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Sample records for benthic denitrification nitrate

  1. Denitrification, nitrate turnover, and aerobic respiration by benthic foraminiferans in the oxygen minimum zone off Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Population density, nitrate turnover, and oxygen respiration of benthic foraminiferans were investigated in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off the Chilean coast. Live foraminiferans were found predominantly in the upper 3 mm of the sediment, and the nitrate accumulating species Nonionella cf. stel...

  2. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, S.L.; Michel, R.C.; Terpandjian, P.D.; Vora, J.N.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial denitrification by Pseudomonas Stutzeri has been chosen as the method for removing nitrate from the effluent stream of the Y-12 uranium purification process. A model was developed to predict bacterial growth and carbon and nitrate depletion during the induction period and steady state operation. Modification of analytical procedures and automatic control of the pH in the reactor are recommended to improve agreement between the prediction of the model and experimental data. An initial carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) mass ratio of 1.4-1.5 insures adequate population growth during the induction period. Further experiments in batch reactors and in steady state flow reactors are recommended to obtain more reliable kinetic rate constants

  3. Denitrification inhibition by high nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veydovec, W.; Silverstein, J.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The processing of radioactive metal products at nuclear weapons plants and research labs has produced wastewaters containing high concentrations of nitrate, often greater than 50,000 mg/l N. The adaptation of activated sludge and inhibition of denitrification at high nitrate concentrations was studied using pH controlled bench-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), operated with 50% of the SBR volume recycled (recycle volume = influent volume). Denitrification of 1,350 and 2,700 mg/l NO 3 - -N was completed after approximately 5 hours and 15 hours, respectively. No denitrification of 5,400 mg/l NO 3 - -N was observed. These results suggest that there is a progressive inhibition of denitrification as nitrate concentrations increase from 1,350 to 5,400 mg/l NO 3 - -N. In a subsequent series of experiments at an initial reactor nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, a significant accumulation of nitrate was observed, resulting once in destabilization with loss of denitrification and once in successful adaptation of the activated sludge. At a nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, the adaptation of activated sludge appears to be unstable, resulting sometimes in stable denitrification and sometimes in biomass washout

  4. Anaerobic columnar denitrification of high nitrate wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Malone, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    Anaerobic columns were used to test the effectiveness of biological denitrification of nitrate solutions ranging in concentration from 1 to 10 kg NO 3 /m 3 . Several sources of nitrate (Ca(CNO 3 ) 2 , NaNO 3 , NH 4 NO 3 , and actual nitrate wastes from a UO 2 fuel fabrication plant) were evaluated as well as two packing media. The packing media were anthracite coal particles, whose effective diameter size ranged between 2 and 3 mm, and polypropylene Raschig rings 1.6 x 1.6 diameter. The anthracite coal proved to be the better packing media as excessive hydraulic short circuiting occurred in a 120 x 15 cm diameter glass column packed with the polypropylene rings after 40 days operation. With anthracite coal, floatation of the bed occurred at flow rates greater than 0.80 cm 3 /s. Tapered columns packed with anthracite coal eliminated the floatation problem, even at flow rates as high as 5 cm 3 /s. Under optimum operating conditions the anthracite coal behaved as a fluidized bed. Maximum denitrification rates were 1.0--1.4 g NO 3 /m 3 /s based on initial bed volume. Denitrification kinetics indicated that rates of denitrification became substrate inhibited at nitrate concentrations greater than 6.5 kg NO 3 /m 3 Anaerobic columns packed with anthracite coal appear to be an effective method of nitrate disposal for nitrate rich wastewater generated at UO 2 fuel fabrication plants and fuel reprocessing facilities. (U.S.)

  5. Studies on benthic denitrification in the Chwaka Bay mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial variations in denitrification rates were due to variations in concentration levels of organic matter and possibly to disproportionate competition for inorganic nitrogen between denitrifiers and benthic autotrophs among sites. There were no seasonal differences in denitrification rates. Results from the present study ...

  6. Denitrification of high strength nitrate waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamole, Pradip B; Nair, Rashmi R; D'Souza, Stanislaus F; Lele, S S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the treatment of high strength nitrate waste (40000 ppm NO(3) i.e., 9032 ppm NO(3)-N) by acclimatizing sludge initially capable of degrading dilute streams (100-200 ppm NO(3)-N). Sludge from an effluent treatment plant of a fertilizer industry was acclimatized for 15 d each at 1694, 3388, 6774 and 9032 ppm NO(3)-N in a 4 L sequencing batch reactor. Complete denitrification of extremely concentrated nitrate waste (9032 ppm NO(3)-N) using acclimatized sludge was achieved in just 6 h. During the acclimatization period, increase in nitrite peak value from zero to 5907 ppm NO(2)-N was observed, as the concentration was increased from 1694 to 9032 ppm NO(3)-N. Kinetic analysis of the nitrate and nitrite profile could reasonably support microbiological explanations for nitrite build up and changes in sludge composition.

  7. Cotton-supported heterotrophic denitrification of nitrate-rich drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biological denitrification (BD) process represents an interesting solution to remove nitrate from water and as well as to close the natural nitrogen cycle. Potential applications are related to both groundwater denitrification and treatment of nitraterich effluents from reverse osmosis and ion-exchange processes. This paper ...

  8. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and hydrogen sulfide by autotrophic denitrification in nitrate-contaminated water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjie; Chen, Nan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping; Li, Miao

    2018-02-23

    Nitrate contamination is a risk to human health and may cause eutrophication, whereas H 2 S is an undesirable constituent in biogas. In order to better understand denitrification using gaseous H 2 S as electron donor, this study investigated denitrification at different molar ratios of sulfur and nitrogen (S/N ratios) and H 2 S dosages. Although nitrate continued to decrease, a lag in sulfate generation was observed, implying the generation of sulfide oxidizing intermediates, which accumulated even though nitrate was in excess at lower S/N ratios of 0.19 and 0.38. More addition of H 2 S could result in a longer lag of sulfate generation. Before depletion of dissolved sulfide, denitrification could proceed with little nitrite accumulation. High throughout sequencing analysis identified two major genera, Thiobacillus and Sulfurimonas, that were responsible for autotrophic denitrification. The simultaneous removal of nitrate and H 2 S using a wide range of concentrations could be able to be achieved.

  9. Seasonal variation in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia process rates and corresponding key functional genes along an estuarine nitrate gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Wilson, John; Stott, Andrew; Osborn, A. Mark; Nedwell, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated spatial-temporal variation in benthic bacterial community structure, rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) processes and abundances of corresponding genes and transcripts at three sites—the estuary-head, mid-estuary and the estuary mouth (EM) along the nitrate gradient of the Colne estuary over an annual cycle. Denitrification rates declined down the estuary, while DNRA rates were higher at the estuary head and middle than the EM. In four out of the six 2-monthly time-points, rates of DNRA were greater than denitrification at each site. Abundance of gene markers for nitrate-reduction (nitrate reductase narG and napA), denitrification (nitrite reductase nirS) and DNRA (DNRA nitrite reductase nrfA) declined along the estuary with significant relationships between denitrification and nirS abundance, and DNRA and nrfA abundance. Spatially, rates of denitrification, DNRA and corresponding functional gene abundances decreased along the estuary. However, temporal correlations between rate processes and functional gene and transcript abundances were not observed. PMID:26082763

  10. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, M.; Lehmann, M. F.; del Giorgio, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN) was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrate (ϵapp) and TDN (ϵsed) during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+). We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate ϵapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of ϵsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate ϵsed above ϵapp. Calculated ϵsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2‰ and were related to organic matter reactivity and oxygen penetration depth in the sediments. ϵsed reflects the δ15N of the N2 lost from marine sediments and thus best describes the isotopic impact of fixed N loss from sediments on the oceanic fixed N pool. Our mean value for ϵsed is larger than assumed by earlier work, questioning

  11. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrateapp and TDN (εsed during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+. We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values <3‰. The strongest under-expression (i.e. lowest εapp of the biological N isotope fractionation was observed at the most oxygenated sites with the least reactive organic matter, indicating that, through their control on the depth of the denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate εapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of εsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate εsed above εapp. Calculated εsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2

  12. Denitrification in an oligotrophic estuary: a delayed sink for riverine nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Hellemann, Dana; Tallberg, Petra Astrid Sofia; Bartl, Ines; Voss, Maren; Hietanen, Siru Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Estuaries are often seen as natural filters of riverine nitrate, but knowledge of this nitrogen sink in oligotrophic systems is limited. We measured spring and summer dinitrogen production (denitrification, anammox) in muddy and non-permeable sandy sediments of an oligotrophic estuary in the northern Baltic Sea, to estimate its function in mitigating the riverine nitrate load. Both sediment types had similar denitrification rates, and no anammox was detected. In spring at high nitrate loading...

  13. Simultaneous biological removal of sulfide and nitrate by autotrophic denitrification in an activated sludge system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Carucci, A.; Lens, P.N.L.; Rossetti, S.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of an autotrophic denitrification process in an activated sludge reactor, using sulphide as the electron donor, was tested for simultaneous denitrification and sulphide removal. The reactor was operated at nitrate (N) to sulphide (S) ratios between 0.5 and 0.9 to evaluate their

  14. Evidence for complete denitrification in a benthic foraminifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Langezaal, Alexandra; Ingvardsen, Signe

    2006-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera are unicellular eukaryotes found abundantly in many types of marine sediments. Many species survive and possibly reproduce in anoxic habitats1, but sustainable anaerobic metabolism has not been previously described. Here we demonstrate that the foraminifer Globobulimina pseud...

  15. Nitrification and denitrification in a midwestern stream containing high nitrate: In situ assessment using tracers in dome-shaped incubation chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Repert, D.A.; Hart, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which in-stream processes alter or remove nutrient loads in agriculturally impacted streams is critically important to watershed function and the delivery of those loads to coastal waters. In this study, patch-scale rates of in-stream benthic processes were determined using large volume, open-bottom benthic incubation chambers in a nitrate-rich, first to third order stream draining an area dominated by tile-drained row-crop fields. The chambers were fitted with sampling/mixing ports, a volume compensation bladder, and porewater samplers. Incubations were conducted with added tracers (NaBr and either 15N[NO3-], 15N[NO2-], or 15N[NH4+]) for 24-44 h intervals and reaction rates were determined from changes in concentrations and isotopic compositions of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and nitrogen gas. Overall, nitrate loss rates (220-3,560 ??mol N m-2 h-1) greatly exceeded corresponding denitrification rates (34-212 ??mol N m-2 h-1) and both of these rates were correlated with nitrate concentrations (90-1,330 ??M), which could be readily manipulated with addition experiments. Chamber estimates closely matched whole-stream rates of denitrification and nitrate loss using 15N. Chamber incubations with acetylene indicated that coupled nitrification/denitrification was not a major source of N2 production at ambient nitrate concentrations (175 ??M), but acetylene was not effective for assessing denitrification at higher nitrate concentrations (1,330 ??M). Ammonium uptake rates greatly exceeded nitrification rates, which were relatively low even with added ammonium (3.5 ??mol N m-2 h-1), though incubations with nitrite demonstrated that oxidation to nitrate exceeded reduction to nitrogen gas in the surface sediments by fivefold to tenfold. The chamber results confirmed earlier studies that denitrification was a substantial nitrate sink in this stream, but they also indicated that dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) turnover rates greatly exceeded the rates of

  16. Using rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction to map the subsurface distribution of groundwater denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, T.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Abbott, B. W.; Aquilina, L.; Babey, T.; Green, C. T.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Labasque, T.; Laverman, A.; Marçais, J.; Peiffer, S.; Thomas, Z.; Pinay, G.

    2017-12-01

    Widespread fertilizer application over the last 70 years has caused serious ecological and socioeconomic problems in aquatic and estuarine ecosystems. When surplus nitrogen leaches as nitrate (a major groundwater pollutant) to the aquifer, complex flow dynamics and naturally occurring degradation processes control its transport. Under the conditions of depleted oxygen and abundant electron donors, microorganisms reduce NO3- to N2 (denitrification). Denitrification rates vary over orders of magnitude among sites within the same aquifer, complicating estimation of denitrification capacity at the catchment scale. Because it is impractical or impossible to access the subsurface to directly quantify denitrification rates, reactivity is often assumed to occur continuous along flowlines, potentially resulting in substantial over- or underestimation of denitrification. Here we investigated denitrification in an unconfined crystalline aquifer in western France using a combination of common tracers (chlorofluorocarbons, O2, NO3-, and N2) measured in 16 wells to inform a time-based modeling approach. We found that spatially variable denitrification rates arise from the intersection of nitrate rich water with reactive zones defined by the abundance of electron donors (primarily pyrite). Furthermore, based on observed reaction rates of the sequential reduction of oxygen and nitrate, we present a general framework to estimate the location and intensity of the reactive zone in aquifers. Accounting for the vertical distribution of reaction rates results in large differences in estimations of net denitrification rates that assume homogeneous reactivity. This new framework provides a tractable approach for quantifying catchment and regional groundwater denitrification rates that could be used to improve estimation of groundwater resilience to nitrate pollution and develop more realistic management strategies.

  17. Biological nitrate removal from water and wastewater by solid-phase denitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlong; Chu, Libing

    2016-11-01

    Nitrate pollution in receiving waters has become a serious issue worldwide. Solid-phase denitrification process is an emerging technology, which has received increasing attention in recent years. It uses biodegradable polymers as both the carbon source and biofilm carrier for denitrifying microorganisms. A vast array of natural and synthetic biopolymers, including woodchips, sawdust, straw, cotton, maize cobs, seaweed, bark, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), polycaprolactone (PCL), polybutylene succinate (PBS) and polylactic acid (PLA), have been widely used for denitrification due to their good performance, low cost and large available quantities. This paper presents an overview on the application of solid-phase denitrification in nitrate removal from drinking water, groundwater, aquaculture wastewater, the secondary effluent and wastewater with low C/N ratio. The types of solid carbon source, the influencing factors, the microbial community of biofilm attached on the biodegradable carriers, the potential adverse effect, and the cost of denitrification process are introduced and evaluated. Woodchips and polycaprolactone are the popular and competitive natural plant-like and synthetic biodegradable polymers used for denitrification, respectively. Most of the denitrifiers reported in solid-phase denitrification affiliated to the family Comamonadaceae in the class Betaproteobacteria. The members of genera Diaphorobacter, Acidovorax and Simplicispira were mostly reported. In future study, more attention should be paid to the simultaneous removal of nitrate and toxic organic contaminants such as pesticide and PPCPs by solid-phase denitrification, to the elucidation of the metabolic and regulatory relationship between decomposition of solid carbon source and denitrification, and to the post-treatment of the municipal secondary effluent. Solid-phase denitrification process is a promising technology for the removal of nitrate from water and wastewater. Copyright © 2016

  18. Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in a temperate re-connected floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, F; Heppell, C M; Wharton, G; Lansdown, K; Trimmer, M

    2011-10-15

    The relative magnitudes of, and factors controlling, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in the soil of a re-connected temperate floodplain divided into four different land management zones (grazing grassland, hay meadow, fritillary meadow and a buffer zone). Soil samples were collected from each zone to measure their respective potentials for nitrate attenuation using 15N both at the surface and at depth in the soil column and additional samples were collected to measure the lability of the organic carbon. Denitrification capacity ranged between 0.4 and 4.2 (μmol N g(-1) dry soil d(-1)) across the floodplain topsoil and DNRA capacity was an order of magnitude lower (0.01-0.71 μmol N g(-1) d(-1)). Land management practice had a significant effect on denitrification but no significant effects were apparent for DNRA. In this nitrogen-rich landscape, spatial heterogeneity in denitrification was explained by differences in lability and the magnitude of organic carbon associated with different management practices (mowing and grazing). The lability of organic carbon was significantly higher in grazing grassland in comparison to other ungrazed areas of the floodplain, and consequently denitrification capacity was also highest in this area. Our results indicate that bacteria capable of DNRA do survive in frequently flooded riparian zones, and to a limited extent, compete with denitrification for nitrate, acting to retain and recycle nitrogen in the floodplain. Exponential declines in both denitrification and DNRA capacity with depth in the floodplain soils of a hay meadow and buffer zone were controlled primarily by the organic carbon content of the soils. Furthermore, grazing could be employed in re-connected, temperate floodplains to enhance the potential for nitrate removal from floodwaters via denitrification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Autotrophic denitrification of nitrate and nitrite using thiosulfate as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Amin, Khurram; Kim, Seungjin; Yoon, Seungjoon; Kwon, Kiwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of autotrophic denitritation using thiosulfate as an electron donor, compare the kinetics of autotrophic denitrification and denitritation, and to study the effects of pH and sulfur/nitrogen (S/N) ratio on the denitrification rate of nitrite. Both nitrate and nitrite were removed by autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor at concentrations up to 800 mg-N/L. Denitrification required a S/N ratio of 5.1 for complete denitrification, but denitritation was complete at a S/N ratio of 2.5, which indicated an electron donor cost savings of 50%. Also, pH during denitrification decreased but increased with nitrite, implying additional alkalinity savings. Finally, the highest specific substrate utilization rate of nitrite was slightly higher than that of nitrate reduction, and biomass yield for denitrification was relatively higher than that of denitritation, showing less sludge production and resulting in lower sludge handling costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Benthic metabolism and denitrification in a river reach: a comparison between vegetated and bare sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi VIAROLI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at comparing biogeochemical processes in a Vallisneria spiralis meadow and in unvegetated sediments in the upper reach of the Mincio River (Northern Italy. The main hypothesis of this work is that meadows of rooted macrophytes affect benthic metabolism, enhancing capacity to retain nutrients (assimilation and dissipate (denitrification nitrogen loadings. In order to highlight how plants affect benthic processes in the riverbed, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and inorganic nitrogen fluxes, together with denitrification rates, were measured from February to November 2007 in intact cores collected from stands of V. spiralis and bare sediments. V. spiralis biomass, elemental composition and growth rates were concurrently measured. Macrophyte biomass ranged from 60 to 120 g m-2 (as dry matter; growth rates followed a seasonal pattern from 0.001 in winter up to 0.080 d-1 in summer. On an annual basis, the macrophyte meadow was autotrophic with net O2 production and dissolved inorganic carbon uptake, while the bare sediment was net heterotrophic. The concurrent N assimilation by macrophytes and losses through denitrification led to similar N uptake/dissipation rates, up to 2500 mmol m-2 y-1. Under the very high NO3 - concentrations of the Mincio River, the competition between primary production and denitrification processes was also avoided. A significant ammonium regeneration from sediments to the water column occurred in the V. spiralis meadow, where plant debris and particulate matter accumulated. Here, SRP was also released into the water column, whilst in the bare sediment SRP fluxes were close to zero. Overall, V. spiralis affected the benthic metabolism enhancing the ecosystem capacity to control nitrogen contamination. However, the actual N removal rates were not sufficient to mitigate the pollution discharge.

  1. Effect of growing plants on denitrification at high soil nitrate concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, K.; Mosier, A.; Heinemeyer, O.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of plant rhizosphere C deposits and its influence on microbial denitrification is not clearly defined. Conflicting reports as to the influence of plants and root exudation on denitrification continue to appear in the literature. The results of the authors earlier phytotron study indicated that denitrification was not stimulated in soils planted with corn or wheat compared to unplanted soils. Lower nitrate concentrations in the planted soils, however, may have led to misinterpretation of this data. A second study was conducted, to evaluate the effect of actively growing plants on denitrification where the NO 3 7 content of planted soils was maintained similar to unplanted soils. Simultaneously the C fixed by corn (Zea mays) and the fate of fertilizer N applied to the soil during the growing season were quantified. The corn was grown in a phytotron under a continuous supply of 14 CO 2 in 15 N fertilized soils to which 15 N-NO 3 - was added periodically during the growing season. The results of these studies showed that denitrification was not stimulated in soils planted with corn during active plant growth phase even when soil NO 3 - was relatively high. Denitrification was, however, greater in corn planted than unplanted soil when the recoverable root biomass began to decrease. Less N was immobilized and net 15 N immobilization was lower in planted soils than in unplanted soils. As denitrification was lower in planted soils during the time of active plant growth, the study suggests that root exudates did not stimulate either process

  2. Denitrification and environmental factors influencing nitrate removal in Guaymas Basin hydrothermally-altered sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall W Bowles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We measured potential nitrate removal and denitrification rates in hydrothermally altered sediments inhabited by Beggiatoa mats and adjacent brown oil stained sediments from the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. Sediments with Beggiatoa maintained slightly higher rates of potential denitrification than did brown sediments at 31.2 (±12.1 versus 21.9 (±1.4 μM N d-1, respectively. In contrast, the nitrate removal rates in brown sediments were higher than those observed in mat-hosting sediments at 418 ± 145 versus 174 ± 74 μM N d-1, respectively. Additional experiments were conducted to assess the responses of denitrifying communities to environmental factors (i.e. nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration. The denitrifying community had a high affinity for nitrate (Km = 137 ± 91 μΜ ΝΟ3-, in comparison to other environmental communities of denitrifiers, and were capable of high maximum rates of denitrification (vmax = 1164 ± 153 μM N d-1. The presence of sulfide resulted in significantly lower denitrification rates. Microorganisms with the potential to perform denitrification were assessed in these sediments using the bacterial16S rRNA gene and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ functional gene libraries. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library was dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (38%, some of which (e.g. Sulfurimonas sp. have a potential for sulfide dependent denitrification. The nosZ clone library did not contain clones similar to pure culture denitrifiers; these clones were most closely associated with environmental clones.

  3. Determining Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Nitrate Using Bacterial Denitrification Followed by Laser Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Tiezhu; Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia; Heiling, Maria; Weltin, Georg; Toloza, Arsenio; Resch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate (NO 3 - ) pollution is a prevalent problem that can cause water quality degradation and eutrophication of water bodies. Quantifying the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of nitrates will allow for better identification of their potential sources, which in turn will assist in remediation of contaminated water and the designing of future water management practices. In this research bacterial denitrification followed by laser spectroscopy are used to determine isotopic composition of δ 15 N and δ 18 O of dissolved nitrates. The objective of the project is to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) that outlines the best practices for both methods in sequence and designed to be used as a technical guideline

  4. Evaluating Carbon Release Rate of Controlled-release Tablet and Its Applicability to Biological Nitrate Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeum, Y.; HAN, K.; Yoon, J.; Lee, J.; Song, K.; Kang, J. H.; Park, C. W.; Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Generally, indigenous microbes in an aquifer have known to effectively degrade nitrate through heterotrophic denitrification in the presence of carbon source (CS). However, in case of continuous injection of excess amount of CS into an aquifer for complete denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, the injection of CS frequently results in biological clogging around the vicinity of an injection well. To overcome this problem, we developed a controlled-release CS tablet (CRCST) using fumarate as a CS. However, there is lack of study about CRCST release profile under field condition and its applicability to nitrate denitrification. Thus, we assessed CS release profile of CRCST in a continuous flowing cell (CFC) and its efficiency on biological denitrification in a soil column. During the CFC test, six different CRCSTs (3 for precipitating CRCSTs and 3 for floating CRCSTs) having different contents of polymer controlling CS release evaluated. CFC was operated under four different flowrates similar to groundwater velocities, and CRCST was added into the CFC before injecting test solution containing bromide (100 mg/L) as a tracer. During the soil column test, CFC and soil column was connected in sequence. Test solution containing nitrate (30 mg-N/L) and bromide was pumped into CFC, and its effluent was pumped into the column. Although the CRCSTs contain different amount of polymer, CS release rate and peak concentration of CS were highly proportional to flow rate. The ranges of CS release rate for precipitating and floating CRCSTs were 1.35-2.83 and 0.41-4.05 mmol/L/hr, respectively. The result suggests that groundwater velocity is a key parameter affecting CS release rate of CRCST. During the soil column test, one tablet addition of precipitating and floating CRCST maintained nitrate concentration less than 10mg-N/L (drinking water standard) for 4.3 and 3.7 days, respectively. These results suggest that CRCST may apply for the effective means of controlling high

  5. Optimization of nitrate removal from wastewater with a low C/N ratio using solid-phase denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Ji, Fangying; Xu, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the optimization of nitrate removal from wastewater with a low C/N ratio using solid-phase denitrification was investigated. Biodegradable polymer, an attractive alternative to liquid carbon sources for biological denitrification, was used as a carbon source and biofilm support for nitrate removal. An experiment was conducted based on a central composite design (CCD) with response surface methodology (RSM). A secondary polynomial regression with nitrate removal efficiency as response value was developed. Based on statistical analysis, the nitrate removal model was highly significant with very low probability values (denitrification process, electron donor for denitrification could be obtained by biological degradation of biodegradable polymer. Therefore, the influent CODCr concentration has no major effect on nitrate removal efficiency compared with that of HRT and influent NO3 (-)-N concentration.

  6. Establishing Ideal Conditions for Complete Denitrification by Pseudomonas Aureofaciens - An Update on Determining Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Nitrate Using Bacterial Denitrification and Laser Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Amelia Lee Zhi; Heiling, Maria; Toloza, Arsenio; Heng, Lee K.

    2017-01-01

    This serves as update on research entitled “Determining isotopic composition of dissolved nitrate using bacterial denitrification and laser spectroscopy” first published in the Vol. 39, No. 1, July 2016 SWMCN Soils Newsletter. In this research, isotopic δ 15 N and δ 18 O composition of dissolved nitrates is measured by laser spectroscopy after reduction of nitrate to N 2 O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens. Quantifying the isotopic composition of nitrates in aqueous samples allows for better identification of potential nitrate sources, which in turn assists in remediation of nitrate-contaminated water and design of future agricultural management practises. The overall objective of the project is to establish a technical guide in the form of a standard operating procedure outlining best practises for denitrification method.

  7. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Hall, Robert [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University; Dodds, Walter [Kansas State University; Findlay, Stuart [Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; O' Brien, Jon [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Ashkenas, Linda [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL; Dahm, Cliff [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Gregory, Stanley [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Johnson, Sherri [Oregon State University; Meyer, Judy [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory; Poole, Geoff [Eco-metrics; Valett, H. Maurice [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Webster, Jackson [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Arango, Clay [University of Notre Dame, IN; Beaulieu, Jake [University of Notre Dame, IN; Bernot, Melody [Murray State University; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Helton, Ashley [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Johnson, Laura [University of Notre Dame, IN; Niederlehner, Bobbie [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sheibley, Rich [Arizona State University; Thomas, Suzanne [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  8. Effect of Co-Contaminant on Denitrification Removal of Nitrate in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu KILIÇ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nitrogenous fertilizers used in agriculture, unconscious and without treatment wastewater is discharged led to an increase in groundwater nitrate pollution. In many countries, nitrate concentration in the ground waters used as drinking water source exceeded the maximum allowable concentration of 10 mg/L NO3-N. According to a study, some wells in the Harran Plain contain nitrate as high as 180 mg/L NO3--N and the average concentration for whole plain is 35 mg/L NO3--N (Yesilnacar et al., 2008. Additionally, increased water consumption, unconscious use of fertilizers and pesticides has led to the emergence of co-contaminant in drinking water. Recently, hazardous to human health co-contaminant such as arsenic, pesticides, perchlorate, selenate, chromate, uranium are observed in the nitrate pollution drinking water. There are many processes used for the removal of nitrate. The physical–chemical technologies that can be used for nitrate removal are reverse osmosis, ion exchange and electrodialysis (Alvarez et al., 2007. Important disadvantages of these processes are their poor selectivity, high operation and maintenance costs and the generation of brine wastes after treatment. Consequently, biological treatment processes to convert nitrates to benign dinitrogen gas, could be an interesting alternative for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with nitrates. The aim of this article, effective and cheap method for the removal of nitrate from drinking water biological denitrification is to examine the usability of contaminated drinking water with co-contaminant pollutions.

  9. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    -labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed......In batch experiments, we studied the isotope fractionation in N and O of dissolved nitrate during dentrification. Denitrifying strains Thauera aromatica and “Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1” were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions with acetate, benzoate, and toluene as carbon sources. 18O...... of nitrate transport across the cell wall compared to the kinetics of the intracellular nitrate reduction step of microbial denitrification....

  10. Biological denitrification of high-nitrates wastes generated in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    Biological denitrification appears to be one of the most effective methods to remove nitrates from wastewater streams (Christenson and Harremoes, 1975). However, most of the research and development work has been centered on removal of nitrates from sewage or agricultural drainage waters, nitrate nitrogen concentration usually less than 50 g/m 3 . Work was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1974 to test the use of biological nitrification in the removal of high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 1.0 kg NO 3 -N/m 3 ) from uranium purification waste streams. Since then, a full-scale treatment facility, a stirred reactor, has been installed at the Y-12 plant; and a pilot-plant, using a fluidized bed, has been proposed at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The objective of this manuscript is to present some applied microbiological research relating to possible constraints in biologically denitrifying certain waste streams in the nuclear industry and comparing the effectiveness of denitrification of these waste streams in three bench scale reactors, (1) a continuous flow-stirred reactor, (2) stirred bed rector, and (3) a fluidized bed reactor

  11. Benthic nitrogen fluxes and fractionation of nitrate in the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone (Eastern Tropical North Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Ryabenko, E.; Noffke, A.; Bohlen, L.; Wallmann, K.; Stolpovsky, K.; Greinert, J.; Pfannkuche, O.

    2014-06-01

    We present sedimentary geochemical data and in situ benthic flux measurements of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: NO3-, NO2-, NH4+) and oxygen (O2) from 7 sites with variable sand content along 18°N offshore Mauritania (NW Africa). Bottom water O2 concentrations at the shallowest station were hypoxic (42 μM) and increased to 125 μM at the deepest site (1113 m). Total oxygen uptake rates were highest on the shelf (-10.3 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) and decreased quasi-exponentially with water depth to -3.2 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. Average denitrification rates estimated from a flux balance decreased with water depth from 2.2 to 0.2 mmol N m-2 d-1. Overall, the sediments acted as net sink for DIN. Observed increases in δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 in the benthic chamber deployed on the shelf, characterized by muddy sand, were used to calculate apparent benthic nitrate fractionation factors of 8.0‰ (15εapp) and 14.1‰ (18εapp). Measurements of δ15NNO2 further demonstrated that the sediments acted as a source of 15N depleted NO2-. These observations were analyzed using an isotope box model that considered denitrification and nitrification of NH4+ and NO2-. The principal findings were that (i) net benthic 14N/15N fractionation (εDEN) was 12.9 ± 1.7‰, (ii) inverse fractionation during nitrite oxidation leads to an efflux of isotopically light NO2- (-22 ± 1.9‰), and (iii) direct coupling between nitrification and denitrification in the sediment is negligible. Previously reported εDEN for fine-grained sediments are much lower (4-8‰). We speculate that high benthic nitrate fractionation is driven by a combination of enhanced porewater-seawater exchange in permeable sediments and the hypoxic, high productivity environment. Although not without uncertainties, the results presented could have important implications for understanding the current state of the marine N cycle.

  12. A new method for in situ nitrate removal from groundwater using submerged microbial desalination-denitrification cell (SMDDC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    A considerable increase in nitrate concentration in groundwater has become a serious concern worldwide. We developed a novel submerged microbial desalination-denitrification cell (SMDDC) to in situ remove nitrate from groundwater, produce electric energy, and potentially treat wastewater. The SMDDC...

  13. Particulate Pyrite Autotrophic Denitrification (PPAD) for Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, S.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, L. C.; Henderson, M.; Feng, C.; Ergas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid movement of human civilization towards urbanization, industrialization, and increased agricultural activities has introduced a large amount of nitrate into groundwater. Nitrate is a toxic substance discharged from groundwater to rivers and leads to decreased dissolved oxygen and eutrophication. For this experiment, an electron donor is needed to convert nitrate into non-toxic nitrogen gas. Pyrite is one of the most abundant minerals in the earth's crust making it an ideal candidate as an electron donor. The overall goal of this research was to investigate the potential for pyrite to be utilized as an electron donor for autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Batch studies of particulate pyrite autotrophic denitrification (PPAD) of synthetic groundwater (100 mg NO3--N L-1) were set up with varying biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size. Reactors were seeded with mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (VSS) from a biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment facility. PPAD using small pyrite particles (Box-Behnken design (BBD) and response surface methodology (RSM), the optimal amount of biomass concentration, pyrite dose, and pyrite particle size were 1,250 mg VSS L-1, 125 g L-1, and 0.815-1.015 mm, respectively. PPAD exhibited substantial nitrate removal rate, lower sulfate accumulation (5.46 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N) and lower alkalinity consumption (1.70 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N) when compared to SOD (7.54 mg SO42-/mg NO3--N, 4.57 mg CaCO3/mg NO3--N based on stoichiometric calculation). This research revealed that the PPAD process is a promising technique for nitrate-contaminated groundwater treatment and promoted the utilization of pyrite in the field of environmental remediation.

  14. Influence oFe3+ Ions on Nitrate Removal by Autotrophic Denitrification Using Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Blažková

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available he sulphur-based autotrophic denitrification process utilizing Thiobacillus denitrificans was studied experimentally as an alternative method of removing nitrates from industrial wastewater. The objective of the work was to examine the effect of ferric iron addition to the reaction mixture and determine optimal dosage for specific conditions. All experiments were carried out in anoxic batch bioreactor, and elemental sulphur was used as an electron donor. Compared to the control operation without ferric iron addition, significant increases in nitrates removal were demonstrated for the concentration of ferric iron equal to 0.1 mg L–1. However, under these conditions, increased nitrite content was detected in the reaction mixture which exceeds the limits for drinking water.

  15. Acid Fermentation Process Combined with Post Denitrification for the Treatment of Primary Sludge and Wastewater with High Strength Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kurniawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR, combined with a post denitrification process, was applied to treat primary sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant and wastewater with a high concentration of nitrate. The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs was maximized with a short hydraulic retention time in the acid fermentation of the ABR process, and then the produced VFAs were supplied as an external carbon source for the post denitrification process. The laboratory scale experiment was operated for 160 days to evaluate the VFAs’ production rate, sludge reduction in the ABR type-acid fermentation process, and the specific denitrification rate of the post denitrification process. As results, the overall removal rate of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD, total suspended solids (TSS, and total nitrogen (TN were found to be 97%, 92%, 73%, respectively, when considering the influent into ABR type-acid fermentation and effluent from post denitrification. We observed the specific VFAs production rate of 0.074 gVFAs/gVSS/day for the ABR type-acid fermentation, and an average specific denitrification rate of 0.166 gNO3−-N/gVSS/day for the post denitrification. Consequently, we observed that a high production of VFAs from a primary sludge, using application of the ABR type acid fermentation process and the produced VFAs were then successfully utilized as an external carbon source for the post denitrification process, with a high removal rate of nitrogen.

  16. Direct contribution of clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) to benthic fluxes, nitrification, denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in a farmed sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David T.; Nizzoli, Daniele; Fano, Elisa A.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) on N-cycle processes, and oxygen and nutrient fluxes in a farmed sediment was investigated using a multiple core incubation approach and parallel incubations of individual clams. Clam population/biomass density varied ∼8-fold between cores and all sediment-water column solute (O2. N2, N2O, NH4+, NOX and DIN) fluxes and benthic process (N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification) rates were strongly and significantly correlated with clam density/biomass. Isolated clams exhibited high rates of respiration, N-excretion, nitrification and denitrification of 2050 ± 70, 395 ± 49, 201 ± 42 and 235 ± 40 nmol individual-1 h-1, respectively. The direct contribution of the clams and their associated microbiota to benthic processes was estimated by multiplying the per individual rates by the number of clams in each incubated core. The clams on average directly accounted for 64-133% of total rates of sediment oxygen demand, N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification, indicating that they regulated processes primarily through their own metabolic activity and that of bacteria that colonise them. Clams and the farmed sediments were significant sources of the greenhouse gas N2O, but this was primarily due to their high nitrification and denitrification rates, rather than high specific N2O yields, as N2O emissions represented farmed sediments had a high denitrification efficiency of 67 ± 10%, but this ecosystem service came at the environmental cost of increased N-regeneration and N2O emission rates. The measured N2O emissions indicate that bivalve aquaculture may be a significant source of N2O. It is therefore recommended that N2O emissions should be included in the impact assessments of current and future bivalve-farming projects.

  17. Nitrate removal, spatiotemporal communities of denitrifiers and the importance of their genetic potential for denitrification in novel denitrifying bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Wang, Longmian; Han, Wei; Wang, Xu; Guo, Zhaobing; Peng, Fuquan; Yang, Fei; Kong, Ming; Gao, Yuexiang; Chao, Jianying; Wu, Dan; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Yueming

    2017-10-01

    Nitrate treatment performance and denitrification activity were compared between denitrifying biological filters (DNBFs) based on dewatered alum sludge (DAS) and neutralized used acid (NUA). The spatiotemporal distribution of denitrifying genes and the genetic potential associated with denitrification activity and nitrate removal in both DNBFs were also evaluated. The removal efficiency of NUA-DNBF increased by 8% compared with that of DAS-DNBF, and the former NUA-DNBF emitted higher amount of N 2 O. Analysis of abundance and composition profiles showed that denitrifying gene patterns varied more or less in two matrices with different depths at three sampling times. Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, and Rhizobiales were the most commonly detected in both media during stable periods. Denitrification was determined by the abundance of specific genes or their ratios as revealed by controlling factors. The enhanced nitrate removal could be due to increasing qnosZ or decreasing ∑qnir/qnosZ. Furthermore, NUA-DNBF solely reduced nitrate by increasing the denitrification enzyme activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitrate removal and microbial analysis by combined micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Desheng; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Qianyi; Deng, Shihai

    2016-07-01

    A process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification (CEAD) with iron-carbon micro-electrolysis carriers was developed for nitrate removal. The process was performed using organic-free influent with a NO3(-)-N concentration of 40.0±3.0mg/L and provided an average nitrate removal efficiency of 95% in stable stages. The total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75%, with 21% of NO3(-)-N converted into NH4(+)-N. The corresponding hydraulic retention time was 8-10h, and the optimal pH ranged from 8.5 to 9.5. Microbial analysis with high-throughput sequencing revealed that dominant microorganisms in the reactor belonged to the classes of β-, γ-, and α-Proteobacteria. The abundance of the genera Thermomonas significantly increased during the operation, comprising 21.4% and 24.1% in sludge attached to the carriers in the middle and at the bottom of the reactor, respectively. The developed CEAD achieved efficient nitrate removal from water without organics, which is suitable for practical application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Denitrification rate determined by nitrate disapperance is higher than determined by nitrous oxide production with acetylene blockage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Kewei; Struwe, Sten; Kjøller, Annelise

    2008-01-01

    A mixed beech and spruce forest soil was incubated under potential denitrification assay (PDA) condition with 10% acetylene (C2H2) in the headspace of soil slurry bottles. Nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration in the headspace, as well as nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations in the soil...... slurries were monitored during the incubation. Results show that nitrate disappearance rate was higher than N2O production rate with C2H2 blockage during the incubation. Sum of nitrate, nitrite, and N2O with C2H2 blockage could not recover the original soil nitrate content, showing an N imbalance...... in such a closed incubation system. Changes in nitrite and ammonium concentration during the incubation could not account for the observed faster nitrate disappearance rate and the N imbalance. Non-determined nitric oxide (NO) and N2 production could be the major cause, and the associated mechanisms could vary...

  20. Microbial nitrate removal in biologically enhanced treated coal gasification wastewater of low COD to nitrate ratio by coupling biological denitrification with iron and carbon micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengwen; Han, Yuxing; Xu, Chunyan; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Zheng, Mengqi; Zhu, Hao; Ma, Weiwei

    2018-04-21

    Mixotrophic denitrification coupled biological denitrification with iron and carbon micro-electrolysis (IC-ME) is a promising emerging bioprocess for nitrate removal of biologically enhanced treated coal gasification wastewater (BECGW) with low COD to nitrate ratio. TN removal efficiency in R1 with IC-ME assisted was 16.64% higher than R2 with scrap zero valent iron addition, 23.05% higher than R3 with active carbon assisted, 30.51% higher than R4 with only active sludge addition, 80.85% higher than R5 utilizing single IC-ME as control. Fe 2+ generated from IC-ME decreased the production of N 2 O and enriched more Nitrate-reducing Fe(Ⅱ) oxidation bacteria (NRFOB) Acidovorax and Thiobacillus, which could convert nitrate to nitrogen gas. And the presence of Fe 3+ , as the Fe 2+ oxidation product, could stimulate the growth of Fe(III)-reducing strain (FRB) that indicated by redundancy analysis. Microbial network analysis demonstrated FRB Geothrix had a co-occurrence relationship with other bacteria, revealing its dominant involvement in nitrate removal of BECGW. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of process operating conditions on the autotrophic denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater using bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconet, D; Devecseri, M; Callegari, A; Capodaglio, A G

    2018-02-01

    Nitrates have been detected in groundwater worldwide, and their presence can lead to serious groundwater use limitations, especially because of potential health problems. Amongst different options for their removal, bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have achieved promising results; in particular, attention has raised on BES-driven autotrophic denitrification processes. In this work, the performance of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for groundwater autotrophic denitrification, is assessed in different conditions of nitrate load, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and process configuration. The system obtained almost complete nitrate removal under all conditions, while nitrite accumulation was recorded at nitrate loads higher than 100mgNO 3 - L -1 . The MEC system achieved, in different tests, a maximum nitrate removal rate of 62.15±3.04gNO 3 - -Nm -3 d -1 , while the highest TN removal rate observed was 35.37±1.18gTNm -3 d -1 . Characteristic of this process is a particularly low (in comparison with other reported works) energy consumption: 3.17·10 -3 ±2.26·10 -3 kWh/gNO 3 - N removed and 7.52·10 -2 ±3.58·10 -2 kWhm -3 treated. The anolyte configuration in closed loop allowed the process to use less clean water, while guaranteeing identical performances as in other conventional configurations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Denitrification of high strength nitrate waste from a nuclear industry using acclimatized biomass in a pilot scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamole, Pradip B; Nair, Rashmi R; D'Souza, Stanislaus F; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Lele, S S

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the performance of acclimatized biomass for denitrification of high strength nitrate waste (10,000 mg/L NO3) from a nuclear industry in a continuous laboratory scale (32 L) and pilot scale reactor (330 L) operated over a period of 4 and 5 months, respectively. Effect of substrate fluctuations (mainly C/NO3-N) on denitrification was studied in a laboratory scale reactor. Incomplete denitrification (95-96 %) was observed at low C/NO3-N (≤2), whereas at high C/NO3-N (≥2.25) led to ammonia formation. Ammonia production increased from 1 to 9 % with an increase in C/NO3-N from 2.25 to 6. Complete denitrification and no ammonia formation were observed at an optimum C/NO3-N of 2.0. Microbiological studies showed decrease in denitrifiers and increase in nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at high C/NO3-N (≥2.25). Pilot scale studies were carried out with optimum C/NO3-N, and sustainability of the process was checked on the pilot scale for 5 months.

  4. Comparison of heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification processes for nitrate removal from phosphorus-limited surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; He, Shengbing; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Chen, Wanning

    2018-03-29

    Phosphorus (P) limitation has been demonstrated for micro-polluted surface water denitrification treatment in previous study. In this paper, a lab-scale comparative study of autotrophic denitrification (ADN) and heterotrophic denitrification (HDN) in phosphorus-limited surface water was investigated, aiming to find out the optimal nitrogen/phosphorus (N/P) ratio and the mechanism of the effect of P limitation on ADN and HDN. Furthermore, the optimal denitrification process was applied to the West Lake denitrification project, aiming to improve the water quality of the West Lake from worse than grade V to grade IV (GB3838-2006). The lab-scale study showed that the lack of P indeed inhibited HDN more greatly than ADN. The optimal N/P ratio for ADN and HDN was 25 and a 0.15 mg PO 4 3- -P L -1 of microbial available phosphorus (MAP) was observed. P additions could greatly enhance the resistance of ADN and HDN to hydraulic loading shock. Besides, The P addition could effectively stimulate the HDN performance via enriching the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs). Additionally, HDN was more effective and cost-effective than ADN for treating P-limited surface water. The study of the full-scale HDBF (heterotrophic denitrification biofilter) indicated that the denitrification performance was periodically impacted by P limitation, particularly at low water temperatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequential in situ hydrotalcite precipitation and biological denitrification for the treatment of high-nitrate industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ka Yu; Kaksonen, Anna H; Douglas, Grant B

    2014-11-01

    A sequential process using hydrotalcite precipitation and biological denitrification was evaluated for the treatment of a magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2)-rich effluent (17,000mgNO3(-)-N/L, 13,100mgMg/L) generated from an industrial nickel-mining process. The hydrotalcite precipitation removed 41% of the nitrate (7000mgNO3(-)-N/L) as an interlayer anion with an approximate formula of Mg5Al2(OH)14(NO3)2·6H2O. The resultant solute chemistry was a Na-NO3-Cl type with low trace element concentrations. The partially treated effluent was continuously fed (hydraulic retention time of 24h) into a biological fluidised bed reactor (FBR) with sodium acetate as a carbon source for 33days (1:1 v/v dilution). The FBR enabled >70% nitrate removal and a maximal NOx (nitrate+nitrite) removal rate of 97mg NOx-N/Lh under alkaline conditions (pH 9.3). Overall, this sequential process reduced the nitrate concentration of the industrial effluent by >90% and thus represents an efficient method to treat Mg(NO3)2-rich effluents on an industrial scale. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogeological and multi-isotopic approach to define nitrate pollution and denitrification processes in a coastal aquifer (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittalis, Daniele; Carrey, Raul; Da Pelo, Stefania; Carletti, Alberto; Biddau, Riccardo; Cidu, Rosa; Celico, Fulvio; Soler, Albert; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Agricultural coastal areas are frequently affected by the superimposition of various processes, with a combination of anthropogenic and natural sources, which degrade groundwater quality. In the coastal multi-aquifer system of Arborea (Italy)—a reclaimed morass area identified as a nitrate vulnerable zone, according to Nitrate Directive 91/676/EEC—intensive agricultural and livestock activities contribute to substantial nitrate contamination. For this reason, the area can be considered a bench test for tuning an appropriate methodology aiming to trace the nitrate contamination in different conditions. An approach combining environmental isotopes, water quality and hydrogeological indicators was therefore used to understand the origins and attenuation mechanisms of nitrate pollution and to define the relationship between contaminant and groundwater flow dynamics through the multi-aquifer characterized by sandy (SHU), alluvial (AHU), and volcanic hydrogeological (VHU) units. Various groundwater chemical pathways were consistent with both different nitrogen sources and groundwater dynamics. Isotope composition suggests a mixed source for nitrate (organic and synthetic fertilizer), especially for the AHU and SHU groundwater. Moreover, marked heterotrophic denitrification and sulfate reduction processes were detected; although, for the contamination related to synthetic fertilizer, the attenuation was inefficient at removing NO3 - to less than the human consumption threshold of 50 mg/L. Various factors contributed to control the distribution of the redox processes, such as the availability of carbon sources (organic fertilizer and the presence of lagoon-deposited aquitards), well depth, and groundwater flow paths. The characterization of these processes supports water-resource management plans, future actions, and regulations, particularly in nitrate vulnerable zones.

  7. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vertical migration, nitrate uptake and denitrification: survival mechanisms of foraminifers (Globobulimina turgida) in low oxygen conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.; Piña-Ochoa, E.; Geslin, E.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2011-01-01

    15NO3− isotope labelling experiments were performed to investigate foraminiferal nitrate uptake strategies and the role of pseudopodial networks in nitrate uptake. Globobulimina turgida were placed below the nitrate penetration depth in homogenized sediment cores incubated in artificial seawater

  9. Combined ion exchange / biological denitrification for nitrate removal from ground water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der J.P.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a new process for nitrate removal from ground water. High nitrate concentrations in ground water are a result of fertilization in agriculture. According to a directive of the European Community the maximum admissible concentration of nitrate in

  10. Biological nitrate transport in sediments on the Peruvian margin mitigates benthic sulfide emissions and drives pelagic N loss during stagnation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Lomnitz, U.; Bourbonnais, A.; Wallmann, K.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic N cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) was investigated at ten stations along 12 °S from the middle shelf (74 m) to the upper slope (1024 m) using in situ flux measurements, sediment biogeochemistry and modeling. Middle shelf sediments were covered by mats of the filamentous bacteria Thioploca spp. and contained a large 'hidden' pool of nitrate that was not detectable in the porewater. This was attributed to a biological nitrate reservoir stored within the bacteria to oxidize sulfide during 'dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium' (DNRA). The extremely high rates of DNRA on the shelf (15.6 mmol m-2 d-1 of N), determined using an empirical steady-state model, could easily supply all the ammonium requirements for anammox in the water column. The model further showed that denitrification by foraminifera may account for 90% of N2 production at the lower edge of the OMZ. At the time of sampling, dissolved oxygen was below detection limit down to 400 m and the water body overlying the shelf had stagnated, resulting in complete depletion of nitrate and nitrite. A decrease in the biological nitrate pool was observed on the shelf during fieldwork concomitant with a rise in porewater sulfide levels in surface sediments to 2 mM. Using a non-steady state model to simulate this natural anoxia experiment, these observations were shown to be consistent with Thioploca surviving on a dwindling intracellular nitrate reservoir to survive the stagnation period. The model shows that sediments hosting Thioploca are able to maintain high ammonium fluxes for many weeks following stagnation, potentially sustaining pelagic N loss by anammox. In contrast, sulfide emissions remain low, reducing the economic risk to the Peruvian fishery by toxic sulfide plume development.

  11. Widespread occurrence of nitrate storage and denitrification among Foraminifera and Gromiida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochoa, Elisa Pina; Høgslund, Signe; Geslin, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    acceptors are absent from the environment, may be one of the reasons for their successful colonization of diverse marine sediment environments. The contribution of eukaryotes to the removal of fixed nitrogen by respiration may equal the importance of bacterial denitrification in ocean sediments....

  12. CROSS-STREAM COMPARISON OF SUBSTRATE-SPECIFIC DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Stuart [Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University

    2011-01-01

    Headwater streams have a demonstrated ability to denitrify a portion of their nitrate (NO(3) (-)) load but there has not been an extensive consideration of where in a stream this process is occurring and how various habitats contribute to total denitrification capability. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II (LINX II) we measured denitrification potential in 65 streams spanning eight regions of the US and draining three land-use types. In each stream, potential denitrification rates were measured in common substrate types found across many streams as well as locations unique to particular streams. Overall, habitats from streams draining urban and agricultural land-uses showed higher potential rates of denitrification than reference streams draining native vegetation. This difference among streams was probably driven by higher ambient nitrate concentrations found in urban or agricultural streams. Within streams, sandy habitats and accumulations of fine benthic organic matter contributed more than half of the total denitrification capacity (mg N removed m(-2) h(-1)). A particular rate of potential denitrification per unit area could be achieved either by high activity per unit organic matter or lower activities associated with larger standing stocks of organic matter. We found that both small patches with high rates (hot spots) or more widespread but less active areas (cool matrix) contributed significantly to whole stream denitrification capacity. Denitrification estimated from scaled-up denitrification enzyme assay (DEA) potentials were not always dramatically higher than in situ rates of denitrification measured as (15)N gas generation following 24-h (15)N-NO(3) tracer additions. In general, headwater streams draining varying land-use types have significant potential to remove nitrate via denitrification and some appear to be functioning near their maximal capacity.

  13. Accounting for the Decreasing Denitrification Potential of Aquifers in Travel-Time Based Reactive-Transport Models of Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Loschko, M.; Wöhling, T.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Excess nitrate concentrations pose a threat to drinking-water production from groundwater in all regions of intensive agriculture worldwide. Natural organic matter, pyrite, and other reduced constituents of the aquifer matrix can be oxidized by aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, leading to self-cleaning of groundwater. Various studies have shown that the heterogeneity of both hydraulic and chemical aquifer properties influence the reactive behavior. Since the exact spatial distributions of these properties are not known, predictions on the temporal evolution of nitrate should be probabilistic. However, the computational effort of pde-based, spatially explicit multi-component reactive-transport simulations are so high that multiple model runs become impossible. Conversely, simplistic models that treat denitrification as first-order decay process miss important controls on denitrification. We have proposed a Lagrangian framework of nonlinear reactive transport, in which the electron-donor supply by the aquifer matrix is parameterized by a relative reactivity, that is the reaction rate relative to a standard reaction rate for identical solute concentrations (Loschko et al., 2016). We could show that reactive transport simplifies to solving a single ordinary dfferential equation in terms of the cumulative relative reactivity for a given combination of inflow concentrations. Simulating 3-D flow and reactive transport are computationally so inexpensive that Monte Carlo simulation become feasible. The original scheme did not consider a change of the relative reactivity over time, implying that the electron-donor pool in the matrix is infinite. We have modified the scheme to address the consumption of the reducing aquifer constituents upon the reactions. We also analyzed how a minimally complex model of aerobic respiration and denitrification could look like. With the revised scheme, we performed Monte Carlo simulations in 3-D domains, confirming that the uncertainty in

  14. Nitrate removal, communities of denitrifiers and adverse effects in different carbon substrates for use in denitrification beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Sören; Schipper, Louis A.; Matiasek, Michael G.; Scow, Kate M.; Cameron, Stewart; Bruesewitz, Denise A.; McDonald, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Denitrification beds are containers filled with wood by-products that serve as a carbon and energy source to denitrifiers, which reduce nitrate ( NO3−) from point source discharges into non-reactive dinitrogen (N2) gas. This study investigates a range of alternative carbon sources and determines rates, mechanisms and factors controlling NO3− removal, denitrifying bacterial community, and the adverse effects of these substrates. Experimental barrels (0.2 m3) filled with either maize cobs, wheat straw, green waste, sawdust, pine woodchips or eucalyptus woodchips were incubated at 16.8 °C or 27.1 °C (outlet temperature), and received NO3− enriched water (14.38 mg N L−1 and 17.15 mg N L−1). After 2.5 years of incubation measurements were made of NO3−−N removal rates, in vitro denitrification rates (DR), factors limiting denitrification (carbon and nitrate availability, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and concentrations of NO3−, nitrite and ammonia), copy number of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK ) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ ) genes, and greenhouse gas production (dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane), and carbon (TOC) loss. Microbial denitrification was the main mechanism for NO3−−N removal. Nitrate–N removal rates ranged from 1.3 (pine woodchips) to 6.2 g N m−3 d−1 (maize cobs), and were predominantly limited by C availability and temperature (Q10 = 1.2) when NO3−−N outlet concentrations remained above 1 mg L−1. The NO3−−N removal rate did not depend directly on substrate type, but on the quantity of microbially available carbon, which differed between carbon sources. The abundance of denitrifying genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ ) was similar in replicate barrels under cold incubation, but varied substantially under warm incubation, and between substrates. Warm incubation enhanced growth of nirS containing bacteria and bacteria that lacked the nosZ gene, potentially explaining the greater N2O emission in warmer

  15. Nitrate Removal from Wastewater through Biological Denitrification with OGA 24 in a Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rossi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates pollution of waters is a worldwide problem and its remediation is a big challenge from the technical and the scientific point of view. One of the most used and promising cleaning techniques is the biological treatment of wastewaters operated by denitrifying bacteria. In this paper we begin a thorough study of denitrifying performances of the bacterium Azospira sp. OGA 24, recently isolated from the highly polluted Sarno river in the south of Italy. Here, the kinetics of nitrates consumption operated by bacteria in a specifically devised batch bioreactor, in anoxic condition and with acetate as the organic substrate, has been characterized. Experimental data were then used in a simplified model of a real wastewater treatment plant to find that OGA 24 can clean water with efficiency up to 90%. The denitrifying performances of OGA 24 match the requirements of Italian laws and make the bacterium suitable for its employment in treatment plants.

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions from denitrification and the partitioning of gaseous losses as affected by nitrate and carbon addition and soil aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillam, K.M.; Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Truro, NS; Zebarth, B.J.; Burton, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The factors controlling nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions vary with different soil and environmental conditions and management practices. This study was conducted to determine the importance of soil aeration, nitrate (NO 3 ) addition, carbon (C) additions, and C sources on gaseous nitrogen (N) losses from the denitrification of arable soils at a potato farm in Atlantic Canada. Denitrification and N 2 O emissions were measured using acetylene inhibition. An N 2 O and nitrogen gas (N 2 ) ratio of 0.7 showed that most emissions occurred as N 2 O. Emissions at water-filled pore spaces (WFPs) of 0.45 m 3 per m 3 were negligible. N 2 O emissions increased with NO 3 and C additions. Results suggested that soil aeration plays a dominant role in controlling the magnitude of denitrification and N 2 O emissions. However, soil NO 3 supplies in this study did not limit the denitrification process. The study showed that N 2 O emissions are controlled by C availability when there is a high degree of soil disturbance and high fertilizer N inputs. The relationship between the demand and supply of terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) was used to explain the spatial distribution of the N 2 O emissions. Higher WFPs and lower soil NO 3 concentrations resulted in higher rates of total denitrification. It was concluded that further research is needed to examine the role of overall soil and crop management in relation to C availability when developing mitigation strategies. 52 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Potential rates of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, nitrate reduction and denitrification in the young barley rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    and denitrifiers. The results indicate that potential activities (enzyme contents) in the four bacterial groups were less dependent on their inorganic N substrates in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, but showed distinct and different responses to duration of soil wetting after rainfall.......Potential activities (enzyme contents) of ammonium (NH4+) oxidizing, nitrite (NO2-) oxidizing, nitrate (NO3-) reducing and denitrifying bacteria were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil obtained from young barley plants in the field. The activities as well as pools of inorganic N (NH4+, NO2......- and NO3-) were followed for 3 weeks in the beginning of the growth season (May-June). During the 3 weeks two separate periods of rain gave dramatic changes in soil water content. A rainfall in the beginning of the sampling period, resulting in a short-term wetting of the soil, stimulated the potential...

  18. Evaluating vertical concentration profile of carbon source released from slow-releasing carbon source tablets and in situ biological nitrate denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeum, Y.; HAN, K.; Yoon, J.; Lee, J. H.; Song, K.; Kang, J. H.; Park, C. W.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Slow-releasing carbon source tablets were manufactured during the design of a small-scale in situ biological denitrification system to reduce high-strength nitrate (> 30 mg N/L) from a point source such as livestock complexes. Two types of slow-releasing tablets, precipitating tablet (PT, apparent density of 2.0 g/mL) and floating tablet (FT), were prepared to achieve a vertically even distribution of carbon source (CS) in a well and an aquifer. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) was used to control the release rate, and microcrystalline cellulose pH 101 (MCC 101) was added as a binder. The #8 sand was used as a precipitation agent for the PTs, and the floating agents for the FTs were calcium carbonate and citric acid. FTs floated within 30 min. and remained in water because of the buoyance from carbon dioxide, which formed during the acid-base reaction between citric acid and calcium carbonate. The longevities of PTs with 300 mg of HPMC and FTs with 400 mg of HPMC were 25.4 days and 37.3 days, respectively. We assessed vertical CS profile in a continuous flowing physical aquifer model (release test, RT) and its efficiency on biological nitrate denitrification (denitrification test, DT). During the RT, PTs, FTs and a tracer (as 1 mg rhodamine B/L) were initially injected into a well of physical aquifer model (PAM). Concentrations of CS and the tracer were monitored along the streamline in the PAM to evaluate vertical profile of CS. During the DT, the same experiment was performed as RT, except continuous injection of solution containing 30 mg N/L into the PAM to evaluate biological denitrification activity. As a result of RT, temporal profiles of CS were similar at 3 different depths of monitoring wells. These results suggest that simultaneous addition of PT and FT be suitable for achieving a vertically even distribution of the CS in the injection well and an aquifer. In DT, similar profile of CS was detected in the injection well, and nitrate was biologically

  19. Controls on denitrification potential in nitrate-rich waterways and riparian zones of an irrigated agricultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Alex J; Groffman, Peter M; Cadenasso, Mary L

    2018-02-21

    Denitrification, the microbial conversion of NO 3 - to N gases, is an important process contributing to whether lotic and riparian ecosystems act as sinks for excess NO 3 - from agricultural activities. Though agricultural waterways and riparian zones have been a focus of denitrification research for decades, almost none of this research has occurred in the irrigated agricultural settings of arid and semi-arid climates. In this study, we conducted a broad survey of denitrification potential in riparian soils and channel sediment from 79 waterway reaches in the irrigated agricultural landscape of California's Central Valley. With this approach, we sought to capture the wide range of variation that arose from diverse waterway management and fluctuating flow conditions, and use this variation to identify promising management interventions. We explored associations of denitrification potentials with surface water NO 3 - -N, organic matter, flow conditions, vegetation cover, near-channel riparian bank slope, and channel geomorphic features using generalized linear mixed models. We found strong associations of sediment denitrification potentials with reach flow conditions, which we hypothesize was the result of variation in microbial communities' tolerance to dry-wet cycles. Denitrification potentials in riparian soils, in contrast, did not appear affected by flow conditions, but instead were associated with organic matter, vegetation cover, and bank slope in the riparian zone. These results suggest a strong need for further work on how denitrification responds to varying flow conditions and dry-wet cycles in non-perennial lotic ecosystems. Our findings also demonstrate that denitrifier communities respond to key features of waterway management, which can therefore be leveraged to control denitrification through a variety of management actions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrate removal properties of solid-phase denitrification processes using acid-blended poly(L-lactic acid) as the sole substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Matsuoka, H; Sun, J; Tsuji, H; Hiraishi, A; Yoshikawa, S

    2013-01-01

    The large amount of waste that is discharged along with the diffusion of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) articles in use is persistent concern. Previously, we studied solid-phase denitrification (SPD) processes using PLLA to establish an effective re-use of PLLA waste. We found that PLLA with a weight-average molecular weight (M w ) of approximately 10,000 was suitable for SPD processes; however, the recycling of PLLA waste consumes a high energy. A new PLLA plastic including 5% poly(ethylene oxalate) (PEOxPLLA) as a blend material has attracted attention because recycling of PEOxPLLA consumes less electricity than that of PLLA. In this study, our main objectives were to evaluate whether PEOxPLLA can be used for SPD processes by changing its M w and to investigate the bioavailability for denitrification of hydrolysates released from PEOxPLLA. The predicted hydrolysates, including oxalic acid, ethylene glycol, and lactate, are abiotically released, leading to different biological nitrate removal rates. Consequently, the nitrate removal rate of PEOxPLLA ranged from 0.9–4.1 mg-NO 3 − -N·g-MLSS·h −1 by changing the M w in the range of 8,500–238,000. In culture-dependent approaches, denitrifying bacteria using each substrate as an electron donor are found in activated sludge, suggesting that all hydrolysates functioned in the SPD processes using PEOxPLLA.

  1. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth el Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins from Fallopia spp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strain Pseudomonas brassicacearum NFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability of P. brassicacearum were determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the gene narG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the gene nirS) under NO3 or NO2 were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearum responded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the gene narG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and that P. brassicacearum responds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. In situ batch denitrification of nitrate rich groundwater using sawdust as a carbon source - Marydale, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Israel, S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available carbon (DOC), potassium and chloride was monitored. Two soil depths, 75 to 100cm and 165 to 200cm respectively, from the Marydale area were used as matrix material during denitrification based on contrasting chemical composition with respect to major ion...

  3. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  4. High-rate biological denitrification in the cyclic rotating-bed biological reactor: Effect of COD/NO3(-), nitrate concentration and salinity and the phylogenetic analysis of denitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Seyed Javad; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2015-12-01

    The effects of COD/NO3(-) ratio, nitrate concentration and salinity was tested on the performance of the CRBR in denitrification with catechol as carbon source. The maximum nitrate reduction attained at COD/NO3(-) ratio of 1. The CRBR operated at optimum COD/NO3(-) ratio could completely denitrify the nitrate at inlet concentration up to 1250mg/L without nitrite accumulation. The maximum denitrification rate in the CRBR was 3.56kgNO3(-)/m(3)d with a nitrate reduction efficiency of 99% when the bioreactor was operated at inlet nitrate loading rate of 3.6kgNO3(-)/m(3)d. The denitrification performance of the CRBR was not affected significantly by NaCl concentrations up to 20g/L. 16S rRNA fragment and phylogenetic analysis identified Pseudomonas resinovorans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Bacillus cereus as the most abundant denitrifiers in biomass. Accordingly, the CRBR is a high-rate bioreactor and appropriate technology for treatment of nitrate-laden industrial wastewaters containing phenolic compounds and salinity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Understanding the hydrologic control of N cycle: Effect of water filled pore space on heterotrophic nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium mechanisms in unsaturated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, C; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2017-07-01

    Irrigation practice will be effective if it supplies optimal water and nutrients to crops and act as a filter for contaminants leaching to ground water. There is always a scope for improving the fertilizer use efficiency and scheduling of wastewater irrigation if the fate and transport of nutrients particularly nitrogenous compounds in the soil are well understood. In the present study, nitrogen transport experiments for two different agricultural soils are performed under varying saturation 33, 57, 78% water filled pore space for sandy soil 1 and 52, 81 and 96% for loam soil 2. A HYDRUS 2D model with constructed wetland (CW2D) module could simulate aerobic nitrification and anoxic denitrification well for both soils and estimated the reaction kinetics. A hot spot of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) pathway has been observed at 81% moisture content for a loamy sand soil. The presence of high organic content and reductive soil environment (5.53 C/NO 3 - ratio; ORP=-125mV) results in ammonium accumulation of 16.85mg in the soil. The overall observation from this study is nitrification occurs in a wide range of saturations 33-78% with highest at 57% whereas denitrification is significant at higher water saturations 57-78% for sandy soil texture. For a loamy sand soil, denitrification is dominant at 96% saturation with least nitrification at all saturation studies. The greatest nitrogen losses (>90%) was observed for soil 2 while 30-70% for soil1. The slow dispersive subsurface transport with varying oxygen dynamics enhanced nitrogen losses from soil2 due to lesser soil permeability. This in turn, prevents NO 3 - leaching and groundwater contamination. This type of modeling study should be used before planning field experiments for designing optimal irrigation and fertigation schedules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the hydrologic control of N cycle: Effect of water filled pore space on heterotrophic nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium mechanisms in unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, C.; Nambi, Indumathi M.

    2017-07-01

    Irrigation practice will be effective if it supplies optimal water and nutrients to crops and act as a filter for contaminants leaching to ground water. There is always a scope for improving the fertilizer use efficiency and scheduling of wastewater irrigation if the fate and transport of nutrients particularly nitrogenous compounds in the soil are well understood. In the present study, nitrogen transport experiments for two different agricultural soils are performed under varying saturation 33, 57, 78% water filled pore space for sandy soil 1 and 52, 81 and 96% for loam soil 2. A HYDRUS 2D model with constructed wetland (CW2D) module could simulate aerobic nitrification and anoxic denitrification well for both soils and estimated the reaction kinetics. A hot spot of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) pathway has been observed at 81% moisture content for a loamy sand soil. The presence of high organic content and reductive soil environment (5.53 C/NO3- ratio; ORP = - 125 mV) results in ammonium accumulation of 16.85 mg in the soil. The overall observation from this study is nitrification occurs in a wide range of saturations 33-78% with highest at 57% whereas denitrification is significant at higher water saturations 57-78% for sandy soil texture. For a loamy sand soil, denitrification is dominant at 96% saturation with least nitrification at all saturation studies. The greatest nitrogen losses (> 90%) was observed for soil 2 while 30-70% for soil1. The slow dispersive subsurface transport with varying oxygen dynamics enhanced nitrogen losses from soil2 due to lesser soil permeability. This in turn, prevents NO3- leaching and groundwater contamination. This type of modeling study should be used before planning field experiments for designing optimal irrigation and fertigation schedules.

  8. Denitrification in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Noronha, R.J.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Estimates of the amount of denitrification in the Arabian Sea are inconsistent, and so two methods of calculations of 'original' nitrate concentrations used in earlier studies have been reviewed. Nitrite at intermediate depths was not restricted...

  9. Denitrification by Rhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, A.

    1996-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains were investigated for their denitrification activity as free-living cells and in nodules on lucerne (Medicago sativa) roots. They were also investigated for presence of nitrous oxide reductase (nos) activity and for genes using a nosZ probe derived from the Pseudomonas stutzeri. To decide whether R. meliloti strains used as inoculants contribute to the total denitrification activity in a lucerne ley, strains with different denitrifying capacities were used in field and laboratory experiments. The nitrate reduction activity of R. meliloti during anaerobic respiration was compared with that of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A great diversity in the denitrification activity was found within strains of R. meliloti, and four of thirteen investigated strains showed an obvious denitrification activity. Two denitrifying bacteria were used as references, one strain each of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and P. aeruginosa. All but one of the R. meliloti strains hybridized to the PstI-fragment of the nosZ-gene from P. stutzeri. Two sizes of the hybridizing fragment, 5 and 7 kb, were noticed. Nos activity was only shown in three R. meliloti strains, and these were all characterized by a high denitrification activity. The potential denitrification activity was about 20, 40, and 80 times higher than the actual denitrification activity for lucerne, fallow, and grass, respectively. The potential denitrification activity was almost the same in lucerne and grass planted soils. Compared with the unplanted soil, the presence of lucerne roots in the soil increased the actual denitrification activity, while roots of both plant species, grass and lucerne, increased the potential denitrification activity in the soil. 32 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  10. Denitrification processes in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    rate in the vicinity of 30 Tg Ny@u-1@@, but the extent of benthic contribution remains unknown. A decoupling of denitrification from primary production, unique to the Arabian Sea, is revealed by nitrite, Electron Transport System (ETS) activity...

  11. Denitrification in the recharge area and discharge area of a transient agricultural nitrate plume in a glacial outwash sand aquifer, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Wanty, R.; Tuttle, M.; Delin, G.; Landon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Recharge rates of nitrate (NO3−) to groundwater beneath agricultural land commonly are greater than discharge rates of NO3− in nearby streams, but local controls of NO3− distribution in the subsurface generally are poorly known. Groundwater dating (CFC, 3H) was combined with chemical (ions and gases) and stable isotope (N, S, and C) analyses to resolve the effects of land use changes, flow patterns, and water-aquifer reactions on the distributions of O2, NO3−, SO4=, and other constituents in a two-dimensional vertical section leading from upland cultivated fields to a riparian wetland and stream in a glacial outwash sand aquifer near Princeton, Minnesota. Within this section a “plume” of oxic NO3−-rich groundwater was present at shallow depths beneath the fields and part of the wetland but terminated before reaching the stream or the wetland surface. Groundwater dating and hydraulic measurements indicate travel times in the local flow system of 0 to >40 years, with stratified recharge beneath the fields, downward diversion of the shallow NO3−-bearing plume by semiconfining organic-rich valley-filling sediments under the wetland and upward discharge across the valley and stream bottom. The concentrations and δ15N values of NO3− and N2 indicate that the NO3− plume section was bounded in three directions by a curvilinear zone of active denitrification that limited its progress; however, when recalculated to remove the effects of denitrification, the data also indicate changes in both the concentrations and δ15N values of NO3− that was recharged in the past. Isotope data and mass balance calculations indicate that FeS2 and other ferrous Fe phases were the major electron donors for denitrification in at least two settings: (1) within the glacial-fluvial aquifer sediments beneath the recharge and discharge areas and (2) along the bottom of the valley-filling sediments in the discharge area. Combined results indicate that the shape and progress of

  12. Assessment of the denitrification process in alluvial wetlands at floodplain scale using the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    As alluvial plains support intensive agricultural activities, they often suffer from groundwater nitrate pollution. Denitrification is recognized as an important process in nitrate pollution control in riparian zones. In shallow aquifer zones influenced by recharged surface water, denitrification ...

  13. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies reveal that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly......-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen...... (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release...

  14. Bedforms as Biocatalytic Filters: A Pumping and Streamline Segregation Model for Nitrate Removal in Permeable Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Morvarid; Grant, Stanley B; Kessler, Adam J; Cook, Perran L M; Rippy, Megan A; Stewardson, Michael J

    2015-09-15

    Bedforms are a focal point of carbon and nitrogen cycling in streams and coastal marine ecosystems. In this paper, we develop and test a mechanistic model, the "pumping and streamline segregation" or PASS model, for nitrate removal in bedforms. The PASS model dramatically reduces computational overhead associated with modeling nitrogen transformations in bedforms and reproduces (within a factor of 2 or better) previously published measurements and models of biogeochemical reaction rates, benthic fluxes, and in-sediment nutrient and oxygen concentrations. Application of the PASS model to a diverse set of marine and freshwater environments indicates that (1) physical controls on nitrate removal in a bedform include the pore water flushing rate, residence time distribution, and relative rates of respiration and transport (as represented by the Damkohler number); (2) the biogeochemical pathway for nitrate removal is an environment-specific combination of direct denitrification of stream nitrate and coupled nitrification-denitrification of stream and/or sediment ammonium; and (3) permeable sediments are almost always a net source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. The PASS model also provides a mechanistic explanation for previously published empirical correlations showing denitrification velocity (N2 flux divided by nitrate concentration) declines as a power law of nitrate concentration in a stream (Mulholland et al. Nature, 2008, 452, 202-205).

  15. Biological denitrification process based on the Fe(0)-carbon micro-electrolysis for simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal from low organic carbon water under a microaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi

    2016-11-01

    A combined process between micro-electrolysis and biological denitrification (MEBD) using iron scraps and an activated carbon-based micro-electrolysis carrier was developed for nitrogen removal under a microaerobic condition. The process provided NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 92.6% and 95.3%, respectively, and TN removal rate of 0.373±0.11kgN/(m(3)d) at corresponding DO of 1.0±0.1mg/L and HRT of 3h, and the optimal pH of 7.6-8.4. High-throughput sequencing analysis verified that dominant classes belonged to β-, α-, and γ-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira. The dominant genera Hydrogenophaga and Sphaerotilus significantly increased during the operation, covering 13.2% and 6.1% in biofilms attached to the carrier in the middle of the reactor, respectively. Autotrophic denitrification contributed to >80% of the TN removal. The developed MEBD achieved efficient simultaneous nitrification and autotrophic denitrification, presenting significant potential for application in practical low organic carbon water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Denitrification across landscapes and waterscapes: a synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzinger, S; Harrison, J A; Böhlke, J K; Bouwman, A F; Lowrance, R; Peterson, B; Tobias, C; Van Drecht, G

    2006-12-01

    Denitrification is a critical process regulating the removal of bioavailable nitrogen (N) from natural and human-altered systems. While it has been extensively studied in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine systems, there has been limited communication among denitrification scientists working in these individual systems. Here, we compare rates of denitrification and controlling factors across a range of ecosystem types. We suggest that terrestrial, freshwater, and marine systems in which denitrification occurs can be organized along a continuum ranging from (1) those in which nitrification and denitrification are tightly coupled in space and time to (2) those in which nitrate production and denitrification are relatively decoupled. In aquatic ecosystems, N inputs influence denitrification rates whereas hydrology and geomorphology influence the proportion of N inputs that are denitrified. Relationships between denitrification and water residence time and N load are remarkably similar across lakes, river reaches, estuaries, and continental shelves. Spatially distributed global models of denitrification suggest that continental shelf sediments account for the largest portion (44%) of total global denitrification, followed by terrestrial soils (22%) and oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs; 14%). Freshwater systems (groundwater, lakes, rivers) account for about 20% and estuaries 1% of total global denitrification. Denitrification of land-based N sources is distributed somewhat differently. Within watersheds, the amount of land-based N denitrified is generally highest in terrestrial soils, with progressively smaller amounts denitrified in groundwater, rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and estuaries. A number of regional exceptions to this general trend of decreasing denitrification in a downstream direction exist, including significant denitrification in continental shelves of N from terrestrial sources. Though terrestrial soils and groundwater are responsible for much

  17. Hydrodynamic and Environmental Controls on the Nitrogen Isotope Effect of Benthic N2 Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooze, J.; Meile, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    Isotopic signatures of nitrogen (N) pools, together with knowledge on fractionation during the conversion between different forms of N, can be used to constrain marine N budgets. However, the reported extent of N isotope fractionation during benthic N2 production has differed substantially between studies, leading to uncertainty in the estimate of the global benthic N2 production rate. To assess the range and identify mechanisms underlying such observations, we developed a reactive transport model and ran simulations evaluating the impact of nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation on the isotopic composition of in-situ N/2 production. Different hydrodynamic regimes were taken into account, including advective flow induced by bioirrigation and purely diffusive transport. The effects of the benthic mineralization rate and the composition of the overlying water were also quantified. The benthic redox conditions were found to control the N isotope effect, which under reducing conditions is driven by fractionation during nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation and under oxidizing conditions by fractionation during denitrification. The mineralization rate, the bioirrigation intensity, and chemical composition of the overlying water affect the benthic redox zonation and therefore also the benthic N isotope effect. With increasing water-depth the mineralization rate and the advective nitrate supply to the sediment both decrease, constraining most benthic N cycling to the continental shelf. Simulations that reproduce observed trends of sediment O2 uptake and N2 fluxes with water depth, combined with ocean bathymetry yield an average benthic N isotope effect of -3‰, in line with independent estimates from global circulation models coupled to N cycle models (Somes et al., 2013. Biogeosciences 10, 5889-5910).

  18. Denitrification in groundwater at uranium mill tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goering, Timothy J.; Groffman, Armando; Thomson, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Nitrates are a major contaminant in groundwater at many Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Microbial denitrification, the transformation of nitrate to nitrogen gas, may be occurring in groundwater at several UMTRA sites. Denitrification is a biologically mediated process whereby facultative anaerobes use nitrate for respiration under anaerobic conditions. Denitrifying bacteria are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and water. Denitrification requires nitrate, organic carbon, oxygen-limiting conditions, and trace nutrients, especially phosphorus. The lack of organic carbon is the most common limiting factor for denitrification. Denitrification occurs under a limited range of temperature and pH. The uranium milling processes used at UMTRA sites provided a readily available source of carbon and nitrates for denitrifying bacteria. At the Maybell, Colorado, site, the denitrifying organisms Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Acinetobacter were identified in core samples of materials from beneath the tailings. In addition, microcosm experiments simulating aquifer conditions beneath the tailings pile showed an average 40 percent decrease in nitrate concentrations over 13 days. At the New Rifle, Colorado, site, aquifer conditions appear favorable for denitrification. Nitrate and organic carbon are readily available in the groundwater, and redox conditions beneath and downgradient of the tailings pile are relatively anoxic. Downgradient from the tailings, total nitrogen is being removed from the groundwater system at a greater rate than the geochemically conservative anion, chloride. This removal may be due to denitrification and adsorption of ammonium onto clay and silt particles. (author)

  19. Denitrification gene density across a wastewater-impacted riparian buffer zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian buffers are a best management practice used extensively to protect water bodies from agriculturally-generated nitrate pollution. In particular, the biological process of denitrification has been shown to be a sink for this nitrate. Denitrification results in the reduction of nitrate under a...

  20. Nitrogen dynamics in the shallow groundwater of a riparian wetland zone of the Garonne, SW France: nitrate inputs, bacterial densities, organic matter supply and denitrification measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sánchez-Pérez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the role of interactions between surface and sub-surface water of the riparian zone of a large river (the Garonne, SW France. Information is given about the role of surface water in supplying Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC to the riparian zone for nitrate removal processes. The densities of bacteria (up to 3.3 106 cell m L-1 in groundwater are strongly conditioned by the water moving during flood events. Total bacterial densities in groundwater were related to surface water bacterial densities. In sediment, total bacteria are attached mainly to fine particles (90% in the fraction Keywords: riparian zone, nitrate removal, spatial variations, alluvial groundwater

  1. Physiological levels of nitrate support anoxic growth by denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at growth rates reported in cystic fibrosis lungs and sputum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Line, Laura; Alhede, Morten; Kolpen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The infection is characterized by the formation of biofilm surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and strong O2 depletion in the endobronchial mucus. We have...... reported that O2 is mainly consumed by the activated PMNs, while O2 consumption by aerobic respiration is diminutive and nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced in infected CF sputum. This suggests that the reported growth rates of P. aeruginosa in lungs and sputum may result from anaerobic respiration using...... comparable to our reported growth rates in the majority of P. aeruginosa cells in CF lungs and sputum. Thus, we have demonstrated that denitrification is required for P. aeruginosa growth in infected endobronchial CF mucus....

  2. Transient exposure to oxygen or nitrate reveals ecophysiology of fermentative and sulfate-reducing benthic microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sainab; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Strous, Marc; Ruff, S Emil

    2017-12-01

    For the anaerobic remineralization of organic matter in marine sediments, sulfate reduction coupled to fermentation plays a key role. Here, we enriched sulfate-reducing/fermentative communities from intertidal sediments under defined conditions in continuous culture. We transiently exposed the cultures to oxygen or nitrate twice daily and investigated the community response. Chemical measurements, provisional genomes and transcriptomic profiles revealed trophic networks of microbial populations. Sulfate reducers coexisted with facultative nitrate reducers or aerobes enabling the community to adjust to nitrate or oxygen pulses. Exposure to oxygen and nitrate impacted the community structure, but did not suppress fermentation or sulfate reduction as community functions, highlighting their stability under dynamic conditions. The most abundant sulfate reducer in all cultures, related to Desulfotignum balticum, appeared to have coupled both acetate- and hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. We describe a novel representative of the widespread uncultured candidate phylum Fermentibacteria (formerly candidate division Hyd24-12). For this strictly anaerobic, obligate fermentative bacterium, we propose the name ' U Sabulitectum silens' and identify it as a partner of sulfate reducers in marine sediments. Overall, we provide insights into the function of fermentative, as well as sulfate-reducing microbial communities and their adaptation to a dynamic environment. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Transient exposure to oxygen or nitrate reveals ecophysiology of fermentative and sulfate‐reducing benthic microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sainab; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Geelhoed, Jeanine S.; Strous, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Summary For the anaerobic remineralization of organic matter in marine sediments, sulfate reduction coupled to fermentation plays a key role. Here, we enriched sulfate‐reducing/fermentative communities from intertidal sediments under defined conditions in continuous culture. We transiently exposed the cultures to oxygen or nitrate twice daily and investigated the community response. Chemical measurements, provisional genomes and transcriptomic profiles revealed trophic networks of microbial populations. Sulfate reducers coexisted with facultative nitrate reducers or aerobes enabling the community to adjust to nitrate or oxygen pulses. Exposure to oxygen and nitrate impacted the community structure, but did not suppress fermentation or sulfate reduction as community functions, highlighting their stability under dynamic conditions. The most abundant sulfate reducer in all cultures, related to Desulfotignum balticum, appeared to have coupled both acetate‐ and hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. We describe a novel representative of the widespread uncultured candidate phylum Fermentibacteria (formerly candidate division Hyd24‐12). For this strictly anaerobic, obligate fermentative bacterium, we propose the name ‘USabulitectum silens’ and identify it as a partner of sulfate reducers in marine sediments. Overall, we provide insights into the function of fermentative, as well as sulfate‐reducing microbial communities and their adaptation to a dynamic environment. PMID:28836729

  4. Assessment of denitrification process in lower Ishikari river system, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pawan Kumar; Minagawa, Masao

    2013-11-01

    Sediment denitrification rate and its role in removal of dissolved nitrate load in lower Ishikari river system were examined. Denitrification rate were measured using acetylene inhibition technique on the sediment samples collected during August 2009-July 2010. The denitrification rate varied from 0.001 to 1.9 μg Ng(-1) DM h(-1) with an average value of 0.21 μg Ng(-1) DM h(-1) in lower Ishikari river system. Denitrification rate showed positive correlation with dissolved nitrate concentration in the river basin, indicating overlying water column supplied nitrate for the sediment denitrification processes. Nutrient enrichment experiments result showed that denitrification rate increased significantly with addition of nitrate in case of samples collected from Barato Lake however no such increase was observed in the samples collected from Ishikari river main channel and its major tributaries indicating that factors other than substrate concentration such as population of denitrifier and hydrological properties of stream channel including channel depth and flow velocity may affects the denitrification rate in lower Ishikari river system. Denitrification rate showed no significant increase with the addition of labile carbon (glucose), indicating that sediment samples had sufficient organic matter to sustain denitrification activity. The result of nutrient spiraling model indicates that in- stream denitrification process removes on an average 5%d(-1) of dissolve nitrate load in Ishikari river. This study was carried out to fill the gap present in the availability of riverine denitrification rate measurement and its role in nitrogen budget from Japanese rivers characterize by small river length and high flow rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterotrophic Anodic Denitrification in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Drewnowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pollution caused by energy production systems is a major environmental concern. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources is required. Amongst others, the microbial fuel cell (MFC seems to be a possible solution because it can produce clean energy at the same time that waste is stabilized. Unfortunately, mainly due to industrial discharges, the wastes could contain nitrates, or nitrates precursors such ammonia, which could lead to lower performance in terms of electricity production. In this work, the feasibility of coupling anodic denitrification process with electricity production in MFC and the effect of the nitrates over the MFC performance were studied. During the experiments, it was observed that the culture developed in the anodic chamber of the MFC presented a significant amount of denitrificative microorganisms. The MFC developed was able to denitrify up to 4 ppm, without affecting the current density exerted, of about 1 mA/cm2. Regarding the denitrification process, it must be highlighted that the maximum denitrification rate achieved with the culture was about 60 mg·NO3−·L−1·h−1. Based on these results, it can be stated that it is possible to remove nitrates and to produce energy, without negatively affecting the electrical performance, when the nitrate concentration is low.

  6. Benthic nitrogen cycling traversing the capitalize peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, L.; Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Mosch, T.; Hensen, C.; Noffke, A.; Scholz, F.; Wallmann, K.

    2011-10-01

    Benthic nitrogen (N) cycling was investigated at six stations along a transect traversing the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at 11°S. An extensive dataset including porewater concentration profiles and in situ benthic fluxes of nitrate (NO 3-), nitrite (NO 2-) and ammonium (NH 4+) was used to constrain a 1-D reaction-transport model designed to simulate and interpret the measured data at each station. Simulated rates of nitrification, denitrification, anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by filamentous large sulfur bacteria (e.g. Beggiatoa and Thioploca) were highly variable throughout the OMZ yet clear trends were discernible. On the shelf and upper slope (80-260 m water depth) where extensive areas of bacterial mats were present, DNRA dominated total N turnover (⩽2.9 mmol N m -2 d -1) and accounted for ⩾65% of NO 3- + NO 2- uptake by the sediments from the bottom water. Nonetheless, these sediments did not represent a major sink for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NO 3- + NO 2- + NH 4+) since DNRA reduces NO 3- and, potentially NO 2-, to NH 4+. Consequently, the shelf and upper slope sediments were recycling sites for DIN due to relatively low rates of denitrification and high rates of ammonium release from DNRA and ammonification of organic matter. This finding contrasts with the current opinion that sediments underlying OMZs are a strong sink for DIN. Only at greater water depths (300-1000 m) did the sediments become a net sink for DIN. Here, denitrification was the major process (⩽2 mmol N m -2 d -1) and removed 55-73% of NO 3- and NO 2- taken up by the sediments, with DNRA and anammox accounting for the remaining fraction. Anammox was of minor importance on the shelf and upper slope yet contributed up to 62% to total N 2 production at the 1000 m station. The results indicate that the partitioning of oxidized N (NO 3-, NO 2-) into DNRA or denitrification is a key factor determining the role of marine sediments as DIN

  7. A simple model for simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garibay-Orijel, C.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a useful and simple model for studies of simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification (M-D) systems. One equation predicts an inverse relationship between the percentage of electron donor channeled into dissimilatory denitrification and the loading ratio X given by grams degradable COD per...... gram nitrate-N in the influent. It allows the determination of the extent of use of organic matter by the denitrification and the methanogenic pathways for a given concentration of nitrate salts in the influent. This equation was validated with experimental data from the literature and good agreement...

  8. Denitrification in the water column of the central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; De Brabandere, Loreto; Hall, Per

    2013-01-01

    Removal of fixed nitrogen in the water column of the eastern Gotland Basin, central Baltic Sea, was studied during two cruises in September 2008 and August 2010. The water column was stratified with anoxic sulfidic bottom water meeting oxic nitrate containing water at the oxic–anoxic interface...... was in some situations driven by organic matter alone. Nitrous oxide (N2O) became an increasingly important product of denitrification with increasing sulfide concentration and was >80% of the total N gas formation at 10 μM sulfide. The potential rates of denitrification measured in incubations at elevated......ML source and once the O2 has been depleted denitrification will follow resulting in enormous rates per unit area. Even with an active denitrification layer of 3–6 m thickness the pelagic denitrification per unit area clearly exceeded sediment denitrification rates elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. When...

  9. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute

    2006-01-01

    nitrate conversion from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate-reduction to ammonium (DNRA). In situ microsensor profiling in stagnant sludge revealed the typical stratification of nitrate reduction on top of sulfate reduction. Increasing the bulk nitrate concentration lead to a downward shift....... The interaction of these processes is less understood. Our aim was to investigate the functional interaction of nitrate reduction, denitrification and sulfate reduction in an anaerobic marine sludge. We hypothesize that sulfide (from sulfate reduction) (i) causes incomplete denitrification, and (ii) directs...... of the nitrate-sulfide transition zone; within this zone, N2O accumulated to 260 µM. Batch incubations of sludge with sulfide and 15N-nitrate showed the formation of ammonium at the expense of N2 with increasing sulfide concentrations; an indication of the predicted shift from denitrification to DNRA. However...

  10. Nitrification and denitrification in pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Puji Pujihastuti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More of waste than pond aquacultutre system produced, will increase sedimentation in the bottom.  Ammonium and nitrite compounds are other forms of inorganic nitrogen in the pond. Nitrogen anorganic consist of ammonia, ammonium, nitrit, nitrat and nitrogen. Degradation of process metabolic biota culture waste can biologically be nitrat compound one of the forms that are not toxic in the nitrification process.  Five process of nitrogen biogeochemical cycle in the container cultivation is the amonification, nitrification, nitrogen assimilation, denitrification and nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen is the one of the compound in the overlay/ top stratification sediment.  Improvement of speed degradation will be success if the pond bottom on aerobic condition. Survival rate of tiger shrimp in the laboratory scale can be increase by administration of nitrification and denitrification bacteria should not just in the water kolom of pond engineering but also at the bottom pond layer at the preparation step.  Depht of the sediment 15 cm in day zero, intensive pond have been produced of nitrit and ammonium with the producing bacteria.  Application of nitrification and denitrification bacteria in the sediment and water coloum can be performed as the measurenment and evaluation nitrit, nitrat and ammonium abudance. Key words:  ponds, nitrogen inorganic, nitrification, denitrification   ABSTRAK Semakin banyak limbah kegiatan yang dihasilkan dalam sistem budidaya tambak, akan meningkatkan sedimentasi dalam dasar tambak.  Senyawa amonium dan nitrit merupakan bentuk lain dari nitrogen anorganik dalam tambak. Nitrogen anorganik terdiri terdiri dari amonia (NH3-, amonium (NH4+, nitrit (NO2-, dan nitrogen (N2. Secara biologis, proses perombakan sisa metabolisme biota budidaya dapat menjadi nitrat (NO3, suatu bentuk yang tidak berbahaya dalam proses nitrifikasi.  Lima proses siklus biogeokimia nitrogen yang terjadi di wadah budidaya adalah amonifikasi

  11. Denitrification in the water column of the central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; De Brabandere, Loreto; Hall, Per O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of fixed nitrogen in the water column of the eastern Gotland Basin, central Baltic Sea, was studied during two cruises in September 2008 and August 2010. The water column was stratified with anoxic sulfidic bottom water meeting oxic nitrate containing water at the oxic–anoxic interface......3 or sulfide concentrations were converted to in situ rates using the measured water column concentrations of NO3 and sulfide and the actual measured relations between NO3 and sulfide concentrations and enitrification rates. In situ denitrification ranged from 0.24 to 15.9 nM N2 h1. Assuming...... area. Even with an active denitrification layer of 3–6 m thickness the pelagic denitrification per unit area clearly exceeded sediment denitrification rates elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. When extrapolated to the entire Baltic Proper (BP) denitrification in the water column was in the range of 132...

  12. Plant effects on soil denitrification - a review of potential mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malique, Francois; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Dannenmann, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process occurring in soils, both producing and consuming the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (NO), competing for nitrate with plants and hydrological leaching pathways, removing nutrients and reactive nitrogen from the biosphere, and closing the global nitrogen cycle. Despite its obvious importance, denitrification remained among the least well quantified biogeochemical processes in soils. This is due to enormous methodological difficulties involved in the direct quantification of soil microbial denitrification rates (mainly with regard to the terminal product N2) and the denitrification nitrogen gas product ratios (NO:N2O:N2), Plants may affect denitrification through a myriad of mechanisms such as e.g., competition for nitrate and water, through oxygen consumption, by regulating litter quality and changing soil pH, and via the exudation of labile carbon or secondary plant compounds involved in shaping the rhizospheric microbial community. However, plant effects on denitrification so far hardly were quantified so that the actual extent of plant control on denitrification is largely unknown. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms how plants can affect denitrification rates and N gas product ratios in soils at temporal scales from hours to days and years. We review earlier research to quantify plant effects on denitrification as well as critically discuss the limited methods currently available to quantify plant-soil-denitrifier interactions. Finally, we provide pointers to use plants as tools to manage denitrification, e.g. to improve N use efficiency in agricultural ecosystems and to minimize soil nitrous oxide emissions.

  13. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Arat

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2, nitric oxide (NO and nitrous oxide (N2O. This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2, nitrate (NO3, and phosphate (PO4 suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  14. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  15. Correlations between in situ denitrification activity and nir-gene abundances in pristine and impacted prairie streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, David W.; Trippett, Clare; Dodds, Walter K.; O'Brien, Jonathan M.; Banner, Eric B.K.; Head, Ian M.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Yang, Richard K.; Knapp, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Denitrification is a process that reduces nitrogen levels in headwaters and other streams. We compared nirS and nirK abundances with the absolute rate of denitrification, the longitudinal coefficient of denitrification (i.e., K den , which represents optimal denitrification rates at given environmental conditions), and water quality in seven prairie streams to determine if nir-gene abundances explain denitrification activity. Previous work showed that absolute rates of denitrification correlate with nitrate levels; however, no correlation has been found for denitrification efficiency, which we hypothesise might be related to gene abundances. Water-column nitrate and soluble-reactive phosphorus levels significantly correlated with absolute rates of denitrification, but nir-gene abundances did not. However, nirS and nirK abundances significantly correlated with K den , as well as phosphorus, although no correlation was found between K den and nitrate. These data confirm that absolute denitrification rates are controlled by nitrate load, but intrinsic denitrification efficiency is linked to nirS and nirK gene abundances. - Denitrification efficiency best correlated to nirS and nirK gene abundances.

  16. Warming Can Boost Denitrification Disproportionately Due to Altered Oxygen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraart, Annelies J.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Scheffer, Marten

    2011-01-01

    Background Global warming and the alteration of the global nitrogen cycle are major anthropogenic threats to the environment. Denitrification, the biological conversion of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen, removes a substantial fraction of the nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems, and can therefore help to reduce eutrophication effects. However, potential responses of denitrification to warming are poorly understood. Although several studies have reported increased denitrification rates with rising temperature, the impact of temperature on denitrification seems to vary widely between systems. Methodology/Principal Findings We explored the effects of warming on denitrification rates using microcosm experiments, field measurements and a simple model approach. Our results suggest that a three degree temperature rise will double denitrification rates. By performing experiments at fixed oxygen concentrations as well as with oxygen concentrations varying freely with temperature, we demonstrate that this strong temperature dependence of denitrification can be explained by a systematic decrease of oxygen concentrations with rising temperature. Warming decreases oxygen concentrations due to reduced solubility, and more importantly, because respiration rates rise more steeply with temperature than photosynthesis. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that denitrification rates in aquatic ecosystems are strongly temperature dependent, and that this is amplified by the temperature dependencies of photosynthesis and respiration. Our results illustrate the broader phenomenon that coupling of temperature dependent reactions may in some situations strongly alter overall effects of temperature on ecological processes. PMID:21483809

  17. Warming can boost denitrification disproportionately due to altered oxygen dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies J Veraart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Global warming and the alteration of the global nitrogen cycle are major anthropogenic threats to the environment. Denitrification, the biological conversion of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen, removes a substantial fraction of the nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems, and can therefore help to reduce eutrophication effects. However, potential responses of denitrification to warming are poorly understood. Although several studies have reported increased denitrification rates with rising temperature, the impact of temperature on denitrification seems to vary widely between systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We explored the effects of warming on denitrification rates using microcosm experiments, field measurements and a simple model approach. Our results suggest that a three degree temperature rise will double denitrification rates. By performing experiments at fixed oxygen concentrations as well as with oxygen concentrations varying freely with temperature, we demonstrate that this strong temperature dependence of denitrification can be explained by a systematic decrease of oxygen concentrations with rising temperature. Warming decreases oxygen concentrations due to reduced solubility, and more importantly, because respiration rates rise more steeply with temperature than photosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that denitrification rates in aquatic ecosystems are strongly temperature dependent, and that this is amplified by the temperature dependencies of photosynthesis and respiration. Our results illustrate the broader phenomenon that coupling of temperature dependent reactions may in some situations strongly alter overall effects of temperature on ecological processes.

  18. Temperature coefficient for modeling denitrification in surface water sediments using the mass transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.W. Appelboom; G.M. Chescheir; F. Birgand; R.W. Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; D. Amatya

    2010-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers. Modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks requires quantifying the denitrification within the sediments in canals and streams. In a previous study, several of the authors developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment denitrification....

  19. Correlations between in situ denitrification activity and nir-gene abundances in pristine and impacted prairie streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David W.; Trippett, Clare; Dodds, Walter K.; O’Brien, Jonathan M.; Banner, Eric B.K.; Head, Ian M.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Yang, Richard K.; Knapp, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Denitrification is a process that reduces nitrogen levels in headwaters and other streams. We compared nirS and nirK abundances with the absolute rate of denitrification, the longitudinal coefficient of denitrification (i.e., Kden, which represents optimal denitrification rates at given environmental conditions), and water quality in seven prairie streams to determine if nir-gene abundances explain denitrification activity. Previous work showed that absolute rates of denitrification correlate with nitrate levels; however, no correlation has been found for denitrification efficiency, which we hypothesise might be related to gene abundances. Water-column nitrate and soluble-reactive phosphorus levels significantly correlated with absolute rates of denitrification, but nir-gene abundances did not. However, nirS and nirK abundances significantly correlated with Kden, as well as phosphorus, although no correlation was found between Kden and nitrate. These data confirm that absolute denitrification rates are controlled by nitrate load, but intrinsic denitrification efficiency is linked to nirS and nirK gene abundances. PMID:20724046

  20. Linking denitrification and infiltration rates during managed groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Calla M; Fisher, Andrew T; Racz, Andrew J; Lockwood, Brian S; Huertos, Marc Los

    2011-11-15

    We quantify relations between rates of in situ denitrification and saturated infiltration through shallow, sandy soils during managed groundwater recharge. We used thermal methods to determine time series of point-specific flow rates, and chemical and isotopic methods to assess denitrification progress. Zero order denitrification rates between 3 and 300 μmol L(-1) d(-1) were measured during infiltration. Denitrification was not detected at times and locations where the infiltration rate exceeded a threshold of 0.7 ± 0.2 m d(-1). Pore water profiles of oxygen and nitrate concentration indicated a deepening of the redoxocline at high flow rates, which reduced the thickness of the zone favorable for denitrification. Denitrification rates were positively correlated with infiltration rates below the infiltration threshold, suggesting that for a given set of sediment characteristics, there is an optimal infiltration rate for achieving maximum nitrate load reduction and improvements to water supply during managed groundwater recharge. The extent to which results from this study may be extended to other managed and natural hydrologic settings remains to be determined, but the approach taken in this study should be broadly applicable, and provides a quantitative link between shallow hydrologic and biogeochemical processes.

  1. Dynamic interplay between microbial denitrification and antibiotic resistance under enhanced anoxic denitrification condition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Liu, Kuan; Schwab, Arthur P; Liu, Manqiang; Jiao, Jiaguo; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Tian, Da; Wu, Jun; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Mixed contamination of nitrate and antibiotics/antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) is an emerging environmental risk to farmland soil. This is the first study to explore the role of excessive anthropogenic nitrate input in the anoxic dissipation of soil antibiotic/ARGs. During the initial 10 days of incubation, the presence of soil antibiotics significantly inhibited NO 3 - dissipation, N 2 O production rate, and denitrifying genes (DNGs) abundance in soil (p antibiotic contents and ARG abundance. Significantly negative correlations were detected between DNGs and ARGs, suggesting that the higher the DNG activity, the more dramatic is the denitrification and the greater are the antibiotic dissipation and ARG abundance. This study provides crucial knowledge for understanding the mutual interaction between soil DNGs and ARGs in the enhanced anoxic denitrification condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany, a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment–water interface.

  3. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähnke, K.; Thamdrup, B.

    2013-05-01

    The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N) to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany), a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment-water interface.

  4. The efficiency of a membrane bioreactor in drinking water denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovič Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The membrane bioreactor (MBR system was investigated regarding its nitrate removal capacity from drinking water. The performance of a pilot-scale MBR was tested, depending on the operational parameters, using sucrose as a carbon source. Drinking water from the source was introduced into the reactor in order to study the influence of flow-rate on the nitrate removal and denitrification efficiency of drinking water. The content of the nitrate was around 70 mg/L and the C/N ratio was 3:1. Nitrate removal efficiencies above 90% were obtained by flow-rates lower than 4.8 L/h. The specific denitrification rates varied between 0.02 and 0.16 g/L NO3/ (g/L MLSS•d. The efficiencies and nitrate removal were noticeably affected by the flow-rate and hydraulic retention times. At the maximum flow-rate of 10.2 L/h still 68% of the nitrate had been removed, whilst the highest specific denitrification rate was achieved at 0.2738 g/L NO3/ (g/L MLSS•d. The maximum reactor removal capacity was calculated at 8.75 g NO3/m3•h.

  5. Labile dissolved organic carbon supply limits hyporheic denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay P. Zarnetske; Roy Haggerty; Steven M. Wondzell; Michelle A. Baker

    2012-01-01

    We used an in situ steady state 15N-labeled nitrate and acetate well-to-wells injection experiment to determine how the availability of labile dissolved organic carbon as acetate influences microbial denitrification in the hyporheic zone of an upland (third-order) agricultural stream.

  6. Warming can boost denitrification disproportionately due to altered oxygen dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraart, A.J.; Klein, de J.J.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Global warming and the alteration of the global nitrogen cycle are major anthropogenic threats to the environment. Denitrification, the biological conversion of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen, removes a substantial fraction of the nitrogen from aquatic ecosystems, and can therefore help to

  7. Benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    sensitive to the changes in ambient environment. The response of benthic foraminifera to the changes in the ambient environment is incorporated in their tests, which have high preservation potential. Therefore, the characteristics of the benthic...

  8. Effect of Chlorella sorokiniana on the biological denitrification of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovič, Aleksandra; Simonič, Marjana

    2015-04-01

    The influence of Chlorella sorokiniana on drinking water's biological denitrification was studied at two different initial nitrate concentrations, 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively. Sucrose and grape juice were used as carbon sources. The experiments showed that the denitrification process in the presence of algae was, even at low concentrations, i.e. 50 mg/L of nitrate, slower than without them, but yet still more than 95% of nitrate was removed in 24 h. It was also discovered that, with the addition of ammonium and urea, the urea interfered much more with the denitrification process, as less than 50% of the initial nitrate was removed. However, algae did not contribute to the nitrate and ammonium removals, as the final concentrations of both in the presence of algae were higher by approx 5%. At 100 mg/L of initial nitrate, the denitrification kinetics in the presence of algae was apparently slower regarding those experiments at lower levels of nitrate and only 65-70% of nitrate was removed over 24 h. Using grape juice instead of sucrose improved the nitrate removal slightly.

  9. Denitrification as an adaptive trait in soil and groundwater bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergwall, C.

    1997-09-01

    The focus of this thesis is on selection and adaptation processes in bacteria with emphasis on denitrifying bacteria in groundwater. Other nitrogen transformation processes such as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (nitrate ammonification) and nitrification of forest soil bacteria are briefly discussed. Microcosms with sterile sediment and groundwater were inoculated with single denitrifying strains isolated from three groundwater aquifers, two of which are agricultural aquifers (in situ NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N was 24.1 and 35.2 mg1{sup -1}) and the third which is a pristine lake water infiltration aquifer (in situ NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N was 6.3 mg1{sup -1}). The average denitrification activity for strains from the nitrate contaminated sites were twice as high as the activity of the strains from the pristine site. Denitrification were carbon limited and glucose amendment increased the denitrification activity about a 2-fold for all strains. The strain specific differences in denitrification rates increased to a 2.5-fold after carbon addition indicating that the differences in reduction rates cannot be explained by different carbon utilisation rates but rather reflect innate differences in the reductases of the strains. A preliminary identification of the molecular target for adaptation was performed with artificial electron donors and electron acceptors for all enzymatic steps in the denitrification pathway. Nitrous oxide reductase activity was significantly higher in denitrifiers from the nitrate contaminated sites. This suggests that nos genes may be the molecular target, possibly by mutation or gene duplication for adaptation to high nitrate concentrations. Two anaerobic denitrifiers from each of the contaminated sites were capable of aerobic denitrification indicating that high nitrate concentrations may select for strains that denitrifies in the presence of both oxygen and nitrate. Microcosm experiments with fertilized coniferous forest soil showed that the

  10. Behavior of solid carbon sources for biological denitrification in groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianmei; Feng, Chuanping; Hong, Siqi; Hao, Huiling; Yang, Yingnan

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the behavior of wheat straw, sawdust and biodegradable plastic (BP) as potential carbon sources for denitrification in groundwater remediation. The results showed that a greater amount of nitrogen compounds were released from wheat straw and sawdust than from BP in leaching experiments. In batch experiments, BP showed higher nitrate removal efficiency and longer service life than wheat straw and sawdust, which illustrated that BP is the most appropriate carbon source for stimulation of denitrification activity. In column experiments, BP was able to support complete denitrification at influent nitrate concentrations of 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 mg NO(3)(-)-N/L, showing corresponding denitrification rates of 0.12, 0.14, 0.17, 0.19, and 0.22 mg NO(3)(-)-N.L(-1).d(-1).g(-1), respectively. These findings indicate that BP is applicable for use as a carbon source for nitrate-polluted groundwater remediation.

  11. Enhanced biological denitrification in the cyclic rotating bed reactor with catechol as carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Jafari, Seyed Javad; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    The performance of CRBR in denitrification with catechol carbon source is presented. The influence of inlet nitrate concentration, hydraulic retention time (HRT), media filling ratio and rotational speed of media on the performance of CRBR was investigated. The bioreactor could denitrify over 95% of the nitrate at an inlet concentration up to 1000 mg NO3(-)/L and a short HRT as low as 18 h. The optimum media filling ratio at which the maximum denitrification was achieved in the CRBR was 30% and the contribution of media at this condition was around 36%. The optimum ratio of media filling at which the maximum denitrification was 20 rpm and the contribution of rotational speed under this condition was around 17%. According to the findings, the CRBR is a high rate bioreactor and thus serves as an appropriate technology for denitrification of wastewaters containing a high concentration of nitrate and toxic organic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Denitrification 'Woodchip' Bioreactors for Productive and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, L. E.; Summerfelt, S.; Sharrer, K.; Lepine, C.; Helmers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Growing alarm about negative cascading effects of reactive nitrogen in the environment has led to multifaceted efforts to address elevated nitrate-nitrogen levels in water bodies worldwide. The best way to mitigate N-related impacts, such as hypoxic zones and human health concerns, is to convert nitrate to stable, non-reactive dinitrogen gas through the natural process of denitrification. This means denitrification technologies need to be one of our major strategies for tackling the grand challenge of managing human-induced changes to our global nitrogen cycle. While denitrification technologies have historically been focused on wastewater treatment, there is great interest in new lower-tech options for treating effluent and drainage water from one of our largest reactive nitrogen emitters -- agriculture. Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors are able to enhance this natural N-conversion via addition of a solid carbon source (e.g., woodchips) and through designs that facilitate development of anoxic conditions required for denitrification. Wood-based denitrification technologies such as woodchip bioreactors and 'sawdust' walls for groundwater have been shown to be effective at reducing nitrate loads in agricultural settings around the world. Designing these systems to be low-maintenance and to avoid removing land from agricultural production has been a primary focus of this "farmer-friendly" technology. This presentation provides a background on woodchip bioreactors including design considerations, N-removal performance, and current research worldwide. Woodchip bioreactors for the agricultural sector are an accessible new option to address society's interest in improving water quality while simultaneously allowing highly productive agricultural systems to continue to provide food in the face of increasing demand, changing global diets, and fluctuating weather.

  13. The effect of metronidazole on biological denitrification of Pesudomonas stutzeri in wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hossein Masoumbeigi

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: With ergard to strong ability of Pseudomonus stutzeri to remove nitrate high concentrations and high resistance of this bacterium against metrinidazole, biological denitrification process can have a high potential to be used for removal of nitrates high concentrations from industrial wastewater, particularly pharmaceutical industries wastewater.

  14. Modeling nitrogen removal for a denitrification biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Guillaume; Bernier, Jean; Rocher, Vincent; Lessard, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a major greenhouse gas, heavily contributing to global warming. N2O is emitted from various sources such as wastewater treatment plants, during the nitrification and denitrification steps. ASM models, which are commonly used in wastewater treatment, usually consider denitrification as a one-step process (NO3- directly reduced to N2) and are as such unable to provide values for intermediate products of the reaction like N2O. In this study, a slightly modified ASM1 model was implemented in the GPS-X software to simulate the concentration of such intermediate products (NO2-, NO and N2O) and to estimate the amounts of gaseous N2O emitted by the denitrification stage (12 biofilters) of the Seine-Centre WWTP (SIAAP, Paris). Simulations running on a 1-year period have shown good agreements with measured effluent data for nitrate and nitrite. The calculated mean value for emitted N2O is 4.95 kgN-N2O/day, which stands in the typical range of estimated experimental values of 4-31 kgN-N2O/day. Nitrous oxide emissions are usually not measured on WWTPs and so, as obtained results show, there is a certain potential for using models that quantify those emissions using traditionally measured influent data.

  15. Comparing the environmental impact of a nitrifiying biotrickling filter with or without denitrification for ammonia abatement at animal houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.W.; Melse, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to assess the environmental impact of a biotrickling filter with nitrification only and with subsequent denitrification. Life cycle assessment was applied to assess greenhouse gases, nitrate, ammonia and fossil fuel depletion. The biotrickling filter with nitrification and

  16. The role of benthic macrofauna on nitrogen cycling in eutrophic lake sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis concerns the role of sediment-living macrobenthos in the cycling of nitrogen species and nitrogen transformation in eutrophic freshwater sediments. In my thesis I have, employing {sup 15}N-isotope techniques in laboratory experiments, shown the importance of infaunal chironomid larvae and oligochaetes on denitrification in eutrophic lake sediments. Investigated benthic organisms not only expand the sediment surface with their permanent or non-permanent burrow constructions, they also transport water through the burrows continuously. This behaviour of intermittent water-pumping activity, provides the burrows with oxygen, and in addition, mediates the supply of nitrate to denitrifying zones. The highly dynamic oxygen climate within and narrow oxic zones around burrows, due to their radial geometry, provides a very short diffusion path for nitrate into surrounding anoxic zones. In my studies rates of denitrification were enhanced c. 3 to 6-fold by the influence of chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) and c. 2-fold by the influence of oligochaetes at comparable biomass. The difference in degree of stimulation is explained by species-specific habitat exploitation which could also be observed between different tube-dwelling species of chironomids. Besides chironomid biomass, the degree of enhancement of denitrification by chironomids was dependent on nitrate concentration in the overlying water, and water temperature. Nitrification was also seen to be stimulated by the infaunal macrobenthos but to a lesser degree than denitrification. It is suggested that bioturbated eutrophic sediment, under predominantly oxic bottom water conditions may act more pronouncedly as a sink for inorganic nitrogen relative to non-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbated sediment above all, may be an important factor contributing to lowered transport of nitrogen to the coast. In order to sustain high nitrogen removal capacity in wetlands, ponds and lakes, it is further suggested

  17. Potential rates and environmental controls of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in a temperate urbanized estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Boaventura, Rui A R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2010-12-01

    Denitrification may play a major role in inorganic nitrogen removal from estuarine ecosystems, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate and organic matter loads. The Douro estuary (NW Portugal) suffers from both problems: freshwater input of nitrate and organic load from untreated wastewater discharges. To assess how these factors might control sediment denitrification, a 12-month survey was designed. Denitrification potential and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production were measured at different locations using the slurry acetylene blockage technique. Denitrification rate ranged from 0.4 to 38 nmol N g⁻¹ h⁻¹, increasing towards the river mouth following an urban pollution gradient. N(2)O production, a powerful greenhouse gas implicated on the destruction of the ozone layer, was significantly related with sediment organic matter and accounted for 0.5-47% of the N gases produced. Additional enrichment experiments were consistent with the results found in the environment, showing that sediments from the upper less urban stretch of the estuary, mostly sandy, respond positively to carbon and, inversely, in organic rich sediments from the lower estuary, the denitrification potential was limited by nitrate availability. The obtained results confirmed denitrification as an important process for the removal of nitrate in estuaries. The presence of wastewater discharges appears to stimulate nitrogen removal but also the production of N(2)O, a powerful greenhouse gas, exacerbating the N(2)O:N(2) ratio and thus should be controlled. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenazines regulate Nap-dependent denitrification inPseudomonas aeruginosabiofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Sekedat, Matthew D; Cornell, William Cole; Silva, Gustavo M; Okegbe, Chinweike; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Vogel, Christine; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2018-02-20

    Microbes in biofilms face the challenge of substrate limitation. In particular, cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms growing in the laboratory or during host colonization often become limited for oxygen. Previously we found that phenazines, antibiotics produced by P. aeruginosa , balance the intracellular redox state for cells in biofilms. Here, we show that genes involved in denitrification are induced in phenazine-null (Δ phz ) mutant biofilms grown under an aerobic atmosphere, even in the absence of nitrate. This finding suggests that resident cells employ a bet-hedging strategy to anticipate the potential availability of nitrate and counterbalance their highly reduced redox state. Consistent with our previous characterization of aerobically-grown colonies supplemented with nitrate, we find that the pathway that is induced in Δ phz colonies combines the nitrate reductase activity of the periplasmic enzyme Nap with downstream reduction of nitrite to nitrogen gas catalyzed by the enzymes Nir, Nor, and Nos. This regulatory relationship differs from the denitrification pathway that functions under anaerobic growth with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor, which depends on the membrane-associated nitrate reductase Nar. We identify sequences in the promoter regions of the nap and nir operons that are required for the effects of phenazines on expression. We also show that specific phenazines have differential effects on nap gene expression. Finally, we provide evidence that individual steps of the denitrification pathway are catalyzed at different depths within aerobically grown biofilms, suggesting metabolic cross-feeding between community subpopulations. IMPORTANCE An understanding of the unique physiology of cells in biofilms is critical to our ability to treat fungal and bacterial infections. Colony biofilms of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa , grown under an aerobic atmosphere but without nitrate, express a denitrification pathway

  19. Simultaneous denitrification and anaerobic digestion in GRAnular Bed Baffled Reactor (GRABBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, M.I.; Akunna, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    This study elucidates the characteristics of compartmentalised anaerobic system seeded with UASB granules, called GRAanular Bed Baffled Reactor (GRABBR), for combined denitrification and anaerobic digestion processes. The reactor was used for the treatment of glucose enriched synthetic wastewater with various nitrate concentrations. The study was carried out with a 10 litre working volume GRABBR divided into 5 equal compartments operating at organic loading rate (OLR) of 20 kg COD/m 3 .d with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours. At these conditions, phase separation (between acidogenesis and methanogenesis) was created in the system and then the effect of varying nitrate concentrations (50-200 mg/l NO 3 -N) in the acidogenic zone (i.e. first compartment) was studied. Due to its unique compartmentalised design, denitrification was the major pathway for nitrate reduction with no noticeable dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). More than 84% of all added nitrates were removed in the acidogenic zone, showing that acidogens possess high denitrifying capabilities. The denitrification rate increased with increase in nitrate concentration, with maximum value estimated as 175 mg NO 3 -N/l.h at influent nitrate concentration of 200 mg/l NO 3 -N in the acidogenic zone. Although nitrate addition resulted in lower methane production, COD removal efficiencies improved by up to 8% when compared with the reactor performance before nitrate addition. Furthermore, the alkalinity produced during denitrification improved the stability of the system by controlling the decrease in pH resulting from acidogenesis. The system encouraged simultaneous denitrification and anaerobic digestion in a single unit by accommodating denitrifiers in the early compartments and allowing methanogenesis to flourish in the downstream compartments of the system, thus minimising inhibition to methane producing bacteria by nitrates. (author)

  20. Relationships Between Denitrifier Abundance, Denitrifier Diversity and Denitrification in Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, L. M.; Childs, C.; MacAuley, S.

    2002-12-01

    The largest zone of anthropogenic bottom water hypoxia in the Western Hemisphere occurs seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This hypoxic zone reaches its greatest extent in the summer months and is a consequence of seasonal stratification of the water column combined with the decomposition of organic matter derived from accelerated rates of primary production. The enhanced primary production is driven by inorganic nitrogen input from the Mississippi River and these conditions would seem ideal for supporting high levels of denitrification. Yet sediment denitrification exhibited a wide range, even at the height of the seasonal hypoxia. Therefore, we compared benthic denitrifier abundances and denitrifier diversity at several stations over two seasons exhibiting extremes in denitrification to evaluate the relationship between abundances, diversity and denitrification levels. Sediment denitrification ranged from 20 to 100 umol m-2 h-1, with rates in July, 2000 approximately half that observed in July, 2001. The highest rates were generally observed at stations with bottom water DO concentrations between 1 and 3 mg l-1. Relative denitrifier abundances, using nirS and nirK as proxies for denitrifiers, suggested a direct relationship between abundances and denitrification while denitrifier diversity, measured by T-RFLPs of nirS and nirK, suggested an inverse relationship between diversity and denitrification. These results suggest that several factors are important in understanding what controls denitrification in Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone sediments.

  1. Inorganic nitrogen and nitrate reduction in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Qasim, S.Z.

    the secondary nitrite maximum seem to be associated with Persian Gulf water. It is suggested that these originate as a result of biological reduction of nitrate (denitrification) due to the prevailing reducing conditions associated with a pronounced depletion...

  2. Marine denitrification rates determined from a global 3-D inverse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. DeVries

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A major impediment to understanding long-term changes in the marine nitrogen (N cycle is the persistent uncertainty about the rates, distribution, and sensitivity of its largest fluxes in the modern ocean. We use a global ocean circulation model to obtain the first 3-D estimate of marine denitrification rates that is maximally consistent with available observations of nitrate deficits and the nitrogen isotopic ratio of oceanic nitrate. We find a global rate of marine denitrification in suboxic waters and sediments of 120–240 Tg N yr−1, which is lower than many other recent estimates. The difference stems from the ability to represent the 3-D spatial structure of suboxic zones, where denitrification rates of 50–77 Tg N yr−1 result in up to 50% depletion of nitrate. This depletion reduces the effect of local isotopic enrichment on the rest of the ocean, allowing the N isotope ratio of oceanic nitrate to be achieved with a sedimentary denitrification rate about 1.3–2.3 times that of suboxic zones. This balance of N losses between sediments and suboxic zones is shown to obey a simple relationship between isotope fractionation and the degree of nitrate consumption in the core of the suboxic zones. The global denitrification rates derived here suggest that the marine nitrogen budget is likely close to balanced.

  3. Influence of Trypaea australiensis population density on benthic metabolism and nitrogen dynamics in sandy estuarine sediment: A mesocosm simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Mark A.; Welsh, David T.; Dunn, Ryan J. K.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    Laboratory mesocosm incubations were undertaken to investigate the influence of natural densities of the thalassinidean shrimp, Trypaea australiensis (marine yabby) on sediment oxygen demand (SOD), inorganic nutrient fluxes, and the N-cycle processes of nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Mesocosms (~ 0.1 m 2 × 55 cm deep) of sieved, natural T. australiensis inhabited sands were continually flushed with fresh seawater and pre-incubated for two weeks prior to being assigned to one of three treatments; control (no additions), low yabby density (40 T. australiensis m - 2 ) or high yabby density (80 T. australiensis m - 2 ). Thereafter, SOD and sediment-water column inorganic nutrient fluxes were determined periodically over a 38 day period. On the final day rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were also determined using the 15N-isotope pairing technique. Yabbies consistently and significantly ( p nitrification rates by 31 and 46% in the low and high density treatments. However, somewhat surprisingly T. australiensis population density had no effect on rates of denitrification and DNRA despite the higher rates of nitrification and higher equilibrium water column nitrate concentration. Indeed, nitrate reduction processes became an increasingly unimportant element with increasing yabby density with for example, N 2 generated by coupled nitrification-denitrification representing 11.5, 5.2 and 2.8% of the total inorganic-N recycled to the water column in the control, low density and high density yabby treatments, respectively. Overall, the major influence of T. australiensis in the studied low organic matter content, sandy sediments was to enhance coupling between the benthic and pelagic systems through increased rates of inorganic nitrogen regeneration in the sediment and enhanced export of this nitrogen to the water column. Our results also suggest that the influences of

  4. Electron transfer rates and energy releases during denitrification of municipal wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul-Talib, S.; Ujang, Z; Vollertsen, J.

    2004-01-01

    could be simplified by a two-stage process. In the first stage, nitrate was utilised with significant accumulation of nitrite. In the second stage nitrite was utilised when nitrate depleted. Denitrification rates during the two stages were expressed in terms of electron equivalents (e-eq.) in order...... to compare the process when differennt electron acceptors namlely, nitrate and nitrite were utilised. The energy release rates during the two stages were calculated and compared....

  5. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion exchange. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes which can be effectively used for denitrifying ground water as well as industrial water.

  6. Stochastic Models of Soil Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, T. B.; Robinson, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Soil denitrification is a highly variable process that appears to be lognormally distributed. This variability is manifested by large sample coefficients of variation for replicate estimates of soil core denitrification rates. Deterministic models for soil denitrification have been proposed in the past, but none of these models predicts the approximate lognormality exhibited by natural denitrification rate estimates. In this study, probabilistic (stochastic) models were developed to understand how positively skewed distributions for field denitrification rate estimates result from the combined influences of variables known to affect denitrification. Three stochastic models were developed to describe the distribution of measured soil core denitrification rates. The driving variables used for all the models were denitrification enzyme activity and CO2 production rates. The three models were distinguished by the functional relationships combining these driving variables. The functional relationships used were (i) a second-order model (model 1), (ii) a second-order model with a threshold (model 2), and (iii) a second-order saturation model (model 3). The parameters of the models were estimated by using 12 separate data sets (24 replicates per set), and their abilities to predict denitrification rate distributions were evaluated by using three additional independent data sets of 180 replicates each. Model 2 was the best because it produced distributions of denitrification rate which were not significantly different (P > 0.1) from distributions of measured denitrification rates. The generality of this model is unknown, but it accurately predicted the mean denitrification rates and accounted for the stochastic nature of this variable at the site studied. The approach used in this study may be applicable to other areas of ecological research in which accounting for the high spatial variability of microbiological processes is of interest. PMID:16347838

  7. Effect of settled diatom-aggregates on benthic nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, Ugo; Thamdrup, Bo; Stief, Peter; Glud, Ronnie N

    2018-01-01

    The marine sediment hosts a mosaic of microhabitats. Recently it has been demonstrated that the settlement of phycodetrital aggregates can induce local changes in the benthic O 2 distribution due to confined enrichment of organic material and alteration of the diffusional transport. Here, we show how this microscale O 2 shift substantially affects benthic nitrogen cycling. In sediment incubations, the settlement of diatom-aggregates markedly enhanced benthic O 2 and NO3- consumption and stimulated NO2- and NH4+ production. Oxygen microprofiles revealed the rapid development of anoxic niches within and underneath the aggregates. During 120 h following the settling of the aggregates, denitrification of NO3- from the overlying water increased from 13.5 μmol m -2 h -1 to 24.3 μmol m -2 h -1 , as quantified by 15 N enrichment experiment. Simultaneously, N 2 production from coupled nitrification-denitrification decreased from 33.4 μmol m -2 h -1 to 25.9 μmol m -2 h -1 , probably due to temporary inhibition of the benthic nitrifying community. The two effects were of similar magnitude and left the total N 2 production almost unaltered. At the aggregate surface, nitrification was, conversely, very efficient in oxidizing NH4+ liberated by mineralization of the aggregates. The produced NO3- was preferentially released into the overlying water and only a minor fraction contributed to denitrification activity. Overall, our data indicate that the abrupt change in O 2 microdistribution caused by aggregates stimulates denitrification of NO3- from the overlying water, and loosens the coupling between benthic nitrification and denitrification both in time and space. The study contributes to expanding the conceptual and quantitative understanding of how nitrogen cycling is regulated in dynamic benthic environments.

  8. Effect of settled diatom‐aggregates on benthic nitrogen cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Stief, Peter; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The marine sediment hosts a mosaic of microhabitats. Recently it has been demonstrated that the settlement of phycodetrital aggregates can induce local changes in the benthic O2 distribution due to confined enrichment of organic material and alteration of the diffusional transport. Here, we show how this microscale O2 shift substantially affects benthic nitrogen cycling. In sediment incubations, the settlement of diatom‐aggregates markedly enhanced benthic O2 and NO3− consumption and stimulated NO2− and NH4+ production. Oxygen microprofiles revealed the rapid development of anoxic niches within and underneath the aggregates. During 120 h following the settling of the aggregates, denitrification of NO3− from the overlying water increased from 13.5 μmol m−2 h−1 to 24.3 μmol m−2 h−1, as quantified by 15N enrichment experiment. Simultaneously, N2 production from coupled nitrification‐denitrification decreased from 33.4 μmol m−2 h−1 to 25.9 μmol m−2 h−1, probably due to temporary inhibition of the benthic nitrifying community. The two effects were of similar magnitude and left the total N2 production almost unaltered. At the aggregate surface, nitrification was, conversely, very efficient in oxidizing NH4+ liberated by mineralization of the aggregates. The produced NO3− was preferentially released into the overlying water and only a minor fraction contributed to denitrification activity. Overall, our data indicate that the abrupt change in O2 microdistribution caused by aggregates stimulates denitrification of NO3− from the overlying water, and loosens the coupling between benthic nitrification and denitrification both in time and space. The study contributes to expanding the conceptual and quantitative understanding of how nitrogen cycling is regulated in dynamic benthic environments. PMID:29456269

  9. EFFECTS OF STREAM RESTORATION ON GROUND WATER NITRATE AT MINEBANK RUN, AN URBAN STREAM IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated nitrate levels in streams and ground water pose human and ecological threats. Microbial denitrification removes nitrate from ground water but requires anaerobic (saturated) conditions and adequate supply of dissolved organic carbon from detritus and organic soils. Con...

  10. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to moderate-depth...

  11. A mathematical model of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Oskar

    2018-05-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria use methane as their only source of energy and carbon. They release organic compounds that can serve as electron donors for co-existing denitrifiers. This interaction between methanotrophs and denitrifiers is known to contribute to nitrogen losses in natural environments and has also been exploited by researchers for denitrification of nitrate-contaminated wastewater. The purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model describing aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification in suspended-growth reactors. The model considered the activities of three microbial groups: aerobic methanotrophs, facultative methylotrophs, and facultative heterotrophs. The model was tested against data from the scientific literature and used to explore the effects of the oxygen mass transfer coefficient, the solids retention time, and the fraction methane in the feed gas on nitrate removal. The fraction of methane in the feed gas was found to be critical for the nitrate removal rate. A value of about 15% in air was optimal. A lower methane fraction led to excess oxygen, which was detrimental for denitrification. A higher fraction led to oxygen-limitation, which restricted the growth rate of methanotrophs in the reactor.

  12. Influence of organic carbon sources and isotope exchange processes between water and nitrate on the fractionation of the stable isotopes 15N/14N and 18O/16O in dissolved nitrate during microbial dentrification in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Anja A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are commonly used to determine sources and degradation of nitrate. In this study, nitrite oxidizing bacteria were found to promote an oxygen isotope exchange between water and nitrate under anoxic conditions. Also, different carbon sources were found to influence the enrichment of stable isotopes in nitrate during microbial denitrification. Both results refine the stable isotope model of nitrate in respect to nitrate source determination and microbial nitrate reduction.

  13. Regulation of nitrous oxide emission associated with benthic invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    1. A number of freshwater invertebrate species emit N2O, a greenhouse gas that is produced in their gut by denitrifying bacteria (direct N2O emission). Additionally, benthic invertebrate species may contribute to N2O emission from sediments by stimulating denitrification because of their bioirrig...

  14. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For most of the cultivated crops, nitrate is the major source of nitrogen. Most steps in the nitrate assimilatory pathway are nitrate inducible. In this study, Cucurbita pepo were grown in washed sand per pot at three potassium and sodium nitrate supplies (25, 50 and 100 mM) to investigate the effects of nitrate salts supply on ...

  15. Application of plant carbon source for denitrification by constructed wetland and bioreactor: review of recent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Qianyu; Wang, Haiyan; Chu, Zhaosheng; Ye, Bibi; Li, Chunmei; Hou, Zeying

    2016-05-01

    Water quality standard for nitrate becomes more and more strict, and the plant carbon source is widely used for denitrification by constructed wetland (CW) and bioreactor. However, the nitrate removal efficiency by different types of plant carbon source are not evaluated comprehensively. Denitrification performance of different plant carbon sources, and the influence of dosing method and pretreatment are thoroughly reviewed in this paper, which aims to investigate the accurate utilization of plant carbon source for nitrogen (as nitrate) removal. It is concluded that plant carbon source addition for all types of CWs and bioreactors can improve the nitrate removal efficiency to some extent, and the dosing method of plant carbon source for denitrification should be further studied and optimized in the future. The popular carbon sources for CW and bioreactor denitrification enhancement are woodchip, chopped macrophytes, crop plants, macrophytes litters, etc. The recommended optimum C:N ratios for CW and bioreactor are 4.0:5.0 and 1.8:3.0, respectively. The physical and biological pretreatments are selected to supply organic carbon for long-term denitrification.

  16. Biodiesel waste as source of organic carbon for municipal WWTP denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodík, I; Blstáková, A; Sedlácek, S; Hutnan, M

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments to test biodiesel waste (glycerine--g-phase) as an organic carbon source for the removal of nitrate in a WWTP denitrification process. Investigation of g-phase was first centered on g-phase utilization as an external source for denitrification under laboratory conditions and consequently, after positive results from the laboratory investigation, g-phase was applied in the denitrification process in the WWTP Vrútky (35,000 PE). This WWTP had insufficient nitrogen removal via denitrification. Denitrification was insufficient due to an influent with a low BOD5/N ratio (1.7:1) entering into the activated sludge tank. Laboratory experiments and calculations showed that, to reach Ntotal concentration under 10 mg l(-1) in effluent, a biodiesel waste dose of 500 kg(COD) d(-1) was necessary. Glycerol phase (g-phase) dosing into the denitrification tank increased denitrification efficiency by 2.0 - 5.0 mg(NO)(3)(-N)l(-1) per 100 l of g-phase dose into the denitrification tank.

  17. Denitrification gene expression in clay-soil bacterial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, R.; Landi, S.

    2009-04-01

    Our contribution in the Italian research project SOILSINK was focused on microbial denitrification gene expression in Mediterranean agricultural soils. In ecosystems with high inputs of nitrogen, such as agricultural soils, denitrification causes a net loss of nitrogen since nitrate is reduced to gaseous forms, which are released into the atmosphere. Moreover, incomplete denitrification can lead to emission of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas which contributes to global warming and destruction of ozone layer. A critical role in denitrification is played by microorganisms and the ability to denitrify is widespread among a variety of phylogenetically unrelated organisms. Data reported here are referred to wheat cultivation in a clay-rich soil under different environmental impact management (Agugliano, AN, Italy). We analysed the RNA directly extracted from soil to provide information on in situ activities of specific populations. The expression of genes coding for two nitrate reductases (narG and napA), two nitrite reductases (nirS and nirK), two nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-nested PCR. Only napA, nirS, nirK, qnorB and nosZ were detected and fragments sequenced showed high similarity with the corresponding gene sequences deposited in GenBank database. These results suggest the suitability of the method for the qualitative detection of denitrifying bacteria in environmental samples and they offered us the possibility to perform the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyzes for denitrification genes.. Earlier conclusions showed nirK gene is more widely distributed in soil environment than nirS gene. The results concerning the nosZ expression indicated that microbial activity was clearly present only in no-tilled and no-fertilized soils.

  18. River water infiltration enhances denitrification efficiency in riparian groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth, Nico; Musolff, Andreas; Knöller, Kay; Kaden, Ute S; Keller, Toralf; Werban, Ulrike; Fleckenstein, Jan H

    2018-03-01

    Nitrate contamination in ground- and surface water is a persistent problem in countries with intense agriculture. The transition zone between rivers and their riparian aquifers, where river water and groundwater interact, may play an important role in mediating nitrate exports, as it can facilitate intensive denitrification, which permanently removes nitrate from the aquatic system. However, the in-situ factors controlling riparian denitrification are not fully understood, as they are often strongly linked and their effects superimpose each other. In this study, we present the evaluation of hydrochemical and isotopic data from a 2-year sampling period of river water and groundwater in the riparian zone along a 3rd order river in Central Germany. Based on bi- and multivariate statistics (Spearman's rank correlation and partial least squares regression) we can show, that highest rates for oxygen consumption and denitrification in the riparian aquifer occur where the fraction of infiltrated river water and at the same time groundwater temperature, are high. River discharge and depth to groundwater are additional explanatory variables for those reaction rates, but of minor importance. Our data and analyses suggest that at locations in the riparian aquifer, which show significant river water infiltration, heterotrophic microbial reactions in the riparian zone may be fueled by bioavailable organic carbon derived from the river water. We conclude that interactions between rivers and riparian groundwater are likely to be a key control of nitrate removal and should be considered as a measure to mitigate high nitrate exports from agricultural catchments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism and rate of denitrification in an agricultural watershed: Electron and mass balance along groundwater flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, Anthony J.; Liebscher, Hugh; Cox, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of nitrate removal along and between groundwater flow paths were investigated using a series of well nests screened in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. Intensive agricultural activity in this area has resulted in nitrate concentrations in groundwater often exceeding drinking water standards. Both the extent and rate of denitrification varied depending on the groundwater flow path. While little or no denitrification occurred in much of the upland portions of the aquifer, a gradual redox gradient is observed as aerobic upland groundwater moves deeper in the aquifer. In contrast, a sharp shallow redox gradient is observed adjacent to a third‐order stream as aerobic groundwater enters reduced sediments. An essentially complete loss of nitrate concurrent with increases in excess N2 provide evidence that denitrification occurs as groundwater enters this zone. Electron and mass balance calculations suggest that iron sulfide (e.g., pyrite) oxidation is the primary source of electrons for denitrification. Denitrification rate estimates were based on mass balance calculations using nitrate and excess N2 coupled with groundwater travel times. Travel times were determined using a groundwater flow model and were constrained by chlorofluorocarbon‐based age dates. Denitrification rates were found to vary considerably between the two areas where denitrification occurs. Denitrification rates in the deep, upland portions of the aquifer were found to range from from 1.0 to 2.7 mM of N per year. Potential denitrification rates in groundwater adjacent to the stream may be much faster, with rates up to 140 mM per year based on an in situ experiment conducted in this zone.

  20. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... nitrate salts supply on nitrate accumulation, amino acid biosynthesis, total protein production, nitrate reductase activity and carbohydrate biosynthesis in the roots and leaves of the plants. The results indicate that both sodium and potassium nitrate supplementation had stimulatory effects on all of the.

  1. Diversity of Nitrate-Reducing and Denitrifying Bacteria in a Marine Aquaculture Biofilter and their Response to Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krieger, Bärbel; Schwermer, Carsten U.; Rezakhani, Nastaran

    2006-01-01

    was developed containing a 3-stage biofilter for nitrification, denitrification/anaerobic sludge digestion, and sulfide oxidation. Sulfate reduction in the anaerobic part of the system leads to sulfide concentrations exceeding 5 mM, which may affect nitrate reduction and denitrification. Sulfide can inhibit...... nitrous oxide reductase, trigger a shift from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), or be used as electron donor for nitrate reduction. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate nitrate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria from the biofilter and to investigate...

  2. [Effect of PLA/starch slow-release carbon source on biological denitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dan-Qi; Wang, Juan; Zheng, Tian-Long; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qun-Hui

    2014-06-01

    We used polylactic acid (PLA) and starch to develop a slow-release carbon source and biofilm carrier by blending and fusing techniques for removing nitrate contamination from groundwater, investigated the changes of nitrate, nitrite concentrations and COD in denitrification process supplied by the slow-release carbon source in different mass ratios [PLA/starch (P: S) were 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, 5:5, respectively]. The experimental results demonstrated that the best mass ratio of PLA/starch was 5:5, resulting in a nitrate removal rate of more than 99%. A high denitrification performance was achieved in continuous fixed-bed reactor, the effluent nitrate concentration was below 2 mg x L(-1). These experiments provide scientific basis for the development of environmentally-friendly and controllable slow-release carbon source.

  3. Operation of a fluidized-bed bioreactor for denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancher, C.W.; Taylor, P.A.; Napier, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two denitrification fluidized-bed bioreactors of the same length (i.e., 5 m) but with different inside diameters (i.e., 5 and 10 cm) have been operated on feed ranging in nitrate concentration from 200 to 2000 g/m 3 ; thus far, good agreement has been obtained. Two 10-cm-ID bioreactors operating in series have also been tested; the results are in accordance with predicted results based on the performance of a 5-cm-ID bioreactor. The overall denitrification rate in the dual 10-cm-ID bioreactor system was found to be 23 kg N(NO 3 - )/day-m 3 using feed with a nitrate concentration of 1800 g/m 3 . Data obtained in operating-temperature tests indicate that the maximum denitrification rate is achieved between 22 and 30 0 C. These data will form the basis of the design of our mobile pilot plant which consists of dual 20-cm-ID by 7.3-m-long bioreactors

  4. The fate of nitrate in intertidal permeable sediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah K Marchant

    Full Text Available Coastal zones act as a sink for riverine and atmospheric nitrogen inputs and thereby buffer the open ocean from the effects of anthropogenic activity. Recently, microbial activity in sandy permeable sediments has been identified as a dominant source of N-loss in coastal zones, namely through denitrification. Some of the highest coastal denitrification rates measured so far occur within the intertidal permeable sediments of the eutrophied Wadden Sea. Still, denitrification alone can often account for only half of the substantial nitrate (NO3- consumption. Therefore, to investigate alternative NO3- sinks such as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA, intracellular nitrate storage by eukaryotes and isotope equilibration effects we carried out 15NO3- amendment experiments. By considering all of these sinks in combination, we could quantify the fate of the 15NO3- added to the sediment. Denitrification was the dominant nitrate sink (50-75%, while DNRA, which recycles N to the environment accounted for 10-20% of NO3- consumption. Intriguingly, we also observed that between 20 and 40% of 15NO3- added to the incubations entered an intracellular pool of NO3- and was subsequently respired when nitrate became limiting. Eukaryotes were responsible for a large proportion of intracellular nitrate storage, and it could be shown through inhibition experiments that at least a third of the stored nitrate was subsequently also respired by eukaryotes. The environmental significance of the intracellular nitrate pool was confirmed by in situ measurements which revealed that intracellular storage can accumulate nitrate at concentrations six fold higher than the surrounding porewater. This intracellular pool is so far not considered when modeling N-loss from intertidal permeable sediments; however it can act as a reservoir for nitrate during low tide. Consequently, nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storage can add an additional 20% to

  5. Increased Denitrification Rates Associated with Shifts in Prokaryotic Community Composition Caused by Varying Hydrologic Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Tomasek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While modern developments in agriculture have allowed for increases in crop yields and rapid human population growth, they have also drastically altered biogeochemical cycles, including the biotransformation of nitrogen. Denitrification is a critical process performed by bacteria and fungi that removes nitrate in surface waters, thereby serving as a potential natural remediation strategy. We previously reported that constant inundation resulted in a coupling of denitrification gene abundances with denitrification rates in sediments, but these relationships were not maintained in periodically-inundated or non-inundated environments. In this study, we utilized Illumina next-generation sequencing to further evaluate how the microbial community responds to these hydrologic regimes and how this community is related to denitrification rates at three sites along a creek in an agricultural watershed over 2 years. The hydrologic connectivity of the sampling location had a significantly greater influence on the denitrification rate (P = 0.010, denitrification gene abundances (P < 0.001, and the prokaryotic community (P < 0.001, than did other spatiotemporal factors (e.g., creek sample site or sample month within the same year. However, annual variability among denitrification rates was also observed (P < 0.001. Furthermore, the denitrification rate was significantly positively correlated with water nitrate concentration (Spearman's ρ = 0.56, P < 0.0001, denitrification gene abundances (ρ = 0.23–0.47, P ≤ 0.006, and the abundances of members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Anaerolinaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Acidimicrobineae incertae sedis, Cytophagaceae, and Hyphomicrobiaceae (ρ = 0.17–0.25, P ≤ 0.041. Prokaryotic community composition accounted for the least amount of variation in denitrification rates (22%, while the collective influence of spatiotemporal factors and gene abundances accounted for 37%, with 40% of the variation related to

  6. Effect of dissolved oxygen on biological denitrification using biodegradable plastic as the carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xucai; Zhang, Jianmei

    2018-02-01

    Biological denitrification is currently a common approach to remove nitrate from wastewater. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of dissolved oxygen on denitrification in wastewater treatment using biodegradable plastic as carbon source by designing the aerated, anoxic, and low-oxygen experimental treatment groups. The results showed that the removal rates of nitrate in anoxic and low-oxygen groups were 30.6 g NO3 --Nm-3 d-1 and 30.8 g NO3 --N m-3 d-1 at 83 h, respectively, both of which were higher than that of the aerated group. There was no significant difference between the anoxic and low-oxygen treatment groups for the nitrate removal. Additional, the nitrite accumulated during the experiments, and the nitrite concentrations in anoxic and aerated groups were lower than those in low-oxygen group. No nitrite was detected in all groups at the end of the experiments. These findings indicated that dissolved oxygen has important influence on denitrification, and anoxic and low-oxygen conditions can support completely denitrification when using BP as carbon source in nitrate-polluted wastewater treatment.

  7. End-of-pipe single-sludge denitrification in pilot-scale recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Nielsen, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    A step toward environmental sustainability of recirculat aquaculture systems (RAS) is implementation ofsingle-sludge denitrification, a process eliminating nitrate from the aqueous environment while reduc-ing the organic matter discharge simultaneously. Two 1700 L pilot-scale RAS systems each...

  8. Temperature Coefficient for Modeling Denitrification in Surface Water Sediments Using the Mass Transfer Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. W. Appelboom; G. M. Chescheir; R. W. Skaggs; J. W. Gilliam; Devendra M. Amatya

    2006-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers with the high costs of water quality monitoring. When modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks, denitrification within the sediments needs to be accounted for. Birgand et. al. developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment...

  9. Measuring potential denitrification enzyme activity rates using the membrane inlet mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) assay, provides a quantitative assessment of the multi enzyme, biological process of reactive nitrogen removal via the reduction of N03 to N2. Measured in soil, usually under non limiting carbon and nitrate concentrations, this short ter...

  10. The use of a rubble chimney for denitrification of irrigation return waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Roy B.; Kruger, Paul

    1970-01-01

    Biological denitrification has been proposed as a means of removing nitrates from waste waters to control eutrophication in receiving waters. A potential use for this method is the treatment of irrigation return waters containing high concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen, since direct discharge of such wastes may cause objectionable algal growth in the receiving waters. For example, the process may be used to treat agricultural waste waters in the San Joaquin Valley in California, where an estimated 580,000 acre-feet/year of return waters, containing 20 mg/l of nitrate-nitrogen, will require disposal by A.D. 2020. Two methods of biological denitrification are presently under study for possible use in the San Joaquin Valley. In one method nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by bacterial action in deep ponds; in the other method bacterial denitrification takes place in biological filters. In biological filters, bacteria are grown on columns of submerged stones. A possible alternative to the conventional construction of these filters is the creation of a rubble chimney by a contained nuclear explosion. This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation of the feasibility of using a rubble chimney as a biological filter for denitrification. (author)

  11. Modeling and mitigation of denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactor phosphorus releases during treatment of aquaculture wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification 'woodchip' bioreactors designed to remove nitrate from agricultural waters may either be phosphorus sources or sinks. A 24 d batch test showed woodchip leaching is an important source of phosphorus during bioreactor start-up with a leaching potential of approximately 20 -30 mg P per ...

  12. Molecular Approaches to Studying Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    Denitrification is carried out by a diverse array of microbes, mainly as an alternative mode of respiration that allows the organisms to respire using oxidized N compounds instead of oxygen. A common approach in biogeochemistry to the study of the regulation of denitrification is to assess activity by mass balance of substrates and products or direct rate measurements and has intrinsically assumed resource regulation of denitrification. Reported rates can vary significantly even among ecosystems characterized by similar environmental conditions, thus indicating that direct control by abiotic factors often is not sufficient to predict denitrification rates accurately in natural environments. Alternatively, a microbiological approach would proceed with the identification of the organisms responsible and an evaluation of the effect of environmental factors on the biochemical pathways involved. Traditional studies have relied on culturing techniques, such as most probable number enrichments, and have failed to assess the role of the predominately uncultivable members of the microbial community. A combination of biogeochemical measurements and the assessment of the microbial community is necessary and becoming increasingly possible with the development and application of molecular techniques. In order to understand how the composition and physiological behavior of the microbial community affects denitrification rates, we use a suite of molecular techniques developed for phylogenetic and metabolic characterization of denitrifying communities. Molecular tools available for quantifying denitrifying bacteria and assessing their diversity and activity are summarized. Their application is illustrated with examples from marine and freshwater environments. Emerging techniques and their application to ground water studies will be discussed.

  13. Denitrification and inference of nitrogen sources in the karstic Floridan Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Heffernan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aquifer denitrification is among the most poorly constrained fluxes in global and regional nitrogen budgets. The few direct measurements of denitrification in groundwaters provide limited information about its spatial and temporal variability, particularly at the scale of whole aquifers. Uncertainty in estimates of denitrification may also lead to underestimates of its effect on isotopic signatures of inorganic N, and thereby confound the inference of N source from these data. In this study, our objectives are to quantify the magnitude and variability of denitrification in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA and evaluate its effect on N isotopic signatures at the regional scale. Using dual noble gas tracers (Ne, Ar to generate physical predictions of N2 gas concentrations for 112 observations from 61 UFA springs, we show that excess (i.e. denitrification-derived N2 is highly variable in space and inversely correlated with dissolved oxygen (O2. Negative relationships between O2 and δ15NNO3 across a larger dataset of 113 springs, well-constrained isotopic fractionation coefficients, and strong 15N:18O covariation further support inferences of denitrification in this uniquely organic-matter-poor system. Despite relatively low average rates, denitrification accounted for 32 % of estimated aquifer N inputs across all sampled UFA springs. Back-calculations of source δ15NNO3 based on denitrification progression suggest that isotopically-enriched nitrate (NO3 in many springs of the UFA reflects groundwater denitrification rather than urban- or animal-derived inputs.

  14. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... reductase activity and nitrite accumulation depend on the exogenous nitrate. Nitrite itself is reduced to ammonium by palstidic nitrite reductase. Nitrite reductase is activated by both nitrate and nitrite ions by positive feed forward, whereas nitrate metabolites, most likely ammonium and glutamine; down.

  15. The effect of floating vegetation on denitrification and greenhouse gas production in wetland mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. E.; Harrison, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic intensification of nitrogen (N) loading to aquatic ecosystems is widespread and can lead to the degradation of these systems. Wetlands are important sites for N removal via denitrification, the microbially mediated reduction of reactive nitrate to inert N2 gas, but they can also produce high levels of greenhouse gases. Floating plants play an important role in encouraging denitrification, since they create low oxygen conditions that may favor denitrification. We investigated whether wetland sediments with floating plant cover had higher denitrification and greenhouse gas production rates than wetland sediments without floating plants. Replicate flow-through mesocosms with wetland sediment and water were constructed in a growth chamber to mimic the wetland where the sediment and water were collected. Mesocosm treatments were covered with floating vegetation (duckweed), an opaque tarp, or no cover to determine how cover type affects denitrification and greenhouse gas production and whether biotic or abiotic factors are likely responsible for observed differences. Denitrification and greenhouse gas production rates were calculated by measuring excess N2 gas, methane, and nitrous oxide concentrations in the water column and measuring the gas exchange rates between the water column and the atmosphere. Gas exchange rates were measured using an inert volatile tracer added to the water column and accumulation of gas in the mesocosm headspace. Additional mesocosm experiments were performed to determine how duckweed-dominated wetland systems respond to nitrogen loading and which mechanism for lowering dissolved oxygen concentrations is important in affecting denitrification under floating vegetation. Mesocosms with floating vegetation had lower dissolved oxygen than no cover or tarp-covered mesocosms, which is consistent with field and literature observations. Water flowing out of the mesocosms had statistically lower total nitrogen and nitrate concentrations

  16. Treatment of domestic wastewater by anaerobic denitrification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SALAMA YOUSSEF

    for the denitrification process could be deduced from the. pH variation. The alkalinity and pH increased in heterotrophic and H2-based autotrophic denitrification because nitrite reduction consumed protons (H+). Proton consumption is illustrated in Equations (1 to 4) (Rittmann and McCarty, 2001). Heterotrophic denitrification.

  17. Combined denitrification and phosphorus removal in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Christina Maria; Harremoes, Poul; Mosbæk, Hans

    2000-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilter was run continuously for 11/2 years for combined denitrification and phosphorus removal. Alternation between anaerobic and anoxic (nitrate) conditions was used to obtain an enriched culture of denitrifying, phosphate accumulating organisms. Batch experiments were performed...... to test the importance of diffusion and zonation in the biofilm. Half- and zero-order anaerobic phosphate release and anoxic phosphate uptake rates were verified, which was taken as an indication of a zonated biofilm. To investigate the practical applicability of the process, the development of a computer...

  18. Cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on autotrophic denitrification process with sulphide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Carmen; Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Isaac; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Autotrophic denitrification is a suitable technology to simultaneously remove oxidised nitrogen compounds and reduced sulphur compounds yielding nitrogen gas, sulphur and sulphate as the main products. In this work, several batch tests were conducted to investigate the cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on the autotrophic denitrification. Denitrification efficiencies above 95% were achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5-8.0 with maximum specific autotrophic denitrifying activities up to 188mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1). Free ammonia did not show any effect on denitrification at concentrations up to 53mg NH3-NL(-1). Different sulphide concentrations were also tested with stoichiometric nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Sulphide inhibited denitrification at concentrations higher than 200mgS(2-)L(-1). A 50% inhibition was also found at nitrite concentrations above 48mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The maximum specific activity decreased until a value of 25mgN2g(-1) VSSd(-1) at 232mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The Haldane model was used to describe denitrification inhibition caused by nitrite. Kinetic parameters determined from the fitting of experimental data were rmax=176mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1), Ks=10.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1) and Ki=34.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The obtained model allowed optimising an autotrophic denitrification process by avoiding situations of inhibition and thus obtaining higher denitrification efficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Denitrification coupled with methane anoxic oxidation and microbial community involved identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Medici Frayne Cuba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the biological denitrification associated with anoxic oxidation of methane and the microbial diversity involved were studied. Kinetic tests for nitrate (NO3- and nitrite (NO2- removal and methane uptake were carried out in 100 mL batch reactors incubated in a shaker (40 rpm at 30 ºC. Denitrificant/methanotrophic biomass was taken from a laboratory scale reactor fed with synthetic nitrified substrates (40 mgN L-1 of NO3- and subsequently NO2- and methane as carbon source. Results obtained from nitrate removal followed a first order reaction, presenting a kinetic apparent constant (kNO3 of 0.0577±0.0057d-1. Two notable points of the denitrification rate (0.12gNO3--N g-1 AVS d-1 and 0.07gNO3--N g-1 AVS d-1 were observed in the beginning and on the seventh day of operation. When nitrite was added as an electron acceptor, denitrification rates were improved, presenting an apparent kinetic constant (kNO2 of 0.0722±0.0044d-1, a maximum denitrification rate of 0.6gNO2--N g-1AVS d-1, and minimum denitrification rate of 0.1gNO2--N g-1AVS d-1 at the beginning and end of the test, respectively. Endogenous material supporting denitrification and methane concentration dissolved in the substrate was discarded from the control experiments in the absence of methane and seed, respectively. Methylomonas sp. was identified in the reactors fed with nitrate and nitrite as well as uncultured bacterium.

  20. Lateral Transfer of the Denitrification Pathway Genes among Thermus thermophilus Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Laura; Bricio, Carlos; José Gómez, Manuel; Berenguer, José

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate respiration is a common and strain-specific property in Thermus thermophilus encoded by the nitrate respiration conjugative element (NCE) that can be laterally transferred by conjugation. In contrast, nitrite respiration and further denitrification steps are restricted to a few isolates of this species. These later steps of the denitrification pathway are under the regulatory control of an NCE-encoded transcription factor, but nothing is known about their coding sequences or its putative genetic linkage to the NCE. In this study we examine the genetic linkage between nitrate and nitrite respiration through lateral gene transfer (LGT) assays and describe a cluster of genes encoding the nitrite-nitric oxide respiration in T. thermophilus PRQ25. We show that the whole denitrification pathway can be transferred from the denitrificant strain PRQ25 to an aerobic strain, HB27, and that the genes coding for nitrite and nitric oxide respiration are encoded near the NCE. Sequence data from the draft genome of PRQ25 confirmed these results and allowed us to describe the most compact nor-nir cluster known thus far and to demonstrate the expression and activities of the encoded enzymes in the HB27 denitrificant derivatives obtained by LGT. We conclude that this NCE nor-nir supercluster constitutes a whole denitrification island that can be spread by lateral transfer among Thermus thermophilus strains. PMID:21169443

  1. [Denitrification study of Elodea nuttallii-nitrogen cycling bacteria restoration in Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Li, Zheng-Kui; Zhou, Tao; Wu, Ning-Mei; Ye, Zhong-Xiang; Liu, Dan-Dan

    2013-08-01

    Undisturbed sediment cores were collected from Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake, and the integrated Elodea nuttallii-nitrogen cycling bacteria technology was applied as a restoration method. The effects of the Elodea nuttallii-nitrogen cycling bacteria technology on sediment denitrification was observed by isotope pairing technique. The highest denitrification rate of 104.64 micromol x (m2 x h)(-1) was achieved in sediments with Elodea nuttallii-nitrogen cycling bacteria assemblage. The abundance of nirS, nirK and nosZ genes involved in denitrification processes in the sediments (within 2 cm below the water-sediment interface) were measured by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The abundance of nirS and nosZ genes in the sediments with restoration treatments was increased, which was more than one order of magnitudes higher than that in bare sediments. The results indicated that the presence of macrophyte and nitrogen cycling bacteria could increase benthic nitrogen removal by facilitating coupled nitrification-denitrification and uncoupled nitrification-denitrification.

  2. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND THE DENITRIFICATION IN UASB REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tavares de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental conditions in Brazil have been contributing to the development of anaerobic systems in the treatment of wastewaters, especially UASB - Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The classic biological process for removal of nutrients uses three reactors - Bardenpho System, therefore, this work intends an alternative system, where the anaerobic digestion and the denitrification happen in the same reactor reducing the number of reactors for two. The experimental system was constituted by two units: first one was a nitrification reactor with 35 L volume and 15 d of sludge age. This system was fed with raw sanitary waste. Second unit was an UASB, with 7.8 L and 6 h of hydraulic detention time, fed with ¾ of effluent nitrification reactor and ¼ of raw sanitary waste. This work had as objective to evaluate the performance of the UASB reactor. In terms of removal efficiency, of bath COD and nitrogen, it was verified that the anaerobic digestion process was not affected. The removal efficiency of organic material expressed in COD was 71%, performance already expected for a reactor of this type. It was also observed that the denitrification process happened; the removal nitrate efficiency was 90%. Therefore, the denitrification process in reactor UASB is viable.

  3. Use of bioreactor landfill for nitrogen removal to enhance methane production through ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and in situ denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojie; Zhang, Hongxia; Cheng, Zhaowen

    2017-08-01

    High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 - -N) derived from ex situ nitrification phase can inhibit methane production during ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification bioreactor landfill. A combined process comprised of ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) in an aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) and in situ denitrification in a fresh refuse bioreactor (FRB) was conducted to reduce the negative effect of high concentrationsof NO 3 - -N. Ex situ SND can be achieved because NO 3 - -N concentration can be reduced and the removal rate of ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 + -N) remains largely unchanged when the ventilation rate of ARB-A2 is controlled. The average NO 3 - -N concentrations of effluent were 470mg/L in ex situ nitrification ARB-A1 and 186mg/L in ex situ SND ARB-A2. The average NH 4 + -N removal rates of ARB-A1 and ARB-A2 were 98% and 94%, respectively. Based on the experimental data from week 4 to week 30, it is predicted that NH 4 + -N concentration in FRB-F1 of the ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process would reach 25mg/L after 63weeks, and about 40weeks for the FRB-F2 of ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process . Ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process can improve themethane production of FRB-F2. The lag phase time of methane production for the FRB-F2 was 11weeks. This phase was significantly shorter than the 15-week phases of FRB-F1 in ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process. A seven-week stabilizationphase was required to increase methane content from 5% to 50% for FRB-F2. Methane content in FRB-F1 did not reach 50% but reached the 45% peak after 20weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyporheic zone denitrification: controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, John Karl; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To demonstrate at a field site, we injected 15NO3−, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways transport where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  5. A Review on Alternative Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Nitrate Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamole, Pradip B.; D'Souza, S. F.; Lele, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    Huge amount of wastewater containing nitrogen is produced by various chemical and biological industries. Nitrogen is present in the form of ammonia, nitrate and nitrite. This review deals with treatment of nitrate based effluent using biological denitrification. Because of its adverse effect on aquatic life and human health, treatment of nitrate bearing effluents has become mandatory before discharge. Treatment of such wastes is a liability for the industries and incurs cost. However, the economics of the process can be controlled by selection of proper method and reduction in the operating cost. This paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of nitrate removal with emphasis on biological denitrification. The cost of biological denitrification is controlled by the carbon source. Hence, use of alternative carbon sources such as agricultural wastes, industrial effluent or by products is reviewed in this paper. Policies for reducing the cost of nitrate treatment and enhancing the efficiency have been recommended.

  6. Biological denitrification using poly(butanediol succinate) as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-07-01

    Poly(butanediol succinate) (PBS), a biodegradable polymer, was used as both solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for biological nitrate removal process, in which PBS was filled in a packed-bed bioreactor. The denitrification performance and the microbial diversity of biofilm attached on the surface of PBS were investigated. The experimental results showed that the volumetric denitrification rate was 0.60 kg m(-3) day(-1) when NO3-N loading rate was 0.63 kg m(-3) day(-1), and the average NO2-N concentration was below 0.20 mg L(-1). The effluent pH value decreased slightly from a range of 6.98-7.87 to 6.46-7.18. The analysis of microbial community structure of biofilm by pyrosequencing method showed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (89.87 %), and β-Proteobacteria represented the most abundant class. Among the 76 identified genera, Dechloromonas (10.26 %), Alicycliphilus (9.15 %), Azospira (8.92 %), and Sinobacteraceae-uncultured (8.75 %) were the abundant genera. PBS, as a promising alternative carbon source, is a suitable solid carbon source and biofilm carrier for nitrate removal.

  7. Long term performance of the Waterloo denitrification barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, W.D.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in 1991 a series of laboratory tests and small scale field trials were initiated to test the performance of an innovative permeable reactive barrier for treatment of nitrate from septic systems. The barrier promotes denitrification by providing an energy source in the form of solid organic carbon mixed into the porous media material. Advantages of the system for nitrate treatment are that the reaction is passive and in situ and it is possible to incorporate sufficient carbon mass in conveniently sized barriers to potentially provide treatment for long periods (decades) without the necessity for maintenance. However, longevity can only be demonstrated by careful long term monitoring of field installations. This paper documents four years of operating history at three small scale field trials; two where the denitrification barrier is installed as a horizontal layer positioned in the unsaturated zone below conventional septic system infiltration beds and one where the barrier is installed as a vertical wall intercepting a septic system plume at a downgradient location. The barriers have successfully attenuated 50-100% of NO - 3 -N levels of up to 170 mg/L and treatment has remained consistent over the four year period in each case, thus considerable longevity is indicated. Other field trials have demonstrated this technology to be equally effective in treating nitrogen contamination from other sources such as landfill leachate and farm field runoff

  8. A Microbial Fuel Cell Modified with Carbon Nanomaterials for Organic Removal and Denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njud S. Alharbi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated microbial denitrification using electrochemical sources to replace organic matter as reductant. The work also involved developing a system that could be optimised for nitrate removal in applied situations such as water processing in fish farming or drinking water, where high nitrate levels represent a potential health problem. Consequently, the study examined a range of developments for the removal of nitrate from water based on the development of electrochemical biotransformation systems for nitrate removal. This also offers considerable scope for the potential application of these systems in broader bionanotechnology based processes. Furthermore, the work discussed the context of improved microbial fuel cell (MFC performance, potential analytic applications, and further innovations using a bionanotechnology approach to analyse cell-electrode interactions. High nitrate removal rate of more than 95% was successfully achieved by using a MFC system modified with carbon nanomaterials.

  9. Biological denitrification of brine: the effect of compatible solutes on enzyme activities and fatty acid degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyplik, Paweł; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Marecik, Roman; Czarny, Jakub; Drozdzyńska, Agnieszka; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the addition of compatible solutes (ectoine and trehalose) on the denitrification process of saline wastewater was studied. In saline wastewater, it was observed that the initial concentration of nitrates was 500 mg N l⁻¹. A fatty substance isolated from oiled bleaching earth (waste of vegetable oil refining process) was used as a source of carbon.The consortium, which was responsible for the denitrification process originated from the wastewater of the vegetable oil industry. The consortium of microorganisms was identified by the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and sequencing techniques. It was noted that ectoine affects significantly the activity of lipase and nitrate reductase, and resulted in faster denitrification compared to saline wastewater with the addition of trehalose or control saline wastewater (without compatible solutes). It was observed that relative enzyme activities of lipase and nitrate reductase increased by 32 and 35%, respectively, in the presence of 1 mM ectoine. This resulted in an increase in specific nitrate reduction rate in the presence of 1 mM ectoine to 5.7 mg N g⁻¹ VSS h⁻¹, which was higher than in the absence of ectoine (3.2 mg N g⁻¹ VSS h⁻¹). The addition of trehalose did not have an effect on nitrate removals. Moreover, it was found that trehalose was used up completely by bacteria as a source of carbon in the denitrification process. The fatty acids were biodegraded by 74% in the presence of 1 mM ectoine.

  10. Interactions between benthic copepods, bacteria and diatoms promote nitrogen retention in intertidal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Willem; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at evaluating the impact of diatoms and copepods on microbial processes mediating nitrate removal in fine-grained intertidal sediments. More specifically, we studied the interactions between copepods, diatoms and bacteria in relation to their effects on nitrate reduction and denitrification. Microcosms containing defaunated marine sediments were subjected to different treatments: an excess of nitrate, copepods, diatoms (Navicula sp.), a combination of copepods and diatoms, and spent medium from copepods. The microcosms were incubated for seven and a half days, after which nutrient concentrations and denitrification potential were measured. Ammonium concentrations were highest in the treatments with copepods or their spent medium, whilst denitrification potential was lowest in these treatments, suggesting that copepods enhance dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium over denitrification. We hypothesize that this is an indirect effect, by providing extra carbon for the bacterial community through the copepods' excretion products, thus changing the C/N ratio in favour of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Diatoms alone had no effect on the nitrogen fluxes, but they did enhance the effect of copepods, possibly by influencing the quantity and quality of the copepods' excretion products. Our results show that small-scale biological interactions between bacteria, copepods and diatoms can have an important impact on denitrification and hence sediment nitrogen fluxes.

  11. Potential Denitrification: Concept and Conditions of its Measurement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Denitrification plays important roles in nitrogen cycling and management affecting both the environment and agricultural systems. Potential denitrification has a role in comparison of denitrification magnitudes in different soils. This paper discusses the concept of potential denitrification in relation to denitrification rate and ...

  12. Identifying functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems by numerical simulations - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; He, W.; Shao, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater is still one of the common problems in many countries. Because of its high solubility and anionic nature, nitrate can easily leach through soil and persist in groundwater for decades. High nitrate concentration has been suggested as a major cause of accelerated eutrophication, methemoglobinemia and gastric cancer. There are several factors influencing the fate of nitrate in groundwater system, which is e.g. distribution of N- sources to soil and groundwater, distribution and amount of reactive substances maintaining denitrification, rate of nitrate degradation and its kinetics, and geological characteristics of the aquifer. Nitrate transport and redox transformation processes are closely linked to complex and spatially distributed physical and chemical interaction, therefore it is difficult to predict and quantify in the field and laboratory experiment. Models can play a key role in elucidation of nitrate reduction pathway in groundwater system and in the design and evaluation of field tests to investigate in situ remediation technologies as well. The goal of the current study is to predict groundwater vulnerability to nitrate, to identify functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems and to describe the uncertainty of the predictions due to scale effects. For this aim, we developed a kinetic model using multi-component mass transport code OpenGeoSys coupling with IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The developed model included sequential aerobic and nitrate-based respiration, multi-Monod kinetics, multi-species biogeochemical reactions, and geological characteristics of the groundwater aquifer. Moreover water-rock interaction such as secondary mineral precipitation was also included in this model. In this presentation, we focused on the general modelling approach and present the simulation results of nitrate transport simulation in a hypothetical aquifer systems based on data from

  13. Denitrification Rates in Newly Formed and Restored Wetlands of Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, K.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.; Maiti, K.

    2017-12-01

    The potential for deltaic wetlands to mitigate and reduce increasing loads of inorganic nitrogen (N) has been recognized as one of the most relevant ecosystem services in coastal regions across the globe. N could be removed from the system via denitrification, a dominant NO3- removal pathway. Past studies are mostly restricted to nitrogen fluxes in marshes with no data available for relative contribution of channels to total denitrification fluxes making it difficult for landscape level budgeting. This study evaluates differences in net denitrification rates among two distinctly different coastal setting undergoing land formation (Wax Lake Delta, WLD) and land loss (Barataria, BB). We collected intact cores from different habitats of WLD (channel, ridge, and interior) and BB (lake, channel, and marsh) during spring, summer, and winter seasons (2015-2017) to experimentally evaluate denitrification rates in temperature controlled laboratory chambers. Our results revealed higher denitrification rates in WLD compared to BB indicating that WLD is an important N sink. The highest denitrification rates were measured in WLD interior site, where the soil is characterized by high organic matter content due to high wetland productivity and anoxic conditions caused by high flooding duration most of the year. Denitrification rates increased by two-fold during summer (T=30oC) compared to winter (T=10oC) in both coastal settings. Denitrification rates ranged from 29.31±6.86 to 57.14±4.16 μmolm-2hr-1 in winter and ranged from 49.4±1.0 to 123.7±5.86 μmolm-2hr-1 in summer in the WLD. Denitrification rates in BB varied between 23.9±2.52 to 47.2±0.30 μmolm-2hr-1 in winter and from 54.1±3.34 to 77.3±1.08 μmolm-2hr-1 in summer. This increase in nitrogen concentration was correlated with decreasing oxygen and nitrate concentration overtime. Nitrate concentration decreased rapidly during summer, particularly in the WLD interior site (41.62 to 32.72 μmol/l) and BB marshes (6

  14. The influence of stormwater management practices on denitrification rates of receiving streams in an urban watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronenberger, M. S.; McMillan, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing urbanization and the subsequent disruption of floodplains has led to the need for implementing stormwater management strategies to mitigate the effects of urbanization, including soil and streambank erosion, increased export of nutrients and contaminants and decreased biotic richness. Excessive stormwater runoff due to the abundance of impervious surfaces associated with an urban landscape has led to the ubiquitous use of best management practices (BMPs) to attenuate runoff events and prevent the destructive delivery of large volumes of water to stream channels. As a result, effluent from BMPs (i.e. wetlands and wet ponds) has the potential to alter the character of the receiving stream channel and thus, key ecosystem processes such as denitrification. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which BMPs, in the form of constructed wetlands and wet ponds, influence in-stream denitrification rates in the urban landscape of Charlotte, NC. Four sites, two of each BMP type, were evaluated. Sediment samples were collected upstream and downstream of the BMP outflow from May-July 2011 to determine the effect of wetland discharge on in-stream nitrogen removal via denitrification. Denitrification rates were determined using the acetylene block method; water column nutrient and carbon concentrations and sediment organic matter content were also measured. Generally, wetland sites exhibited higher denitrification rates, nitrate concentrations and sediment organic matter content. Our work and others has demonstrated a significant positive correlation between nitrate concentration and denitrification rates, which is the likely driver of the higher observed rates at the wetland sites. Geomorphology was also found to be a key factor in elevated denitrification rates at sites with riffles and boulder jams. Sediment organic matter was found to be higher downstream of BMP outflows at all four sites, but demonstrated no significant relationship with

  15. Use of microbial analysis to evaluate denitrification in the karstic aquifer of Okinawa, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumoto, J.

    2014-12-01

    Denitrification, a microbial process in the nitrogen cycle, is a facultative respiratory pathway in which nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide (N2O), successively, are reduced to nitrogen gas (N2). This study explores the use of microbial analysis to evaluate the processes involved in nitrate attenuation in groundwater. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is used to identify denitrifiers based only on their 16SrRNA gene sequences, and Real-Time PCR analysis is used to quantify nitrite reducing genes (nirK and nirS), this suggest that a new methods for detecting denitrification activity by comparing the gene dosage that has been detected by RT-PCR and the value of the δ15NNO3- and δ18ONO3-. This study focuses on a zone of significant NO3- attenuation occurring at underground dam catchment area in the karstic Ryukyu limestone aquifer, which is located southern part of Okinawa, Japan. As a result of microbial analysis, the bacteria were detected at all observation points which have been reported to have denitrification ability. And it has been confirmed that the bacteria has a gene nirS which is related to denitrification. In addition, many bacteria related to denitrification have been extracted from suspended solids more than from groundwater in the aquifer. And, the correlation was high between nirK /nirS gene dosage that has been detected by RT-PCR and the value of the δ15N and δ18O; therefore, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of using Real-Time PCR analysis for providing insights into the processes affecting nitrate attenuation in ground water.

  16. Denitrification on internal carbon sources in RAS is limited by fibers in fecal waste of rainbow trout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meriac, A.; Eding, E.H.; Kamstra, A.; Busscher, J.P.; Schrama, J.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification on internal carbon sources offers the advantage to control nitrate levels in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) by using the fecal carbon produced within the husbandry system. However, it is not clear to which extent fecal carbon can be utilized by the microbial community within

  17. Single-sludge denitrification in recirculating aquaculture systems: effects of pre-fermentation and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Letelier-Gordo, Carlos Octavio; Prat Busquets, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Single-sludge denitrification (DN) reactors in aquaculture use the carbonous solid fish waste produced in the system to reduce the discharged nitrate load. The solid waste is available for denitrifiers when present in soluble, readily biodegradable form, and the transformation is accomplished...

  18. Single-sludge denitrification in recirculating aquaculture systems: Effects of pre-fermentation and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Letelier Gordo, Carlos Octavio; Prat Busquets, Pau

    2014-01-01

    Single-sludge denitrification (DN) reactors in aquaculture utilize the solid fish waste produced in the system to reduce the nitrate load discharged. The solid waste is available for denitrifiers when present in soluble readily biodegradable form. A transformation accomplished by bacterial...

  19. Comparison research on denitrification efficiency of two types of solid carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Zhang, J. D.; Li, F.; Cao, Y. X.; Zhu, L. Y.; Yang, Z. F.

    2017-05-01

    C/N rates can greatly influence efficiency of denitrification. It is difficult for current treated effluent to reach GB18918-2002 primary effluent standard because of its low C/N rate. To improve the efficiency of denitrification, the quality of effluent, and realize the waste recycling, this article selected magnolia leaves and degradable meal box as the solid carbon source for periodic denitrification stage to study the change of NO3 --N, TN, COD, NO2 --N, NH4 +, PO4 3- and color. The results showed that in the condition of influent nitrate concentration of 40 mg/L, carbon dosage of 10 g, the reaction temperature of 25°C the nitrate removal rates of magnolia leaves and degradable meal box reached 89.0% and 56.3% respectively, and the TN removal rates reached 91.7% and 53.9% respectively. But in the aspect of final treated effluent COD concentration level, magnolia leaves experiment (608 mg/L) was much higher than the degradable meal box (78 mg/L). Besides, the accumulation of nitrite, the released concentration of ammonia nitrogen and phosphate of magnolia leaves experiment were also higher than the degradable meal box. Under the integrated analysis, the magnolia leaves are more suitable than the degradable meal box as the denitrification external carbon source.

  20. Alternative solutions for the bio-denitrification of landfill leachates using pine bark and compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trois, Cristina; Pisano, Giulia; Oxarango, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Nitrified leachate may still require an additional bio-denitrification step, which occurs with the addition of often-expensive chemicals as carbon source. This study explores the applicability of low-cost carbon sources such as garden refuse compost and pine bark for the denitrification of high strength landfill leachates. The overall objective is to assess efficiency, kinetics and performance of the substrates in the removal of high nitrate concentrations. Garden refuse and pine bark are currently disposed of in general waste landfills in South Africa, separated from the main waste stream. A secondary objective is to assess the feasibility of re-using green waste as by-product of an integrated waste management system. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests and leaching columns packed with immature compost and pine bark. Biologically treated leachate from a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) with nitrate concentrations of 350, 700 and 1100 mgN/l were used for the trials. Preliminary results suggest that, passed the acclimatization step (40 days for both substrates), full denitrification is achieved in 10-20 days for the pine bark and 30-40 days for the compost.

  1. Indicators: Benthic Macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthic (meaning “bottom-dwelling”) macroinvertebrates are small aquatic animals and the aquatic larval stages of insects. Benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used as indicators of the biological condition of waterbodies.

  2. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... and temperature. Given the increasing nitrate pollution of freshwater ecosystems, the collective gut of benthic macrofauna might constitute an increasingly important yet hitherto overlooked link in the global nitrous oxide budget....

  3. Denitrification in Agriculturally Impacted Streams: Seasonal Changes in Structure and Function of the Bacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manis, Erin; Royer, Todd V.; Johnson, Laura T.; Leff, Laura G.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrifiers remove fixed nitrogen from aquatic environments and hydrologic conditions are one potential driver of denitrification rate and denitrifier community composition. In this study, two agriculturally impacted streams in the Sugar Creek watershed in Indiana, USA with different hydrologic regimes were examined; one stream is seasonally ephemeral because of its source (tile drainage), whereas the other stream has permanent flow. Additionally, a simulated flooding experiment was performed on the riparian benches of the ephemeral stream during a dry period. Denitrification activity was assayed using the chloramphenicol amended acetylene block method and bacterial communities were examined based on quantitative PCR and terminal restriction length polymorphisms of the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) and 16S rRNA genes. In the stream channel, hydrology had a substantial impact on denitrification rates, likely by significantly lowering water potential in sediments. Clear patterns in denitrification rates were observed among pre-drying, dry, and post-drying dates; however, a less clear scenario was apparent when analyzing bacterial community structure suggesting that denitrifier community structure and denitrification rate were not strongly coupled. This implies that the nature of the response to short-term hydrologic changes was physiological rather than increases in abundance of denitrifiers or changes in composition of the denitrifier community. Flooding of riparian bench soils had a short-term, transient effect on denitrification rate. Our results imply that brief flooding of riparian zones is unlikely to contribute substantially to removal of nitrate (NO3-) and that seasonal drying of stream channels has a negative impact on NO3- removal, particularly because of the time lag required for denitrification to rebound. This time lag is presumably attributable to the time required for the denitrifiers to respond physiologically rather than a change in abundance or

  4. Denitrification in agriculturally impacted streams: seasonal changes in structure and function of the bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Manis

    Full Text Available Denitrifiers remove fixed nitrogen from aquatic environments and hydrologic conditions are one potential driver of denitrification rate and denitrifier community composition. In this study, two agriculturally impacted streams in the Sugar Creek watershed in Indiana, USA with different hydrologic regimes were examined; one stream is seasonally ephemeral because of its source (tile drainage, whereas the other stream has permanent flow. Additionally, a simulated flooding experiment was performed on the riparian benches of the ephemeral stream during a dry period. Denitrification activity was assayed using the chloramphenicol amended acetylene block method and bacterial communities were examined based on quantitative PCR and terminal restriction length polymorphisms of the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ and 16S rRNA genes. In the stream channel, hydrology had a substantial impact on denitrification rates, likely by significantly lowering water potential in sediments. Clear patterns in denitrification rates were observed among pre-drying, dry, and post-drying dates; however, a less clear scenario was apparent when analyzing bacterial community structure suggesting that denitrifier community structure and denitrification rate were not strongly coupled. This implies that the nature of the response to short-term hydrologic changes was physiological rather than increases in abundance of denitrifiers or changes in composition of the denitrifier community. Flooding of riparian bench soils had a short-term, transient effect on denitrification rate. Our results imply that brief flooding of riparian zones is unlikely to contribute substantially to removal of nitrate (NO3- and that seasonal drying of stream channels has a negative impact on NO3- removal, particularly because of the time lag required for denitrification to rebound. This time lag is presumably attributable to the time required for the denitrifiers to respond physiologically rather than a change

  5. Enhanced denitrification of Pseudomonas stutzeri by a bioelectrochemical system assisted with solid-phase humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Li, Zhiling; Katayama, Arata

    2016-07-01

    The denitrification reactions performed by Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778 were enhanced electrochemically with the use of solid-phase humin, although P. stutzeri itself was incapable of receiving electrons directly from the graphite electrode. Electrochemically reduced humin enhanced the microbial, but not abiotic, denitrification reactions. Electric current and cyclic voltammetry analyses suggested that the solid-phase humin functioned as an electron donor for the denitrification reactions of P. stutzeri. Nitrogen balance study and the estimation of the first-order rate constants of the consecutive denitrification reactions suggested that the solid-phase humin enhanced all reducing reactions from nitrate to nitrogen gas. Considering the wide distribution of humin in the environment, the findings that solid-phase humin can assist in electron transfer, from the electrode to a denitrifying bacterium that has little ability to directly utilize external electrons, has important implications for the widespread application of bioelectrochemical systems assisted by solid-phase humin for enhancing microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling electron competition among nitrogen oxides reduction and N2 O accumulation in hydrogenotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ngo, Huu H; Guo, Wenshan; Peng, Lai; Chen, Xueming; Wang, Dongbo; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification is a novel and sustainable process for nitrogen removal, which utilizes hydrogen as electron donor, and carbon dioxide as carbon source. Recent studies have shown that nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a highly undesirable intermediate and potent greenhouse gas, can accumulate during this process. In this work, a new mathematical model is developed to describe nitrogen oxides dynamics, especially N 2 O, during hydrogenotrophic denitrification for the first time. The model describes electron competition among the four steps of hydrogenotrophic denitrification through decoupling hydrogen oxidation and nitrogen reduction processes using electron carriers, in contrast to the existing models that couple these two processes and also do not consider N 2 O accumulation. The developed model satisfactorily describes experimental data on nitrogen oxides dynamics obtained from two independent hydrogenotrophic denitrifying cultures under various hydrogen and nitrogen oxides supplying conditions, suggesting the validity and applicability of the model. The results indicated that N 2 O accumulation would not be intensified under hydrogen limiting conditions, due to the higher electron competition capacity of N 2 O reduction in comparison to nitrate and nitrite reduction during hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The model is expected to enhance our understanding of the process during hydrogenotrophic denitrification and the ability to predict N 2 O accumulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification in a packed bed reactor: effects of hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Lee, K H; Park, K Y; Maeng, S K

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen dissolution and hydrogenotrophic denitrification performance were investigated in a lab-scale packed bed reactor (PBR) by varying the hydrogen flow rate and hydraulic retention time (HRT). The denitrification performance was enhanced by increasing the hydrogen flow rate and HRT as a result of high dissolved hydrogen concentration (0.39mg/L) and utilization efficiencies (79%). In this study, the hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio (Q(g)/Q(w)) was found to be a new operating factor representing the two parameters of hydrogen flow rate and HRT. Hydrogen dissolution and denitrification efficiency were nonlinearly and linearly correlated with the Q(g)/Q(w), respectively. Based on its excellent linear correlation with denitrification efficiency, Q(g)/Q(w) should be greater than 2.3 to meet the WHO's guideline of nitrate nitrogen for drinking water. This study demonstrates that Q(g)/Q(w) is a simple and robust factor to optimize hydrogen-sparged bioreactors for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrated assessment on groundwater nitrate by unsaturated zone probing and aquifer sampling with environmental tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Lijuan; Pang Zhonghe; Huang Tianming

    2012-01-01

    By employing chemical and isotopic tracers ( 15 N and 18 O in NO 3 − ), we investigated the main processes controlling nitrate distribution in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. Soil water was extracted from two soil cores drilled in a typical agricultural cropping area of the North China Plain (NCP), where groundwater was also sampled. The results indicate that evaporation and denitrification are the two major causes of the distribution of nitrate in soil water extracts in the unsaturated zone. Evaporation from unsaturated zone is evidenced by a positive correlation between chloride and nitrate, and denitrification by a strong linear relationship between δ 18 O NO 3 and ln(NO 3 − /Cl). The latter is estimated to account for up to 50% of the nitrate loss from soil drainage. In the saturated zone, nitrate is reduced at varying extents (100 mg/L and 10 mg/L at two sites, respectively), largely by dilution of the aquifer water. - Highlights: ► The transport of nitrate in unsaturated zone and saturated zone was integrated in a single investigation. ► Oxygen isotope enrichment factor for denitrification in the unsaturated zone was calculated. ► Denitrification loss in the aquifer was evaluated. - Denitrification loss has been evaluated in the unsaturated zone and saturated zone.

  9. Nitrate removal in deep sediments of a nitrogen-rich river network: A test of a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Robert S.; Bartsch, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Many estimates of nitrogen removal in streams and watersheds do not include or account for nitrate removal in deep sediments, particularly in gaining streams. We developed and tested a conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments in a nitrogen-rich river network. The model predicts that oxic, nitrate-rich groundwater will become depleted in nitrate as groundwater upwelling through sediments encounters a zone that contains buried particulate organic carbon, which promotes redox conditions favorable for nitrate removal. We tested the model at eight sites in upwelling reaches of lotic ecosystems in the Waupaca River Watershed that varied by three orders of magnitude in groundwater nitrate concentration. We measured denitrification potential in sediment core sections to 30 cm and developed vertical nitrate profiles to a depth of about 1 m with peepers and piezometer nests. Denitrification potential was higher, on average, in shallower core sections. However, core sections deeper than 5 cm accounted for 70%, on average, of the depth-integrated denitrification potential. Denitrification potential increased linearly with groundwater nitrate concentration up to 2 mg NO3-N/L but the relationship broke down at higher concentrations (> 5 mg NO3-N/L), a pattern that suggests nitrate saturation. At most sites groundwater nitrate declined from high concentrations at depth to much lower concentrations prior to discharge into the surface water. The profiles suggested that nitrate removal occurred at sediment depths between 20 and 40 cm. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were much higher in deep sediments than in pore water at 5 cm sediment depth at most locations. The substantial denitrification potential in deep sediments coupled with the declines in nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations in upwelling groundwater suggest that our conceptual model for nitrate removal in deep sediments is applicable to this river network. Our results suggest that nitrate removal rates

  10. Benthic contributions to Adriatic and Mediterranean biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capet, Arthur; Lazzari, Paolo; Spagnoli, Federico; Bolzon, Giorgio; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2017-04-01

    The 3D biogeochemical BFM-OGSTM implementation currently exploited operationally in the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Services Mediterranean Sea Monitoring and Forecasting Centre (CMEMS-Med-MFC; Lazzari et al., 2010) has been complemented with a benthic component. The approach followed that of (Capet et al 2016) and involved a vertically integrated benthic module accounting for the effect of environmental bottom conditions on diagenetic rates (aerobic mineralization, denitrification, nitrification) through transfer functions as well as the effect of waves and bottom currents on sediment deposition and resuspension. A balanced climatological year is simulated for various values of the resuspension parameters, using specifically calibrated transfer functions for the Adriatic Sea and generic formulations for the rest of the Mediterranean basin. The results serves the mapping of distinct provinces of the Adriatic Sea based on the benthic contributions biogeochemical budgets and the seasonal variability of benthic-pelagic fluxes. The differences with the non-benthic reference simulation are highlighted in details regarding the Adriatic, and more generally for the entire Mediterranean Sea. Lazzari, P., Teruzzi, A., Salon, S., Campagna, S., Calonaci, C., Colella, S., Tonani, M., Crise, A. (2010). Pre-operational short-term forecasts for Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry. Ocean Science, 6(1), 25-39. Capet, A., Meysman, F. J., Akoumianaki, I., Soetaert, K., & Grégoire, M. (2016). Integrating sediment biogeochemistry into 3D oceanic models: A study of benthic-pelagic coupling in the Black Sea. Ocean Modelling, 101, 83-100.

  11. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  12. Denitrification potential in the subsurface environment in the Manawatu River catchment, New Zealand: Indications from oxidation-reduction conditions, hydrogeological factors, and implications for nutrient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Aldrin; Singh, Ranvir; Horne, David; Roygard, Jonathan; Matthews, Abby; Hedley, Michael J

    2017-07-15

    A sound understanding of the effects of hydrogeological factors on loss, transport and transformation of farm nutrients is essential for predicting their impacts on ecosystem health of receiving waters. We assessed the potential of groundwater to attenuate nitrate through denitrification, and the distribution of this potential across the Tararua Groundwater Management Zone (GWMZ) in the Manawatu River catchment, New Zealand. We combined a number of methods in an unprecedented manner to confirm findings and obtain supporting evidence for the features that determine the subsurface denitrification characteristics. Our results showed that the denitrification characteristics of groundwater varied considerably in the Tararua GWMZ. The southern part of the Tararua GWMZ contained mainly oxic groundwater with low potential to denitrify, whereas the middle and northern parts of the Tararua GWMZ contained reduced groundwater with high denitrification potential. The hydrogeological features that influence denitrification potential in groundwater were identified as soil texture and drainage class, and the aquifer material or rock type. Low dissolved oxygen levels and nitrate concentrations were found in groundwater where the combinations of soil and rock types had poor drainage characteristics as opposed to higher concentrations in groundwater under well-drained soils and rocks (e.g. gravels). Intensive pastoral farming over well-drained soils and rocks showed high nitrate concentration in groundwater. This spatial variability in denitrification potential of groundwater offers a targeted management of nutrients runoff and leaching from pastoral lands to reduce their impacts on receiving surface waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Small scale denitrification variability in riparian zones: Results from a high-resolution dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassen, Niklas; Knöller, Kay; Musolff, Andreas; Popp, Felix; Lüders, Tillmann; Stumpp, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Riparian zones are important compartments at the interface between groundwater and surface water where biogeochemical processes like denitrification are often enhanced. Nitrate loads of either groundwater entering a stream through the riparian zone or streamwater infiltrating into the riparian zone can be substantially reduced. These processes are spatially and temporally highly variable, making it difficult to capture solute variabilities, estimate realistic turnover rates and thus to quantify integral mass removal. A crucial step towards a more detailed characterization is to monitor solutes on a scale which adequately resemble the highly heterogeneous distribution and on a scale where processes occur. We measured biogeochemical parameters in a spatial high resolution within a riparian corridor of a German lowland river system over the course of one year. Samples were taken from three newly developed high-resolution multi-level wells with a maximum vertical resolution of 5 cm and analyzed for major ions, DOC and N-O isotopes. Sediment derived during installation of the wells was analyzed for specific denitrifying enzymes. Results showed a distinct depth zonation of hydrochemistry within the shallow alluvial aquifer, with a 1 m thick zone just below the water table with lower nitrate concentrations and EC values similar to the nearby river. Conservative parameters were consistent inbetween the three wells, but nitrate was highly variable. In addition, spots with low nitrate concentrations showed isotopic and microbial evidence for higher denitrification activities. The depth zonation was observed throughout the year, with stronger temporal variations of nitrate concentrations just below the water table compared to deeper layers. Nitrate isotopes showed a clear seasonal trend of denitrification activities (high in summer, low in winter). Our dataset gives new insight into river-groundwater exchange processes and shows the highly heterogeneous distribution of

  14. Denitrification across landscapes and waterscapes: a synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seitzinger, S.P.; Harrison, J.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bouwman, A.F.; Lowrance, R.; Peterson, B.; Tobias, C.; Drecht, G.V.

    2006-01-01

    Denitrification is a critical process regulating the removal of bioavailable nitrogen (N) from natural and human-altered systems. While it has been extensively studied in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine systems, there has been limited communication among denitrification scientists working in

  15. Potential For Denitrification near Reclaimed Water Application Sites in Orange County, Florida, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael J.; Smith, Richard L.; Repert, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for denitrification was tested in water samples from four Upper Floridan aquifer wells near a reclaimed water application site, in west Orange County Florida, and two adjacent springs. Results of the study indicate that denitrifying bacteria are present in the groundwater and spring water samples, and that these bacteria can readily denitrify the waters when suitable geochemical conditions exist. The acetylene block technique was used to assess nitrous oxide in the samples that was produced by denitrification. The laboratory incubation experiment consisted of four different treatments to each of the six samples: (1) ambient water (no added nitrate or glucose), (2) ambient water amended with 1.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) nitrate as nitrogen (N), (3) ambient water amended with 5.0 mg/L nitrate as N, and (4) ambient water amended with 5.0 mg/L nitrate as N and 10 mg/L glucose as C6H12O6. A companion set of incubations using treatment 2 tracked changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration with time. The rate of denitrification in treatment 2 ranged from 0.059 to 0.124 milligram per liter per day nitrogen [(mg/L)/d N] and in treatment 3 ranged from 0.071 to 0.226 (mg/L)/d N. At all of the sampling sites, treatment 4 yielded denitrification rates at least an order of magnitude greater than those measured for the other treatments; rates ranged from 2.3 to 4.4 (mg/L)/d N. The electron donor supply, dissolved organic carbon, in the groundwater and springwater is sufficient to remove at least 1.1-1.4 mg/L nitrate as N in 20 to 30 days, as indicated by nitrous oxide production rates under ambient conditions (treatment 1). The even higher nitrate removal observed with addition of supplemental carbon in treatment 4 suggests that carbon is a limiting nutrient in this reaction. Denitrifying activity might explain the low ambient nitrate concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer in this area.

  16. Isotopic overprinting of nitrification on denitrification as a ubiquitous and unifying feature of environmental nitrogen cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, J.; Wankel, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate have long provided a tool for tracking environmental sources and biological transformations. However, divergent interpretations of fundamental nitrate isotope systematics exist among disciplinary divisions. In an effort to transcend disciplinary boundaries of terrestrial and marine biogeochemistry, we use a quantitative model for coupled nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate founded on benchmarks established from microbial cultures, in order to reconcile decades of nitrate isotopic measurements in freshwater and seawater - and move toward a unified understanding of cycling processes and isotope systematics. Our findings indicate that denitrification operates within the pervasive context of other re-oxidation mechanisms, specifically highlighting the relative importance of nitrification in marine denitrifying systems and anammox in groundwater aquifers.

  17. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.J.; Tank, J.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Wollheim, W.M.; Hall, R.O.; Mulholland, P.J.; Peterson, B.J.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, W.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Johnson, S.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Poole, G.C.; Maurice, Valett H.; Arango, C.P.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; O'Brien, J. M.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Sobota, D.J.; Thomas, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N 2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowing waters. Here, we present the results of whole-stream 15N-tracer additions conducted in 72 headwater streams draining multiple land-use types across the United States. We found that stream denitrification produces N2O at rates that increase with stream water nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, but that production, but does not increase the N2O yield. In our study, most streams were sources of N2O to the atmosphere and the highest emission rates were observed in streams draining urban basins. Using a global river network model, we estimate that microbial N transformations (e.g., denitrification and nitrification) convert at least 0.68 Tg??y -1 of anthropogenic N inputs to N2O in river networks, equivalent to 10% of the global anthropogenic N2O emission rate. This estimate of stream and river N2O emissions is three times greater than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  18. The use of organic wastes at different degrees of maturity as carbon sources for denitrification of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plüg, B D; Cibati, A; Trois, C

    2015-12-01

    In this study different garden refuses were investigated to ascertain their efficiency to act as carbon sources in a denitrification system. Six different garden refuse materials were studied: commercial and domestic garden refuse raw (CGR RAW, DGR RAW), immaturely composted domestic and commercial garden refuse (DGR 10 and CGR 10 respectively), commercial garden refuse composted by Dome Aeration Technology and by "turned windrow" technology (DAT and TW). Different concentrations of synthetic nitrate solution were used to assess the efficiency of each substrate. The results demonstrate that all substrates were able to sustain the denitrification process. However, due to its higher C/N ratio the CGR RAW was the better performing of the materials, reaching 100% removal after 8 and 12h for the 100 and 500 mg L(-1) respectively and after 11 days for 2000 mg L(-1). Kinetic studies revealed that the zero-order reaction better describes the process indicating a denitrification rate independent from the nitrate concentrations investigated when 100 and 500 mg L(-1) of nitrate were used. The study demonstrated the suitability of organic municipal solid wastes to sustain denitrification, opening a new scenario towards a low cost and in situ solution for treatment of landfill leachate by using wastes, otherwise disposed of in landfill. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal denitrification of evaporators concentrates in reactor with fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnot, C.

    1993-11-01

    As part of the treatments of liquid wastes coming from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, the study of a thermal denitrification process for evaporator concentrates has been chosen by the CEA/CEN Cadarache: the fluidized-bed calcination. This work presents the study of a calcination pilot-plant for wastes with a very high sodium nitrate content. After a reactional analysis carried out in a thermobalance on samples which are representative of the fluidized-bed compounds, the perfecting of many of the plant parameters - such as the solution injection system - was carried out on a scale-model at first. Then, it was verified on the pilot-plant, and some experiments have been carried out. A mathematical model for the particle growth inside the fluidized-bed is proposed. (author). 179 refs., 65 figs., 23 tabs

  20. Relative importance of plant uptake and plant associated denitrification for removal of nitrogen from mine drainage in sub-arctic wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Sara; Hellman, Maria; Choudhury, Maidul I; Ecke, Frauke

    2015-11-15

    Reactive nitrogen (N) species released from undetonated ammonium-nitrate based explosives used in mining or other blasting operations are an emerging environmental problem. Wetlands are frequently used to treat N-contaminated water in temperate climate, but knowledge on plant-microbial interactions and treatment potential in sub-arctic wetlands is limited. Here, we compare the relative importance of plant uptake and denitrification among five plant species commonly occurring in sub-arctic wetlands for removal of N in nitrate-rich mine drainage in northern Sweden. Nitrogen uptake and plant associated potential denitrification activity and genetic potential for denitrification based on quantitative PCR of the denitrification genes nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII were determined in plants growing both in situ and cultivated in a growth chamber. The growth chamber and in situ studies generated similar results, suggesting high relevance and applicability of results from growth chamber experiments. We identified denitrification as the dominating pathway for N-removal and abundances of denitrification genes were strong indicators of plant associated denitrification activity. The magnitude and direction of the effect differed among the plant species, with the aquatic moss Drepanocladus fluitans showing exceptionally high ratios between denitrification and uptake rates, compared to the other species. However, to acquire realistic estimates of N-removal potential of specific wetlands and their associated plant species, the total plant biomass needs to be considered. The species-specific plant N-uptake and abundance of denitrification genes on the root or plant surfaces were affected by the presence of other plant species, which show that both multi- and inter-trophic interactions are occurring. Future studies on N-removal potential of wetland plant species should consider how to best exploit these interactions in sub-arctic wetlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. Nitrate removal by electro-bioremediation technology in Korean soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong-Hee; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Lee, Hyun-Goo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Bae, Jeong-Hyo

    2009-01-01

    The nitrate concentration of surface has become a serious concern in agricultural industry through out the world. In the present study, nitrate was removed in the soil by employing electro-bioremediation, a hybrid technology of bioremediation and electrokinetics. The abundance of Bacillus spp. as nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated and identified from the soil sample collected from a greenhouse at Jinju City of Gyengsangnamdo, South Korea. The nitrate reducing bacterial species were identified by 16 s RNA sequencing technique. The efficiency of bacterial isolates on nitrate removal in broth was tested. The experiment was conducted in an electrokinetic (EK) cell by applying 20 V across the electrodes. The nitrate reducing bacteria (Bacillus spp.) were inoculated in the soil for nitrate removal process by the addition of necessary nutrient. The influence of nitrate reducers on electrokinetic process was also studied. The concentration of nitrate at anodic area of soil was higher when compared to cathode in electrokinetic system, while adding bacteria in EK (EK + bio) system, the nitrate concentration was almost nil in all the area of soil. The bacteria supplies electron from organic degradation (humic substances) and enhances NO 3 - reduction (denitrification). Experimental results showed that the electro-bio kinetic process viz. electroosmosis and physiological activity of bacteria reduced nitrate in soil environment effectively. Involvement of Bacillus spp. on nitrification was controlled by electrokinetics at cathode area by reduction of ammonium ions to nitrogen gas. The excellence of the combined electro-bio kinetics technology on nitrate removal is discussed.

  2. Assessment of the acute toxicity of eutrophic sediments after the addition of calcium nitrate (Ibirité reservoir, Minas Gerais-SE Brazil: initial laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Janke

    the calcium nitrate technology proved effective in retaining phosphorus, promoting sediment oxidation via denitrification, from the ecotoxicological standpoint and under the experimental conditions of this study, the application of nitrate for remediation of the sediments in the Ibirité reservoir did not prove effective up to a period of 135 days of incubation. However, we presume that after longer periods of incubation, treated sediments may recover their ability to sustain a benthic community. More advanced experiments are planned involving longer incubation times, thus extending the denitrification process, which may lead to a higher phosphorus retention capacity and to more complete abatement of sediment toxicity.

  3. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, Jake [University of Notre Dame, IN; Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wollheim, Wilfred [University of New Hampshire; Hall, Robert [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory; Ashkenas, Linda [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL; Dahm, Cliff [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Dodds, Walter [Kansas State University; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; Johnson, Sherri [Oregon State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Poole, Geoffrey C. [Montana State University; Valett, H. Maurice [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Arango, Clay [University of Notre Dame, IN; Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Helton, Ashley [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Johnson, Laura [University of Notre Dame, IN; O' Brien, Jon [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sheibley, Rich [Arizona State University; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University; Thomas, Suzanne [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N{sub 2}O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N{sub 2}O and dinitrogen (N{sub 2}). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N{sub 2}O rather than N{sub 2} (i.e., the N{sub 2}O yield) is an important determinant of how much N{sub 2}O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N{sub 2}O yield in flowing waters. Here, we present the results of whole-stream {sup 15}N-tracer additions conducted in 72 headwater streams draining multiple land-use types across the United States. We found that stream denitrification produces N{sub 2}O at rates that increase with stream water nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations, but that <1% of denitrified N is converted to N{sub 2}O. Unlike some previous studies, we found no relationship between the N{sub 2}O yield and stream water NO{sub 3}{sup -}. We suggest that increased stream NO{sub 3}{sup -} loading stimulates denitrification and concomitant N{sub 2}O production, but does not increase the N{sub 2}O yield. In our study, most streams were sources of N{sub 2}O to the atmosphere and the highest emission rates were observed in streams draining urban basins. Using a global river network model, we estimate that microbial N transformations (e.g., denitrification and nitrification) convert at least 0.68 Tg {center_dot} y{sup -1} of anthropogenic N inputs to N{sub 2}O in river networks, equivalent to 10% of the global anthropogenic N{sub 2}O emission rate. This estimate of stream and river N{sub 2}O emissions is three times greater than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  4. Denitrification performance of acclimated bio-floc in sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Qingsong; Li, Hua; Dong, Hongbiao; Duan, Yafei; Zhang, Jiasong

    2018-01-01

    Bio-floc technology (BFT) is a new aquaculture models contain both aquaculture and water treatment. Nevertheless, there exists a universal phenomenon of nitrate accumulation in bio-floc system with zero water exchange. In this study, bio-floc was acclimated under 2 hours anaerobic conditions per day by sequencing batch method, which aims to enrichment culture denitrifying microorganisms. The results illustrated that NH4 +-N and NO2 --N concentration in effluent was remained below 0.5 mg/L and 0.1 mg/L respectively, coupled with NO3 --N below 57 mg/L during 240 days cultivation and acclimation. The nitrate concentration was far less than results reported in other bio-floc system with zero water exchange. After acclimation, the anaerobic denitrification performance of the bio-floc was tested and it exhibited high denitrification activity. Nitrate removal rate was approximately 100%, and special nitrate reduction rate was as high as 475.74 mg/(gVSS·d). This acclimation method made bio-floc could be used to nitrogen removal in aquaculture water treatment.

  5. Distributed denitrification in a northeastern agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. R.; Groffman, P. M.; Walter, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Denitrification may be an important sink of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in eastern US watersheds. Denitrification occurs primarily under anaerobic conditions by heterotrophic microbes, and is therefore expected to be vigorous in wet soils containing large amounts of organic carbon. Actual rates of denitrification, however, have been difficult to quantify, and remain one of the critical unresolved N processes at the landscape scale. We measured denitrification rates in situ along hydrologic flow paths and across gradients of hydroperiodicities, i.e., frequencies and durations of saturated conditions, at Cornell University's Teaching & Research Center in Harford, NY (an active dairy farm). Denitrification rates were measured monthly using the 15N push-pull method from 14 mini-piezometers arrayed along a gradient of hydroperiodicity as indicated by a soil topographic index (STI). Measured rates of denitrification were spatially variable across sites and ranged from undetectable to over 4500 μg N/kg soil/day with a mean of 572 ± 167 μg N/kg soil/day. Mean rates of denitrification increased with STI, which ranged from 8.7 to 23.0 across our mini-piezometer sites. This relationship was used to estimate denitrification rates across the landscape and resolve a missing piece of the N budget for the farm. Only 14% of the farm fell into areas of STI greater than 8.7; however, denitrification in these areas account for more than 60% of the missing N balance for the entire landscape. Improved understanding of the distribution and magnitudes of denitrification in agricultural landscapes has good potential to facilitate new, novel, and better management practices for controlling N loading to streams and rivers. Indeed, the very areas that appear to have a propensity to harbor denitrification, i.e., areas prone to be wet, are often artificially drained as part of standard agricultural practices which reduces the frequency that these areas are likely to be anaerobic and

  6. Denitrification and Biodiversity of Denitrifiers in a High-Mountain Mediterranean Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Castellano-Hinojosa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wet deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr species is considered a main factor contributing to N inputs, of which nitrate (NO3− is usually the major component in high-mountain lakes. The microbial group of denitrifiers are largely responsible for reduction of nitrate to molecular dinitrogen (N2 in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, but the role of denitrification in removal of contaminant nitrates in high-mountain lakes is not well understood. We have used the oligotrophic, high-altitude La Caldera lake in the Sierra Nevada range (Spain as a model to study the role of denitrification in nitrate removal. Dissolved inorganic Nr concentration in the water column of la Caldera, mainly nitrate, decreased over the ice-free season which was not associated with growth of microbial plankton or variations in the ultraviolet radiation. Denitrification activity, estimated as nitrous oxide (N2O production, was measured in the water column and in sediments of the lake, and had maximal values in the month of August. Relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria in sediments was studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA and the two phylogenetically distinct clades nosZI and nosZII genes encoding nitrous oxide reductases. Diversity of denitrifiers in sediments was assessed using a culture-dependent approach and after the construction of clone libraries employing the nosZI gene as a molecular marker. In addition to genera Polymorphum, Paracoccus, Azospirillum, Pseudomonas, Hyphomicrobium, Thauera, and Methylophaga, which were present in the clone libraries, Arthrobacter, Burkholderia, and Rhizobium were also detected in culture media that were not found in the clone libraries. Analysis of biological activities involved in the C, N, P, and S cycles from sediments revealed that nitrate was not a limiting nutrient in the lake, allowed N2O production and determined denitrifiers’ community structure. All these results indicate that

  7. Solid phase electron donors control denitrification in groundwater at agricultural sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater caused by agricultural use of chemical and organic fertilizers are a concern because of possible risks to environmental and human health. At many sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Recent studies have clarified the factors affecting the rates and extents of denitrification in groundwater in agricultural areas. Intensive studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey to study agricultural chemicals in California, Nebraska, Washington, and Maryland using laboratory analyses, field measurements, and flow and transport modeling for monitoring well transects (0.5 to 2.5 km in length) and vertical profiles (0 to 50 m in depth). Groundwater analyses included major ion chemistry, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, and atmospheric age-tracers. Sediments were analyzed for concentrations of potential electron donors for denitrification, including reduced iron and sulfur, and organic carbon. Geochemical data and mass balance calculations indicated that solid-phase electron donors were an important factor controlling denitrification at these sites. To examine the generality of this result, a mathematical model of vertical flux of water, oxygen, and nitrate was developed and applied at these study sites along with 2 new study sites in Iowa and Mississippi and 8 additional sites from previous studies in Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Maryland (2 sites), and New York. Model results confirmed the importance of solid phase electron donors. The normalized reaction rates on an electron flux basis tended to increase with depth from the shallow oxygen reduction zone to the underlying nitrate reduction zone. The pattern of higher rates at depth is consistent with a reaction rate controlled by solid phase donors that are depleted under oxidizing conditions near the surface and in

  8. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process for decentralized wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Lynn, Thomas J; Banihani, Qais; Bartacek, Jan; Jenicek, Pavel; Ergas, Sarina J

    2014-09-15

    Nitrogen discharges from decentralized wastewater treatment (DWT) systems contribute to surface and groundwater contamination. However, the high variability in loading rates, long idle periods and lack of regular maintenance presents a challenge for biological nitrogen removal in DWT. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process was developed that combines nitrate (NO3(-)) adsorption to scrap tire chips with sulfur-oxidizing denitrification. This allows the tire chips to adsorb NO3(-) when the influent loading exceeds the denitrification capacity of the biofilm and release it when NO3(-) loading rates are low (e.g. at night). Three waste products, scrap tire chips, elemental sulfur pellets and crushed oyster shells, were used as a medium in adsorption, leaching, microcosm and up-flow packed bed bioreactor studies of NO3(-) removal from synthetic nitrified DWT wastewater. Adsorption isotherms showed that scrap tire chips have an adsorption capacity of 0.66 g NO3(-)-N kg(-1) of scrap tires. Leaching and microcosm studies showed that scrap tires leach bioavailable organic carbon that can support mixotrophic metabolism, resulting in lower effluent SO4(2-) concentrations than sulfur oxidizing denitrification alone. In column studies, the T-SHAD process achieved high NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies under steady state (90%), variable flow (89%) and variable concentration (94%) conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of millennial-scale changes in Arabian Sea denitrification on atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altabet, M.A.; Higginson, M.J.; Murray, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    Most global biogeochemical processes are known to respond to climate change, some of which have the capacity to produce feedbacks through the regulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Marine denitrification - the reduction of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen - is an important process in this regard, affecting greenhouse gas concentrations directly through the incidental production of nitrous oxide, and indirectly through modification of the marine nitrogen inventory and hence the biological pump for C0 2 . Although denitrification has been shown to vary with glacial-interglacial cycles, its response to more rapid climate change has not yet been well characterized. Here we present nitrogen isotope ratio, nitrogen content and chlorin abundance data from sediment cores with high accumulation rates on the Oman continental margin that reveal substantial millennial-scale variability in Arabian Sea denitrification and productivity during the last glacial period. The detailed correspondence of these changes with Dansgaard-Oeschger events recorded in Greenland ice cores indicates rapid, century-scale reorganization of the Arabian Sea ecosystem in response to climate excursions, mediated through the intensity of summer monsoonal upwelling. Considering the several-thousand-year residence time of fixed nitrogen in the ocean, the response of global marine productivity to changes in denitrification would have occurred at lower frequency and appears to be related to climatic and atmospheric C0 2 oscillations observed in Antarctic ice cores between 20 and A kyr ago. (author)

  10. Characterization of Biogenic Gas and Mineral Formation Process by Denitrification in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. A.; Kim, D.; Mahabadi, N.; van Paassen, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Biologically mediated processes have been regarded and developed as an alternative approach to traditional ground improvement techniques. Denitrification has been investigated as a potential ground improvement process towards liquefaction hazard mitigation. During denitrification, microorganisms reduce nitrate to dinitrogen gas and facilitate calcium carbonate precipitation as a by-product under adequate environmental conditions. The formation of dinitrogen gas desaturates soils and allows for potential pore pressure dampening during earthquake events. While, precipitation of calcium carbonate can improve the mechanical properties by filling the voids and cementing soil particles. As a result of small changes in gas and mineral phases, the mechanical properties of soils can be significantly affected. Prior research has primarily focused on quantitative analysis of overall residual calcium carbonate mineral and biogenic gas products in lab-scale porous media. However, the distribution of these products at the pore-scale has not been well-investigated. In this research, denitrification is activated in a microfluidic chip simulating a homogenous pore structure. The denitrification process is monitored by sequential image capture, where gas and mineral phase changes are evaluated by image processing. Analysis of these images correspond with previous findings, which demonstrate that biogenic gas behaviour at the pore scale is affected by the balance between reaction, diffusion, and convection rates.

  11. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yan-Chun; Prommer, Henning; Broers, Hans Peter; Slomp, Caroline P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159424003; Greskowiak, Janek; Van Der Grift, Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/373433484; Van Cappellen, Philippe|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829366

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  12. Kinetics of nitrous oxide production by denitrification in municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuanfu; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    As one of the Nitrous Oxide (N2O) production pathways, denitrification plays an important role in regulating the emission of N2O into the atmosphere. In this study, the influences of different substrate concentrations and transient conditions on the denitrification rate and N2O-reducing activities were investigated. Results revealed that N2O production rates (i.e. denitrification rates) were stimulated by increased total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, while it was restrained under high oxygen concentrations. Moreover, the impact of nitrate concentrations on N2O production rates depended on the TOC/NO3--N ratios. All the N2O production rate data fitted well to a multiplicative Monod equation, with terms describing the influence of TOC and nitrate concentrations, and an Arrhenius-type equation. Furthermore, results demonstrated that high temperatures minimized the N2O-reducing activities in aged municipal solid waste, resulting in an accumulation of N2O. On the other hand, a transient condition caused by changing O2 concentrations may strongly influence the N2O production rates and N2O-reducing activities in solid waste. Finally, based on the results, we believe that a landfill aeration strategy properly designed to prevent rising temperatures and to cycle air injection is the key to reducing emissions of N2O during remediation of old landfills by means of in situ aeration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the nitrogen cycle of coastal ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giblin, Anne E.; Tobias, Craig R.; Song, Bongkeun

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, it was believed that biological assimilation and gaseous nitrogen (N) loss through denitrification were the two major fates of nitrate entering or produced within most coastal ecosystems. Denitrification is often viewed as an important ecosystem service that removes reactive N from...... the ecosystem. However, there is a competing nitrate reduction process, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), that conserves N within the ecosystem. The recent application of nitrogen stable isotopes as tracers has generated growing evidence that DNRA is a major nitrogen pathway that cannot...... of denitrification and DNRA, and how the balance changes with increased nitrogen loading, is of critical importance for predicting eutrophication trajectories. Recent improvements in methods for assessing rates of DNRA have helped refine our understanding of the rates and controls of this process, but accurate...

  14. Determining Roles of Accessory Genes in Denitrification by Mutant Fitness Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Brian J; Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Price, Morgan N; Wetmore, Kelly M; Poole, Farris L; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam P; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes of the denitrification pathway play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, including release of nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. In addition, nitric oxide reductase, maturation factors, and proteins associated with nitric oxide detoxification are used by pathogens to combat nitric oxide release by host immune systems. While the core reductases that catalyze the conversion of nitrate to dinitrogen are well understood at a mechanistic level, there are many peripheral proteins required for denitrification whose basic function is unclear. A bar-coded transposon DNA library from Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 was grown under denitrifying conditions, using nitrate or nitrite as an electron acceptor, and also under molybdenum limitation conditions, with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Analysis of sequencing results from these growths yielded gene fitness data for 3,307 of the 4,265 protein-encoding genes present in strain RCH2. The insights presented here contribute to our understanding of how peripheral proteins contribute to a fully functioning denitrification pathway. We propose a new low-affinity molybdate transporter, OatABC, and show that differential regulation is observed for two MoaA homologs involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. We also propose that NnrS may function as a membrane-bound NO sensor. The dominant HemN paralog involved in heme biosynthesis is identified, and a CheR homolog is proposed to function in nitrate chemotaxis. In addition, new insights are provided into nitrite reductase redundancy, nitric oxide reductase maturation, nitrous oxide reductase maturation, and regulation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Combining pyrosequencing and isotopic approaches to assess denitrification in a hyporheic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Kaown, Dugin; Mayer, Bernhard; Lee, Jin-Yong; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2018-03-12

    Hyporheic zones are considered hot spots for numerically vast and phylogenetically diverse microbial communities. However, biogeochemical effects of hyporheic zones have rarely been investigated in detail because of the difficulty in accurately measuring denitrification in these zones. To date, little is known about the hydroecology of hyporheic zones. The effect of changes in hydraulic conditions on the community variations of indigenous microorganisms and water quality was examined based on the depth of the hyporheic zone. In particular, we report on the use of the pyrosequencing technique to elucidate denitrifying bacteria (DNB) community profiles combined with the stable isotope composition of nitrate and hydrological patterns in the hyporheic zones to reveal whether denitrification occurs. δ 15 N-NO 3 and δ 18 O-NO 3 values of nitrate were analyzed to evaluate the transformation processes of nitrate in upwelling and downwelling areas and mixed zones. The isotope values indicated different origins of water in upwelling and downwelling zones and that denitrification occurred predominantly in the upwelling areas. Analyses of microbial communities in the hyporheic zone showed that the new genera, species, and isotope data were associated with the hydrological uniqueness of the hyporheic zones. The 16S rRNA sequences were determined and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the DNB communities distributed and gathered the genus Comamonas denitrificans within the mixing patterns of the hyporheic zones and that the relative scarcity of these microbes in these zones was caused by the lack of appropriate substrates. The delineation of the surface water-groundwater mixing zone was quantitatively determined by systematically combining the hydrological and heat transfer analyses and by comparing denitrifying bacteria communities and N isotope data. This study showed that pyrosequencing and isotopic approaches are useful for evaluating the transformation processes of

  16. Oxygen at nanomolar levels reversibly suppresses process rates and gene expression of anammox and denitrification in the oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Tage; Stewart, Frank J.; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O2 and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N2-producing processes of anammox and denitrification determine where this loss occurs. We studied experimentally how O2...... at nanomolar levels affects anammox and denitrification rates and the transcription of nitrogen cycle genes in the anoxic OMZ off Chile. Rates of anammox and denitrification were reversibly suppressed, most likely at the enzyme level. Fiftypercent inhibition of N2 and N2O production by denitrification....... This O2 concentration did not suppress the transcription of other dissimilatory nitrogen cycle genes, including nitrate reductase (narG), hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo), and nitrite reductase (nirK). However, taxonomic characterization of transcripts suggested inhibition of narG transcription...

  17. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments......, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques...... in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were...

  18. Denitrification potential and its correlation to physico-chemical and biological characteristics of saline wetland soils in semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huibin; Song, Yonghui; Xi, Beidou; Du, Erdeng; He, Xiaosong; Tu, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway of NO(3)(-) removal depending on wetland soil characteristics. Most studies on denitrification have been conducted in the freshwater wetlands and coastal marshes, but little information is available on how soil and environmental factors affect denitrification of saline wetlands in semi-arid regions. We conducted a correlative study on denitrification potential in relation to the physico-chemical and biological characteristics. Composite soil samples of different depths were collected from different halophyte communities along a saline-impact gradient around Wuliangsuhai Lake, i.e. Comm. Salicornia europaea (CSE), Comm. Suaeda glauca (CSG), Comm. Kalidium foliatum (CKF) and Comm. Sophora alopecuroides (CSA). The CSA soil profile showed the fastest denitrification kinetics and tended to yield the largest amount of N(2)O, followed by the CKF, CSG and CSE. The mean of potential denitrification rates was the highest across all depths of the CSA soil profile, followed by the CKF, CSG, and CSE. Principal component analysis indicated that exchangeable sodium percentage was a key factor to denitrification potential, apart from organic carbon, nitrate and denitrifying bacteria. The results could have significant implication in integrated assessment and management of salined wetlands for treating nutrient-rich return water from farmland, industrial wastewater and domestic sewage in the diverted trunk drain used for the lakeshore restoration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from shorter-term incubation experiments and sediment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eschenbach

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the spatial variability of denitrification rates and the lifetime of denitrification in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, regression models were derived to estimate the measured cumulative denitrification of aquifer sediments after one year of incubation from initial denitrification rates and several sediment parameters, namely total sulphur, total organic carbon, extractable sulphate, extractable dissolved organic carbon, hot water soluble organic carbon and potassium permanganate labile organic carbon.

    For this purpose, we incubated aquifer material from two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany under anaerobic conditions in the laboratory using the 15N tracer technique. The measured amount of denitrification ranged from 0.19 to 56.2 mg N kg−1 yr−1. The laboratory incubations exhibited high differences between non-sulphidic and sulphidic aquifer material in both aquifers with respect to all investigated sediment parameters. Denitrification rates and the estimated lifetime of denitrification were higher in the sulphidic samples. For these samples, the cumulative denitrification measured during one year of incubation (Dcum(365 exhibited distinct linear regressions with the stock of reduced compounds in the investigated aquifer samples. Dcum(365 was predictable from sediment variables within a range of uncertainty of 0.5 to 2 (calculated Dcum(365/measured Dcum(365 for aquifer material with a Dcum(365 > 20 mg N kg−1 yr−1. Predictions were poor for samples with lower Dcum(365, such as samples from the NO3 bearing groundwater zone, which includes the non-sulphidic samples, from the upper part of both aquifers where denitrification is not sufficient to

  20. Denitrification mechanism in combustion of biocoal briquettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejoon; Li, Tianji

    2005-02-15

    Pulp black liquor (PBL), an industrial waste from paper production, has been previously shown to be an effective binder and denitrification agent for coal briquettes. This study investigated the denitrification mechanism of PBL in both the volatile combustion and char combustion stages of coal briquettes. X-ray diffraction and ion chromatography were used to analyze the residual ashes of combustion. The exhaust gas was analyzed by a flue gas analysis system and a Q-mass spectrometry system. The denitrification mechanism of PBL in the volatile combustion stage was found to result from the emission of NH3. The denitrification of PBL in the char combustion stage was associated with the NaOH contained in PBL. The direct reaction of NaOH with NO gas was examined, and some interesting phenomena were observed. Pure carbon or pure NaOH showed only limited reaction with NO. However, the mixture of NaOH and carbon (NaOH + C) significantly enhanced the reaction. This mixture increased the NO removal up to 100%. Subsequently, denitrification lasted for a long time period, with about 25% of NO removal. The pyrolysis characteristic of NaNO3, a compound resulting from denitrification, was also affected by the presence of carbon. In the presence of carbon, the NOx emission resulting from the pyrolysis of NaNO3 was reduced by a factor of 6. Since the denitrification phenomena appeared only in the absence of oxygen, a model of oxygen distribution in a burning coal briquette was employed to explain the reactions occurring in real combustion of coal briquettes.

  1. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor......An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... for frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design...

  2. Benthic nitrogen loss in the Arabian Sea off Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSokoll

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pronounced deficit of nitrogen (N in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ of theArabian Sea suggests the occurrence of heavy N-loss that is commonly attributed to pelagicprocesses. However, the OMZ water is in direct contact with sediments on three sides of thebasin. Contribution from benthic N-loss to the total N-loss in the Arabian Sea remains largelyunassessed. In October 2007, we sampled the water column and surface sediments along atransect cross-cutting the Arabian Sea OMZ at the Pakistan continental margin, covering arange of station depths from 360 to 1430 m. Benthic denitrification and anammox rates weredetermined by using 15N-stable isotope pairing experiments. Intact core incubations showeddeclining rates of total benthic N-loss with water depth from 0.55 to 0.18 mmol N m-2 d-1.While denitrification rates measured in slurry incubations decreased from 2.73 to 1.46 mmolN m-2 d-1 with water depth, anammox rates increased from 0.21 to 0.89 mmol N m-2 d-1.Hence, the contribution from anammox to total benthic N-loss increased from 7% at 360 m to40% at 1430 m. This trend is further supported by the quantification of nirS, the biomarkerfunctional gene encoding for cytochrome cd1-nitrite reductases of microorganisms involved inboth N-loss processes. Anammox-like nirS genes within the sediments increased in proportionto total nirS gene copies with water depth. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of nirS revealeddifferent communities of both denitrifying and anammox bacteria between shallow and deepstations. Together, rate measurement and nirS analyses showed that anammox, determined forthe first time in the Arabian Sea sediments, is an important benthic N-loss process at thecontinental margin off Pakistan, especially in the sediments at deeper water depths.Extrapolation from the measured benthic N-loss to all shelf sediments within the basinsuggests that benthic N-loss may be responsible for about half of the overall N-loss in theArabian Sea.

  3. Research on denitrification efficiency of three types of solid carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Zhang, J. D.; Li, F.; Cao, Y. X.; Zhu, L. Y.; Xiao, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    C/N rates can greatly influence efficiency of denitrification. It is difficult for current treated effluent to reach GB18918-2002 primary effluent standard because of its low C/N rate. To improve the efficiency of denitrification, the quality of effluent, and realize the waste recycling, this article selected magnolia leaves, loofah and degradable meal box as the solid carbon source and set different solid-liquid ratio of magnolia leaves for periodic denitrification stage to study the change of NO3 --N, TN, COD, NO2 --N, NH4 +, PO4 3- and color. The results showed that in the condition of influent nitrate concentration of 40 mg/L, carbon dosage of 10 g, the reaction temperature of 25°C, the nitrate removal rates of magnolia leaves and loofah reached 89.0% and 96.8% respectively, rather higher than degradable meal box (56.3%). The TN removal rates of magnolia leaves (91.7%) and loofah (77.7%) were both higher than degradable meal box (53.9%), and the effluent TN concentration of loofah and degradable meal box reached 25.4 mg/L and 21.1 mg/L respectively, which couldn’t be discharged according to the primary effluent concentration standard of GB18918-2002. The released concentration of ammonia nitrogen and phosphate: loofah> magnolia> degradable meal box. The high solid-liquid ratio of magnolia leaves helped to improve the TN removal rate, which reached 75.0% (1:200) and 91.7% (1:100), but it caused higher released concentration of carbon, ammonia nitrogen and phosphate to effect system heavily. Under the integrated analysis, the low solid-liquid ratio (1:200) of magnolia leaves was more suitable to be the denitrification external carbon source.

  4. Plant trait diversity buffers variability in denitrification potential over changes in season and soil conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie M McGill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Denitrification is an important ecosystem service that removes nitrogen (N from N-polluted watersheds, buffering soil, stream, and river water quality from excess N by returning N to the atmosphere before it reaches lakes or oceans and leads to eutrophication. The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA assay is widely used for measuring denitrification potential. Because DEA is a function of enzyme levels in soils, most ecologists studying denitrification have assumed that DEA is less sensitive to ambient levels of nitrate (NO(3(- and soil carbon and thus, less variable over time than field measurements. In addition, plant diversity has been shown to have strong effects on microbial communities and belowground processes and could potentially alter the functional capacity of denitrifiers. Here, we examined three questions: (1 Does DEA vary through the growing season? (2 If so, can we predict DEA variability with environmental variables? (3 Does plant functional diversity affect DEA variability? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study site is a restored wetland in North Carolina, US with native wetland herbs planted in monocultures or mixes of four or eight species. We found that denitrification potentials for soils collected in July 2006 were significantly greater than for soils collected in May and late August 2006 (p<0.0001. Similarly, microbial biomass standardized DEA rates were significantly greater in July than May and August (p<0.0001. Of the soil variables measured--soil moisture, organic matter, total inorganic nitrogen, and microbial biomass--none consistently explained the pattern observed in DEA through time. There was no significant relationship between DEA and plant species richness or functional diversity. However, the seasonal variance in microbial biomass standardized DEA rates was significantly inversely related to plant species functional diversity (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that

  5. The significance of denitrification of applied nitrogen in fallow and cropped rice soils under different flooding regimes. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillery, I.R.P.; Vlek, P.L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The role of nitrification-denitrification in the loss of nitrogen from urea applied to puddled soils planted to rice and subjected to continuous and intermittent flooding was evaluated in three greenhouse pot studies. The loss of N via denitrification was estimated indirectly using the 15 N balance, after either first accounting for NH 3 volatilization or by analyzing the 15 N balance immediately before and after the soil was dried and reflooded. When urea was broadcast and incorporated the loss of 15 N from the soil-plant systems depended on the soil, being about 20% - 25% for the silt loams and only 10% - 12% for the clay. Ammonia volatilization accounted for an average 20% of the N applied in the silt loam. Denitrification losses could not account for more than 10% of the applied N in any of the continuously flooded soil-plant systems under study and were most likely less than 5%. Intermittent flooding of soil planted to rice did not increase the loss of N. Denitrification appeared to be an important loss mechanism in continuously flooded fallow soils, accounting for the loss of approximately 40% of the applied 15 N. Loss of 15 N was not appreciably enhanced in fallow soils undergoing intermittent flooding. Apparently, nitrate formed in oxidized zones in the soil was readily denitrified in the absence of plant roots. Extensive loss (66%) of 15 N-labeled nitrate was obtained when 100 mg/pot of nitrate-N was applied to the surface of nonflooded soil prior to reflooding. This result suggests that rice plants may not compete effectively with denitrifiers if large quantities of nitrate were to accumulate during intermittent dry periods. (orig.)

  6. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  7. Drinking water decontamination by biological denitrification using fresh bamboo as inoculum source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucco, Samuel; Padoin, Natan; Netto, Willibaldo Schmidell; Soares, Hugo Moreira

    2014-10-01

    Groundwater contamination is becoming a serious problem in many Brazilian regions. European countries started to deal with this issue in the 1980s, mainly caused by the extensive usage of nitrogenous fertilizers and the absence of domestic wastewater treatment. Due to its high solubility, nitrate readily passes through the soil and reaches the aquifer. Thereafter, this ion moves, following groundwater flow, and can be found several kilometers from the area where the pollution occurred. Concern about nitrate contamination is due to the link found between this contaminant and various human health diseases, such as methemoglobin and cancer. Studies carried out in France enabled the design and implementation of several biological denitrification plants throughout the country, in order to remove nitrate from its contaminated groundwater. Heterotrophic denitrification facilities shown to be adequate to treat high water flows with satisfactory nitrate removal efficiency, especially when static media supports are employed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the existence of denitrifying microorganisms in bamboo (Bambusa tuldóides) and verify the feasibility of their use to inoculate a pilot-scale fixed-bed bioreactor. The support material selected to fill the bioreactor bed was commercial polypropylene Pall rings, since such support has a high porosity associated with a wide superficial area. The bioreactor was able to produce and retain a large amount of cells. Using ethanol as carbon source, nitrate (N-NO3(-)) removal efficiency of the bioreactor stood around 80 % for a maximum nitrogen loading rate of approximately 6.5 mg N-NO3 (-) L(-1) h(-1).

  8. Simultaneous selenate reduction and denitrification by a consortium of enriched mine site bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Gaurav; Taylor, Jon; Hatam, Ido; Baldwin, Susan A

    2017-09-01

    Increasing selenium concentrations in aquatic environments downstream of mine sites is of great concern due to selenium's bioaccumulation propensity and teratogenic toxicity. Removal of selenium from mine influenced water is complicated by the presence of nitrate, which is also elevated in mine influenced water due to the use of explosives in mining. In many biological treatment processes, nitrate as a thermodynamically more preferable electron acceptor inhibits selenate reduction. Here we report on an enrichment of a bacterial assemblage from a mine impacted natural marsh sediment that was capable of simultaneous selenate reduction and denitrification. Selenate reduction followed first order kinetics with respect to the concentration of total dissolved selenium. The kinetic rate constant was independent of initial nitrate concentration over the range 3-143 mg L -1 -NO 3 - -N. The initial concentration of selenate inhibited selenate reduction kinetics over the range 1-24 mg-Se L -1 . Dominant taxa that grew in selenate only medium were classified in the genera Pseudomonas, Lysinibacillus and Thauera. When nitrate was introduced in addition to selenate, previously rare taxa that became dominant were relatives of Exiguobacterium, Tissierella and Clostridium. Open reading frames (ORFs) associated with dissimilatory denitrification were identified for Pseudomonas, Thauera and Clostridium. In addition, ORFs were found that were homologous with known selenate reductase subunits (SerA and SerB). These findings suggest that native mine site bacteria can be used for removing selenate and nitrate from mine wastewater. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification for Aquatic Habitat in International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Uchida, S.

    2014-04-01

    The biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was constructed for aquatic animal experiments in the International Space Station (ISS). The biological filter will be used to remove harmful ammonia excreted from aquatic animals in a closed water circulation system (Aquatic Habitat). The biological filter is a cylindrical tank packed with porous glass beads for nitrification and dual plastic bags for denitrification. The porous beads are supporting media for Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells on the porous beads, oxidize the excreted ammonia to nitrate via nitrite. On the other hand, the dual bag is composed of an outer non-woven fabric bag and an inner non-porous polyethylene film bag. The outer bag is supporting media for Paracoccus pantotrophus. The inner bag, in which 99.5% ethanol is packed, releases the ethanol slowly, since ethanol can permeate through the non-porous polyethylene film. The P. pantotrophus cells on the outer bag reduce the produced nitrate to nitrogen gas by using the released ethanol as an electron donor for denitrification. The biological filter constructed in this study consequently removed the ammonia without accumulating nitrate. Most of the excess ethanol was consumed and did not affect the nitrification activity of the N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells severely. In accordance with the aquatic animal experiments in the ISS, small freshwater fish had been bred in the closed water circulation system equipped with the biological filter for 90 days. Ammonia concentration daily excreted from fish is assumed to be 1.7 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Under such conditions, the harmful ammonia and nitrite concentrations were kept below 0.1 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Nitrate and total organic carbon concentrations in the recirculation water were kept below 5 mg-N/L and 3 mg-C/L, respectively. All breeding fish were alive and ate

  10. Combined used of natural zeolites and microalgaes for the denitrification of wastewater from fertilizer plants; Uso combinado de zeolitas naturales y microalgas en la denitrificacion de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soca Olazabal, N.; Blanco Toledo, F.; Pizarro Camacho, D.

    1997-06-01

    In our work we investigated the process of denitrification of waster-water with high percentage of nitrate and ammonia using natural zeolites that can be used later in agricultures fertilizer, because of the nitrogen load received. This effluents was used for micro algae growth reducing the nitrate concentration, the micro algae was Chlorella Vulgaris. The zeolite reduced the NH``+{sub 4} concentration up to 5 mg/l. and the NH``+{sub 4} concentration in the zeolite, it si very important in the agriculture. The chlorella Vulgaris reduces 30 mg/l of nitrate in six hours in the steady state. (Author) 9 refs.

  11. Application of Lentikats Biotechnology for removal of nitrates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Denitrifying Bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in polyvinyl alcohol matrix (so called Lentikats Biocatalyst; LB) was applied for the removal of nitrates from simulated ion-exchange brines (12.14 g.L-1 Cl-, 1.35 g.L-1 SO42-, and 2.26 g.L-1 N-NO3-). The effect of brines dilution on the denitrification activity of fresh ...

  12. Heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-18

    Jul 18, 2011 ... Under the environmental conditions of 22% DO and C/N ratio of. 5, the ultimate efficiencies of nitrification ... aerobic nitrification-denitrification bacteria are abundant in wastewater and sludge environments ... to grow the bacteria at 32°C. After 28 days of enrichment with repeated inoculation every fourth day, ...

  13. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  14. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  15. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  16. A stable isotope tracer study of the influences of adjacent land use and riparian condition on fates of nitrate in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Sobota; Sherri L. Johnson; Stan V. Gregory; Linda R. Ashkenas

    2012-01-01

    The influence of land use on potential fates of nitrate in stream ecosystems, ranging from denitrification to storage in organic matter, has not been documented extensively. Here, we describe the Pacific Northwest component of Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment, phase II (LINX II) to examine how land-use setting influences fates of nitrate in streams.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Veterinary Antibiotics on Denitrification in Groundwater: A Microcosm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary antibiotics in groundwater may affect natural microbial denitrification process. A microcosm study was conducted to evaluate the influence of sulfamethazine and chlortetracycline at different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L on nitrate reduction in groundwater under denitrifying condition. Decrease in nitrate removal and nitrite production was observed with the antibiotics. Maximum inhibition of nitrate removal was observed after seven days of incubation with 0.01 mg/L sulfamethazine (17.0% and 1.0 mg/L chlortetracycline (15.4%. The nitrite production was inhibited with 1.0 mg/L sulfamethazine to 82.0% and chlortetracycline to 31.1%. The initial/final nitrate concentrations indicated that 0.01 mg/L sulfamethazine and 1.0 mg/L chlortetracycline were most effective in inhibiting activity of denitrifying bacteria in groundwater. After 12 days of incubation, the sulfamethazine biodegradation was observed whereas chlortetracycline was persistent. Sulfamethazine and chlortetracycline in groundwater could inhibit the growth and capability of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria, thereby threatening nitrate pollution in groundwater.

  18. Long-term operation of double chambered microbial fuel cell for bio-electro denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Yoong-Sin; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur; Thung, Wei-Eng

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this study is to investigate the performance of organic oxidation and denitrification of the system under long-term operation. The MFC reactor was operated in continuous mode for 180 days. Nitrate was successfully demonstrated as terminal electron acceptor, where nitrate was reduced at the cathode using electron provided by acetate oxidation at the anode. The removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrate were higher in the closed circuit system than in open circuit system. Both COD and nitrate reduction improved with the increase of organic loading and subsequently contributed to higher power output. The maximum nitrate removal efficiency was 88 ± 4 % (influent of 141 ± 14 mg/L). The internal resistant was 50 Ω, which was found to be low for a double chambered MFC. The maximum power density was 669 mW/m(3) with current density of 3487 mA/m(3).

  19. Characteristic of nitrous oxide production in partial denitrification process with high nitrite accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rui; Peng, Yongzhen; Cao, Shenbin; Wang, Shuying; Niu, Meng

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production during the partial denitrification process with nitrate (NO3(-)-N) to nitrite (NO2(-)-N) transformation ratio of 80% was investigated in this study. Results showed that N2O was seldom observed before complete depletion of NO3(-)-N, but it was closely related to the reduction of NO2(-)-N rather than NO3(-)-N. High COD/NO3(-)-N was in favor of N2O production in partial denitrification with high NO2(-)-N accumulation. It was seriously enhanced at constant acidic pH due to the free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition. However, the N2O production was much lower at initial pH of 5.5 and 6.5 due to the pH increase during denitrification process. Significantly, the pH turning point could be chosen as a controlled parameter to denote the end of NO3(-)-N reduction, which could not only achieve high NO2(-)-N accumulation but also decrease the N2O production significantly for practical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous denitrification and phosphorus removal by Agrobacterium sp. LAD9 under varying oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tao; Chen, Qian; Gui, Mengyao; Li, Can; Ni, Jinren

    2016-04-01

    Although efficient aerobic denitrification has received increasing attention, few studies have been made on simultaneous denitrification and phosphorus removal (SDPR) under aerobic condition. In this study, SDPR by an efficient aerobic denitrifier, Agrobacterium sp. LAD9, was firstly demonstrated. High nitrate and phosphorus removal rates of 7.50 and 1.02 mg L(-1) h(-1) were achieved in wide range of O2 concentration from 5.92 to 20.02 mg L(-1). The N2O production would be inhibited as O2 concentration exceeded 11.06 mg L(-1), while the phosphorus removal efficiency would be generally improved with increasing O2 concentration. (15)N mass spectrometry revealed that nitrogen removal accorded with the typical aerobic denitrification pathway, while (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P NMR) indicated the fate of phosphorus to cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and polyphosphate (poly-P) of the denitrifier. EPS acted as a reservoir of phosphorus and the transformation of poly-P was dynamic and depended on initial orthophosphate (ortho-P) content. The aerobic SDPR would greatly simplify the conventional wastewater treatment processes which required separated considerations of nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

  1. Selective enhancement and verification of woody biomass digestibility as a denitrification carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongting; Zheng, Xilai; Xin, Jia; Sun, Zhaoyue; Zheng, Tianyuan

    2017-11-01

    The denitrification efficiency of woody biomass as carbon source is low because of its poor carbon availability. In this study, representative poplar sawdust was pretreated with lime and peracetic acid to enhance the biomass digestibility to different degrees; sawdust was then mixed with soil to investigate its denitrification efficiency. Under controllable conditions (25-95°C, 12-24h, varying dosages), sawdust digestibility (characterized by reducing sugar yield) was selectively enhanced 1.0-21.8 times over that of the raw sawdust (28.8mgeq.glucoseg -1 dry biomass). This increase was mainly attributed to the removal of lignin from the biomass. As a carbon source, the sawdust (digestibility enhanced by 5.4 times) increased the nitrate removal rate by 4.7 times, without N 2 O emission. However, the sawdust with high digestibility (12.6 or 18.0 times), despite releasing more dissolved organic carbon (DOC), did not exhibit further increase in denitrification efficiency, and emitted N 2 O. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Denitrification and biofilm growth in a pilot-scale biofilter packed with suspended carriers for biological nitrogen removal from secondary effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunhong; Wu, Guangxue; Wei, Nan; Hu, Hongying

    2015-06-01

    Tertiary denitrification is an effective method for nitrogen removal from wastewater. A pilot-scale biofilter packed with suspended carriers was operated for tertiary denitrification with ethanol as the organic carbon source. Long-term performance, biokinetics of denitrification and biofilm growth were evaluated under filtration velocities of 6, 10 and 14 m/hr. The pilot-scale biofilter removed nitrate from the secondary effluent effectively, and the nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) removal percentage was 82%, 78% and 55% at the filtration velocities of 6, 10 and 14 m/hr, respectively. At the filtration velocities of 6 and 10 m/hr, the nitrate removal loading rate increased with increasing influent nitrate loading rates, while at the filtration velocity of 14 m/hr, the removal loading rate and the influent loading rate were uncorrelated. During denitrification, the ratio of consumed chemical oxygen demand to removed NO3-N was 3.99-4.52 mg/mg. Under the filtration velocities of 6, 10 and 14 m/hr, the maximum denitrification rate was 3.12, 4.86 and 4.42 g N/(m2·day), the half-saturation constant was 2.61, 1.05 and 1.17 mg/L, and the half-order coefficient was 0.22, 0.32 and 0.24(mg/L)1/2/min, respectively. The biofilm biomass increased with increasing filtration velocity and was 2845, 5124 and 7324 mg VSS/m2 at filtration velocities of 6, 10 and 14 m/hr, respectively. The highest biofilm density was 44 mg/cm3 at the filtration velocity of 14 m/hr. Due to the low influent loading rate, biofilm biomass and thickness were lowest at the filtration velocity of 6m/hr. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Isotopologue data reveal denitrification as the primary source of nitrous oxide along a fertilization gradient in a temperature agricultural field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, N. E.; Ostrom, P. H.; Gandhi, H.; Millar, N.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    The microbial source of nitrous oxide in terrestrial ecosystems has long been debated. Both nitrification and denitrification produce nitrous oxide but their relative importance remains uncertain. Here we apply site preference, SP, (the difference in δ15N between the central and outer N atom in nitrous oxide), to estimate production of nitrous oxide from bacterial denitrification (including nitrifier denitrification). Soil flux chambers were deployed within 3 agricultural plots planted with wheat in corn-soybean wheat rotation as part of ongoing studies at the Kellogg Biological Stations Long-Term Ecosystem Research site. Distinct levels of urea-ammonium nitrate (28%) fertilizer were applied to each plot in the spring of 2007 to obtain totals of 0, 134, and 246 kg-N ha-1. Samples for nitrous oxide flux and isotopologue composition were collected approximately 4 times per week from May through December, 2007, in each of the plots. The average annual nitrous oxide flux weighted N isotope values increased along the fertilization gradient (-14.7, -12.3 and -9.1 ‰, for the no, medium and high N additions, respectively) whereas O isotope values decreased (33.2, 28.7 and 25.3 ‰, respectively). Flux weighted SP values along the fertilization gradient (0.7, 4.0 and 3.8 ‰, respectively) were low and consistent with an origin predominantly from denitrification based on SP values found for nitrification and denitrification in pure culture studies. Consequently, we find that irregardless of the level of fertilizer applied denitrification was the predominant source of nitrous oxide.

  4. Dynamics of nitrate production and removal as a function of residence time in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay P. Zarnetske; Roy Haggerty; Steven M. Wondzell; Michelle A. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Biogeochemical reactions associated with stream nitrogen cycling, such as nitrification and denitrification, can be strongly controlled by water and solute residence times in the hyporheic zone (HZ). We used a whole-stream steady state 15N-Iabeled nitrate and conservative tracer addition to investigate the spatial and temporal physiochemical...

  5. Batch studies on nitrate removal from potable water | Darbi | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sulphur / limestone autotrophic denitrification process was used to achieve the biological removal of nitrate from groundwater. The feasibility of the system was evaluated under anaerobic conditions using laboratory-scale batch reactors. The optimum sulphur / limestone ratio was determined to be 1:1 (wt/wt). Different ...

  6. Upwelling and isolation in oxygen-depleted anticyclonic modewater eddies and implications for nitrate cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Johannes; Schütte, Florian; Pietri, Alice

    2017-01-01

    utilization (AOU) versus dissolved inorganic nitrate (NO3-) ratios are about twice as high (16) in the eddy core compared to surrounding waters (8.1). A large NO3- deficit of 4 to 6μmolkg-1 is determined, rendering denitrification an unlikely explanation. Here it is hypothesized that the differences in local...

  7. Deep Nitrate Deficit Observed in the Highly Oxygenated East/Japan Sea and Its Possible Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Nam Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present evidence of denitrification on the continental slopes of the Ulleung Basin (UB and the Eastern Japan Basin (EJB near the Tatar Strait (TtS in the East/Japan Sea (EJS, despite its high water column dissolved oxygen concentrations. Some nutrient concentration data deviate significantly from the fitted regression line of nitrate (N vs. phosphate (P in deep waters, indicating a loss of nitrate in the region. The EJS has a lower N/P ratio (ca. 12.4 below 300 dbar than a traditional Redfield ratio (16. The N/P ratio and oxygen concentration are substantially lower at several locations whose depths are close to the sediment-water interface, near TtS (500 - 1100 dbar and in UB (1100 - 2200 dbar. The decreased nitrate concentration is smaller than the expected nitrate level (a low N/P ratio of < 12.4, and a secondary nitrite peak near the bottom of these two regions: taken collectively, both indicate the presence of denitrification in the bottom layer. It is speculated that active re-mineralization and denitrification may occur simultaneously along the rich organic matter bottom layer on the slope environment. Denitrification rates are estimated at ~3 - 33 μmol N m-2 d-1. Current estimates do not support the previous idea of basin-wide denitrification in EJS, although the N/P ratio is low like in other hypoxic/anoxic seas. A better understanding of the denitrification process is necessary for predicting future changes of nitrogen cycle in the well-oxygenated EJS considering the decadal-scale physical and biogeochemical changes that have occurred.

  8. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification significantly reduces N2O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Qing; Lu, Hui; Ding, Zhi; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process build on anaerobic carbon conversion through biological sulfate reduction and autotrophic denitrification by using the sulfide byproduct from the previous reaction. This study confirmed extra decreases in N2O emissions from the sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification by investigating N2O reduction, accumulation, and emission in the presence of different sulfide/nitrate (S/N) mass ratios at pH 7 in a long-term laboratory-scale granular sludge autotrophic denitrification reactor. The N2O reduction rate was linearly proportional to the sulfide concentration, which confirmed that no sulfide inhibition of N2O reductase occurred. At S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N, this rate resulted by sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge (average granule size = 701 μm) was 27.7 mg-N/g-VSS/h (i.e., 2 and 4 times greater than those at 2.5 and 0.8 g-S/g-N, respectively). Sulfide actually stimulates rather than inhibits N2O reduction no matter what granule size of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying sludge engaged. The accumulations of N2O, nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) with average granule size 701 μm of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge engaged at S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N were 4.7%, 11.4% and 4.2% relative to those at 3.0 g-S/g-N, respectively. The accumulation of FNA can inhibit N2O reduction and increase N2O accumulation during sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification. In addition, the N2O gas emission level from the reactor significantly increased from 14.1 ± 0.5 ppmv (0.002% of the N load) to 3707.4 ± 36.7 ppmv (0.405% of the N load) as the S/N mass ratio in the influent decreased from 2.1 to 1.4 g-S/g-N over the course of the 120-day continuous monitoring period. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological nutrient removal when sulfur conversion processes are applied

  9. Effect of organic loading on nitrification and denitrification in a marine sediment microcosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, J.M.; Sloth, N.P.; Kaspar, H.F.; Blackburn, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of organic additions on nitrification and denitrification were examined in sediment microcosms. The organic material, heat killed yeast, had a C/N ratio of 7.5 and was added to sieved, homogenized sediments. Four treatments were compared: no addition (control, 30 g dry weight (dw) m-2 mixed throughout the 10 cm sediment column (30 M), 100 g dw m-2 mixed throughout sediments (100M), and 100 g dw m-2 mixed into top 1 cm (100S). After the microcosms had been established for 7-11 days, depth of O2 penetration, sediment-water fluxes and nitrification rates were measured. Nitrification rates were measured using three different techniques: N-serve and acetylene inhibition in intact cores, and nitrification potentials in slurries. Increased organic additions decreased O2 penetration from 2.7 to 0.2 mm while increasing both O2 consumption, from 30 to 70 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, and NO3- flux into sediments. Nitrification rates in intact cores were similar for the two methods. Highest rates occurred in the 30 M treatment, while the lowest rate was measured in the 100S treatment. Total denitrification rates (estimated from nitrification and nitrate fluxes) increased with increased organic addition, because of the high concentrations of NO3- (40 ??M) in the overlying water. The ratio of nitrification: denitrification was used as an indication of the importance of nitrification as the NO3- supply for denitrification. This ratio decreased from 1.55 to 0.05 with increased organic addition.

  10. Denitrification in a low-temperature bioreactor system at two different hydraulic residence times: laboratory column studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Albin; Herbert, Roger B

    2017-06-01

    Nitrate removal rates in a mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge were determined in laboratory column studies at 5°C, 12°C, and 22°C, and at two different hydraulic residence times (HRTs; 58.2-64.0 hours and 18.7-20.6 hours). Baffles installed in the flow path were tested as a measure to reduce preferential flow behavior, and to increase the nitrate removal in the columns. The nitrate removal in the columns was simulated at 5°C and 12°C using a combined Arrhenius-Monod equation controlling the removal rate, and a first-order exchange model for incorporation of stagnant zones. Denitrification in the mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge reduced nitrate concentrations of 30 mg N L -1 at 5°C to below detection limits at a HRT of 58.2-64.0 hours. At a HRT of 18.7-20.6 hours, nitrate removal was incomplete. The Arrhenius frequency factor and activation energy retrieved from the low HRT data supported a biochemically controlled reaction rate; the same parameters, however, could not be used to simulate the nitrate removal at high HRT. The results show an inversely proportional relationship between the advection velocity and the nitrate removal rate, suggesting that bioreactor performance could be enhanced by promoting low advection velocities.

  11. Central Composite Design (CCD) applied for statistical optimization of glucose and sucrose binary carbon mixture in enhancing the denitrification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Beh, Hoe-Guan; Ching, Dennis Ling Chuan; Ho, Yeek-Chia; Baloo, Lavania; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Wee, Seng-Kew

    2017-11-01

    The present study provides an insight into the optimization of a glucose and sucrose mixture to enhance the denitrification process. Central Composite Design was applied to design the batch experiments with the factors of glucose and sucrose measured as carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio each and the response of percentage removal of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3 --N). Results showed that the polynomial regression model of NO3 --N removal had been successfully derived, capable of describing the interactive relationships of glucose and sucrose mixture that influenced the denitrification process. Furthermore, the presence of glucose was noticed to have more consequential effect on NO3 --N removal as opposed to sucrose. The optimum carbon sources mixture to achieve complete removal of NO3 --N required lesser glucose (C:N ratio of 1.0:1.0) than sucrose (C:N ratio of 2.4:1.0). At the optimum glucose and sucrose mixture, the activated sludge showed faster acclimation towards glucose used to perform the denitrification process. Later upon the acclimation with sucrose, the glucose uptake rate by the activated sludge abated. Therefore, it is vital to optimize the added carbon sources mixture to ensure the rapid and complete removal of NO3 --N via the denitrification process.

  12. Micro-electrolysis/retinervus luffae-based simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification for low C/N wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Li, Desheng; Cui, Yuwei; Xing, Wei; Deng, Shihai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen bioremediation in organic insufficient wastewater generally requires an extra carbon source. In this study, nitrate-contaminated wastewater was treated effectively through simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification based on micro-electrolysis carriers (MECs) and retinervus luffae fructus (RLF), respectively. The average nitrate and total nitrogen removal rates reached 96.3 and 94.0% in the MECs/RLF-based autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification (MRAHD) system without ammonia and nitrite accumulation. The performance of MRAHD was better than that of MEC-based autotrophic denitrification for the wastewater treatment with low carbon nitrogen (COD/N) ratio. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the relative abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers attached to MECs (4.9%) and RLF (5.0%) was similar. Illumina sequencing suggested that the dominant genera were Thiobacillus (7.0%) and Denitratisoma (5.7%), which attached to MECs and RLF, respectively. Sulfuritalea was discovered as the dominant genus in the middle of the reactor. The synergistic interaction between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers played a vital role in the mixotrophic substrate environment.

  13. Biodiversity in Benthic Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Nikolai; Carl, J. D.

    Foreword: This proceeding is based on a set of papers presented at the second Nordic Benthological Meeting held in Silkeborg, November 13-14, 1997. The main theme of the meeting was biodiversity in benthic ecology and the majority of contributions touch on this subject. In addition, the proceeding...

  14. Influences of the unsaturated, saturated, and riparian zones on the transport of nitrate near the Merced River, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Phillips, S.P.; Bayless, E.R.; Zamora, C.; Kendall, C.; Wildman, R.A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Transport and transformation of nitrate was evaluated along a 1-km groundwater transect from an almond orchard to the Merced River, California, USA, within an irrigated agricultural setting. As indicated by measurements of pore-water nitrate and modeling using the root zone water quality model, about 63% of the applied nitrogen was transported through a 6.5-m unsaturated zone. Transport times from recharge locations to the edge of a riparian zone ranged from approximately 6 months to greater than 100 years. This allowed for partial denitrification in horizons having mildly reducing conditions, and essentially no denitrification in horizons with oxidizing conditions. Transport times across a 50-100-m-wide riparian zone of less than a year to over 6 years and more strongly reducing conditions resulted in greater rates of denitrification. Isotopic measurements and concentrations of excess N2 in water were indicative of denitrification with the highest rates below the Merced River. Discharge of water and nitrate into the river was dependent on gradients driven by irrigation or river stage. The results suggest that the assimilative capacity for nitrate of the groundwater system, and particularly the riverbed, is limiting the nitrate load to the Merced River in the study area. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  15. Storage and mobilization of natural and septic nitrate in thick unsaturated zones, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Flint, Alan L.; O'Leary, David R.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter; Johnson, Russell D.; Clark, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of natural and septic nitrate from the unsaturated zone as a result of managed aquifer recharge has degraded water quality from public-supply wells near Yucca Valley in the western Mojave Desert, California. The effect of nitrate storage and potential for denitrification in the unsaturated zone to mitigate increasing nitrate concentrations were investigated. Storage of water extractable nitrate in unsaturated alluvium up to 160 meters (m) thick, ranged from 420 to 6600 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) as nitrogen (N) beneath undeveloped sites, from 6100 to 9200 kg/ha as N beneath unsewered sites. Nitrate reducing and denitrifying bacteria were less abundant under undeveloped sites and more abundant under unsewered sites; however, δ15N–NO3, and δ18O–NO3 data show only about 5–10% denitrification of septic nitrate in most samples—although as much as 40% denitrification occurred in some parts the unsaturated zone and near the top of the water table. Storage of nitrate in thick unsaturated zones and dilution with low-nitrate groundwater are the primary attenuation mechanisms for nitrate from septic discharges in the study area. Numerical simulations of unsaturated flow, using the computer program TOUGH2, showed septic effluent movement through the unsaturated zone increased as the number and density of the septic tanks increased, and decreased with increased layering, and increased slope of layers, within the unsaturated zone. Managing housing density can delay arrival of septic discharges at the water table, especially in layered unsaturated alluvium, allowing time for development of strategies to address future water-quality issues.

  16. Correlation of denitrification-accepted fraction of electrons with NAD(P)H fluorescence for Pseudomonas aeruginosa performing simultaneous denitrification and respiration at extremely low dissolved oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Xia, Qing; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2004-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis airway infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms a microaerobic biofilm and undergoes significant physiological changes. It is important to understand the bacterium's metabolism at microaerobic conditions. In this work, the culture properties and two indicators (the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and an NAD(P)H fluorescence fraction) for the culture's "fractional approach" to a fully anaerobic denitrifying state were examined in continuous cultures with practically zero DO but different aeration rates. With decreasing aeration, specific OUR decreased while specific NAR and NIR increased and kept Y(ATP/S) relatively constant. P. aeruginosa thus appeared to effectively compensate for energy generation at microaerobic conditions with denitrification. At the studied dilution rate of 0.06 h(-1), the maximum specific OUR was 2.8 mmol O2/g cells-h and the Monod constant for DO, in the presence of nitrate, was extremely low (Y(X/S) increased significantly (from 0.24 to 0.34) with increasing aeration, attributed to a roughly opposite trend of Y(ATP/X) (ATP generation required for cell growth). As for the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and the fluorescence fraction, both decreased with increasing aeration as expected. The two fractions, however, were not directly proportional. The fluorescence fraction changed more rapidly than the e- fraction at very low aeration rates, whereas the opposite was true at higher aeration. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using online NAD(P)H fluorescence to monitor sensitive changes of cellular physiology and provided insights to the shift of e- -accepting mechanisms of P. aeruginosa under microaerobic conditions.

  17. Denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri coupled with CO2 reduction by Sporomusa ovata with hydrogen as an electron donor assisted by solid-phase humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Katayama, Arata

    2016-09-01

    A co-culture system comprising an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata DSMZ2662, and a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778, enabled denitrification using H2 as the sole external electron donor and CO2 as the sole external carbon source. Acetate produced by S. ovata supported the heterotrophic denitrification of P. stutzeri. A nitrogen balance study showed the reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas without the accumulation of nitrite and nitrous oxide in the co-culture system. S. ovata did not show nitrate reduction to ammonium in the co-culture system. Significant proportions of the consumed H2 were utilized for denitrification: 79.9 ± 4.6% in the co-culture system containing solid-phase humin and 62.9±11.1% in the humin-free co-culture system. The higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen in the humin-containing system was attributed to the higher denitrification activity of P. stutzeri under the acetate deficient conditions. The nitrogen removal rate of the humin-containing co-culture system reached 0.19 kg NO3(-)-N·m(-3)·d(-1). Stable denitrification activity for 61 days of successive sub-culturing suggested the robustness of this co-culture system. This study provides a novel strategy for the in situ enhancement of microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Disentangling the rhizosphere effect on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers: insight into the role of root exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Texier, S; Hallet, S; Bru, D; Dambreville, C; Chèneby, D; Bizouard, F; Germon, J C; Philippot, L

    2008-11-01

    To determine to which extent root-derived carbon contributes to the effects of plants on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers, four solutions containing different proportions of sugar, organic acids and amino acids mimicking maize root exudates were added daily to soil microcosms at a concentration of 150 microg C g(-1) of soil. Water-amended soils were used as controls. After 1 month, the size and structure of the nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities were analysed using the narG and napA, and the nirK, nirS and nosZ genes as molecular markers respectively. Addition of artificial root exudates (ARE) did not strongly affect the structure or the density of nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities whereas potential nitrate reductase and denitrification activities were stimulated by the addition of root exudates. An effect of ARE composition was also observed on N(2)O production with an N(2)O:(N(2)O + N(2)) ratio of 0.3 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 80% of sugar and of 1 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 40% of sugar. Our study indicated that ARE stimulated nitrate reduction or denitrification activity with increases in the range of those observed with the whole plant. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the composition of the ARE affected the nature of the end-product of denitrification and could thus have a putative impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Kinetic exploration of nitrate-accumulating microalgae for nutrient recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Joeri; Decostere, Bjorge; Van Hulle, Stijn; Nopens, Ingmar; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; De Gelder, Leen; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-01

    Within sustainable resource management, the recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients from waste streams is becoming increasingly important. Although the use of microalgae has been described extensively in environmental biotechnology, the potential of nitrate-accumulating microalgae for nutrient recovery has not been investigated yet. The ability of these marine microorganisms to concentrate environmental nitrate within their biomass is remarkable. The aim of this study was to investigate the application potential of nitrate-accumulating diatoms for nutrient recovery from marine wastewaters. The intracellular nitrate storage capacity was quantified for six marine diatom strains in synthetic wastewater. Amphora coffeaeformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum stored the highest amount of nitrate with respectively 3.15 and 2.10 g N L(-1) of cell volume, which accounted for 17.3 and 4.6 %, respectively, of the total nitrogen content. The growth and nitrate and phosphate uptake of both diatoms were further analyzed and based on these features P. tricornutum showed the highest potential for nutrient recovery. A mathematical model was developed which included intracellular nitrate storage and the kinetic parameters were derived for P. tricornutum. Furthermore, a simulation study was performed to compare the performance of a proposed microalgal nutrient recovery unit with a conventional denitrification system for marine wastewater treatment. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential application of P. tricornutum for saline wastewater treatment with concurrent nitrogen and phosphorus recycling.

  20. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660–4,890 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31–437 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones. PMID:25472842

  1. The role of C:N:P stoichiometry in affecting denitrification in sediments from agricultural surface and tile-water wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebliunas, Brian D; Perry, William L

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient stoichiometry within a wetland is affected by the surrounding land use, and may play a significant role in the removal of nitrate (NO3-N). Tile-drained, agricultural watersheds experience high seasonal inputs of NO3-N, but low phosphorus (PO4-P) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads relative to surface water dominated systems. This difference may present stoichiometric conditions that limit denitrification within receiving waterways. We investigated how C:N:P ratios affected denitrification rates of sediments from tile-drained mitigation wetlands incubated for: 0, 5, 10, and 20 days. We then tested whether denitrification rates of sediments from surface-water and tile-drained wetlands responded differently to C:N ratios of 2:1 versus 4:1. Ratios of C:N:P (P tile-drained wetland sediments. Carbon limitation of denitrification became evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Denitrification measured from tile water and surface water wetland sediments increased significantly (P < 0.05) at the 2:1 and 4:1 C:N treatments. The results from both experiments suggest wetland sediments provide a limiting pool of labile DOC to maintain prolonged NO3-N removal. Also, DOC limitation became more evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Irrespective of NO3-N concentrations, P did not limit denitrification rates. In addition to wetting period, residence time, and maintenance of anaerobic conditions, the availability of labile DOC is playing an important limiting role in sediment denitrification within mitigation wetlands.

  2. Identification of nitrate sources and discharge-depending nitrate dynamics in a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christin; Strachauer, Ulrike; Brauns, Mario; Musolff, Andreas; Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Brase, Lisa; Tarasova, Larisa; Merz, Ralf; Knöller, Kay

    2017-04-01

    discharge resulting in a higher impact of evaporation on water isotopes and a higher/different level of biological activity (esp. in the WWTP). Enriched isotope values for nitrogen and oxygen are not indicative of a significant impact of bacterial denitrification, because they are accompanied by increased nitrate concentrations (1 to 16 mg L-1). Based on the presented study, 50 % of the nitrate export from the Holtemme river catchment can be attributed to WWTP effluent. The remaining amount is related to agricultural land use. Consequently, nitrate load reduction in the river system cannot rely on internal processing but needs to be regulated by preventive measures especially by an improved wastewater treatment and land use management.

  3. Regional oxygen reduction and denitrification rates in groundwater from multi-model residence time distributions, San Joaquin Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Jurgens, Bryant; Zhang, Yong; Starn, Jeffrey; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction are key factors in determining the chemical evolution of groundwater. Little is known about how these rates vary and covary in regional groundwater settings, as few studies have focused on regional datasets with multiple tracers and methods of analysis that account for effects of mixed residence times on apparent reaction rates. This study provides insight into the characteristics of residence times and rates of O2 reduction and denitrification (NO3− reduction) by comparing reaction rates using multi-model analytical residence time distributions (RTDs) applied to a data set of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and geochemical data from 141 well samples in the Central Eastern San Joaquin Valley, CA. The RTD approach accounts for mixtures of residence times in a single sample to provide estimates of in-situ rates. Tracers included SF6, CFCs, 3H, He from 3H (tritiogenic He),14C, and terrigenic He. Parameter estimation and multi-model averaging were used to establish RTDs with lower error variances than those produced by individual RTD models. The set of multi-model RTDs was used in combination with NO3− and dissolved gas data to estimate zero order and first order rates of O2 reduction and denitrification. Results indicated that O2 reduction and denitrification rates followed approximately log-normal distributions. Rates of O2 and NO3− reduction were correlated and, on an electron milliequivalent basis, denitrification rates tended to exceed O2 reduction rates. Estimated historical NO3− trends were similar to historical measurements. Results show that the multi-model approach can improve estimation of age distributions, and that relatively easily measured O2 rates can provide information about trends in denitrification rates, which are more difficult to estimate.

  4. A software nitrate sensor based on ammonium and redox signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, D

    2003-01-01

    We have computed the nitrate concentration in the activated sludge in real-time using a model, which is a subset of ASM1. The model is in operation at two WWTPs where oxygen, ammonium and redox are measured online in the aeration tanks. The model uses these measurements to continuously adjust its values for the influent ammonium concentration, the nitrification rate, the denitrification rate and the net hydrolysis. Then it computes the nitrate concentration. This value is updated every 10 s. The model results have been compared with the output from a Dr Lange in-situ nitrate sensor at one of these WWTPs. The systematic difference between these two measurements is less than 0.2 mgN L(-1) and 90% of the differences are between -1.1 and 1.1 mgN L(-1).

  5. Enhanced removal of nitrate using starch/PCL blends as solid carbon source in a constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Yuexi; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Yu; Cao, Rong; Wu, Fuping

    2015-01-01

    Cornstarch/polycaprolactone (SPCL) blends were prepared and used as external carbon source for biological denitrification in a constructed wetland. The denitrification performances, components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and microbial diversity were investigated. The results showed that nitrate was removed mainly in the layer filled with SPCL, and the average denitrification rate was 0.069kg/m(3)d (nitrate removal efficiency was 98.23%). The major component of DOM was polysaccharides which mainly consisted of reducing sugar. Besides, the concentrations of polysaccharides and reducing sugar decreased along the height of the constructed wetland. Therefore, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of effluent decreased to 6.54mg/L. Denitrifying bacteria Bacillus (24.25%) and Thauera (9.36%) were the most abundant genera in the biofilm attached on the surface of SPCL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transport and fate of nitrate in headwater agricultural streams in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Todd V; Tank, Jennifer L; David, Mark B

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen inputs to the Gulf of Mexico have increased during recent decades and agricultural regions in the upper Midwest, such as those in Illinois, are a major source of N to the Mississippi River. How strongly denitrification affects the transport of nitrate (NO(3)-N) in Illinois streams has not been directly assessed. We used the nutrient spiraling model to assess the role of in-stream denitrification in affecting the concentration and downstream transport of NO(3)-N in five headwater streams in agricultural areas of east-central Illinois. Denitrification in stream sediments was measured approximately monthly from April 2001 through January 2002. Denitrification rates tended to be high (up to 15 mg N m(-2) h(-1)), but the concentration of NO(3)-N in the streams was also high (>7 mg N L(-1)). Uptake velocities for NO(3)-N (uptake rate/concentration) were lower than reported for undisturbed streams, indicating that denitrification was not an efficient N sink relative to the concentration of NO(3)-N in the water column. Denitrification uptake lengths (the average distance NO(3)-N travels before being denitrified) were long and indicated that denitrification in the streambed did not affect the transport of NO(3)-N. Loss rates for NO(3)-N in the streams were <5% d(-1) except during periods of low discharge and low NO(3)-N concentration, which occurred only in late summer and early autumn. Annually, most NO(3)-N in these headwater sites appeared to be exported to downstream water bodies rather than denitrified, suggesting previous estimates of N losses through in-stream denitrification may have been overestimated.

  7. A multi-tracer approach to assess fingerprints of nitrate in an aquifer under agriculturally used land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasten-Zapata, Ernesto; Ledesma-Ruiz, Rogelio; Ramirez, Aldo; Harter, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    To effectively manage groundwater quality it is essential to understand sources of contamination and underground processes. The objective of the study was to identify sources and fate of nitrate pollution occurring in an aquifer underneath a sub-humid to humid region in NE Mexico which provides 10% of national citrus production. Nitrate isotopes and halide ratios were applied to understand nitrate sources and transformations in relation to land use/land cover. It was found that the study area is subject to diverse nitrate sources including organic waste and wastewater, synthetic fertilizers and soil processes. Animal manure and sewage from septic tanks were the causes of groundwater nitrate pollution within orchards and vegetable agriculture. Dairy activities within a radius of 1,000m from a sampling point increased nitrate pollution. Leachates from septic tanks incited nitrate pollution in residential areas. Soil nitrogen and animal waste were the sources of nitrate in groundwater under shrubland and grassland. Partial denitrification processes were evidenced. The denitrification process helped to attenuate nitrate concentration in the agricultural lands and grassland particularly during summer months.

  8. Influence of temperature on denitrification of an industrial high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The temperature effect on denitrification rate of a two-sludge system has been studied. An industrial high-strength wastewater and an industrial by-product containing mainly methanol, as external carbon source, were used in this study. The maximum denitrification rate (MDR) was determined at six different temperatures: 6, ...

  9. Coastal versus open-ocean denitrification in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Naik, H.; Pratihary, A.K.; DeSouza, W.; Narvekar, P.V.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Devol, A.H.; Yoshinari, T.; Saino, T.

    The Arabian Sea contains one of the three major open-ocean denitrification zones in the world. In addition, pelagic denitrification also occurs over the inner and mid-shelf off the west coast of India. The major differences between the two...

  10. Oyster Reef Restoration and Aquaculture Impacts on Denitrification and the Benthic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human impacts have greatly altered coastal ecosystems through a variety of processes including nutrient enrichment and overfishing. The negative consequences of these actions are well known and include increased macroalgae blooms, low oxygen conditions, and losses of biodiversity...

  11. PDU scale nitrification/denitrification of pretreated coal gasification wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, J.R.; Shockey, R.E.; Turner, C.D.; Mayer, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling tower tests with the stripped gas liquor (SGL) demonstrated that biological treatment to reduce the organic loading was sufficient for satisfactory operation of the tower at 10 cycles of concentration. However, ammonia stripping remained at high levels, which could result in industrial hygiene and nuisance odor concerns, environmental damage and, after longer periods of acclimation, lead to biofouling in the cooling tower from nitrification. These concerns coupled dishcharge to receiving waters, prompted research into biological nitrogen removal. As a result of this research, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) stripped gas liquor, pretreated by biological oxidation, can be nitrified. Complete nitrification can be obtained at influent concentrations of greater than 500 mg/1 as NH/sub 3/-N. (2) The highest removal rates and best system stability was found at the highest solids retention time (SRT). The low SRT reactor (12 days) did not attain stable operation until after approximately 110 days of operation. The ammonia removals during steady-state operation were 97.7%, 96.9% and 96.9%, respectively for reactors N1 through N3 (SRTs of 37, 21 and 12 days). (3) Influent ammonia-N spikes up to 1020 mg/l were observed. At these high levels, inhibition was observed at all three SRTs. However, when concentrations fell to typical values (500 mg/l NH/sub 3/-N) the systems recovered rapidly. (4) Denitrification of biologically treated and nitrified GPGP SGL was complete in an activated sludge reactor using a 4 day HRT, 10 day SRT and a 2.47:1 molar ratio of methanol to NO/sub 3/-N as the supplemental carbon source. (5) Nitrate-N concentrations in the influent greater than 750 mg/l were completely denitrified demonstrating a maximum observed specific removal rate of 92.8 mg NO/sub 3/-N/mg MLVSS-day. 16 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Measurement of the denitrification in soil monoliths from grassland and arable soil by means of 15N techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippold, H.; Foerster, I.

    1980-01-01

    Losses of fertilizer nitrogen by denitrification were determined in soil monoliths from two sites (loess chernozem and clay ranker). The monoliths were isolated by driving plastic pipes into the plots, and fertilized with 15 N-labelled ammonium nitrate. Emission spectrometric techniques were applied to measure the N 2 and N 2 O quantities released in the isolated atmospheric layer above the monolith. The considerable losses, especially on grassland soils (up to a maximum of 30 kg N/ha), indicate the influence of rainfalls and mean temperature at the 5 dates of sampling (end of March to mid-October). (author)

  13. From the Gut of an Insect to the Global Climate: Denitrification and Nitrous Oxide Production inside Lake Chironomidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2006-01-01

    an environmentally relevant ecosystem function by reducing nitrate to dinitrogen gas. Thereby, they remove inorganic nitrogen that originates from organic matter mineralisation and anthropogenic pollution. Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, is emitted from lakes only...... and preferential nitrous oxide production are induced. Our investigation indeed revealed the guts of Chironomus plumosus, a widely distributed insect larva, as microsites of microbial denitrification by providing anoxic conditions and enrichment of organic carbon. Both the larvae and their dissected guts emitted...

  14. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes. PMID:26883983

  15. Surfactant use with nitrate-based bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.H.; Hutchins, S.R.; West, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents results of an initial survey on the effect of six surfactants on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in bioremediation applications using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Aquifer material from Park City, Kansas, was used for the study. The three atomic surfactants chosen were Steol CS-330, Dowfax 8390 and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS); the three nonionic surfactants were T-MAZ-60, Triton X-100, and Igepal CO-660. Both Steol CS-330 and T-MAZ-60 biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. The Steol inhibited biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes (BTEXTMB). Only toluene was rapidly degraded in the presence of T-MAZ-60. Biodegradation of all compounds, including toluene, appears to be inhibited by Dowfax 8390 and SDBS. No biodegradation of Dowfax 8390 or SDBS was observed. SDBS inhibited denitrification, but Dowfax 8390 did not. For the microcosms containing Triton X-100 or Igepal CO-660, removal of toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, 1,3,5-TMB, and 1,2,4-TMB were similar to their removals in the no-surfactant treatment. These two surfactants did not biodegrade, did not inhibit biodegradation of the alkylbenzenes, and did not inhibit denitrification. Further studies are continuing with aquifer material from Eglin Air Force Base

  16. Denitrification-derived nitric oxide modulates biofilm formation in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruebarrena Di Palma, Andrés; Pereyra, Cintia M; Moreno Ramirez, Lizbeth; Xiqui Vázquez, María L; Baca, Beatriz E; Pereyra, María A; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Creus, Cecilia M

    2013-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a rhizobacterium that provides beneficial effects on plants when they colonize roots. The formation of complex bacterial communities known as biofilms begins with the interaction of planktonic cells with surfaces in response to appropriate signals. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule implicated in numerous processes in bacteria, including biofilm formation or dispersion, depending on genera and lifestyle. Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 produces NO by denitrification having a role in root growth promotion. We analyzed the role of endogenously produced NO on biofilm formation in A. brasilense Sp245 and in a periplasmic nitrate reductase mutant (napA::Tn5; Faj164) affected in NO production. Cells were statically grown in media with nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources and examined for biofilm formation using crystal violet and by confocal laser microscopy. Both strains formed biofilms, but the mutant produced less than half compared with the wild type in nitrate medium showing impaired nitrite production in this condition. NO measurements in biofilm confirmed lower values in the mutant strain. The addition of a NO donor showed that NO influences biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner and reverses the mutant phenotype, indicating that Nap positively regulates the formation of biofilm in A. brasilense Sp245. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  18. A novel nonwoven hybrid bioreactor (NWHBR) for enhancing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fangang; Wang, Yuan; Huang, Li-Nan; Li, Jie; Jiang, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2013-07-01

    This study proposed a nonwoven hybrid bioreactor (NWHBR) in which the nonwoven fabric played dual roles as a biofilm carrier and membrane-like separation of the flocculent sludge in the reactor. The results of long-term monitoring demonstrated that the NWHBR could achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND), with nearly complete ammonium removal and 80% removal of total nitrogen. The biofilm attached to the nonwoven fabric removed 27% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 36% of the nitrate in the reactor, an enhanced elimination of nutrients that was attributed to the increased mass transfer within the biofilm due to permeate drag. The results of batch experiments showed that the flocculent sludge played a more dominant role in nitrification and denitrification (79% and 61%, respectively) than the biofilm (21% and 36%, respectively). The batch experiments also revealed that the enforced mass transfer, with an effluent recirculation rate of 4.3 L/m(2)h (which was the same as the flux during the reactor's long-term operation), improved the denitrification rate by 58% (i.e., from 9.0 to 14.2 mg-NO(3)(-)-N/h). Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplification revealed a high microbial diversity in both the flocculent sludge and biofilm, with Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi as the dominant groups. A phylogenetic (P) test indicated that the NWHBR contained phylogenetically distinct microbial communities: those in the biofilm differed from those in the flocculent sludge. However, the communities on the exterior and interior of the biofilm were more similar to each other. Due to its good SND performance, low physical back-washing frequency and low air-to-water ratio, the NWHBR represents an attractive alternative for the wider application of either low-cost membrane bioreactors or biofilm reactors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study. Volume 3, Biodegradability, nitrification and denitrification: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillos, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    1993-09-01

    The Fresh Kills Landfill is a 2400-acre site located on the western shore of Staten Island. The landfill is divided into several geographical sections, two of which, sections 1/9 and 6/7, will remain active for the near future. These sections will continue to produce leachate which will be collected and treated in an on-site facility. This volume presents the results of a series of leachate analyses and batch- and continuous-flow experiments designed to characterize the leachate and to develop loading criteria for a biological nitrogen removal process. The analyses showed that 57 percent of the organic matter in the leachate falls below the 1,000 MW size while 14 percent is higher than 30,000 MW. Most of the organic matter is nonbiodegradable. Procedures applied to improve biodegradability, such as thermal and pH conditioning, and attempts to chemically oxidize the organic matter with ozone and hydrogen peroxide were not effective, demonstrating that the organic matter is stable and should persist indefinitely when released to the environment. However, biological nitrogen removal was extremely effective. Ammonia nitrification in excess of 99 percent was achieved in a sequencing batch reactor, using process loading rates in the range of 0.23 to 0.44 lb NH{sub 3}/lb MLVSS/day. Subsequent denitrification of the nitrites and nitrates required an external source of carbon. Methanol was used as the carbon source achieving complete denitrification in an anaerobic upflow reactor. Denitrification rates were measured in the range 62 to 125 lb NO{sub x}/1000 cu ft/day, with methanol to nitrogen ratio dosages in the rang 1.9 to 2.2 and retention time of approximately 10 hours.

  20. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources of...

  1. Sulfide persistence in oil field waters amended with nitrate and acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulecki, Jordan C; Foght, Julia M; Gray, Murray R; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate amendment is normally an effective method for sulfide control in oil field-produced waters. However, this approach has occasionally failed to prevent sulfide accumulation, despite the presence of active nitrate-reducing bacterial populations. Here, we report our study of bulk chemical transformations in microcosms of oil field waters containing nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but lacking denitrifying heterotrophs. Amendment with combinations of nitrate, acetate, and phosphate altered the microbial sulfur and nitrogen transformations. Elemental sulfur produced by chemotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria was re-reduced heterotrophically to sulfide. Ammonification, rather than denitrification, was the predominant pathway for nitrate reduction. The application of nitrite led to transient sulfide depletion, possibly due to higher rates of nitrite reduction. The addition of molybdate suppressed both the accumulation of sulfide and the heterotrophic reduction of nitrate. Therefore, sulfidogenesis was likely due to elemental sulfur-reducing heterotrophic bacteria, and the nitrate-reducing microbial community consisted mainly of facultatively chemotrophic microbes. This study describes one set of conditions for continued sulfidogenesis during nitrate reduction, with important implications for nitrate control of sulfide production in oil fields.

  2. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes

  3. [Nitrous oxide emission during denitrification for activated sludge acclimated with methanol as the organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Cheng-Ai; Wu, Guang-Xue; Guan, Yun-Tao

    2013-04-01

    Denitrification of wastewater is one of the important sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). In this study, denitrifies were acclimated in a sequencing batch reactor with methanol and nitrate (NO3(-) -N) as the electron donor and acceptor, respectively. N2O emission during denitrification was examined both in typical cycles and in batch experiments under conditions of different electron acceptors, carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios and initial nitrite (NO2(-)-N) concentrations. With methanol as the organic carbon, the N2O emission was high with NO2(-)-N as the electron acceptor and the N2O emission was low with NO3(-) -N as the electron acceptor. The C/N ratios affected the emission of N2O by affecting activities of denitrifiers, and both the activity of denitrifiers and the emission of N2O decreased with decreasing C/N ratios. The N2O emission increased with increasing initial NO2(-) -N concentrations, and a certain range of NO2(-) -N concentrations enhanced the activity of denitrifiers. The N2O emission could be correlated very well with initial NO2(-) -N concentrations.

  4. Electron competition among nitrogen oxides reduction during methanol-utilizing denitrification in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie; Bond, Philip L; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-06-15

    Limited availability of carbon sources has been regarded as an important factor leading to N2O accumulation during denitrification in wastewater treatment. By varying the carbon (methanol) loading rate to a methanol utilizing denitrifying culture in the presence of various electron acceptors (nitrate, nitrite, N2O and their combinations), this study quantitatively investigated the electron distribution among different nitrogen oxide reductases during denitrification. The results showed that electron competition occurs under not only carbon limiting but also carbon abundant conditions. The electron distribution among the nitrogen oxide reductases is affected by the carbon loading rate, with a lower fraction of electrons distributed to the N2O reductase with reduced carbon loading rate. N2O accumulation occurs when the electron flux going to nitrite reduction is higher than that going to N2O reduction. The study also showed that, for the culture investigated, the carbon to nitrogen ratio is not a key factor leading to N2O accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of cotton gin trash to enhance denitrification in restored forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, S.; Faulkner, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) has lost about 80% bottomland hardwood forests, mainly to agriculture. This landscape scale alteration of the LMV resulted in the loss of nitrate (NO3) removal capacity of the valley, contributing to nitrogen (N)-enhanced eutrophication and potentially hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Restoration of hardwood forests in the LMV is a highly recommended practice to reduce NO3 load of the Mississippi River. However, restored bottomland forests take decades to develop characteristic ecological functions including denitrifier activity. One way to enhance denitrifier activity in restored wetland forests is to amend the soils with an available carbon (C) source. This research investigated the effects of cotton gin trash (CGT) amendment on denitrification rate and N2O:N2 emission ratio from a restored bottomland forest soils and compared it to those from an adjacent unamended natural forest soils. CGT amendment increased denitrification rates in the restored forest soils to the level of the natural forest soils. N2O:N2 emission ratios from the restored and natural forest soils were highly variable and were not significantly different from each other. These findings suggest that restoration of bottomland hardwood forests in the LMV will require organic carbon amendment to achieve enhanced denitrifier activity for NO3 removal while the restored forest is developing into a mature state over time. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater.

  7. Effect of pine bark and compost on the biological denitrification process of non-hazardous landfill leachate: Focus on the microbiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Coulon, Frederic; Polge de Combret, Cecile [Centre for Resource Management and Efficiency, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Martins, Jean M.F.; Oxarango, Laurent [Laboratoire d' etude de Transferts en Hydrologie et Environnement, UMR 5564 (CNRS/INPG/IRD/UJF), Universite de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-09-15

    In an attempt to optimize the cost-efficiency of landfill leachate treatment by biological denitrification process, our study focused on finding low-cost alternatives to traditional expensive chemicals such as composted garden refuse and pine bark, which are both available in large amount in South African landfill sites. The overall objective was to assess the behaviour of the bacterial community in relation to each substrate while treating high strength landfill leachates. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests with immature compost and pine bark. High strength leachate was simulated using a solution of water and nitrate at a concentration of 500 mg l{sup -1}. Results suggest that pine bark released large amounts of phenolic compounds and hydroxylated benzene rings, which both can delay the acclimatization time and inhibit the biological denitrification (only 30% efficiency). Furthermore, presence of potential pathogens like Enterobacter and Pantoea agglomerans prevents the applicability of the pine bark in full-scale operations. On the other hand, lightly composted garden refuse (CGR) offered an adequate substrate for the formation of a biofilm necessary to complete the denitrification process (total nitrate removal observed within 7 days). CGR further contributed to a rapid establishment of an active consortium of denitrifiers including Acinetobacter, Rhizobium, Thermomonas, Rheinheimera, Phaeospirillum and Flavobacterium. Clearly the original composition, nature, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) and degree of maturity and stability of the substrates play a key role in the denitrification process, impacting directly on the development of the bacterial population and, therefore, on the long-term removal efficiency.

  8. Effect of pine bark and compost on the biological denitrification process of non-hazardous landfill leachate: Focus on the microbiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trois, Cristina; Coulon, Frederic; Polge de Combret, Cecile; Martins, Jean M.F.; Oxarango, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to optimize the cost-efficiency of landfill leachate treatment by biological denitrification process, our study focused on finding low-cost alternatives to traditional expensive chemicals such as composted garden refuse and pine bark, which are both available in large amount in South African landfill sites. The overall objective was to assess the behaviour of the bacterial community in relation to each substrate while treating high strength landfill leachates. Denitrification processes in fixed bed reactors were simulated at laboratory scale using anaerobic batch tests with immature compost and pine bark. High strength leachate was simulated using a solution of water and nitrate at a concentration of 500 mg l -1 . Results suggest that pine bark released large amounts of phenolic compounds and hydroxylated benzene rings, which both can delay the acclimatization time and inhibit the biological denitrification (only 30% efficiency). Furthermore, presence of potential pathogens like Enterobacter and Pantoea agglomerans prevents the applicability of the pine bark in full-scale operations. On the other hand, lightly composted garden refuse (CGR) offered an adequate substrate for the formation of a biofilm necessary to complete the denitrification process (total nitrate removal observed within 7 days). CGR further contributed to a rapid establishment of an active consortium of denitrifiers including Acinetobacter, Rhizobium, Thermomonas, Rheinheimera, Phaeospirillum and Flavobacterium. Clearly the original composition, nature, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) and degree of maturity and stability of the substrates play a key role in the denitrification process, impacting directly on the development of the bacterial population and, therefore, on the long-term removal efficiency.

  9. Impact of carbon dosing on micro-pollutants removal in MBBR post-denitrification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Torresi, Elena; Gy Plósz, Benedek

    operation and indigenous micro-pollutants concentrations, different dosages of methanol and ethanol were used to manipulate the carbon-to-nitrate ratio in the two systems. This test revealed that atenolol, citalopram and trimethoprim were efficiently removed, with removal percentages from 56 to 98%, 17......Dosing of carbon as methanol or ethanol is a common practice in post-denitrification steps during wastewater treatment by MBBR technology. The impact of the carbon dosage on micro-pollutants removal, in terms of type (methanol or ethanol) and concentration was investigated. First, with continuous...... to 53% and 30 to 100 % respectively. However, type or concentration of carbon did not lead to different micro-pollutant removal rates. Second, an anoxic-batch test with the same wastewater but containing spiked micro-pollutants (2 ng/mL) was conducted. The batch test showed that acetyl...

  10. European-scale modelling of groundwater denitrification and associated N2O production

    KAUST Repository

    Keuskamp, J.A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit model for simulating the fate of nitrogen (N) in soil and groundwater and nitrous oxide (N 2O) production in groundwater with a 1 km resolution at the European scale. The results show large heterogeneity of nitrate outflow from groundwater to surface water and production of N 2O. This heterogeneity is the result of variability in agricultural and hydrological systems. Large parts of Europe have no groundwater aquifers and short travel times from soil to surface water. In these regions no groundwater denitrification and N 2O production is expected. Predicted N leaching (16% of the N inputs) and N 2O emissions (0.014% of N leaching) are much less than the IPCC default leaching rate and combined emission factor for groundwater and riparian zones, respectively. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Denitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1995-01-01

    with the strongest effect, n-butyric acid has a moderate effect, while TMA only have a small effect in stimulating the rates. Propionic, isobutyric, n-valeric, isovaleric and caproic acid inhibit denitrification, nitrate reduction being more inhibited than nitrite reduction. The inhibitor concentration, KI, at which...... mM for isovaleric and 105 mM for caproic acid. KI values for nitrite reduction were found to be 196 mM for propionic, 32 mM for isobutyric, 57 mM for n-valeric, 18 mM for isovaleric and 110 mM for caproic acid. Inhibition of the rate of hydrolysis could not be determined. Anaerobically treated....... For propionic acid it could not be assessed whether the degree of inhibition were determined by the undissociated or the total concentration of the inhibitor....

  12. Evidence for denitrification as main source of N2O emission from residue-amended soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Sørensen, Peter; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Catch crops, especially leguminous catch crops, may increase crop nitrogen (N) supply and decrease environmental impacts in cropping systems, but they may also stimulate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions following spring incorporation. In this 28-day laboratory incubation study, we examined the carbon...... (C) and N dynamics and N2O evolution after simulated incorporation of residues from three catch crop species into a loamy sand soil, with variable soil moisture (40, 50 or 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS)). The catch crops include two leguminous (red clover and winter vetch) and one non-leguminous...... species (ryegrass). Plant material was placed in a discrete layer surrounded by soil in which the nitrate View the MathML source pool was enriched with 15N to distinguish N2O derived from denitrification and nitrification. Net N mineralisation from leguminous catch crops was significant (30–48 mg N kg−1...

  13. Nitrate Attenuation in Degraded Peat Soil-Based Constructed Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kleimeier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Constructed wetlands (CWs provide favorable conditions for removing nitrate from polluted agricultural runoff via heterotrophic denitrification. Although the general operability of CWs has been shown in previous studies, the suitability of peat soils as a bed medium for a vertical flow through a system for nitrate attenuation has not been proven to date. In this study, a mesocosm experiment was conducted under continuous flow with conditions aiming to quantify nitrate (NO3− removal efficiency in degraded peat soils. Input solution of NO3− was supplied at three different concentrations (65, 100, and 150 mg/L. Pore water samples were collected at different depths and analyzed for NO3−, pH, and dissolved N2O concentrations. The redox potential (Eh was registered at different depths. The results showed that the median NO3-N removal rate was 1.20 g/(m2·day and the median removal efficiency was calculated as 63.5%. The nitrate removal efficiency was affected by the NO3− supply load, flow rate, and environmental boundary conditions. A higher NO3− removal efficiency was observed at an input NO3− concentration of 100 mg/L, a lower flow rate, and higher temperature. The results of pore water pH and NO3− and N2O levels from the bottom of the mesocosm suggest that N2 is the dominant denitrification product. Thus, degraded peat soils showed the potential to serve as a substrate for the clean-up of nitrate-laden agricultural runoff.

  14. Denitrification potential evaluation of a newly indigenous aerobic denitrifier isolated from largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides culture pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Kai; Xie, Jun; Liu, Qigen; Yu, Deguang; Wang, Guangjun; Yu, Ermeng; Gong, Wangbao; Li, Zhifei

    2017-10-01

    This work evaluates the application potential of a new indigenous aerobic denitrifier, strain Pseudomonas CW-2, isolated from a largemouth bass culture pond. The rate of ammonium-N removal by strain CW-2 was approximately 97% at a DO concentration of 5.2 mg/L. Furthermore, when nitrate and ammonia coexisted, the strain gave priority to assimilating ammonia, and thereafter to denitrification. Under optimal cultivation conditions, citrate and acetate were the carbon resources, C/N was 8, dissolved oxygen was 5.2 mg/L, and pH was 7; the removal rate of ammonium reached nearly 90%. The changing patterns of different bacteria in strain CW-2-treated and the control pond water were also compared. Lower levels of ammonia, nitrite, and phosphates were observed in the treated water as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, phylum-level distributions of the bacterial OTUs revealed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Nitrospirae continuously changed their relative abundances in relation to carbon and the addition of strain CW-2; this finding implies that the conventional denitrification process was weakened under the effects of carbon or the presence of strain CW-2. We propose that strain CW-2 is a promising organism for the removal of ammonium in intensive fish culture systems, according to our evaluations of its denitrification performance.

  15. Applying linear discriminant analysis to predict groundwater redox conditions conducive to denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. R.; Close, M. E.; Abraham, P.

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse nitrate losses from agricultural land pollute groundwater resources worldwide, but can be attenuated under reducing subsurface conditions. In New Zealand, the ability to predict where groundwater denitrification occurs is important for understanding the linkage between land use and discharges of nitrate-bearing groundwater to streams. This study assesses the application of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for predicting groundwater redox status for Southland, a major dairy farming region in New Zealand. Data cases were developed by assigning a redox status to samples derived from a regional groundwater quality database. Pre-existing regional-scale geospatial databases were used as training variables for the discriminant functions. The predictive accuracy of the discriminant functions was slightly improved by optimising the thresholds between sample depth classes. The models predict 23% of the region as being reducing at shallow depths (<15 m), and 37% at medium depths (15-75 m). Predictions were made at a sub-regional level to determine whether improvements could be made with discriminant functions trained by local data. The results indicated that any gains in predictive success were offset by loss of confidence in the predictions due to the reduction in the number of samples used. The regional scale model predictions indicate that subsurface reducing conditions predominate at low elevations on the coastal plains where poorly drained soils are widespread. Additional indicators for subsurface denitrification are a high carbon content of the soil, a shallow water table, and low-permeability clastic sediments. The coastal plains are an area of widespread groundwater discharge, and the soil and hydrology characteristics require the land to be artificially drained to render the land suitable for farming. For the improvement of water quality in coastal areas, it is therefore important that land and water management efforts focus on understanding hydrological

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOLOGICAL DENITRIFICATION PROCESS, ECOMAT, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EcoMat, Inc. of Hayward, CA has developed a two-stage ex situ anoxic biofilter biodenitrification process. The process is a fixed film bioremediation, using biocarriers and specific bacteria to treat nitrate-contaminated water. Unique to EcoMat's process is a patented mixed bed r...

  17. ECOMAT INC. BIOLOGICAL DENITRIFICATION PROCESS, ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    EcoMat, Inc. of Hayward, California (EcoMat) has developed an ex situ anoxic biofilter biodenitrification (BDN) process. The process uses specific biocarriers and bacteria to treat nitrate-contaminated water and employs a patented reactor that retains biocarrier within the syste...

  18. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  19. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high...... sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3- reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under...

  20. Groundwater nitrate reduction versus dissolved gas production: A tale of two catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, E B; Coxon, C E; Richards, K G; Jahangir, M M R; Grant, J; Mellander, Per E

    2017-05-15

    At the catchment scale, a complex mosaic of environmental, hydrogeological and physicochemical characteristics combine to regulate the distribution of groundwater and stream nitrate (NO 3 - ). The efficiency of NO 3 - removal (via denitrification) versus the ratio of accumulated reaction products, dinitrogen (excess N 2 ) & nitrous oxide (N 2 O), remains poorly understood. Groundwater was investigated in two well drained agricultural catchments (10km 2 ) in Ireland with contrasting subsurface lithologies (sandstone vs. slate) and landuse. Denitrification capacity was assessed by measuring concentration and distribution patterns of nitrogen (N) species, aquifer hydrogeochemistry, stable isotope signatures and aquifer hydraulic properties. A hierarchy of scale whereby physical factors including agronomy, water table elevation and permeability determined the hydrogeochemical signature of the aquifers was observed. This hydrogeochemical signature acted as the dominant control on denitrification reaction progress. High permeability, aerobic conditions and a lack of bacterial energy sources in the slate catchment resulted in low denitrification reaction progress (0-32%), high NO 3 - and comparatively low N 2 O emission factors (EF 5g 1). In the sandstone catchment denitrification progress ranged from 4 to 94% and was highly dependent on permeability, water table elevation, dissolved oxygen concentration solid phase bacterial energy sources. Denitrification of NO 3 - to N 2 occurred in anaerobic conditions, while at intermediate dissolved oxygen; N 2 O was the dominant reaction product. EF 5g 1 (mean: 0.0018) in the denitrifying sandstone catchment was 32% less than the IPCC default. The denitrification observations across catchments were supported by stable isotope signatures. Stream NO 3 - occurrence was 32% lower in the sandstone catchment even though N loading was substantially higher than the slate catchment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  1. Verifiable metamodels for nitrate losses to drains and groundwater in the Corn Belt, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Malone, Robert W.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Thorp, K.R.; Ma, Liwang

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in the unsaturated zone poses a risk to groundwater, whereas nitrate in tile drainage is conveyed directly to streams. We developed metamodels (MMs) consisting of artificial neural networks to simplify and upscale mechanistic fate and transport models for prediction of nitrate losses by drains and leaching in the Corn Belt, USA. The two final MMs predicted nitrate concentration and flux, respectively, in the shallow subsurface. Because each MM considered both tile drainage and leaching, they represent an integrated approach to vulnerability assessment. The MMs used readily available data comprising farm fertilizer nitrogen (N), weather data, and soil properties as inputs; therefore, they were well suited for regional extrapolation. The MMs effectively related the outputs of the underlying mechanistic model (Root Zone Water Quality Model) to the inputs (R2 = 0.986 for the nitrate concentration MM). Predicted nitrate concentration was compared with measured nitrate in 38 samples of recently recharged groundwater, yielding a Pearson’s r of 0.466 (p = 0.003). Predicted nitrate generally was higher than that measured in groundwater, possibly as a result of the time-lag for modern recharge to reach well screens, denitrification in groundwater, or interception of recharge by tile drains. In a qualitative comparison, predicted nitrate concentration also compared favorably with results from a previous regression model that predicted total N in streams.

  2. Direct impacts of biochar on N2O production during denitrification by a soil microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Akanksha; Harter, Johannes; Hagemann, Nikolas; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar, i.e. biomass heated under O2 limitation to 350-1000°C (pyrolysis), is suggested as a beneficial soil amendment to mitigate climate change and to maintain and restore the fertility of agro-ecosystems. Its stability enables long-term carbon sequestration and biochar effectively reduces soil-borne N2O emissions. Biochar's ability to reduce N2O emissions is well recognized through field and laboratory experiments as well as meta-analyses. However, the underlying mechanisms remain widely debated. Microbial nitrogen transformations, especially denitrification, the stepwise reduction of nitrate/nitrite via NO and N2O to N2, are considered to be a major source of N2O emissions. Soil microcosm experiments showed lower N2O emissions in the presence of biochar often correlate with a higher abundance and/or activity of N2O reducing bacteria in the presence of biochar. However, it is still unknown whether these shifts in the microbial community and/or activity is cause or effect of reduced N2O production. Biochar has the potential to change the physico-chemical environment towards conditions that favor complete denitrification, i.e. decrease the N2O/(N2O+N2) product ratio. Specifically, biochar can increase soil pH, reduce the availability of nitrate and increase the entrapment of gases, including N2O. These effects are known to decrease the N2O/(N2O+N2) ratio. In addition to the observed effects in the physio-chemical environment, we hypothesized that biochar has a direct impact on the soil microbial community. For instance, it has been shown to provide a suitable habitat to microorganisms, or facilitate electron transfer between microbe and substrates by acting as an electron shuttle or as a temporary acceptor/donor of electrons. To test this hypothesis, our experiment consisted of a microbial community extracted from soil and cultivated under anoxic conditions. It was introduced as an inoculum into three different treatments: biochar, quartz (control with a solid

  3. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eDecleyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate. In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary. We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m, with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  4. Impacts to Ecological Services: Buried Oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Spill and Its Effect on Salt Marsh Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B. M.; White, J. R.; Delaune, R.

    2016-02-01

    In coastal Louisiana (LA), demands for ecosystem services are increasing while human activities continue to deteriorate coastal systems. On April 20, 2010, the largest offshore oil spill in United States history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, known as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Approximately 795 million L of crude oil were released, consequently oiling 1,773 km of Gulf Coast shoreline. Four years later, oil from the spill was found buried in the soil and seeping at the salt marsh surface in Bay Jimmy, LA. Previous studies found that immediately following oil exposure, wetland soils have suppressed microbial activity. This study seeks to understand effects of the long-term presence of oil on soil microbes and associated impacts to wetland soil denitrification. Bulk soil and intact soil cores were collected four years after the DWH spill from a heavily impacted salt marsh and a proximal site deemed unoiled in Barataria Bay, LA. Oil present in the soil subsurface increased dry weight bulk density, and decreased moisture content. Potential denitrification (acetylene block) in the top 10 cm of soil was 38% lower for oiled samples versus unoiled controls. Areal nitrate reduction rates were significantly lower in oiled samples in an intact core flux experiment under environmentally relevant nitrate conditions (2mg/L NO3-N), P-value ecosystem service of water quality improvement. Future studies should investigate impacts of oil being rebroadcasted onto marshes as land erodes in the study area.

  5. Metolachlor metabolite (MESA) reveals agricultural nitrate-N fate and transport in Choptank River watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Gregory W.; Hapeman, Cathleen J.; Rice, Clifford P.; Hively, W. Dean; McConnell, Laura L.; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Lang, Megan W.; Whitall, David R.; Bialek, Krystyna; Downey, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Over 50% of streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have been rated as poor or very poor based on the index of biological integrity. The Choptank River estuary, a Bay tributary on the eastern shore, is one such waterway, where corn and soybean production in upland areas of the watershed contribute significant loads of nutrients and sediment to streams. We adopted a novel approach utilizing the relationship between the concentration of nitrate-N and the stable, water-soluble herbicide degradation product MESA {2-[2-ethyl-N-(1-methoxypropan-2-yl)-6-methylanilino]-2-oxoethanesulfonic acid} to distinguish between dilution and denitrification effects on the stream concentration of nitrate-N in agricultural subwatersheds. The ratio of mean nitrate-N concentration/(mean MESA concentration * 1000) for 15 subwatersheds was examined as a function of percent cropland on hydric soil. This inverse relationship (R2 = 0.65, p 2 ≤ 0.99) for all eight sampling dates except one where R2 = 0.90. This very strong correlation indicates that nitrate-N was conserved in much of the Choptank River estuary, that dilution alone is responsible for the changes in nitrate-N and MESA concentrations, and more importantly nitrate-N loads are not reduced in the estuary prior to entering the Chesapeake Bay. Thus, a critical need exists to minimize nutrient export from agricultural production fields and to identify specific conservation practices to address the hydrologic conditions within each subwatershed. In well drained areas, removal of residual N within the cropland is most critical, and practices such as cover crops which sequester the residual N should be strongly encouraged. In poorly drained areas where denitrification can occur, wetland restoration and controlled drained structures that minimize ditch flow should be used to maximize denitrification.

  6. Nitrate and dissolved nitrous oxide in groundwater within cropped fields and riparian buffers

    OpenAIRE

    D.-G. Kim; T. M. Isenhart; T. B. Parkin; R. C. Schultz; T. E. Loynachan

    2009-01-01

    Transport and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) in groundwater and its significance to nitrogen dynamics within agro-ecosystems are poorly known in spite of significant potential of N2O to global warming and ozone depletion. Increasing denitrification in riparian buffers may trade a reduction in nitrate (NO3) transport to surface waters for increased N2O emissions ...

  7. Temporary storage or permanent removal? The division of nitrogen between biotic assimilation and denitrification in stormwater biofiltration systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G I Payne

    Full Text Available The long-term efficacy of stormwater treatment systems requires continuous pollutant removal without substantial re-release. Hence, the division of incoming pollutants between temporary and permanent removal pathways is fundamental. This is pertinent to nitrogen, a critical water body pollutant, which on a broad level may be assimilated by plants or microbes and temporarily stored, or transformed by bacteria to gaseous forms and permanently lost via denitrification. Biofiltration systems have demonstrated effective removal of nitrogen from urban stormwater runoff, but to date studies have been limited to a 'black-box' approach. The lack of understanding on internal nitrogen processes constrains future design and threatens the reliability of long-term system performance. While nitrogen processes have been thoroughly studied in other environments, including wastewater treatment wetlands, biofiltration systems differ fundamentally in design and the composition and hydrology of stormwater inflows, with intermittent inundation and prolonged dry periods. Two mesocosm experiments were conducted to investigate biofilter nitrogen processes using the stable isotope tracer 15NO3(- (nitrate over the course of one inflow event. The immediate partitioning of 15NO3(- between biotic assimilation and denitrification were investigated for a range of different inflow concentrations and plant species. Assimilation was the primary fate for NO3(- under typical stormwater concentrations (∼1-2 mg N/L, contributing an average 89-99% of 15NO3(- processing in biofilter columns containing the most effective plant species, while only 0-3% was denitrified and 0-8% remained in the pore water. Denitrification played a greater role for columns containing less effective species, processing up to 8% of 15NO3(-, and increased further with nitrate loading. This study uniquely applied isotope tracing to biofiltration systems and revealed the dominance of assimilation in stormwater

  8. Experimental effects of grazers on autotrophic species assemblages across a nitrate gradient in Florida springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs face accelerated degradation of ecosystem structure, namely in the form of autotrophic species assemblage shifts from submerged vascular macrophytes to benthic filamentous algae. Increasing nitrate concentrations have been cited as a primary driver of this shift and numeric nutrient criteria...

  9. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  10. National Benthic Infaunal Database (NBID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NBID is a quantitative database on abundances of individual benthic species by sample and study region, along with other synoptically measured environmental...

  11. Benthic fauna of mangrove environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    distribution of benthic communities in mangrove environment is governEd. by tidal amplitude, light penetration, nature of substratum and distance from the sea. The littoral zone, neritic zone, Barnacle-oyster zone, Uca zone, Polychaeta zone have been delineated...

  12. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN UREA TERHADAP PENINGKATAN PENCEMARAN NITRIT DAN NITRAT DALAM TANAH (Influence of Addition of Urea to Increased Pollution of Nitrite and Nitrate in The Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mawaddah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Nitrat dan nitrit merupakan sumber nitrogen bagi tanaman. Nitrogen sangat diperlukan tanaman untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan. Bentuk-bentuk nitrogen di lingkungan mengalami transformasi sebagai bagian dari siklus nitrogen seperti nitrifikasi dan denitrifikasi. Apabila kadar nitrogen dalam tanah rendah, maka urea digunakan sebagai sumber nitrogen. Perubahan urea menjadi nitrit atau nitrat pada beberapa sampel tanah perlu diketahui. Kadar nitrit dan nitrat yang tinggi dapat meningkatkan pencemaran di dalam tanah. Sampel tanah yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah tanah pasir, tanah sawah, tanah pupuk kompos dan tanah pupuk kandang. Analisis nitrit dan nitrat dilakukan dengan menggunakan pereaksi asam p-amino benzoat (PABA yang dikopling dengan N-naftiletilendiamin (NEDA dan reduktor spongy cadmium. Sebelum digunakan untuk analisis nitrit dan nitrat, metode divalidasi terlebih dahulu. Hasil validasi metode analisis nitrit dan nitrat dengan pereaksi PABA/NEDA menunjukkan persentase perolehan kembali masing-masing antara 87,15–100,8% untuk nitrit dan 88,16–105,7% untuk nitrat. Setelah ditambah urea sebesar 0,66 g.kg-1 ke dalam tanah, konsentrasi nitrit dan nitrat pada semua sampel tanah mengalami peningkatan. Dari penelitian ini diketahui bahwa peningkatan kadar nitrit dan nitrat setelah ditambahkan urea sangat dipengaruhi oleh kondisi tanah.   ABSTRACT Nitrate and nitrite were sources of nitrogen for plants. Nitrogen is indispensable for the growth and development of plants. The forms of nitrogen in the environment undergoes a transformation as part of the nitrogen cycle like nitrification and denitrification. If nitrogen level in the soil is low, urea is used as a source of nitrogen. Changes of urea into nitrite or nitrate in some of soil samples need to be known. The levels of nitrite and nitrate are high can increase pollution in the soil. Some of soil samples which is used in this research were sandy soil, paddy soil

  13. Stoichiometric control of organic carbon-nitrate relationships from soils to the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip G; Townsend, Alan R

    2010-04-22

    The production of artificial fertilizers, fossil fuel use and leguminous agriculture worldwide has increased the amount of reactive nitrogen in the natural environment by an order of magnitude since the Industrial Revolution. This reorganization of the nitrogen cycle has led to an increase in food production, but increasingly causes a number of environmental problems. One such problem is the accumulation of nitrate in both freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems. Here we establish that ecosystem nitrate accrual exhibits consistent and negative nonlinear correlations with organic carbon availability along a hydrologic continuum from soils, through freshwater systems and coastal margins, to the open ocean. The trend also prevails in ecosystems subject to substantial human alteration. Across this diversity of environments, we find evidence that resource stoichiometry (organic carbon:nitrate) strongly influences nitrate accumulation by regulating a suite of microbial processes that couple dissolved organic carbon and nitrate cycling. With the help of a meta-analysis we show that heterotrophic microbes maintain low nitrate concentrations when organic carbon:nitrate ratios match the stoichiometric demands of microbial anabolism. When resource ratios drop below the minimum carbon:nitrogen ratio of microbial biomass, however, the onset of carbon limitation appears to drive rapid nitrate accrual, which may then be further enhanced by nitrification. At low organic carbon:nitrate ratios, denitrification appears to constrain the extent of nitrate accretion, once organic carbon and nitrate availability approach the 1:1 stoichiometry of this catabolic process. Collectively, these microbial processes express themselves on local to global scales by restricting the threshold ratios underlying nitrate accrual to a constrained stoichiometric window. Our findings indicate that ecological stoichiometry can help explain the fate of nitrate across disparate environments and in the face

  14. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX−-N (NO3−-N and NO2−-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  15. Transport and transformation of nitrate in a riparian wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Jes; Prinds, Christian; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    areas, in which riparian wetlands plays an important role. The present case study investigates the transport and transformation of nitrate entering a riparian wetland via drain water from surrounding agricultural areas. The drain pipes are cut off at the hillslope and drain water irrigates the wetland....... Depending on the saturation state of the wetland soils and the amount of water entering during precipitation events, a part of the water infiltrates into the wetland sediments and travels towards the stream. Some of the infiltrated water may be caught by drains within the wetland soils and transported...... directly to the stream. The remaining water can be either evapotranspired or transported directly to the stream via overland flow. Preliminary results show an efficient denitrification of nitrate infiltrating into the studied wetland soils. The nitrogen removal efficiency at different drain outlets seems...

  16. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found......The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...

  17. The process and potential of nitrate attenuation in the aquifers with different scale of flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M.; Onodera, S.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a widespread pollutant derived from human activities. Many studies have confirmed that agricultural practices such as fertilizer application have resulted in nitrate contamination of groundwater (Burt et al., 1993; Mueller et al., 1995; Böhlke, 2002). Also in the developing megacities, groundwater pollution by nitrate is a severe environmental problem because of the huge amount of domestic and industrial wastewater (Onodera et al., 2008; Umezawa et al., 2008). For the sustainable use of groundwater resources for the future, it is important to clarify about the natural function of nitrate attenuation such as denitrification process in groundwater. The previous studies have shown the nitrate attenuation by denitrification process in groundwater of the riparian wetlands (Hill et al., 2000; Böhlke et al., 2002), floodplain (Fustec et al., 1991; Tesoriero et al., 2000) or coastal area (Howard, 1985; Uchiyama et al., 2000) with relatively gentle topographic gradient. In recent years, several researchers have suggested that landscape hydrogeology can provide an important framework for understanding nitrate removal capacity at the riparian zones (Hill, 1996; Baker et al., 2001; Vidon & Hill, 2004). However, few studies discussed about the relation between groundwater flow condition and denitrification process on the catchment scales. The objective this study is to examine the process and potential of nitrate attenuation in the aquifers with the different scale of flow system. We compared the data on the groundwater flow, nitrate concentration and nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in groundwater in the three study sites (IK, YD and JK). All these study areas are characterized by the large nitrogen load from agricultural, domestic and industrial activities. The IK (Ikuchijima) aquifer is located in southern Japan with the catchment area of 44ha and topographic gradient of 1/50. The YD (Yellow River Delta) aquifer is located on the lower reaches of the

  18. Microbial Oxidation of Pyrite Coupled to Nitrate Reduction in Anoxic Groundwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2009-01-01

    Although many areas in Denmark are intensively agricultured, the discharge of nitrate from groundwater aquifers to surface water is often lower than expected. In this study it is experimentally demonstrated that anoxic nitrate reduction in sandy sediment containing pyrite is a microbially mediated...... be ascribed to pyrite oxidation. The apparent zero-order denitrification rate in anoxic pyrite containing sediment at groundwater temperature has been determined to be 2-3 µmol NO3- kg-1 day-1. The in situ groundwater chemistry at the boundary between the redoxcline and the anoxic zone reveals that between 65...

  19. Evaluation of sources and fate of nitrates in the western Po plain groundwater (Italy) using nitrogen and boron isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna, Manuela; De Luca, Domenico Antonio

    2017-11-24

    Diffuse nitrate pollution in groundwater is currently considered one of the major causes of water quality degradation. Determining the sources of nitrate contamination is an important first step for a better management of water quality. Thus, the isotopic composition of nitrate (δ 15 N NO3 and δ 18 O NO3 ) and boron (δ 11 B) were used to evaluate nitrate contamination sources and to identify geochemical processes occurring in the shallow and deep aquifers of the Turin-Cuneo plain (NW Italy). The study area is essentially an agricultural zone, where use of synthetic nitrogenous fertilizers and organic manure is a common practice and the connection to sewer services is locally lacking. Also livestock farming are highly developed. A groundwater sampling campaign was performed on 34 wells in the shallow aquifer and 8 wells in the deep aquifers, to analyze nitrate, chloride, boron, δ 15 N NO3 , δ 18 O NO3 and δ 11 B. Isotope data of nitrate indicate that nitrate contamination in the Turin-Cuneo plain originates from mixtures of synthetic and organic sources, slightly affected by denitrification, and manure or septic tank effluents. Moreover, boron isotopes were used to discriminate further among the main anthropogenic sources of pollution. The analyses results confirm that both animal manure and domestic sewage, especially under the city of Turin, can contribute to the nitrate contamination. The isotope analysis was also used for the evaluation of denitrification and nitrification processes: contrary to expectations, a significant denitrification phenomenon was assessed only in the shallow unconfined aquifer, especially in the Poirino Plateau, the most contaminated sector of the study area.

  20. Metabolic modeling of denitrification in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: A tool to study inhibiting and activating compounds for the denitrification pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kampschreur, M.J.; Kleerebezem, R.; Picioreanu, C.; Bakken, L.; Bergaust, L.; De Vries, S.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    A metabolic network model for facultative denitrification was developed based on experimental data obtained with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The model includes kinetic regulation at the enzyme level and transcription regulation at the enzyme synthesis level. The objective of this work was to study the key factors regulating the metabolic response of the denitrification pathway to transition from oxic to anoxic respiration and to find parameter values for the biological processes that were mode...

  1. Application of multiple-isotope and groundwater-age data to identify factors affecting the extent of denitrification in a shallow aquifer near a river in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaown, Dugin; Koh, Eun-Hee; Mayer, Bernhard; Kim, Heejung; Park, Dong Kyu; Park, Byeong-Hak; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2018-01-01

    The extent of denitrification in a small agricultural area near a river in Yangpyeong, South Korea, was determined using multiple isotopes, groundwater age, and physicochemical data for groundwater. The shallow groundwater at one monitoring site had high concentrations of NO3-N (74-83 mg L-1). The δ15N-NO3 values for groundwater in the study area ranged between +9.1 and +24.6‰ in June 2014 and +12.2 to +21.6‰ in October 2014. High δ15N-NO3 values (+10.7 to +12.5‰) in both sampling periods indicated that the high concentrations of nitrate in the groundwater originated from application of organic fertilizers and manure. In the northern part of the study area, some groundwater samples showed elevated δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 values, which suggest that nitrate was removed from the groundwater via denitrification, with N isotope enrichment factors ranging between -4.8 and -7.9‰ and O isotope enrichment factors varying between -3.8 and -4.9‰. Similar δD and δ18O values of the surface water and groundwater in the south appear to indicate that groundwater in that area was affected by surface-water infiltration. The mean residence times (MRTs) of groundwater showed younger ages in the south (10-20 years) than in the north (20-30 years). Hence, it was concluded that denitrification processes under anaerobic conditions with longer groundwater MRT in the northern part of the study area removed considerable amounts of nitrate. This study demonstrates that multi-isotope data combined with physicochemical data and age-dating information can be effectively applied to characterize nitrate contaminant sources and attenuation processes.

  2. Biological reduction of nitrates in wastewaters from nuclear processing using a fluidized-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, W.W.; Hancher, C.W.; Patton, B.D.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt.% NO 3 - and as large as 2000 m 3 /day, in the nuclear fuel cycle. The biological reduction of nitrate in wastewater to gaseous nitrogen, accompanied by the oxidation of a nutrient carbon source to gaseous carbon dioxide, is an ecologically sound and cost-effective method of treating wastewaters containing nitrates. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO 3 - )/m 3 by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The denitrification bacteria are a mixed culture derived from garden soil; the major strain is Pseudomonas. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25- to 0.50-mm-diam coal fluidization particles, which are then fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m 3 . This paper describes the results of a biodenitrification R and D program based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m 3 and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 g N(NO 3 - ) per day per liter of empty bioreactor volume. 4 figures, 7 tables

  3. Nitrogen release from differently aged Raphanus sativus L. nitrate catch crops during mineralization at autumn temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Elsgaard, Lars; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    pool at both temperatures. The N mineralization and nitrification potential at these low soil temperatures suggest that a considerable fraction of the N captured by nitrate catch crops may be remineralized, nitrified and thus available for plant uptake but also for loss by leaching and denitrification.......In temperate climates with surplus precipitation and low temperatures during autumn and winter, nitrate catch crops have become crucial in reducing nitrate leaching losses. Preferably, the N retained by the catch crop should remain in the soil and become available to the next main crop. Fodder...... radish (Raphanus sativus, L.) has emerged as a promising nitrate catch crop in cereal cropping, although the course of remineralization of residue N following termination of this frost-sensitive crucifer remains obscured. We incubated radish residues of different age (different planting and harvest dates...

  4. Subsurface nitrate reduction under wetlands takes place in narrow superficial zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos Ribas, Osmar; Calderer, M.; Marti, Vicens

    2017-01-01

    and the performance of a re-established wetland. Intact soil cores were collected and divided in slices for the determination of Organic Matter (OM) through Loss of Ignition (LOI) as well as Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and NRP spiking nitrate in batch tests. The Nitrate Reduction (NR) was fitted as a pseudo......This study aims to investigate the depth distribution of the Nitrate Reduction Potential (NRP) on a natural and a re-established wetland. The obtained NRP provides a valuable data of the driving factors affecting denitrification, the Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) process...... with NRP, high amounts of DOC ensured enough quantity and quality of labile OM for NR. Besides, high concentration of LOI but a scarce abundance of DOC failed to drive NR. DNRA was only important in superficial samples with high contents of OM. Lastly, the high NRP of the re-established wetland confirms...

  5. Nitrate distribution and isotopic composition in vadose-zone sediments underlying large dairy operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Roberts, S. K.; Barton, C. G.; Watanabe, N.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the transport and cycling of nitrate in the vadose zone is essential to 1) linking agronomic models of nitrate flux out of the root zone to groundwater models of nitrate loading at the water table, 2) quantifying the impact of vadose-zone biogeochemical processes on nitrate isotopic composition for the purpose of source attribution, and 3) constraining transport time scales through the vadose zone in order to assess the impact of changes in agricultural nutrient management on underlying groundwater quality. In this study, we have investigated the isotopic composition of water-leachable nitrate extracted from sediment cores underlying three dairy operations in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. One of the dairy operations is new (less than ten years old) and is sited on former range land; the other two operations are older (with one having been continuously operated for over a century). All use dairy wastewater for irrigation, and have vadose zones of 25-60 meters thickness developed in sedimentary sequences dominated by alluvial fan deposits. Sediment core samples from a UC-Davis monitor well drilling program were extracted with an equal amount of ultrapure water, and analyzed for nitrate isotopic composition using the denitrifying bacteria method at LLNL. The range in nitrate isotopic composition (δ15N,air = 4.8 to 26.6 permil, δ18O,VSMOW = -0.3 to 16.2 permil) is large, comparable to isotopic compositions observed in dairy wastewater-impacted groundwaters (Singleton et al., 2007, ES&T 41:759-765), and varies from site to site. The range is the largest on the oldest operation (δ15N = 5.2 to 26.6), and most tightly clustered on the youngest operation (δ15N = 4.8 to 7.8). Leachable nitrate-δ18O correlates with nitrate-δ15N along a characteristic denitrification trend for individual cores. Leachable nitrate-δ15N is not simply correlated with leachable nitrate concentration (which is generally high in shallow sediments and decreases

  6. Stream denitrification across biomes and its response to anthropogenic nitrate loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J Mulholland; Ashely M. Helton; Geoffrey C. Poole; Robert O. Hall; Stephen K. Hamilton; Bruce J. Peterson; Jennifer L. Tank; Linda R. Ashkenas; Lee W. Cooper; Clifford N. Dahm; Walter K. Dodds; Stuart E.G. Findlay; Stanley V. Gregory; Nancy B. Grimm; Sherri L. Johnson; William H. McDowell; Judy L. Meyer; H. Maurice Valett; Jackson R. Webster; Clay P. Arango; Jake J. Beaulieu; Melody J. Bernot; Amy J. Burgin; Chelsea L. Crenshaw; Laura T. Johnson; B.R. Niederlehner; Jonathan M. O' Brien; Jody D. Potter; Richard W. Sheibley; Daniel J. Sobota; Suzanne M. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Anthropogenic addition of bioavailable nitrogen to the biosphere is increasing, and terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated, causing more bioavailable nitrogen to enter groundwater and surface waters. Large-scale nitrogen budgets show that an average of about 20 to 25 percent of the nitrogen added to the biosphere is exported from rivers to...

  7. Nitrate levels modulate denitrification activity in tropical mangrove sediments (Goa, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    organic carbon (TOC) was determined by wet oxidation method with a precision of 0.01% (El Wakeel and Riley 1957). Labile organic matter The labile organic matter (LOM) was measured as a sum of proteins, carbohydrate and lipid content... and transferred aseptically to sterile 20 ml headspace vials. Three ml of sterilized ambient seawater from the sampling site was added to the sediment. This seawater used for slurry preparation was spiked with a KNO 3 solution to give final concentrations of 0...

  8. A benthic quality index for European alpine lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rossaro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of benthic quality indices for European lakes is hindered by the lack of information concerning many national lake types and pressures. Most information is from north European lakes stressed by acidification and from deep lakes subjected to eutrophication; for other lake types (the ones included in the Mediterranean areas for example and for other pressures (hydro-morphological alteration, toxic stress there is practically no information about the response of benthic macro-invertebrates; this hinders the possibility of an intercalibration of the indices among the member states (MS in the EU. In the present communication three benthic quality indices are proposed considering the littoral, sublittoral and profundal zone in 5 reference and 7 non reference lakes from the Alpine region in response to eutrophication. The sensitivity values of the 177 species found in these lakes were calculated taking a weighted average of the values of environmental variables from lakes in which the species were present. The indicator taxa which prevailed in these lakes were Chironomids and Oligochaetes. A coinertia analysis emphasized the importance of trophic variables (transparency, nitrates, total phosphorous in explaining the species distribution, but geographic (altitude and morphometric (depth, volume variables were also important. The indices enabeled a separation of reference from non-reference lakes and to assign the non-reference lakes to different quality classes in agreement with the Water Framework Directive.doi: 10.5324/fn.v31i0.1364.Published online: 17 October 2012. 

  9. Effects of atrazine, metolachlor, carbaryl and chlorothalonil on benthic microbes and their nutrient dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elias

    Full Text Available Atrazine, metolachlor, carbaryl, and chlorothalonil are detected in streams throughout the U.S. at concentrations that may have adverse effects on benthic microbes. Sediment samples were exposed to these pesticides to quantify responses of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate uptake by the benthic microbial community. Control uptake rates of sediments had net remineralization of nitrate (-1.58 NO3 µg gdm⁻¹ h⁻¹, and net assimilation of phosphate (1.34 PO4 µg gdm⁻¹ h⁻¹ and ammonium (0.03 NH4 µg gdm⁻¹ h⁻¹. Metolachlor decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake. Chlorothalonil decreased nitrate remineralization and phosphate uptake. Nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate uptake rates are more pronounced in the presence of these pesticides due to microbial adaptations to toxicants. Our interpretation of pesticide availability based on their water/solid affinities supports no effects for atrazine and carbaryl, decreasing nitrate remineralization, and phosphate assimilation in response to chlorothalonil. Further, decreased ammonium and phosphate uptake in response to metolachlor is likely due to affinity. Because atrazine target autotrophs, and carbaryl synaptic activity, effects on benthic microbes were not hypothesized, consistent with results. Metolachlor and chlorothalonil (non-specific modes of action had significant effects on sediment microbial nutrient dynamics. Thus, pesticides with a higher affinity to sediments and/or broad modes of action are likely to affect sediment microbes' nutrient dynamics than pesticides dissolved in water or specific modes of action. Predicted nutrient uptake rates were calculated at mean and peak concentrations of metolachlor and chlorothalonil in freshwaters using polynomial equations generated in this experiment. We concluded that in natural ecosystems, peak chlorothalonil and metolachlor concentrations could affect phosphate and ammonium by decreasing net assimilation, and nitrate uptake rates by

  10. Nitrate leaching index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  11. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  12. Tracing the role of endogenous carbon in denitrification using wine industry by-product as an external electron donor: Coupling isotopic tools with mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrey, R; Rodríguez-Escales, P; Soler, A; Otero, N

    2018-02-01

    Nitrate removal through enhanced biological denitrification (EBD), consisting of the inoculation of an external electron donor, is a feasible solution for the recovery of groundwater quality. In this context, liquid waste from wine industries (wine industry by-products, WIB) may be feasible for use as a reactant to enhance heterotrophic denitrification. To address the feasibility of WIB as electron donor to promote denitrification, as well as to evaluate the role of biomass as a secondary organic C source, a flow-through experiment was carried out. Chemical and isotopic characterization was performed and coupled with mathematical modeling. Complete nitrate attenuation with no nitrite accumulation was successfully achieved after 10 days. Four different C/N molar ratios (7.0, 2.0, 1.0 and 0) were tested. Progressive decrease of the C/N ratio reduced the remaining C in the outflow and favored biomass migration, producing significant changes in dispersivity in the reactor, which favored efficient nitrate degradation. The applied mathematical model described the general trends for nitrate, ethanol, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations. This model shows how the biomass present in the system is degraded to dissolved organic C (DOC en ) and becomes the main source of DOC for a C/N ratio between 1.0 and 0. The isotopic model developed for organic and inorganic carbon also describes the general trends of δ 13 C of ethanol, DOC and DIC in the outflow water. The study of the evolution of the isotopic fractionation of organic C using a Rayleigh distillation model shows the shift in the organic carbon source from the WIB to the biomass and is in agreement with the isotopic fractionation values used to calibrate the model. Isotopic fractionations (ε) of C-ethanol and C-DOC en were -1‰ and -5‰ (model) and -3.3‰ and -4.8‰ (Rayleigh), respectively. In addition, an inverse isotopic fractionation of +10‰ was observed for

  13. Nitrate Sensing and Metabolism Modulate Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alst, Nadine E.; Picardo, Kristin F.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Haidaris, Constantine G.

    2007-01-01

    Infection by the bacterial opportunist Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently assumes the form of a biofilm, requiring motility for biofilm formation and dispersal and an ability to grow in nutrient- and oxygen-limited environments. Anaerobic growth by P. aeruginosa is accomplished through the denitrification enzyme pathway that catalyzes the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Mutants mutated in the two-component nitrate sensor-response regulator and in membrane nitrate reductase displayed altered motility and biofilm formation compared to wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1. Analysis of additional nitrate dissimilation mutants demonstrated a second level of regulation in P. aeruginosa motility that is independent of nitrate sensor-response regulator function and is associated with nitric oxide production. Because motility and biofilm formation are important for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity, we examined the virulence of selected regulatory and structural gene mutants in the surrogate model host Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, the membrane nitrate reductase mutant was avirulent in C. elegans, while nitrate sensor-response regulator mutants were fully virulent. The data demonstrate that nitrate sensing, response regulation, and metabolism are linked directly to factors important in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. PMID:17526746

  14. Evaluating sources and processing of nonpoint source nitrate in a small suburban watershed in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Huang, Minsheng; Ma, Minghai; Wei, Jinbao; Hu, Wei; Chouhan, Seema

    2018-04-01

    Identifying nonpoint sources of nitrate has been a long-term challenge in mixed land-use watershed. In the present study, we combine dual nitrate isotope, runoff and stream water monitoring to elucidate the nonpoint nitrate sources across land use, and determine the relative importance of biogeochemical processes for nitrate export in a small suburban watershed, Longhongjian watershed, China. Our study suggested that NH4+ fertilizer, soil NH4+, litter fall and groundwater were the main nitrate sources in Longhongjian Stream. There were large changes in nitrate sources in response to season and land use. Runoff analysis illustrated that the tea plantation and forest areas contributed to a dominated proportion of the TN export. Spatial analysis illustrated that NO3- concentration was high in the tea plantation and forest areas, and δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 were enriched in the step ponds. Temporal analysis showed high NO3- level in spring, and nitrate isotopes were enriched in summer. Study as well showed that the step ponds played an important role in mitigating nitrate pollution. Nitrification and plant uptake were the significant biogeochemical processes contributing to the nitrogen transformation, and denitrification hardly occurred in the stream.

  15. Modeling the long-term fate of agricultural nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Campbell, Bruce G.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Landon, Mathew K.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater systems used for human water supplies is a major environmental problem in many parts of the world. Fertilizers containing a variety of reduced nitrogen compounds are commonly added to soils to increase agricultural yields. But the amount of nitrogen added during fertilization typically exceeds the amount of nitrogen taken up by crops. Oxidation of reduced nitrogen compounds present in residual fertilizers can produce substantial amounts of nitrate which can be transported to the underlying water table. Because nitrate concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L in drinking water can have a variety of deleterious effects for humans, agriculturally derived nitrate contamination of groundwater can be a serious public health issue. The Central Valley aquifer of California accounts for 13 percent of all the groundwater withdrawals in the United States. The Central Valley, which includes the San Joaquin Valley, is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world and much of this groundwater is used for crop irrigation. However, rapid urbanization has led to increasing groundwater withdrawals for municipal public water supplies. That, in turn, has led to concern about how contaminants associated with agricultural practices will affect the chemical quality of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley. Crop fertilization with various forms of nitrogen-containing compounds can greatly increase agricultural yields. However, leaching of nitrate from soils due to irrigation has led to substantial nitrate contamination of shallow groundwater. That shallow nitrate-contaminated groundwater has been moving deeper into the Central Valley aquifer since the 1960s. Denitrification can be an important process limiting the mobility of nitrate in groundwater systems. However, substantial denitrification requires adequate sources of electron donors in order to drive the process. In many cases, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon

  16. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Bohlke, John Karl; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br– as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (e18O/e37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ~0.8 (e18O/e15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (e18O/e37Cl, e18O/e15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g. pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent e values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  17. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.; Lavik, Gaute; Stief, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms survive in dark, anoxic sediment layers for months to decades. Our investigation reveals a correlation between the dark survival potential of marine diatoms and their ability to accumulate NO3− intracellularly. Axenic strains of benthic and pelagic diatoms that stored 11–274 mM NO3− in their cells survived for 6–28 wk. After sudden shifts to dark, anoxic conditions, the benthic diatom Amphora coffeaeformis consumed 84–87% of its intracellular NO3− pool within 1 d. A stable-isotope labeling experiment proved that 15NO3− consumption was accompanied by the production and release of 15NH4+, indicating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). DNRA is an anaerobic respiration process that is known mainly from prokaryotic organisms, and here shown as dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway used by a eukaryotic phototroph. Similar to large sulfur bacteria and benthic foraminifera, diatoms may respire intracellular NO3− in sediment layers without O2 and NO3−. The rapid depletion of the intracellular NO3− storage, however, implies that diatoms use DNRA to enter a resting stage for long-term survival. Assuming that pelagic diatoms are also capable of DNRA, senescing diatoms that sink through oxygen-deficient water layers may be a significant NH4+ source for anammox, the prevalent nitrogen loss pathway of oceanic oxygen minimum zones. PMID:21402908

  18. Impact of chloride on denitrification potential in roadside wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, Nakita A.; Bushey, Joseph T.; Tobias, Craig R.; Song, Bongkeun; Vadas, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Developed landscapes are exposed to changes in hydrology and water chemistry that limit their ability to mitigate detrimental impacts to coastal water bodies, particularly those that result from stormwater runoff. The elevated level of impervious cover increases not only runoff but also contaminant loading of nutrients, metals, and road salt used for deicing to water bodies. Here we investigate the impact that road salt has on denitrification in roadside environments. Sediments were collected from a series of forested and roadside wetlands and acclimated with a range of Cl − concentrations from 0 to 5000 mg L −1 for 96 h. Denitrification rates were measured by the isotope pairing technique using 15 N–NO 3 − , while denitrifying community structures were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of nitrous oxide reductase genes (nosZ). Chloride significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited denitrification in forested wetlands at a Cl − dosage of 2500 or 5000 mg L −1 , but the decrease in denitrification rates was less and not significant for the roadside wetlands historically exposed to elevated concentrations of Cl − . The difference could not be attributed to other significant changes in conditions, such as DOC concentrations, N species concentrations, or pH levels. Denitrifying communities, as measured by T-RFs of the nosZ gene, in the roadside wetlands with elevated concentration of Cl − were distinctly different and more diverse compared to forested wetlands, and also different in roadside wetlands after 96 h exposures to Cl − . The shifts in denitrifying communities seem to minimize the decrease in denitrification rates in the wetlands previously exposed to Cl. As development results in more Cl − use and exposure to a broad range of natural or manmade wetland structures, an understanding of the seasonal effect of Cl on denitrification processes in these systems would aid in design or mitigation of the effects on

  19. Microbial ecology of denitrification in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huijie; Chandran, Kartik; Stensel, David

    2014-11-01

    Globally, denitrification is commonly employed in biological nitrogen removal processes to enhance water quality. However, substantial knowledge gaps remain concerning the overall community structure, population dynamics and metabolism of different organic carbon sources. This systematic review provides a summary of current findings pertaining to the microbial ecology of denitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes. DNA fingerprinting-based analysis has revealed a high level of microbial diversity in denitrification reactors and highlighted the impacts of carbon sources in determining overall denitrifying community composition. Stable isotope probing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, microarrays and meta-omics further link community structure with function by identifying the functional populations and their gene regulatory patterns at the transcriptional and translational levels. This review stresses the need to integrate microbial ecology information into conventional denitrification design and operation at full-scale. Some emerging questions, from physiological mechanisms to practical solutions, for example, eliminating nitrous oxide emissions and supplementing more sustainable carbon sources than methanol, are also discussed. A combination of high-throughput approaches is next in line for thorough assessment of wastewater denitrifying community structure and function. Though denitrification is used as an example here, this synergy between microbial ecology and process engineering is applicable to other biological wastewater treatment processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence for biological denitrification inhibition (BDI) by plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Piola, Florence; Bellvert, Floriant; Haichar, Feth el Zahar; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Pommier, Thomas; Puijalon, Sara; Tsafack, Noelline; Poly, Franck

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies on the effect of secondary metabolites on the functioning of rhizosphere microbial communities have often focused on aspects of the nitrogen (N) cycle but have overlooked biological denitrification inhibition (BDI), which can affect plant N-nutrition. Here, we investigated the BDI by the compounds of Fallopia spp., an invasive weed shown to be associated with a low potential denitrification of the soil. Fallopia spp. extracts were characterized by chromatographic analysis and were used to test the BDI effects on the metabolic and respiratory activities of denitrifying bacteria, under aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) conditions. The BDI of Fallopia spp. extracts was tested on a complex soil community by measuring denitrification enzyme activity (DEA), substrate induced respiration (SIR), as well as abundances of denitrifiers and total bacteria. In 15 strains of denitrifying bacteria, extracts led to a greater BDI (92%) than respiration inhibition (50%). Anaerobic metabolic activity reduction was correlated with catechin concentrations and the BDI was dose dependent. In soil, extracts reduced the DEA/SIR ratio without affecting the denitrifiers: total bacteria ratio. We show that secondary metabolite(s) from Fallopia spp. inhibit denitrification. This provides new insight into plant-soil interactions and improves our understanding of a plant's ability to shape microbial soil functioning. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Effects of salt pond restoration on benthic flux: Sediment as a source of nutrients to the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Brent R.; Kuwabara, James S.; Carter, James L.; Garrettt, Krista K.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sarah; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding nutrient flux between the benthos and the overlying water (benthic flux) is critical to restoration of water quality and biological resources because it can represent a major source of nutrients to the water column. Extensive water management commenced in the San Francisco Bay, Beginning around 1850, San Francisco Bay wetlands were converted to salt ponds and mined extensively for more than a century. Long-term (decadal) salt pond restoration efforts began in 2003. A patented device for sampling porewater at varying depths, to calculate the gradient, was employed between 2010 and 2012. Within the former ponds, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus and that of dissolved ammonia were consistently positive (i.e., moving out of the sediment into the water column). The lack of measurable nitrate or nitrite concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface suggested negligible fluxes for dissolved nitrate and nitrite. The dominance of ammonia in the porewater indicated anoxic sediment conditions, even at only 1 cm depth, which is consistent with the observed, elevated sediment oxygen demand. Nearby openestuary sediments showed much lower benthic flux values for nutrients than the salt ponds under resortation. Allochthonous solute transport provides a nutrient advective flux for comparison to benthic flux. For ammonia, averaged for all sites and dates, benthic flux was about 80,000 kg/year, well above the advective flux range of −50 to 1500 kg/year, with much of the variability depending on the tidal cycle. By contrast, the average benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus was about 12,000 kg/year, of significant magnitude, but less than the advective flux range of 21,500 to 30,000 kg/year. These benthic flux estimates, based on solute diffusion across the sediment-water interface, reveal a significant nutrient source to the water column of the pond which stimulates algal blooms (often autotrophic). This benthic source may be

  2. Biological nitrate removal using a food waste-derived carbon source in synthetic wastewater and real sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haowei; Jiang, Jianguo; Li, Menglu; Yan, Feng; Gong, Changxiu; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-15

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from food waste to improve biological nutrient removal has drawn much attention. In this study, acidogenic liquid from food waste was used as an alternative carbon source for synthetic wastewater treatment. C/N ratios of 5 and 6 were suitable for denitrification, and the change in acidogenic liquid composition had no negative effect on denitrification. The denitrification rates using optimal carbon-to-nitrate ratios of acidogenic liquid were more than 25 mg NO3-N/(gVSS·h). At the same time, acidogenic liquid was used to improve nutrient removal from summer and winter sewage. C/N ratios of 5 and 6 were acceptable for summer sewage treatment. Total nitrogen in the final effluent was less than 7 mg/L. Two additional hours were required for winter sewage treatment, and the C/N ratio had to be >6. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. In Situ Groundwater Denitrification in the Riparian Zone of a Short-Rotation Woody Crop Experimental Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, J. B.; Jackson, C. R.; Rau, B.; Pringle, C. M.; Matteson, C.

    2017-12-01

    The southeastern United States has potential to become a major producer of short rotation woody crops (SRWC) for the production of biofuels, but this will require converting to more intensive forest management practices that will increase nitrate (NO3-) loading and alter nitrogen cycling in nearby freshwater ecosystems. Water quality monitoring in an experimental short-rotation woody crop watershed in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina has shown increased concentrations of NO3- in groundwater but no evidence of increased NO3- in riparian groundwater or surface waters. Forested riparian areas established as streamside management zones (SMZ) are known to act as buffers to surface water bodies by mitigating nutrients. The objectives of this study were to quantify denitrification by measuring dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations along groundwater flow paths and analyze relationships between denitrification estimates, nutrients, and water chemistry parameters. A network of piezometers has been established in the Fourmile Experimental Watershed at the Department of Energy - Savannah River Site. Water samples were collected monthly and were analyzed for concentrations of nutrients (temperature, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, dissolved organic carbon) and dissolved gases (N2, Ar, N2O). Preliminary data showed greater dissolved N2O concentrations than dissolved N2 concentrations in groundwater. The ratios of N2O to combined end products of denitrification (N2O / N2O+N2) ranged from 0.33 to 0.99. Mean N2O+N2 concentrations were greater in groundwater samples in the SRWC plot and along the SMZ boundary than along the ephemeral stream within the riparian zone. Correlations between water chemistry parameters and N2 concentrations are indicative of known biogeochemical driving factors of denitrification. Continued monthly sampling will be coupled with analysis of nutrient concentrations (NO3-, NH4+, TN) to help determine transport and processing

  4. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate has become an increasingly abundant potential electron acceptor for Fe(II) oxidation in groundwater, but this redox couple has not been well characterized within aquifer settings. To investigate this reaction and some of its implications for redox-sensitive groundwater contaminants, we conducted an in situ field study in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod. Long-term (15 year) geochemical monitoring within the contaminant plume indicated interacting zones with variable nitrate-, Fe(II)-, phosphate-, As(V)-, and As(III)-containing groundwater. Nitrate and phosphate were derived predominantly from wastewater disposal, whereas Fe(II), As(III), and As(V) were mobilized from the aquifer sediments. Multiple natural gradient, anoxic tracer tests were conducted in which nitrate and bromide were injected into nitrate-free, Fe(II)-containing groundwater. Prior to injection, aqueous Fe(II) concentrations were approximately 175 μM, but sorbed Fe(II) accounted for greater than 90% of the total reactive Fe(II) in the aquifer. Nitrate reduction was stimulated within 1 m of transport for 100 μM and 1000 μM nitrate additions, initially producing stoichiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N). In subsequent injections at the same site, nitrate was reduced even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and were accompanied by Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation and decreases in dissolved phosphate, As(III), and As(V) concentrations. Nitrate N and O isotope fractionation effects during nitrate reduction were approximately equal (ε15N/ε18O = 1.11) and were similar to those reported for laboratory studies of biological nitrate reduction, including denitrification, but unlike some reported effects on nitrate by denitrification in aquifers. All constituents affected by the in situ tracer experiments returned to pre-injection levels after several weeks

  5. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Buckwalter, S.P.; Repert, D.A.; Miller, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  6. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, M.; Fenton, O.; Horan, B.; Hennessy, D.; Richards, K. G.; Jordan, P.; Goldscheider, N.; Butscher, C.; Blum, P.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e. rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in South Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and on the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD). In future, more research should focus on the high

  7. Denitrification of fertilizer wastewater at high chloride concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucisik, Ahmed Süheyl; Henze, Mogens

    Wastewater from fertilizer industry is characterized by high contents of chloride concentration, which normally vary between 60 and 76 g/l. Experiments with bilogical denitrification were performed in lab-scale "fill and draw" reactors with synthetic wastewater with chloride concentrations up to 77.......4 g/l. The results of the experiments showed that biological denitrification was feasible at the extreme environmental conditions prevailing in fertilizer wastewater. Stable continuous biological denitrfication of the synthetic high chloride wastewater was performed up to 77.4 g Cl/l at 37 degree C...

  8. Rising Sludge in Secondary Settlers Due to Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Dupont, Rene; Grau, Peter

    1993-01-01

    High suspended solids concentrations in settler effluents can be caused by rising sludge, which is the effect of flotation of solids by nitrogen gas resulting from biological denitrification. Many factors influence the nitrogen gas bubble evolution. The most important factor is the rate...... of biological denitrification. Factors like nitrogen gas solubility and oxygen concentration in settler influent only play a minor role. The hydraulic retention time in the bottom part of the settler is, for all practical purposes, so high that sufficient nitrogen gas will be generated at temperatures above 20...

  9. Novel flow-through bioremediation system for removing nitrate from nursery discharge water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Wilson, P; Albano, Joseph P

    2013-11-30

    Nitrate losses in surface runoff water from nursery production areas can be significant. This study evaluated the potential use of microbial-based (denitrification), flow-through bioreactors for their nitrate-remediation ability. Duplicate bioreactor systems were constructed at a local foliage plant nursery. Each bioreactor system consisted of four 242 L tanks with connections alternating between bottom and top. Each tank was filled with approximately 113 L of Kaldness media to provide surface area for attachment of native microflora. Molasses was supplied as a carbon source for denitrification and water flow rates through the systems ranged from 5 to 18 L min(-1) during tests. Automatic water samplers were used to collect composite samples every 15 min from both the inflow and the exit flow water. Results indicate consistent removal of 80-100% of the nitrate flowing into the systems. Accumulation of ammoniacal and nitrite nitrogen did not occur, indicating that the nitrate-nitrogen was removed from the water, and not simply transformed into another water-soluble species. Occasions where removal rates were less than 80% were usually traced to faulty delivery of the carbon source. Results indicate that modular microbial-based bioremediation systems may be a useful tool for helping water managers meet stringent nitrogen water quality regulations, especially at nurseries with limited space for expansion of water retention facilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. VT Nitrate Leaching Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Nitrate Leaching Index data for the state of Vermont. This is a derivative product based on the SSURGO soils data for all counties except Essex...

  11. Biological reduction of nitrate wastewater using fluidized-bed bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Hancher, C.W.; Patton, B.D.; Kowalchuk, M.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt % NO 3 - and as large as 2000 m 3 /d, in the nuclear fuel cycle as well as in many commercial processes such as fertilizer production, paper manufacturing, and metal finishing. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO 3 - )/m 3 by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The major strain of denitrification bacteria is Pseudomonas which was derived from garden soil. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25 to 0.50-mm-diam coal particles, which are fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m 3 . A description is given of the results of two biodenitrification R and D pilot plant programs based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m 3 and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 gN(NO 3 - )/d per liter of empty bioreactor volume. The first of these pilot plant programs consisted of two 0.2-m-diam bioreactors, each with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 208 liters, operating in series. The second pilot plant was used to determine the diameter dependence of the reactors by using a 0.5-m-diam reactor with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 1200 liters. These pilot plants operated for a period of six months and two months respectively, while using both a synthetic waste and the actual waste from a gaseous diffusion plant operated by Goodyear Atomic Corporation

  12. Characterization and single-stage denitrification anaerobic digestion of spent stream from the hydrolysis-fermentation-combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramnik

    The demand for ethanol as an oxygenate and octane booster in automobile fuel is growing. A number of processes are being investigated for conversion of biomass to ethanol. The Hydrolysis-Fermentation-Combustion (HFC) process for fuel ethanol production developed at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory, Richmond, California is at the stage of technology transfer following over two decades of research and development. This study addresses the technology to be used in treatment of spent streams to be discharged from this process. The treatment design combines a single stage denitrification and anaerobic digestion (SSDAD) for the biological treatment of a representative stream from this process. A typical spent stream contained a wide range of soluble organic materials including: unfermented sugars, components of the feedstocks solubilized in the hydrolysis, acid degradation products of carbohydrates, cleavage products of lignin, water-soluble extractives and phenolics, terpenes and other unfermented organic material, and nitrate ion from the nitric acid used as a catalyst in the hydrolysis reaction. Three sets of experiments were conducted in laboratory scale anaerobic digesters. Commonly available anaerobic sludge from local sewage treatment plants was used as a starter seed and was successfully acclimated to the high nitrate substrate leading to enrichment of denitrifiers. Necessary nutrients and trace elements were identified and supplied to satisfy the obligatory requirements of different groups of bacterial groups present. A major finding was the unique role of ammonium hydroxide in controlling pH leading to steady-state operation of the digester. At steady state operation the reduction in COD was 65%, the nitrate reduction was 88% and the nitrite reduction was 100%. Nitrate was reduced to safe nitrogen gas without buildup of any intermediate products. Organic material was converted to useful methane gas and carbon dioxide. The SSDAD system was

  13. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  14. Groundwater nitrate remediation using plant-chip bioreactors under phosphorus-limited environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shunichi; Tang, Changyuan

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater denitrification bioreactors under limited phosphorus conditions were studied in column experiments using four types of plant-chips. When the phosphate-P concentration in the influent increased from 0.04 mg/L to 0.4 mg/L, the nitrate removal ratio increased from 61.6% to 86.1% in reed, from 7.2% to 12.6% in Japanese cedar, from 37.0% to 73.6% in Moso bamboo, and from 19.2% to 50.5% in Lithocarpus edulis. The carbon source of the denitrifiers' growth was indicated by the content of acid detergent soluble organic matter in the chips. Furthermore, according to the modified Michaelis-Menten-type equation proposed in the study, the denitrification rate was largely limited by the phosphate-P concentration in reed and L. eduilis, and by the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Japanese cedar. Denitrification in Moso bamboo was affected by both phosphate-P and DOC. Besides the DOC, phosphorus emerged as an important limiting element of denitrification in some bioreactor plant-chips.

  15. Groundwater nitrate remediation using plant-chip bioreactors under phosphorus-limited environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shunichi; Tang, Changyuan

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater denitrification bioreactors under limited phosphorus conditions were studied in column experiments using four types of plant-chips. When the phosphate-P concentration in the influent increased from 0.04mg/L to 0.4mg/L, the nitrate removal ratio increased from 61.6% to 86.1% in reed, from 7.2% to 12.6% in Japanese cedar, from 37.0% to 73.6% in Moso bamboo, and from 19.2% to 50.5% in Lithocarpus edulis. The carbon source of the denitrifiers' growth was indicated by the content of acid detergent soluble organic matter in the chips. Furthermore, according to the modified Michaelis-Menten-type equation proposed in the study, the denitrification rate was largely limited by the phosphate-P concentration in reed and L. eduilis, and by the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Japanese cedar. Denitrification in Moso bamboo was affected by both phosphate-P and DOC. Besides the DOC, phosphorus emerged as an important limiting element of denitrification in some bioreactor plant-chips. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying benthic nitrogen fluxes in Puget Sound, Washington: a review of available data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, Richard W.; Paulson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding benthic fluxes is important for understanding the fate of materials that settle to the Puget Sound, Washington, seafloor, as well as the impact these fluxes have on the chemical composition and biogeochemical cycles of marine waters. Existing approaches used to measure benthic nitrogen flux in Puget Sound and elsewhere were reviewed and summarized, and factors for considering each approach were evaluated. Factors for selecting an appropriate approach for gathering information about benthic flux include: availability of resources, objectives of projects, and determination of which processes each approach measures. An extensive search of literature was undertaken to summarize known benthic nitrogen fluxes in Puget Sound. A total of 138 individual flux chamber measurements and 38 sets of diffusive fluxes were compiled for this study. Of the diffusive fluxes, 35 new datasets were located, and new flux calculations are presented in this report. About 65 new diffusive flux calculations are provided across all nitrogen species (nitrate, NO3-; nitrite, NO2-; ammonium, NH4+). Data analysis of this newly compiled benthic flux dataset showed that fluxes beneath deep (greater than 50 meters) water tended to be lower than those beneath shallow (less than 50 meters) water. Additionally, variability in flux at the shallow depths was greater, possibly indicating a more dynamic interaction between the benthic and pelagic environments. The overall range of bottom temperatures from studies in the Puget Sound area were small (5–16 degrees Celsius), and only NH4+ flux showed any pattern with temperature. For NH4+, flux values and variability increased at greater than about 12 degrees Celsius. Collection of additional study site metadata about environmental factors (bottom temperature, depth, sediment porosity, sediment type, and sediment organic matter) will help with development of a broader regional understanding benthic nitrogen flux in the Puget Sound.

  17. The offshore benthic fish community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantry, Brian F.; Lantry, Jana R.; Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Hoyle, James A.; Schaner, Teodore; Neave, Fraser B.; Keir, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lake Ontario’s offshore benthic fish community includes primarily slimy sculpin, lake whitefish, rainbow smelt, lake trout, burbot, and sea lamprey. Of these, lake trout have been the focus of an international restoration effort for more than three decades (Elrod et al. 1995; Lantry and Lantry 2008). The deepwater sculpin and three species of deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) that were historically important in the offshore benthic zone became rare or were extirpated by the 1960s (Christie 1973; Owens et al. 2003; Lantry et al. 2007b; Roth et al. 2013). Ecosystem changes continue to influence the offshore benthic fish community, including the effects of dreissenid mussels, the near disappearance of burrowing amphipods (Diporeia spp.) (Dermott et al. 2005; Watkins et al. 2007), and the increased abundance and expanded geographic distribution of round goby (see Nearshore Fish Community chapter) (Lantry et al. 2007b). The fish-community objectives for the offshore benthic fish community, as described by Stewart et al. (1999), are:

  18. Biogeochemistry and Genetic Potential related to Denitrification of Heterotrophic Bacteria isolated from Lake Vida Cryobrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubl, G.; Kuhn, E.; Ichimura, A.; Fritsen, C. H.; Murray, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Vida, one of the largest lakes in McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, is a thick block of ice permeated by brine channels below 16 m that contain the highest levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) that have been reported from a terrestrial environment (86.6 ± 5.9 μM). The subzero -13.4oC brine (18% salinity) has an unusual geochemistry with high levels of iron, dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and ammonium. A number of heterotrophic bacteria were cultivated from this unusual, extreme ecosystem that has been isolated for at least three thousand years. The aim of this research was to phylogenetically characterize the bacterial isolates (using 16S ribosomal RNA analysis) and investigate their denitrifying abilities and genetic potential related to key reactions in the denitrification cycle. Fifteen phylotypes were isolated from Lake Vida brine among three phyla: Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Based on the 16S ribosomal RNA analysis, Marinobacter was the most abundant (56%) genus identified among the 57 isolates. The other isolates were related to the genera Psychrobacter, Exiguobacterium, Kocuria, and Microbacterium. Representatives of each phylotype were characterized and verified for: (1) Nitrate (NO3-) reduction to either N2O or dinitrogen (N2) by Gas Chromatography; (2) presence of the genes nirK or nirS for NO3- reduction and nosZ for nitric oxide (NO) reduction by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and (3) growth response to salinity and temperature gradients. Thirty five of the Lake Vida isolates produced either N2O or N2 coupled to cell growth. All 57 isolates have grown across a 32°C temperature range (-10°C to 22°C) and 54 isolates were halotolerant bacteria (growing in 0% to 16% salinity), while the last three isolates were halophilic. Electron microscopy revealed membrane vesicles and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) around the Lake Vida isolates, which may be a survival adaptation. Investigating the denitrification and other

  19. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H 13 CO 3 - and H 12 CO 3 - as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H 13 CO 3 - , demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the 13 C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of ultralow-dose antibiotics exposure on soil nitrate and N2O flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Stephanie L.; Loving, Madeline; Li, Xiqing; Zhang, Pengfei

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics has been shown to alter the metabolic activity of micro-organisms, but the impact on soil denitrification and N2O production has rarely been reported. In this study, incubation and column transport experiments were conducted on soils exposed to as many as four antibiotics in the ng·kg-1 range (several orders of magnitude below typical exposure rates) to evaluate the impact of ultralow dose exposure on net nitrate losses and soil N2O flux over time. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, three antibiotics produced statistically significant dose response curves in which denitrification was stimulated at some doses and inhibited at others. Sulfamethoxazole in particular had a stimulatory effect at ultralow doses, an effect also evidenced by a near 17% increase in nitrate removal during column transport. Narasin also showed evidence of stimulating denitrification in anaerobic soils within 3 days of exposure, which is concurrent to a statistically significant increase in N2O flux measured over moist soils exposed to similar doses. The observation that even ultralow levels of residual antibiotics may significantly alter the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil raises a number of concerns pertaining to agriculture, management of nitrogen pollution, and climate change, and warrants additional investigations.

  1. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification which converts N to N2O and dinitrog...

  2. Rising Sludge in Secondary Settlers Due to Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Dupont, Rene; Grau, Peter

    1993-01-01

    High suspended solids concentrations in settler effluents can be caused by rising sludge, which is the effect of flotation of solids by nitrogen gas resulting from biological denitrification. Many factors influence the nitrogen gas bubble evolution. The most important factor is the rate of biolog...

  3. Biological denitrification of fertiliser wastewater at high chloride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wastewater from the fertiliser industry is characterised by high chloride concentration, normally varying between 60 and 76 g/ℓ. Experiments with biological denitrification were performed in laboratory-scale \\'fill and draw\\' reactors with synthetic fertiliser wastewater, with chloride concentrations up to 96.7 g Cl/ℓ at 37oC; the ...

  4. Applying MICP by denitrification in soils : A process analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, P.V.; Nakano, A.; van der Star, WRL; Heimovaara, T.J.; van Paassen, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) by denitrification was investigated in relation to its potential use as a ground improvement method. Liquid batch experiments indicated that the substrate solution had an optimum carbon–nitrogen ratio of 1·6 and confirmed that

  5. Evaluation of an Industrial Byproduct Glycol Mixture for Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Boardman, Gregory D; Bott, Charles B

      In this study, the effectiveness of an industrial byproduct that contained ethylene and propylene glycols to serve as a denitrification carbon source was investigated. Use of the byproduct was compared to methanol on the basis of denitrification rate and yield. Three sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were studied; one was fed methanol, the other two were fed with low and high dosages of the byproduct separately. The low dosage reactor (GLYL) exhibited the highest denitrification rate of 11.55 mg NO x -N/g MLVSS•h and the lowest yield of 0.21 mg VSS/mg COD, while the high dosage reactor (GLYH) had the lowest denitrification rate of 8.56 mg NO x -N/g MLVSS•h and the highest yield of 0.55 mg VSS/mg COD. The results of this study showed that the industrial byproduct can be used to effect efficient nitrogen removal, but excess dosage can cause poor performance.

  6. Fate of nitrate and origin of ammonium during infiltration of treated wastewater investigated through stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Schlögl, Johanna; Knöller, Kay; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL addresses water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. However, a potential impact to water quality is increasing ammonium concentrations, which are known to be a problem resulting from bank filtration. In the context of MAR, increasing ammonium concentrations have received little attention so far. A soil column experiment was conducted to investigate transformations of nitrogen species when secondary treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated through a natural soil (organic matter content 5.6%) being considered for MAR. The TWW contains nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), but typically very low (samples were collected from six depths. Results show that the largest decreases in nitrate concentration occur in the upper part of the soil, with on average 77% attenuated by 15 cm depth and 94% by 30 cm depth. Starting at 30 cm and continuing downward, ammonium concentrations increased, with concentrations reaching as high as 4 mg-N/L (the EU drinking water limit is 0.41 mg-N/L). Selected samples were also measured for stable nitrogen and oxygen isotopes. Nitrate became isotopically heavier (both N and O) with increasing depth (samples collected at 5 and 15 cm below the soil surface), with most results forming a linear trend for δ18O vs. δ15N. This pattern is consistent with denitrification, which is also supported by the fact that the ammonium concentration first increases at a depth below where most of the nitrate is consumed. However, the relationship between δ15N-NO3- and nitrate concentration is not clearly logarithmic, so processes other than denitrification are not ruled out for explaining the fate of nitrate. The δ15N of ammonium in the water samples and of nitrogen in the soil were also measured. With increasing depth and time, the δ15N-NH4+ (mean 4.3‰) decreases and approaches the δ15N of the pre

  7. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This

  8. ArcNLET: A GIS-based software to simulate groundwater nitrate load from septic systems to surface water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, J. Fernando; Ye, Ming; Wang, Liying; Lee, Paul Z.; Davis, Hal; Hicks, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS), or septic systems, can be a significant source of nitrates in groundwater and surface water. The adverse effects that nitrates have on human and environmental health have given rise to the need to estimate the actual or potential level of nitrate contamination. With the goal of reducing data collection and preparation costs, and decreasing the time required to produce an estimate compared to complex nitrate modeling tools, we developed the ArcGIS-based Nitrate Load Estimation Toolkit (ArcNLET) software. Leveraging the power of geographic information systems (GIS), ArcNLET is an easy-to-use software capable of simulating nitrate transport in groundwater and estimating long-term nitrate loads from groundwater to surface water bodies. Data requirements are reduced by using simplified models of groundwater flow and nitrate transport which consider nitrate attenuation mechanisms (subsurface dispersion and denitrification) as well as spatial variability in the hydraulic parameters and septic tank distribution. ArcNLET provides a spatial distribution of nitrate plumes from multiple septic systems and a load estimate to water bodies. ArcNLET's conceptual model is divided into three sub-models: a groundwater flow model, a nitrate transport and fate model, and a load estimation model which are implemented as an extension to ArcGIS. The groundwater flow model uses a map of topography in order to generate a steady-state approximation of the water table. In a validation study, this approximation was found to correlate well with a water table produced by a calibrated numerical model although it was found that the degree to which the water table resembles the topography can vary greatly across the modeling domain. The transport model uses a semi-analytical solution to estimate the distribution of nitrate within groundwater, which is then used to estimate a nitrate load using a mass balance argument. The estimates given by ArcNLET are

  9. Evaluation and adjustment of description of denitrification in the DailyDayCent and COUP models based on N2 and N2O laboratory incubation system measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosz, Balázs; Well, Reinhard; Dannenmann, Michael; Dechow, René; Kitzler, Barbara; Michel, Kerstin; Reent Köster, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Denitrification is an anaerobic key process by microbes where the NO3- is step-by-step reduced and emitted as NO, N2O and finally N2 gas from the soil. The accurate knowledge of the reduction of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) to N2O and molecular N2 is important because the N2O fraction is further reduced to N2 and constitutes the main emission source of this greenhouse gas from agricultural soils. Hence, our understanding and ability to quantify soil denitrification is crucial for mitigating nitrogen fertilizer loss as well as for reducing N2O emissions. Models can be an important tool to predict mitigation effects and help to develop climate smart mitigation strategies. Ideally, commonly used biogeochemical models could provide adequate predictions of denitrification processes of agricultural soils but often simplified process descriptions and inadequate model parameters prevent models from simulating adequate fluxes of N2 and N2O on field scale. Model development and parametrization often suffers from limited availability of empirical data describing denitrification processes in agricultural soils. While in many studies N2O emissions are used to develop and train models, detailed measurements on NO, N2O, N2 fluxes and concentrations and related soil conditions are necessary to develop and test adequate model algorithms. Composition of denitrifying communities, coinciding effects of management and local conditions on the development of denitrification hotspots are highly variable in space and time. To address this issue the coordinated research unit „Denitrification in Agricultural Soils: Integrated Control and Modelling at Various Scales (DASIM)" was initiated to more closely investigate N-fluxes caused by denitrification in response to environmental effects, soil properties and microbial communities. Data suitable to validate denitrification models are still scarce due to previous technical and/or methodical limitations of measuring N2 fluxes, but large

  10. Multivariate benthic ecosystem functioning in the Arctic – benthic fluxes explained by environmental parameters in the southeastern Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Link

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of climate change on Arctic marine ecosystems and their biogeochemical cycles are difficult to predict given the complex physical, biological and chemical interactions among the ecosystem components. We studied benthic biogeochemical fluxes in the Arctic and the influence of short-term (seasonal to annual, long-term (annual to decadal and other environmental variability on their spatial distribution to provide a baseline for estimates of the impact of future changes. In summer 2009, we measured fluxes of dissolved oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, soluble reactive phosphate and silicic acid at the sediment–water interface at eight sites in the southeastern Beaufort Sea at water depths from 45 to 580 m. The spatial pattern of the measured benthic boundary fluxes was heterogeneous. Multivariate analysis of flux data showed that no single or reduced combination of fluxes could explain the majority of spatial variation, indicating that oxygen flux is not representative of other nutrient sink–source dynamics. We tested the influence of eight environmental parameters on single benthic fluxes. Short-term environmental parameters (sinking flux of particulate organic carbon above the bottom, sediment surface Chl a were most important for explaining oxygen, ammonium and nitrate fluxes. Long-term parameters (porosity, surface manganese and iron concentration, bottom water oxygen concentrations together with δ13Corg signature explained most of the spatial variation in phosphate, nitrate and nitrite fluxes. Variation in pigments at the sediment surface was most important to explain variation in fluxes of silicic acid. In a model including all fluxes synchronously, the overall spatial distribution could be best explained (57% by the combination of sediment Chl a, phaeopigments, δ13Corg, surficial manganese and bottom water oxygen concentration. We conclude that it is necessary to consider long-term environmental variability along with

  11. Hydrogeologic controls on the transport and fate of nitrate in ground water beneath riparian buffer zones: Results from thirteen studies across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the last two decades there has been growing interest in the capacity of riparian buffer zones to remove nitrate from ground waters moving through them. Riparian zone sediments often contain organic carbon, which favors formation of reducing conditions that can lead to removal of nitrate through denitrification. Over the past decade the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has investigated the transport and fate of nitrate in ground and surface waters in study areas across the United States. In these studies riparian zone efficiency in removing nitrate varied widely as a result of variations in hydrogeologic factors. These factors include (1) denitrification in the up-gradient aquifer due to the presence of organic carbon or other electron donors, (2) long residence times (>50 years) along ground-water flow paths allowing even slow reactions to completely remove nitrate, (3) dilution of nitrate enriched waters with older water having little nitrate, (4) bypassing of riparian zones due to extensive use of drains and ditches, and (5) movement of ground water along deep flow paths below reducing zones. By developing a better understanding of the hydrogeologic settings in which riparian buffer zones are likely to be inefficient we can develop improved nutrient management plans. ?? US Government 2004.

  12. Metabolic modeling of denitrification in Agrobacterium tumefaciens : A tool to study inhibiting and activating compounds for the denitrification pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.; Kleerebezem, R.; Picioreanu, C.; Bakken, L.; Bergaust, L.; De Vries, S.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    A metabolic network model for facultative denitrification was developed based on experimental data obtained with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The model includes kinetic regulation at the enzyme level and transcription regulation at the enzyme synthesis level. The objective of this work was to study

  13. Regulation by sliding operation of a denitrification process; Regulation par regime glissant d`un procede de denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babary, J.P.; Bourrel, S.

    1995-12-31

    Biotechnological processing of waste waters is made through fixed bed bioreactors. Biochemical reaction kinetics can be modelled by non linear differential equations. The model is used to develop control laws. As an application, a denitrification bioreactor is modelled. Then control algorithm is checked through mathematical simulation of nitrogen compounds concentration ratio. (D.L.)

  14. Direct measurement of denitrification in a Prosopis (Mesquite) dominated Sonoran Desert ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, Ross A; Jarrell, W M; Franco-Vizcaino, E

    1982-04-01

    Denitrification was directly measured using the acetylene inhibition technique in a Sonoran Desert ecosystem dominated by Prosopis glandulosa. Soil under Prosopis and from the unvegetated area between Prosopis was wetted with 50 mm of water and denitrification measured for 48 hours. The mean denitrification rate under Prosopis was 11.6 g N ha -1 h -1 compared to only 0.2 g N ha -1 h -1 away from Prosopis. The denitrification response to wetting was rapid and rates peaked about 24 h after water application.The much higher denitrification under Prosopis probably results from high available organic C under Prosopis, but other soil chemical and physical changes effected by Prosopis may influence denitrification rates. About 0.5 kg N ha -1 of Prosopis cover may be lost from this ecosystem by denitrification after infrequent major rainfalls.

  15. Nitrous Oxide Metabolism in Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria: Physiology and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Simon, J; Rowley, G; Bedmar, E J; Richardson, D J; Gates, A J; Delgado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) with substantial global warming potential and also contributes to ozone depletion through photochemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. The negative effects of N2O on climate and stratospheric ozone make N2O mitigation an international challenge. More than 60% of global N2O emissions are emitted from agricultural soils mainly due to the application of synthetic nitrogen-containing fertilizers. Thus, mitigation strategies must be developed which increase (or at least do not negatively impact) on agricultural efficiency whilst decrease the levels of N2O released. This aim is particularly important in the context of the ever expanding population and subsequent increased burden on the food chain. More than two-thirds of N2O emissions from soils can be attributed to bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes. In ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, N2O is formed through the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In denitrifiers, nitrate is reduced to N2 via nitrite, NO and N2O production. In addition to denitrification, respiratory nitrate ammonification (also termed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) is another important nitrate-reducing mechanism in soil, responsible for the loss of nitrate and production of N2O from reduction of NO that is formed as a by-product of the reduction process. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the environmental, regulatory and biochemical control of N2O emissions by nitrate-reducing bacteria and point to new solutions for agricultural GHG mitigation. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Alison [Arup, 50 Ringsend Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Nitsche, Janka [RPS, West Pier Business Campus, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Archbold, Marie [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Deakin, Jenny [Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. - Graphical abstract: Contrasting nitrate isotope signatures of groundwater in a free draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly drained catchment underlain by a low transmissivity aquifer. - Highlights: • Comparison of N fate and

  17. Geochemistry and sources of fluoride and nitrate contamination of groundwater in Lar area, south Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohsen; Nikbakht, Masume; Shakeri, Ata

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater quality in bone-dry and semiarid areas of Iran is decreasing because of contaminants from natural origins and anthropogenic sources. Among many harmful contaminants, nitrate and fluoride ions are more common. This study was carried out with the aim of determining geochemical processes controlling chemistry of groundwater with special reference to nitrate and fluoride enrichment in groundwater in Lar plain aquifer, south of Iran. Groundwater samples were collected from 17 sites and analyzed for main constituents (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO 4 2- , HCO 3 - , F - , and NO 3 - ). Composite diagram, saturation indices calculation, and multivariate analysis techniques including cluster and factor analyses were employed in evaluating groundwater quality. The EC ranges from 8793.87 to 13,345.00 μS/cm in wet season and from 9621.59 to 12,640.00 μS/cm in dry season. Fluoride amounts range between 0.59 and 3.92 mg/L. Nitrate concentrations range between 1.47 and 70.66 mg/L. Results indicate that dissolution-precipitation of carbonate and evaporate minerals, evaporation (in terms of agricultural water return), and opposite ion interchange are the main processes that determine groundwater chemistry. It seems that fluoride has a natural origin and the equilibrium reaction between fluorite and calcite is very significant to control fluoride concentration level in water. Vertical variation of nitrate concentration and distribution of agricultural areas have indicated that nitrate originated from nitrogenous inorganic fertilizers used during irrigation periods. The results also indicate that denitrification takes place in the aquifer and that nitrate decline is not only a function of dilution but also a process of denitrification.

  18. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations.

  19. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations >60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2–3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations. PMID:27847498

  20. Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxides based catalysts for the reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulić Tatjana J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary waste and bacterial contamination in physico-chemical and biological separation processes used today for nitrate removal from ground water make novel catalytic technologies that convert nitrates to unharmful gaseous nitrogen, very attractive for scientific research. The Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH based catalysts with different Mg/Al ratio were investigated in water denitrification reaction in the presence of hydrogen and with solely copper as an active phase. Since LDHs have ion exchange properties and their derived mixed oxides possess memory effect (restoration of layered structure after thermal decomposition, their adsorption capacity for nitrates was also measured in the same model system. All studied samples showed nitrate removal from 23% to 62% following the decrease in Al content, as well as the substantial adsorption capacity ranging from 18% to 38%. These results underlie the necessity to take into account the effects of the adsorption in all future investigations.

  1. Denitrification of groundwater using a sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized-bed MBR: performance and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AnFB-MBR) that has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification systems. The AnFB-MBR produced consistent high-quality product water when fed by a synthetic groundwater with NO3 (-)-N ranging 25-80 mg/L and operated at hydraulic retention times of 0.5-5.0 h. A nitrate removal rate of up to 4.0 g NO3 (-)-N/Lreactord was attained by the bioreactor, which exceeded any reported removal capacity. The flux of AnFB-MBR was maintained in the range of 1.5-15 L m(-2) h(-1). Successful membrane cleaning was practiced with cleaning cycles of 35-81 days, which had no obvious effect on the AnFB-MBR performance. The (15) N-tracer analyses elucidated that nitrogen was converted into (15) N2-N and (15) N-biomass accounting for 88.1-93.1 % and 6.4-11.6 % of the total nitrogen produced, respectively. Only 0.3-0.5 % of removed nitrogen was in form of (15)N2O-N in sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process, reducing potential risks of a significant amount of N2O emissions. The sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying bacterial consortium was composed mainly of bacteria from Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, and Chloroflexi phyla, with genera Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, and Ignavibacteriales dominating the consortium. The pyrosequencing assays also suggested that the stable microbial communities corresponded to the elevated performance of the AnFB-MBR. Overall, this research described relatively high nitrate removal, acceptable flux, indicating future potential for the technology in practice.

  2. Nitrate in watersheds: straight from soils to streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Perakis, Steven S.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Human activities are rapidly increasing the global supply of reactive N and substantially altering the structure and hydrologic connectivity of managed ecosystems. There is long-standing recognition that N must be removed along hydrologic flowpaths from uplands to streams, yet it has proven difficult to assess the generality of this removal across ecosystem types, and whether these patterns are influenced by land-use change. To assess how well upland nitrate (NO3-) loss is reflected in stream export, we gathered information from >50 watershed biogeochemical studies that reported nitrate concentrations ([NO3-]) for stream water and for either upslope soil solution or groundwater NO3- to examine whether stream export of NO3- accurately reflects upland NO3- losses. In this dataset, soil solution and streamwater [NO3-] were correlated across 40 undisturbed forest watersheds, with streamwater [NO3-] typically half (median = 50%) soil solution [NO3-]. A similar relationship was seen in 10 disturbed forest watersheds. However, for 12 watersheds with significant agricultural or urban development, the intercept and slope were both significantly higher than the relationship seen in forest watersheds. Differences in concentration between soil solution or groundwater and stream water may be attributed to biological uptake, microbial processes including denitrification, and/or preferential flow routing. The results of this synthesis are consistent with the hypotheses that undisturbed watersheds have a significant capacity to remove nitrate after it passes below the rooting zone and that land use changes tend to alter the efficiency or the length of watershed flowpaths, leading to reductions in nitrate removal and increased stream nitrate concentrations.

  3. Nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in an unconfined eogenetic karst aquifer in two sites with different redox potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, W. R.; Huang, L.; Graham, W. D.; Ogram, A.

    2017-05-01

    This study integrates push-pull tracer tests (PPTT) with microbial characterization of extracted water via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR) of selected functional N transformation genes to quantify nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in sites with different redox potential in a karst aquifer. PPTT treatments with nitrate (AN) and nitrate-fumarate (ANC) were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end-members. Oxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates (mmol L-1 h-1) were similar for AN and ANC treatment, ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.01. Anoxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates ranged from 0.03 ± 0.02 (AN) to 0.13 ± 0.02 (ANC). Microbial characterization indicates mechanisms influencing these rates were dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at the anoxic site with AN treatment, assimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (ANRA) with ANC treatment in the water column at both sites, and additional documented nitrate reduction that occurred in unsampled biofilms. With carbon treatment, total numbers of microbes (16S rRNA genes) significantly increased (fourteenfold to thirtyfold), supporting stimulated growth with resulting ANRA. Decreased DNRA gene concentrations (nrfA DNA) and increased DNRA activity ratio (nrfA-cDNA/DNA) supported the assertion that DNRA occurred in the anoxic zone with AN and ANC treatment. Furthermore, decreased DNRA gene copy numbers at the anoxic site with ANC treatment suggests that DNRA microbes in the anoxic site are chemolithoautotrophic. Increased RT-qPCR denitrification gene expression (nirK and nirS) was not observed in water samples, supporting that any observed NO3-N loss due to denitrification may be occurring in unsampled microbial biofilms.

  4. Tracing nitrate pollution sources and transformation in surface- and ground-waters using environmental isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Fadong, E-mail: lifadong@igsnrr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhang, Qiuying [Center for Agricultural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shijiazhuang 050021 (China); Li, Jing [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Water pollution in the form of nitrate nitrogen (NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N) contamination is a major concern in most agricultural areas in the world. Concentrations and nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate, as well as oxygen and deuterium isotopic compositions of surface and groundwater from a typical irrigated region in the North China Plain (NCP) collected from May to October in 2012 were analyzed to examine the major nitrate sources and transformations. Concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N ranged from 0.2 to 29.6 mg/L (mean of 11.2 mg/L) in surface water, and from 0.1 to 19.4 mg/L (mean of 2.8 mg/L) in groundwater. Approximately 46.7% of the surface water samples and 10% of the groundwater samples exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water standard for NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N. Surface water samples that exceeded the standard were collected mainly in the dry season (May and October), while groundwater samples that exceeded the standard were collected in the wet season (June). Overall, the highest nitrate levels were observed in surface water in May and in groundwater in June, indicating that fertilizer application, precipitation, and irrigation strongly influence the NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N concentrations. Analyses of isotopic compositions suggest that the main sources of nitrate are nitrification of fertilizer and sewage in surface water, in contrast, mineralization of soil organic N and sewage is the groundwater sources during the dry season. When fertilizers are applied, nitrate will be transported by precipitation through the soil layers to the groundwater in the wet season (June). Denitrification only occurred in surface water in the wet season. Attempts should be made to minimize overuse of nitrogen fertilizers and to improve nitrogen use efficiency in irrigated agricultural regions. - Highlights: • Nitrate sources in surface and groundwater were identified by multiple isotopes. • Nitrate pollution displayed obvious

  5. Physiological genetics of denitrification: A route to conserving fixed nitrogen: Progress [report], January 1986-January 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A set of 35 mutant strains of Pseudomonas stutzeri blocked in the final step of the denitrification pathway, have been analyzed. These strains, isolated following treatment with a frame-shift mutagen grow anaerobically at near normal rates when nitrate or nitrite ions are present as the only reductant but fail to grow, or grow poorly, if N 2 O is the only reductant. Analyzing these strains using two dimensional gels to examine the proteins they produce revealed that the strains can be grouped into classes that do not produce protein a (a - b + ); those that do not produce protein b (a + b - ) or produce neither protein a nor b (a - b - ); and those that do not produce protein a but instead produce a new protein, e, that migrates to a position on the gel slightly above and to the right of protein b. Protein b has been identified as the copper-containing N 2 O reductase described by Zumft. Protein a, which our mutant studies have identified and shown also to be essential for the reduction of N 2 O, is membrane-bound. Like N 2 O reductase, protein a also contains copper. As judged by the intensity of spots on two dimensional gels we found that the amount of protein a produced by cells grown anaerobically in complex medium in the presence of N 2 O increases with the amount of copper in the medium. The protein seems to be copper-inducible. 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Flood-controlled excess-air formation favors aerobic respiration and limits denitrification activity in riparian groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePeter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The saturated riparian zones of rivers act as spatially and temporally variable biogeochemical reactors. This complicates the assessment of biogeochemical transport and transformation processes. During a flood event, excess-air formation, i.e. the inclusion and dissolution of air bubbles into groundwater, can introduce high amounts of dissolved O2 and thereby affect biogeochemical processes in groundwater. With the help of a field-installed membrane-inlet mass-spectrometer we resolved the effects of flood induced excess-air formationon organic carbon and nitrogen transformations in groundwater of different riparian zones of a restored section of the River Thur, Switzerland. The results show that the flood event triggered high aerobic respiration activity in the groundwater below a zone densely populated with willow plants. The flood introduced high concentrations of O2 (230 µmol L–1 to the groundwater through the formation of excess air and transported up to ~400 µmol L 1 organic carbon from the soil/root layer into groundwater during the movement of the water table. A rapid respiration process, quantified via the measurements of O2, CO2 and noble-gas concentrations, led to fast depletion of the introduced O2 and organic carbon and to high CO2 concentration (590 µmol L–1 in the groundwater shortly after the flood. The synchronous analysis of different nitrogen species allowed studying the importance of denitrification activity. The results indicate that in the willow zone excess-air formation inhibited denitrification through high O2 concentration input. Instead, the observed decrease in nitrate concentration (~50 µmol N L 1 may be related to fostered nitrate uptake by plants. In the other riparian zones closer to the river, no significant excess-air formation and corresponding respiration activity was observed. Overall, analyzing the dissolved gases in the groundwater significantly contributed to deciphering biogeochemical processes in

  7. Temporary Storage or Permanent Removal? The Division of Nitrogen between Biotic Assimilation and Denitrification in Stormwater Biofiltration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Emily G. I.; Fletcher, Tim D.; Russell, Douglas G.; Grace, Michael R.; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Evrard, Victor; Deletic, Ana; Hatt, Belinda E.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The long-term efficacy of stormwater treatment systems requires continuous pollutant removal without substantial re-release. Hence, the division of incoming pollutants between temporary and permanent removal pathways is fundamental. This is pertinent to nitrogen, a critical water body pollutant, which on a broad level may be assimilated by plants or microbes and temporarily stored, or transformed by bacteria to gaseous forms and permanently lost via denitrification. Biofiltration systems have demonstrated effective removal of nitrogen from urban stormwater runoff, but to date studies have been limited to a ‘black-box’ approach. The lack of understanding on internal nitrogen processes constrains future design and threatens the reliability of long-term system performance. While nitrogen processes have been thoroughly studied in other environments, including wastewater treatment wetlands, biofiltration systems differ fundamentally in design and the composition and hydrology of stormwater inflows, with intermittent inundation and prolonged dry periods. Two mesocosm experiments were conducted to investigate biofilter nitrogen processes using the stable isotope tracer 15NO3− (nitrate) over the course of one inflow event. The immediate partitioning of 15NO3− between biotic assimilation and denitrification were investigated for a range of different inflow concentrations and plant species. Assimilation was the primary fate for NO3− under typical stormwater concentrations (∼1–2 mg N/L), contributing an average 89–99% of 15NO3− processing in biofilter columns containing the most effective plant species, while only 0–3% was denitrified and 0–8% remained in the pore water. Denitrification played a greater role for columns containing less effective species, processing up to 8% of 15NO3−, and increased further with nitrate loading. This study uniquely applied isotope tracing to biofiltration systems and revealed the dominance of assimilation in stormwater

  8. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  9. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which resulted in many neurological disorders.1 Thus, the mechanism of nitration in biological system explains how environment and genetic factors induce neurological disorder. Conventional nitration involves use of concentrated H2SO4 and HNO3 mixture as the nitrating agent. Such a method suffers from drawbacks.

  10. Effects of cyanobacterial-driven pH increases on sediment nutrient fluxes and coupled nitrification-denitrification in a shallow fresh water estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Summer cyanobacterial blooms caused an elevation in pH (9 to ~10.5 that lasted for weeks in the shallow and tidal-fresh region of the Sassafras River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay (USA. Elevated pH promoted desorption of sedimentary inorganic phosphorus and facilitated conversion of ammonium (NH4+ to ammonia (NH3. In this study, we investigated pH effects on exchangeable NH4+ desorption, pore water diffusion and the flux rates of NH4+, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and nitrate (NO3, nitrification, denitrification, and oxygen consumption. Elevated pH enhanced desorption of exchangeable NH4+ through NH3 formation from both pore water and adsorbed NH4+ pools. Progressive penetration of high pH from the overlying water into sediment promoted the mobility of SRP and the release of total ammonium (NH4+ and NH3 into the pore water. At elevated pH levels, high sediment-water effluxes of SRP and total ammonium were associated with reduction of nitrification, denitrification and oxygen consumption rates. Alkaline pH and the toxicity of NH3 may inhibit nitrification in the thin aerobic zone, simultaneously constraining coupled nitrification–denitrification with limited NO3 supply and high pH penetration into the anaerobic zone. Geochemical feedbacks to pH elevation, such as enhancement of dissolved nutrient effluxes and reduction in N2 loss via denitrification, may enhance the persistence of cyanobacterial blooms in shallow water ecosystems.

  11. Identification of active denitrifiers by DNA-stable isotope probing and amplicon sequencing reveals Betaproteobacteria as responsible for attenuation of nitrate contamination in a low impacted aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, M Inés; Kumaresan, Deepak; Tarlera, Silvana; Murrell, J Colin; Fernández-Scavino, Ana

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater reservoirs constitute important freshwater resources. However, these ecosystems are highly vulnerable to contamination and have to rely on the resident microbiota to attenuate the impact of this contamination. Nitrate is one of the main contaminants found in groundwater, and denitrification is the main process that removes the compound. In this study, the response to nutrient load on indigenous microbial communities in groundwater from a low impacted aquifer in Uruguay was evaluated. Denitrification rates were measured in groundwater samples from three different sites with nitrate, acetate and pyrite amendments. Results showed that denitrification is feasible under in situ nitrate and electron donor concentrations, although the lack of readily available organic energy source would limit the attenuation of higher nitrate concentrations. DNA-stable isotope probing, combined with amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA, nirS and nirK genes, was used to identify the active denitrifiers. Members of the phylum Betaproteobacteria were the dominant denitrifiers in two of three sites, with different families being observed; members of the genus Vogesella (Neisseriaceae) were key denitrifiers at one site, while the genera Dechloromonas (Rhodocyclaceae) and Comamonas (Comamonadaceae) were the main denitrifiers detected at the other sites. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Community N and O isotope fractionation by sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox in a stratified lacustrine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jakob; Blees, Jan; Veronesi, Mauro; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the community nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of fixed N loss in the northern basin of Lake Lugano, where sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox are the main drivers of suboxic N2 production. A decrease in nitrate (NO3-) concentration toward the redox transition zone (RTZ) at mid-water depth was paralleled by an increase in δ15N and δ18O from approximately 5‰ to >20‰ and from 0‰ to >10‰, respectively. Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations were highest in the near-bottom water and decreased toward the RTZ concomitant with an increase in δ15N-NH4+ from ∼7‰ to >15‰. A diffusion-reaction model yielded N and O isotope enrichment factors that are significantly smaller than isotope effects reported previously for microbial NO3- reduction and NH4+ oxidation (15εNO3 ≈ 10‰, 18εNO3 ≈ 7‰, and 15εNH4 ≈ 10-12‰). For the Lake Lugano north basin, we constrain the apparent under-expression of the N isotope effects to: (1) environmental conditions (e.g., substrate limitation, low cell specific N transformation rates), or (2) low process-specific (chemolithotrophic denitrification and anammox) isotope fractionation. Our results have confirmed the robust nature of the co-linearity between N and O isotope enrichment during microbial denitrification beyond its organotrophic mode. However, the ratio of 18O to 15N enrichment (18εNO3:15εNO3) associated with NO3- reduction in the RTZ was ∼0.89, which is lower than observed in marine environments and in most culture experiments. We propose that chemolithotrophic NO3- reduction in the Lake Lugano north basin was partly catalyzed by the periplasmic dissimilatory nitrate reductase (Nap) (rather than the membrane-bound dissimilatory Nar), which is known to express comparably low 18εNO3:15εNO3 ratios in the ambient NO3- pool. However, NO2- re-oxidation, e.g., during anammox or microaerobic nitrification, could have contributed to the lowered 18O to 15N enrichment ratios. Although

  13. Seasonal carbon cycling in a Greenlandic fjord: an integrated pelagic and benthic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi Louise; Meire, Lorenz; Juul-Pedersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have a pronounced effect on biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjords, but current insight on the biogeochemical functioning of these systems is limited. Here, we present seasonal data on primary production, export of particulate organic carbon (POC), and the coupling...... carbon amounted to 3.2 and 5.3 mol C m−2 yr−1, respectively. Sulfate reduction was the most prominent mineralization pathway, accounting for 69% of the benthic mineralization, while denitrification accounted for 2%. Overall, the carbon mineralization and burial in Kobbefjord were significantly higher...... in ice coverage in higher Arctic Greenlandic fjords will, as a first approximation, entail proportional increases in productivity, mineralization, and burial of organic carbon in the fjords, which will thus become similar to present-day southerly systems....

  14. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  15. Molecular identification of potential denitrifying bacteria and use of D-optimal mixture experimental design for the optimization of denitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taheur, Fadia; Fdhila, Kais; Elabed, Hamouda; Bouguerra, Amel; Kouidhi, Bochra; Bakhrouf, Amina; Chaieb, Kamel

    2016-04-01

    Three bacterial strains (TE1, TD3 and FB2) were isolated from date palm (degla), pistachio and barley. The presence of nitrate reductase (narG) and nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) genes in the selected strains was detected by PCR technique. Molecular identification based on 16S rDNA sequencing method was applied to identify positive strains. In addition, the D-optimal mixture experimental design was used to optimize the optimal formulation of probiotic bacteria for denitrification process. Strains harboring denitrification genes were identified as: TE1, Agrococcus sp LN828197; TD3, Cronobacter sakazakii LN828198 and FB2, Pedicoccus pentosaceus LN828199. PCR results revealed that all strains carried the nirS gene. However only C. sakazakii LN828198 and Agrococcus sp LN828197 harbored the nirK and the narG genes respectively. Moreover, the studied bacteria were able to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces with different degree. Process optimization showed that the most significant reduction of nitrate was 100% with 14.98% of COD consumption and 5.57 mg/l nitrite accumulation. Meanwhile, the response values were optimized and showed that the most optimal combination was 78.79% of C. sakazakii LN828198 (curve value), 21.21% of P. pentosaceus LN828199 (curve value) and absence (0%) of Agrococcus sp LN828197 (curve value). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Denitrification with epsilon-caprolactam by acclimated mixed culture and by pure culture of bacteria isolated from polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C M; Wang, C C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate denitrifying bacteria utilizing epsilon-caprolactam as the substrate, from a polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system. The aim is also to compare the performance of PAN (polyacrylonitrile) mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam and isolated pure strain for treating different initial epsilon-caprolactam concentrations from synthetic wastewater under anoxic conditions. The result showed that the PAN mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam could utilize 1538.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. Sufficient time and about 2200 mg/l of nitrate were necessary for the complete epsilon-caprolactam removal. Paracoccus thiophilus was isolated from the polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system and it could utilize 1722.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. About 3500 mg/l of nitrate was necessary for the complete removal of epsilon-caprolactam. When the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was below 784.3 mg/l, the removal efficiency of epsilon-caprolactam by Paracoccus thiophilus was better than that for the PAN mixed bacteria cultures. The growth of Paracoccus thiophilus was better. However, when the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was as high as 1445.8 mg/l, both the epsilon-caprolactam removal efficiency by Paracoccus thiophilus and Paracoccus thiophilus specific growth rate were similar to the PAN mixed bacteria cultures.

  17. Nitrogen removal and microbial community shift in an aerobic denitrification reactor bioaugmented with a Pseudomonas strain for coal-based ethylene glycol industry wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cong; Cui, Chong-Wei; Qiu, Shan; Shi, Sheng-Nan; Li, Ang; Ma, Fang

    2017-04-01

    An aerobic denitrification system, initially bioaugmented with Pseudomonas strain T13, was established to treat coal-based ethylene glycol industry wastewater, which contained 3219 ± 86 mg/L total nitrogen (TN) and 1978 ± 14 mg/L NO 3 - -N. In the current study, a stable denitrification efficiency of 53.7 ± 4.7% and nitrite removal efficiency of 40.1 ± 2.7% were achieved at different diluted influent concentrations. Toxicity evaluation showed that a lower toxicity of effluent was achieved when industry wastewater was treated by stuffing biofilm communities compared to suspended communities. Relatively high TN removal (~50%) and chemical oxygen demand removal percentages (>65%) were obtained when the influent concentration was controlled at below 50% of the raw industry wastewater. However, a further increased concentration led to a 20-30% decrease in nitrate and nitrite removal. Microbial network evaluation showed that a reduction in Pseudomonas abundance was induced during the succession of the microbial community. The napA gene analysis indicated that the decrease in nitrate and nitrite removal happened when abundance of Pseudomonas was reduced to less than 10% of the overall stuffing biofilm communities. Meanwhile, other denitrifying bacteria, such as Paracoccus, Brevundimonas, and Brucella, were subsequently enriched through symbiosis in the whole microbial network.

  18. Transport zonation limits coupled nitrification-denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Adam J.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2013-01-01

    into the coupling between ammonification, nitrification and denitrification in stationary sand ripples, we combined the diffusion equilibrium thin layer (DET) gel technique with a computational reactive transport biogeochemical model. The former approach provided high-resolution two-dimensional distributions of NO3......- and N-15-N-2 gas. The measured two-dimensional profiles correlate with computational model simulations, showing a deep pool of N-2 gas forming, and being advected to the surface below ripple peaks. Further isotope pairing calculations on these data indicate that coupled nitrification-denitrification......Measurement of biogeochemical processes in permeable sediments (including the hyporheic zone) is difficult because of complex multidimensional advective transport. This is especially the case for nitrogen cycling, which involves several coupled redox-sensitive reactions. To provide detailed insight...

  19. Impact of chloride on denitrification potential in roadside wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Nakita A; Bushey, Joseph T; Tobias, Craig R; Song, Bongkeun; Vadas, Timothy M

    2016-05-01

    Developed landscapes are exposed to changes in hydrology and water chemistry that limit their ability to mitigate detrimental impacts to coastal water bodies, particularly those that result from stormwater runoff. The elevated level of impervious cover increases not only runoff but also contaminant loading of nutrients, metals, and road salt used for deicing to water bodies. Here we investigate the impact that road salt has on denitrification in roadside environments. Sediments were collected from a series of forested and roadside wetlands and acclimated with a range of Cl(-) concentrations from 0 to 5000 mg L(-1) for 96 h. Denitrification rates were measured by the isotope pairing technique using (15)N-NO3(-), while denitrifying community structures were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of nitrous oxide reductase genes (nosZ). Chloride significantly (p removal rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrogen cycling in the deep sedimentary biosphere: nitrate isotopes in porewaters underlying the oligotrophic North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Buchwald, C.; Ziebis, W.; Wenk, C. B.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key component of fundamental biomolecules. Hence, its cycling and availability are central factors governing the extent of ecosystems across the Earth. In the organic-lean sediment porewaters underlying the oligotrophic ocean, where low levels of microbial activity persist despite limited organic matter delivery from overlying water, the extent and modes of nitrogen transformations have not been widely investigated. Here we use the N and oxygen (O) isotopic composition of porewater nitrate (NO3-) from a site in the oligotrophic North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program - IODP) to determine the extent and magnitude of microbial nitrate production (via nitrification) and consumption (via denitrification). We find that NO3- accumulates far above bottom seawater concentrations (~ 21 μM) throughout the sediment column (up to ~ 50 μM) down to the oceanic basement as deep as 90 m b.s.f. (below sea floor), reflecting the predominance of aerobic nitrification/remineralization within the deep marine sediments. Large changes in the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, however, reveal variable influence of nitrate respiration across the three sites. We use an inverse porewater diffusion-reaction model, constrained by the N and O isotope systematics of nitrification and denitrification and the porewater NO3- isotopic composition, to estimate rates of nitrification and denitrification throughout the sediment column. Results indicate variability of reaction rates across and within the three boreholes that are generally consistent with the differential distribution of dissolved oxygen at this site, though not necessarily with the canonical view of how redox thresholds separate nitrate regeneration from dissimilative consumption spatially. That is, we provide stable isotopic evidence for expanded zones of co-occurring nitrification and denitrification. The isotope biogeochemical modeling also yielded estimates for the δ15N and δ18O of newly produced nitrate (

  1. Effect of soil saturation on denitrification in a grassland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritza Cardenas, Laura; Bol, Roland; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Gregory, Andrew Stuart; Matthews, Graham Peter; Whalley, William Richard; Misselbrook, Thomas Henry; Scholefield, David; Well, Reinhard

    2017-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is of major importance as a greenhouse gas and precursor of ozone (O3) destruction in the stratosphere mostly produced in soils. The soil-emitted N2O is generally predominantly derived from denitrification and, to a smaller extent, nitrification, both processes controlled by environmental factors and their interactions, and are influenced by agricultural management. Soil water content expressed as water-filled pore space (WFPS) is a major controlling factor of emissions and its interaction with compaction, has not been studied at the micropore scale. A laboratory incubation was carried out at different saturation levels for a grassland soil and emissions of N2O and N2 were measured as well as the isotopocules of N2O. We found that flux variability was larger in the less saturated soils probably due to nutrient distribution heterogeneity created from soil cracks and consequently nutrient hot spots. The results agreed with denitrification as the main source of fluxes at the highest saturations, but nitrification could have occurred at the lower saturation, even though moisture was still high (71 % WFSP). The isotopocules data indicated isotopic similarities in the wettest treatments vs. the two drier ones. The results agreed with previous findings where it is clear there are two N pools with different dynamics: added N producing intense denitrification vs. soil N resulting in less isotopic fractionation.

  2. Confirmation of co-denitrification in grazed grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbie, Diana R.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Laughlin, Ronald J.; di, Hong J.; Moir, James L.; Cameron, Keith C.; Clough, Tim J.; Watson, Catherine J.; Grant, James; Somers, Cathal; Richards, Karl G.

    2015-11-01

    Pasture-based livestock systems are often associated with losses of reactive forms of nitrogen (N) to the environment. Research has focused on losses to air and water due to the health, economic and environmental impacts of reactive N. Di-nitrogen (N2) emissions are still poorly characterized, both in terms of the processes involved and their magnitude, due to financial and methodological constraints. Relatively few studies have focused on quantifying N2 losses in vivo and fewer still have examined the relative contribution of the different N2 emission processes, particularly in grazed pastures. We used a combination of a high 15N isotopic enrichment of applied N with a high precision of determination of 15N isotopic enrichment by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry to measure N2 emissions in the field. We report that 55.8 g N m-2 (95%, CI 38 to 77 g m-2) was emitted as N2 by the process of co-denitrification in pastoral soils over 123 days following urine deposition (100 g N m-2), compared to only 1.1 g N m-2 (0.4 to 2.8 g m-2) from denitrification. This study provides strong evidence for co-denitrification as a major N2 production pathway, which has significant implications for understanding the N budgets of pastoral ecosystems.

  3. Effect of soil saturation on denitrification in a grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Cardenas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is of major importance as a greenhouse gas and precursor of ozone (O3 destruction in the stratosphere mostly produced in soils. The soil-emitted N2O is generally predominantly derived from denitrification and, to a smaller extent, nitrification, both processes controlled by environmental factors and their interactions, and are influenced by agricultural management. Soil water content expressed as water-filled pore space (WFPS is a major controlling factor of emissions and its interaction with compaction, has not been studied at the micropore scale. A laboratory incubation was carried out at different saturation levels for a grassland soil and emissions of N2O and N2 were measured as well as the isotopocules of N2O. We found that flux variability was larger in the less saturated soils probably due to nutrient distribution heterogeneity created from soil cracks and consequently nutrient hot spots. The results agreed with denitrification as the main source of fluxes at the highest saturations, but nitrification could have occurred at the lower saturation, even though moisture was still high (71 % WFSP. The isotopocules data indicated isotopic similarities in the wettest treatments vs. the two drier ones. The results agreed with previous findings where it is clear there are two N pools with different dynamics: added N producing intense denitrification vs. soil N resulting in less isotopic fractionation.

  4. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  5. The role of the benthic-hyporheic zone in controlling nitrous oxide emissions along two stream networks draining watersheds with contrasting land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Dee, Martha M.; Tonina, Daniele; Tank, Jennifer L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas responsible of stratospheric ozone destruction. Denitrification in stream ecosystems occurs within the benthic layer at the sediment-water interface and within subsurface environments such as the hyporheic zone and results in N2O production that could be eventually emitted to the atmosphere. Here, we quantify the role of benthic and hyporheic zones as sources of N2O gas and explore the dependence of emissions from stream morphology, flow hydraulics, land use and climate using a recently-developed fully analytical framework. Variations in N2O emissions within and among catchments of contrasting land use can be explained with a new denitrification Damköhler number (DaD) that accounts for denitrification processes within both benthic and hyporheic zones. For initial model development, we found a strong relationship between DaD and stream N2O emissions using field data collected from multiple headwater streams (i.e., LINXII project) from different biomes draining contrasting land use. We then tested its generality by comparing N2O emissions predicted with DaD to those measured using a synoptic sampling campaign in two stream networks draining contrasting land use: Manistee R (Michigan, USA) and Tippecanoe R (Indiana, USA). Our dimensionless analysis shows that the effect of land use disappears after making the emissions dimensionless with respect to the nitrogen load. Reliable predictions of N2O emissions at the stream network scale can be obtained from a limited amount of information, consisting in relatively easy to obtain biogeochemical and hydromorphological quantities.

  6. Nitrous oxide emission by the non-denitrifying, nitrate ammonifier Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihua; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2016-01-19

    Firmicutes have the capacity to remove excess nitrate from the environment via either denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium or both. The recent renewed interest in their nitrogen metabolism has revealed many interesting features, the most striking being their wide variety of dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways. In the present study, nitrous oxide production from Bacillus licheniformis, a ubiquitous Gram-positive, spore-forming species with many industrial applications, is investigated. B. licheniformis has long been considered a denitrifier but physiological experiments on three different strains demonstrated that nitrous oxide is not produced from nitrate in stoichiometric amounts, rather ammonium is the most important end-product, produced during fermentation. Significant strain dependency in end-product ratios, attributed to nitrite and ammonium, and medium dependency in nitrous oxide production were also observed. Genome analyses confirmed the lack of a nitrite reductase to nitric oxide, the key enzyme of denitrification. Based on the gene inventory and building on knowledge from other non-denitrifying nitrous oxide emitters, hypothetical pathways for nitrous oxide production, involving NarG, NirB, qNor and Hmp, are proposed. In addition, all publically available genomes of B. licheniformis demonstrated similar gene inventories, with specific duplications of the nar operon, narK and hmp genes as well as NarG phylogeny supporting the evolutionary separation of previously described distinct BALI1 and BALI2 lineages. Using physiological and genomic data we have demonstrated that the common soil bacterium B. licheniformis does not denitrify but is capable of fermentative dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium (DNRA) with concomitant production of N2O. Considering its ubiquitous nature and non-fastidious growth in the lab, B. licheniformis is a suitable candidate for further exploration of the actual mechanism of N2O

  7. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites structure associated with regional habitat modifications directed by the California Bay-Delta Authority. On July 7, 2008, and August 5, 2008, pore-water profilers were successfully deployed at six North Bay sites per trip to measure the concentration gradient of dissolved macronutrients and trace metals near the sediment-water interface. Only two of the sites (433 and SSB009 within Honker Bay) were sampled in both series of profiler deployments. At each sampling site, profilers were deployed in triplicate, while discrete samples and dataloggers were used to collect ancillary data from both the water column and benthos to help interpret diffusive-flux measurements. Benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) inorganic phosphate (that is, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)) ranged from negligible levels (-0.003?0.005 millimole per square meter per day (mmole m-2d-1) at Site 4.1 outside Honker Bay) to 0.060?0.006 mmole m-2d-1 near the northern coast of Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns Island, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was consistently: (1) lower than previously reported for South Bay sites, (2) an order of magnitude lower than oligotrophic Coeur d?Alene Lake, (3) two orders of magnitude lower than determined for eutrophic Upper Klamath Lake, and (4) an order of magnitude or more lower than the estimated summer riverine inputs for SRP (900 to 1,300 kilograms of phosphorous per day (kg-P d-1)). In contrast to fluxes reported for the South Bay, nitrate fluxes were consistently negative (that is, drawn from the water column into the sediment), except for one site with statistically insignificant nitrate fluxes (Site 409 within Suisun Bay). The most negative nitrate flux (-7.3?0.1 mmole m-2d-1) was observed within Grizzly Bay (Site 416

  8. Refining method for bismuth nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shigeyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of separating and removing α ray emitting nuclides present in an aqueous solution of bismuth nitrate by an industrially convenient method. A nitric acid concentration in the aqueous solution of bismuth nitrate in which α ray emitting nuclides are dissolved is lowered to coprecipitate the bismuth oxynitrate and the α ray emitting nuclides. The coprecipitation materials are separated from the aqueous solution of bismuth nitrate to separate the α ray emitting nuclides dissolved in the aqueous solution of bismuth nitrate thereby refining the aqueous solution of bismuth nitrate. (T.M.)

  9. Metabolic modelling of denitrification in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: a tool to study inhibiting and activating compounds for the denitrification pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies J. Kampschreur

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A metabolic network model for facultative denitrification was developed based on experimental data obtained with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The model includes kinetic regulation at the enzyme level and transcription regulation at the enzyme synthesis level. The objective of this work was to study the key factors regulating the metabolic response of the denitrification pathway to transition from oxic to anoxic respiration and to find parameter values for the biological processes that were modelled. The metabolic model was used to test hypotheses that were formulated based on the experimental results and offers a structured look on the processes that occur in the cell during transition in respiration. The main phenomena that were modelled are the inhibition of the cytochrome c oxidase by nitric oxide (NO, the (indirect inhibition of oxygen on the denitrification enzymes. The activation of transcription of nitrite reductase and NO reductase by their respective substrates were hypothesized. The general assumption that nitrite and NO reduction are controlled interdependently to prevent NO accumulation does not hold for A. tumefaciens. The metabolic network model was demonstrated to be a useful tool for unravelling the different factors involved in the complex response of A. tumefaciens to highly dynamic environmental conditions.

  10. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention

  11. Assessing anthropogenic impacts using benthic macroinvertebrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to establish relationships between benthic macroinvertebrate and common stressor types (siltation, agriculture and paper mill waste) in central highlands of Ethiopia. For analysis environmental variables and benthic invertebrate taxa were collected from four streams from November, 2011 to June, ...

  12. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in mangroves and open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in mangroves and open intertidal areas on the Dar es Salaam coast, Tanzania. ... it is recommended that conservation efforts along the Tanzanian coast should focus here. Keywords: benthic macrofauna, community structure, littoral zone, Tanganyika, Western Indian Ocean ...

  13. Identifying the hot spots of denitrification and nitrogen transformation across different land uses in the Silver Spring springshed, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, X.; Inglett, P.; Dobberfuhl, D. R.; Canion, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Silver Springs is the largest of Florida's first magnitude springs and also likely the largest limestone spring in the United States. Land use in the springshed has changed from predominantly natural to urban/agricultural over the past 50 years, leading to more pollution for ground and surface water, and excess nitrate is considered as the major concern in restoring the Silver Springs. In this study, we investigated the effects of land uses on the nitrogen transformation by measuring the dissolved gases (e.g., dissolved N2, Ar, N2O, CH4) in the east and west vent of Silver Spring and ground water from 61 wells around the springshed. The dissolved CH4 and N2O in the ground water ranged from 0 to 106 µM, and 0 to 2.0 µM, respectively. Significantly higher dissolved N2O and CH4 were observed in the dry and wet season, respectively. In our study, significant positive correlation between N2O with dissolved oxygen and nitrate (P land uses of agriculture and urban, whereas higher dissolved N2 and N2:Ar were measured in the land uses of forest and wetlands. Moreover, the principal component analysis based on the geochemical properties of the water showed that the West and East vent reflected the land use of forests and wetlands, and of agriculture and urban, respectively, further suggesting the hot spots for nitrification and denitrification.

  14. Denitrification pathways and rates in the sandy sediments of the Georgia continental shelf, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Ingall Ellery; Vance-Harris Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Denitrification in continental shelf sediments has been estimated to be a significant sink of oceanic fixed nitrogen (N). The significance and mechanisms of denitrification in organic-poor sands, which comprise 70% of continental shelf sediments, are not well known. Core incubations and isotope tracer techniques were employed to determine processes and rates of denitrification in the coarse-grained, sandy sediments of the Georgia continental shelf. In these sediments, heterotrophic denitrifi...

  15. Oxygen Control and Improved Denitrification Efficiency by Means of a Post-Anoxic Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano Urbini; Renato Gavasci; Paolo Viotti

    2015-01-01

    The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) in biological denitrification reactors determines inhibition effects on the denitrification rate. The article shows the results of an experimental study to control the DO concentration in the pre-denitrification stage by a post-anoxic reactor. The results demonstrate that the post-anoxic reactor is very effective in improving the nitrogen removal efficiency because it causes a considerable reduction of the DO content in the mixed liquor recycle sent to th...

  16. Interlake variation and environmental controls of denitrification across different geographical scales

    OpenAIRE

    Rissanen, Antti; Tiirola, Marja; Hietanen, Susanna; Ojala, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Denitrification in lakes significantly reduces the nitrogen (N) load from land to oceans, but the factors controlling it remain poorly understood. Therefore, interlake variation of denitrification in sediments of small to medium-sized lakes (from 0.03 to 17.8 km2) was studied across different geographical scales. At the local scale, the denitrification rates and sediment microbial communities were studied in 4 boreal lakes in close proximity (within 20 km) using the isotope pairing technique ...

  17. Compaction stimulates denitrification in an urban park soil using 15N tracing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shun; Deng, Huan; Rensing, Christopher Günther T

    2014-01-01

    Soils in urban areas are subjected to compaction with accelerating urbanization. The effects of anthropogenic compaction on urban soil denitrification are largely unknown. We conducted a study on an urban park soil to investigate how compaction impacts denitrification. By using 15N labeling method......, no statistical difference in total N losses and 15N-(N2O+N2) flux between the uncompacted soil and the compacted soil was detected. Compaction promoted soil denitrification and may impact urban N biogeochemical cycling....

  18. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  19. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter......Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  20. Stream health of Courtland Creek, Oakland, California utilizing benthic macroinvertebrates as ecological indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.; Ahumada, A.; Lopez, C.; Phillips, A.; Varella, N.; Torres, E.; Quintero, D.; Bracho, H.

    2012-12-01

    An initial benthic macroinvertebrate and water quality survey was conducted on Courtland Creek, Oakland, California. Samples were collected from 3 sites between Brookdale avenue and 45th street at accessible sections of this largely culverted stream. To collect macroinvertebrates, brass frame kick nets with 500 micron netting were placed in the stream and substrate was disturbed for 1 minute in front of the opening of the kick net. The kick net was rinsed into a tub and invertebrates were identified and sorted on site. Organisms were ranked using a biotic index and average index was determined for each site. The biotic index of each site ranked the stream overall as poor. Dissolved oxygen and Nitrates were measured using wet chemistry procedures. Dissolved oxygen levels in the stream are sufficient for invertebrates but low for a stream at 4-5ppm. Nitrate levels were significantly high concentrations of 40 ppm for all sites. Nitrate levels recorded could reflect the presence of animal waste in the water or agricultural fertilizer from private homes and gardens that adjoin the stream. The presence of animal waste was observed at all sites in the study area and may have caused the levels of nitrates observed. Nitrate levels are not at toxic levels but at this level affect immunological functions of invertebrates. Results indicate that the habitat and water quality of Courtland Creek is in poor condition and restoration is recommended in order to increase the ecological health or this urban watershed.

  1. Biological Nitrate Removal from Groundwater by Filamentous Media at Pilot Scale, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Keshtgar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The compounds which contain nitrogen entering the environment can cause some problems, such as eutrophication for water resources and potential risk for human health because of methemoglobinemia and cancer. Biological techniques are effective in removing nitrate. The aim of this study was to remove nitrate from groundwater using denitrification. The main objectives of this research were determining the reduction of water nitrate based on different retention time and also the effect of using grape extract as organic matter and electron acceptor in biological nitrate removal from water. Methods: In this experimental study, the effect of heterotrophic Pseudomonas separated from Shiraz wastewater treatment plant on removing nitrate from groundwater was investigated at pilot scale using grape extract as carbon source and filamentous media at constant pH (7±0.1 and temperature (20±1 °C. During this study, 2 pilots were made. Pilot number 1 was used for separation and growth of the above mentioned bacteria (Pseudomonas that are able to remove nitrate. Pilot number 2 was also used for surveying the removal of nitrate by these bacteria. At least, 13 samples were examined in every retention time and each test was repeated for 2 or 3 times. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS (ver.19 software using one-way repeated measures ANOVA, and Bonferroni tests. Results: According to the results, nitrate removal rates were 49%, 55%, 67% and, 67% at retention times of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 hours, respectively. The best retention time was 2 hours with 67% removal rate (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that using grape extract as the carbon source and proper growth of bacteria in filamentous media led to a significant increase in the removal rate

  2. Hydrogeologic controls on nitrate transport in a small agricultural catchment, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Tomer, M.D.; Zhang, Y.-K.; Weisbrod, T.; Jacobson, P.; Cambardella, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of subsurface deposits on nitrate loss in stream riparian zones are recognized, but little attention has been focused on similar processes occurring in upland agricultural settings. In this paper, we evaluated hydrogeologic controls on nitrate transport processes occurring in a small 7.6 ha Iowa catchment. Subsurface deposits in the catchment consisted of upland areas of loess overlying weathered pre-Illinoian till, drained by two ephemeral drainageways that consisted of Holocene-age silty and organic rich alluvium. Water tables in upland areas fluctuated more than 4 m per year compared to less than 0.3 m in the drainageway. Water quality patterns showed a distinct spatial pattern, with groundwater in the drainageways having lower nitrate concentrations (10 mg L-1) as wells as lower pH, dissolved oxygen and redox, and higher ammonium and dissolved organic carbon levels. Several lines of evidence suggested that conditions are conducive for denitrification of groundwater flowing from uplands through the drainageways. Field-measured nitrate decay rates in the drainageways (???0.02 day-1) were consistent with other laboratory studies and regional patterns. Results from MODFLOW and MT3DMS simulations indicated that soils in the ephemeral drainageways could process all upland groundwater nitrate flowing through them. However, model-simulated tile drainage increased both water flux and nitrate loss from the upland catchment. Study results suggest that ephemeral drainageways can provide a natural nitrate treatment system in our upland glaciated catchments, offering management opportunities to reduce nitrate delivery to streams. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Spatial and temporal dynamics of nitrate fluxes in a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, C.; Musolff, A.; Strachauer, U.; Brauns, M.; Tarasova, L.; Merz, R.; Knoeller, K.

    2017-12-01

    Spatially and temporally variable and often superimposing processes like mobilization and turnover of N-species strongly affect nitrate fluxes at catchment outlets. It remains thus challenging to determine dominant nitrate sources to derive an effective river management. Here, we combine data sets from two spatially highly resolved key-date monitoring campaigns of nitrate fluxes along a mesoscale catchment in Germany with four years of monitoring data from two representative sites within the catchment. The study area is characterized by a strong land use gradient from pristine headwaters to lowland sub-catchments with intense agricultural land use and wastewater sources. Flow conditions were assessed by a hydrograph separation showing the clear dominance of base flow during both investigations. However, the absolute amounts of discharge differed significantly from each other (outlet: 1.42 m³ s-1 versus 0.43 m³ s-1). Nitrate concentration and flux in the headwater was found to be low. In contrast, nitrate loads further downstream originate from anthropogenic sources such as effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and agricultural land use. The agricultural contribution did not vary in terms of nitrate concentration and isotopic signature between the years but in terms of flux. The contrasting amounts of discharge between the years led to a strongly increased relative wastewater contribution with decreasing discharge. This was mainly manifested in elevated δ18O-NO3- values downstream from the wastewater discharge. The four-year monitoring at two sides clearly indicates the chemostatic character of the agricultural N-source and its distinct, yet stable isotopic fingerprint. Denitrification was found to play no dominant role only for controlling nitrate loads in the river. The spatially highly resolved monitoring approach helped to accurately define hot spots of nitrate inputs into the stream while the long-term information allowed a classification of the

  4. Tracing atmospheric nitrate in groundwater using triple oxygen isotopes: evaluation based on bottled drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nakagawa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopic compositions of nitrate dissolved in 49 brands of bottled drinking water collected worldwide were measured, to trace the fate of atmospheric nitrate (NO3− atm that had been deposited into subaerial ecosystems, using the 17O anomalies (Δ17O of nitrate as tracers. The use of bottled water enables collection of groundwater recharged at natural, background watersheds. The nitrate in groundwater had small Δ17O values ranging from −0.2‰ to +4.5‰ n = 49. The average Δ17O value and average mixing ratio of atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate in the groundwater samples were estimated to be 0.8‰ and 3.1%, respectively. These findings indicated that the majority of atmospheric nitrate had undergone biological processing before being exported from the surface ecosystem to the groundwater. Moreover, the concentrations of atmospheric nitrate were estimated to range from less than 0.1 μmol L−1 to 8.5 μmol L−1 with higher NO3−atm concentrations being obtained for those recharged in rocky, arid or elevated areas with little vegetation and lower NO3−atm concentrations being obtained for those recharged in forested areas with high levels of vegetation. Additionally, many of the NO3−atm-depleted samples were characterized by elevated δ15N values of more than +10‰. Uptake by plants and/or microbes in forested soils subsequent to deposition and the progress of denitrification within groundwater likely plays a significant role in the removal of NO3−atm.

  5. Vulnerability of recently recharged groundwater in principal aquifers of the United States to nitrate contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdak, Jason J.; Qi, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Recently recharged water (defined here as resource to nonpoint-source nitrate contamination. Understanding at the appropriate scale the interactions of natural and anthropogenic controlling factors that influence nitrate occurrence in recently recharged groundwater is critical to support best management and policy decisions that are often made at the aquifer to subaquifer scale. New logistic regression models were developed using data from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program and National Water Information System for 17 principal aquifers of the U.S. to identify important source, transport, and attenuation factors that control nonpoint source nitrate concentrations greater than relative background levels in recently recharged groundwater and were used to predict the probability of detecting elevated nitrate in areas beyond the sampling network. Results indicate that dissolved oxygen, crops and irrigated cropland, fertilizer application, seasonally high water table, and soil properties that affect infiltration and denitrification are among the most important factors in predicting elevated nitrate concentrations. Important differences in controlling factors and spatial predictions were identified in the principal aquifer and national-scale models and support the conclusion that similar spatial scales are needed between informed groundwater management and model development.

  6. Effects of groundwater-flow paths on nitrate concentrations across two riparian forest corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiran, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater levels, apparent age, and chemistry from field sites and groundwater-flow modeling of hypothetical aquifers collectively indicate that groundwater-flow paths contribute to differences in nitrate concentrations across riparian corridors. At sites in Virginia (one coastal and one Piedmont), lowland forested wetlands separate upland fields from nearby surface waters (an estuary and a stream). At the coastal site, nitrate concentrations near the water table decreased from more than 10 mg/L beneath fields to 2 mg/L beneath a riparian forest buffer because recharge through the buffer forced water with concentrations greater than 5 mg/L to flow deeper beneath the buffer. Diurnal changes in groundwater levels up to 0.25 meters at the coastal site reflect flow from the water table into unsaturated soil where roots remove water and nitrate dissolved in it. Decreases in aquifer thickness caused by declines in the water table and decreases in horizontal hydraulic gradients from the uplands to the wetlands indicate that more than 95% of the groundwater discharged to the wetlands. Such discharge through organic soil can reduce nitrate concentrations by denitrification. Model simulations are consistent with field results, showing downward flow approaching toe slopes and surface waters to which groundwater discharges. These effects show the importance of buffer placement over use of fixed-width, streamside buffers to control nitrate concentrations.

  7. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A microbial consortium couples anaerobic methane oxidation to denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebarsing, A.A.; Pol, A.; Pas-Schoonen, K.T. van de; Smolders, A.J.P.; Ettwig, K.F.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Camp, H.J.M. op den; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2006-01-01

    Modern agriculture has accelerated biological methane and nitrogen cycling on a global scale. Freshwater sediments often receive increased downward fluxes of nitrate from agricultural runoff and upward fluxes of methane generated by anaerobic decomposition. In theory, prokaryotes should be

  9. Nitrification and denitrification in the activated sludge process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerardi, Michael H

    2002-01-01

    ... Biochemical Pathway and Respiration 139 25 Gaseous End Products 143 26 Sources of Nitrite Ions and Nitrate Ions 145 27 Operational Factors Influencing Denitrification 147 28 Substrate or cBOD 149CONTEN...

  10. Correlation between nitrate concentration in groundwater and parameters affecting aquifer intrinsic vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debernardi, Laura; de Luca, Domenico Antonio; Lasagna, Manuela

    2008-08-01

    the complex phenomena affecting nitrate concentrations in soil, subsoil and groundwater. In particular, the traditional methods for vulnerability analysis do not analyze physical processes in aquifers, such as denitrification and nitrate dilution. According to a recent study in the shallow unconfined aquifer of the Piemonte plain, dilution can be considered as the main cause for nitrate attenuation in groundwater.

  11. Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks

    OpenAIRE

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Hall, Robert O.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Peterson, Bruce J.; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Cooper, Lee W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Dodds, Walter K.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Johnson, Sherri L.; McDowell, William H.; Poole, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change and stratospheric ozone destruction. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loading to river networks is a potentially important source of N2O via microbial denitrification that converts N to N2O and dinitrogen (N2). The fraction of denitrified N that escapes as N2O rather than N2 (i.e., the N2O yield) is an important determinant of how much N2O is produced by river networks, but little is known about the N2O yield in flowi...

  12. Seasonal changes in the denitrification regime of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Noronha, R.J.; Somasundar, K.; SenGupta, R.

    .37. No. 4. pp. 593--611. It~ 0198-..0149¢q~ $.3,00 + 0,GO Printed in Great Britain. ~ 19~0 Pcrpmon Prm t~ Seasonal changes in the denitrification regime of the Arabian Sea S. W. A. NAQVI,* R. J. NORONHA,* K. SOMASUNDAR* and R. SEN GUPTA* (Received 21... of currents at a depth of a few hundred metres, together with the lack of large east-west differences in the downward particulate flux. as revealed by some recent sediment trap experiments, could explain why the oxygen-deficient zone in the Arabian Sea...

  13. Nitrogen cycling in the subsurface biosphere: nitrate isotopes in porewaters underlying the oligotrophic North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Buchwald, C.; Ziebis, W.; Wenk, C. B.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key component of fundamental biomolecules. Hence, the cycling and availability of N is a central factor governing the extent of ecosystems across the Earth. In the organic-lean sediment porewaters underlying the oligotrophic ocean, where low levels of microbial activity persist despite limited organic matter delivery from overlying water, the extent and modes of nitrogen transformations have not been widely investigated. Here we use the N and oxygen (O) isotopic composition of porewater nitrate (NO3-) from a site in the oligotrophic North Atlantic (IODP) to determine the extent and magnitude of microbial nitrate production (via nitrification) and consumption (via denitrification). We find that NO3- accumulates far above bottom seawater concentrations (∼ 21 μM) throughout the sediment column (up to ∼ 50 μM) down to the oceanic basement as deep as 90 mbsf, reflecting the predominance of aerobic nitrification/remineralization within the deep marine sediments. Large changes in the δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, however, reveal variable influence of nitrate respiration across the three sites. We use an inverse porewater diffusion-reaction model, constrained by the N and O isotope systematics of nitrification and denitrification and the porewater NO3- isotopic composition, to estimate rates of nitrification and denitrification throughout the sediment column. Results indicate variability of reaction rates across and within the three boreholes that are generally consistent with the differential distribution of dissolved oxygen at this site, though not necessarily with the canonical view of how redox thresholds separate nitrate regeneration from dissimilative consumption spatially. That is, we provide isotope evidence for expanded zones of co-ocurring nitrification and denitrification. The isotope biogeochemical modeling also yielded estimates for the δ15N and δ18O of newly produced nitrate (δ15NNTR and δ18ONTR), as well as the isotope effect for

  14. Fuzzy-control for improved nitrogen removal and energy saving in WWT-plants with pre-denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, U; Pöpel, H J

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, numerous studies were carried out, dealing with the application of fuzzy-logic to improve the control of the activated sludge process. In this paper, fuzzy-logic based control strategies for wastewater treatment plants with pre-denitrification are presented that should lead to better effluent quality and, in parallel, to a reduction of energy consumption. Extensive experimental investigations on a large scale pilot plant as well as simulation studies (ASM1 with SIMBA) were carried out in order to design, evaluate and compare different fuzzy-controllers with each other and with comparable conventional control systems. The fuzzy-controllers were designed as high-level controllers that determine the DO-setpoints in the aerated zones and the ratio between aerated and non-aerated zones. Conventional PI-controllers were used to maintain the DO-concentration at the set-point levels. The ammonia and nitrate concentration in the effluent and the ammonia load in the influent were considered as input variables for the different fuzzy-controllers. Compared to the operation with fixed nitrification/denitrification zones and constant DO concentrations, the required air-flow could be reduced up to 24% by using fuzzy-logic based control strategies. In comparison with a more advanced conventional control strategy (relay controller with two thresholds and the NH4-N concentration in the effluent as single control variable) a reduction of air-flow-rate up to 14% could be achieved. At the same time, NH4-N peaks in the effluent that are normally caused by peak flow conditions could be reduced significantly. The large scale experiments show that the fuzzy-controllers can be easily implemented in modern control and supervision systems and that the control characteristics can be followed and modified during operation. It therefore can be expected that the developed fuzzy-control systems will be accepted by the operating personnel in wastewater treatment plants.

  15. Denitrification activity is closely linked to the total ambient Fe concentration in mangrove sediments of Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.; Michotey, V.D.; Bonin, P.C.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Denitrification activity is closely linked to the total ambient Fe concentration in mangrove sediments of Goa, India Denitrification activity (DNT) and associated environmental parameters were examined in two mangrove ecosystems of Goa, India e...

  16. Denitrification pathways and rates in the sandy sediments of the Georgia continental shelf, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingall Ellery

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Denitrification in continental shelf sediments has been estimated to be a significant sink of oceanic fixed nitrogen (N. The significance and mechanisms of denitrification in organic-poor sands, which comprise 70% of continental shelf sediments, are not well known. Core incubations and isotope tracer techniques were employed to determine processes and rates of denitrification in the coarse-grained, sandy sediments of the Georgia continental shelf. In these sediments, heterotrophic denitrification was the dominant process for fixed N removal. Processes such as coupled nitrification-denitrification, anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification were not evident over the 24 and 48 h time scale of the incubation experiments. Heterotrophic denitrification processes produce 22.8–34.1 μmole N m-2 d-1 of N2 in these coarse-grained sediments. These denitrification rates are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than rates determined in fine-grained shelf sediments. These lower rates may help reconcile unbalanced marine N budgets which calculate global N losses exceeding N inputs.

  17. Identification of B-type procyanidins in Fallopia spp. involved in biological denitrification inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Piola, Florence; Haichar, Feth el Zahar; Meiffren, Guillaume; Comte, Gilles; Missery, Boris; Balby, Manon; Poly, Franck

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered as a main limiting factor in plant growth, and nitrogen losses through denitrification can be responsible for severe decreases in plant productivity. Recently, it was demonstrated that Fallopia spp. is responsible for biological denitrification inhibition (BDI) through the release of unknown secondary metabolites. Here, we investigate the secondary metabolites involved in the BDI of Fallopia spp. The antioxidant, protein precipitation capability of Fallopia spp. extracts was measured in relation to the aerobic respiration and denitrification of two bacteria (Gram positive and Gram negative). Proanthocyanidin concentrations were estimated. Proanthocyanidins in extracts were characterized by chromatographic analysis, purified and tested on the bacterial denitrification and aerobic respiration of two bacterial strains. The effect of commercial procyanidins on denitrification was tested on two different soil types. Denitrification and aerobic respiration inhibition were correlated with protein precipitation capacity and concentration of proanthocyanidins but not to antioxidant capacity. These proanthocyanidins were B-type procyanidins that inhibited denitrification more than the aerobic respiration of bacteria. In addition, procyanidins also inhibited soil microbial denitrification. We demonstrate that procyanidins are involved in the BDI of Fallopia spp. Our results pave the way to a better understanding of plant-microbe interactions and highlight future applications for a more sustainable agriculture. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Irrigation of DOC-rich liquid promotes potential denitrification rate and decreases N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Shuping; Hu, Chunsheng; Clough, Tim J.; Luo, Jiafa; Oenema, Oene; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-01-01

    Lack of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is generally one of the key factors limiting denitrification in subsoil beneath the root zone. Despite a number of laboratory DOC amendment studies, the effects of in situ DOC infiltration on subsoil denitrification, and on subsequent end product

  19. Assessing denitrification and N leaching in a field with organic amendments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radersma, S.; Smit, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Denitrification and leaching of nitrogen (N) from agriculture are a loss of nutrients to farmers and sources of pollution to water and air, and should therefore be minimized. In a field experiment on loamy soil, denitrification and N leaching were measured after late summer incorporation of fodder

  20. Effect of Temperature on Oxygen Profiles and Denitrification Rates in Freshwater Sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klein, Jeroen J.M.; Overbeek, Ciska C.; Juncher Jørgensen, Christian; Veraart, Annelies J.

    2017-01-01

    Vegetated ditches and wetlands are important sites for nutrient removal in agricultural catchments. About half of the influx of inorganic nitrogen can be removed from these ecosystems by denitrification. Previous studies have shown that denitrification in aquatic ecosystems is strongly temperature

  1. dl-Asparaginium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Moussa Slimane

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C4H9N2O3+·NO3−, alternatively called (1RS-2-carbamoyl-1-carboxyethanaminium nitrate, the asymmetric unit comprises one asparaginium cation and one nitrate anion. The strongest cation–cation O—H...O hydrogen bond in the structure, together with other strong cation–cation N—H...O hydrogen bonds, generates a succession of infinite chains of R22(8 rings along the b axis. Additional cation–cation C—H...O hydrogen bonds link these chains into two-dimensional layers formed by alternating R44(24 and R42(12 rings. Connections between these layers are provided by the strong cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds, as well as by one weak C—H...O interaction, thus forming a three-dimensional network. Some of the cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds are bifurcated of the type D—H...(A1,A2.

  2. [Characteristic research of shortcut denitrification in synthetic ammonia industrial wastewater treatment process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Ze-Bing; Ma, Jia-Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Zhao, Bai-Hang; Li, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Active sludge was from a pilot-scale synthetic ammonia industrial wastewater treatment plant with a strengthen anoxic-oxic (A/O) technology. The zero order kinetic model was suit for describing shortcut and complete denitrification process. Experimental results showed that shortcut denitrification could reduce 14.1% carbon source consumption and 55.7% denitrification time, respectively, comparing with complete denitrification. The maximum specific denitrification rate was 0.509 g x (g x d)(-1) with an initial NO2(-) -N concentration of 36.82 mg x L(-1) and pH 7.5. In the industrial practice, it must be avoided pH higher than 9.0 in anoxic zone for industrial treatment. Replication-selective denitrifying bacteria showed a strong adaptability to methanol and ethanol, but showed maladaptation to other small molecular and easily biodegradable organics, such as glucose and acetic acid.

  3. Influence of denitrification reactor retention time distribution (RTD) on dissolved oxygen control and nitrogen removal efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, Massimo; Gavasci, Renato; Viotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) are usually found in biological anoxic pre-denitrification reactors, causing a reduction in nitrogen removal efficiency. Therefore, the reduction of DO in such reactors is fundamental for achieving good nutrient removal. The article shows the results of an experimental study carried out to evaluate the effect of the anoxic reactor hydrodynamic model on both residual DO concentration and nitrogen removal efficiency. In particular, two hydrodynamic models were considered: the single completely mixed reactor and a series of four reactors that resemble plug-flow behaviour. The latter prove to be more effective in oxygen consumption, allowing a lower residual DO concentration than the former. The series of reactors also achieves better specific denitrification rates and higher denitrification efficiency. Moreover, the denitrification food to microrganism (F:M) ratio (F:MDEN) demonstrates a relevant synergic action in both controlling residual DO and improving the denitrification performance.

  4. Citric acid application for denitrification process support in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Dabrowska, Dorota; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Thornton, Arthur; Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    The study demonstrated that citric acid, as an organic carbon source, can improve denitrification in Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The consumption rate of the organic substrate and the denitrification rate were lower during the period of the reactor's acclimatization (cycles 1-60; 71.5 mgCOD L -1  h -1 and 17.81 mgN L -1  h -1 , respectively) than under the steady state conditions (cycles 61-180; 143.8 mgCOD L -1  h -1 and 24.38 mgN L -1  h -1 ). The biomass yield coefficient reached 0.04 ± 0.02 mgTSS· mgCOD re -1 (0.22 ± 0.09 mgTSS mgN re -1 ). Observations revealed the diversified microbiological ecology of the denitrifying bacteria. Citric acid was used mainly by bacteria representing the Trichoccocus genus, which represented above 40% of the sample during the first phase of the process (cycles 1-60). In the second phase (cycles 61-180) the microorganisms the genera that consumed the acetate and formate, as the result of citric acid decomposition were Propionibacterium (5.74%), Agrobacterium (5.23%), Flavobacterium (1.32%), Sphaerotilus (1.35%), Erysipelothrix (1.08%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Case Study on Nitrogen Uptake and Denitrification in a ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restoring urban infrastructure and managing the nitrogen cycle represent emerging challenges for urban water quality. We investigated whether stormwater control measures (SCMs), a form of green infrastructure, integrated into restored and degraded urban stream networks can influence watershed nitrogen loads. We hypothesized that hydrologically connected floodplains and SCMs are “hot spots” for nitrogen removal through denitrification because they have ample organic carbon, low dissolved oxygen levels, and extended hydrologic residence times. We tested this hypothesis by comparing nitrogen retention metrics in two urban stream networks (one restored and one urban degraded) that each contain SCMs, and a forested reference watershed at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research site. We used an urban watershed continuum approach which included sampling over both space and time with a combination of: (1) longitudinal reach-scale mass balances of nitrogen and carbon conducted over 2 years during baseflow and storms (n = 24 sampling dates × 15 stream reaches = 360) and (2) 15N push–pull tracer experiments to measure in situ denitrification in SCMs and floodplain features (n = 72). The SCMs consisted of inline wetlands installed below a storm drain outfall at one urban site (restored Spring Branch) and a wetland/wet pond configured in an oxbow design to receive water during high flow events at another highly urbanized site (Gwynns Run). The SCMs significantly d

  6. Coupling of oceanic carbon and nitrogen: A window to spatially resolved quantitative reconstruction of nitrate inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, N.; Liebetrau, V.; Gorb, S.; Wallmann, K. J. G.; Erdem, Z.; Schönfeld, J.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic impact has led to a severe acceleration of the global nitrogen cycle. Every second nitrogen atom in the biosphere may now originate from anthropogenic sources such as chemical fertilizers and the burning of fossil fuels. A quantitative reconstruction of past reactive nitrogen inventories is invaluable to facilitate projections for future scenarios and calibrations for such paleoproxies should be done as long the natural signature is still visible. Here we present a first quantitative reconstruction of nitrate concentrations in intermediate water depths of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone over the last deglaciation using the pore density in the benthic foraminiferal species Bolivina spissa. A comparison of the nitrate reconstruction to the stable carbon isotope (δ13C) record reveals a strong coupling between the carbon and nitrogen cycles. The linear correlation between δ13C and nitrate availability remained stable over the last 22,000 years, facilitating the use of δ13C records as a quantitative nitrate proxy. The combination of the pore density record with δ13C records shows an elevated oceanic nitrate inventory during the Last Glacial Maximum as compared to the Holocene. Our novel proxy approach is consistent with the results of previous δ15N-based biogeochemical modeling studies, and thus provides sound estimates of the nitrate inventory in the glacial and deglacial ocean.

  7. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  8. A stable isotope approach and its application for identifying nitrate source and transformation process in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiguo; Kang, Pingping; Sun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of water is a worldwide environmental problem. Recent studies have demonstrated that the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotopes of nitrate (NO3(-)) can be used to trace nitrogen dynamics including identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes. This paper analyzes the current state of identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes using N and O isotopes of nitrate. With regard to nitrate sources, δ(15)N-NO3(-) and δ(18)O-NO3(-) values typically vary between sources, allowing the sources to be isotopically fingerprinted. δ(15)N-NO3(-) is often effective at tracing NO(-)3 sources from areas with different land use. δ(18)O-NO3(-) is more useful to identify NO3(-) from atmospheric sources. Isotopic data can be combined with statistical mixing models to quantify the relative contributions of NO3(-) from multiple delineated sources. With regard to N transformation processes, N and O isotopes of nitrate can be used to decipher the degree of nitrogen transformation by such processes as nitrification, assimilation, and denitrification. In some cases, however, isotopic fractionation may alter the isotopic fingerprint associated with the delineated NO3(-) source(s). This problem may be addressed by combining the N and O isotopic data with other types of, including the concentration of selected conservative elements, e.g., chloride (Cl(-)), boron isotope (δ(11)B), and sulfur isotope (δ(35)S) data. Future studies should focus on improving stable isotope mixing models and furthering our understanding of isotopic fractionation by conducting laboratory and field experiments in different environments.

  9. Application of Water Quality and Ecology Indices of Benthic Macroinvertebrate to Evaluate Water Quality of Tertiary Irrigation in Malang District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desi Kartikasari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the water quality of tertiary irrigation in several subdistricts in Malang, namely Kepanjen, Karangploso, and Tumpang. The water quality depends on the water quality indices (National Sanitation Foundation’s-NSF Indices and O’Connor’s Indices based on variables TSS, TDS, pH, DO, and Nitrate concentrate and ecological indices of benthic macroinvertebrate (Diversity Indices Shannon-Wiener, Hilsenhof Biotic Indices-HBI, Average Score per Taxon-ASPT which is calculated by Biological Monitoring Working Party-BMWP, Ephemeroptera Indices, Plecoptera, Trichoptera-EPT. Observation of the physico-chemical water quality and benthic macroinvertebrate on May 2012 to April 2013. The sampling in each subdistrict was done at two selected stations in tertiary irrigation channel with three plot at each station. The data of physico-chemical quality of water were used to calculate the water quality indices, while the benthic macroinvertebrate data were used to calculate the ecological indices. The research findings showed that 27 taxa of benthic macroinvertebrates belong 10 classes were found in the three subdistrict. The pH, DO, Nitrate, TSS and TDS in six tertiary irrigation channels in Malang still met the water quality standards based on Government Regulation No. 82 of 2001 on Management of Water Quality and Water Pollution Control Class III. Based on NSF-WQI indices and O'Connor's Indices, water qualities in these irrigation channels were categorized into medium or moderate (yellow to good (green category. However, based on benthic macroinvertebrate communities which was used to determine the HBI, the water quality in the irrigation channels were categorized into the fair category (fairly significant organic pollution to fairly poor (significant organic pollution, while based on the value of ASPT, the water were categorized into probable moderate pollution to probable severe pollution. The irrigation water which was

  10. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., combustible liquids, corrosive liquids, chlorates, permanganates, finely divided metals, caustic soda... molten ammonium nitrate if a fire occurred (and thus become potential detonators for the storage piles...

  11. Benthic studies in south Gujarat estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Govindan, K.; Varshney, P.K.; Desai, B.N.

    Benthic biomass and faunal composition in relation to various environmental conditions of the four South Gujarat estuaries namely the Auranga, Ambika, Purna and Mindola were studied and compared. Mean population density of benthos in Auranga, Ambika...

  12. BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL ALIENS IN WILLAPA BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthic macrofaunal samples were collected at random stations in Willapa Bay, WA, in four habitats [eelgrass (Zostera marina), Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis), ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)] in 1996 and in seven habitats (Z...

  13. Composition and dynamic of benthic macroinvertebrates community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The canonical correspondance analysis (CCA) revealed a strong correlationship between Chironomidae, Syrphidae, Culicidae, Psychodidae, as well as the Pulmonates molluscs and organic nutriments feeding dynamics. These findings showed the sensitivity of benthic macroinvertebrates at different level: sensitivity which ...

  14. Benthic carbonate factories of the Phanerozoic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Marine carbonate precipitation occurs in three basic modes: abiotic (or quasi-abiotic), biotically induced, and biotically controlled. On a geologic scale, these precipitation modes combine to form three carbonate production systems, or "factories" in the benthic environment: (1) tropical

  15. Evaluation of some physicochemical parameters and benthic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of some physicochemical parameters and benthic macroinvertebrates of Ikere Gorge Reservoir in Oyo State, Nigeria. ... Reservoir is relatively under stress due to dominance of indicators of pollution. Keywords: Anthropogenic activities, Bioindicator, Ikere Gorge Reservoir, Melanoides tuberculata, Water quality.

  16. Influence of environmental factors on dissolved nitrate stable isotopes under denitrifying conditions - carbon sources and water isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, A.; Meckenstock, R.; Einsiedl, F.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopes in dissolved nitrate are regularly used to identify sources of nitrate contamination in aquifers and water bodies. A dual isotope plot of 15N and 18O in nitrate can provide good evidence of the origin of such pollution as various sources have different isotopic signatures. Microbial denitrification changes both isotopic values by removing nitrate with lighter isotopes first, thereby increasing δ18O as well as δ15N. This change can distort the determination of sources but also has the potential to be used to identify and quantify microbial denitrification. Previous studies found a wide range of enrichment factors (ɛ) that did not allow conclusions towards the extent of microbial denitrification. However, it was found that during denitrification at each respective field site or laboratory experiment, there was a constant ratio in increase of the values of δ18O in relation to δ15N. That ratio was, however, not constant across field sites and the values published range from below 0.5 to more than 1.0. The reasons for these variations in enrichment factors and relative enrichment of oxygen compared to nitrogen are yet unknown. We conducted microcosm experiments with three different bacterial species to elucidate possible influences of environmental factors on these parameters. As a result we conclude that the type of carbon source available to denitrifying bacteria can play a role in the value of the enrichment factors, but not in the relative enrichment of the two isotopes. Specifically we found that complex hydrocarbons (toluene, benzoate) produce significantly different enrichment factors in nitrate than a simple hydrocarbon substrate (acetate). The relative enrichment of δ18O compared to δ15N was 0.86. We hypothesise that this influence is based on a variation in process kinetics of cross-membrane nitrate transport in relation to intracellular nitrate reduction. The core of the hypothesis is that nitrate transport into the cell becomes rate

  17. [The effect of combined and separate inoculation of alfalfa plants with Azospirillum lipoferum and Sinorhizobium meliloti on denitrification and nitrogen-fixing activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furina, E K; Bonartseva, G A

    2007-01-01

    The effects of associative nitrogen fixer Azospirillum lipoferum strain 137 and root nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti after combined and separate inoculation of alfalfa seedlings on the background of mineral nitrogen applied at various times were studied. It was demonstrated that exudates of the alfalfa seedlings with the first pair of cotyledonary leaves already provide a high activity of these bacteria in the rhizosphere. To 74.6% of the introduced nitrate was transformed into N2O when the binary preparation of these bacteria was used. In an extended experiment (30 days), an active reduction of nitrates to N2O (11 micromol N2O/pot x 24 h) with inhibition of nitrogen fixation was observed in all of the experimental variants during the formation of legume-rhizobial and associative symbioses and simultaneous introduction of nitrates and bacteria. The most active enzyme fixation was observed in the case of a late (after 14 days) application of nitrates in the variants with both separate inoculations and inoculation with the binary preparation of A. lipoferum and S. meliloti. Separation in time of the application of bacterial preparations and mineral nitrogen assisted its preservation in all of the experimental variants. The variant of alfalfa inoculation with the binary preparation of A. lipoferum and S. meliloti and application of nitrates 2 weeks after inoculation was optimal for active nitrogen fixation (224.7 C2H4 nmol/flask x 24 h) and low denitrification activity (1.8 x micromol N2O/flask x 24 h). These results are useful in applied developments aimed at the use of bacterial and mineral fertilizers for leguminous plants.

  18. Analysis of Atmospheric Nitrate Deposition in Lake Tahoe Using Multiple Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J. R.; Michalski, G. M.; Hernandez, L. P.; Thiemens, M. H.; Taylor, K.; Kendall, C.; Wankel, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    Lake Tahoe in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range is world renown for its depth and water clarity bringing 2.2 million visitors per year resulting in annual revenue of \\1.6 billion from tourism. In past decades the lake has suffered from decreased water clarity (from 32 m plate depth to less than 20), which is believed to be largely the result of algae growth initiated by increased nutrient loading. Lake nutrients have also seen a shift from a nitrogen limited to a phosphorous limited system indicating a large increase in the flux of fixed nitrogen. Several sources of fixed nitrogen of have been suggested including surface runoff, septic tank seepage from ground water and deposition from the atmosphere. Bio-available nitrogen in the form of nitrate (NO_{3}$-) is a main component of this system. Recent studies have estimated that approximately 50% of the nitrogen input into the lake is of atmospheric origin (Allison et al. 2000). However, the impact and magnitude of atmospheric deposition is still one of the least understood aspects of the relationship between air and water quality in the Basin (TRPA Threshold Assessment 2002). The utility of stable isotopes as tracers of nitrate reservoirs has been shown in several studies (Bohlke et al. 1997, Kendall and McDonnell 1998, Durka et al. 1994). Stable nitrogen (δ15N) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes have been implemented in a dual isotope approach to characterize the various nitrate sources to an ecosystem. While δ18O distinguishes between atmospheric and soil sources of nitrate, processes such as denitrification can enrich the residual nitrate in δ18O leaving a misleading atmospheric signature. The benefit of δ15N as a tracer for NO3- sources is the ability to differentiate natural soil, fertilizer, and animal or septic waste, which contain equivalent δ18O values. The recent implementation of multiple oxygen isotopes to measure Δ17O in nitrate has proven to be a more sensitive tracer of atmospheric deposition. The

  19. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  20. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream

  1. Assessing Stream Ecosystem Metabolism and Nitrate Utilization at Reduced Nitrate Levels Using a Chamber-Based Approach: Looking Below, Scaling Up, and Thinking Inside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijo, C. J.; Cohen, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    As nitrate levels in lotic systems have increased, nutrient reduction strategies have become the centerpiece of water quality standards to protect and restore stream ecosystems. While reducing anthropogenic nitrate (NO3) loads has many positive effects, we lack a fundamental understanding of how lotic systems respond to changing concentrations and no methods exist to characterize nutrient uptake behavior below ambient levels. Therefore, it is difficult to predict whether nutrient reductions will meet management goals. To fill this knowledge gap, we developed a chamber-based method which allows characterization of NO3 utilization along the two major uptake pathways at reduced NO3 levels. The chamber blocks flow by insertion into upper sediments but allows light in and sediment-water-air interactions to occur. At Gum Slough Springs, Florida, high-resolution in-situ sensors measured water quality while NO3 reduced from ambient levels (1.40 mg N/L) to below regulatory thresholds (ca. 0.20 mg N/L) within one week. Daytime NO3 uptake, resulting from both plant uptake and denitrification, was consistently greater than nighttime uptake, which is denitrification alone. Using this method, we compared NO3 uptake rates (UNO3) and gross primary production (GPP) across three vegetative regimes (i.e. submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), SAV with epiphytic algae, and algae alone) and related GPP estimates from the chamber to reach scale. Results showed that UNO3 and GPP were greatest in SAV, GPP was negatively correlated to [NO3] in algae, denitrification rates did not vary by vegetation type, and chamber GPP (e.g. 6-8 g O2/m2/day in SAV) was comparable to reach-scale estimates (6-12 g O2/m2/day). Our results suggest UNO3 and GPP differ by vegetation regimes, GPP scales from chamber to reach level, algal presence potentially reduces GPP, and a lack of nutrient limitation even at low [NO3]. Current work includes replicating measurements across systems as well as refining the

  2. Effects of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors on interactions between denitrification and phosphorus removal in biological nutrient removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Sobotka, Dominika; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    The effects of two different external carbon sources (acetate and ethanol) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and nitrite) were investigated under aerobic and anoxic conditions with non-acclimated process biomass from a full-scale biological nutrient removal-activated sludge system. When acetate was added as an external carbon source, phosphate release was observed even in the presence of electron acceptors. The release rates were 1.7, 7.8, and 3.5 mg P/(g MLVSS·h) (MLVSS: mixed liquor volatile suspended solids), respectively, for dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and nitrite. In the case of ethanol, no phosphate release was observed in the presence of electron acceptors. Results of the experiments with nitrite showed that approximately 25 mg NO 2 -N/L of nitrite inhibited anoxic phosphorus uptake regardless of the concentration of the tested external carbon sources. Furthermore, higher denitrification rates were obtained with acetate (1.4 and 0.8 mg N/(g MLVSS·h)) compared to ethanol (1.1 and 0.7 mg N/ (g MLVSS·h)) for both anoxic electron acceptors (nitrate and nitrite).

  3. Subseafloor nitrogen transformations in diffuse hydrothermal vent fluids of the Juan de Fuca Ridge evidenced by the isotopic composition of nitrate and ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, Annie; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Butterfield, David A.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) transformations in hydrothermal vent (HV) fluids. Here, we present the first isotopic measurements of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) and ammonium (δ15N) from three HV fields on the Juan de Fuca ridge (NE-Pacific). The dominant process that drives DIN concentration variations in low-T diffuse fluids is water mass mixing below the seafloor, with no effect on the DIN isotope ratios. Strong inter-site variations in the concentration andδ15N of NH4+in high-T fluids suggest different subsurface nitrogen (N) sources (deep-sea nitrate versus organic sediments) for hydrothermally discharged ammonium. Low NH4+ community N isotope effects (denitrification occur in bacterial mats, and/or in situ production of low δ15N nitrate. A significantly stronger relative increase for nitrate δ18O than for δ15N was observed at many sites, resulting in marked deviations from the 1:1 relationship for nitrate δ15N versus δ18O that is expected for nitrate reduction in marine settings. Simple box-model calculation show that the observed un-coupling of N and O nitrate isotope ratios is consistent with nitrate regeneration by either nitrite reoxidation and/or partial nitrification of hydrothermal ammonium (possibly originating from N2 fixation). Our isotope data confirm the role of subsurface microbial communities in modulating hydrothermal fluxes to the deep ocean.

  4. Combining Push Pull Tracer Tests and Microbial DNA and mRNA Analysis to Assess In-Situ Groundwater Nitrate Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, W.; Graham, W. D.; Huang, L.; Ogram, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen transformation mechanisms in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA) are still poorly understood because of karst aquifer complexity and spatiotemporal variability in nitrate and carbon loading. Transformation rates have not been directly measured in the aquifer. This study quantifies nitrate-nitrogen transformation potential in the UFA using single well push-pull tracer injection (PPT) experiments combined with microbial characterization of extracted water via qPCR and RT-qPCR of selected nitrate reduction genes. Tracer tests with chloride and nitrate ± carbon were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end members in a spring groundwater contributing area. A significant increase in number of microbes with carbon addition suggests stimulated growth. Increases in the activities of denitrification genes (nirK and nirS) as measured by RT-qPCR were not observed. However, only microbes suspended in the tracer were obtained, ignoring effects of aquifer material biofilms. Increases in nrfA mRNA and ammonia concentrations were observed, supporting Dissimilatory Reduction of Nitrate to Ammonia (DNRA) as a reduction mechanism. In the oxic aquifer, zero order nitrate loss rates ranged from 32 to 89 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 90 to 240 nmol /L*hr with carbon. In the anoxic aquifer, rates ranged from 18 to 95 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 34 to 207 nmol /L*hr with carbon. These loss rates are low; 13 orders of magnitude less than the loads applied in the contributing area each year, however they do indicate that losses can occur in oxic and anoxic aquifers with and without carbon. These rates may include, ammonia adsorption, uptake, or denitrification in aquifer material biofilms. Rates with and without carbon addition for both aquifers were similar, suggesting aquifer redox state and carbon availability alone are insufficient to predict response to nutrient additions without characterization of microbial response. Surprisingly, these

  5. Linking field and laboratory studies to investigate nitrate removal using permeable reactive barrier technology during managed recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, G.; Beganskas, S.; Weir, W. B.; Redford, K.; Saltikov, C.; Fisher, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    We present data from a series of field and laboratory studies investigating mechanisms for the enhanced removal of nitrate during infiltration as a part of managed recharge. These studies combine physical, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during controlled infiltration experiments at both a plot and a laboratory scale using permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology. The presence of a PRB, made of wood chips or biochar, enhances nitrate removal by stimulating the growth and productivity of native soil microbes to process nitrate via denitrification. Earlier work has shown that unamended soil can remove up to 50% of nitrate during infiltration at rates population changes below the PRB where most of the cycling occurs. Coupled with isotopic analyses, these results suggest that a PRB expands the range of infiltration rates at which significant nitrate can be removed by microbial activity. Further, nitrate removal occurs at different depths below the biochar and redwood chips, suggesting different mechanisms of nitrate removal in the presence of different PRB materials. In laboratory studies we flowed artificial groundwater through intact sediment cores collected at the same field site where we also ran infiltration tests. These experiments show that the fluid flow rate and the presence of a PRB exhibit primary control on nitrate removal during infiltration, and that the relationship between flow rate and nitrate removal is fundamentally different in the presence of a PRB. These data from multiple scales and flow regimes are combined to offer a deeper understanding how the use of PRB technology during infiltration can help address a significant non-point source issue at the surface-subsurface interface.

  6. Nitrate source apportionment in a subtropical watershed using Bayesian model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liping; Han, Jiangpei; Xue, Jianlong; Zeng, Lingzao; Shi, Jiachun; Wu, Laosheng; Jiang, Yonghai

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate (NO 3 − ) pollution in aquatic system is a worldwide problem. The temporal distribution pattern and sources of nitrate are of great concern for water quality. The nitrogen (N) cycling processes in a subtropical watershed located in Changxing County, Zhejiang Province, China were greatly influenced by the temporal variations of precipitation and temperature during the study period (September 2011 to July 2012). The highest NO 3 − concentration in water was in May (wet season, mean ± SD = 17.45 ± 9.50 mg L −1 ) and the lowest concentration occurred in December (dry season, mean ± SD = 10.54 ± 6.28 mg L −1 ). Nevertheless, no water sample in the study area exceeds the WHO drinking water limit of 50 mg L −1 NO 3 − . Four sources of NO 3 − (atmospheric deposition, AD; soil N, SN; synthetic fertilizer, SF; manure and sewage, M and S) were identified using both hydrochemical characteristics [Cl − , NO 3 − , HCO 3 − , SO 4 2− , Ca 2+ , K + , Mg 2+ , Na + , dissolved oxygen (DO)] and dual isotope approach (δ 15 N–NO 3 − and δ 18 O–NO 3 − ). Both chemical and isotopic characteristics indicated that denitrification was not the main N cycling process in the study area. Using a Bayesian model (stable isotope analysis in R, SIAR), the contribution of each source was apportioned. Source apportionment results showed that source contributions differed significantly between the dry and wet season, AD and M and S contributed more in December than in May. In contrast, SN and SF contributed more NO 3 − to water in May than that in December. M and S and SF were the major contributors in December and May, respectively. Moreover, the shortcomings and uncertainties of SIAR were discussed to provide implications for future works. With the assessment of temporal variation and sources of NO 3 − , better agricultural management practices and sewage disposal programs can be implemented to sustain water quality in subtropical watersheds

  7. Simultaneous ammonium and nitrate removal by a modified intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactor (SBR with multiple filling events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajsardar Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optimized methods for simultaneous removal of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium are important features of nutrient removal. Nitrogen removal efficiency in an intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactor (IA-SBR with multiple filling events was studied. No external carbon source was added and three filling events were considered. Oxidationreduction potential (ORP and pH curve at solids retention time (SRT of 20 d were analyzed. Effects of three organic loading rates (OLR, 0.67, 1.0 and 1.5 kgCOD/m3d, and three nitrogen loading rates (NLR, 0.054, 0.1 and 0.15 kgN/m3d, on nitrogen removal were studied. Nitrate Apex in pH curve and Nitrate Knee in ORP profile indicated that the end of denitrification would be achieved sooner. The kinetic coefficients of endogenous decay (kd and yield (Y were identified to evaluate heterotrophic specific denitrification rate (SDNRb. In period 2 at NLR of 0.054 kgN/m3d and considering 2 anoxic and 3 aerobic phases, nitrogen removal efficiency was 91.43%.

  8. River Metabolism and Nutrient Cycling at the Point Scale: Insights from In Situ Sensors in Benthic Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. J.; Reijo, C. J.; Hensley, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    Riverine processing of nutrients and carbon is a local process, subject to heterogeneity in sediment, biotic, insolation, and flow velocity drivers. Measurements at the reach scale aggregate across riverscapes, limiting their utility for enumerating these drivers, and thus for scaling to river networks. Using a combination of in situ sensors that sample water chemistry at high temporal resolution and open benthic chambers that isolate the biogeochemical impacts of a small footprint of benthic surface area, we explored controls on metabolism and nutrient cycling. We specifically sought to answer two questions. First, what are the controls on primary production, with a particular emphasis on the relative roles of light vs. nutrient limitation? Second, what are the pathways of nutrient retention, and do the reaction kinetics of these different pathways differ? We demonstrate the considerable utility of these benthic chambers, reasoning that they provide experimental units for river processes that are not attainable at the reach or network scale. Specifically, in addition to their ability to sample the heterogeneity of the river bed as well as observe nutrient depletion to create concentrations well below ambient levels, they enable manipulative experiments (e.g., nutrient enrichment, light reduction, grazer adjustments) while retaining key elements of the natural system. Across several of Florida's spring-fed river sites, our results strongly support the primacy of light limitation of primary production, with very little evidence of any incremental effects of nutrient enrichment. Nutrient depletion assays further support the dominance of two N retention mechanisms (denitrification and assimilation), the kinetics of which differ markedly, with denitrification exhibiting nearly first-order reactions, and assimilation following zero-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics over the range of observed concentrations. This latter result helps explain the absence of strong

  9. Impact of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth and analysis of bacterial growth kinetics using a modified Gompertz model in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hengyuan; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Tong, Shuang; Li, Rui

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth in a bio-electrochemical reactor, and the growth were modeled using modified Gompertz model under different current densities at three C/Ns. It was found that the similar optimum current density of 250mA/m 2 was obtained at C/N=0.75, 1.00 and 1.25, correspondingly the maximum nitrate removal efficiencies were 98.0%, 99.2% and 99.9%. Moreover, ATP content and cell membrane permeability of denitrifying bacteria were significantly increased at optimum current density. Furthermore, modified Gompertz model fitted well with the microbial growth curves, and the highest maximum growth rates (µ max ) and shorter lag time were obtained at the optimum current density for all C/Ns. This study demonstrated that the modified Gompertz model could be used for describing microbial growth under different current densities and C/Ns in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor, and it provided an alternative for improving the performance of denitrification process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interpretation of stable isotope, denitrification, and groundwater age data for samples collected from Sandia National Laboratories /New Mexico (SNL/NM) Burn Site Groundwater Area of Concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Singleton, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Visser, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-02

    This report combines and summarizes results for two groundwater-sampling events (October 2012 and October/November 2015) from the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Burn Site Groundwater (BSG) Area of Concern (AOC) located in the Lurance Canyon Arroyo southeast of Albuquerque, NM in the Manzanita Mountains. The first phase of groundwater sampling occurred in October 2012 including samples from 19 wells at three separate sites that were analyzed by the Environmental Radiochemistry Laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as part of a nitrate Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation. The three sites (BSG, Technical Area-V, and Tijeras Arroyo) are shown on the regional hydrogeologic map and described in the Sandia Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report. The first phase of groundwater sampling included six monitoring wells at the Burn Site, eight monitoring wells at Technical Area-V, and five monitoring wells at Tijeras Arroyo. Each groundwater sample was analyzed using the two specialized analytical methods, age-dating and denitrification suites. In September 2015, a second phase of groundwater sampling took place at the Burn Site including 10 wells sampled and analyzed by the same two analytical suites. Five of the six wells sampled in 2012 were resampled in 2015. This report summarizes results from two sampling events in order to evaluate evidence for in situ denitrification, the average age of the groundwater, and the extent of recent recharge of the bedrock fracture system beneath the BSG AOC.

  11. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Alison; Nitsche, Janka; Archbold, Marie; Deakin, Jenny; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ(15)N and δ(18)O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Studying solubility of praseodymium(3) nitrate with nitrates of aniline, guanidine in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, L.S.; Zhuravlev, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The solubility in the systems praseodymium nitrate-aniline nitrate-water(1) and praseodymium nitrate-guanidine nitrate-water(2) has been studied at 20 and 40 deg C. In the given temperature range the state diagrams of the systems correspond to the isotherms of the simple eutonic type. Aniline nitrate and hexahydrate of praseodymium nitrate in the first system and guanidine nitrate and hexahydrate of praseodymium nitrate in the second system are equilibrium solid phases. The most developed crystallization fields are those of amine nitrates; eutonics are enriched with praseodymium nitrate

  13. Enhancement of denitrification in a down-flow hanging sponge reactor by effluent recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, N; Natori, T; Okubo, T; Sugo, A; Aoki, M; Kimura, M; Yamaguchi, T; Harada, H; Ohashi, A; Uemura, S

    2013-01-01

    A down-flow hanging sponge reactor, constructed by connecting three identical units in series, was applied to the treatment of artificial wastewater containing phenol and ammonia under high salinity conditions (10.9 g-Cl(-)/L). The theoretical hydraulic retention time (HRT) of each unit was 4 h (total HRT = 12 h). To enhance denitrification by effluent recirculation, the effluent recirculation ratio was increased in increments ranging from 0.0 to 2.0. The concentration of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), NO2-N, and NO3-N in the final effluent as a proportion of the TAN in the influent was determined to calculate the unrecovered, or denitrification, proportion. The denitrification proportion of the reactor was equivalent to 19.1 ± 14.1% with no effluent recirculation; however, this was increased to 58.6 ± 6.2% when the effluent recirculation ratio was increased to 1.5. Further increasing the effluent recirculation ratio to 2.0 resulted in a decrease in the denitrification proportion to 50.9 ± 9.3%. Activity assays of nitrification and denitrification, as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, revealed that denitrification occurred primarily in the upper sections of the reactor, while nitrification increased in the lower sections of the reactor. Gene sequence analysis revealed that denitrification by Azoarcus-like species using phenol as an electron donor was dominant.

  14. Constraining denitrification in permeable wave-influenced marine sediment using linked hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Permeable marine sediment are ubiquitous complex environments, the biogeochemistry of which are strongly coupled to hydrodynamic process above and within the sediment. The biogeochemical processes in these settings have global scale implications but are poorly understood and challenging to quantify. We present the first simulation of linked turbulent oscillatory flow of the water column, porous media flow, and solute transport in the sediment with oxygen consumption, nitrification, denitrification, and ammonification, informed by field- and/ or experimentally-derived parameters. Nitrification and denitrification were significantly impacted by advective pore water exchange between the sediment and the water column. Denitrification rates showed a maximum at intermediate permeabilities, and were negligible at high permeabilities. Denitrification rates were low, with only ~15% of total N mineralized being denitrified, although this may be increased temporarily following sediment resuspension events. Our model-estimated denitrification rates are about half of previous estimates which do not consider solute advection through the sediment. Given the critical role of sediment permeability, topography, and bottom currents in controlling denitrification rates, an improved knowledge of these factors is vital for obtaining better estimates of denitrification taking place on shelf sediment. Broad application of our approach to myriad conditions will lead to improved predictive capacity, better informed experimental and sampling design, and more holistic understanding of the biogeochemistry of permeable sediment.

  15. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification of flue gas by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.; Jordan, S.; Maetzing, H.; Paur, H.R.; Schikarski, W.; Wiens, H.

    1987-05-01

    The simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification by the irradiation with 300 keV electrons in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of ammonia yields removal efficiencies of more than 90%. NO X -removal efficiencies depend on the absorbed dose, NO X -concentration and NH 3 -stoichiometry. SO 2 -removal proceeds by thermal and radiation induced mechanisms. The efficiency of the SO 2 -removal process is highest for low temperatures and high NH 3 -stoichiometries. By recycling of scrubbed gas into the reaction chamber (multiple irradiation) the efficiency of the process is increased by 50%. The product aerosol has mass median diameters of 2 and NO x removals in the absence of NH 3 are predicted with reasonable accuracy by the computer model. In the presence of NH 3 experimental data show higher SO 2 removal efficiencies than calculated. This is probably due to additional heterogeneous reactions on particles, which are not covered by the computer model. With 119 figs., 86 refs [de

  16. Desulphurization and denitrification processes in the energy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virèíková Edita

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The world´s problem of environmental pollution is also an important problem in the Slovak Republic. One of the biggest sources of air pollution is the combustion of low quality fossil fuels. During the burning of coal, combustible types of sulfur, like organic and pyritic, are oxidized and form sulfur dioxide or trioxide. Nitrogen oxides in chimney gases are generally found in three forms: NO, NO2 and N2O. It is more difficult to remove NOX than SO2 because of the structure of NOx. For this reason it is necesary to keep lower NOx emissions in the system by various methods. This paper surveys the current status of the desulphurization and denitrification processes in the energy industry.

  17. Residence times of grou