged children and teenagers, teachers and school psychologists report not being properly prepared to assist grieving students (Adamson and Peacock, "Psychology in the Schools," 44, 749-764, 2007; Pratt et al. "Education," 107,…

  8. Intrapersonal Resources and the Effectiveness of Self-Help Groups for Bereaved Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Michael S.; Lund, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined relative impact of 3 intrapersonal resources (self-esteem, competencies, and life satisfaction) and duration of self-help group intervention on levels of depression and grief over time among 295 recently widowed adults. Found that, in general, resources examined had greater direct influence on outcomes than did intervention. (Author/NB)

  9. A loss in the family: silence, memory, and narrative identity after bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Jenna; Singer, Jefferson A

    2010-02-01

    Grief theories have converged on the idea that the sharing of autobiographical memory narratives of loss and of the deceased person, especially within the family, is a major way to maintain and/or reconfigure a healthy sense of identity after a loss. In contrast, we examine unspoken memory-the withholding of socially sharing autobiographical memories about the loss and the departed family member-as a way to either conserve an existing narrative identity or assert a new narrative identity. Depending on its context and function, silence about memory can play either a positive or negative role in an individual griever's ongoing narrative identity, as well as in the larger family narrative in which the griever's identity is embedded.

  10. Bereavement, silence and culture within a peer-led HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The argument draws on a number of qualitative studies and uses empirical evidence from an evaluation of a peer-led HIV/AIDS-prevention strategy aimed at providing psychosocial support for 10- to 13-year-old South African children living in resource-poor communities. The paper reveals a central paradox regarding how ...

  11. Investigation of a Developmental Model of Risk for Depression and Suicidality Following Spousal Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Zhang, Baohui; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2008-01-01

    Data from a community-based multi-wave investigation were used to examine a developmental model of risk for depression and suicidality following the death of a spouse. Measures of perceived parental affection and control during childhood were administered to 218 widowed adults 11 months after the death of the spouse. Self-esteem, spousal…

  12. Does bereavement-related first episode depression differ from other kinds of first depressions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    (4.7%) had experienced death of a first degree relative (parent, sibling, child) or a near friend, 163 patients (54.2%) had experienced other moderate to severe stressful life events and 112 patients had not experienced stressful life events in a 6 months period prior to the onset of depression...

  13. Play Therapy for Bereaved Children: Adapting Strategies to Community, School, and Home Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nancy Boyd

    2011-01-01

    Play therapy is a highly adaptable treatment method that can be modified according to children's ages, circumstances, and settings in which counseling occurs. Play therapy may be used in schools, community settings, and homes to help children following the death of a significant other. After reviewing basic developmental factors that affect…

  14. [Risc factors for assisted suicide for cancer patients - mental burden of bereaved].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Caroline; Müller-Busch, H Christof

    2015-12-01

    Chronic and progressive disease represents a significant risk factor for suicidal behavior. Cancer patients have almost twice the rate of suicides compared to the general population. Based on a case report, the suicidal risk factors for cancer patients are presented. It is further investigated to what extent professional support by a mobile palliative care team can affect the wish for assisted suicide or the suicidal behavior generally among patients receiving palliative care. In addition, the mental impact on individuals, who were witnesses of assisted suicide of relatives or close friends are presented. The occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depressions, anxiety disorders and complicated grief (CG) in close family members is shown. However, further research will be necessary to develop adequate support for patients (and their relatives), who plan an assisted suicide.

  15. Quality of Social Relationships and the Development of Depression in Parentally-Bereaved Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Erin N.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene; MacKinnon, David

    2011-01-01

    Fear of abandonment has been found to be associated with mental health problems for youth who have experienced a parent's death. This article examines how youth's fears of abandonment following the death of a parent lead to later depressive symptoms by influencing relationships with caregivers, peers, and romantic partners. Participants were 109…

  16. Parents bereaved by infant death: PTSD symptoms up to 18 years after the loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentially traumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic posttraumatic

  17. Addressing the dead - the role of digital/social media in times of bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotved, Stine

    This presentation explores the connections between new communication media for emotional sharing and co-created memorials, and the somehow connected and slowly changing national culture around the death of a human being. The key research will take place from 2016 and consists of several case stud...

  18. Coping with loss and bereavement in post-war Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanger, Dag Ø

    2007-12-01

    Drawing upon data collected through in-depth interviews with 20 victims of the Ethio-Eritrean war, this article addresses how psychosocial impacts of political violence are coped with in a Tigrayan context in northern Ethiopia. Qualitative procedures of condensation and categorization of interview texts revealed that informants presented three kinds of coping strategies, all aimed at avoiding indulging in sorrow: (1) diverted thinking, (2) distraction, and (3) future investment. As their main rationale for employing such coping strategies, informants reported the belief that grieving and crying would have negative impacts on their health, their household, and on their relationship with God. This belief is discussed in terms of how it is informed by sociocultural discourses of the Tigrayan community in general, and discourses of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church in particular. Some implications concerning the mismatch between the western trauma discourse and local discourses for psychosocial coping are discussed.

  19. Complicated grief – a challenge in bereavement support in palliative care: an update of the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt

    2014-01-01

    udgave af den amerikanske diagnose-manual (DSM-V) er sorg ikke blevet anerkendt som diagnostisk kategori. I stedet diagnosticeres sorgen som depression, men dette giver nogle kliniske problemstillinger i forhold til intervention. Denne artikel ser nærmere på kompliceret sorg som en tabsrelateret lidelse...

  20. Deathscape politics in Colombian metropolises : Conservation, grave recycling and the position of the bereaved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaufus, C.

    2016-01-01

    Colombian metropolises face a rapid transformation of public and private death spaces because of land scarcity, a demographic transition and a changing market for dead-disposal services. Based on case studies conducted in Bogotá and Medellín, within a Latin American context, this paper analyses the

  1. Psychopathology Symptoms, Rumination and Autobiographical Memory Specificity : Do Associations Hold After Bereavement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, Maarten C.; Schut, Henk A. W.; Stroebe, Margaret S.; Voerman, Kim; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Boelen, Paul A.

    Symptoms of psychopathology are associated with overgeneral memory retrieval. Overgeneral memory is hypothesized to be the result of an emotion regulatory process, dampening emotional reactions associated with retrieval of distressing specific memories. However, higher post-loss symptom severity has

  2. Deconstructing Death – Changing Cultures of Death, Dying, Bereavement and Care in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    engagement with the phenomenon of death. Among the themes touched specifically upon in the book are: organ transplantation, death education, communication with the dead, changes in commemorative rituals, mourning practices on the internet, parental responses to children’s suicide, death control, practice...

  3. The Meaning Structures of Muslim Bereavements in Israel: Religious Traditions, Mourning Practices, and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasien-Esmael, Hend; Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    2005-01-01

    The grief and mourning of Muslim citizens in Israel are considered. First, a series of mourning customs spanning the period from notification of death until post-mourning are presented from 3 perspectives: (a) the requirements of the Islamic Sunni tradition; (b) the manner in which Islamic mourning rituals are practiced; and (c) the authors'…

  4. Internet support groups for suicide survivors: a new mode for gaining bereavement assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S; Beal, Karyl Chastain; Jordan, John R

    2008-01-01

    Taken among parents who sustained the loss of a child to suicide this study explores the participation of parents in Internet support groups, comparing their demographic and loss-related characteristics (N = 104) to other parent survivors participating in face-to-face support groups (N = 297). Contrary to expectations that Internet affiliates would be concentrated in under-served rural areas, we found similar levels of urban, suburban, small city and rural residents in both Internet and face-to-face subsamples. Bivariate and multivariate analyses suggested several important factors contributing to interest in Internet grief support including: 24/7 availability and opportunities to invest more time into this type of support group experience. Compared to their face-to-face group counterparts, Internet affiliates experienced greater suicide stigmatization from their families and other associates. Unable to find ready comfort and support from their personal communities, Internet users-and especially highly depressed survivors-sought and obtained valuable help from the Internet support resource.

  5. The bereavement gap: grief, human dignity and legal personhood in the debate over Zoe's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Hannah

    2014-12-01

    A Bill before the New South Wales Parliament attempted to re-frame harm to late-term fetuses as grievous bodily harm to the fetus itself rather than (under the existing law) grievous bodily harm to the mother. To achieve this, the Bill extended legal personhood to the fetus for a limited number of offences. The Bill was brought on behalf of Brodie Donegan, who lost her daughter Zoe at 32 weeks' gestation when Donegan was hit by a drug-affected driver. This article asks what the perspective of a grieving mother can bring to the debate, in terms of helping the criminal law accurately come to grips with the complexity of pregnancy and the specific harm of fetal loss. It assesses the likely impacts of a change to fetal personhood and suggests an alternative legislative approach which is less likely to result in an erosion of bodily autonomy for pregnant women.

  6. Bereaved parents' online grief communities: de-tabooing practices or grief-ghettos?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Hård af Segerstad, Ylva

    , children are not supposed to die before their parents, old people are supposed to die. Losing a child cuts to the core of human existence. A 100 years ago, the most common death was a child. Today, it is an old person. So the percentage of parents who have suffered the death of a child is comparably small...... compared with people who have lost an old relative. Moreover, the traditional view for socially accepted grief and mourning (at least in protestant Nordic countries) is often that you should not to grieve for too long, not too intensely or not to publicly. A taboo can be said to be a rule against something......-tabooing practices going on. In everyday interaction in the physical world there is a taboo against performing parenthood once your child is dead. It is normal for a parent to talk about their children extensively, as long as it lives. What is to be considered normal, or accepted, is a matter of perspective...

  7. Violent Deaths and Traumatic Bereavement: The Importance of Appropriate Death Notification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego de Leo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The communication of a death due to unexpected and traumatic causes is considered a very sensitive issue that can deeply affect both operators responsible for reporting the incident and the mourning process of family members, relatives, and other survivors. By focusing particularly on cases of traumatic death, this article tries to explain how inadequate communication of death may adversely affect the course of mourning. The article also illustrates the basic principles of correct notification of death. In this way, we hope to contribute to the ongoing dialogue on this topic and the promotion of new studies aimed at setting best practices for those professionally involved in the challenging task of communicating that a life has ended. This would be important in order to safeguard the emotional integrity of notifiers whilst effectively helping the survivors to cope with the early stages of their difficult mourning process.

  8. Death, Dying and Bereavement in Norway and Sweden in Recent Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gustavsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of my research projects examines pictorial symbols and epitaphs on gravestones in Norway and Sweden. The focus has been on the 1990s and the 2000s. The choice of this period is motivated by the fact that new national burial laws were adopted in both countries in the early 1990s. These laws provided the next of kin with the possibility of choosing memorial symbols and inscriptions more freely than had previously been the case. To judge from the data under study, individual symbols have gained popularity, especially in Sweden, while Norway has been more faithful to earlier traditions of a collective character; moreover, secular motifs are more manifest on the gravestones in Sweden than in Norway. Another research project analyses memorial websites on the Internet related to persons who have died in recent years. The all-inclusive issue in these studies concerns mourners’ expressions of their emotions and beliefs regarding the deceased person’s afterlife, that is, beliefs in after-death existence. Belief in the deceased being somewhere in heaven is common. Belief in angels is also a popular concept in memorial websites. Moreover, in Sweden, this includes deceased pets as well. The previously strictly observed distinction between humans and pets has become indiscernible in Sweden. Norwegian practice, however, remains critical towards this type of “humanlike characterization”. In Norway, memorial websites for the deceased are generally associated with more traditional Christian concepts than are similar sites in Sweden. By contrast, in Sweden, one observes a kind of diffuse religiosity reminiscent of New Age ways of thinking, according to which the individual plays the central role, and glorification of afterlife existence prevails. Secularization, that is, a decline in the influence of traditional forms of religious experience, is conspicuously more prominent in Sweden. Within the project on memorial websites, I have performed a special study of memorials of persons who have committed suicide. In Norway, differences between suicide and deaths by other causes are conceived in an entirely different manner than on memorial websites in Sweden. There, the contrast between suicide and other forms of death has been increasingly wiped out. Norway has preserved earlier mortuary traditions to a greater extent, and no notions of a bright afterlife, or of angels, are to be found in connection with suicides.

  9. "We Take Care of People; What Happens to Us Afterwards?": Home Health Aides and Bereavement Care in Hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Bagaajav, Ariunsanaa

    2018-01-01

    After a hospice patient dies, hospice providers can experience a variety of emotional responses. While work has been done on social workers' and nurses' reactions to patient death, home health aides (HHAs) have been overlooked. To address this gap, we conducted focus groups and individual qualitative interviews with 14 hospice HHAs. Questions covered HHAs' grief responses and how they coped with grief. We found a high burden of grief reactions; many HHAs often developed very close patient relationships. HHAs also noted that they often started working with new patients almost immediately after a death, leaving little time to process the loss. However, HHAs found support from other HHAs, their supervisors, as well as family, friends, and spiritual practices to be helpful in coping with their grief. Future work should enhance support to HHAs around patient loss; for example, grief support may be embedded into hospice team activities.

  10. The Driver Whose Heart Was Full of Sand: Leigh's Story--A Play Therapy Case Study of a Bereaved Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the therapeutic journey of Leigh (not his real name), a nine-year-old boy who was referred for play therapy due to the death of his 15-year-old brother. The play therapy was offered through a joint project called "Playing through Loss" and run jointly between a UK university and the local branch of a national…

  11. Culture and Continuing Bonds: A Prospective Comparison of Bereavement in the United States and the People's Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Kathleen M.; Bonanno, George A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been an increased interest and debate regarding the adaptiveness of continuing bonds with the deceased. The authors used data from a cross-cultural study of 61 participants from the United States (US) and 58 participants from the People's Republic of China (PRC) who completed measures of continuing bonds and adjustment at 4 and 18 months…

  12. Reproductive function in the sons of women who experienced stress due to bereavement before and during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Li, Jiong; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and reproductive disorders in Danish men, where prenatal stress exposure was defined as the mother's loss of a close relative during pregnancy or in the 12 months before conception. DESIGN: Population-based cohort...

  13. World Health organization guidelines for management of acute stress, PTSD, and bereavement: key challenges on the road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Wietse A; Barbui, Corrado; Bisson, Jonathan; Cohen, Judith; Hijazi, Zeinab; Jones, Lynne; de Jong, Joop T V M; Magrini, Nicola; Omigbodun, Olayinka; Seedat, Soraya; Silove, Derrick; Souza, Renato; Sumathipala, Athula; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Weissbecker, Inka; Zatzick, Douglas; van Ommeren, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Wietse Tol and colleagues discuss some of the key challenges for implementation of new WHO guidelines for stress-related mental health disorders in low- and middle-income countries. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  14. Maternal bereavement and the risk of preterm delivery: the importance of gestational age and of the precursor of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, K D; Li, J; Olsen, J; Vestergaard, M; Obel, C; Cnattingius, S

    2016-04-01

    Maternal stress during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm delivery (PD), but the associations between stress and subtypes of PD are not clear. We investigated maternal loss of a close relative and risks of very and moderately PD (information on death of women's family members (children, partner, siblings, parents), birth outcomes and maternal characteristics from nationwide registries. Overall, the death of a close family member the year before pregnancy or in the first 36 weeks of pregnancy was associated with a 7% increased risk of PD [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.10]. The highest hazard ratios (HR) for PD were found for death of an older child [HR (95% CI) 1.20 (1.10-1.31)] and for death of a partner [HR (95% CI) 1.31 (1.03-1.66)]. These losses were associated with higher risks of very preterm [HR (95% CI) 1.61 (1.29-2.01) and 2.07 (1.15-3.74), respectively] than of moderately preterm [HR (95% CI) 1.14 (1.03-1.26) and 1.22 (0.94-1.58), respectively] delivery. There were no substantial differences in the association between death of a child or partner and the risk of spontaneous v. medically indicated PD. Death of a close family member the year before or during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of PD, especially very PD. Possible mechanisms include both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm birth.

  15. Giving Birth to Life--Again!: Bereaved Parents' Experiences with Children Born Following the Death of an Adult Son

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Rosenfeld, Sarah; Buchbinder, Eli

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study examining the experiences of parents that lost a son during military service in Israel and consequently choose to give birth to another child. Seven couples and 3 mothers were interviewed for the study, and their interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Three main themes…

  16. End of life care and decision making: Opinions and experiences of the general public, bereaved relatives, and professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J.H. Raijmakers (Natasja)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEnd-of-life care aims to improve quality of life of patients and their relatives facing problems associated with life-threatening illness in the last days of life. End-of-life decision-making is an important aspect of end-of-life care that can have a significant impact on the process of

  17. Maladaptive coping in adults who have experienced early parental loss and grief counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Beverley Lim; Appel, Charlotte W.; von Heymann-Horan, Annika B.

    2017-01-01

    bereaved adults who received grief counseling (N = 822 women, N = 190 men) with bereaved controls who had not (N = 233 women, N = 66 men). Bereaved adults reported significantly more substance use, behavioral disengagement, and emotional eating than non-bereaved adults. Counseling participants reported...

  18. Mental health of adolescents before and after the death of a parent or sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stikkelbroek, Yvonne; Bodden, Denise H M; Reitz, Ellen; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; van Baar, Anneloes L

    2016-01-01

    The death of a parent or sibling (family bereavement) is associated with mental health problems in approximately, 25 % of the affected children. However, it is still unknown whether mental health problems of family-bereaved adolescents are predicted by pre-existing mental health problems, pre-loss family functioning, or multiple bereavements. In this study, a prospective longitudinal assessment of change in mental health following bereavement was done in a large representative sample from the 'Tracking Adolescents Individual Lives Survey' (TRAILS). This is a four-wave prospective cohort study of Dutch adolescents (n = 2230) of whom 131 (5.9 %) had experienced family bereavement at the last wave (T4). Family-bereaved adolescents reported more internalizing problems, within 2 years after family bereavement, compared to the non-bereaved peers, while taking into account the level of internalizing problems before the bereavement. A clinically relevant finding was that 22 % new cases were found in family-bereaved, in comparison to 5.5 % new cases in non-bereaved. Low SES predicted more internalizing problems in family-bereaved but not in non-bereaved adolescents. Family functioning, reported by the adolescent, did not predict mental health problems within 2 years. Multiple family bereavements predicted fewer externalizing problems. In conclusion, internalizing problems increase in adolescents after family bereavement in comparison to non-bereaved and these can be predicted by pre-loss factors. Awareness among professionals regarding the risks for aggravation of mental health problems after family loss is needed.

  19. Tradução portuguesa, adaptação e validação da Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS em mulheres com perda de gravidez Traducción portuguesa, adaptación y validación de la Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS en mujeres con pérdida gestacional Portuguese translation, adaptation and validation of the Perinatal Bereavement Grief Scale (PBGS in women with pregnancy loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida Koch

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A perda precoce de uma gravidez, para muitas mulheres, pode constituir um significativo stressor psicossocial. Fazer o luto deste tipo de perda pode ser complexo e uma avaliação precoce pode permitir intervenções mais eficazes. São poucos os instrumentos existentes para esta avaliação. Assim, neste estudo pretendeu-se traduzir, adaptar, validar e avaliar a aplicabilidade da PBGS em mulheres em situação de perda involuntária da gravidez, analisando as suas capacidades de mensuração. A amostra constituiu-se por 100 mulheres entre as quatro e as seis semanas pós-perda. A análise de componentes principais permitiu confirmar a estrutura dimensional única da escala, proposta pelo autor. O nível de confiabilidade da escala evidenciado no nosso estudo (coeficiente Alpha de Cronbach 0,81, embora um pouco inferior ao apresentado originalmente, é igualmente bom. Apresenta uma boa estabilidade temporal (r = 0,98, p La pérdida precoz del embarazo para muchas mujeres, puede ser un factor estresante psicosocial significativo. Hacer el duelo de este tipo de pérdida puede ser complejo y una evaluación temprana puede permitir intervenciones más eficaces. Existen pocos instrumentos para esta evaluación. Asimismo, en este estudio se ha pretendido traducir, adaptar, validar y evaluar la aplicabilidad de la PBGS en mujeres en situación de pérdida involuntaria del embarazo, analizando sus capacidades de mensuración. La muestra está constituida por 100 mujeres entre las cuatro a seis semanas tras la pérdida. El análisis de componentes principales permitió confirmar la estructura dimensional única de la escala, propuesta por el autor. El nivel de fiabilidad de la escala evidenciado en nuestro estudio (coeficiente Alpha de Cronbach 0,81, aunque un poco inferior al presentado originalmente, es igualmente bueno. Presenta una buena estabilidad temporal (r = 0,98, p The early loss of pregnancy for many women may be a significant psychosocial stressor. To mourn a loss of this type can be complex and early evaluation can allow more effective interventions. Few instruments exist for this assessment. Therefore in this study we sought to translate, adapt, and evaluate the applicability of the PBGS to women in situations of involuntary pregnancy loss, examining its measurement capabilities. The sample consisted of 100 women between four and six weeks after their respective losses. The analysis of the scale’s primary components confirmed its unique dimensional structure as proposed by the author. Although slightly lower than originally presented, the scale’s level of reliability, as evidenced in our study (Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient 0.81, is also satisfactory. The scale shows good temporal stability (r = 0.98, p <0.01. The scale, applied in this study, was found to be both reliable and valid, and may constitute an important tool to be used by nurses in evaluating women at risk of developing complications while adapting to pregnancy loss.

  20. Paediatric End-of-LIfe CAre Needs in Switzerland (PELICAN) : Current end-of-life care practices and the persepctives of bereaved parents

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite continued advancements in medical care and improved survival or life expectancy, childhood deaths due to complex chronic conditions (CCC) or prematurity are inevitable. Deaths during the first year of life constitute approximately 50% of disease-related deaths, the causes of which include perinatal complications, prematurity, or congenital anomalies. Beyond the age of one year, the three most common life-limiting CCCs are neurological/neuromuscular and cardiovascular conditions (inclu...

  1. Midlife suicide risk, partner's psychiatric illness, spouse and child bereavement by suicide or other modes of death: a gender specific study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who committed suicide; 180 220 age-gender matched controls; 111 172 marital partners; 174 672 children. MAIN RESULTS: The suicide risk in women whose partner had...... been first admitted with a psychiatric disorder after 31 December two years earlier was 6.9 (95% CI 3.6 to 13.0), whereas their male counterpart experienced a risk of 3.9 (2.7 to 5.6); p value gender difference = 0.39. Men who had lost their partner by suicide or other causes of death experienced...... a parent was protective in women. Except for widows (1.6, 1.2 to 2.0) and widowers (3.0, 2.3 to 3.9) the suicide risk associated with being separated (2.0, 1.8 to 2.3), divorced (1.8, 1.7 to 2.0), never married (1.4, 1.3 to 1.6), cohabitant (1.2, 1.1 to 1.3) was virtually the same in the two sexes...

  2. How to support teenagers who are losing a parent to cancer: Bereaved young adults' advice to healthcare professionals-A nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvariza, Anette; Lövgren, Malin; Bylund-Grenklo, Tove; Hakola, Pia; Fürst, Carl Johan; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2017-06-01

    The loss of a parent to cancer is considered one of the most traumatic events a teenager can experience. Studies have shown that teenagers, from the time of diagnosis, are already extremely worried about the consequences of a parent's cancer but tend to be left to manage these concerns on their own. The present study aimed to explore young adults' advice to healthcare professionals on how to support teenagers who are losing a parent to cancer. This work derives from a Swedish nationwide survey and employs a qualitative approach with a descriptive/interpretive design to obtain answers to an open-ended question concerning advice to healthcare professionals. Of the 851 eligible young adults who had lost a parent to cancer when they were 13-16 years of age within the previous 6 to 9 years, 622 participated in our survey (response rate = 73%). Of these 622 young adults, 481 responded to the open-ended question about what advice to give healthcare professionals. Four themes emerged: (1) to be seen and acknowledged; (2) to understand and prepare for illness, treatment, and the impending death; (3) to spend time with the ill parent, and (4) to receive support tailored to the individual teenager's needs. This nationwide study contributes hands-on suggestions to healthcare staff regarding attitudes, communication, and support from the perspective of young adults who, in their teenage years, lost a parent to cancer. Teenagers may feel better supported during a parent's illness if healthcare professionals take this manageable advice forward into practice and see each teenager as individuals; explain the disease, its treatments, and consequences; encourage teenagers to spend time with their ill parent; and recommend sources of support.

  3. The contributions of family care-givers at end of life : A national post-bereavement census survey of cancer carers' hours of care and expenditures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowland, Christine; Hanratty, Barbara; Pilling, Mark; van den Berg, Bernard; Grande, Gunn

    Background: Family members provide vital care at end of life, enabling patients to remain at home. Such informal care contributes significantly to the economy while supporting patients' preferences and government policy. However, the value of care-givers' contributions is often underestimated or

  4. Sharing experiences to improve bereavement support and clinical care after stillbirth : report of the 7th annual meeting of the international stillbirth alliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heazell, Alexander E. P.; Leisher, Susannah; Cregan, Mairie; Flenady, Vicki; Froen, J. Frederik; Gravensteen, Ida K.; De Groot-Noordenbos, Mariette; De Groot, Paul; Hale, Sue; Jennings, Belinda; Mcnamara, Karen; Millard, Caron; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.

    Stillbirth remains a global health challenge which is greatly affected by social and economic inequality, particularly the availability and quality of maternity care. The International Stillbirth Alliance (ISA) exists to raise awareness of stillbirth and to promote global collaboration in the

  5. Cognitive therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for reducing psychopathology among disaster-bereaved individuals : Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Lonneke; Piersma, Eline; de Keijser, Jos; Smid, Geert E.; Boelen, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Confrontation with a traumatic (e.g. disaster-related) loss is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, including symptoms of prolonged grief (PG), posttraumatic stress (PTS), and depression. Although interventions have been developed for reducing post-loss psychopathology,

  6. Rh Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & ...

  7. Parental Grief and Marital Issues Aftermath: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah Mohamed Hussin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The death of a child is difficult to the bereaved parents. Literature had associated the loss with marriage disruption. The issues on that the difficulties to communicate, gender-related coping mechanisms and sexual need were discussed as reasons for bereaved parents to have conflict in their relationship. However there is limited knowledge about this issue. A pilot study has been conducted among six bereaved parents. The bereaved parents were Malaysian Muslim bereaved parents. They were interviewed individually to explore the challenges or conflicts that they had experienced after the death of their child. This study revealed that there were situations which bereaved parents described as having difficulties in their relationship. However, this study also revealed that the mutual understanding and respect to each other are the most of important components for bereaved parents to maintain their relationship post-loss. This study suggested the importance of suggesting couple counselling to bereaved parents after the death of their child.

  8. 展望 悲嘆の心理過程と心理学的援助

    OpenAIRE

    富田, 拓郎; 太田, ゆず; 小川, 恭子; 杉山, 晴子; 鏡, 直子; 上里, 一郎

    1997-01-01

    Grief for bereavement influence the psychosomatic status of the bereaved negatively. This paper aimed at reviewing studies on the psychological process of grief, psychological interventions and help for the bereaved. First, we reconsidered and evaluated two basic theories: psychoanalytical grief theory (attachment theory) and stress theory. The grief theory, Freud's traditional theory, induced a number of studies on grief. ln this theory, the bereaved must experience grief work,the task of mo...

  9. Autobiographical memory specificity and symptoms of complicated grief, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder following loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Huntjens, Rafaele J. C.; van Deursen, Denise S.; van den Hout, Marcel A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the specificity and content of autobiographical memories among bereaved individuals. Self-report measures of bereavement-related distress and a standard and trait version of the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) were administered to 109 bereaved people. We examined associations

  10. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M

    Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with social workers (7%), psychologists (4%), or unspecified (8%); 85% were Jewish, and 60% had ≥10 years of oncology experience. Most respondents thought that contacting bereaved families was important (73%), and that it provided closure for staff (79%); 41% indicated that they contacted >50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted.

  11. Digital Storytelling: Families' Search for Meaning after Child Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolbiecki, Abigail J; Washington, Karla; Bitsicas, Katina

    2017-01-01

    Bereaved families that collectively make meaning of their grief experiences often function better than those that do not, yet most social work bereavement interventions target individuals rather than family units. In this article, authors describe an innovative social work intervention that employs digital storytelling. This is a narrative technique that combines photography, music, and spoken word to help families bereaved by child death make meaning of their loss and envision a future without their deceased child.

  12. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Seymour (Jane); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J. Brown (Jayne); A. van der Heide (Agnes); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); L. Deliens (Luc)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of

  13. Aras Mhuire Nursing Home, Greenville, Listowel, Kerry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spillane, Ailbhe

    2017-03-30

    Research indicates that experiencing the suicide of a relative can have a significant impact on family members\\' emotional health. However, research incorporating the impact of suicide bereavement on family members\\' physical health is sparse. This paper details the protocol for a mixed-methods study of suicide-bereaved family members. The study will primarily examine the physical and mental health needs of those bereaved by suicide. A secondary objective of the study is to describe the support service needs of family members bereaved by suicide.

  14. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Granot

    Full Text Available Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families.This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale.Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with 50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%, nurses (84%, or social workers (89%. The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68% and lack of time (63%; 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse, primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other, and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender were non-significant.Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted.

  15. Daddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisanen, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    The autobiographical essay below was shared by Ms.Waisanen with researchers from the University of Michigan?s Child Bereavement Project when, at age16, Ms. Waisanen was interviewed in a study of the impact of parental death upon families with school-aged children. The Project, a longitudinal, community-based study of parentally bereaved children…

  16. Position Statement: Palliative Care for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death Studies, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Notes that International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement recognizes wide variation of attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors pertaining to childhood death, dying, and bereavement. Statement identifies set of assumptions which can serve as guidelines, across cultures, in care of children with terminal illness and their families. (Author/NB)

  17. Meeting the Needs of Our Clients Creatively: The Impact of Art and Culture on Caregiving. Death, Value and Meaning Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John D., Ed.

    This book integrates traditional understandings of care of the dying and bereaved with the use of arts and other forms of cultural creativity in therapy and funeralization. Authors provide insights into the practical aspects of caring for the dying and bereaved as well as new understandings of creativity. Chapters include: (1) "The Knowledge…

  18. Grief Counselling In African Indigenous Churches: A Case Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collective participation, social isolation of the bereaved and then culminates in reincorporation of the bereaved into the community. The aim of this article is to explicate the meaning and value of grief counselling in AICs with special reference to the Zion Apostolic Church in Venda. Keywords: Grief counselling, african ...

  19. 42 CFR 418.64 - Condition of participation: Core services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Social work services must be based on the patient's psychosocial assessment and the patient's and family... must be available to the patient and family to assist the patient and family in minimizing the stress... bereavement services available to the family and other individuals in the bereavement plan of care up to 1...

  20. Mental health of adolescents before and after the death of a parent or sibling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stikkelbroek, Yvonne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/168171147; Bodden, Denise H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297688499; Reitz, Ellen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/265031036; Vollebergh, Wilma A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/090632893; van Baar, Anneloes L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08504749X

    The death of a parent or sibling (family bereavement) is associated with mental health problems in approximately, 25 % of the affected children. However, it is still unknown whether mental health problems of family-bereaved adolescents are predicted by pre-existing mental health problems, pre-loss

  1. What parents of children who have received emergency care think about deferring consent in randomised trials of emergency treatments: postal survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrol Gamble

    Full Text Available To investigate parents' views about deferred consent to inform management of trial disclosure after a child's death.A postal questionnaire survey was sent to members of the Meningitis Research Foundation UK charity, whose child had suffered from bacterial meningitis or meningococcal septicaemia within the previous 5 years. Main outcome measures were acceptability of deferred consent; timing of requesting consent; and the management of disclosure of the trial after a child's death.220 families were sent questionnaires of whom 63 (29% were bereaved. 68 families responded (31%, of whom 19 (28% were bereaved. The majority (67% was willing for their child to be involved in the trial without the trial being explained to them beforehand; 70% wanted to be informed about the trial as soon as their child's condition had stabilised. In the event of a child's death before the trial could be discussed the majority of bereaved parents (66% 12/18 anticipated wanting to be told about the trial at some time. This compared with 37% (18/49 of non-bereaved families (p = 0.06. Parents' free text responses indicated that the word 'trial' held strongly negative connotations. A few parents regarded gaps in the evidence base about emergency treatments as indicating staff lacked expertise to care for a critically ill child. Bereaved parents' free text responses indicated the importance of individualised management of disclosure about a trial following a child's death.Deferred consent is acceptable to the majority of respondents. Parents whose children had recovered differed in their views compared to bereaved parents. Most bereaved parents would want to be informed about the trial in the aftermath of a child's death, although a minority strongly opposed such disclosure. Distinction should be drawn between the views of bereaved and non-bereaved parents when considering the acceptability of different consent processes.

  2. Association Between Spousal Suicide and Mental, Physical, and Social Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runeson, Bo; Bolton, James M.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Forman, Julie L; Krogh, Jesper; Shear, M. Katherine; Nordentoft, Merete; Conwell, Yeates

    2017-01-01

    Importance Bereavement after spousal suicide has been linked to mental disorders; however, a comprehensive assessment of the effect of spousal suicide is needed. Objective To determine whether bereavement after spousal suicide was linked to an excessive risk of mental, physical, and social health outcomes when compared with the general population and spouses bereaved by other manners. Design, Setting, and Participants This nationwide, register-based cohort study conducted in Denmark of 6.7 million individuals aged 18 years and older from 1980 to 2014 covered more than 136 million person-years and compared people bereaved by spousal suicide with the general population and people bereaved by other manners of death. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using Poisson regressions while adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and the presence of mental and physical disorders. Main Outcomes and Measures Mental disorders (any disorder, mood, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, and self-harm); physical disorders (cancers, diabetes, sleep disorder, cardiovascular diseases, chronic lower respiratory tract diseases, liver cirrhosis, and spinal disc herniation); causes of mortality (all-cause, natural, unintentional, suicide, and homicide); social health outcomes; and health care use. Results The total study population included 3 491 939 men, 4814 of whom were bereaved by spousal suicide, and 3 514 959 women, 10 793 of whom were bereaved by spousal suicide. Spouses bereaved by a partner’s suicide had higher risks of developing mental disorders within 5 years of the loss (men: incidence rate ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6-2.0; women: incidence rate ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.8) than the general population. Elevated risks for developing physical disorders, such as cirrhosis and sleep disorders, were also noted as well as the use of more municipal support, sick leave benefits, and disability pension funds than the general

  3. Perinatal death: uncovering the needs of midwives and nurses and exploring helpful interventions in the United States, England, and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J M

    1999-04-01

    Perinatal death is a crisis for midwives and nurses as well as for bereaved parents and extended families. Surveys and interviews conducted in the United States, England, and Japan described the needs and responses of nurses and midwives as they coped with their own feelings while caring for bereaved parents. Results emphasized common needs of caregivers for increased knowledge, mentored experience, communication skills, and personal support to confidently provide sensitive care to families. Although need for education regarding cultural-specific care was revealed, participants identified helpful strategies of care for bereaved parents that could extend and improve care universally.

  4. Parental grief and memento mori photography: narrative, meaning, culture, and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Cybele; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem photography is a widespread practice in perinatal bereavement care, yet few studies have explored how it affects bereaved parents, or how it might be received by parents of older children. This study is an examination of the meaning, utility, and social context of postmortem photography in a sample of 181 bereaved parents. Data were subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Photographs were positively regarded by most parents after perinatal death and several parents of older children. Other parents rejected postmortem photography for aesthetic, personal, or cultural reasons. Brief recommendations are offered for healthcare providers.

  5. Association Between Spousal Suicide and Mental, Physical, and Social Health Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Runeson, Bo; Bolton, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bereavement after spousal suicide has been linked to mental disorders; however, a comprehensive assessment of the effect of spousal suicide is needed. Objective: To determine whether bereavement after spousal suicide was linked to an excessive risk of mental, physical, and social health......-years and compared people bereaved by spousal suicide with the general population and people bereaved by other manners of death. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using Poisson regressions while adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and the presence of mental and physical disorders. Main Outcomes...... and Measures: Mental disorders (any disorder, mood, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, and self-harm); physical disorders (cancers, diabetes, sleep disorder, cardiovascular diseases, chronic lower respiratory tract diseases, liver cirrhosis, and spinal disc...

  6. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  7. A COMPLICATED GRIEF INTERVENTION MODEL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-29

    Jul 29, 2010 ... of complicated grief as a contributing factor to impaired social functioning. This can ... includes a diagnosis of bereavement-related major depression if symptoms ..... networking, Social Sciences Citation Index, Social Sciences.

  8. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  9. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  10. Feeding Your Baby

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  11. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  12. Exercise during Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  13. Cesarean Section: The Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  14. Exercise during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media ...

  15. Understanding Grief and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the process of adapting to life after a loss. It is influenced by each person’s society, culture, and religion. Bereavement is the state of having experienced a loss. Common grief reactions Reactions to loss are called ...

  16. Future Dead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits

    Today the dying and the bereaved attend memorialization both online and offline. Cemeteries, urns, coffins, graves, memorials, monuments, websites, social network sites, applications and software services, form technologies that are influenced by discourse, culture, public, professional and econo...

  17. 01 MutulaFM.fm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Dennis Ocholla

    the emotional pain experienced by bereaved children may at times be ... Forty children who attended primary school in the KwaZulu-Natal province participated in the study. ..... Elementary School Guidance and Counselling, 29 (2), 129-137.

  18. articles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-03

    Sep 3, 2011 ... hypernasal speech, history of speech therapy, velopharyngeal incompetence ..... difficulties, bereavement, the death of peers or physical disability may contribute to .... Focus on geriatric psychiatry: Schizophrenia in later life:.

  19. Cesarean Section: Recovering After Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  20. Cesarean Section: The Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  1. Exercise during Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  2. Feeding Your Baby

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  3. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  4. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories Ambassadors Spotlights Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us ...

  5. Self-worth mediates the effects of violent loss on PTSD symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Anthony D; Prati, Gabriele; Black, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    Although research has confirmed that violent losses can exacerbate grief reactions, few investigations have explored underlying mechanisms. In this study, the authors used a dataset on bereaved spouses and bereaved parents at 4- and 18-months postloss to examine the mediating effects of self-worth and worldviews (benevolence and meaningfulness beliefs). Persons bereaved by violent causes had significantly more posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), grief, and depression symptoms at 4- and 18-months postloss than persons bereaved by natural causes. Moreover, self-worth but not worldviews mediated the effects of violent loss on PTSD and depression symptoms cross sectionally and PTSD symptoms longitudinally. Findings underscore that self-views are a critical component of problematic reactions to violent loss, but fail to support the role of "shattered" worldviews. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  6. 42 CFR 418.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... care. Bereavement counseling means emotional, psychosocial, and spiritual support and services provided... appropriate nutritional intake as the patient's condition progresses. Dietary counseling is provided by... Act, identified and coordinated by an interdisciplinary group to provide for the physical...

  7. Parents of children diagnosed with cancer: work situation and sick leave, a five-year post end-of-treatment or a child's death follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikman, Anna; Hovén, Emma; Cernvall, Martin; Ljungman, Gustaf; Ljungman, Lisa; von Essen, Louise

    Cancer in a child is associated with a significant impact on parental employment. We assessed the proportions of parents of survivors and bereaved parents working and reporting sick leave five years after end of successful treatment (ST)/child's death (T7) compared with one year after end of ST/child's death (T6) and the association between partial post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and work situation and sick leave at T7. Participants and procedure: The sample included 152 parents of survivors (77 mothers, 75 fathers) and 42 bereaved parents (22 mothers, 20 fathers) of children diagnosed with cancer in Sweden. The proportions of parents working or reporting sick leave did not differ among mothers and fathers of survivors (92% vs. 96% working, 20% vs. 18% on sick leave) or among bereaved mothers and fathers (91% vs. 90% working, 14% vs. 20% on sick leave) at T7. There was no change from T6 to T7 in the proportion of fathers working (fathers of survivors 91% vs. 96%, bereaved fathers 95% vs. 90%). Although more mothers of survivors (92% vs. 82%) and bereaved mothers (91% vs. 77%) worked at T7 than at T6, this increase was not significant. Fewer bereaved mothers reported sick leave at T7 than at T6 (14% vs. 59%, p leave at T7 than at T6 (fathers of survivors 18% vs. 8%, bereaved fathers 20% vs. 15%), this was not significant. Partial PTSD was not associated with parents' work situation or sick leave at T7. Results suggest little adverse effect on work situation and sick leave among parents of survivors and bereaved parents five years after end of ST/child's death from cancer. However, the pattern of change observed differed between parents, which could potentially indicate possible delayed consequences for fathers not captured in the present paper.

  8. La Verna Nursing Home, 30 Haddon Road, Clontarf, Dublin 3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-06-01

    The report presents findings and recommendations from the largest survey of bereaved relatives undertaken by two adult acute hospitals in Ireland in conjunction with their academic partners TCD and UCD. The findings provide significant insight into the quality of care delivered at end of life from the perspective of bereaved relatives. This report will be of interest to all healthcare staff involved in improving end-of-life care in acute hospitals and other healthcare settings.

  9. Grief and culture: a checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Tony

    2010-01-01

    All groups have a culture. This article is intended to help the bereavement practitioner better understand the support needs of clients from other cultures. It sets out and explains a simple checklist of questions designed to explore cultural practices and attitudes to grief and bereavement. The questions cover the obligations mourners feel towards the dead and towards society; who should be mourned; what should be done with the dead; what should be done with emotions; the inclusion or exclus...

  10. Culture and Death: A multicultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Pentaris, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    The factor of culture plays a critical role on how people perceive and deal with death, dying and bereavement. Each culture is unique and holds different and authentic beliefs and customs. This literature review will provide information from different cultural backgrounds among the population of Hawaìi regarding death, dying and bereavement (beliefs, customs, rituals, expectations, processes, etc.). The information aims to provide social workers and other helping professionals with appropriat...

  11. Remembered parenting style and psychological well-being in young adults whose parents had experienced early child loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantke, Renate; Slade, Pauline

    2006-03-01

    Pre-, peri-, or postnatal childloss can have devastating consequences for bereaved families. This study explored the long-term sequelae of these experiences for the young adult siblings' psychological well-being and the perceived quality of parenting received during participants' first 16 years of life. A bereaved group of young adult siblings was compared to a non-bereaved group on the Parent Bonding Instrument, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and the Mental Health Index-5. The loss group reported their mothers, but not their fathers, to have been more protective/controlling than non-bereaved participants. No differences between the loss group and the comparison group were found for parental care, their own mental health or self-esteem. Those participants whose siblings died during the peri/post-natal period perceived their parents as more controlling than the miscarriage group as well as the non-bereaved group. Higher protection scores were evident among those born subsequent to the loss than those who were born before. Lower levels of protection were associated with better mental health across all groups. In the non-bereaved group lower levels of protection were associated with better self-esteem, but in the bereaved group a different even opposite pattern was shown. Young adults who lost a sibling when they themselves were under 5 recall their mothers as more protective/controlling than non-bereaved groups, although they do not report less care nor differ in mental health nor self-esteem. Higher levels of parental protection/control were found where the child was born subsequent to loss and for peri/post-natal loss rather than miscarriage. While high protection was associated with poorer mental health regardless of loss this may not be necessarily disadvantageous to the child's self-esteem. Differences with regard to parent gender were found.

  12. Lakes Nursing Home, Hill Road, Killaloe, Clare.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-06-01

    The report presents findings and recommendations from the largest survey of bereaved relatives undertaken by two adult acute hospitals in Ireland in conjunction with their academic partners TCD and UCD. The findings provide significant insight into the quality of care delivered at end of life from the perspective of bereaved relatives. This report will be of interest to all healthcare staff involved in improving end-of-life care in acute hospitals and other healthcare settings.

  13. Communicatively Constructing the Bright and Dark Sides of Hope: Family Caregivers? Experiences during End of Life Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig Kellas, Jody; Castle, Katherine M.; Johnson, Alexis; Cohen, Marlene Z.

    2017-01-01

    (1) Background: The communication of hope is complicated, particularly for family caregivers in the context of cancer who struggle to maintain hope for themselves and their loved ones in the face of terminality. In order to understand these complexities, the current study examines the bright and dark sides of how hope is communicated across the cancer journey from the vantage point of bereaved family caregivers; (2) Methods: We analyzed interviews with bereaved family caregivers using qualita...

  14. When Sorrow Never Stops. Chronic Sorrow After the Death of a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Cindy J Lightfoot

    2016-01-01

    The death of a child, regardless of age, is the most horrendous, severe, and debilitating form of bereavement a parent can experience. Two authors--one who lost her son and one who has a son with intellectual limitations--explain how the Theory of Chronic Sorrow offers help in understanding the grieving process and how nurses can assist parents and others experiencing long-term bereavement.

  15. キリスト教記念式への一提案

    OpenAIRE

    中野, 敬一

    2010-01-01

    A memorial service in a Japanese Christian church refers to a special service memorializing the deceased and is held after the funeral services. The role of a memorial service is not only to "comfort and console the bereaved family" but "commend the deceased to God". I insist that the memorial service handles the latter more positively. There is a deep relationship between commending to God and comforting the dead. For the bereaved family who are saddened, the destiny of the dear departed aft...

  16. Inhibition of mourning by pregnancy: psychopathology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E

    1979-01-01

    A bereavement during pregnancy is difficult to mourn: a pregnant woman is so increasingly preoccupied with the new life that mourning is interrupted and often impossible to resume later. This may lead to idealisation of the child as a reincarnation of the dead person or child abuse. A bereaved woman should be helped to mourn at the time of death and to keep alive the expectation of future mourning once her baby is thriving. PMID:572731

  17. Carechoice Malahide, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-06-01

    The report presents findings and recommendations from the largest survey of bereaved relatives undertaken by two adult acute hospitals in Ireland in conjunction with their academic partners TCD and UCD. The findings provide significant insight into the quality of care delivered at end of life from the perspective of bereaved relatives. This report will be of interest to all healthcare staff involved in improving end-of-life care in acute hospitals and other healthcare settings.

  18. Coping Flexibility and Complicated Grief: A Comparison of American and Chinese Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Charles L.; Yan, Oscar H.; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Chan, Ide S. F.; Ho, Samuel; Bonanno, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to process a death, and the ability to remain optimistic and look beyond the loss, are both thought to be effective means of coping with loss and other aversive events. Recently, these seemingly contrary dimensions have been integrated into the idea of coping flexibility. Method In this study we assessed the ability of married and bereaved individuals in the US and Hong Kong to use both coping approaches as operationalized by the trauma-focused and forward-focused coping scales of a previously validated questionnaire. We also calculated a single flexibility score. Results Bereaved participants reported greater trauma-focused coping ability than did married participants. However, bereaved participants meeting criteria for complicated grief (CG) reported less forward-focused coping than both asymptomatic bereaved and married participants. The CG group also showed less overall coping flexibility than the asymptomatic bereaved and married groups. Country was not a factor. Conclusions Findings suggest that deficits in coping flexibility are indicative of pathology in bereaved individuals, and that this relationship extends across cultures. Limitations of the study and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:21898713

  19. La mort du prince Henri (†1612 : éthique et rhétorique du deuil dans un cycle de sermons funèbres anglais The prince Henry’s death (†1612 : ethics and rhetoric of bereavement in a cycle of English funeral sermons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barros

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article examine les spécificités thématiques et rhétoriques d’un cycle de sermons de deuil de Daniel Price, prononcés en 1612 à l’occasion de la mort du prince Henri, le fils aîné du roi d’Angleterre, Jacques Ier. Le premier volet expose les caractéristiques du sermon funèbre anglais, un genre de discours fortement codifié, dont les conventions se fixèrent dans la seconde moitié du XVIe siècle, alors même que le clergé s’efforçait de démontrer la légitimité de la prédication funèbre dans un contexte protestant. À l’aube du XVIIe siècle, les sermons funèbres imprimés se conforment en majorité à un modèle rhétorique bien défini et poursuivent un objectif pastoral double : la commémoration des morts et l’édification des vivants. Vis-à-vis de cette norme, les sermons de Daniel Price présentent des écarts considérables. En effet, ils se consacrent pour l’essentiel à la prise en charge du deuil des fidèles, un choix thématique qui implique une stratégie rhétorique spécifique. Se focalisant sur l’examen de ces caractéristiques, le deuxième volet de l’article montrera que ces textes, s’ils sont peu représentatifs de la pratique homilétique du clergé anglais au moment des funérailles, sont symptomatiques d’un changement culturel qui se dessine en Angleterre à l’aube du XVIIe siècle, et qui se traduit par la valorisation du deuil humain à des fins dévotionnellesThis article examines the thematic and rhetorical specificities of a cycle of funeral sermons preached in 1612 by Daniel Price on the occasion of the death of prince Henry, the eldest son of James I. It begins by describing the conventions of the English funeral sermon, which took shape in the second half of the sixteenth century, at a time when the clergy aimed at legitimizing the act of preaching over the dead in a Protestant context. It will be shown that at the beginning of the seventeenth century, the majority of printed funeral sermons conformed to a well-defined rhetorical pattern and pursued a two-fold pastoral aim : the commemoration of the dead and the edification of the living. Focusing on the grief of the audience, the sermons of Daniel Price significantly differ from this pattern, both rhetorically and thematically. The second part of the article will focus on the analysis of these idiosyncrasies, which will be shown to be symptomatic of a wider cultural change occurring in England at the beginning of the seventeenth century : the valuing of human grief in a devotional context.

  20. Parental Grief Following the Death of a Child from Cancer: The Ongoing Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Kaye, Erica C; Torres, Carlos; Gibson, Deborah; Baker, Justin N

    2016-09-01

    The death of a child is a devastating event that results in profound grief and significant psychosocial and physical morbidities in parents. The parental grief journey is a complex phenomenon necessitating the utilization of newer models of bereavement with a focus on relationships and exploration of parents' perceived meanings of the experience. To further characterize the grief journey of parents whose child died from cancer in order to better identify parents who can benefit from additional bereavement support and design strategies to improve bereavement services for these parents. We conducted focus group sessions with 11 bereaved parents. The parents were given two prompts to describe their grief journey before and after their child's death, and their responses in a narrative form were audio-recorded. The responses were coded and studied independently by semantic content analysis. Collation and analysis of the coded responses to both prompts results in the emergence of four concepts from the parental narratives: (1) description of the grief trajectory and evolution of grief over time, (2) mechanisms of parental coping throughout the grief journey, (3) factors that exacerbate parental grief, and (4) sources of parental support throughout the grief journey. The narratives highlighted that parents whose child died of cancer experience a unique and evolving form of grief and they wish to continue their bond with the deceased child. We recommend that healthcare providers and institutions incorporate support systems into a comprehensive bereavement program for families of children who die from cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.