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Sample records for benoxaprofen human polymorphonuclear

  1. Effects of Pneumolysin on Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D; Pierce, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Pneumolysin was bound by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a reaction which occurred very rapidly at 0 degrees C. Low concentrations of pneumolysin were found to stimulate leukocyte migration and lysosomal enzyme secretion. At increasing lysin levels, inhibition of spontaneous migration and chemotaxis, cell death, and lysis were observed. Pneumolysin was also found to lyse platelets and to activate serum to become chemotactic.

  2. IFN-gamma is produced by polymorphonuclear neutrophils in human uterine endometrium and by cultured peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, G R; Collins, J E; Currie, J K; Guyre, P M; Wira, C R; Fanger, M W

    1998-05-15

    Cytokines present in the human uterus play an important role both in modulating immune responses to infectious challenge and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. In particular, successful implantation and pregnancy is thought to require the establishment of a Th2 environment, while Th1 cytokines are associated with pregnancy loss and infertility. On the other hand, a Th1 response appears to be required for the resolution of acute infection. Using novel confocal microscopic analysis of fresh sections of human tissue, we have investigated the production of IFN-gamma, a Th1 cytokine, in human endometria. Extracellular IFN-gamma, mostly associated with matrix components, was located immediately beneath the luminal epithelium and along the glandular epithelium proximal to the lumen. As evidenced by intracellular staining, IFN-gamma is produced by both stromal cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes through all stages of the menstrual cycle. Surprisingly, the stromal cell containing intracellular IFN-gamma was identified as a polymorphonuclear neutrophil on the basis of its reactivity with a panel of mAbs and its nuclear morphology. We further found that polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from normal donors produce IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with LPS, IL-12, and TNF-alpha. Taken together, these findings suggest that polymorphonuclear neutrophils are capable of producing IFN-gamma both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that their role in shaping immune responses may be more extensive than previously thought. Furthermore, these studies strongly suggest that polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in determining immune responsiveness within the female reproductive tract.

  3. EFFECTS OF FRUITS OF BARRINGTONIA RACEMOSA LINN. ON HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to investigate Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and hydroalcoholic extracts of B. racemosa fruits in vitro on human polymorphonuclear (PMN cells to screen their effects on phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Ethyl acetate extract of B. racemosa fruits was found to be a stimulant of PMN cell phagocytosis of Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT dye and candida albicans. It also stimulated intracellur killing capacity of PMN cells. It was further found to increase the chemotaxis of human PMN cells. While, petroleum ether extract and hydroalcoholic extract were lesser active as far as these activities are concerned.

  4. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration.

  5. Influence of fluoroquinolones on phagocytosis and killing of Candida albicans by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

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    Gruger, Thomas; Morler, Caroline; Schnitzler, Norbert; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Nidermajer, Sabine; Horre, Regine; Zundorf, Josef

    2008-11-01

    Candida albicans infections often occur during or shortly after antibacterial treatment. Phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN) is the most important primarily defence mechanism against C. albicans. Certain antibiotics such as some fluoroquinolones (FQ) are known to influence phagocyte functions. Thus, we investigated the influence of older and newer FQ on the phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans by human PMN paying special attention to CD11b expression of these cells as an indicator of the degree of their activation. In order to obtain comprehensive and comparable results we tested 13 FQ over a wide range of concentrations and in a time dependent manner in a standardized approach. When used at therapeutic concentrations, the FQ tested did not influence to a clinically significant degree the phagocytosis or the killing of C. albicans by human PMN and also not their activation. However, at high concentrations those FQ with cyclopropyl-moiety at position N1 showed increase in CD11b expression and diminished phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

  6. Characterization of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-induced vasoconstriction in isolated human umbilical veins.

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    Kerr, S W; Yu, R; Stearns, C D; Haynes, N A; Winquist, R J

    1998-11-01

    We investigated the contractile effects of both activated and unactivated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on human vascular tissue to characterize the influence of human PMNs on vascular tone. PMNs were added either unactivated or after f-met-leu-phe (fMLP) activation (10(-8) M), into tissue chambers containing human umbilical vein segments under either control or cytokine-treated conditions. The activation state of different PMN preparations was measured by immunofluorescence staining of the adhesion glycoproteins Mac-1 and L-selectin. Both unactivated and activated PMNs induced a cell number-dependent (1.5 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(6) cells/ml) vasoconstriction in human umbilical vein segments. This PMN-induced response was not inhibited by treatment with indomethacin (10(-5) M), superoxide dismutase (2 x 10(-7) M) or L-nitro-monomethyl arginine (10(-4) M). However, treatment of PMNs with the leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BIRM-270 partially inhibited (-61 +/- 19%, P <.05) the contraction induced only by unactivated PMNs. Moreover, the supernatant from unactivated, but not that from activated, PMNs elicited a contractile response comparable to that from the addition of cells. We observed a significant correlation between the Mac-1/L-selectin ratio of activated PMNs and the contractile response they generated (r = 0.77, P <.05). The activated PMN response had an endothelium-dependent component, whereas the unactivated PMN response was endothelium-independent. These results suggest that human PMNs of varying activation states have the capacity to modulate vascular smooth muscle tone via distinct mechanisms. Unactivated PMNs appear to modulate tone via a secreted product, whereas the more activated phenotype modulates vascular tone via a cognate interaction with the endothelium.

  7. Mechanisms of interaction among subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, and gram-negative bacilli.

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    Mandell, L A; Afnan, M

    1991-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that pretreatment of bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antibiotics enhances the susceptibility of the organisms to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Our purpose was to study a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action and to determine whether the mechanism and locus of action altered the sub-MIC effect. The following outcome measures were used: ingestion and killing of bacteria by PMNs, bacterial killing in the absence of phagosome formation, and binding requirements of the bacteria to PMNs. The antibiotics used were representative of a variety of classes, including beta-lactams (piperacillin and imipenem) and quinolones (ciprofloxacin). Bacterial uptake and killing were measured by using standard techniques, and results were analyzed by using the analysis-of-variance technique and Dunnett's t test. Pretreatment of Escherichia coli with all drugs showed significantly enhanced killing of bacteria by PMNs, which was independent of ingestion by the phagocytes. Even in the absence of phagosome formation, statistically significant killing persisted with piperacillin-pretreated bacteria but not with imipenem- or ciprofloxacin-pretreated organisms. The opsonization experiments showed that contact between bacteria and PMNs was necessary for killing to occur. The sub-MIC effect appears to be independent of the locus or mechanism of action of the antibiotic. It results in enhanced killing by PMNs which is independent of ingestion and also may persist even in the absence of phagosome formation. Killing is dependent upon specific contact between bacteria and an intact phagocyte.

  8. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

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    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  9. Antipseudomonal agents exhibit differential pharmacodynamic interactions with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against established biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen infecting the lower respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where it forms tracheobronchial biofilms. Pseudomonas biofilms are refractory to antibacterials and to phagocytic cells with innate immunity, leading to refractory infection. Little is known about the interaction between antipseudomonal agents and phagocytic cells in eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Herein, we investigated the capacity of three antipseudomonal agents, amikacin (AMK), ceftazidime (CAZ), and ciprofloxacin (CIP), to interact with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) against biofilms and planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from sputa of CF patients. Three of the isolates were resistant and three were susceptible to each of these antibiotics. The concentrations studied (2, 8, and 32 mg/liter) were subinhibitory for biofilms of resistant isolates, whereas for biofilms of susceptible isolates, they ranged between sub-MIC and 2 × MIC values. The activity of each antibiotic alone or in combination with human PMNs against 48-h mature biofilms or planktonic cells was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. All combinations of AMK with PMNs resulted in synergistic or additive effects against planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates compared to each component alone. More than 75% of CAZ combinations exhibited additive interactions against biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates, whereas CIP had mostly antagonistic interaction or no interaction with PMNs against biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Our findings demonstrate a greater positive interaction between AMK with PMNs than that observed for CAZ and especially CIP against isolates of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract of CF patients.

  10. Synergy of caspofungin with human polymorphonuclear granulocytes for killing Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Tullio, Vivian; Mandras, Narcisa; Scalas, Daniela; Allizond, Valeria; Banche, Giuliana; Roana, Janira; Greco, Deborah; Castagno, Franco; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Carlone, Nicola A.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of caspofungin on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans was investigated. Caspofungin, at all of the concentrations tested (2, 3.2, and 8 μg/ml), significantly increased intracellular killing by PMNs through its direct action on both yeast cells and PMNs, indicating the potential ability of caspofungin to synergize with phagocytes for candidal killing. Caspofungin may therefore constitute an effective therapeutic option for ...

  11. Entry of Sanfetrinem into Human Polymorphonuclear Granulocytes and Its Cell-Associated Activity against Intracellular, Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian; Bonino, Alessandro; Allocco, Alessandra; Palarchio, Angela Ianni; Carlone, Nicola A.

    1998-01-01

    The entry of antibiotics into phagocytes is necessary for activity against intracellular pathogens. The ability of sanfetrinem, the first member of a new class of antibiotics, to penetrate human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and its consequences upon subsequent phagocytosis and killing of ingested penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evaluated. Sanfetrinem penetrated into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) at all concentrations tested, with cellular concentration/extracellular concentration ratios of 6.6 to 5.03 and 4.21 when sanfetrinem was used at 0.25 to 0.5 and 1 μg/ml, respectively, within 30 min of incubation. The uptake was complete within 5 min and was not energy dependent, since it was not affected by cell viability, environmental temperature, or the addition of a metabolic inhibitor. At a concentration of one-half the MIC, sanfetrinem significantly enhanced human PMN phagocytosis and increased intracellular bactericidal activity against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae. Following preexposure of PMNs to a concentration of one-half the MIC of sanfetrinem, there was a significant increase in both phagocytosis and killing compared with that for the controls, indicating the ability of sanfetrinem to interact with biological membranes and remain active within PMNs. Preexposure of streptococci to sanfetrinem made penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae more susceptible to the bactericidal mechanisms of human PMNs than untreated organisms. PMID:9661015

  12. Inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine on superoxide anion generation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

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    Villagrasa, V; Cortijo, J; Martí-Cabrera, M; Ortiz, J L; Berto, L; Esteras, A; Bruseghini, L; Morcillo, E J

    1997-05-01

    It has been suggested that reactive oxygen species released by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in man is one mechanism of tissue injury. Therapeutic action aimed at increasing antioxidant defence mechanisms is still a clinical challenge. This study examines the activity of N-acetylcysteine, a known antioxidant, in the protection of PMN exposed in-vitro to the chemoattractant peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (FMLP), the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate or the lipid peroxidation promoter t-butyl hydroperoxide. FMLP (3-300 nM) and phorbol myristate acetate (160 pm-160 nM) induced concentration-related superoxide anion generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (33-333 microM) resulted in concentration-related inhibition of superoxide production induced by FMLP (30 nM) or phorbol myristate acetate (16 nM);-log IC50 values were 3.97 +/- 0.07 and 3.91 +/- 0.10, respectively. Changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by FMLP (30 nM) were studied in fura-2-loaded human PMN. FMLP produced a transient calcium response, i.e. a peak followed by decay to a residual value above baseline. N-Acetylcysteine (333 microM) did not affect either basal [Ca2+]i values or changes in [Ca2+]i values after treatment with FMLP. Activation by phorbol myristate acetate caused a reduction in glutathione levels from 5.94 +/- 0.86 (control) to 1.84 +/- 0.51 nmol/3 x 10(6) cells (P 0.05 compared with control). Exposure to t-butyl hydroperoxide (0.5 mM, 30 min) markedly increased malondialdehyde levels (from 0.03 +/- 0.02 to 0.73 +/- 0.07 nmol/10(6) cells), and index of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde levels were significantly reduced in PMN treated with N-acetylcysteine (333 microM; 0.55 +/- 0.04 nmol/10(6) cells; P < 0.05 compared with untreated cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide). In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine reduces superoxide generation in response to FMLP and phorbol myristate acetate and partially protects against lipid

  13. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes. Preincubation of neutrophils with L. pneumophila sonicate did not affect phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes, whereas Listeria killing was significantly inhibited at sonicate concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/ml. The phenol phase of a phenol-water extraction, containing most...... of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), had no inhibitory effect on the listericidal activity of neutrophils. Killing of Listeria by monocytes was inhibited in a similar manner. The inhibitory activity was mainly recovered in the sonicate fraction above 100 kDa, suggesting that components organized in larger molecular complexes...... are most likely to represent the inhibitory factors. The inhibitory activity of L. pneumophila sonic extract appears to be related to inhibition of killing mechanisms since uptake of Listeria was not affected by the sonicate. Our observations indicate that as Legionella infection progresses, bacterial...

  14. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation with human serum from oxidant-challenged individuals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Hoffer; T Machamid; A Tabak; Y Baum; A Tamir; Y Lerman

    2003-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that stimulated superoxide production from PMN was inhibited ( < 0.05) by serum from young smokers as compared to that of young nonsmokers, both from the unexposed group. Incubation of PMN with serum from elderly nonsmoking individuals decreased superoxide production as compared to incubation with serum from young nonsmoking individuals, both from the unexposed group. A decrease in superoxide production by incubation with serum of welders as compared to that of unexposed individuals was significant only when the comparison was carried out between the young, non-smoking subgroups. These findings suggest that age, smoking, and exposure to oxidants induce appearance in serum of factors that affect the PMN function.

  15. [Physiology and pathology of bactericidal activity in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, J

    1980-09-13

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils defend man against aggressions from pathogens. Under the combined influence of granulocytic and non-granulocytic factors, the defensive process develops by steps: the neutrophil moves towards the pathogenic organism which, one reached, is engulfed and killed. The killing systems of the cell are either oxygen-dependent or independent. the oxygen-dependent system is triggered off by stimulation of the cell membrane and involves various reactions, including cyanide-resistant oxygen consumption, production of activated oxygen, oxygen peroxide and halogenisation of the pathogen membrane. Impairment of the killing activity requires quantitative assessment of its various components in the presence of autologous or control serum with the view of: determining the origin (granulocytic or non-granulocytic) of the impairment, and identifying the step in oxygen metabolism that is affected. In the vast majority of non-granulocytic insufficiencies the cause lies in defective opsonins. In granulocytic insufficiencies, global failure of the system indicates chromic granulomatous disease, a syndrome that is now being dismembered. Defective halogenisation should lead to testing for deficiency of myeloperoxidase or abnormal degranulation. The non oxygen-independent bactericidal system, although highly effective in vitro, appears to be less important in vivo than the oxygen-dependent system. Little is known of its pathology.

  16. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

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    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  17. Comparative evaluation of the cytomegalovirus DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects.

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    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Murray, G; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G

    1998-02-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load was determined in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and plasma samples from 106 human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects at risk of developing CMV disease (group 1) and from 27 AIDS patients with documented CMV disease (group 2). For both groups, the number of CMV copies in PMNL was significantly higher than in plasma when results were derived from an equivalent blood volume (P < .001, PMNL vs. plasma). Additionally, group 2 (symptomatic) patients had a greater viral DNA load than group 1 (asymptomatic) subjects (P < .001 for both PMNL and plasma). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of qualitative polymerase chain reaction using PMNL (PCR-PMNL) for the presence of CMV disease were 100%, 58%, 38%, and 100%, respectively, compared with 70%, 93%, 74%, and 92% for qualitative PCR-plasma and 93%, 92%, 76%, and 98% for quantitative PCR-PMNL using a cutoff of 16,000 copies/mL. Thus, the best strategy for diagnosing CMV disease in these individuals relies on quantitative assessment of the viral DNA load in PMNL.

  18. Effects of Propyl Gallate on Adhesion of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes to Human Endothelial Cells Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yue-rong; CHEN Ke-ji; XU Yong-gang; YANG Xiao-hong; YIN Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Prowl Gallate (PrG) on cellular adhesion between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) as well as the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) and E-selectin (CD62E) on the VEC surface. Methods: A human VEC inflammation model was induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). VECs were pre-incubated with varying concentrations of PrG (0.001-5 mmol/L) or 1‰ DMSO (v:v) or 10 mmol/L acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for 1 h, and then were stimulated with 10 ng/mL TNF-α for 6 h. Rose bengal vital staining method was used to measure the adherence rate of PMN to VEC, while flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of CD54 and CD62E on the VEC surface. Results: After 6 h of incubation with TNF-α, the adherence of PMN to HUVECs as well as the percentage of fluorescence-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of surface CD54 and CD62E in HUVECs increased significantly (P0.05). ASA at 10 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the positive rate of CD62E and CD54. Conclusions: High concentrations of PrG (0.1-5 mmol/L) exert its inhibitory effect on cellular adherence of PMN to HUVECs, and its mechanism may be related to inhibiting surface expression of CD54 and CD62E in HUVECs. Its action concentration was lower than that of ASA.

  19. Deletion of the SSK1 response regulator gene in Candida albicans contributes to enhanced killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

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    Du, Chen; Calderone, Richard; Richert, John; Li, Dongmei

    2005-02-01

    The isolation and partial functional characterization of the two-component response regulator SSK1 gene of Candida albicans was previously reported. Compared to wild-type (CAF2-1) and gene-reconstituted (SSK23) strains, the ssk1 null strain (SSK21) was avirulent in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis and less able to adhere to human esophageal cells. More recent data indicate that SSK21 is sensitive to 4 to 8 mM H(2)O(2) in vitro than CAF2-1 and SSK23. Furthermore, microarray studies indicate that the regulation of two classes of genes, those encoding cell wall functions and stress adaptation, are altered in the ssk1 mutant. In the present study, the susceptibility of strains CAF2-1, SSK21, and SSK23 to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was assessed. Results are also described for a newly constructed ssk1 mutant (SSK24) in which the URA3 gene is integrated into its native locus. Our results indicate that killing of SSK21 and SSK24 was significantly greater than that of CAF2-1 and SSK23 (P killing activity of human PMNs, we compared the signal transduction activity and the inflammatory response gene profiles of PMNs infected with either the wild type or the ssk1 mutant. Phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p42/44 and p38 from neutrophils infected with either CAF2-1 (wild type) or SSK21 (ssk1/ssk1) was similar, while expression and phosphorylation of the JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase was not observed following infection with either strain. On the other hand, we observed an upregulation of seven inflammatory response genes in PMNs infected with the SSK21 mutant only, while an increase in interleukin-10 expression was measured in PMNs infected with either strain. Downregulation of interleukin-2 was observed in PMNs infected with either strain. Verification of the transcriptional profiling was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR for three of the genes that were upregulated in neutrophils infected

  20. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-01-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase ba...

  1. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-03-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase bacteria, compared with those growing in logarithmic phase. The antibacterial effect of granule extract was destroyed by boiling, but some activity was retained after heating to 56 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Granule extract activity was tested under conditions in which oxygen-dependent antibacterial systems were inhibited. The rate and extent of killing was not affected by anaerobiosis, sodium azide, or cysteine hydrochloride. These results suggest that the activity of granule extract is independent of oxidative antibacterial systems, and therefore, under conditions that occur in anaerobic infections, potent leukocyte granule-associated mechanisms exist for the destruction of B. fragilis.

  2. Immunosenescence of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

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    Inga Wessels

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All immune cells are affected by aging, contributing to the high susceptibility to infections and increased mortality observed in the elderly. The effect of aging on cells of the adaptive immune system is well documented. In contrast, knowledge concerning age-related defects of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is limited. During the past decade, it has become evident that in addition to their traditional role as phagocytes, neutrophils are able to secrete a wide array of immunomodulating molecules. Their importance is underlined by the finding that genetic defects that lead to neutropenia increase susceptibility to infections. Whereas there is consistence about the constant circulating number of PMN throughout aging, the abilities of tissue infiltration, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst of PMN from aged donors are discussed controversially. Furthermore, there are numerous discrepancies between in vivo and in vitro results, as well as between results for murine and human PMN. Most of the reported functional changes can be explained by defective signaling pathways, but further research is required to get a detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. This could form the basis for drug development in order to prevent or treat age-related diseases, and thus to unburden the public health systems.

  3. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are essential cellular constituents in the innate host response, and their recruitment to the lungs and subsequent ubiquitous phagocytosis controls primary respiratory infection. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary decline...... with P. aeruginosa by augmenting the phagocytic competence of PMNs may postpone the deteriorating chronic biofilm infection. Anti-P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies significantly increase the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa in vitro. The mode of action......, which enhances bacterial killing by PMN-mediated phagocytosis and thereby may facilitate a rapid bacterial clearance in airways of people with cystic fibrosis....

  4. [Reactive oxygen species produced by the addition of sepiolite and vermiculite (expanded or not) to suspensions of human polymorphonuclear phagocytes and bovine alveolar macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, M; Visonà, I; Valentino, M; Scancarello, G; Governa, M

    1997-01-01

    We have studied a sample of commercial sepiolite and two samples of commercial vermiculite, which are clay minerals advised to replace asbestos. We have in vitro tested their abilities to produce reacting oxygen species (ROS) after they have been added to suspension of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bovine alveolar macrophages. The behaviour of sepiolite and vermiculite have been compared with those of asbestos fibres given by Unione Internationale contre le Cancer (UICC) and with kaolin and illite. Sepiolite was not able to induce ROS production, while vermiculite was able to induce a relevant ROS generation, even if the values were always lower than that obtained from chrysotile. Kaolin was able to generate a high ROS production.

  5. Kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization, attachment, ingestion and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: a quantitative assay using [3H]thymidine labeled bacteria.

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    Verhoef, J; Peterson, P K; Quie, P G

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed for studying quantitatively the separate processes of bacterial opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes using [3H]thymidine labeled Staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis is determined by assaying for leukocytes-associated radioactivity after differential centrifugation and washing the leukocytes. Opsonization is studied by incubating bacteria with an opsonic source for varying durations and then adding leukocytes. By treatment of samples with the muralytic enzyme, lysostaphin, the attachment and ingestion phases of phagocytosis can be separated. Sampling for colony forming units after disruption of the leukocytes permits the measurement of bacterial killing. Using this method, differences in the kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization by normal and C2 deficient sera were defined, opsonic influences on the attachment and ingestion phases of pH agocytosis were delineated, and the influences of different opsonins and leukocyte populations on killing were determined.

  6. [Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs, alone and combined with ofloxacin, on the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, E; Velert, M M; Orero, A; Martínez, P; Cantón, E

    2001-06-01

    The antibacterial activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) is based on the production of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2) in the respiratory burst and can be impaired in different ways. The combination of an antibacterial agent and an antiinflammatory drug is quite common in immunodepressed patients whose respiratory burst of PMN could be impaired. In this study we examine in vitro the effect of pretreating (35 degrees C for 30 min) PMNs with the antiinflammatory drugs dexamethasone (0.4, 4 and 40 microgram/ml), methylprednisolone (0.37, 3.7 and 37 microgram/ ml), hydrocortisone (0.048, 0.48 and 4.8 microgram/ml), betamethasone (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 mg/ml), phenylbutazone (1000 microgram/ml) and acetylsalicylic acid (25, 250, 2500 microgram/ml) alone, and combined with 10 mg/ml of ofloxacin on the respiratory burst. Superoxide anion was measured by the cytochrome c reduction microtechnique and H(2)O(2) by phenol red. The antiinflammatory drugs alone decreased the production of H(2)O(2) (except dexamethasone and methylprednisolone) and superoxide anion (except betamethasone) from 15-45%, depending on the antiinflammatory drug and concentration, while ofloxacin increased the production of superoxide anion (20.2 +/- 6.7%). The combination of antiinflammatory drugs with ofloxacin neutralizes the inhibitory effect of the former on the respiratory burst of PMNs. It is therefore important to know the effect of drugs on the respiratory burst in order to choose those that have the same therapeutic effect without interfering with PMN functions.

  7. Inhibition by soya isoflavones of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function: possible relevance for the beneficial effects of soya intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Serenella; Krauze-Brzósko, Katarzyna; Manarini, Stefano; Martelli, Nicola; Pecce, Romina; Evangelista, Virgilio; Benedetta Donati, Maria; Cerletti, Chiara

    2008-02-01

    Lower CVD incidence is reported in Asian populations consuming soya-containing food. As polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are involved in the risk of CVD, we investigated the modulatory effect of soya isoflavones on several PMN functions and their molecular mechanisms in vitro. PMN, isolated from blood from healthy subjects, were tested upon activation with 1 microm- n-formyl-methyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) for superoxide anion production (ferric cytochrome c reduction) and released elastase (chromogenic test). PMN homotypic aggregates stimulated by fMLP or P-selectin in dynamic conditions were detected by optical microscopy. PMN, mixed with thrombin-activated, washed platelets, formed cell aggregates, measured by flow cytometry. Phosphorylation of Pyk2, a focal adhesion kinase, was studied by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Genistein, daidzein and equol inhibited superoxide anion production (IC50 0.25 (sem 0.1), 21.0 (sem 4.2) and 13.0 (sem 2.8) microm, respectively); the release of elastase was prevented by genistein (IC50 63 (sem 17) microm). PMN homotypic aggregates, stimulated by fMLP, were significantly reduced (24 (sem 12) and 51 (sem 14) % of control) by 100 microm genistein and equol. P-selectin-induced aggregates were reduced to 19 (sem 6), 44 (sem 10) and 28 (sem 9) % of control by 100 microm genistein, daidzein and equol, respectively. Genistein, daidzein and equol also significantly reduced mixed platelet-PMN aggregates (IC50 4.0 (sem 0.9), 57 (sem 6) and 66 (sem 23) microm, respectively). In PMN challenged by fMLP or P-selectin, activation of Pyk2 was prevented by isoflavones. The cardioprotective effect of soya-containing food might be linked to reduction of PMN activation and PMN-platelet interaction, novel targets for the biological effects of soya isoflavones.

  8. Evidence of Qi-gong energy and its biological effect on the enhancement of the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, M; Kataoka, T; Hamada, C; Matsumoto, M

    2001-01-01

    In order to test for an effect of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) treated externally with Qi energy ("Qi-treated" PBS) on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), rigorously controlled experiments employing masking and randomized procedures were carried out under independent monitoring. In all experiments, Qi treatment was externally applied under monitoring to newly purchased unopened 100 ml bottles of PBS, and the PMN phagocytic activity was assayed by one experimenter in masked, randomized and monitored conditions using a highly sensitive chemiluminescence method. Phagocytic activity data were obtained in triplicate for each sample and then statistically analyzed. The PBS samples Qi-treated by the Qi-gong master and by one of the Qi-gong trainees showed clear stimulation of PMN phagocytic activity which was significant statistically, and this phenomenon was highly reproducible. Out of 10 experiments by the Qi-gong master, only twice did Qi-treatment fail to influence the PBS. The activity of Qi-treated PBS decayed over days or weeks. Furthermore, it was found that Qi-treated PBS had decreased phagocytic stimulatory activity after microwave treatment, but not after autoclave treatment. We also demonstrated that microwave irradiation and infrared laser pulse irradiation have similar effects on PBS as Qi-treatment. The results obtained in this experiment provide evidence of the existence of Qi energy, its ability to influence an electrolyte solution and its biological effect. Furthermore, microwave or infrared laser pulse treatment was found to partly mimic the Qi-treatment of PBS.

  9. The quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) enhances the host defence by activating human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christof; Zimmermann, Sabine; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Hug, Friederike; Prior, Birgit; Obst, Ursula; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2007-01-01

    The P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) interacts not only with bacteria, but also with mammalian cells, among others with those of the immune defence system. We focussed on the possible interaction of 3OC12-HSL with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), because these cells are the first to enter an infected site. We found that 3OC12-HSL attracts PMN, and up-regulates expression of receptors known to be involved in host defence, including the adhesion proteins CD11b/CD18 and the immunoglobulin receptors CD16 and CD64. Furthermore, the uptake of bacteria (phagocytosis), which is crucial for an efficient defence against infection, was enhanced. Thus, recognising and responding to 3OC12-HSL not only attracts the PMN to the site of a developing biofilm, but also reinforces their defence mechanisms, and hence could be a means to control the infection in an early stage and to prevent biofilm formation.

  10. Garenoxacin-induced increase of CD11b expression on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils does not affect phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüger, Thomas; Reiners, Ana-Lena; Schnitzler, Norbert; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Zündorf, Josef

    2011-04-01

    Garenoxacin is considered to be the most active quinolone against Staphylococcus aureus. Quinolones are believed to alter the function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and garenoxacin is known to be the only quinolone which alters the expression of the beta-chain (CD11b) of the complement receptor 3 (CR3) which is known to be important in the phagocytosis of S. aureus by PMN. Therefore, the effect of this altered CD11b expression on phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and killing of S. aureus was addressed and compared with that of standard quinolones. Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were determined by flow cytometry, and killing was measured by a colony-count method. Garenoxacin at therapeutic concentrations affected neither phagocytosis nor killing of Staphylococcus aureus NMS54. At supratherapeutic concentrations (1,500 mg/l) garenoxacin reduced and delayed phagocytosis like all other quinolones tested except norfloxacin. This decrease seems to be a result of inhibition of the oxidative burst of PMN and reduced CD11b expression at this supratherapeutic concentration. In conclusion, the alteration of CD11b expression of PMN caused by garenoxacin at 0.5, 5.0, and 100.0 mg/l is not considered to hamper the function of these first-line-defense phagocytes.

  11. Study of the inhibition by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of TNF-α release from human mononuclear cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of human PMNs on the production of TNF-α by the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to elucidate its tentative mechanism.

  12. Study of the inhibition by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of TNF-α release from human mononuclear cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of human PMNs on the production of TNF-α by the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to elucidate its tentative mechanism. Human PMNs and PBMCs were isolated from the venous blood of healthy donors by dextran sedimentation and density gradient centrifugation. In the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PMNs and PBMCs were cocultured at the ratio of 2:1 for 20 h and the concentration of TNF-α in the supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The binding rate of monocytes with the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled LPS (FITC-LPS) and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results showed that PMNs were capable of inhibiting the TNF-α release from PBMCs (P<0.05). PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs by 45% on average when PMNs and PBMCs cocultured at the ratio of 2:1. Paraformaldehyde-fixed PMNs still demonstrated the same inhibition (P<0.05),which proved that the inhibition was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and suggested that effector molecules responsible for this effect existed on the cell surface of PMNs. In the presence of PMNs, the binding rate of monocytes with the FITC-LPS and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were not affected compared with PBMCs alone (P>0.05). As incubation time was prolonged, the binding of FITC-LPS to monocytes increased (P<0.05). Thus PMNs did not block the binding of LPS with monocytes. It was concluded that PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs via cell-to-cell interaction. In a cell-contact dependent manner, PMNs might interfere with the signal transduction pathway through which LPS activated PBMCs, thus attenuating the response of PBMCs to LPS and downregulating the TNF-α release.

  13. ADAM9 Is a Novel Product of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Hergrueter, Anja H; Polverino, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 9 is known to be expressed by monocytes and macrophages. In this study, we report that ADAM9 is also a product of human and murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). ADAM9 is not synthesized de novo by circulating PMNs. Rather, ADAM9 protein ...

  14. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time.

  15. Metabolism of phospholipids by polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsbach, P.; Berg, J.W.O. van den; Bosch, H. van den; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1965-01-01

    By incubating homogenates of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from rabbit-peritoneal exudates with various 32P-labeled phosphoglycerides the following reactions were identified: Lecithin → Lysolecithin and fatty acid (1) Lysolecithin → Glycerylphosphorylcholine and fatty acid (2) Lysolecithin →

  16. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils: an effective antimicrobial force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D W; Donowitz, G R; Mandell, G L

    1989-01-01

    The production and deployment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are under close regulation. PMNs interact through cytokines with a number of cell types, including macrophages, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. PMNs are guided by bacterial products and cytokines to target sites, where microbes are recognized and killed. Killing occurs through oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. The frequent and severe infections seen in patients with defects (either congenital or acquired) in PMN function demonstrate the importance of PMNs in host defense against infection. PMNs are potent inflammatory cells and can exacerbate disease states such as myocardial ischemia, gram-negative bacterial sepsis, and the adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. In vitro effect of benzodiazepines on polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, G; Belghiti, J; Gautero, H; Boivin, P

    1984-01-01

    The effect of three benzodiazepine compounds, diazepam, flunitrazepam, and clorazepate, on oxidative activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) was investigated. The oxidative activity of zymosan-stimulated PMN in the presence of three concentrations (10, 20, and 40 micrograms/ml) of these compounds was measured polarographically. In addition, zymosan-stimulated nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction was measured in the presence of various concentrations of flunitrazepam. All three compounds inhibited oxygen consumption of the PMN. The extent of inhibition was linear with respect to log-concentrations; oxygen consumption was reduced 50% for concentrations of diazepam, flunitrazepam, and clorazepate of 13 micrograms/ml, 56 micrograms/ml, and 285 micrograms/ml, respectively. In addition 30% and 100% inhibition of NBT reduction by flunitrazepam were observed at respective concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml and 60 micrograms/ml. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be determined.

  6. Modulation of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Response to N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-10

    to the scapular crests. The skin was closed with 4/0 chromic gut placed in a continuous subcuticular suture pattern and bandaged. These procedures...Clin. Immun. and Immunopath., 15:525, 1980. 16. Gray, G.D., Ohlmann, G.M., Morton. D.R. and Schaaub, R.G., Feline Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Respond...Mature Human Neutrophil and Eosinophil Function, Surface Receptor Expression and Survival. J. Clin. Invest., 78:1220, 1986. Gasson, J .C., Weisbart

  7. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  8. Rapid Necrotic Killing of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Is Caused by Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Production of Rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. Ø.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2007-01-01

    a QS-regulated tolerance of biofilm bacteria to the antimicrobial properties of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The precise QS-regulated effect on the PMNs is, however, unknown. Incubation of human PMNs with supernatants from dense P. aeruginosa cultures showed that the QS-competent P. aeruginosa...

  9. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF MELOXICAM ON HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTE ADHESION TO HUMAN SYNOVIAL CELL%美洛昔康抑制正常人中性粒细胞与滑膜细胞粘附的作用机理研究(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良成; 侯琦; 郭颖; 程桂芳

    2002-01-01

    目的研究美洛昔康对正常人中性粒细胞(polymorphonuclear leukocyte,PMN)与滑膜细胞(human synovial cell,HSC)粘附的抑制作用及其作用机理.方法用MTT比色法检测PMN与HSC的粘附,分别用Cell-ELISA和RT-PCR法检测粘附分子ICAM-1和VCAM-1的蛋白及基因表达,用EMSA法检测NF-κB的活性.结果美洛昔康可显著的并以剂量依赖的方式抑制TNF-α(50 u·mL-1)和IL-1β(50 u·mL-1)作用12 h诱导的PMN与HSC粘附,其IC50分别为3.38×10-7和3.56×10-6 mol·L-1.进一步研究发现美洛昔康在1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1时还可在蛋白水平及mRNA水平抑制TNF-α(50 u·mL-1)诱导的HSC细胞ICAM-1的表达,但对VCAM-1蛋白及mRNA表达均未见显著影响;同时美洛昔康还可显著抑制50 u·mL-1 TNF-α诱导的NF-κB的活化.结论美洛昔康抑制NF-κB的活化,进而抑制ICAM-1的表达可能是其抑制PMN与HSC粘附的机制之一.%AIM To investigate the effect of meloxicam on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion to human synovial cell (HSC),and to explore its mechanism.METHODS MTT colorimetry was used to determine the adhesion effect of PMN to HSC.Cell-ELISA and RT-PCR methods were used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1.Nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) method.RESULTS Meloxicam was found to effectively inhibit TNF-α (50 u·mL-1 for 12 h) and IL-1β (50 u·mL-1 for 12 h)-induced adhesion of PMN to HSC (IC50 3.38×10-7 mol·L-1 and 3.56×10-6 mol·L-1,respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner.ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression induced by TNF-α (50 u·mL-1) were inhibited by meloxicam at 1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1.The activation of NF-κB was also inhibited by meloxicam at 1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1.CONCLUSION These results suggest that meloxicam inhibit TNF-α stimulated PMN-HSC adhesion and expression of ICAM-1 by suppressing the activity of NF-κB.

  10. Modulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil functions by astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Luokun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation is a complex process involving cells from the immune system and the central nerve system (CNS. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN are the most abundant class of white blood cells, and typically the first type of leukocyte recruited to sites of inflammation. In the CNS, astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell population and participate in the local innate immune response triggered by a variety of insults. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of astrocytes on PMN function. Methods Primary astrocyte cultures were derived from postnatal C57BL/6 mice and primary neutrophils were isolated from 8 to 12 weeks old C57BL/6 mice. PMNs respiratory burst was analyzed by H2DCFDA assay. For phagocytosis assay, neutrophils were incubated with FITC-labeled E. coli and the phagocytosis of E coli was determined by flow cytometer. PMNs degranulation was determined by myeloperoxidase assay. Cytokine expression was determined by real-time PCR. To determine the involvement of different signaling pathway, protein lysates were prepared and western blots were conducted to assess the activation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38. Results Using ex vivo neutrophils and primary astrocyte cultures, our study demonstrated that astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions, depending upon whether the interactions between the two cell types are direct or indirect. Upon direct cell-cell contact, astrocytes attenuate neutrophil apoptosis, respiratory bust, and degranulation, while enhancing neutrophil phagocytic capability and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Through indirect interaction with neutrophils, astrocytes attenuate apoptosis and enhance necrosis in neutrophils, augment neutrophil phagocytosis and respiratory burst, and inhibit neutrophil degranulation. In addition, astrocytes could augment Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 activation in neutrophils. Conclusions Astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions through

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  13. Influence of light sources on the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Beard, Richard B.; Dai, Xiaoyan

    1995-05-01

    In the process of inflammation, leukocytes must travel from the intraluminal space of the capillary to the interstitial space in order to reach the site of the inflammation. The two major populations of mature human leukocytes based on the morphology are the polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). Previous research on PMNs and MNLs at the Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute of Drexel University have shown that their migration can be markedly enhanced by excitation with electric and magnetic fields. This presentation demonstrates that the migration of PMNs under excitation of photons is enhanced in the red light region of (lambda) equals 660 nm and inhibited in the green light region of (lambda) equals 565 nm. There is an intensity threshold at which red light enhances migration and an intensity threshold at which green light inhibits migration. In these experiments the Boyden technique was used with the distance of the cell migration through a cellulose filter measured in terms of the leading edge. The comparison of the relative value of the distance to cell migration under a light to cell migration without a light stimulus was recorded as a cytokinetic index, K.I.. K.I. is a measure of the cytokinesis which is the progress of the cell movement in which the migration is enhanced by substances in the cell environment irrespective of a concentration gradient. The cytotactic index is a measure of cytotaxis which is the directional movement along a chemical gradient formed by a chemotactic factor. A Russian pulsed commercial laser biostimulator in the near infrared wavelength above an intensity threshold enhances PMN migration. Intermittent green and red stimulators below the intensity threshold markedly influence the cytokinetic index of PMNs while above the intensity threshold, this influence is deminished.

  14. Biochemical changes in polymorphonuclear leucocytes in diabetic patients.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    A study on the functional ability of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) indicates that the total lysosomal enzyme levels viz. Beta-glucuronidase, lysozyme, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were not altered in diabetics, compared to that in control subjects. However, the findings also reveal that the release of these lysosomal enzymes in response to a particulate stimulus is impaired in diabetics. This suggests that the bactericidal capacity of these cells, which are involved in phag...

  15. Decreased apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocyte rate in dogs with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Junichi; Oguma, Keisuke; Kano, Rui; Tsumagari, Shigehisa; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) apoptosis was examined in three dogs with pyometra by TUNEL assay in a 24-hr incubation period and compared with that in healthy control dogs (n=5). The incidence of apoptotic PMNs in dogs with pyometra was 26.4 +/- 5% and that in healthy dogs was 54.3 +/- 7%. The results indicated that apoptotic PMN rates in dogs with pyometra were significantly lower than those in control dogs (p<0.05), suggesting the prolongation of PMN survival.

  16. New combined assay of phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Escherichia coli by polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P.J.; Ford, J.M. (Saint Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (UK))

    1982-03-12

    A new combined radiometric assay is described in which adherence, and phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) are simultaneously measured in the same sample. Pure monolayers of PMN in Petri dishes are allowed to ingest (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine labelled E. coli and excess bacteria are removed by washing. A period of incubation allows intracellular killing to occur while polymyxin-B is added to half the dishes to kill extracellular bacteria. The remaining viable bacteria in all dishes are labelled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. The number of ingested bacteria and the percentage of intracellular organisms killed is determined from the /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H counts by a simple subtraction technique. By performing protein assays on representative monolayers, the number of PMN adhered in the monolayers and hence the mean bacterial uptake per PMN is estimated. The assay detected killing efficiencies reduced below the normal range, in monolayers treated with sodium azide, phenylbutazone, in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, and in immature neutrophils from the promyelocytic leukaemic cell line, HL60. The assay was adapted to measure phagocytosis and killing by cells in suspension.

  17. Differential effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in intact polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, R H; Knudsen, T; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    The effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes was studied and compared with the activity in mixed peritoneal leucocytes from rats. While there was maximal decrease in the pump activity (25-30%) of leucocytes from both rat...... and human by calcium 0.6 mM, a concentration of 0.1 mM caused a substantial decrease indicating a high sensitivity for extracellular calcium. In contrast, calcium had no effect on the pump activity in erythrocytes. The effect of calcium on the pump activity in leucocytes may be due to regulation...

  18. 111In)oxine labelling of polymorphonuclear leucocytes: doubts concerning elution and effects on cell behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, N.J.; Brown, K.A.; Camacho, A.; Dumonde, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal human subjects were labelled with (111In)oxine (20 muCi 10(8) cells). In the presence of 20% autologous serum (AS), dissociation of 111In from the cells resulted in mean losses of radioactivity of 13% at 3 h and 30% at 24 h. Adherence of 111In-labelled PMN to cultured porcine endothelial monolayers was increased by 40.7 +/- 31.6% after 60 min incubation in 20% AS at 37 degrees C when compared with unlabelled cells. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans were unaltered by labelling. Elution of 111In from labelled PMN together with enhanced adhesiveness may have important implications for the study of PMN kinetics and the investigation of inflammatory disease.

  19. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes consume oxygen in sputum from chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Hansen, C. R.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most severe complication for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This infection is characterised by endobronchial mucoid biofilms surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). The mucoid phenotype offers protectio...

  1. Contribution of phosphoglucosamine mutase to the resistance of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 to polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ayako; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Shimazu, Kisaki; Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Uchikawa, Yoshimori; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-01

    Phosphoglucosamine mutase (GlmM; EC 5.4.2.10) catalyzes the interconversion of glucosamine-6-phosphate to glucosamine-1-phosphate, an essential step in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of the peptidoglycan precursor uridine 5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine. We have recently identified the gene (glmM) encoding the enzyme of Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer on the human tooth and an important cause of infective endocarditis, and indicated that the glmM mutation in S. gordonii appears to influence bacterial cell growth, morphology, and sensitivity to penicillins. In the present study, we assessed whether the glmM mutation also affects escape from polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-dependent killing. Although no differences in attachment to human PMNs were observed between the glmM mutant and the wild-type S. gordonii, the glmM mutation resulted in increased sensitivity to PMN-dependent killing. Compared with the wild type, the glmM mutant induced increased superoxide anion production and lysozyme release by PMNs. Moreover, the glmM mutant is more sensitive to lysozyme, indicating that the GlmM may be required for synthesis of firm peptidoglycans for resistance to bacterial cell lysis. These findings suggest that the GlmM contributes to the resistance of S. gordonii to PMN-dependent killing. Enzymes such as GlmM could be novel drug targets for this organism.

  2. EDU pretreatment decreases polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration into rat lung airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, D J; Elbon, C L; Ishii, Y; Yang, H; Otterbein, L; Boswell, G A; Kerr, J S

    1994-07-01

    Pretreatment with the heterocyclic compound EDU (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolindinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea) has previously been shown to reduce polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration into the airways of ozone-exposed rats. The present study further examined the effects of 1 and 2 days EDU pretreatment on rat lung inflammatory responses by determining PMN infiltration in response to intratracheal instillation with the chemoattractant formyl-norleucine-leucine-phenylalanine (fNLP). Maximal recovery of PMNs by bronchoalveolar lavage was observed 4 hr after fNLP instillation with no alteration in the numbers of recoverable macrophages and lymphocytes. Although 1-day pretreatment with EDU did not affect PMN recovery from fNLP-instilled rat lungs, 2 days of EDU pretreatment prevented PMN infiltration as indicated by PMN recoveries that were similar to those obtained from saline-instilled lungs. Measurements of lung-marginated and interstitial pools of inflammatory cells using collagenase tissue digestion demonstrated no effect of 2 days EDU pretreatment. Although 2 days EDU pretreatment alone did not alter blood PMN content, lung permeability, and the lavage recoveries of inflammatory cells, blood PMN responses to chemotactic stimuli in vitro were impaired. In addition, EDU was shown to directly inhibit PMN chemotaxis and superoxide anion generation in vitro. These data demonstrated that EDU acts by interfering with PMN activation and migration rather than by decreasing PMN availability. EDU, by modulating the inflammatory response, represents a useful compound for preventing PMN-associated amplification of acute lung injuries.

  3. Inactivation of the rhlA gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa prevents rhamnolipid production, disabling the protection against polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Many of the virulence factors produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are quorum-sensing (QS) regulated. Among these are rhamnolipids, which have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, e.g. monocyte-derived macrophages...... and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We have previously shown that rhamnolipids produced by P. aeruginosa cause necrotic death of PMNs in vitro. This raises the possibility that rhamnolipids may function as a 'biofilm shield' in vivo, which contributes significantly to the increased tolerance of P. aeruginosa...... experimental data showed that a P. aeruginosa strain, unable to produce any detectable rhamnolipids due to an inactivating mutation in the single QS-controlled rhlA gene, did not induce necrosis of PMNs in vitro and exhibited increased clearance compared with its wild-type counterpart in vivo. Conclusively...

  4. Effect of telithromycin (HMR 3647) on polymorphonuclear neutrophil killing of Staphylococcus aureus in comparison with roxithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazifeh, D; Abdelghaffar, H; Labro, M T

    2002-05-01

    HMR 3647 (telithromycin), a new ketolide, is active on intracellular pathogens. It was previously demonstrated that it inhibits superoxide anion production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, at concentrations which inhibit 50% of the control response of about 55 microg/ml (5 min) to 30 microg/ml (30 min); these values are similar to those obtained with roxithromycin, a classical erythromycin A derivative. Here we investigated whether these drugs modified the bactericidal activity of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) on four strains of Staphylococcus aureus with different profiles of susceptibility to macrolides and ketolides. We found that the main factor involved in killing was the antibacterial potency of the drugs, although combinations of antibiotics with PMN were slightly more active than each component used alone against two of the four strains. In addition, high concentrations of the drugs, which impaired the PMN oxidative burst, did not impair PMN bactericidal activity. Likewise, some cytokines which enhance PMN oxidative metabolism did not modify PMN bactericidal activity in the presence or absence of macrolides or ketolides. These data suggest that oxygen-independent mechanisms contribute to the bactericidal activity of PMN on these strains of S. aureus. Both live and/or heat-killed bacteria impaired the uptake of telithromycin and roxithromycin (but not that of levofloxacin, a quinolone) in a concentration-dependent manner, owing to a modulation of PMN transductional systems involved in the activation of the macrolide carrier.

  5. 金葡菌P-V杀白细胞毒素的原核表达及对人多形核白细胞的杀伤效应%Prokaryotie expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin and its cytolytic activities to human polymorphonuclear neutrophils'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静; 张天托; 吴本权; 朱家馨; 刘慧; 周宇麒

    2008-01-01

    AIM:Panton-Valentine leukocidin(PVL)is a pore-forming toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus epidemiologieally associated with the often-lethal necrotizing pneumonia.Until now,the mechanisms of pathogene-sis of PVL leading to the fatal pulmonia remains undefined and also acquired plenty of the toxins is difficult.In the present study,we obtain recombinant staphylococcal F and S components of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin by gene engineering and evaluate its biological activity in vitro,which provides an experimental basis for the further studies of its biological func-tion and its toxicity in pneumonia.METHODS:The full-length of F and S components of PVL gene amplified from the strain of Staphylococcus aureus DNA by hiSh-fidelity PCR was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET22b(+),and the vector was transformed into BL21(DE3)plysS to construct a prokaryotie expression system.The integrity of the opening-reading frame of each construct was verified by DNA sequencing.The recombinant PVL(rPVL)was induced by1.0 mmol/L IPTG.The expressed products were identified by SDS-PAGE and the fusion proteins(6His-LukS-PV and 6His-LukF-PV)were purified from lysates of transfeeted E.coli cells by affinity chromatography on nitrilotriacetic acid columns.The eytolytie activity was tested by incubation of rPVL with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils(PMNs)in vitro.RESULTS:The nueleotide sequence of the cloned PVL gene was the same as that of reported in GenBank.E coli BL21(DE3)plysS containing recombinant vectors grow at 37℃causes some proteins to accumulate as inclusion bodies.while incubation at 30℃led to a significant amount of soluble active proteins which accounted for about 31.7% of the total bacterial protein.The relative molecular weight showed on SDS-PAGE profile was consistent with the expected value which the LukS-PV protein was about 34 kD.and the LukF-PV protein was about 35 kD.The purified rPVL was obtained and its cytolytic activity to PMNs was

  6. Mechanisms of innate immunity: cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes, antimicrobial action, translocation, role, and fate in antimicrobial phagocytosis. Progress report, March 1976--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitznagel, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: characterization of the III f granules of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN); studies on glycosidases using methylumbelliferyl derivatives of the sugars with spectrofluorometry; distribution of proteinases and cationic proteins in human PMN; comparison of granules of eosinophils with those of other PMN; identification of a cyanide-resistant NADPH oxidase in PMN; subcellular localization of superoxide dismutase in PMN; oxygen-independent antimicrobial activities of each granule class; the phagocytic and intraleukocytic killing capacity of PMN deprived of their specific granules with phorbol myristate acetate; and studies on the PMN of an infant with the Chediak Higashi syndrome. (HLW)

  7. Rapid necrotic killing of polymorphonuclear leukocytes is caused by quorum-sensing-controlled production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ø; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2007-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) denotes a density-dependent mode of inter-bacterial communication based on signal transmitter molecules. Active QS is present during chronic infections with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompromised patients. The authors have previously demonstrated...... a QS-regulated tolerance of biofilm bacteria to the antimicrobial properties of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The precise QS-regulated effect on the PMNs is, however, unknown. Incubation of human PMNs with supernatants from dense P. aeruginosa cultures showed that the QS-competent P. aeruginosa...... induced rapid necrosis of the PMNs. This mechanism was also observed in mouse lungs infected with P. aeruginosa, and in sputum obtained from P.-aeruginosa-infected patients with cystic fibrosis. Evidence is presented that the necrotic effect was caused by rhamnolipids, production of which is QS controlled...

  8. Killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of an O2-independent bactericidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J; Victor, M; Stendhal, O; Elsbach, P

    1982-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a cationic bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) present in both rabbit and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes is the principal O2-independent bactericidal agent of these cells toward several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium (1978. J. Biol. Chem. 253: 2664--2672; 1979. J. Biol. Chem. 254: 11000--11009). To further evaluate the possible role of this protein in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the bactericidal activity of intact rabbit peritoneal exudate leukocytes under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and of intact human leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. Anaerobic conditions were created by flushing the cells under a nitrogen stream. Effective removal of oxygen was demonstrated by the inability of nitrogen-flushed leukocytes to mount a respiratory burst (measured as increased conversion of 1-[14C]glucose leads to 14CO2 or by superoxide production) during bacterial ingestion. At a bacteria/leukocyte ratio of 10:1, killing of gram-positive, BPI-resistant, Staphylococcus epidermidis is markedly impaired in the absence of oxygen (76.4 +/- 3.3% killing in room air, 29.2 +/- 8.2% killing in nitrogen). Essentially all increased bacterial survival is intracellular. In contrast, both a nonopsonized rough strain (MR-10) and an opsonized smooth strain (MS) of S. typhimurium 395 are killed equally well in room air and nitrogen. A maximum of 70--80 MR-10 and 30--40 MS are killed per leukocyte either in the presence or absence of oxygen. There is no intracellular bacterial survival in either condition indicating that intracellular O2-independent bactericidal system(s) of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes can at least match the leukocyte's ingestive capacity. Whole homogenates and crude acid extracts manifest similar bactericidal capacity toward S. typhimurium 395. This activity can be accounted for by the BPI content of these

  9. Are primed polymorphonuclear leukocytes contributors to the high heparanase levels in hemodialysis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Sela, Shifra; Mazor, Rafi; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Rops, Angelique L; van der Vlag, Johan; Cohen, Hector I; Kristal, Batya

    2008-02-01

    Patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. Heparanase, an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate (HS) side chains of proteoglycans, is involved in extracellular matrix degradation and, as such, may be involved in the atherosclerotic lesion progression. We hypothesize that heparanase is elevated in HD patients, partly due to its release from primed circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), undergoing degranulation. Priming of PMNLs was assessed by levels of CD11b and the rate of superoxide release. Heparanase mRNA expression in PMNLs was determined by RT-PCR. PMNL and plasma levels of heparanase were determined by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry analyses. The levels of soluble HS in plasma were measured by a competition ELISA. This study shows that PMNLs isolated from HD patients have higher mRNA and protein levels of heparanase compared with normal control (NC) subjects and that heparanase levels correlate positively with PMNL priming. Plasma levels of heparanase were higher in HD patients than in NC subjects and were further elevated after the dialysis session. In addition, heparanase expression inversely correlates with plasma HS levels. A pronounced expression of heparanase was found in human atherosclerotic lesions. The increased heparanase activity in the blood of HD patients results at least in part from the degranulation of primed PMNLs and may contribute to the acceleration of the atherosclerotic process. Our findings highlight primed PMNLs as a possible source for the increased heparanase in HD patients, posing heparanase as a new risk factor for cardiovascular complications and atherosclerosis.

  10. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans by murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A.G.; Netea, M.G.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are important phagocytes in the control of Candida infections. The phagocytic contribution of PMNs to host defence can by assessed by various methods, such as microbiological assays. However, assessment and definition of intracellular killing capacity can be a so

  11. Vero cytotoxin binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes among households with children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, D.M.W.M. te; Heuvelink, A.E.; Boer, E. de; Nauta, J.; Walle, J. van der; Schröder, C.H.; Hinsbergh, V.W.H. van; Chart, H.; Kar, N.C.A.J. van de; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2001-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the leading cause of acute renal failure in childhood, can be caused by different serotypes of vero cytotoxin (VT; i.e., Shiga toxin)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). Recently, VT was shown to bind to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in the systemic circulation

  12. Dendritic cells take up and present antigens from viable and apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alfaro

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8, for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1 and CD4 (OT-2 TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2(d mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2(d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2(b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2(d are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2(b. In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC.

  13. Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels modulate α-defensin release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Tyler Jacob; Cohen, Hannah Caitlin; Kao, W John

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) release granule proteins as the first line of defense against bacteria and set up chemotactic gradients that result in monocyte infiltration to the site of injury. Although well established, the role of biomaterials in regulating adherent PMN degranulation and subsequent PMN-monocyte paracrine interactions is less clear. The aim of this study was to determine how biomaterials affect the degranulation of selected biomarkers and downstream monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing hydrogels (PEG and an interpenetrating network of PEG and gelatin) promote the release of the α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3, but not azurocidin or monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Although human neutrophil peptides 1-3 are monocyte chemoattractants, no subsequent effects on monocyte transmigration are observed in static conditions. Under flow conditions, monocyte adhesion on human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α is elevated in the presence of granule proteins from PMNs adherent on polydimethylsiloxane, but not from PMNs cultured on PEG hydrogels. These results suggest that PEG promotes PMN antimicrobial capacity without enhanced monocyte recruitment.

  14. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte dysfunction during short term metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia in type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, H; Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) ingestion of particles coated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli was compared to other PMN functions in seven patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during short-term controlled metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia wit...

  15. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.;

    2009-01-01

    with infected burn wound. Furthermore, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capacity of the PMNs were reduced in the group of mice with burn wound. Using this novel mouse model of thermal injury a decline of peripheral leucocytes was observed, whereas the increased local inflammatory response at the site...... of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization...... of the skin showed a more polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs)-dominated inflammation in the group of mice with infected burn wound compared with the with burn wound group. In contrast, a higher degree of inflammation was observed in the burn wound group compared with the group of mice...

  16. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  17. Therapeutic relevance of penicillin-induced hypersensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, C; Georgopoulos, A.; Laber, G.; Schütze, E

    1984-01-01

    There is an overwhelming body of evidence that certain Staphylococcus aureus strains become more sensitive to killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes after their growth in media containing subinhibitory concentrations of penicillin. However, it is not clear to what extent this phenomenon contributes to the curative effect of penicillin in vivo. To explore its therapeutic relevance, we evaluated the interaction of staphylococci pretreated with penicillin in vitro with leukocytes in cell-proof ...

  18. Phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes: effect of cystic fibrosis serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, M J; Demko, C A; Wood, R.E.; Sherman, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown previously that serum from chronically infected patients with cystic fibrosis inhibits the phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by both normal and cystic fibrosis alveolar macrophages. In the present study, the ability of peripheral monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from normal volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients to phagocytize P. aeruginosa was shown not to be inhibited in the presence of serum from cystic fibrosis patients.

  19. Effects of carvedilol on oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Watanabe, Takanori; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Asada, Akira

    2004-04-01

    To compare the effects of carvedilol and propranolol on oxidative stress in leukocytes and C-reactive protein levels in patients with hypertension. Sixty hypertensive patients were randomly assigned to carvedilol (20 mg; n = 30) or propranolol (60 mg; n = 30) for 6 months. Thirty normotensive subjects who were given placebo served as controls. Oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells were measured by gated flow cytometry. C-reactive protein levels were measured by immunonephelometric assay. Oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells was increased significantly in hypertensive patients compared with in normotensive controls. After 6 months of treatment, carvedilol decreased oxidative stress significantly in polymorphonuclear cells by a mean of 45 arbitrary units (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32 to 59 arbitrary units; P <0.001) and propranolol decreased oxidative stress significantly by 20 arbitrary units (95% CI: 7 to 33 arbitrary units; P <0.003; P = 0.001 for difference between treatments). Carvedilol also decreased oxidative stress significantly in mononuclear cells by 23 arbitrary units (95% CI: 15 to 31 arbitrary units; P <0.001), whereas propranolol decreased oxidative stress by 2 arbitrary units (95% CI: 7 to 12 arbitrary units; P = 0.62; P = 0.002 for difference between treatments). Carvedilol decreased C-reactive protein levels significantly by a median of 0.073 mg/dL (interquartile range, 0.034 to 0.112 mg/dL; P <0.001), whereas propranolol decreased levels by 0.012 mg/dL (interquartile range, 0.009 to 0.032 mg/dL; P = 0.26; P = 0.003 for difference between treatments). These findings suggest that carvedilol inhibits oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, as well as lowers C-reactive protein levels, to a greater extent than does propranolol in hypertensive patients.

  20. Killing of Pseudomonas pseudomallei by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and peritoneal macrophages from chicken, sheep, swine and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, N; Kussovski, V; Radoucheva, T

    1998-07-01

    Differences in the kinetics of Pseudomonas pseudomallei killing by peritoneal macrophages (PM) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) from chickens, sheep, swine and rabbits were found. P. pseudomallei was rapidly killed by porcine PM and PMNL. However the bacterial killing by ovine and lapine PM and PMNL proceeded at a slower rate. In contrast, chicken PM and PMNL ingested and killed the lowest number of P. pseudomallei bacteria. The differences in the bactericidal activity of PM and PMNL from different animal species correlated with the level of their acid phosphatase and glycolytic activity.

  1. Ocular microbiota and polymorphonuclear leucocyte recruitment during overnight contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Sansey, N; Holden, B A

    1997-05-01

    Bacterial colonization of the ocular surface and contact lens (CL) and recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during overnight CL wear was examined in 11 asymptomatic wearers. The ocular surface was more frequently colonized than the CL, with commensal bacteria (P < 0.05). Following sleep, more bacteria were recovered from the CL compared with daily use (P < 0.05), and fewer PMN were recruited compared to sleep without CL wear (P < 0.05). Overnight CL wear may inhibit physiological PMN recruitment to the cornea by preventing their access, by modifying the chemotactic signal or by altering the activation state of the recruited cells.

  2. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Candida albicans by murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Alieke G; Netea, Mihai G; Kullberg, Bart Jan

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are important phagocytes in the control of Candida infections. The phagocytic contribution of PMNs to host defence can by assessed by various methods, such as microbiological assays. However, assessment and definition of intracellular killing capacity can be a source of considerable confusion. A comparison of the growth of Candida in the presence of PMN with the growth of Candida in phagocyte-free suspensions may lead to an overestimation of killing capacity because PMNs can use both intracellular and extracellular killing mechanisms. Here, we describe the use of an adherent monolayer of exudate peritoneal PMNs that is used to differentiate between the process of phagocytosis and intracellular killing.

  3. Impaired metabolic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in glycogen storage disease Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahr, M; Heyne, K

    1983-09-01

    To elucidate the basis for the recurrent infections in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) Ib we tested polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) function in one patient. Bactericidal capacity and phagocytosis-induced O2 consumption were reduced. Also, phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated superoxide production and glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate shunt were diminished compared to control subjects. Therefore it could be speculated that in PMN of patients with GSD Ib, glucose-6-phosphate has no access to the enzymes of the hexose monophosphate shunt due to a transport-related defect as shown for glucogenesis in hepatocytes.

  4. Reduced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to herpes simplex virus-infected cells of salivary polymorphonuclear leukocytes and inhibition of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytotoxicity by saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, M; Kohl, S

    1990-06-15

    Blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (BPMN) have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against HSV-infected cells. Although HSV infections are frequently found in the oral cavity, the ADCC capacity of salivary PMN (SPMN) has not been studied, mainly because methods to isolate SPMN were not available. We have recently developed a method to isolate SPMN, and in this study have evaluated their ADCC activity against HSV-infected cells. SPMN were obtained by repeated washings of the oral cavity, and separated from epithelial cells by nylon mesh filtration. ADCC was quantitatively determined by 51Cr release from HSV-infected Chang liver cells. SPMN in the presence of antibody were able to destroy HSV-infected cells, but SPMN were much less effective in mediating ADCC than BPMN (3.4% vs 40.7%, p less than 0.0001). In the presence of antiviral antibody, SPMN were able to adhere to HSV-infected cells, but less so than BPMN (34% vs 67%), and specific antibody-induced adherence was significantly lower in SPMN (p less than 0.04). The spontaneous adherence to HSV-infected cells was higher for SPMN than BPMN. SPMN demonstrated up-regulation of the adhesion glycoprotein CD18, but down-regulation of the FcRIII receptor. Incubation with saliva decreased ADCC capacity of BPMN, up-regulated CD18 expression, and down-regulated FcRIII expression.

  5. 琥珀酸对中性粒细胞的抑制作用%Succinic acid inhibits polymorphonuclear leukocyte's function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任利成; 黄晓元; 龙剑虹

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To examine the effect of succinic acid on the function of human polymorphonuclear(PMN)leukocyte and it's special function as a virulent factor of Bacteroides Fragilis.Methods:PMN wasseperated from the blood of healthy donors,incubated with succinic acid at the concentration of 5,10,20 and 30 mmol/L for 20 min or at the concentration of 20 mmol/L for 5,10 15 and 20 min.Tested PMN's power of adherence and deoxidizing NBT.Results:Succinic acid can inhibit PMN's power of adherence and deoxidization,the inhibitory action was related to the time of incubation and succinic acid's concentration.Conclusions:Succinic acid can inhibit PMN's function and it may be an important virulent factor to Bacteroides Fragilis.%目的探讨脆弱类杆菌代谢产物琥珀酸(succinic acid)对中性粒细胞(polymorphonuclear,PMN)功能的影响及其在脆弱类杆菌(bacteroides fragilis)发病中的作用.方法体外分离外周血PMN,以5,10,20,30 nmol/L四种浓度的琥珀酸分别孵育20 min,或以20 mmol/L浓度的琥珀酸孵育5,10,15和20 min,测定对PMN粘附率(adherencerate)及硝基蓝四氮唑(NBT)还原能力的影响.结果琥珀酸能显著抑制PMN粘附率及NBT还原能力,且呈浓度,时间依赖关系.结论琥珀酸能抑制PMN的功能,在脆弱类杆菌的发病中占有重要的作用.

  6. Pro-apoptotic role of NF-κB pathway inhibition in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳梅; 张君岚; 赵占胜; 凌亦凌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway inhibition in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs).Methods Rats with acute lung injury induced by LPS intratracheal instillation and cultured human venous PMNs were studied. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and gliotoxin were used as NF-κB inhibitors. Additionally, to explore the role of extracellularly regulated protein kinase as an upstream signal in NF-κB pathway on regulating LPS-stimulated PMN apoptosis, PD098059, the specific inhibitor of extracellularly regulated protein kinase, was also applied. The lung injury was determined by protein content and PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PMN apoptosis was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) end labeling and DNA fragmentation. IκBα degradation was analyzed by Western blot. NF-κB DNA binding activity was detected by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.Results (1) The increase of protein content and PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid induced by LPS (100 μg per rat) intratracheal instillation were alleviated by PDTC (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, I.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. (2) PMNs apoptosis in vivo or in vitro was delayed by LPS, and accelerated by PDTC, gliotoxin or PD098059 pretreatment. (3) IκBα degradation and increased NF-κB DNA binding activity mediated by LPS were inhibited by PDTC, gliotoxin or PD098059 pretreatment.Conclusion Inhibition of either NF-κB itself or the upstream signals in NF-κB pathway such as extracellularly regulated protein kinases has therapeutic effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury, in which the dysregulation of PMN apoptosis plays an important role.

  7. Interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and Leptospira species; innate responses in the natural bovine reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Wilson-Welder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and L. interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2 was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of

  8. Effect of donkey seminal plasma on sperm movement and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils attachment in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Jordi; Vilés, Karina; García, Wilber; Jordana, Jordi; Yeste, Marc

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of seminal plasma in endometrial inflammation in donkeys, samples from fresh pure, fresh diluted and frozen-thawed semen of three different jackasses were co-incubated in water bath at 37°C with uterine Jennie's secretions collected 6h after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed donkey semen. Individual sperm movement parameters using the computerised sperm analysis system (CASA) and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils (sperm-PMN) attachment observed in Diff-Quick stained smears were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4h of co-incubation. Controls consisted of incubating diluted or frozen-thawed sperm in the absence of uterine secretions. For data analyses, a repeated measures ANOVA was performed with incubation time as intra-subject factor and with treatment and donkey as inter-subject factor, followed by a post-hoc Bonferroni's test. Greater values (Pdonkey semen. As a result, spermatozoa with the greater motility characteristics are selected.

  9. Dammarane triterpene saponin from Bacopa monniera as the superoxide inhibitor in polymorphonuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, R; Gopalakrishnan, C; Bhutani, K K

    2001-11-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of the whole plant of Bacopa monniera Wettst. (Scrophulariaceae), exhibited an inhibitory effect on superoxide released from polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells in the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The major saponin bacoside A(3) was found to be responsible for this effect in the herb. This compound showed 85, 91.66, 91.66, and 83 % inhibitions of NBT reduction at the concentrations of 200, 100, 50, and 25 microg/ml, respectively, with an IC(50) value of 10.22 microg/ml. These inhibitory effects were compared with those of the standard positive controls, quercetin and ascorbic acid with IC(50) of 111 and 14.16 microg/ml, respectively. Another major saponin bacopasaponin C was found to be much less potent as compared to bacoside A(3) whereas the remaining two mixtures of saponins were found to be inactive.

  10. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...... (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria...

  11. Determination of phagocytosis of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulin, A.M.; Paape, M.J.; Weinland, B.T.

    1984-04-01

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of /sup 32/P from /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined.

  12. Impairment of polymorphonuclear leucocyte function in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarin, A; Uberti Foppa, C; Galli, M; Mantovani, A; Poli, G; Franzetti, F; Nóvati, R

    1986-01-01

    Granulocyte functions were studied in 20 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), 20 subjects with lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) and 15 symptom-free drug addicts (SFDA). Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans appeared normal in homosexual men with AIDS, while drug addicts with AIDS or LAS and SFDA showed a significant defect of these functions as compared to healthy controls. Migration of PMNL in response to a chemoattractant was normal in SFDA, but markedly defective both in LAS and in AIDS patients. In the AIDS group no significant differences were evident between homosexual men and drug addicts. We conclude that defective PMNL phagocytosis and killing, unlike defective migration, are somehow related to drug abuse rather than to infection with the causative agent of the immunodeficiency. PMID:3791696

  13. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    trapping. • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis.

  14. Mechanisms and target sites of damage in killing of Candida albicans hyphae by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, L; Wysong, D R; Meshulam, T; Wang, S; Diamond, R D

    1997-12-01

    Target sites of fungal cell damage were studied to define mechanisms of neutrophil-mediated killing of Candida albicans hyphae. Neutrophils induced hyphal cell wall damage, as evidenced by release of cell wall glycoproteins and confocal microscopic changes. Damage occurred in the presence of neutrophil granule extracts and did not require oxidants. However, oxidation of hyphal surface glycoproteins correlated strongly with parallel increments in fungicidal activity, suggesting that oxidants did contribute to maximal cell wall damage. Neutrophil oxidants also induced hyphal DNA fragmentation, primarily single-strand breakage, as shown by increased electrophoretic migration after nuclease-S1 DNA digestion at single-strand break sites. The onset of damage to hyphal cell walls and DNA preceded detectable neutrophil-mediated fungicidal effects. Likewise, hyphal amino acid and nucleotide turnover as well as ATP initially rose, then declined as lethal effects became detectable. Thus, preceding detectable fungal cell death, neutrophil oxidative and oxygen-independent mechanisms damaged defined targets.

  15. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  16. Increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils and regulation by interleukin 10 during intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaus, S; Bauditz, J; Gionchetti, P; Witt, C; Lochs, H; Schreiber, S.

    1998-01-01

    Background—Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines are increased in the intestinal mucosa of patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN) are the most abundant cell type in intestinal lesions in IBD. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an important contra-inflammatory cytokine which induces downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. 
Aims—To investigate whether PMN from patients with IBD or infectious colitis, respec...

  17. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Ø.;

    2014-01-01

    in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also...... PMNs slow the growth of the bacteria and render them less susceptible to antibiotic treatment while enabling them to persist by anaerobic respiration....

  18. Opsonisation and phagocytosis of group B meningococci by polymorphonuclear leucocytes: comparison of sulphonamide sensitive and resistant strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, K N; Fleer, A; Verhoef, J; Jones, D M

    1987-01-01

    A large proportion of disease caused by sulphonamide resistant strains of group B type 15 meningococci affects patients 10-24 years. In contrast, disease caused by sulphonamide sensitive strains conforms to the usual pattern, and most infection occurs in early childhood. In an attempt to explain this phenomenon possible differences in susceptibility of resistant and sensitive strains to phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leucocytes were investigated, using radioactively labelled bacteria. In i...

  19. Albumin binding of anti-inflammatory drugs. Utility of a site-oriented versus a stoichiometric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1984-01-01

    Binding equilibria of 12 nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory substances, salicylic acid, diflunisal, phenylbutazone, azapropazone, fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid, naproxen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofin, diclofenac, indomethacin, and benoxaprofen, to defatted human serum albumin has been investigated at 37...

  20. Altered Ca2+ homeostasis in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukaemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revankar Chetana M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL, mobilization of calcium ions is one of the early events triggered by binding of chemoattractant to its receptors. Besides chemotaxis, a variety of other functional responses are dependent on calcium ion mobilization. PMNL from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients that were morphologically indistinguishable from normal PMNL were found to be defective in various functions stimulated by a chemoattractant – fMLP. To study the mechanism underlying defective functions in CML PMNL, we studied calcium mobilization in CML PMNL in response to two different classical chemoattractants, fMLP and C5a. Results Release of calcium estimated by flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry using fluo-3 as an indicator showed that the [Ca2+]i levels were lower in CML PMNL as compared to those in normal PMNL. But, both normal and CML PMNL showed maximum [Ca2+]i in response to fMLP and C5a at 10 sec and 30 sec, respectively. Spectrofluorimetric analysis of the total calcium release in chemoattractant treated PMNL indicated more and faster efflux of [Ca2+]i in CML PMNL as compared to normal PMNL. Conclusion Fine-tuning of Ca2+ homeostasis was altered in CML PMNL. The altered Ca2+ homeostasis may contribute to the defective functions of CML PMNL.

  1. Different Modulating Effects of Adenosine on Neonatal and Adult Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs are the major leukocytes in the circulation and play an important role in host defense. Intact PMN functions include adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS release. It has been known for a long time that adenosine can function as a modulator of adult PMN functions. Neonatal plasma has a higher adenosine level than that of adults; however, little is known about the modulating effects of adenosine on neonatal PMNs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adenosine on neonatal PMN functions. We found that neonatal PMNs had impaired adhesion, chemotaxis, and ROS production abilities, but not phagocytosis compared to adult PMNs. As with adult PMNs, adenosine could suppress the CD11b expressions of neonatal PMNs, but had no significant suppressive effect on phagocytosis. In contrast to adult PMNs, adenosine did not significantly suppress chemotaxis and ROS production of neonatal PMNs. This may be due to impaired phagocyte reactions and a poor neonatal PMN response to adenosine. Adenosine may not be a good strategy for the treatment of neonatal sepsis because of impaired phagocyte reactions and poor response.

  2. Polymorphonuclear cells stimulate the migration and metastatic potential of rat sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedi, María Mónica; Donadio, Ana Carolina; Chiabrando, Gustavo Alberto

    2009-02-01

    The tumour microenvironment, which is largely composed of inflammatory cells, is a crucial participant in the neoplastic process through the promotion of cell proliferation, survival and migration. Neutrophil polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) induce inflammatory reactions that can be either cytotoxic for tumour cells or can promote tumour growth and metastasis. Previously, we have reported a spontaneous metastasis tumour model that has tumour PMNs infiltration, and metastasis, to liver and spleen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PMNs influences on the tumour cell invasion and metastatic properties. We analysed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), MT1-MMP (membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase) and MMP2 protein expression in TuE-t cells cultured with PMNs or PMNs-conditioned medium isolated from tumour bearing and normal rats. The interaction between tumour cells and PMNs induced a decrease in ICAM-1 expression in tumour cells as well as an increase in MMP2 and tumour cell motility. Besides, conserved expression of uPAR and MT1-MMP in tumour cells was also demonstrated. The up-regulation in MMP2 associated with uPAR and MT1-MMP conserved expression may be related to an increased extracellular matrix proteolysis. These results showed that the interaction of tumour cells with PMNs could favour tumour cell spreading through the promotion of a tumour invasive phenotype.

  3. Differential inhibition of polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment in vivo by dextran sulphate and fucoidan

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    N. Van Osselaer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The selectin-mediated rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial cells is a prerequisite step followed by firm adhesion and extravasation into the inflamed tissue. This initial contact can be suppressed by sulphated polysaccharides. We have studied the effect of sulphated polysaccharides on the ultimate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN recruitment and plasma leakage in rabbit skin in response to intradermal injection of various inflammatory mediators. PMN infiltration evoked by various PMN chemoattractants (FMLP, C5a desArg, LTB4 and IL-8 was significantly inhibited after intravenous injection of dextran sulphate (25 mg/kg, heparin (2 × 90 mg/kg or fucoidan (1 mg/kg. PMN-dependent plasma leakage was equally well reduced by the different sulphated polymers. Vascular permeability induced by histamine or thrombin acting via a PMN-independent mechanism was not reduced. Fucoidan was the only polysaccharide able to suppress IL-1-induced PMN infiltration for 60–70%. Local administration of dextran sulphate had no effect on PMN-dependent plasma leakage. Differential inhibition of PMN recruitment was determined after injection of dextran sulphate or fucoidan depending on the type of insult. Therefore, these results suggest that different adhesion pathways are utilized during PMN recruitment in vivo in response to chemoattractants and IL-1.

  4. CCL2 Promotes Colorectal Carcinogenesis by Enhancing Polymorphonuclear Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Population and Function

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    Eunyoung Chun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study reveals a non-canonical role for CCL2 in modulating non-macrophage, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and shaping a tumor-permissive microenvironment during colon cancer development. We found that intratumoral CCL2 levels increased in patients with colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC, adenocarcinomas, and adenomas. Deletion of CCL2 blocked progression from dysplasia to adenocarcinoma and reduced the number of colonic MDSCs in a spontaneous mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. In a transplantable mouse model of adenocarcinoma and an APC-driven adenoma model, CCL2 fostered MDSC accumulation in evolving colonic tumors and enhanced polymorphonuclear (PMN-MDSC immunosuppressive features. Mechanistically, CCL2 regulated T cell suppression of PMN-MDSCs in a STAT3-mediated manner. Furthermore, CCL2 neutralization decreased tumor numbers and MDSC accumulation and function. Collectively, our experiments support that perturbing CCL2 and targeting MDSCs may afford therapeutic opportunities for colon cancer interception and prevention.

  5. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration intensity as consequence of Entamoeba histolytica density in amebic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gonzalez, Sonia M; de Uribe, Marleny Lunar; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2009-04-01

    It has been suggested that the damage observed in invasive amebiasis is related to interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. We analyzed the relation between infiltrating inflammatory cell populations and E. histolytica density in intestinal amebic lesions. Biopsies obtained endoscopically from patients with amebic colitis were analyzed to describe their morphologic abnormalities. Cellular populations and E. histolytica trophozoites were measured quantitatively in order to assess the correlation between infiltrating inflammatory cell populations and parasite density. Amebic lesions were most often located in the colon (55%). The histopathologic diagnoses were colitis in 31%, erosive colitis in 26%, and ulcerated colitis in 24%. The predominant cellular populations found in the lesions were lymphocytes (59.8%) (3,672 +/- 2,413/mm(2)) followed by PMN (17%) (1,038 +/- 1,171 PMN/mm(2)) (p < 0.01). A higher density of PMN infiltration was observed in severe cases. Cellular populations predictive of the presence of E. histolytica trophozoites (p = 0.047) were PMN (p = 0.019) and lymphocytes (p = 0.033). The highest association was found between E. histolytica trophozoites and PMN (p = 0.0221). Neutrophils and lymphocytes, particularly the former, are associated significantly with the density of parasites. Our findings support the theory that PMN interaction with E. histolytica contributes to the pathogenesis of amebic intestinal lesions.

  6. Differential effects of acute morphine administrations on polymorphonuclear cell metabolism in various mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, P; Tavazzi, B; Gaziano, R; Lazzarino, G; Casalinuovo, I A; Di Pierro, D; Garaci, E

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that an acute morphine treatment dose-dependently alters the energetic and oxidative metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from BALB/c and DBA/2 mice, while phagocytic cells from C57BL/6 were not affected. In sensitive mouse strains, i.e. BALB/c and DBA/2, morphine decreased both ATP concentration and energy charge potential. At the same time, ATP catabolic products, i.e. nucleosides (inosine+adenosine) and oxypurines (hypoxanthine+xanthine+uric acid), significantly increased, indicating an imbalance between energy production and consumption. Morphine treatment also induced malondialdehyde and superoxide anions production in leukocyte cells from sensitive mice. The opiate antagonist naloxone blocked morphine-induced modifications by the lower morphine dose. The same parameters in cells from C57BL/6 mice were not affected. These findings confirm that: i) the phagocytic cells are an important target for the in vivo effects of morphine, and ii) the genotype-dependent variation influences the immunological responsiveness to opiates.

  7. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria and PMNs, which we found to consist of DNA and other polymers. Here we present a novel method to study a pathogen-host interaction in detail. The data presented provide the first direct, high-resolution visualization of the failure of PMNs to protect against bacterial biofilms.

  8. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Georgiadou, Sarah P; Wierda, William G; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key non-opsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 non-neutropenic patients with CLL (PMN count > 1000/mm(3)) and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the patients with CLL had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi compared with the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in patients with CLL were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  9. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte chemotactic hyperresponsiveness in a case of canine acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A L; Thomsen, M K; Aaes, H; Andreasen, M; Søndergaard, J

    1993-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to affect polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte (PMN) function and to be secreted by mononuclear cells, indicating that the hormone may be active in an immunophysiologic network, acting as an endo- or paracrine priming agent. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the chemotactic responsiveness of canine peripheral PMN in a dog with acromegaly, caused by spontaneous, progesterone-induced hypersecretion of GH and, secondary to this, a seven-fold increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). The chemotactic responsiveness towards zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was evaluated at a time when the dog suffered from acromegaly and again 57 days after corrective surgery (ovariohysterectomy). The experiments showed that PMN from the patient exhibited enhanced chemotactic migration that appeared to be associated with the hypersomatotropic condition as judged from the reversibility of the phenomenon. The glucose intolerance and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase that were observed in the acromegalic dog were also shown to be reversible following surgery.

  10. Do indium 111-labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes detect neutrophil-prominent, fibrosing lung disease in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.H. Jr.; Hartman, T.M.; Lichter, J.; Moser, K.M.

    1987-07-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in fibrotic lung disease remains poorly defined, but PMN prominence may predict a poor response to therapy in some patients. The bleomycin injury to rats represents a model of PMN-prominent alveolitis leading to fibrosis. We examined a method of identifying the alveolitis during its PMN-prominent phase with indium 111-labeled homologous PMNs (In-PMNs). When pairs of injured and uninjured rats were compared, greater activity was consistently found persisting in the lung images of the injured rats, both several hours (early) and a day (late) after injection of In-PMNs. Differences could likewise be identified when lung activity was normalized to activity of the injectate, the spleen, and variably the liver, as determined from organ images. These differences in gamma camera images were supported by direct measurement of activity in organs obtained by killing the animals after scanning. When groups of animals were compared, lung/spleen ratios appeared to most consistently differentiate the group of normal animals from those with alveolitis. These methods may provide a noninvasive means of identifying PMN prominence in the lung, which occurs in some fibrotic processes.

  11. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is a mediator of polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx in ocular bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernacki, K A; Barrett, R P; Hobden, J A; Hazlett, L D

    2000-01-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected cornea are required to clear bacteria from affected tissue, yet their persistence may contribute to irreversible tissue destruction. This study examined the role of C-X-C chemokines in PMN infiltration into P. aeruginosa-infected cornea and the contribution of these mediators to disease pathology. After P. aeruginosa challenge, corneal PMN number and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and KC levels were compared in mice that are susceptible (cornea perforates) or resistant (cornea heals) to P. aeruginosa infection. While corneal PMN myeloperoxidase activity (indicator of PMN number) was similar in both groups of mice at 1 and 3 days postinfection, by 5-7 days postinfection corneas of susceptible mice contained a significantly greater number of inflammatory cells. Corneal MIP-2, but not KC, levels correlated with persistence of PMN in the cornea of susceptible mice. To test the biological relevance of these data, resistant mice were treated systemically with rMIP-2. This treatment resulted in increased corneal PMN number and significantly exacerbated corneal disease. Conversely, administration of neutralizing MIP-2 pAb to susceptible mice reduced both PMN infiltration and corneal destruction. Collectively, these findings support an important role for MIP-2 in recruitment of PMN to P. aeruginosa-infected cornea. These data also strongly suggest that a timely down-regulation of the host inflammatory response is critical for resolution of infection.

  12. The immunoregulatory abilities of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the course of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ziaber

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN possess sufficient potential to affect both immune response and inflammation, however it has not been yet described in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. We have studied binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC- stained TNF-α by PMN, the expression of CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 molecules of β 2-integrines and the expression of CD10 (neutral endopeptidaseNEP and of CD13 (aminopeptidase N; APN antigens on PMN in three different groups of MS patients. The control group included neurological patients (OND with noninflammatory diseases. The obtained results have proved that during MS exacerbation and in the course of chronic progressive MS, PMN reveal several forms of preactivation, including significantly higher stained-TNF-α binding, higher expression of CD11b and CD18, as well as CD10 and CD13 antigens, in comparison with MS remission or OND. We suggest that the increased expression of these molecules on PMN of MS patients in exacerbation of the disease and to a lower degree in the course of CP-MS is a result of PMN priming, and directly prove the PMN involvement in the disease pathogenesis.

  13. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E Castañeda-Delgado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs cathelicidin (LL-37 and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1 in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals.

  14. Expression of CD64 on polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migita, K; Agematsu, K; Yamazaki, K; Suzuki, A; Yazaki, M; Jiuchi, Y; Miyashita, T; Izumi, Y; Koga, T; Kawakami, A; Eguchi, K

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and serosal or synovial inflammation. We examined the utility of CD64 (FcγRI) expression in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as clinical and biological parameters in patients with FMF. We studied 12 Japanese FMF patients (mean age; 22·8 ± 15·5 years, male/female: 2/10), along with rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA, n = 38 male/female: 6/32, mean age; 52·2 ± 15·3 years), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15 male/female: 0/15, mean age; 38·5 ± 15·9 years) and 12 healthy subjects (male/female: 3/9, mean age; 37·9 ± 17·2 years). CD64 expression on PMNs was determined using flow cytometry. The quantitative expression of CD64 in patients with FMF (2439·6 ± 2215·8 molecules per PMN) was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (547·8 ± 229·5, P = 0·003) or in patients with RA (606·5 ± 228·2, P < 0·0001) and SLE (681·3 ± 281·1, P = 0·004). The increased CD64 expression on PMNs isolated from untreated FMF patients was down-regulated by colchicine treatment. NACHT-LRR-PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) activation using MurNAc-L-Ala-D-isoGln (MDP) resulted in increased CD64 expression on PMNs from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that quantitative measurement of CD64 expression on PMNs can be a valuable tool to discriminate between FMF and autoimmune diseases. PMID:21438869

  15. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  16. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, H.H.; D' Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W. (Rhode Island Hospital, Providence (USA))

    1991-03-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions.

  17. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduces polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation following spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzipanteli, K; Yanagawa, Y; Marcillo, A E; Kraydieh, S; Yezierski, R P; Dietrich, W D

    2000-04-01

    The present study addresses the effects of moderate posttraumatic hypothermia (32 degrees C) on the temporal and regional profile of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) accumulation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that posttraumatic hypothermia would reduce the degree of inflammation by reducing PMNL infiltration. Rats underwent moderate spinal cord injury at T10 using the NYU impactor device. In the first study, the temporal profile of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (a marker of neutrophil accumulation) under normothermic (37 degrees C) conditions was determined. The animals were allowed to survive for 3 or 24 h, or 3 or 7 days after SCI. Spinal cords were dissected into five segments rostral and caudal to the injury site. Additional animals were studied for the immunocytochemical visualization of MPO. In the second study, rats were sacrificed at 24 h after a monitoring period of normothermia (36.5 degrees C/3 h) or hypothermia (32.4 degrees C/3 h) with their controls. In the time course studies, MPO enzymatic activity was significantly increased at 3 and 24 h within the traumatized T10 segment compared to controls. MPO activity was also increased at 3 h within the rostral T8 and T9 segments and caudal T11 and T12 segments compared to controls. At 24 h after trauma, MPO activity remained elevated within both the rostral and caudal segments compared to control. By 3 days, the levels of MPO activity were reduced compared to the 24-h values but remained significantly different from control. Neutrophils that exhibited MPO immunoreactivity were seen at 6 and 24 h, with a higher number at 3 days. PMNLs were located within the white and gray matter of the lesion and both rostral and caudal to the injury site. Posttraumatic hypothermia reduced MPO activity at 24 h in the injured spinal cord segment, compared to normothermic values. The results of this study indicate that a potential mechanism by which hypothermia improves outcome following SCI is

  18. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-01-01

    Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have...... observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  19. Nano-layered magnesium fluoride reservoirs on biomaterial surfaces strengthen polymorphonuclear leukocyte resistance to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Geyong; Zhou, Huaijuan; Wang, Qiaojie; Wang, Jiaxing; Tan, Jiaqi; Li, Jinhua; Jin, Ping; Shen, Hao

    2017-01-05

    Biomaterial-related bacterial infections cause patient suffering, mortality and extended periods of hospitalization, imposing a substantial burden on medical systems. In this context, understanding of nanomaterials-bacteria-cells interactions is of both fundamental and clinical significance. Herein, nano-MgF2 films were deposited on titanium substrate via magnetron sputtering. Using this platform, the antibacterial behavior and mechanism of the nano-MgF2 films were investigated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that, for S. aureus (CA-MRSA, USA300) and S. epidermidis (RP62A), the nano-MgF2 films possessed excellent anti-biofilm activity, but poor anti-planktonic bacteria activity in vitro. Nevertheless, both the traditional SD rat osteomyelitis model and the novel stably luminescent mouse infection model demonstrated that nano-MgF2 films exerted superior anti-infection effect in vivo, which cannot be completely explained by the antibacterial activity of the nanomaterial itself. Further, using polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), the critical immune cells of innate immunity, a complementary investigation of MgF2-bacteria-PMNs co-culturing revealed that the nano-MgF2 films improved the antibacterial effect of PMNs through enhancing their phagocytosis and stability. To our knowledge, this is the first time of exploring the antimicrobial mechanism of nano-MgF2 from the perspective of innate immunity both in vitro and in vivo. Based on the research results, a plausible mechanism is put forward for the predominant antibacterial effect of nano-MgF2in vivo, which may originate from the indirect immune enhancement effect of nano-MgF2 films. In summary, this study of surface antibacterial design using MgF2 nanolayer is a meaningful attempt, which can promote the host innate immune response to bacterial pathogens. This may give us a new understanding towards the antibacterial behavior and mechanism of nano-MgF2 films and pave the way towards their clinical applications.

  20. Sulfur dioxide attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury via enhancing polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-jie MA; Xin-li HUANG; Yan LIU; Ya-min FAN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:We speculated that the enhanced apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) might be responsible for the inhibition of PMN infiltration in the lung.This study was designed to investigate the effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on PMN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro,which may mediate the protective action of SO2 on pulmonary diseases.Methods:Acute lung injury (ALI) was induced by intratracheally instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS,100 μg/100 g.in 200 μL saline) in adult male SD rats.SO2 solution (25 μmol/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before LPS treatment.The rats were killed 6 h after LPS treatment.Lung tissues were collected for histopathologic study and SO2 concentration assay.Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for the measurement of PMN apoptosis.For in vitro experiments,rat peripheral blood PMNs were cultured and treated with LPS (30 mg/L) and S02 (10,20 and 30 μmol/L) for 6 h,and apoptosis-related protein expression was detected by Western blotting,and apoptosis rate was measured with flow cytometry.Results:LPS treatment significantly reduced the SO2 concentrations in the lung tissue and peripheral blood,as compared with the control group.Pretreatment with SO2 prevented LPS-induced reduction of the SO2 concentration in the lung tissue and peripheral blood.LPS treatment significantly reduced PMN apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro,which could be prevented by the pretreatment with SO2.The protein levels of caspase-3 and Bax was significantly increased,but Bcl-2 was decreased by the pretreatment with SO2,as compared with LPS administration alone.Conclusion:SO2 plays an important role as the modulator of PMN apoptosis during LPS-induced ALl,which might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective action of SO2 on pulmonary diseases.

  1. MicroRNA-941 Expression in Polymorphonuclear Granulocytes Is Not Related to Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Baslund, Bo; Cramer, Elisabeth Præstekjær; Rapin, Nicolas; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Jumonji Domain-Containing Protein 3 (JMJD3)/lysine demethylase 6B (KDM6B) is an epigenetic modulator that removes repressive histone marks on genes. Expression of KDM6B mRNA is elevated in leukocytes from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and has been suggested to be the reason for higher proteinase 3 (PR3) mRNA expression in these cells due to derepression of PRTN3 gene transcription. MicroRNA-941 (miR-941) has been shown to target KDM6B mRNA and inhibit JMJD3 production. We therefore investigated whether polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) from patients suffering from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) have lower expression of miR-941 than healthy control donors as a biological cause for higher JMJD3 levels. We found no significant difference in the degree of maturation of PMNs from GPA patients (n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 11) as determined from cell surface expression of the neutrophil maturation marker CD16 and gene expression profile of FCGR3B. The expression of PRTN3 and KDM6B mRNAs and miR-941 was not significantly different in GPA patients and healthy controls. Transfection of pre-miR-941 into the neutrophil promyelocyte cell line PLB-985 cells did not result in reduction of the KDM6B mRNA level as shown previously in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. The amount of PR3 in PMNs from GPA patients and healthy controls was comparable. In conclusion, we found that PRTN3 mRNA, KDM6B mRNA, and miR-941 expression levels in PMNs do not differ between GPA patients and healthy controls, and that miR-941 does not uniformly regulate KDM6B mRNA levels by inducing degradation of the transcript. Thus, decreased miR-941 expression in PMNs cannot be part of the pathogenesis of GPA. PMID:27755585

  2. Effect of local immunization of the mammary gland on phagocytosis and intracellular kill of Staphylococcus aureus by polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, A J; Paape, M J; Pearson, R E; Williams, W F

    1980-09-01

    Four cows in the latter part of their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th lactations were immunized by multiple intramammary infusions of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus in 2 quarters. The direct bactericidal effects of milk whey from the immunized and control quarters, before and after immunization, and the ability of these whey to support phagocytosis and intracellular kill were determined by incubating live S aureus with polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from milk. Immunoglobulins (Ig) were determined by single radial immunodiffusion. One immunized and 1 control quarter in each cow were challenge exposed with live S aureus and the courses of the infections were determined for 2 weeks. There were significant cow differences in all Ig classes and in percentage of phagocytosis. Immunization resulted in a significant increase in IgA, IgG2, and IgM in the immunized quarters. Whey collected from immunized quarters supported phagocytosis of S aureus by isolated milk polymorphonuclear neutrophils significantly greater than did whey from control quarters. Extracellular live S aureus in the incubation medium was decreased by 59% in whey collected after immunization from immunized quarters. This decrease in extracellular S aureus was associated with a concomitant increase in total intracellular S aureus. However, intracellular live organisms showed no change. This lack of change indicated that the additional S aureus that were phagocytosed were killed. Direct bactericidal effects of whey were not observed. Intracellular live S aureus was not significantly correlated with any of the variables measured.

  3. Leakage of protein into lungs of preterm ventilated rabbits is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, F; vanOeveren, W; Heikamp, A; Okken, A; Oetomo, SB

    We investigated whether leakage of protein in lungs of pre term ventilated rabbits of 28- and 29-d gestational age is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in plasma. We found signs of systemic activation of clotting, complement, and PMN in

  4. Leakage of protein into lungs of preterm ventilated rabbits is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, F; vanOeveren, W; Heikamp, A; Okken, A; Oetomo, SB

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether leakage of protein in lungs of pre term ventilated rabbits of 28- and 29-d gestational age is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in plasma. We found signs of systemic activation of clotting, complement, and PMN in ventil

  5. Combination of autoantibodies against different histone proteins influences complement-dependent phagocytosis of necrotic cell material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lefort, Malin H; Tydén, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with autoantibody-coated engulfed necrotic cell material (NC) are frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the roles of complement, different antihistone antibodies (anti-H ab), and oxidative burst in the phagocytosis of NC by PMN...

  6. The assessment of serum-mediated phagocytosis of necrotic material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes to diagnose and predict the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compagno, Michele; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    with hypocomplementemia, PNC positivity preceded increased Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 score, glomerulonephritis, and alopecia. CONCLUSIONS: Serum-mediated PNC by polymorphonuclear leukocytes is commonly but not exclusively seen in patients with SLE. The PNC assay may be used in follow...

  7. Dietary Fiber Intake is Associated with Increased Colonic Mucosal GPR43+ Polymorphonuclear Infiltration in Active Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingli; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 43/free fatty acid receptor 2 (GPR43/FFAR2) is essential for polymorphonuclear (PMN) recruitment. We investigated the expression of GPR43/FFAR2 in the colon from Crohn's disease patients and whether dietary fiber in enteral nutrition increases GPR43+ polymorphonuclear infiltration in mucosa. Segments of ascending colon and white blood cells from peripheral blood were obtained from 46 Crohn's disease patients and 10 colon cancer patients. The Crohn's disease patients were grouped by the activity of disease (active or remission) and enteral nutrition with or without dietary fiber. Histological feature, expression and location of GPR43/FFAR2 and level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase were assessed. The results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the infiltration of immune cells, including GPR43+ PMN, was more severe in active Crohn's disease patients who consumed normal food or enteral nutrition with dietary fiber than in remission patients and colon cancer patients. This finding was supported by the results of GPR43 and myeloperoxidase expression. Active Crohn's disease (CD) patients who consumed enteral nutrition without dietary fiber exhibited severe immune cell infiltration similar to the other active CD patients, but GPR43+ PMNs were rarely observed. The level of TNF-α mRNA in active Crohn's disease patients was higher than those of the other patients. In conclusion, the use of dietary fiber in enteral nutrition by active Crohn's disease patients might increase GPR43+ PMNs infiltration in colon mucosa. This effect was not observed in Crohn's disease patients in remission.

  8. Dietary Fiber Intake is Associated with Increased Colonic Mucosal GPR43+ Polymorphonuclear Infiltration in Active Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingli; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 43/free fatty acid receptor 2 (GPR43/FFAR2) is essential for polymorphonuclear (PMN) recruitment. We investigated the expression of GPR43/FFAR2 in the colon from Crohn’s disease patients and whether dietary fiber in enteral nutrition increases GPR43+ polymorphonuclear infiltration in mucosa. Segments of ascending colon and white blood cells from peripheral blood were obtained from 46 Crohn’s disease patients and 10 colon cancer patients. The Crohn’s disease patients were grouped by the activity of disease (active or remission) and enteral nutrition with or without dietary fiber. Histological feature, expression and location of GPR43/FFAR2 and level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase were assessed. The results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the infiltration of immune cells, including GPR43+ PMN, was more severe in active Crohn’s disease patients who consumed normal food or enteral nutrition with dietary fiber than in remission patients and colon cancer patients. This finding was supported by the results of GPR43 and myeloperoxidase expression. Active Crohn’s disease (CD) patients who consumed enteral nutrition without dietary fiber exhibited severe immune cell infiltration similar to the other active CD patients, but GPR43+ PMNs were rarely observed. The level of TNF-α mRNA in active Crohn’s disease patients was higher than those of the other patients. In conclusion, the use of dietary fiber in enteral nutrition by active Crohn’s disease patients might increase GPR43+ PMNs infiltration in colon mucosa. This effect was not observed in Crohn’s disease patients in remission. PMID:26140540

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant ...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Burmølle, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant...

  11. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte integrin pattern, at baseline and after activation, in type 2 diabetic subjects with macrovascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, G; Montana, M; Ferrara, F; Porretto, F; Musso, M; Canino, B; Lo Presti, R

    2003-03-01

    In vascular atherosclerotic disease and in diabetes mellitus few studies have evaluated the polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion molecule pattern. In this study we examined the PMN integrin expression at baseline and after activation in controls and type 2 diabetic subjects with macrovascular complications (MVC). We enrolled 21 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and macrovascular complications, localized in peripheral, coronary and cerebral sites. The patients had peripheral occlusive arterial disease, chronic cerebrovascular disease or coronary heart disease. We evaluated the expression of some PMN integrins (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD18), using flow cytofluorimetry, at baseline and after in vitro activation with 4-phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate. Type 2 diabetic subjects with MVC showed, compared to normals, an increase of CD11a and CD18 and a decrease of CD11b and CD11c. After activation, in PMN(s) of normal subjects, we found an increase in the expression of all adhesion molecules, while in PMNS of type 2 diabetic subjects with MVC we observed an increase of CD11b and CD11c and a decrease of CD11a. In type 2 diabetic patients with MVC the basal upregulation of CD11a and CD18 may be related to the PMN spontaneous activation, while the behavior of CD11b may depend on its self-consumption. After activation the CD11a modification may be due to its cleavage or to an altered integrin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation balance.

  12. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O; Callison, Julie A; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K; Plano, Gregory V

    2011-12-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node.

  13. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail Protein in Preventing a Protective Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Response during Bubonic Plague▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O.; Callison, Julie A.; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K.; Plano, Gregory V.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node. PMID:21969002

  14. Effects of methylprednisolone on exercise-induced increases of plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase and myeloperoxidase in man. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify whether a single oral dose of methylprednisolone could modulate the exercise-induced release of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN elastase and myeloperoxidase. Four healthy, male subjects were submitted to a 20 min downhill run (−20% at 60% VO2 max, 3 h after oral absorption of a placebo or a single dose of 32 mg methylprednisolone. A marked neutrophilia (+103% of basal PMN count; p < 0.02 was observed 3 h after methylprednisolone ingestion. During both exercise trials, placebo and methylprednisolone, PMN counts were increased by 46% and 19% (p < 0.05, respectively. The running test caused marked and significant (p < 0.05 increases in plasma myeloperoxidase concentration (MPO. The magnitude of MPO changes was the same in the two trials (+110%. Exercise also resulted in significant changes in plasma elastase concentration (EL in both experimental conditions (placebo: +104%, p < 0.05; methylprednisolone: +338%, p < 0.005. Plasma elastase levels reached at the end of exercise on methylprednisolone were significantly higher than after placebo (p < 0.05. A significant relationship was found between EL and PMN in methylprednisolone trial only (r = 0.72; l0 < 0.005. These results showed that the transient exercise-induced release of elastase and myeloperoxidase were not decreased by methylprednisolone.

  15. Apoptosis induced by low-level laser in polymorphonuclear cells of acute joint inflammation: comparative analysis of two energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara Januário; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2017-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory property of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely described in literature, although action mechanisms are not always clarified. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate apoptosis mechanisms in the LLLT anti-inflammatory effects on the arthritis experimental model in vivo at two different energy densities (3 and 30 Jcm(-2)). Arthritis was induced in mice by zymosan solution, animals were distributed into five groups, and morphological analysis, immunocytochemistry and gene expressions for apoptotic proteins were performed. Data showed an anti-inflammatory effect, DNA fragmentation in polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells and alteration in gene expression of proteins related to apoptosis pathways after LLLT. p53 gene expression increased at both energy densities, Bcl2 gene expression increased at 3 Jcm(-2), and Bcl2 tissue expression decreased at 30 Jcm(-2). In addition, apoptosis was restricted to PMN cells. Results suggest that apoptosis in PMN cells comprise part of LLLT anti-inflammatory mechanisms by disbalance promotion between expression of pro-apoptotic (Bax and p53) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, with pro-apoptotic gene expression selectively in PMN cells.

  16. Harvesting the noncirculating pool of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in rats by hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET): yield and functional assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.H. Jr.; Moser, K.M.; Ulich, T.; Cairo, M.S.

    1987-11-01

    Isolation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) provides an opportunity to study PMN activity in vitro and to label PMN for study of in vivo kinetics. However, simple phlebotomy (SP) of a small animal frequently yields too few PMN for in vitro handling, while PMN harvested from an induced-peritonitis may not accurately reflect PMN in a less stimulated state. We report a novel method of harvesting PMN from the circulation of rats, using hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET), which is both time and animal sparing. HET harvested 8-fold more PMN than SP. In vitro cell function was examined with assays of adherence, chemotaxis, bacterial killing, and superoxide generation. No significant (p less than 0.05) difference was found between PMN obtained by HET and pooled-PMN obtained by SP. In vivo function was examined following labeling with indium 111-oxine. The kinetics pattern described suggested normal migratory activity when compared to previous reports. The data demonstrate that rats possess a relatively large, noncirculating pool of PMN which is readily accessible by HET.

  17. Effects of Acer okamotoanum sap on the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Yang, Mhan-Pyo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-02-01

    Sap is a plant fluid that primarily consists of water and small amounts of mineral elements, sugars, hormones and other nutrients. Acer mono (A. mono) is an endemic Korean mono maple which was recently suggested to have health benefits due to its abundant calcium and magnesium ion content. In the present study, we examined the effects of sap from Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) on the phagocytic response of mouse neutrophils in vivo and rat and canine neutrophils in vitro. We tested the regulation of phagocytic activity, oxidative burst activity (OBA) and the levels of filamentous polymeric actin (F-actin) in the absence and presence of dexamethasone (DEX) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that DEX primarily reduced OBA in the mouse neutrophils, and that this was reversed in the presence of the sap. By contrast, the phagocytic activity of the mouse cells was not regulated by either DEX or the sap. Rat and canine polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) responded in vitro to the sap in a similar manner by increasing OBA. However, regulation of phagocytic activity by the sap was different between the species. In canine PMNs, phagocytic activity was enhanced by the sap at a high dose, while it did not significantly modulate this activity in rat PMNs. These findings suggest that the sap of A. okamotoanum stimulates neutrophil activity in the mouse, rat and canine by increasing OBA in vivo and in vitro, and thus may have a potential antimicrobial effect in the PMNs of patients with infections.

  18. Experimental studies on the pathogenesis of adult respiratory distress syndrome using sup 111 In-labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, Taijiro (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-06-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism of the development of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and to improve its treatment by studying the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in an endotoxin shock model of rats. PMNs from a rat were labeled with {sup 111}In by the use of tropolone and were injected into rats pretreated with endotoxin. Then the biodistribution of PMNs was studied by either counting the radioactivity of excised organs or using a gamma scintillation camera on the anesthetized rats. The two methods facilitated to observe the distribution of PMNs faily a short time after the injection of endotoxin. There was a significantly higher radioactivity in the lungs of the endotoxin group than in the control group. The accumulation of PMNs into the lungs occurred immediately after endotoxin injection. In rats depleted of the complement by cobra venom factor (CVF), an increase in radioactivity in the lung was not observed. These results indicate that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS. When rats were injected with methylprednisolone, the pulmonary accumulation of {sup 111}In-PMNs by endotoxin were suppressed. This is an experimental support of possible beneficial effects of corticosteroids in the treatment of ARDS. (author).

  19. Reactive oxygen species formation by polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells as a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro

    2006-04-01

    To better identify patients at high risk for cardiovascular events, several markers of risk have been proposed for use in screening. Recently, oxidative stress and inflammation have been evaluated as potential tools for prediction of the risk of cardiovascular events. Among them, we have measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs), since they may be a possible link between inflammation and oxidative stress. ROS formation by PMNs and MNCs was measured by a gated flow cytometric assay. Such biotechnological method of measuring ROS formation by PMNs and MNCs will make it possible that we measure vascular oxidative stress and vascular inflammation at the same time from only small amount of blood. We will state in this review that ROS formation by PMNs and MNCs are regulated by different mechanisms, although PMNs and MNCs are circulating in the same blood. Moreover, we will state that ROS formation by PMNs are regulated by blood pressure, Hb A(1C) and oxidided LDL. ROS formation by MNCs are regulated by vascular inflammation, and that ROS formation by MNCs are also related to various cardiovascular risks such as LV mass, norepinephrine, IMT, and nocturnal blood pressure.

  20. Protective Effect of Distillate and Redistillate of Cow's Urine in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Challenged With Established Genotoxic Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. KRISHNAMURTHI; DIPANWITA DUTTA; S. D. SIVANESAN; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2004-01-01

    From the ancient period cow's urine has been used as a medicine. In Veda, cow's urine was compared to the nectar. In Susrut, several medicinal properties of cow's urine have been mentioned and are known to cause weight loss, reversal of certain cardiac and kidney problems, indigestion, stomach ache, edema, etc. However, the literature and scripture did not mention the antigenotoxic properties of cow's urine. Methods In the present investigation, the antigenotoxic/ antioxidant properties of cow's urine distillate and redistillate were studied in vitro. The antioxidant status and volatile fatty acid levels were determined. Actinomycin-D (0.1 μmol/L) and hydrogen peroxide (150 μmol/L) were used for inducing DNA strand break with 0.1% DMSO as negative control. Dose for the antigenotoxic effect of cow's urine was chosen from the dose response study carried out earlier. Results Both actinomycin-D and H2O2 caused statistically significant DNA unwinding of 80% & 75% respectively (P<0.001) as revealed by fluorimetric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU), and the damage could be protected with the redistilled cow's urine distillate (1, 50 & 100 μL) in simultaneous treatment with genotoxic chemicals. Conclusion The redistillate of cow's urine was found to possess total antioxidant status of around 2.6 mmol, contributed mainly by volatile fatty acids (1500 mg/L) as revealed by the GC-MS studies. These fatty acids and other antioxidants might cause the observed protective effects.

  1. Spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II heterodimer induces migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the uterine cavity of the sow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Saravia, F; Wallgren, M; Martinez, E A; Sanz, L; Roca, J; Vazquez, J M; Calvete, J J

    2010-01-01

    Seminal plasma (SP) is a complex fluid which exerts biological actions in the female reproductive tract. In pigs, SP elicits endometrial inflammation and consequent immune changes after mating. This study tested whether heparin-binding spermadhesins (HBPs) and the heterodimer of porcine sperm adhesions I and II (PSP-I/PSP-II) in SP recruit different lymphocyte subsets (CD2(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) or polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the superficial endometrium or luminal epithelium and lumen, respectively, of oestrous sows. In Experiment 1, endometrial biopsies were taken between 2 and 120 min after infusion of uterine horns with HBPs, PSP-I/PSP-II or saline and evaluated by immunohistochemistry or histology. In Experiment 2, the uterus of oestrous sows was infused with PSP-I/PSP-II or saline to assess PMN numbers in the uterine lumen 3h later. PSP-I/PSP-II elicited CD2+ T cell recruitment from 10 min, and CD8(+) T cells from 60 min after infusion, while HBPs increased CD4(+) T cell recruitment by 120 min. PSP-I/PSP-II but not HBPs induced PMN migration to the surface epithelium by 10 min. PMN numbers were elevated 5-fold by 30 min and 7-fold from 60 min, with PMNs detectable in the lumen from 30 min after infusion. Six-fold more PMNs were collected from the uterine lumen of PSP-I/PSP-II-infused sows compared to controls at 3h after infusion. These data show that PSP-I/PSP-II heterodimer in seminal plasma has a predominant role in triggering the recruitment of uterine PMNs and T cells after mating, initiating a cascade of transient and long-lasting immunological events.

  2. Oral polymorphonuclear neutrophil characteristics in relation to oral health:a cross-sectional, observational clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick Rijkschroeff; Ineke DC Jansen; Fridus A van der Weijden; Bart JF Keijser; Bruno G Loos; Elena A Nicu

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have a major role in the innate immune system. However, little is known about PMN contribution in relation to oral health. The objective of this study was to investigate the numbers and functional characteristics of oral PMNs (oPMNs) compared with circulatory PMNs (cPMNs). Oral rinse and venous blood samples were obtained from 268 systemically and orally healthy volunteers in a cross-sectional observational study. PMN counts, cell cycle analysis and cellular activation state were investigated. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was analyzed, with and without bacterial stimulation (Fusobacterium nucleatum). In males, 1.2 × 106 ± 1.0 × 106 oPMNs were collected, and showed a tendency to correlate with the levels of gingival bleeding (r=0.215, P=0.008). Comparable oPMNs counts were found among females (1.0 × 106 ± 0.7 × 106). More late-stage apoptotic/necrotic cells were found among the oPMNs (53.1%) compared with the cPMNs (8.5%;Po0.001). Without additional stimulation, oPMNs were more activated than cPMNs, as indicated by higher expression of CD11b, CD63 and CD66b, and higher constitutive ROS levels (Po0.001). Notably, in response to bacterial stimulation, oPMNs released comparable ROS levels as cPMNs (P=0.042). In conclusion, this study provides data on viable oPMNs showing high levels of activation in orally and systemically healthy individuals, free of apparent caries lesions and periodontal disease. These data suggests that although the oPMNs are in a more mature stage of their life cycle compared with the cPMNs, oPMNs are still responsive to stimulation, which indicates their functional potential and possible contribution to a healthy oral ecosystem.

  3. Benidipine, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, inhibits oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Watanabe, Takanori; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2005-02-01

    To study the relationship between blood pressure and oxidative stress in leukocytes, the effect of benidipine on these variables was compared with that of a placebo. Hypertensive patients were randomly assigned benidipine 4 mg (n=40) or placebo (n=40), and treated for 6 months. Oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) was measured by gated flow cytometry. There was a significant relationship between systolic or diastolic arterial pressure and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by PMNs in the benidipine group (r=0.61, p<0.01) and in the placebo group (r=0.58, p<0.01). After administration of 4 mg benidipine, ROS formation by PMNs fell by 32 arbitrary units (n=40, p<0.01). After administration of placebo, ROS formation by PMNs decreased by 0.6 arbitrary units (n=40, p=0.31) (p<0.01 for differing treatment effects). There was a significant relationship between the decrease in systolic arterial pressure and the decrease in ROS formation by PMNs in the benidipine group (r=0.52, p<0.01), but not in the placebo group (r=-0.08, p=0.61). There was also a significant relationship between the decrease in diastolic arterial pressure and decrease in ROS formation by PMNs in the benidipine group (r=0.65, p<0.01) but not in the placebo group (r=-0.09, p=0.59). In hypertensive patients, we observed a significant relationship between systolic or diastolic blood pressure and ROS formation by PMNs, and found that benidipine decreased oxidative stress in PMNs of hypertensive patients, at least in part by decreasing blood pressure.

  4. Prescription-event monitoring. A preliminary study of benoxaprofen and fenbufen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, W H

    1984-01-01

    Prescription-Event Monitoring (PEM) has been established at the Drug Surveillance Research Unit of the University of Southampton as a low-cost technique for ascertaining the pattern of events, whether drug-related or not, in large general practice cohorts. The reporting of "events" without the need for an opinion about the probability that they may be adverse drug reactions (ADRs) removes much of the uncertainty inherent in voluntary ADR reporting systems. Numerators (adverse events) and denominators (the number of prescriptions), enable estimates of incidence to be derived from the data. Where related drugs are studied concurrently, differences in the pattern of events may signal important differences in their safety or efficacy . A successful large-scale preliminary exercise involving nearly 9 000 doctors and 16 000 patients is described.

  5. Characterization of early and terminal complement proteins associated with polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro and in vivo after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan Manuel D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system has been suggested to affect injury or disease of the central nervous system (CNS by regulating numerous physiological events and pathways. The activation of complement following traumatic CNS injury can also result in the formation and deposition of C5b-9 membrane attack complex (C5b-9/MAC, causing cell lysis or sublytic effects on vital CNS cells. Although complement proteins derived from serum/blood-brain barrier breakdown can contribute to injury or disease, infiltrating immune cells may represent an important local source of complement after injury. As the first immune cells to infiltrate the CNS within hours post-injury, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs may affect injury through mechanisms associated with complement-mediated events. However, the expression/association of both early and terminal complement proteins by PMNs has not been fully characterized in vitro, and has not observed previously in vivo after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Method We investigated the expression of complement mRNAs using rt-PCR and the presence of complement proteins associated with PMNs using immunofluroescence and quantitative flow cytometry. Results Stimulated or unstimulated PMNs expressed mRNAs encoding for C1q, C3, and C4, but not C5, C6, C7 or C9 in culture. Complement protein C1q or C3 was also detected in less than 30% of cultured PMNs. In contrast, over 70% of PMNs that infiltrated the injured spinal cord were associated with C1q, C3, C7 and C5b-9/MAC 3 days post-SCI. The localization/association of C7 or C5b-9/MAC with infiltrating PMNs in the injured spinal cord suggests the incorporation or internalization of C7 or C5b-9/MAC bound cellular debris by infiltrating PMNs because C7 and C5b-9/MAC were mostly localized to granular vesicles within PMNs at the spinal cord epicenter region. Furthermore, PMN presence in the injured spinal cord was observed for many weeks post-SCI, suggesting that this

  6. Shiga toxins present in the gut and in the polymorphonuclear leukocytes circulating in the blood of children with hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigotti, Maurizio; Caprioli, Alfredo; Tozzi, Alberto E; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ricci, Francesca; Conte, Roberto; Carnicelli, Domenica; Procaccino, Maria Antonietta; Minelli, Fabio; Ferretti, Alfonso V S; Paglialonga, Fabio; Edefonti, Alberto; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2006-02-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome, the main cause of acute renal failure in early childhood, is caused primarily by intestinal infections from some Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins. The toxins released in the gut are targeted to renal endothelium after binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The presence of Shiga toxins in the feces and the circulating neutrophils of 20 children with hemolytic uremic syndrome was evaluated by the Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. The latter showed the presence of Shiga toxins on the polymorphonuclear leukocytes of 13 patients, 5 of whom had no other microbiologic or serologic evidence of infection by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. A positive relationship was observed between the amounts of Shiga toxins released in the intestinal lumen and those released in the bloodstream. The toxins were detectable on the neutrophils for a median period of 5 days after they were no longer detectable in stools. This investigation confirms that the immunodetection of Shiga toxins on neutrophils is a valuable tool for laboratory diagnosis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in hemolytic-uremic syndrome and provides clues for further studies on the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  7. Shiga Toxins Present in the Gut and in the Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Circulating in the Blood of Children with Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigotti, Maurizio; Caprioli, Alfredo; Tozzi, Alberto E.; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ricci, Francesca; Conte, Roberto; Carnicelli, Domenica; Procaccino, Maria Antonietta; Minelli, Fabio; Ferretti, Alfonso V. S.; Paglialonga, Fabio; Edefonti, Alberto; Rizzoni, Gianfranco

    2006-01-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome, the main cause of acute renal failure in early childhood, is caused primarily by intestinal infections from some Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins. The toxins released in the gut are targeted to renal endothelium after binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The presence of Shiga toxins in the feces and the circulating neutrophils of 20 children with hemolytic uremic syndrome was evaluated by the Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. The latter showed the presence of Shiga toxins on the polymorphonuclear leukocytes of 13 patients, 5 of whom had no other microbiologic or serologic evidence of infection by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. A positive relationship was observed between the amounts of Shiga toxins released in the intestinal lumen and those released in the bloodstream. The toxins were detectable on the neutrophils for a median period of 5 days after they were no longer detectable in stools. This investigation confirms that the immunodetection of Shiga toxins on neutrophils is a valuable tool for laboratory diagnosis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in hemolytic-uremic syndrome and provides clues for further studies on the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. PMID:16455876

  8. Unsupervised explorative data analysis of normal human leukocytes and BCR/ABL positive leukemic cells mid-infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellisola, G.; Bolomini-Vittori, M.; Cinque, G.; Dumas, P.; Fiorini, Z.; Laudanna, C.; Mirenda, M.; Sandt, C.; Silvestri, G.; Tomasello, L.; Vezzalini, M.; Wehbe, K.; Sorio, C.

    2015-01-01

    We proved the ability of Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR) complemented by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to detect protein phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in mammalian cells. We analyzed by microFTIR human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMNs) leukocytes, mouse-derived p

  9. Clinical relevance of P-glycoprotein activity on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils to methotrexate in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Macías-Díaz, Salvador; Etchegaray-Morales, Ivet; Méndez-Martínez, Socorro; Soto-Santillán, Pamela; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Jiménez-Herrera, Erick A; Guzmán-Ruiz, Omar; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro

    2017-06-14

    To elucidate the relationship between P-glycoprotein activity on peripheral blood leukocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with lupus arthritis and the clinical response to methotrexate. An observational study was made in patients with SLE according to ACR criteria 1997 who had arthralgia and arthritis and received methotrexate for ≥3 months. Methotrexate responders and non-responders were compared according to the Clinical Disease Activity Index. Mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils were isolated from SLE patients and P-glycoprotein expression was measured using the relative fluorescence index and percentage of positive cells. The chi-square test was used to compare P-glycoprotein activity between responders and non-responders. Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 45.4 ± 10.7 years were included: 34.4% had a response to methotrexate and 65.6% did not. Mean relative fluorescence units of both mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils were significantly lower in patients with a good response (7.0 ± 4.3 vs. 9.6 ± 3.8; p = 0.041 and 4.2 ± 3.5 vs. 7.6 ± 4.0; p = 0.004). The prevalence of low fluorescence levels (P-glycoprotein activity of both mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, was higher in methotrexate responders than in non-responders (27.3 vs. 4.8%; p = 0.10 and 81.8 vs. 23.8%; p = 0.003, respectively). In SLE patients with joint involvement treated with methotrexate, P-glycoprotein activity was higher in responders to methotrexate than in non-responders. Further studies are required to determine the mechanisms behind this finding and whether P-glycoprotein activity mediates alterations in methotrexate efficacy.

  10. LL-37, HNP-1, and HBD2/3 modulate the secretion of cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10 and MMP1 in human primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Santos, Carlos Erik; López Hurtado, Carmen Nathaly; Rivas Santiago, Bruno; Gonzalez-Amaro, Roberto; Cataño Cañizales, Yolanda Guadalupe; Martínez Fierro, Margarita de la Luz; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; García Hernández, Mariana Haydee

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the LL-37, HNP-1 and HBD2/3 peptides on cytokine and MMP production in human polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear cells and chondrocytes. The levels of cytokines in supernatants from mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell cultures were measured with a cytometric bead array by flow cytometry. Likewise, the levels of metalloproteinase/MMP-1, 3, and 13 were measured in supernatants from chondrocyte cultures using an ELISA. The expression of RANKL on lymphocytes was analyzed by flow cytometry. We observed increased levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 in mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell cultures stimulated with HBD-2/3. We also observed increased levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-6 in mononuclear cell cultures stimulated with HNP-1, and increased IL-6 levels were observed in polymorphonuclear cell cultures exposed to HNP-1. We also found that the MMP-1 level increased in the chondrocyte cultures stimulated with HBD-3, whereas the MMP-1 level was decreased in cultures exposed to LL-37. The present report is the first study to determine that HNP-1and HBD2/3 promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells and the secretion of MMP by chondrocytes, whereas LL-37 diminishes MMP1 secretion. Our results suggest that HBD-2/3 and HNP1 might play a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis, while LL-37 might have a protective role.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of anti-hypertensive agents: influence on interleukin-1β secretion by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Farkhondeh; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Hosseini, Fatemeh; Mahmoudian, Massoud; Shafiei, Massoumeh

    2011-01-01

    The effects of clinically relevant concentrations of anti-hypertensive agents on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) secretion by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were investigated in vitro. Lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of IL-1β by PMNs from 15 hypertensive and 15 normotensive subjects after incubation with losartan, captopril, amlodipine, atenolol, and hydrochlorothiazide were assessed. IL-1β secretion by PMNs markedly increased in hypertensive patients versus normotensive subjects. Losartan, captopril, and amlodipine caused a concentration-dependent attenuation of IL-1β levels in both groups. Losartan, captopril, and amlodipine demonstrated marked in vitro anti-inflammatory effects at clinically relevant serum concentrations but atenolol and hydrochlorothiazide did not.

  12. Activation of toll-like receptor 4 is necessary for trauma hemorrhagic shock-induced gut injury and polymorphonuclear neutrophil priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reino, Diego C; Palange, David; Feketeova, Elenora; Bonitz, Robert P; Xu, Da Zhong; Lu, Qi; Sheth, Sharvil U; Peña, Geber; Ulloa, Luis; De Maio, Antonio; Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A

    2012-07-01

    Interactions of toll-like receptors (TLRs) with nonmicrobial factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of early trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS)-induced organ injury and inflammation. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that TLR4 mutant (TLR4 mut) mice would be more resistant to T/HS-induced gut injury and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) priming than their wild-type littermates and found that both were significantly reduced in the TLR4 mut mice. In addition, the in vivo and ex vivo PMN priming effect of T/HS intestinal lymph observed in the wild-type mice was abrogated in TLR4 mut mice as well the TRIF mut-deficient mice and partially attenuated in Myd88 mice, suggesting that TRIF activation played a more predominant role than MyD88 in T/HS lymph-induced PMN priming. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil depletion studies showed that T/HS lymph-induced acute lung injury was PMN dependent, because lung injury was totally abrogated in PMN-depleted animals. Because the lymph samples were sterile and devoid of endotoxin or bacterial DNA, we investigated whether the effects of T/HS lymph was related to endogenous nonmicrobial TLR4 ligands. High-mobility group box 1 protein 1, heat shock protein 70, heat shock protein 27, and hyaluronic acid all have been implicated in ischemia-reperfusion-induced tissue injury. None of these "danger" proteins appeared to be involved, because their levels were similar between the sham and shock lymph samples. In conclusion, TLR4 activation is important in T/HS-induced gut injury and in T/HS lymph-induced PMN priming and lung injury. However, the T/HS-associated effects of TLR4 on gut barrier dysfunction can be uncoupled from the T/HS lymph-associated effects of TLR4 on PMN priming.

  13. Cloning of Humanα-defensin-1(HNP-1) Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionDefensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that function in the host's innate immune system. The human defensin family includes three small peptides from the azurophil granules of polymorphonuclear cells named human neutrophil peptide (HNP)-1, HNP-2, HNP-3, which consist 5%-7% of the protein of human neutrophil. HNP-4 is approximately one hundred times less abundant. They demonstrate antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties in vitro. HNPs are important component of nonoxidat...

  14. 78 FR 33426 - Eli Lilly and Co.; Withdrawal of Approval of a New Drug Application for ORAFLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Eli Lilly and Co.; Withdrawal of Approval of a New Drug... Administration (FDA) is withdrawing approval of a new drug application (NDA) for ORAFLEX (benoxaprofen)...

  15. Advances in researches on polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase in semen%精液中性粒细胞弹性蛋白酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯瑞祥; 卢坤刚; 张红烨; 陆金春

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection is one of the important factors of male reproduction. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil elas-tase (PMNE) in semen, as a marker of male reproductive tract inflammation, especially recessive infection, potentially affects male fertility. The concentration of PMNE in semen is correlated significantly not only with semen white blood cell count and seminal plasma ROS level, but also with the levels of other inflammation related cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-ot. Furthermore, PMNE has a negative impact on sperm quality by decreasing sperm motility, increasing the percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm and interfering with DNA integrity. PMNE inhibitors in semen can form a compound with PMNE, and theimbalanced proportions of the two may promote the development of chronic inflammation, and consequently lead to male infertility. At present, PMNE in semen is detected mainly by enzyme immunoassay, but this method still needs to be standardized, and the diagnostic standards to be unified. Natl JAndrol, 2011, 17 (11): 1023 -1028%影响男性生殖的因素很多,生殖道感染是其中重要因素之一.精液中性粒细胞弹性蛋白酶( polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase,PMNE)作为男性生殖道感染尤其是隐性感染诊断的重要炎症指标,对男性生育能力有潜在的负面影响.精液PMNE浓度不仅与精液白细胞数、精浆ROS水平显著相关,而且与其他炎症相关细胞因子如IL-6、IL-8、TNF-α水平等密切相关.PMNE对精子质量亦有影响,可以削弱精子活力,影响精子形态和DNA完整性等.精液中存在PMNE抑制剂,可与PMNE形成复合物,两者比例的失衡可以促进慢性炎症的发生,进而可能导致男性不育.检测精液PMNE的方法主要为酶免疫分析法,但检测方法仍需标准化,诊断标准尚需统一.

  16. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Qiuling, E-mail: 924969007@qq.com [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, 510-0293 (Japan); Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Mu, Jinjun [The Second Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Li, Yuanfei [The First Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China)

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  17. Cloning of Human α-defensin-1 (HNP-1) Gene and Construction of Its Eukaryotic Expression Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Hua CHEN; Jing-Ping Ou YANG; Bao-Hua WANG; Yue Yang; Han-Qiao ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Defensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that function in the host's innate immune system. The human defensin family includes three small peptides from the azurophil granules of polymorphonuclear cells named human neutrophil peptide (HNP)-1, HNP-2, HNP-3,which consist 5%-7% of the protein of human neutrophil. HNP-4 is approximately one hundred times less abundant. They demonstrate antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties in vitro. HNPs are important component of nonoxidative mechanism in macrophages, and can direct inactivate the enveloped viruses. Because only special cells express defensins. And it is hard to extract them naturally and the production is few. So researcher expect to obtain defensins highly through heterogenous expression by gene engineering technology. In order to express HNP-1, we cloned the cDNA of HNP-1 from human polymorphonuclear cells in peripheral blood, and constructed its eukaryotic expression vector, which provided a base for the further study on its mechanism of antimicrobial effect.

  18. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Quercetin and Vitexin on Activated Human Peripheral Blood Neutrophils - The effects of quercetin and vitexin on human neutrophils -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abd Nikfarjam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs constitute the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens. Early events in inflammation involve the recruitment of neutrophils to the site of injury or damage where changes in intracellular calcium can cause the activation of pro-inflammatory mediators from neutrophils including superoxide generation, degranulation and release of myeloperoxidase (MPO, productions of interleukin (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, and adhesion to the vascular endothelium. To address the anti-inflammatory role of flavonoids, in the present study, we investigated the effects of the flavonoids quercetin and vitexin on the stimulus-induced nitric oxide (NO, TNF-α, and MPO productions in human neutrophils. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated, and their viabilities were determined by using the Trypan Blue exclusion test. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL preparations contained more than 98% neutrophils as determin

  19. Construction of a Mammary-specific Expression Vector of Humanα-defensin-1 (HNP-1) Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionDefensins, also called human neutrophil peptides(HNP), are small cationic peptides with broad antimicrobial activity~([1]). Human defensins are highly abundant in the cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Alpha-defensin-1 is an important mediator in either innate immunity or anti-infection. It can be developed to be an ideal new type antibiotic and may provide a better solution for the present situation of extensive antibiotics-resistence. It is difficult to achieve amount of ...

  20. Changes of pulmonary intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and CD11b/CD18 in peripheral polymorphonuclear neutrophils and their significance at the early stage of burns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金榕兵; 朱佩芳; 王正国; 刘大维; 周继红

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the accumulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in the lungs at the early stage of burns. Methods: Myeloperoxidase content in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were detected. ICAM-1 and its mRNA expression in lung tissues were determined by immunohistochemical method and in situ hybridization. CD11b/CD18 expression on the peripheral PMNs was measured by flowcytometry. Results: The levels of myeloperoxidase in lung tissues and BALF after burn injury were markedly higher than those of control. Expression of ICAM-1 and its mRNA in the lung tissues and CD11b/CD18 on peripheral PMNs surface was significantly increased at 2, 6, 12, 24 h after burns. Conclusions: PMNs accumulation in the lungs is related to increased ICAM-1 expression on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and CD11b/CD18 expression on PMN at the early stage of burn injury.

  1. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  2. Effects of Brazilian green propolis on double-stranded RNA-mediated induction of interferon-inducible gene and inhibition of recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakari, Ryo; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Xing, Fei; Tayone, Janeth C; Dempoya, Junichi; Tatsuta, Tetsuya; Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Yoshida, Hidemi; Satoh, Kei

    2013-02-01

    Propolis is a bee product with various biological properties, including an antiviral activity when taken orally. However, its mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level are not well understood. We investigated the effect of propolis on antiviral signaling in A549 cells transfected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a model for viral infection. Pretreatment of the cells with propolis inhibited poly I:C (synthetic dsRNA)-induced interferon (IFN)-β expression. Propolis had no effect on the dsRNA-induced expression of RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), which are known as intracellular viral RNA sensors. As to the effect on antiviral executor genes, propolis enhanced myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1) expression, whereas interferon-inducible gene 6-16 (G1P3) and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) were unaffected. All of these genes belong to the IFN-inducible genes, suggesting that the effect of propolis on antiviral signaling is not necessarily mediated by the autocrine regulation by IFN-β. Propolis pretreatment inhibited dsRNA-induced interleukin-8 (IL8) and CCL5 expression, and consequently lowered polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotactic activity in the cell-conditioned medium. Taken together, these results suggest that propolis may suppress excess inflammatory responses without affecting the innate immunity during viral infection. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. The influence of different anticoagulants and sample preparation methods on measurement of mCD14 on bovine monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibeagha-Awemu Eveline M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane-CD14 (mCD14 is expressed on the surface of monocytes, macrophages and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN. mCD14 acts as a co-receptor along with Toll like receptor 4 (TLR 4 and MD-2 for the detection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. However, studies using different sample preparation methods and anticoagulants have reported different levels of mCD14 on the surface of monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, the influence of various anticoagulants and processing methods on measurement of mCD14 on monocytes and neutrophils was examined. Results Whole blood samples were collected in vacutainer tubes containing either sodium heparin (HEPARIN, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA or sodium citrate (CITRATE. mCD14 on neutrophils and monocytes in whole blood samples or isolated cells was measured by the method of flow cytometry using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled monoclonal antibody. There was a significant difference (p p Conclusion From these results, it is suggested that sodium heparin should be the preferred anticoagulant for use in the reliable quantification of the surface expression of mCD14. Furthermore, measurement of mCD14 is best carried out in whole blood samples, both for neutrophils and monocytes.

  4. Mannose binding lectin plays a crucial role in innate immunity against yeast by enhanced complement activation and enhanced uptake of polymorphonuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herpers Bjorn L

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose binding lectin (MBL is an important host defence protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens. This carbohydrate-binding protein, an opsonin and lectin pathway activator, binds through multiple lectin domains to the repeating sugar arrays displayed on the surface of a wide range of clinically relevant microbial species. We investigated the contribution of MBL to antifungal innate immunity towards C. parapsilosis in vitro. Results High avidity binding was observed between MBL and C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Addition of MBL to MBL deficient serum increased the deposition of C4 and C3b and enhanced the uptake of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and acapsular C. neoformans by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs. Compared to other microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Cryptococcus neoformans, C. parapsilosis and Candida albicans were potent activators of the lectin pathway. Conclusion Our results suggest that MBL plays a crucial role in the innate immunity against infections caused by yeast by increasing uptake by PMN.

  5. Comparison of photonic and electromagnetic effects on the human leukocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Beard, Richard B.; Feng, D.; Dai, Xiaoyan; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Priezzhev, Alexander V.

    1998-06-01

    The dielectric and magnetic influence on human cells have been widely studied previously by the authors. Recently, the effects of energy in the visible electromagnetic spectrum have been investigated. In this subsequent study, the photonic effects on the in vitro migration of the polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are compared with the corresponding electromagnetic field effects. Dielectric spectra of the polymorph in the 300 KHz to 400 KHz and 700 KHz to 800 KHz range have been measured. At frequencies of 350 KHz and 720 KHz an increase in the migration of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte have been observed. This stimulation was attributed to the charges on the nuclear surface. Recent preliminary data have shown a similar increased migration in the 20 MHz range. Photonic studies have indicated an enhanced migration for the polymorphonuclear leukocytes at a wavelength of 660 nm (red) and an inhibited migration at 565 nm (green). The photonic effects were postulated to be the results of a biochemical interaction rather than a membranous surface charge displacement secondary to an electric field. The migration of the white blood cells were measurement via the Boyden chamber technique and expressed in terms of a cytokinetic index which expresses the cellular movement independent of its environmental concentration gradient.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  7. IFN-γ regulates xanthine oxidase-mediated iNOS-independent oxidative stress in maneb- and paraquat-treated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepali; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Chetna

    2017-03-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) provoke oxidative stress-mediated cell damage. Role of xanthine oxidase (XO) in oxidative stress and its association with nitric oxide (NO)/NO synthase (NOS) have been widely reported. While inducible NOS (iNOS) is implicated in MB+PQ-induced toxicity in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), role of XO and its alliance with iNOS have not yet been established. The study investigated the role of XO in MB+PQ-induced oxidative stress in rat PMNs and its regulation by iNOS and inflammatory cytokines. MB+PQ-augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, nitro-tyrosine, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and nitrite levels along with the catalytic activity of iNOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and XO. XO inhibitor, allopurinol (AP), alleviated MB+PQ-induced changes except nitrite content and iNOS activity. Conversely, an iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine, mitigated MB+PQ-induced LPO, nitrite, iNOS, and nitro-tyrosine levels; however, no change was observed in ROS, SOD, and XO. Nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, pentoxyfylline, and an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone, attenuated MB+PQ-induced increase in XO, superoxide, and ROS with parallel reduction in the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rat PMNs. Exogenous IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β enhanced superoxide, ROS, and XO in the PMNs of control and MB+PQ-treated rats; however, IFN- γ was found to be the most potent inducer. Moreover, AP ameliorated cytokine-induced free radical generation and restored XO activity towards normalcy. The results thus demonstrate that XO mediates oxidative stress in MB+PQ-treated rat PMNs via iNOS-independent but cytokine (predominantly IFN-γ)-dependent mechanism.

  8. Differential expression of interleukin-8 by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of two closely related species, Ovis canadensis and Ovis aries, in response to Mannheimia haemolytica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Caroline N; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2010-08-01

    The pneumonic lesions and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) are more severe than those in the related species, domestic sheep (DS; Ovis aries), under both natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin (Lkt) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the most important virulence factors of this organism. One hallmark of pathogenesis of pneumonia is the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the lungs. Lkt-induced cytolysis of PMNs results in the release of cytotoxic compounds capable of damaging lung tissue. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent PMN chemoattractant. The objective of the present study was to determine if there is differential expression of IL-8 by the macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS in response to M. haemolytica. Macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS were stimulated with heat-killed M. haemolytica or LPS. IL-8 expression by the cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The PMNs of BHS expressed severalfold higher levels of IL-8 than those of DS upon stimulation. Lesional lung tissue of M. haemolytica-infected BHS contained significantly higher levels of IL-8 than nonlesional tissue. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of infected BHS also contained higher levels of IL-8 than that of infected DS. Depletion of IL-8 reduced migration of PMNs toward BAL fluid by approximately 50%, indicating that IL-8 is integral to PMN recruitment to the lung during M. haemolytica infection. Excessive production of IL-8, enhanced recruitment of PMNs, and PMN lysis by Lkt are likely responsible for the severity of the lung lesions in M. haemolytica-infected BHS.

  9. Differential effect of exogenous interleukin-10 versus glucocorticoids on gene expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes of the newly born

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Dennis; Patel, Hardik; Degoy, Ana C; Gershkovich, Irina; Vancurova, Ivana; Miskolci, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Persistent inflammation, with an abnormal influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) followed by monocytes (MONOs), occurs early in the pathogenesis of BPD. Anti-inflammatory therapy with better efficacy and safety than dexamethasone (DEX) is needed. In the present study we determined cell-specific gene expression and cytokine release in response to glucocorticoids versus interleukin-10 (IL-10). Subsequently, we hypothesized that the insensitivity of MONOs to DEX was associated with a failure of the glucocorticoid receptor to translocate to the nucleus. PMNs and MONOs were isolated from umbilical cord blood at birth, and pretreated with PBS vehicle, IL-10 or glucocorticoids prior to endotoxin (LPS)-stimulation for 4 and 18h. Genome-wide gene expressions were determined by microarray and validated by RT-qPCR. Interleukin 8 release in cell culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. To examine the mechanism of monocyte insensitivity to glucocorticoids, nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor was determined by Western blots. MONOs had 6 times the number of genes changing expression with IL-10 compared to PMNs at 4h. DEX at the therapeutic level for neonates with BPD had no effect on gene expression in MONOs. The order of potency for inhibition of interleukin-8 release from MONOs was IL-10 >betamethasone >dexamethasone and hydrocortisone. Glucocorticoid potency in MONOs was directly related to glucocorticoid receptor translocation to nucleus. Gene expression profiling for IL-10 versus glucocorticoids indicates there may be major differences in therapeutic efficacy for BPD. PMID:23390570

  10. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  11. Lethal effect of polymorphonuclear neutrophils on squamous cell carcinoma of the lung%中性粒细胞对肺鳞状细胞癌杀伤效应的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟梅; 王琼; 邰艳红; 董周寰; 赵坡; 吕亚莉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effect of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) towards human lung squamous cell carcinoma ( SCC ) . Methods 300 human lung squamous cancer samples were randomly selected, and G-CSF expression in the tumors were detected immunohistochemically, and the relationship between the intensity of G-CSF expression and PMNs distribution status were analyzed. 5 cases of PMNs in peripheral blood of lung SCC patients and healthy volunteers were purified respectively. The antitumor effect of PMNs on lung SCC cell line and primary cultured lung SCC cells were detected by MTT method, and the morphologic change of PMNs and lung SCC cells were observed microscopically. Results The variable levels of PMNs infiltration in 221 cases were found in the whole 300 samples, and the infiltrating degree positively related to G-CSF expression level significantly (p < 0. 01). Morphologically, PMNs required direct contact to cancer cells in rosette formation so as to perform antitumor effect on lung SCC cells. The maximal killing efficiency was obtained under the ratio of PMNs: cancer cells = 500 ~ 600: 1. Conclusion PMNs could perform the antitumor effect in vivo and in vitro on squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, the killing effect requires the direct contact of PMNs and cancer cells, and G-CSF secreted by cancer cells could promote PMNs' antitumor effect.%目的 探索中性粒细胞(PMNS)对人肺鳞状细胞癌的杀伤效应.方法 随机选取人肺鳞状细胞癌石蜡 包埋标本300例,行G-CSF的免疫组化染色,分析其阳性强度与中性粒细胞分布的关系;分离人肺鳞状细胞癌患者及健康志愿者的外周血中性粒细胞各5例,体外杀伤建系及原代培养的肺鳞状细胞癌细胞;MTT法检测杀伤效应,观察中性粒细胞和肺癌细胞的形态变化.结果 300例人肺鳞状细胞癌中221例可见中性粒细胞浸润,且其浸润程度和G-CSF的阳性强度成显著正相关(P<0.01),HE切片可见

  12. 牙龈卟啉单胞菌脂多糖对多形核白细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on polymorphonuclear leukocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王惠宁; 余杰

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to determine whether the polymorphonuclear leukocyte ( PMN ) undergo apoptosis in response to porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide(LPS). Methods Freshly isolated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte obtained from 10 healthy volunteers was incubated with( experimental group )or without( control group) LPS to investigate the capacity of LPS to induce polymorphonuelear leukocyte's apoptosis. Results Our results revealed that there was a marked decrease in alyoptosis of polymorphonuclear leuk ooyte in experimental group compared with control group( P < O. 05 ). Conclusions The findings of the presem study demonstrate that LPS delays PMN apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion. It suggests that haeterial-delayed apoptesis may be an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.%目的 研究牙龈卟啉单胞菌脂多糖对人的外周血中多形核白细胞的凋亡作用.方法 通过流式细胞仪对10名健康人外周血中多形核白细胞培养组(对照组)与不同浓度的牙龈卟啉单胞菌脂多糖和多形核白细胞共同培养组(实验组)进行比较研究,观察多形核白细胞的凋亡情况.结果 实验组和对照组相比,多形核白细胞凋亡数明显减少(P<0.05).结论 牙龈卟啉单胞菌脂多糖以浓度依赖的形式延缓多形核白细胞的凋亡,细菌延缓细胞凋亡在牙周可疑致病菌的致病机制中可能具有重要的作用.

  13. Immediate diagnostic criteria for bacterial infection of ascitic fluid. Evaluation of ascitic fluid polymorphonuclear leukocyte count, pH, and lactate concentration, alone and in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassen, W N; McCullough, A J; Bacon, B R; Gutnik, S H; Wadiwala, I M; McLaren, C; Kalhan, S C; Tavill, A S

    1986-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated the ascitic fluid (AF) polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) count, pH, and lactate concentration in single ascitic fluids from 60 patients to determine their relative predictive values for the immediate diagnosis of ascitic fluid infection. Nine of the 60 ascitic fluids were malignant. Of the remaining 51 samples, nine from cirrhotic patients were infected. The mean AF pH, lactate concentration, and PMN count in the infected group were 7.20 +/- 0.19, 80 +/- 51 mg/dl, and 18,199 +/- 19,650 cells/mm3, respectively, and all were significantly different from the corresponding values in noninfected ascites. Mean arterial blood-ascitic fluid (B-AF) pH and lactate gradients in the infected group were 0.23 +/- 0.17 and -46 +/- 31 mg/dl, respectively, and were significantly different from the corresponding values in noninfected ascites (p less than 0.05). Significant differences were not found between infected and malignant ascites, except for the AF PMN count (p less than 0.001). In cirrhosis with ascites, an AF pH less than or equal to 7.34 was the most specific single test (100%) and had the highest diagnostic accuracy (98%). In the larger group of patients with ascites of diverse etiology, a B-AF pH gradient greater than or equal to 0.10 or an AF PMN count greater than or equal to 500 cells/mm3 were the single tests with the highest diagnostic accuracy (92%). Combining an AF PMN count greater than 500 cells/mm3 with any of the other diagnostic criteria increased the specificity and diagnostic accuracy (up to 98%) compared to the best single criterion. Although our data support the use of a number of different combinations of AF measurements for the immediate diagnosis of infection, the simplest and most readily obtainable measurements are the pH and PMN count. Therefore, in the clinical setting we recommend the use of either an AF pH less than or equal to 7.34 or a B-AF pH gradient greater than or equal to 0.10 in combination with an AF PMN count

  14. Modulation of ROS production in human leukocytes by ganglioside micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gavella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exogenous gangliosides, the sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, are able to modulate many cellular functions. We examined the effect of micelles of mono- and trisialoganglioside GM1 and GT1b on the production of reactive oxygen species by stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils using different spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that exogenous gangliosides did not influence extracellular superoxide anion (O2.- generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils activated by receptor-dependent formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. However, when neutrophils were stimulated by receptor-bypassing phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, gangliosides above their critical micellar concentrations prolonged the lag time preceding the production in a concentration-dependent way, without affecting total extracellular O2.- generation detected by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction. The effect of ganglioside GT1b (100 µM on the increase in lag time was shown to be significant by means of both superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction assay and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.005, respectively. The observed phenomena can be attributed to the ability of ganglioside micelles attached to the cell surface to slow down PMA uptake, thus increasing the diffusion barrier and consequently delaying membrane events responsible for PMA-stimulated O2.- production.

  15. The small breathing amplitude at the upper lobes favours the attraction of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to Mycobacterium tuberculosis lesions and helps to understand the evolution towards active disease in an individual-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan eCardona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb can induce two kinds of lesions, namely proliferative and exudative. The former are based on the presence of macrophages with controlled induction of intragranulomatous necrosis, and are even able to stop its physical progression, thus avoiding the induction of active tuberculosis (TB. In contrast, the most significant characteristic of exudative lesions is their massive infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs, which favour enlargement of the lesions and extracellular growth of the bacilli. We have built an individual-based model (IBM (known as TBPATCH using the NetLogo interface to better understand the progression from Mtb infection to TB. We have tested four main factors previously identified as being able to favour the infiltration of Mtb-infected lesions with PMNs, namely the tolerability of infected macrophages to the bacillary load; the capacity to modulate the Th17 response; the breathing amplitude (large or small in the lower and upper lobes respectively, which influences bacillary drainage at the alveoli; and the encapsulation of Mtb-infected lesions by the interlobular septae that structure the pulmonary parenchyma into secondary lobes. Overall, although all the factors analysed play some role, the small breathing amplitude is the major factor determining whether Mtb-infected lesions become exudative, and thus induce TB, thereby helping to understand why this usually takes place in the upper lobes. This information will be very useful for the design of future prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against TB.

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  17. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Monch, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, P.

    2004-01-01

    receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing...... and function, and promotes wound healing.......To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin...

  18. Elastase is the only human neutrophil granule protein that alone is responsible for in vitro killing of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R; Gusmani, L; Murgia, R; Guarnaccia, C; Cinco, M; Rottini, G

    1998-04-01

    Phagocytosis of Borrelia burgdorferi by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes triggers oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms of potentially cidal outcome. Nevertheless, no factor or process has yet been singled out as being borreliacidal. We have studied the B. burgdorferi-killing ability of the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system and that of primary and secondary granule components in an in vitro assay. We found that neither secondary granule acid extracts nor the chlorinating system could kill these microorganisms, while primary granule extracts were effective. The Borrelia-killing factor was purified to homogeneity and demonstrated to be elastase. Its cidal activity was found to be independent of its proteolytic activity.

  19. In vitro combined effect of co-amoxiclav concentrations achievable in serum after a 2000/125 mg oral dose, and polymorphonuclear neutrophils against strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae exhibiting decreased susceptibility to amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Raquel; Alou, Luis; Giménez, María José; Sevillano, David; Gómez-Lus, María Luisa; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Prieto, José

    2004-07-01

    The in vitro effect that the presence of components of non-specific immunity (serum plus polymorphonuclear neutrophils) has on the bactericidal activity of co-amoxiclav was explored against Streptococcus pneumoniae strains exhibiting an amoxicillin MIC > or =4 mg/L. Eight penicillin-resistant clinical isolates non-susceptible to co-amoxiclav with MICs of 4 (two strains), 8 (four strains) and 16 mg/L (two strains) were used. Values of MBC were identical to MIC values in all cases. Time-kill curves were performed with co-amoxiclav concentrations achievable in serum after a single oral dose administration of the new 2000/125 mg sustained-release formulation. Results were expressed as percentage of reduction of initial inocula after 3 h incubation. Control curves showed growth with no reduction of initial inocula. Against strains with MIC of 4 and 8 mg/L, the results obtained with the antibiotic alone or with the presence of factors of non-specific immunity were similar, with a weak combined effect due to the intrinsic activity of co-amoxiclav (reductions of initial inocula ranging from 70 to 99.16%). Against strains with MIC of 16 mg/L, the addition of PMN in the presence of serum increased the reduction of bacterial load provided by the aminopenicillin, even at sub-inhibitory concentrations (25.8% versus 51.1% at 0.5 x MIC concentration--8/0.5 mg/L). This combined activity against strains with an amoxicillin MIC of 16 mg/L which decreased the bacterial load may be important in preventing bacterial proliferation within the host and the transmission of resistant clones to others.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of the butanolic fraction of Byrsonima verbascifolia leaves: Mechanisms involving inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha, prostaglandin E(2) production and migration of polymorphonuclear leucocyte in vivo experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Aline Aparecida; de Siqueira, João Máximo; Castro, Ana Hortência Fonsêca; de Azambuja Ribeiro, Rosy Iara Maciel; de Oliveira, Flávio Martins; de Oliveira Lopes, Débora; Pinto, Flávia Carmo Horta; Silva, Denise Brentan; Soares, Adriana Cristina

    2016-02-01

    The leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia (Malpighiaceae) are traditionally used to treat various diseases including inflammatory conditions. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of the polar constituents from the butanolic fraction of B. verbascifolia leaves (BvBF), as well as to investigate the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activity. The polar constituents were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector and mass spectrometry (LC-DAD–MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to obtain a complete chemical profile of the fraction. Forty-five compounds were detected in the BvBF by LC-DAD–MS/MS, including condensed tannins, phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavones and flavonols) and other compounds. In addition, several condensed tannins were identified by MALDI-MS/MS, which are composed predominantly by procyanidin units (PCY) and up to six flavan-3-ol units. The BvBF exhibited significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The BvBF inhibited paw edema and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte migration to the footpad and pleural cavity induced by carrageenan. Furthermore, a minor dose (12.50 mg/kg) of BvBF effectively decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the footpad. These findings suggest that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action in the BvBF is linked to the inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and PGE2 and the PMN cell migration.

  1. Antioxidant effect of hyaluronan on polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived reactive oxygen species is dependent on its molecular weight and concentration and mainly involves the extracellular space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Krasiński

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyaluronan (HA, a component of the extracellular matrix, may regulate immune cell functions through its interactions with cellular receptors. Besides its effect on cytokine and chemokine production, its antioxidant properties have been described. However, the mechanisms of this are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HA concentration and molecular weight and its antioxidant properties towards human neutrophils. Also assessed was whether the antioxidant effect of HA is connected with a reduction in intracellular oxygen potential, which could indicate its direct effect on neutrophil respiratory burst.Materials/Methods: The relationship between HA’s antioxidant properties and its concentration and molecular weight was assessed by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence method (CL. To evaluate the effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential selectively, the dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123 flow cytometric method was used.Results: Reduction of both HA molecular weight and its concentration decreased its antioxidant properties in the CL method. A selective effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential measured by the DHR123 method was not shown.Conclusions: The antioxidant properties of HA are related to both its molecular weight and its concentration. The lack of an antioxidant effect of HA in the DHR123 test compared with a significant reduction in CL values at the same HA concentration suggests that HA acts mainly as a chemical ROI scavenger in the extracellular space.

  2. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Haurogné

    Full Text Available In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis.

  3. Construction of a Mammary-specific Expression Vector of Human α- defensin- 1 ( HNP- 1) Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue YANG; Jing-Ping OU YANG; Bao-Hua WANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Defensins, also called human neutrophil peptides(HNP), are small cationic peptides with broad antimicrobial activity[1]. Human defensins are highly abundant in the cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Alpha-defensin-1 is an important mediator in either innate immunity or anti-infection. It can be developed to be an ideal new type antibiotic and may provide a better solution for the present situation of extensive antibiotics-resistence. It is difficult to achieve amount of antimicrobial peptides from nature sources. Transgenic mammary gland bioreactors offer a safe and cost effective source to produce important proteins. The purpose of this study was to construct a mammary-specific expression plasmid containing beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene promoter and human α-defensin-1 (HNP-1) gene.

  4. Effect of free-base cacaine consumption (basuca on phagocytic and microbicidal functions of polymorphonuclear neutrophils Efecto del consumo de basuca sobre las función fagocítica y microbicida de los polimorfonucleares neutrófilos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavive Rebage

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The effect of free.base cocaine consumption on the phagocytic and microbicidal capabilities of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN was studied in habitual users and in ex-users of this substance. The opsonic capability of their sera was also determined. Results showed a normal response in all these activities when compared with cells and sera of healthy non-users. Mean percentages of bacteria associated with PMNs of users and controls, using sera of with PMNs of users, 52.9 with those of ex-users, and 49.7 and 53.8 with cells of the respective controls. Percentages of destruction of bacteria associated with PMNs in normal serum were as follows: 47.2 for users; 50.5 for ex-users, and 44.5 and 51.6 for their respective controls.

     

    Although the habitual consumption of free-base cocaine did not affect the phagocytic and microbicidal capabilities of peripheral blood PMNs, it is important to determine the effects of this substance on neutrophils and macrophages of the bronchoalveolar region, since these are the cells that receive maximum exposure to the drug during consumption.

    Se Investigó el efecto del consumo de basuca sobre la capacidad fagocitica y mcrobicida de los polimorfonucleares neutrófilos (PMN en Individuos consumidores y ex-consumidores habituales de esta sustancia y se determinó, además, la capacidad opsónica de sus sueros. Los resultados mostraron una respuesta normal en todas estas actividades, en comparación con células y sueros de individuos controles sanos, no consumidores de drogas de ningún tipo. Los promedios de los porcentajes de bacterias asociadas a los PMN de los consumidores y de sus controles, utilizando sueros de

  5. Caspase-3活性改变对胆道梗阻大鼠中性粒细胞凋亡的影响%Altered caspase-3 activity results in delayed polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis in rats with bile duct obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓雪松; 倪勇; 王成友; 詹勇强; 韩庆; 周尤星

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in the alteration of caspase - 3 activity on peripheral polymorphonuclear neutrophil( PMN ) apoptosis in rats with bile duct obstruction( BDO ). Methods 54 SD adult rats were divided into three groups at random: normal rats termed Group A, other rats underwent either sham - ligated operation or bile duct obstruction termed Group B or Group C. Subsequently, Group B and Group C were randomly separated into subgroups of day 1,3,7, and 10. Blood samples were collected , PMN apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry and caspase - 3 activity was detected by fluorescence staining. Results Group C displayed significantly decreased apoptosis of PMN from day l( 54. 34 ± 2. 35 ) to day 10( 36. 01 ± 2. 11 ), as well as attenuated activity of caspase - 3 on PMN from day l( 52. 33 ± 2. 35 ) to day 10( 34. 14 ± 3. 63 ), when compared to group A( 65. 53 ± 2. 25 ), ( 60. 58 ± 5. 35 ) and each subgroup B( P <0. 01 ). Conclusion BDO rats reveal attenuated activity of caspase - 3 , which take part in regulation on PMN apoptosis process. Delayed PMN apoptosis may contribute to the excessive inflammation and severe septic complications, which plays an important role in the initiation and development of obstructive jaundice.%目的 探讨半胱天冬酶-3(Caspase-3)活性的改变对胆道梗阻(BDO)大鼠外周血中性粒细胞(PMN)凋亡的影响.方法 54只SD大鼠随机分为正常组(A组)、假手术组(B组)和胆总管结扎组(C组),B、C组术后又分为1、3、7、10 d等4个时相,每个时相6只.留取血样标本分离PMN,应用流式细胞仪检测PMN凋亡率,采用荧光分光光度法检测Caspase-3活性.结果 C组PMN凋亡率从术后1 d的54.34±2.35降至10 d的36.01±2.11,低于A组(65.53±2.25)及B组相应时相,P<0.05;Caspase-3活性从术后1 d的52.33±2.35逐步下降至10 d的34.14±3.63,低于A组(60.58±5.35)及B组相应时相,(P<0.05).结论 BDO大鼠外周血Caspase-3活性降低,

  6. Anticlastogenic Effect of Redistilled Cow's Urine Distillate in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Challenged With Manganese Dioxide and Hexavalent Chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIPANWITA DUTTA; S.SARAVANA DEVI; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the anticlastogenic effect of redistilled cow's urine distillate (RCUD) in human peripheral lymphocytes (HLC) challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium. Methods The anticlastogenic activity of redistilled cow's urine distillate was studied in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (HPNLs) and human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium as established genotoxicants and clastogens which could cause induction of DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus. Three different levels of RCUD: 1 μL/mL, 50 μL/mL and 100μL/mL, were used in the study. Results Manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium caused statistically significant DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus formation, which could be protected by redistilled cow's urine distillate. Conclusion The redistilled cow's urine distillate posseses strong antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic properties against HPNLs and HLC treated with Cr+6 and MnO2. This property is mainly due to the antioxidants present in RCUD.

  7. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  8. Human colostral cells. I. Separation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crago, S S; Prince, S J; Pretlow, T G; McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J

    1979-12-01

    Analyses of the cells present in human colostrum obtained from fifty-four healthy donors during the first four days of lactation revealed that there were 3.3 x 10(6) (range 1.1 x 10(5)--1.2 x 10(7)) cells per ml of colostrum. Based on histochemical examinations, it was found that this population consisted of 30--47% macrophages, 40--60% polymorphonuclear leucocytes, 5.2--8.9% lymphocytes, and 1.3--2.8% colostral corpuscles; epithelial cells were rarely encountered. The identity of various cell types was confirmed by Wright's stain and by a series of histochemical techniques which disclosed the presence of non-specific esterase, peroxidase, and lipids. For further characterization, the different types of cells were separated by various methods, such as Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation, isokinetic centrifugation on a linear Ficoll gradient, adherence to glass or plastic, and phagocytosis of carbonyl iron. Immunohistochemical staining with FITC- and/or TRITC-labelled reagents to IgA, IgM, IgG, K- and lambda-chains, secretory component, lactoferrin, and alpha-lactalbumin were applied to unseparated as well as separated colostral cells. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (staining for peroxidase) as well as macrophages and colostral corpuscles (staining for non-specific esterase) exhibited numerous intracellular vesicles that contained lipids as well as various combinations of milk proteins. Lymphoid cells did not stain with any of these reagents and plasma cells were not detected among the colostral cells. Individual phagocytic cells contained immunoglobulins of the IgA and IgM classes, both K and lambda light chains, secretory component, lactoferrin, and alpha-lactalbumin. The coincidental appearance of these proteins in single, phagocytic cells but not in lymphoid cells indicate that the cells acquired these proteins by ingestion from the environment. Markers commonly used for the identification of B lymphocytes (surface immunoglobulins) and T lymphocytes (receptors

  9. Ultra-structure and localisation of formazan formed by human neutrophils and amoebae phagocytosing virulent and avirulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halablab, M A; Bazin, M; Richards, L; Pacy, J

    1990-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila (LP) strains of differing virulence were incubated with a solution of nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) at a concentration of 1 mg.ml-1 in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga or human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Reduction of NBT to formazan occurred at a faster rate in the presence of virulent strains. Reduction appeared to be temperature dependent; at 37 degrees C the reaction rate was higher than at 20 degrees C. On microscopic examination, deposits of formazan around Legionella cells were observed inside amoebae similar to those deposited in human neutrophils. Electron microscopy revealed electron-dense particles surrounding virulent legionellae, which appeared to be associated with formazan formation. Formazan formation inside amoebae may suggest the presence of a respiratory burst against LP, which is more intense with virulent strains.

  10. Mild hypothermia reduces polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltration in induced brain inflammation A hipotermia moderada reduz a infiltração leucocitária na inflamação encefálica induzida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirto N. Prandini

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years deep hypothermia (23(0 C has demonstrated to be an excellent neuroprotective agent in cerebral ischemic injury. Mild hypothermia (31-33(0 C has proven to have the same neuroprotective properties without the detrimental effects of deep hypothermia. Mechanisms of injury that are exaggerated by moderate hyperthermia and ameliorated by hypothermia include, reduction of oxygen radical production, with peroxidase damage to lipids, proteins and DNA, microglial activation and ischemic depolarization, decrease in cerebral metabolic demand for oxygen and reduction of glycerin and excitatory amino acid (EAA release. Studies have demonstrated that inflammation potentiates cerebral ischemic injury and that hypothermia can reduce neutrophil infiltration in ischemic regions. To further elucidate the mechanisms by which mild hypothermia produces neuroprotection in ischemia by attenuating the inflammatory response, we provoked inflammatory reaction, in brains of rats, dropping a substance that provokes a heavy inflammatory reaction. Two groups of ten animals underwent the same surgical procedure: the skull bone was partially removed, the duramater was opened and an inflammatory substance (5% carrageenin was topically dropped. The scalp was sutured and, for the group that underwent neuroprotection, an ice bag was placed covering the entire skull surface, in order to maintain the brain temperature between 29,5-31(0 C during 120 minutes. After three days the animals were sacrificed and their brains were examined. The group protected by hypothermia demonstrated a remarkable reduction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL infiltration, indicating that mild hypothermia can have neuroprotective effects by reducing the inflammatory reaction.Nos últimos 50 anos, a hipotermia tem demonstrado ser um excelente agente neuroprotetor nas lesões isquêmicas encefálicas. A hipotermia moderada (31(0 C - 33(0 C provou também apresentar as mesmas

  11. Disorders of innate immunity in human ageing and effects of nutraceutical administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Immune decline with ageing accounts for the increased risk of infections, inflammatory chronic disease, autoimmunity and cancer in humans. Both innate and adaptive immune functions are compromised in aged people and, therefore, attempts to correct these dysfunctions represent a major goal of modern medicine. In this review, special emphasis will be placed on the aged innate immunity with special reference to polymorphonuclear cell, monocyte/ macrophage, dendritic cell and natural killer cell functions. As potential modifiers of the impaired innate immunity, some principal nutraceuticals will be illustrated, such as micronutrients, pre-probiotics and polyphenols. In elderly, clinical trials with the above products are scanty, however, some encouraging effects on the recovery of innate immune cells have been reported. In addition, our own results obtained with symbiotics and polyphenols extracted from red wine or fermented grape marc suggest the potential ability of these substances to modulate the innate immune response in ageing, thus reducing the inflammaging which characterizes immune senescence.

  12. Optimal humanization of 1B4, an anti-CD18 murine monoclonal antibody, is achieved by correct choice of human V-region framework sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, I I; Kawka, D W; DeMartino, J A; Daugherty, B L; Elliston, K O; Alves, K; Bush, B L; Cameron, P M; Cuca, G C; Davies, P

    1993-04-01

    The murine anti-CD18 mAb 1B4 has been humanized using CDR grafting. Three VH (Gal, Jon, and New) and two VL (Rei and Len) human frameworks, whose selection was based exclusively on their sequence identity with m1B4, were used to construct five human gamma 4/kappa recombinant antibodies: Gal/Rei, Gal/Len, Jon/Rei, and New/Rei, and a "hemichimeric" antibody pairing the VH of m1B4 with grafted Rei. Each of these h1B4 constructs completely inhibited the binding of m1B4 to activated human leukocytes with avidities (IC50) ranging from 1.5 to 8.0 nM, compared to 0.5 nM for m1B4. Replacement of three VH residues in the best VH framework, Gal, with the corresponding m1B4 "packing" (nonsolvent exposed) residues gave an h1B4 (mutant Gal/Rei) with the same avidity as m1B4. Avidity correlated with overall percent identity between the human and murine VH frameworks and, in particular, with conservation of "packing" residues. Rei and Len VL frameworks proved to be interchangeable. Further characterization showed that the Gal/Rei prototype was equipotent to m1B4 in blocking adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes to human vascular endothelium in vitro, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte extravasation into C5a-injected rabbit or monkey skin sites. Dual-label immunofluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cells with Gal/Rei h1B4 and m1B4 demonstrated that the fine specificity of the combining sites had not been altered by humanization. Reduced immunogenicity was demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that tolerated weekly treatment with h1B4 for 6 wk, whereas m1B4 induced profound anaphylaxis at 3 wk. Anti-1B4 titers in h1B4-treated rhesus were 50 to 66% lower and developed 1 wk later than in m1B4-treated monkeys. Crucially, the anti-h1B4 antibodies were anti-idiotypic while the anti-m1B4 antibodies were directed against constant and framework regions. We conclude that sequence identity searches are sufficient to identify suitable human frameworks for CDR-grafting of m1B4

  13. Interleukin-15 increases Paracoccidioides brasiliensis killing by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, Elisandra Garcia; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão; Acorci, Michele Janegitz; Graciani, Ana Paula Bordon; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha Serrão; Soares, Angela Maria Victoriano de Campos

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 is a cytokine produced by a wide range of different cell types, including macrophages, in response to lipopolysaccharide or microbial infection. This cytokine may play a crucial role in the activation of phagocytic cells against pathogens, especially during innate immune response. The effects of IL-15 on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte fungicidal activity against a highly virulent Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain were investigated. Pretreatment of human neutrophils from healthy individuals with IL-15 for 18 hours increased cell fungicidal activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the exposure to IL-15 induced an increase in neutrophil oxidative burst as evaluated by superoxide anion and H(2)O(2) release. Catalase inhibited fungicidal activity supporting a role for H(2)O(2) in fungus killing. In contrast, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were not affected by IL-15 suggesting that its effects were not mediated by these cytokines. Together, these results show that IL-15 is a potent stimulant of antifungal activities in human neutrophils, at least in part by a mechanism dependent on oxidative metabolism.

  14. Identification of skin immune cells in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lucille; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Cosma, Antonio; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    The skin is a valuable target for vaccine delivery because it contains many immune cell populations, notably antigen presenting cells. Skin immune cells have been extensively described in mice and humans but not in non-human primates, which are pertinent models for immunological research in vaccination. The aim of this work was to describe immune cell populations in the epidermis, dermis and skin draining lymph nodes in cynomolgus macaques by a single 12-parameter flow cytometry protocol. Given that skin cells share several markers, we defined a gating strategy to identify accurately immune cells and to limit contamination of one immune cell population by another. The epidermis contained CD1a(+)CD1c(-) Langerhans cells (LCs), CD3(+) T cells and putative NK cells. The dermis contained CD1a(+)CD1c(-) cells, which were similar to LCs, CD1a(+)CD1c(+) dermal dendritic cells (DDCs), CD163(high)CD11b(+) resident macrophages, CD3(+) T cells and putative NK cells. The skin also contained CD66(+) polymorphonuclear cells in some animals. Thus, immune cell populations in the macaque are similar to those in humans despite some differences in phenotype. In skin draining lymph nodes, we identified migratory LCs, CD1a(+)CD1c(+) DDCs and macrophages. The simultaneous identification of these different immune cells with one panel of markers avoids the use of large amounts of precious sample and may improve the understanding of immune mechanisms in the skin after treatment or vaccination.

  15. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  16. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Monch, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, P.

    2004-01-01

    receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing......To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin...... lesions. After migration to skin lesions, PMNs demonstrated a significant transcriptional response including genes from several different functional categories. The up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes concomitant with the down-regulation of proapoptotic genes suggested a transient anti-apoptotic priming...

  17. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  18. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    Full Text Available Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis. Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  19. Human SAP is a novel peptidoglycan recognition protein that induces complement- independent phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jang-Hyun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Hee; Fujimoto, Yukari; Fukase, Koichi; Coggeshall, K. Mark; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for many community-acquired and hospital-associated infections and is associated with high mortality. Concern over the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains has renewed interest in the elucidation of host mechanisms that defend against S. aureus infection. We recently demonstrated that human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) binds to S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer, a discovery that prompted further screening to identify additional serum proteins that recognize S. aureus cell wall components. In this report, we incubated human serum with 10 different S. aureus mutants and determined that serum amyloid P component (SAP) bound specifically to a WTA-deficient S. aureus ΔtagO mutant, but not to tagO-complemented, WTA-expressing cells. Biochemical characterization revealed that SAP recognizes bacterial peptidoglycan as a ligand and that WTA inhibits this interaction. Although SAP binding to peptidoglycan was not observed to induce complement activation, SAP-bound ΔtagO cells were phagocytosed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in an Fcγ receptor-dependent manner. These results indicate that SAP functions as a host defense factor, similar to other peptidoglycan recognition proteins and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors. PMID:23966633

  20. D-alanine modification of a protease-susceptible outer membrane component by the Bordetella pertussis dra locus promotes resistance to antimicrobial peptides and polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Neetu Kumra; Ganguly, Tridib; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Nelson, Kimberly J; Dubey, Purnima; Poole, Leslie B; Deora, Rajendar

    2013-11-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of pertussis, a highly contagious disease of the human respiratory tract. Despite very high vaccine coverage, pertussis has reemerged as a serious threat in the United States and many developing countries. Thus, it is important to pursue research to discover unknown pathogenic mechanisms of B. pertussis. We have investigated a previously uncharacterized locus in B. pertussis, the dra locus, which is homologous to the dlt operons of Gram-positive bacteria. The absence of the dra locus resulted in increased sensitivity to the killing action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and human phagocytes. Compared to the wild-type cells, the mutant cells bound higher levels of cationic proteins and peptides, suggesting that dra contributes to AMP resistance by decreasing the electronegativity of the cell surface. The presence of dra led to the incorporation of d-alanine into an outer membrane component that is susceptible to proteinase K cleavage. We conclude that dra encodes a virulence-associated determinant and contributes to the immune resistance of B. pertussis. With these findings, we have identified a new mechanism of surface modification in B. pertussis which may also be relevant in other Gram-negative pathogens.

  1. Induction of oxidative burst response in human neutrophils by adherent staphylococci. Comparison between Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, U; Espersen, F; Skinhøj, P

    1993-01-01

    The ability of staphylococci adherent to silicone surfaces to induce superoxide anion (O2-) production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was investigated and compared with the same activity induced by planktonic bacteria. The responses to Staphylococcus aureus strain E 2371 and Staphylococcus...... epidermidis strain ATCC 14990 were compared. The staphylococci were allowed to adhere to silicone catheters for 2 h at 37 degrees C. After opsonization of adherent bacteria in 30% human AB-positive serum, the induction of superoxide anion production by PMNs was measured in a cytochrome C reduction assay. Both...... bacterial strains, when adhered to the surfaces, were able to induce superoxide anion production by PMNs to about the same extent. Comparing adherent and planktonic bacteria with these two bacterial strains, it was found that planktonic S. epidermidis induced one to three times higher superoxide anion...

  2. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of HA-1077 and Y-32885 on the translocation of PKCβI, PKCβII and PKCζ in human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Siomboing

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To transmit the information inside the cell, one possibility is the action of an enzyme called kinase that phosphorylates other proteins. To study these enzymes, chemical compound synthesis was needed to know the function and the mechanism of activation. The major difficulty is creating a specific molecule for one kinase. In this study, we test the action of Rho-kinase inhibitors (HA-1077 and Y-32885 on protein kinase C (PKC in the respiratory burst in the human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We have shown that these compounds could inhibit the anion superoxide production. To prove their action on PKC, we have shown a decrease of binding of a specific ligand (phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate with each inhibitor. During its activation, PKC was translocated from the cytoplasm to the plasmic membrane. We have also shown an inhibition of this translocation, proving an inhibition of PKC by HA-1077 and Y-32885.

  3. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  4. Transcriptome kinetics of circulating neutrophils during human experimental endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan de Kleijn

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear cells (neutrophils play an important role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the development of sepsis. These cells are essential for the defense against microorganisms, but may also cause tissue damage. Therefore, neutrophil numbers and activity are considered to be tightly regulated. Previous studies have investigated gene transcription during experimental endotoxemia in whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the gene transcription response of the circulating pool of neutrophils to systemic inflammatory stimulation in vivo is currently unclear. We examined neutrophil gene transcription kinetics in healthy human subjects (n = 4 administered a single dose of endotoxin (LPS, 2 ng/kg iv. In addition, freshly isolated neutrophils were stimulated ex vivo with LPS, TNFα, G-CSF and GM-CSF to identify stimulus-specific gene transcription responses. Whole transcriptome microarray analysis of circulating neutrophils at 2, 4 and 6 hours after LPS infusion revealed activation of inflammatory networks which are involved in signaling of TNFα and IL-1α and IL-1β. The transcriptome profile of inflammatory activated neutrophils in vivo reflects extended survival and regulation of inflammatory responses. These changes in neutrophil transcriptome suggest a combination of early activation of circulating neutrophils by TNFα and G-CSF and a mobilization of young neutrophils from the bone marrow.

  5. Relationship between Toll-like receptor 2 on polymorphonuclear neutrophil and postoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation%肝移植术病人围术期中性粒细胞Toll样受体2表达与术后SIRS的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池信锦; 黎尚荣; 程楠

    2010-01-01

    Objectlve investigate the role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) during perioperative period in the development of postoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT).Methods Twenty patients (18 male and 2 female, aged 33-58 yr and weighing 52-73 kg) with ASA Ⅲ or Ⅳ (NYHA Ⅱ or Ⅲ )undergoing OLT were studied. Blood samples were collected from the central vein for determination of TLR2 expression on PMN and plasma TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 concentrations before induction of anesthesia (T1, baseline), at 25 min of anhepatic phase (T2), 3 h (T3) and 24 h after beginning of reperfusion of the allograft (T4). The expression of TLR2 was measured by flow cytometry and the serum concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). The patients were divided into SIRS and non-SIRS group depending on whether the patients developed SIRS or not within 7 days after operation. The diagnosis of SIRS was based on the criteria laid down by ACCP and SCCM in 1992.Results Ten patients developed SIRS within 7 days after operation. There was no significant difference in Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) scores between the two groups. Compared with non-SIRS group, the TLR2 expression on PMN and the serum IL-1β concentration were significantly increased at T4 and the serum IL-8 concentration was significantly increased at T3 in SIRS group.There was positive correlation between serum TNF-α concentration and TLR2 expression on PMN in SIRS group ( r= 0.607, P <0.05).Conclusion The expression of TLR2 on PMN increases significantly at 24 h after beginning of reperfusion of allograft and may play an important role in the development of postoperative SIRS.

  6. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  7. Plasmin is a specific stimulus of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of human peripheral monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weide, I; Tippler, B; Syrovets, T; Simmet, T

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the plasmin-induced stimulation of leukotriene (LT) B4 biosynthesis in human peripheral monocytes (PM). Plasmin up to 175 x 10(-3) CTA U/ml triggers a concentration-dependent release of 5-lipoxygenase-derived LTB4 while release of the cyclooxygenase products thromboxane (TX) B2 and prostaglandin (PG) E2 remained unaffected. The stimulatory effect appeared to be specific in as much as 1) it was found in PM, but not in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), 2) it requires the lysine binding sites of plasmin molecule since it was inhibited by the lysine analogues 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) and trans-4(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (t-AMCA), 3) the intact catalytic center of plasmin is required since neither plasminogen nor catalytic center-blocked plasmin share the stimulatory effect of active plasmin, 4) other serine proteases such as alpha-chymotrypsin, human neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G did not stimulate release of detectable amounts of LTB4 from PM. In addition, catalytic center-blocked plasmin antagonized the stimulatory effect of active plasmin. Plasmin-mediated monocyte activation apparently proceeds via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein. Plasmin did not increase inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate levels, but a time- and concentration-dependent stimulation of cyclic GMP formation was observed. The data show that plasmin is a specific stimulus for human peripheral monocytes. Plasmin may be an important link between the coagulation cascade and inflammatory reactions.

  8. Human See, Human Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  9. Sp110 transcription is induced and required by Anaplasma phagocytophilum for infection of human promyelocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranjo Victoria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tick-borne intracellular pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis after infection of polymorphonuclear leucocytes. The human Sp110 gene is a member of the nuclear body (NB components that functions as a nuclear hormone receptor transcriptional coactivator and plays an important role in immunoprotective mechanisms against pathogens in humans. In this research, we hypothesized that Sp110 may be involved in the infection of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells with A. phagocytophilum. Methods The human Sp110 and A. phagocytophilum msp4 mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR in infected human HL-60 cells sampled at 0, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-infection. The effect of Sp110 expression on A. phagocytophilum infection was determined by RNA interference (RNAi. The expression of Sp110 was silenced in HL-60 cells by RNAi using pre-designed siRNAs using the Nucleofector 96-well shuttle system (Amaxa Biosystems, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. The A. phagocytophilum infection levels were evaluated in HL-60 cells after RNAi by real-time PCR of msp4 and normalizing against human Alu sequences. Results While Sp110 mRNA levels increased concurrently with A. phagocytophilum infections in HL-60 cells, the silencing of Sp110 expression by RNA interference resulted in decreased infection levels. Conclusion These results demonstrated that Sp110 expression is required for A. phagocytophilum infection and multiplication in HL-60 cells, and suggest a previously undescribed mechanism by which A. phagocytophilum modulates Sp110 mRNA levels to facilitate establishment of infection of human HL-60 cells.

  10. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  11. Integrin αDβ2 (CD11d/CD18 is expressed by human circulating and tissue myeloid leukocytes and mediates inflammatory signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Integrin α(Dβ(2 is the most recently identified member of the leukocyte, or β(2, subfamily of integrin heterodimers. Its distribution and functions on human leukocytes have not been clearly defined and are controversial. We examined these issues and found that α(Dβ(2 is prominently expressed by leukocytes in whole blood from healthy human subjects, including most polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. We also found that α(Dβ(2 is displayed by leukocytes in the alveoli of uninjured and inflamed human lungs and by human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, indicating broad myeloid expression. Using freshly-isolated human monocytes, we found that α(Dβ(2 delivers outside-in signals to pathways that regulate cell spreading and gene expression. Screening expression analysis followed by validation of candidate transcripts demonstrated that engagement of α(Dβ(2 induces mRNAs encoding inflammatory chemokines and cytokines and secretion of their protein products. Thus, α(Dβ(2 is a major member of the integrin repertoire of both circulating and tissue myeloid leukocytes in humans. Its broad expression and capacity for outside-in signaling indicate that it is likely to have important functions in clinical syndromes of infection, inflammation, and tissue injury.

  12. 中性粒细胞在外源性硫化氢抗内毒素致急性肺损伤中的作用%Role of polymorphonuclear neutrophil in exogenous hydrogen sulfide attenuating endotoxin-induced acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄新莉; 周晓红; 周君琳; 丁春华; 羡晓辉

    2009-01-01

    本文应用尾静脉注射脂多糖(lipopolysaccharide,LPS)致Sprague-Dawley大鼠急性肺损伤(acute lung injury,ALI)模型和体外培养人血多形核中性粒细胞(polymorphonuclear neutrophil,PMN),观察硫化氢(hydrogen sulfide,H2S)供体硫氢化钠(sodium hydrosulfide,NaHS)对LPS所致肺内PMN聚集、微血管通透性及PMN凋亡的影响.整体实验和体外实验分别设对照组、NariS组、LPS组和LPS+NaHS组,检测肺微血管通透性、肺内PMN聚集以及PMN凋亡情况.结果显示:(1)整体实验中,LPS组大鼠的支气管肺泡灌洗液(bronchoalveloar lavage fluid,BALF)中蛋白含量、PMN数量、肺组织中伊文思蓝(Evans blue)含量均明显高于假手术组(均P<0.05),而LPS+NaHS组上述指标均明显低于LPS组(P<0.05,P<0.01);(2)体外培养人血PMN,LPS组和NaHS组的PMN凋亡百分率明显高于对照组(P<0.01),LPS+NaHS组明显高于LPS组(P<0.01).以上结果提示,NaHS能够减少PMN在肺内的聚集,在一定程度上起到抗LPS所致的以肺微血管高通透性为特征的ALI的作用,促进PMN凋亡可能是NaHS减轻PMN在肺内聚集的机制之一.

  13. Effects of intraoperative thermostasis on respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear neutrophil in patients undergoing radical operation for lung cancer%术中保温对肺癌根治术患者中性粒细胞呼吸爆发的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚允泰; 刘定华; 赵晶

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of intraoperative thermostasis over respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in patients undergoing radical operation for lung cancer.Methods Thirty-two ASA Ⅱ or Ⅲ patients scheduled for radical operation for lung cancer under general anesthesia were randomized into two groups ( n = 16 each): control group (Group C) and warming group (Group W). The patients in Group C were kept warm by routine measures such as using woollen blankets, while the patients in Group W were kept warm by force-air warming system and fluid warming device as soon as the patients were admitted to the operation room. Rectal and axillary temperatures were continuously monitored as the core and surface temperature, respectively. The core temperature was maintained at the preoperative level (baseline). Anesthesia was induced with midazolam, fentanyl and propofol. Tracheal intubation was facilitated with rocuronium. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane and nitrous oxide and intermittent i.v. boluses of fentanyl, midazolam and vecuronium. Venous blood samples were obtained before, during and at the end of surgery for normal blood analysis and respiratory burst of PMNs which included activated PMNs count and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.Results (1) WBC and PMN counts were significantly increased during and after operation as compared with the baseline values before operation in both groups and there was no significant difference in WBC and PMN counts between the two groups. (2)Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulation resulted in higher intraoperative and postoperative activated PMN counts in both groups and higher postoperative ROS production in Group W. Postoperative ROS production was significantly higher in Group W than in Group C. (3) The PMN counts without stimulation activation during operation and intra- and post-operative ROS production were significantly decreased as compared with the baseline values

  14. Synergistic bactericidal interaction of josamycin with human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, M T; el Benna, J

    1990-10-01

    Josamycin and erythromycin have been compared for their in-vitro interaction with bactericidal killing by human neutrophils. The mechanism of this interaction was studied in two ways. First, the target organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were incubated for 60 min with josamycin, erythromycin or control buffer prior to use in a human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) killing assay. Second the macrolides were added directly to acellular killing systems mimicking those acting inside the phagolysosome; oxygen-independent systems were obtained from a crude granule extract of PMN and oxygen-dependent systems consisted either of a mixture of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase or of a solution of H2O2. Whereas josamycin-pretreated P. aeruginosa were twice as sensitive to killing by PMN than were control cells, this was not the case for S. aureus. Both oxidant generating systems were more effective in destroying S. aureus in the presence of josamycin (3 and 30 mg/l). Erythromycin showed a similar synergy but only with the xanthine plus xanthine oxidase system. This synergy was observed with neither of the O2-independent systems for S. aureus, nor with any acellular system for P. aeruginosa. These data suggest that at least two kinds of mechanism may explain the bactericidal synergy observed between macrolides and PMN. The first (for macrolide-resistant species such as P. aeruginosa) could be due to alterations in the bacteria by the antibiotics, while the second (for macrolide-sensitive species such as S. aureus) could be based upon an as yet unexplained transformation of the molecules by reactive oxygen species into more "toxic" forms. These differences between josamycin and erythromycin could arise from differences in their chemical structure.

  15. In vivo involvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in Leishmania infantum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Fichoux Yves

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lymphocytes in the specific defence against L. infantum has been well established, but the part played by polynuclear neutrophil (PN cells in controlling visceral leishmaniasis was much less studied. In this report we examine in vivo the participation of PN in early and late phases of infection by L. infantum. Results Promastigote phagocytosis and killing occurs very early after infection, as demonstrated by electron microscopy analyses which show in BALB/c mouse spleen, but not in liver, numerous PN harbouring ultrastructurally degraded parasites. It is shown, using mAb RB6-8C5 directed against mature mouse granulocytes, that in chronically infected mice, long-term PN depletion did not enhance parasite counts neither in liver nor in spleen, indicating that these cells are not involved in the late phase of L. infantum infection. In acute stage of infection, in mouse liver, where L. infantum load is initially larger than that in spleen but resolves spontaneously, there was no significant effect of neutrophils depletion. By contrast, early in infection the neutrophil cells crucially contributed to parasite killing in spleen, since PN depletion, performed before and up to 7 days after the parasite inoculation, resulted in a ten-fold increase of parasite burden. Conclusions Taken together these data show that neutrophil cells contribute to the early control of the parasite growth in spleen but not in liver and that these cells have no significant effect late in infection in either of these target organs.

  16. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically.

  17. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  18. Binding of Human Fibrinogen to MRP Enhances Streptococcus suis Survival in Host Blood in a αXβ2 Integrin-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Yaya; Li, Xueqin; Zheng, Yuling; Wu, Xiaohong; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-05-27

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2), an important zoonotic pathogen, induces strong systemic infections in humans; sepsis and meningitis are the most common clinical manifestations and are often accompanied by bacteremia. However, the mechanisms of S. suis 2 survival in human blood are not well understood. In our previous study, we identified muramidase-released protein (MRP), a novel human fibrinogen (hFg)-binding protein (FBP) in S. suis 2 that is an important epidemic infection marker with an unknown mechanism in pathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that the N-terminus of MRP (a.a. 283-721) binds to both the Aα and Bβ chains of the D fragment of hFg. Strikingly, the hFg-MRP interaction improved the survival of S. suis 2 in human blood and led to the aggregation and exhaustion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) via an αXβ2 integrin-dependent mechanism. Other Fg-binding proteins, such as M1 (GAS) and FOG (GGS), also induced PMNs aggregation; however, the mechanisms of these FBP-hFg complexes in the evasion of PMN-mediated innate immunity remain unclear. MRP is conserved across highly virulent strains in Europe and Asia, and these data shed new light on the function of MRP in S. suis pathogenesis.

  19. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards an

  20. Effect of L-Arginine and L-NAME treatments on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and mononuclear cells influx during tumor growth Efeito dos tratamentos com L-Arginina e L-NAME sobre o influxo de leucócitos polimorfonucleares e células mononucleares durante o desenvolvimento tumoral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Teixeira Gomes Reis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's and mononuclear cells (MN's involvement in the Ehrlich´s solid tumor (ET growth. METHODS: 90 Swiss mice were inoculated with 10(7 tumor cells (sc, distributed in three groups and treated once a day, via intraperitoneal (ip, with 0.1ml of diluent, L-Arginine (20mg/Kg or L-NAME (20mg/Kg. After 7, 15 and 30 days of treatment, ten animals of each group were euthanized, the tumor mass was removed, processed and fixed for HE. Later, a morphometric analysis of the total area, parenchyma, necrosis, tumor stroma and PMN's leukocytes and MN's cells influx was performed. RESULTS: The L-Arginine treatment increased PMN's influx in the initial stage, whereas L-NAME reduced it. Our data suggests that NO effect on PMN's migration is dose-dependent. On the other hand, the MN´s cells influx was reduced by L-NAME treatment at all evaluated periods and at the same periods an increase in tumor growth was observed. CONCLUSION: At initial stages of tumor implantation, both PMN's leukocytes and MN's cells act together to control ET development.OBJETIVO: Avaliar o envolvimento de leucócitos polimorfonucleares (PMN's e células mononucleares (MN's no crescimento do Tumor Sólido de Ehrlich (TE. MÉTODOS: 90 camundongos Suíços foram inoculados com 10(7 células tumorais (sc, distribuídos em três grupos e tratados uma vez ao dia, via intraperitoneal (ip, com 0.1ml de diluente, L-Arginina (20mg/Kg ou L-NAME (20mg/Kg. Após 7, 15 e 30 dias, dez animais de cada grupo foram eutanasiados, a massa tumoral foi removida, processada e corada pela HE. Posteriormente, foi realizada análise morfométrica das áreas total, parênquima, necrose, estroma e influxo de leucócitos PMN's e células MN's. RESULTADOS: O tratamento com L-Arginina favoreceu o influxo de PMN's em períodos iniciais, enquanto o tratamento com L-NAME o reduziu. Nosso estudo sugere que o efeito do ON sobre a migração de PMN's é dose-dependente. Por

  1. Effects of mitomycin C on infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes after epithelial scrape injury in the mouse cornea Efeito da mitomicina C na infiltração de leucócitos polimorfonucleares após lesão epitelial em córnea de camundongo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília Souza Leão Escarião

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether mitomycin C (MMC alters appearance and disappearance of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN in the cornea stroma, using an epithelial scrape injury in eye mouse model. METHODS: Twenty-mice underwent mechanical epithelium debridement in the central cornea using 20% ethanol. After the scrape, the right eye received 0.02% MMC for one minute, while the left eye received physiological saline. The animals were sacrificed on days 1, 2, 5, and 14 after surgery, and corneal whole mounts were prepared for histology. PMN distribution was analyzed in digitized microscope images. Cell division in the cornea was determined by immunohistochemical detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, which was injected intraperitoneally before the mice were sacrificed. RESULTS: Epithelial scrape injury triggered infiltration of PMNs into the corneal stroma. An analysis of PMN distribution revealed that there was no difference between eyes treated with and without MMC at all time points. BrdU labeling showed that 0.02% MMC for one minute blocked keratocyte proliferation completely. CONCLUSION: MMC treatment regimen, which is common in clinical practice, inhibits keratocyte proliferation during wound healing, but when used at 0.02% for one minute, it does not affect PMN infiltration into the corneal stroma, and subsequent movement toward the injury site, or the disappearance of PMNs from the stroma, in the mouse epithelial injury model.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi determinar se a mitomicina C (MMC altera o aparecimento dos leucócitos polimorfonucleares (PMN no estroma corneano após abrasão epitelial central, utilizando olhos de camundongo como modelo. MÉTODOS: Vinte camundongos foram submetidos à abrasão epitelial em córnea central utilizando etanol a 20%. Após a lesão, o olho direito recebeu MMC a 0,02% por 1 minuto, enquanto o olho esquerdo recebeu solução salina. Os animais foram sacrificados em 1, 2, 5 e 14 dias após a cirurgia e

  2. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  3. In vitro effect of zinc on oxidative changes in human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavella, M; Lipovac, V

    1998-11-01

    The in vitro effect of zinc on superoxide anion (O2-) generation and on experimentally induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) in spermatozoa of infertile men was investigated. Washed spermatozoa pre-incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C in the presence of 1 or 3 mmol l-1 zinc, released less superoxide anions (P spermatozoa. Similar results were obtained using activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (1 x 10(6) cells ml-1) in the presence of 1 or 3 mmol l-1 Zn (P spermatozoa and leukocytes indicates that zinc may act in vivo as a scavenger of excessive O2- production by defective spermatozoa and/or leukocytes in semen after ejaculation. A significant stimulatory effect of Zn (3 mmol l-1) on iron-induced lipid peroxidation, measured by the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), was detected in the spermatozoa of 16 normo- and 17 asthenozoospermic males (P spermatozoa), no effect of zinc on the LPO rate was found. The observed inhibitory effect of zinc on superoxide anion regardless of the initial O2- level and stimulatory effect of zinc depending on the initial LPO rate in human spermatozoa suggests that this metal ion participates in the oxidative changes occurring after ejaculation and thus may modulate the properties of germ cells.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-11-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron.

  5. Human synovial lubricin expresses sialyl Lewis x determinant and has L-selectin ligand activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2012-10-19

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1-3(GlcNAcβ1-6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation.

  6. Human Synovial Lubricin Expresses Sialyl Lewis x Determinant and Has L-selectin Ligand Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P.; Whitelock, John M.; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1–3(GlcNAcβ1–6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation. PMID:22930755

  7. Modulation of Human Colostrum Phagocyte Activity by the Glycine-Adsorbed Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Celso Leventi Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colostrum is a secretion that contains immunologically active components, including immunocompetent cells and glycine, which has anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and cytoprotective effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adsorption of glycine onto polyethylene glycol (PEG microspheres and to verify the immunomodulatory effect of this nanomaterial on human colostrum phagocytes. The PEG microspheres were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. The effects of PEG microspheres with adsorbed glycine on viability, superoxide release, phagocytosis, microbicidal activity, and intracellular calcium release of mononuclear (MN and polymorphonuclear (PMN colostrum phagocytes were determined. Fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that glycine was able to be adsorbed to the PEG microspheres. The PMN phagocytes exposed to glycine-PEG microspheres showed the highest superoxide levels. The phagocytes (both MN and PMN displayed increased microbicidal activity and intracellular calcium release in the presence of PEG microspheres with adsorbed glycine. These data suggest that the adsorption of PEG microspheres with adsorbed glycine was able to stimulate the colostrum phagocytes. This material may represent a possible alternative therapy for future clinical applications on patients with gastrointestinal infections.

  8. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  9. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  10. Extracellular fibrils of pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii are important for ecological niche, murine virulence and human neutrophil interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Springer

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40-100 nm diameter x500-3000 nm length. Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and by high voltage- EM (HVEM. Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12alpha mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN- mediated killing.

  11. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation ...... often mentioned post-human condition....

  12. The Bacillus anthracis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, Anthrolysin O, kills human neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rest Richard F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is an animal and human pathogen whose virulence is characterized by lethal and edema toxin, as well as a poly-glutamic acid capsule. In addition to these well characterized toxins, B. anthracis secretes several proteases and phospholipases, and a newly described toxin of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family, Anthrolysin O (ALO. Results In the present studies we show that recombinant ALO (rALO or native ALO, secreted by viable B. anthracis, is lethal to human primary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, lymphocytes, THP-1 monocytic human cell line and ME-180, Detroit 562, and A549 epithelial cells by trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release viability assays. ALO cytotoxicity is dose and time dependent and susceptibility to ALO-mediated lysis differs between cell types. In addition, the viability of monocytes and hMDMs was assayed in the presence of vegetative Sterne strains 7702 (ALO+, UT231 (ALO-, and a complemented strain expressing ALO, UT231 (pUTE544, and was dependent upon the expression of ALO. Cytotoxicity of rALO is seen as low as 0.070 nM in the absence of serum. All direct cytotoxic activity is inhibited by the addition of cholesterol or serum concentration as low as 10%. Conclusion The lethality of rALO and native ALO on human monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes supports the idea that ALO may represent a previously unidentified virulence factor of B. anthracis. The study of other factors produced by B. anthracis, along with the major anthrax toxins, will lead to a better understanding of this bacterium's pathogenesis, as well as provide information for the development of antitoxin vaccines for treating and preventing anthrax.

  13. Plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human peripheral monocytes acting via a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovets, T; Tippler, B; Rieks, M; Simmet, T

    1997-06-15

    We have previously reported that the serine protease plasmin generated during contact activation of human plasma triggers biosynthesis of leukotrienes (LTs) in human peripheral monocytes (PMs), but not in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We now show that purified plasmin acts as a potent chemoattractant on human monocytes, but not on PMNs. Human plasmin or plasminogen activated with urokinase, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, elicited monocyte migration across polycarbonate membranes. Similarly, stimulation of monocytes with plasmin, but not with active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, induced actin polymerization. As assessed by checkerboard analysis, the plasmin-mediated monocyte locomotion was a true chemotaxis. The plasmin-induced chemotactic response was inhibited by the lysine analog trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (t-AMCA), which prevents binding of plasmin/ogen to the appropriate membrane binding sites. In addition, active site-blocked plasmin inhibited monocyte migration triggered by active plasmin. Further, plasmin-induced monocyte chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG) and chelerythrine, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC). Plasmin, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, triggered formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in monocytes. LY83583, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, inhibited both plasmin-induced cGMP formation and the chemotactic response. The latter effect could be antagonized by 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, KT5823 and (Rp)-8-(p-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate [(Rp)-8-pCPT-cGMPs], two structurally unrelated inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase, inhibited plasmin-mediated monocyte chemotaxis. Thus, beyond being a stimulus for lipid mediator release, plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human monocytes acting via a c

  14. Human microbiomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendhran, J.; P. Gunasekaran

    2010-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has driven the study of human biology in a significant way and enabled the genome-wide study to elucidate the molecular basis of complex human diseases. Recently, the role of microbiota on human physiology and health has received much attention. The influence of gut microbiome (the collective genomes of the gut microbiota) in obesity has been demonstrated, which may pave the way for new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies such as bacteriotherapy. The sig...

  15. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  16. Progesterone induces mucosal immunity in a rodent model of human taeniosis by Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Galileo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Nava-Luna, Paul; Olivos, Alfonso; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Carrero, J C; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    More than one quarter of human world's population is exposed to intestinal helminth parasites. The Taenia solium tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor in the transmission of both human neurocysticercosis and porcine cysticercosis. Sex steroids play an important role during T. solium infection, particularly progesterone has been proposed as a key immunomodulatory hormone involved in susceptibility to human taeniosis in woman and cysticercosis in pregnant pigs. Thus, we evaluated the effect of progesterone administration upon the experimental taeniosis in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Intact female adult hamsters were randomly divided into 3 groups: progesterone-subcutaneously treated; olive oil-treated as the vehicle group; and untreated controls. Animals were treated every other day during 4 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, all hamsters were orally infected with 4 viable T. solium cysticerci. After 2 weeks post infection, progesterone-treated hamsters showed reduction in adult worm recovery by 80%, compared to both vehicle-treated and non-manipulated infected animals. In contrast to control and vehicle groups, progesterone treatment diminished tapeworm length by 75% and increased proliferation rate of leukocytes from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of infected hamsters by 5-fold. The latter exhibited high expression levels of IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α at the duodenal mucosa, accompanied with polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltration. These results support that progesterone protects hamsters from the T. solium adult tapeworm establishment by improving the intestinal mucosal immunity, suggesting a potential use of analogues of this hormone as novel inductors of the gut immune response against intestinal helminth infections and probably other bowel-related disorders.

  17. Progesterone Induces Mucosal Immunity in a Rodent Model of Human Taeniosis by Taenia solium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Escobedo, Ignacio Camacho-Arroyo, Paul Nava-Luna, Alfonso Olivos, Armando Pérez-Torres, Sonia Leon-Cabrera, J.C. Carrero, Jorge Morales-Montor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one quarter of human world's population is exposed to intestinal helminth parasites. The Taenia solium tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor in the transmission of both human neurocysticercosis and porcine cysticercosis. Sex steroids play an important role during T. solium infection, particularly progesterone has been proposed as a key immunomodulatory hormone involved in susceptibility to human taeniosis in woman and cysticercosis in pregnant pigs. Thus, we evaluated the effect of progesterone administration upon the experimental taeniosis in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus. Intact female adult hamsters were randomly divided into 3 groups: progesterone-subcutaneously treated; olive oil-treated as the vehicle group; and untreated controls. Animals were treated every other day during 4 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, all hamsters were orally infected with 4 viable T. solium cysticerci. After 2 weeks post infection, progesterone-treated hamsters showed reduction in adult worm recovery by 80%, compared to both vehicle-treated and non-manipulated infected animals. In contrast to control and vehicle groups, progesterone treatment diminished tapeworm length by 75% and increased proliferation rate of leukocytes from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of infected hamsters by 5-fold. The latter exhibited high expression levels of IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α at the duodenal mucosa, accompanied with polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltration. These results support that progesterone protects hamsters from the T. solium adult tapeworm establishment by improving the intestinal mucosal immunity, suggesting a potential use of analogues of this hormone as novel inductors of the gut immune response against intestinal helminth infections and probably other bowel-related disorders.

  18. Neutrophil and asbestos fiber-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human mesothelial and bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, V L; Raivio, K O; Linnainmaa, K; Ekman, A; Klockars, M

    1995-03-01

    This study investigates reactive oxygen species generation and oxidant-related cytotoxicity induced by amosite asbestos fibers and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) in human mesothelial cells and human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. Transformed human pleural mesothelial cells (MET 5A) and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS 2B) were treated with amosite (2 micrograms/cm2) for 48 h. After 24 h of incubation, the cells were exposed for 1 h to nonactivated or amosite (50 micrograms) activated PMNs, washed, and incubated for another 23 h. Reactive oxygen species generation by the PMNs and the target cells was measured by chemiluminescence. Cell injury was assessed by cellular adenine nucleotide depletion, extracellular release of nucleotides, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Amosite-activated (but also to a lesser degree nonactivated) PMNs released substantial amounts of reactive oxygen metabolites, whereas the chemiluminescence of amosite-exposed mesothelial cells and epithelial cells did not differ from the background. Amosite treatment (48 h) of the target cells did not change intracellular adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) or nucleotide catabolite products (xanthine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid). When the target cells were exposed to nonactivated PMNs, significant adenine nucleotide depletion and nucleotide catabolite accumulation was observed in mesothelial cells only. In separate experiments, when the target cells were exposed to amosite-activated PMNs, the target cell injury was further potentiated compared with the amosite treatment alone or exposure to nonactivated PMNs. In conclusion, this study suggests the importance of inflammatory cell-derived free radicals in the development of amosite-induced mesothelial cell injury.

  19. Progesterone Induces Mucosal Immunity in a Rodent Model of Human Taeniosis by Taenia solium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Galileo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Nava-Luna, Paul; Olivos, Alfonso; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Carrero, J.C.; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    More than one quarter of human world's population is exposed to intestinal helminth parasites. The Taenia solium tapeworm carrier is the main risk factor in the transmission of both human neurocysticercosis and porcine cysticercosis. Sex steroids play an important role during T. solium infection, particularly progesterone has been proposed as a key immunomodulatory hormone involved in susceptibility to human taeniosis in woman and cysticercosis in pregnant pigs. Thus, we evaluated the effect of progesterone administration upon the experimental taeniosis in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Intact female adult hamsters were randomly divided into 3 groups: progesterone-subcutaneously treated; olive oil-treated as the vehicle group; and untreated controls. Animals were treated every other day during 4 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, all hamsters were orally infected with 4 viable T. solium cysticerci. After 2 weeks post infection, progesterone-treated hamsters showed reduction in adult worm recovery by 80%, compared to both vehicle-treated and non-manipulated infected animals. In contrast to control and vehicle groups, progesterone treatment diminished tapeworm length by 75% and increased proliferation rate of leukocytes from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of infected hamsters by 5-fold. The latter exhibited high expression levels of IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α at the duodenal mucosa, accompanied with polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltration. These results support that progesterone protects hamsters from the T. solium adult tapeworm establishment by improving the intestinal mucosal immunity, suggesting a potential use of analogues of this hormone as novel inductors of the gut immune response against intestinal helminth infections and probably other bowel-related disorders. PMID:22110394

  20. Plant production of anti-β-glucan antibodies for immunotherapy of fungal infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodicasa, Cristina; Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; De Bernardis, Flavia; Catellani, Marcello; Palma, Angelina S; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Cassone, Antonio; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Torosantucci, Antonella

    2011-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in the development of therapeutic antibodies (Ab) to improve the control of fungal pathogens, but none of these reagents is available for clinical use. We previously described a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb 2G8) targeting β-glucan, a cell wall polysaccharide common to most pathogenic fungi, which conferred significant protection against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans in animal models. Transfer of this wide-spectrum, antifungal mAb into the clinical setting would allow the control of most frequent fungal infections in many different categories of patients. To this aim, two chimeric mouse-human Ab derivatives from mAb 2G8, in the format of complete IgG or scFv-Fc, were generated, transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and purified from leaves with high yields (approximately 50 mg Ab/kg of plant tissues). Both recombinant Abs fully retained the β-glucan-binding specificity and the antifungal activities of the cognate murine mAb against C. albicans. In fact, they recognized preferentially β1,3-linked glucan molecules present at the fungal cell surface and directly inhibited the growth of C. albicans and its adhesion to human epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, both the IgG and the scFv-Fc promoted C. albicans killing by isolated, human polymorphonuclear neutrophils in ex vivo assays and conferred significant antifungal protection in animal models of systemic or vulvovaginal C. albicans infection. These recombinant Abs represent valuable molecules for developing novel, plant-derived immunotherapeutics against candidiasis and, possibly, other fungal diseases.

  1. Variations of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are associated with extreme human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Ariela; Orisio, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Castaldi, Davide; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Arai, Yasumichi; Todeschini, Marta; Ogliari, Giulia; Imai, Enyu; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Mari, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009). Based on the above study in mice, here we sought to search for AGTR1 variations associated to reduced AT1 receptor protein levels and to prolonged lifespan in humans. AGTR1 was sequenced in 173 Italian centenarians and 376 younger controls. A novel non-synonymous mutation was detected in a centenarian. Two polymorphisms in AGTR1 promoter, rs422858 and rs275653, in complete linkage disequilibrium, were significantly associated with the ability to attain extreme old age. We then replicated the study of rs275653 in a large independent cohort of Japanese origin (598 centenarians and semi-supercentenarians, 422 younger controls) and indeed confirmed its association with exceptional old age. In combined analyses, rs275653 was associated to extreme longevity either at recessive model (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) 3.57) or at genotype level (P = 0.015). Significance was maintained after correcting for confounding factors. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that subjects homozygous for the minor allele of rs275653 had less AT1R-positive peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells. Moreover, rs275653 was associated to lower blood pressure in centenarians. These findings highlight the role of AGTR1 as a possible candidate among longevity-enabling genes.

  2. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  3. Effects of propofol on activation of NF-κB in polymorphonuclear neutrophils in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury%异丙酚对内毒素性急性肺损伤大鼠中性粒细胞NF-κB活化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莎; 张焰; 彭生

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of propofol on activation of NF-κB in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in rats with LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Methods Sixty healthy SD rats of both sexes, aged 3 months, weighing 250-350 g, were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12 each):control group (group C), ALI group and 3 different dose of propofol groups (group P1, P2, P3). The animals were anesthetized with intraperitaneal 3% pentobarbital sodium 40 mg/kg. LPS 5 mg/kg was injected via femoral vein in group ALI.Propofol 5, 10 and 15 mg· kg- 1· h- 1 was infused intravenously over 2 h immeliately after injection of LPS 5 ng/kg through femoral vein in group P1, P2 and P3 respectivey. In group C normal saline 10 ml was injected via femoral vein instead. All rats were killed by exsanguination at the end of infusion of propofol. The right lung was removed for microscopic examination. The morphologic changes were scored 0-3 (0 = normal, 3 = severe morphologic changes). Blood samples were collected from carotid artery for determination of the expression of total NF-κB and activated NF-κB in PMNs by Western blot. Results Compared with group C, morphologic change scores and activated NF-κB expression in PMNs were significantly increased in group ALI, P1 and P2, and morphologic change scores increased in group P3. Morphologic change scores in group P1 and P2 and activated NF-κB expression in PMNs in group P1, P2 and P3 were significantly decreased compared with those in group ALl. Morphologic change scores and activated NF-κB expression in PMNs were decreased gradually in group P1, P2 and P3 . There was no significant difference in total NF-κB expression in PMNs among all groups. Conclusion Propofol can attenuate ALI induced by LPS through inhibition of the activation of NF-κB in PMNs in rats.%目的 探讨异丙酚对内毒素性急性肺损伤(ALI)大鼠中性粒细胞NF-κB活化的影响.方法 健康清洁级SD大鼠60只,3月龄,体重250~350 g

  4. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    the humanities for decades, starting with research fields such as humanities computing or computational linguistics in the 1950s, and later new media studies and internet studies. The historical development of digital humanities has been characterized by a focus on three successive, but co-existing types......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  5. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  6. Tissue tears in the white matter after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in the rat: relevance to human brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D I; Raghupathi, R; Saatman, K E; Meaney, D; McIntosh, T K

    2000-02-01

    A characteristic feature of severe diffuse axonal injury in man is radiological evidence of the "shearing injury triad" represented by lesions, sometimes haemorrhagic, in the corpus callosum, deep white matter and the rostral brain stem. With the exception of studies carried out on the non-human primate, such lesions have not been replicated to date in the multiple and diverse rodent laboratory models of traumatic brain injury. The present report describes tissue tears in the white matter, particularly in the fimbria of Sprague-Dawley rats killed 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 days after lateral fluid percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.1-2.4 atm). The lesions were most easily seen at 24 h when they appeared as foci of tissue rarefaction in which there were a few polymorphonuclear leucocytes. At the margins of these lesions, large amounts of accumulated amyloid precursor protein (APP) were found in axonal swellings and bulbs. By 1 week post-injury, there was macrophage infiltration with marked astrocytosis and early scar formation. This lesion is considered to be due to severe deformation of white matter and this is the first time that it has been identified reproducibly in a rodent model of head injury under controlled conditions.

  7. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  8. Bryostatin, an activator of the calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, A.S.; Smith, J.B.; Berkow, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Phorbol esters bind to and activate a calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (C kinase). Some researchers believe that activation of C kinase is necessary for the induction of phorbol ester biologic effects. The authors' research indicates that bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone that binds to the phorbol ester receptor in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, also binds to this receptor in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Bryostatin activates partially purified C kinase from HL-60 cells in vitro, and when applied to HL-60 cells in vivo, it decreases measurable cytoplasmic C kinase activity. Unlike the phorbol esters, bryostatin is unable to induce a macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells; however, bryostatin, in a dose-dependent fashion, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells and, if applied within 48 hr of phorbol esters, halts further differentiation. These results suggest that activation of the C kinase by some agents is not sufficient for induction of HL-60 cell differentiation and imply that some of the biologic effects of phorbol esters may occur through a more complex mechanism than previously thought.

  9. The anti-inflammatory pharmacology of Pycnogenol in humans involves COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression in leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Raffaella; Comitato, Raffaella; Schonlau, Frank; Virgili, Fabio

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of Pycnogenol supplementation on the arachidonic acid pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in response to an inflammatory stimulus. Pycnogenol is a standardised extract of French maritime pine bark consisting of procyanidins and polyphenolic monomers. Healthy volunteers aged 35 to 50 years were supplemented with 150 mg Pycnogenol a day for five days. Before and after the final day of supplementation, blood was drawn and PMNL were isolated. PMNL were primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stimulated with the receptor-mediated agonist formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) to activate the arachidonic acid pathway and the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, thromboxane and prostaglandins. Pycnogenol supplementation inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. This effect was associated with a compensatory up-regulation of COX-1 gene expression. Interestingly, Pycnogenol suspended the interdependency between 5-LOX and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) expression. Pycnogenol supplementation reduced leukotriene production but did not leave prostaglandins unaltered, which we attribute to a decline of COX-2 activity in favour of COX-1. Here we show for the first time that Pycnogenol supplementation simultaneously inhibits COX-2 and 5-LOX gene expression and reduces leukotriene biosynthesis in human PMNL upon pro-inflammatory stimulation ex vivo.

  10. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis killing by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF activated human neutrophils: role for oxygen metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, D R; Dias-Melicio, L A; Calvi, S A; Peraçoli, M T S; Soares, A M V C

    2007-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a deep mycosis endemic in Latin America, is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Phagocytic cells play a critical role against the fungus and several papers show the effects of activator and suppressive cytokines on macrophage and monocyte functions. However, the studies focusing on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) antifungal functions are scarcer. Thus, the objective of the present paper was to assess the capacity of human PMNs to kill virulent P. brasiliensis strain in vitro, before and after priming with different cytokines. Moreover, the involvement of oxygen metabolites in this activity was evaluated. Nonactivated cells failed to exhibit antifungal activity. However, when these cells were IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha or GM-CSF activated, a significative fungicidal activity was detected. This process was significantly inhibited when P. brasiliensis challenge occurred in presence of catalase (CAT - a scavenger of H2O2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD - a scavenger of superoxide anion). From these results it is concluded that cytokines activation is required for P. brasiliensis killing by human PMNs, and that H2O2 and superoxide anion participate as effectors molecules in this process.

  11. Outer membrane mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have lipopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to the bactericidal activity of anaerobic human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, N; Spitznagel, J K

    1982-06-01

    The capacity of neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) to phagocytize bacteria under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions afforded the opportunity to compare the bactericidal activities of oxygen-independent and oxygen-dependent antimicrobial mechanisms in human PMNs challenged with Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and its lipopolysaccharide mutants (outer membrane mutants). Anaerobic human PMNs challenged with either opsonized LT2 or serum-treated zymosan failed to produce detectable superoxide anion (O2-) or to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium, although aerobic PMNs readily produced O2- in response to such challenge. Anaerobic PMNs killed these bacteria in an ordered fashion that appeared to be dependent on their lipopolysaccharide chemotype. As the carbohydrate content of the mutant lipopolysaccharide decreased, the bacteria became less resistant to the oxygen-independent bactericidal activity. The results resembled the ordered resistance to oxygen-independent killing observed with LT2 and its mutants in PMN-free systems with PMN granule proteins. Studies on the kinetics of killing showed these to be less rapid in anaerobic as compared with aerobic conditions. Opsonization increased the rate of phagocytosis, but such factors as opsonization and the rate of phagocytosis did not appear to affect intraleukocytic bactericidal capacity in that the resultant proportion of bacteria remaining viable after ingestion was similar regardless of which serum was used (normal serum, C6-deficient serum, C8-deficient serum, or no serum at all). The results are consistent with an active and substantial participation by oxygen-independent systems in the antimicrobial effects of neutrophils.

  12. Synthesis and effects of pyrazolines and isoxazoles on the phagocytic chemotaxis and release of reactive oxygen species by zymosan stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Wai, Lam Kok; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Abbas, Faridah; Jasamai, Malina

    2013-12-01

    A series of novel isoxazole and pyrazoline derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated for their effects on the chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity of human phagocytes. Their effects on the chemotactic migration of isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and on the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during respiratory burst of human whole blood and PMNs were carried out using the Boyden chamber technique and luminol-based chemiluminescence assay, respectively. Of the compounds tested, compounds 8, 9, 11 and 12 exhibited higher inhibitory activity on the release of ROS (with IC50 values ranging from 5.6 to 8.4 μM) than acetylsalicylic acid (IC50 = 9.5 μ M). These compounds also showed strong inhibitory activity on the migration of PMNs with compound 8 exhibiting an IC50 value lower than that of ibuprofen. The results suggest that some of these isoxazole and pyrazoline derivatives have ability to modulate the innate immune response of phagocytes at different steps, indicating their potential as a source of new immunomodulatory agents.

  13. Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E L; Lehrer, R I; Rest, R F

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

  14. Human Rights and Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Possenti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be two different versions of human rights in Western tradition: say Rationalistic and Christian; the former adopted in revolutionary France, the latter highly developed in Renaissance Spain. Current relativistic criticisms attempt to deny the universality of human rights alleging that this theory has been created in Western countries or it has no strong justification, and therefore cannot have universal approach; but this objection can be dismissed with an alternative justification of human rights.

  15. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  16. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  17. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  18. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    , and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become...

  19. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  20. Teaching humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  1. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  2. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary societies, the humanities are under constant pressure and have to justify their existence. In the ongoing debates, Humboldt’s ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’ are often used to justify the unique function of the humanities of ensuring free research and contributing to a vital...... philosophy. Contrary to Humboldt’s idea that the non-practical is the most practical in the long run, philosophical pragmatism recommends to the humanities to situate knowledge in practices and apply knowledge to practices....

  3. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  4. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . The first section of this chapter outlines the complete cause-effect pathway, from emissions of toxic substances to intake by the population up to damages in terms of human health effects. Section 2 outlines the framework for assessing human toxicity in LCIA. Section 3 discusses the contributing substances......This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... – demonstrates the importance to account for both outdoor and indoor exposure, including consumer products. Analysing the variations in intake fraction (the fraction of the emitted or applied chemical that is taken in by the consumer and the general population), effect factor and characterisation factor across...

  5. Human influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.; Kasparek, L.; Novicky, O.; Querner, E.P.; Fendeková, M.; Kupczyk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human activities can cause drought, which was not previously reported (man-induced hydrological drought). Groundwater abstractions for domestic and industrial use are a well-known example of such an environmental change

  6. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  7. Human expunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  8. Human babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Gołąb, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes described so far, only some were diagnosed in infected humans, mostly B. microti, B. divergens and B. venatorum (Babesia sp. EU1). Infection in humans is often asymptomatic or mild but is of a particular risk for asplenic individuals, those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiencies, and elderly. Infections transmitted with blood and blood products raise concerns in hemotherapy. Epidemiological situation of babesiosis varies around the world. In Europe, no increase in the number of cases was reported, but in the USA its prevalence is increasing and extension of endemic areas is observed. The aim of this publication is to describe the problems connected with the current epidemiological situation, diagnosis and treatment of human babesiosis with regard to clinical status of patients.

  9. Human energy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the midst of big-oil record profits and growing debate on global warming, the Chevron Corporation launched its “Human Energy” public relations campaign. In television commercials and print advertisements, Chevron portrays itself as a compassionate entity striving to solve the planet’s energy crisis. Yet, the first term in this corporate oxymoron misleadingly reframes the significance of the second, suggesting that the corporation has a renewed focus. In depicting Chevron as a green/human o...

  10. Human Echolocation

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Santani

    2013-01-01

    The use of active natural echolocation as a mobility aid for blind humans has received increased scientific and popular attention in recent years (Engber, 2006; Kreiser, 2006; NPR, 2011), in part due to a focus on several blind individuals who have developed remarkable expertise. However, perhaps surprisingly, the history of empirical human echolocation research is not much younger than the era of echolocation research (cf. Griffin, 1958). Nevertheless, compared to its bat and cetacean count...

  11. Human ehrlichiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Milomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized disease. It is a tick-borne disease caused by several bacterial species of the genhus Erlichia. These are small gram-negative pleomorphic cocci, that are obligatory intracellular bacteria. Tick Ixodes is the principle vector in Europe, and Amblyomma americanum in the United States. Bacterial organisms replicate in a tick, and are transmited from infected cells in a vector to the blood cells of animals or humans. Human ehrlichiosis is a name for a group of diseases caused by different species of Ehrlichia. One of them is the disease named human monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and the other is a human granulocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilia. Case report. We reported a 23-year-old patient admitted for the clinical treatment with the symptoms of high febrility (above 40 °C, headache, vomiting, general weakness and exhaustion, but without data on a tick bite. The patient was treated with trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole for a week when Ehrlichia chaffeensis was confirmed by the immunofluoroscence test, and the therapy contimed with doxacyclin. Conclusion. Human ehrlichiosis is also present in our country, so this disease should be considered everyday, especially in infectology practice.

  12. [Human influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2006-10-01

    Human influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, contributing to approximately one million deaths every year. In Germany, each year between 5.000 and 20.000 individuals die from severe influenza infections. In several countries, the morbidity and mortality of influenza is greatly underestimated. This is reflected by general low immunization rates. The emergence of avian influenza against the background of the scenario of a human influenza pandemic has revived public interest in the disease. According to the World Health Organisation, it is only the question on the beginning of a new influenza pandemic. The virus type of the new pandemic is still uncertain and it is also unclear, if a pandemic spread of the virus may be prevented by consistent controlling of avian influenza.

  13. [Humanized childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2005-06-01

    Childbirth is a major event in a family. The expectant parent's perception of the childbirth experience influences his or her development as a parent. Making childbirth a positive and satisfying experience for women is the responsibility of health care providers. Women want to have physical and emotional privacy during labor and delivery, and to experience both in a friendly, comfortable environment. For women expected to undergo normal deliveries, humanized childbirth is one accessible approach. This article explores the definition and evolution of humanized childbirth and the care practice that it involves. It also explores birth plans and birth experiences, and the improvements necessary to routine labor practices to enable women to participate in decision making about their childbirth experiences. The author emphasizes that when health-care providers recognize the value of humanized childbirth and make changes accordingly, the dignity of women's childbirth experiences will be enhanced.

  14. Beyond Humanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer to the leading question of this paper, namely: ‘what does it mean to go beyond humanisms?’ The conclusion exposes briefly an ethics of hospitality and care from an angeletic perspective.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL. There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells. The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute.

  16. Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B genotypes in blood of AIDS patients: lack of association with either the viral DNA load in leukocytes or presence of retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G; Boivin, G

    1999-09-01

    It has been suggested that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) genotypes could be used as a marker for viral virulence in patients with AIDS. The present study was designed to evaluate a possible association between specific gB genotypes, the presence of HCMV retinitis, and the HCMV viral load. Fifty-four blood samples were obtained from 54 HIV- and HCMV-infected patients. Twenty-seven of these patients were asymptomatic for HCMV, whereas the other 27 patients had been diagnosed recently with HCMV retinitis. HCMV gB genotyping was carried out by using restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified PMNL extracts. Determination of the HCMV viral load in the same specimens was carried out using a quantitative-PCR. HCMV gB genotype 2 was found more frequently than other genotypes in PCR-amplified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) of patients with AIDS (P < 0.05) but not more frequently in samples from patients with HCMV retinitis. No significant association was found between any HCMV gB genotypes and the viral load in blood. In conclusion, the actual HCMV gB genotyping system using PMNL provides no additional benefit over the viral load in blood for identification of HIV-infected subjects at risk of HCMV disease.

  17. Systemic interleukin 2 therapy for human prostate tumors in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triest, J A; Grignon, D J; Cher, M L; Kocheril, S V; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1998-08-01

    Once the regional lymph nodes become involved in prostate carcinoma, 85% of patients develop distant metastases within 5 years, and metastatic disease is difficult to treat. We have investigated the effect of systemic interleukin 2 (IL-2) treatment on metastatic prostate carcinoma using a xenograft tumor model. Cells from a PC-3/IF cell line, produced by intrafemoral injection of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, were injected in the prostate of Balb/c nude mice. Prostate tumors and para-aortic lymph nodes were resected, and tumor cells were recultured and passaged in the prostate in vivo to produce new cell lines. On day 6 following prostatic injection of these cell lines, mice were treated with i.p. injections of IL-2 at 25,000-50,000 units/ day for 5 consecutive days. The effect of IL-2 on tumor progression was assessed, and histological studies were performed on prostate tumor and lymph node sections. The tumor cell lines generated by serial prostate injection were tumorigenic and metastasized to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. Tumors of 0.4 cm were obtained by day 16 and grew to 1-1.5 cm by day 40 with metastasis to para-aortic lymph nodes. Following two to three weekly courses of 5 days of 25,000-40,000 units/day of IL-2, the growth of prostate tumors was inhibited by 94%. Higher doses of 50,000 units/ day were toxic. Histologically, prostate sections showed vascular damage manifested by multifocal hemorrhages and an influx of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear cells into disintegrating tumors and areas of necrosis containing numerous apoptotic cells. In contrast to control mice, para-aortic lymph nodes were not enlarged in responding mice. These findings suggest that systemic IL-2 therapy can induce an antitumor response in prostate tumors and control their growth and metastasis.

  18. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  19. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Barquero-Calvo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs, enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  20. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  1. Ozone-induced inflammation in the lower airways of human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B.; Graham, D.E.; Mann, R.; McGee, M.P.; Horstman, D.H.; Kozumbo, W.J.; Becker, S.; House, D.E.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1989-02-01

    Although ozone (O3) has been shown to induce inflammation in the lungs of animals, very little is known about its inflammatory effects on humans. In this study, 11 healthy nonsmoking men, 18 to 35 yr of age (mean, 25.4 +/- 3.5), were exposed once to 0.4 ppm O3 and once to filtered air for 2 h with intermittent exercise. Eighteen hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and the cells and fluid were analyzed for various indicators of inflammation. There was an 8.2-fold increase in the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the total cell population, and a small but significant decrease in the percentage of macrophages after exposure to O3. Immunoreactive neutrophil elastase often associated with inflammation and lung damage increased by 3.8-fold in the fluid while its activity increased 20.6-fold in the lavaged cells. A 2-fold increase in the levels of protein, albumin, and IgG suggested increased vascular permeability of the lung. Several biochemical markers that could act as chemotactic or regulatory factors in an inflammatory response were examined in the BAL fluid (BALF). The level of complement fragment C3 alpha was increased by 1.7-fold. The chemotactic leukotriene B4 was unchanged while prostaglandin E2 increased 2-fold. In contrast, three enzyme systems of phagocytes with potentially damaging effects on tissues and microbes, namely, NADPH-oxidase and the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase, were increased neither in the lavaged fluid nor cells. In addition, the amounts of fibrogenic-related molecules were assessed in BALF.

  2. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  3. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  4. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  5. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  6. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  7. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  8. Expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi is required for virulence in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Latimer, Jo L; Deng, Kaiping; Hansen, Eric J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2004-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi colocalizes with polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages and evades phagocytosis during experimental infection of human volunteers. H. ducreyi contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, which encode predicted proteins of 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. Compared to its wild-type parent, an lspA1 lspA2 double mutant does not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophage and myelocytic cell lines in vitro and is attenuated in an experimental rabbit model of chancroid. To test whether expression of LspA1 and LspA2 was necessary for virulence in humans, six volunteers were experimentally infected. Each volunteer was inoculated with three doses (ranging from 85 to 112 CFU) of the parent (35000HP) in one arm and three doses (ranging from 60 to 822 CFU) of the mutant (35000HP Omega 12) in the other arm. The papule formation rates were 88% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 76.8 to 99.9%) at 18 parent sites and 72% (95% CI, 44.4 to 99.9%) at 18 mutant sites (P = 0.19). However, papules were significantly smaller at mutant sites (mean size, 24.8 mm(2)) than at parent sites (mean size, 39.1 mm(2)) 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.0002). The pustule formation rates were 44% (95% CI, 5.8 to 77.6%) at parent sites and 0% (95% CI, 0 to 39.4%) at mutant sites (P = 0.009). With the caveat that biosafety regulations preclude testing of a complemented mutant in human subjects, these results indicate that expression of LspA1 and LspA2 facilitates the ability of H. ducreyi to initiate disease and to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  9. Systemic neutrophil depletion modulates the migration and fate of transplanted human neural stem cells to rescue functional repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X; Hooshmand, Mitra J; Saiwai, Hirokazu; Maddox, Jake; Salehi, Arjang; Lakatos, Anita; Nishi, Rebecca; Salazar, Desiree; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J

    2017-08-28

    The interaction of transplanted stem cells with local cellular and molecular cues in the host central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment may affect the potential for repair by therapeutic cell populations. In this regard, spinal cord injury (SCI), Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological injuries and diseases all exhibit dramatic and dynamic changes to the host microenvironment over time. Previously, we reported that delayed transplantation of CNS-derived human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) at 9 or 30 days post-SCI (dpi) resulted in extensive donor cell migration, predominantly neuronal and oligodendrocytic donor cell differentiation, and functional locomotor improvements. Here, we report that acute transplantation of hCNS-SCns at 0 dpi resulted in localized astroglial differentiation of donor cells near the lesion epicenter, and failure to produce functional improvement in an all-female immunodeficient mouse model. Critically, specific immunodepletion of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) blocked hCNS-SCns astroglial differentiation near the lesion epicenter and rescued the capacity of these cells to restore function. These data represent novel evidence that a host immune cell population can block the potential for functional repair derived from a therapeutic donor cell population, and support targeting the inflammatory microenvironment in combination with cell transplantation after SCI.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe interaction of transplanted cells with local cellular and molecular cues in the host microenvironment is a key variable that may shape the translation of neurotransplantation research to the clinical SCI human population, and few studies have investigated these events. We show that the specific immunodepletion of PMN neutrophils using anti-Ly6G inhibits donor cell astrogliosis and rescues the capacity of a donor cell population to promote locomotor improvement after SCI. Critically, our data demonstrate novel evidence that a specific

  10. A third measure-metastable state in the dynamics of spontaneous shape change in healthy human's white cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Selz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human polymorphonuclear leucocytes, PMN, are highly motile cells with average 12-15 µm diameters and prominent, loboid nuclei. They are produced in the bone marrow, are essential for host defense, and are the most populous of white blood cell types. PMN also participate in acute and chronic inflammatory processes, in the regulation of the immune response, in angiogenesis, and interact with tumors. To accommodate these varied functions, their behavior is adaptive, but still definable in terms of a set of behavioral states. PMN morphodynamics have generally involved a non-equilibrium stationary, spheroid Idling state that transitions to an activated, ellipsoid translocating state in response to chemical signals. These two behavioral shape-states, spheroid and ellipsoid, are generally recognized as making up the vocabulary of a healthy PMN. A third, "random" state has occasionally been reported as associated with disease states. I have observed this third, Treadmilling state, in PMN from healthy subjects, the cells demonstrating metastable dynamical behaviors known to anticipate phase transitions in mathematical, physical, and biological systems. For this study, human PMN were microscopically imaged and analyzed as single living cells. I used a microscope with a novel high aperture, cardioid annular condenser with better than 100 nanometer resolution of simultaneous, mixed dark field and intrinsic fluorescent images to record shape changes in 189 living PMNs. Relative radial roundness, R(t, served as a computable order parameter. Comparison of R(t series of 10 cells in the Idling and 10 in the Treadmilling state reveals the robustness of the "random" appearing Treadmilling state, and the emergence of behaviors observed in the neighborhood of global state transitions, including increased correlation length and variance (divergence, sudden jumps, mixed phases, bimodality, power spectral scaling and temporal slowing. Wavelet transformation of an R

  11. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  12. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  13. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  14. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  15. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH...

  16. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  17. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J McCoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf. Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases.In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections.Human innate immune cells are able to recognize, attach to and kill B. malayi

  18. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs) in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases. Principal findings In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections. Conclusions/Significance Human innate immune cells are able to

  19. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  20. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  1. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  2. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    steroid concentrations cause alterations in endometrial development, affecting oocyte viability in assisted reproductive technology. Furthermore, it has been proposed that elevated progesterone levels have a negative effect on the reproductive outcome of COS. This may arise from an asynchrony between...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  3. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  4. Bacterial lipoprotein delays apoptosis in human neutrophils through inhibition of caspase-3 activity: regulatory roles for CD14 and TLR-2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Colm P

    2012-02-03

    The human sepsis syndrome resulting from bacterial infection continues to account for a significant proportion of hospital mortality. Neutralizing strategies aimed at individual bacterial wall products (such as LPS) have enjoyed limited success in this arena. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is a major constituent of the wall of diverse bacterial forms and profoundly influences cellular function in vivo and in vitro, and has been implicated in the etiology of human sepsis. Delayed polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis is a characteristic feature of human sepsis arising from Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial infection. Bacterial wall product ligation and subsequent receptor-mediated events upstream of caspase inhibition in neutrophils remain incompletely understood. BLP has been shown to exert its cellular effects primarily through TLR-2, and it is now widely accepted that lateral associations with the TLRs represent the means by which CD14 communicates intracellular messages. In this study, we demonstrate that BLP inhibits neutrophil mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a subsequent reduction in caspase-3 processing, ultimately leading to a significant delay in PMN apoptosis. Pretreatment of PMNs with an anti-TLR-2 mAb or anti-CD14 mAb prevented BLP from delaying PMN apoptosis to such a marked degree. Combination blockade using both mAbs completely prevented the effects of BLP (in 1 and 10 ng\\/ml concentrations) on PMN apoptosis. At higher concentrations of BLP, the antiapoptotic effects were observed, but were not as pronounced. Our findings therefore provide the first evidence of a crucial role for both CD14 and TLR-2 in delayed PMN apoptosis arising from bacterial infection.

  5. Potent inhibition of human 5-lipoxygenase and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase-1 by the anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory agent embelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Anja M; Traber, Heidi; Temml, Veronika; Noha, Stefan M; Filosa, Rosanna; Peduto, Antonella; Weinigel, Christina; Barz, Dagmar; Schuster, Daniela; Werz, Oliver

    2013-08-15

    Embelin (2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone) possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties in vivo, and these features have been related to interference with multiple targets including XIAPs, NFκB, STAT-3, Akt and mTOR. However, interference with these proteins requires relatively high concentrations of embelin (IC₅₀>4 μM) and cannot fully explain its bioactivity observed in several functional studies. Here we reveal human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase (mPGES)-1 as direct molecular targets of embelin. Thus, embelin potently suppressed the biosynthesis of eicosanoids by selective inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 with IC₅₀=0.06 and 0.2 μM, respectively. In intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, embelin consistently blocked the biosynthesis of various 5-LO products regardless of the stimulus (fMLP or A23187) with IC₅₀=0.8-2 μM. Neither the related human 12- and 15-LO nor the cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 or cytosolic phospholipase A₂ were significantly affected by 10 μM embelin. Inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 by embelin was (I) essentially reversible after wash-out, (II) not impaired at higher substrate concentrations, (III) unaffected by inclusion of Triton X-100, and (IV) did not correlate to its proposed antioxidant properties. Docking simulations suggest concrete binding poses in the active sites of both 5-LO and mPGES-1. Because 5-LO- and mPGES-1-derived eicosanoids play roles in inflammation and cancer, the interference of embelin with these enzymes may contribute to its biological effects and suggests embelin as novel chemotype for development of dual 5-LO/mPGES-1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Selek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human toxocariasis is an parasitic infection caused by the ingestion of larvae of dog nematode Toxocara canis and less frequently of cat nematode T.cati. Toxocara eggs, shed to environment by infected dogs' and cats' droppings, become infective by embryonation. Humans, particularly children, can be infected by accidentally ingesting embryonated Toxocara eggs. Larvae hatch in the small intestine, penetrate the intestinal wall and migrate to other parts of body via the bloodstream. It is generally a benign, asymptomatic, and self-limiting disease, although migrating larvae can cause damage to tissues and organs, especially brain involvement can cause severe morbidity. The two main clinical presentations of toxocariasis are visceral larva migrans (VLM (a systemic disease caused by larval migration through major organs and ocular larva migrans (OLM (a disease limited to the eyes and optic nerves. There are also two less-severe syndromes which have recently been described, one mainly in children (covert toxocariasis and the other mainly in adults (common toxocariasis. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical signs/symptoms, epidemiological background of the patient and the use of immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot. On the other hand definitive diagnosis is much more challenging, since it requires the demonstration of larvae via biopsy or autopsy. Most cases of toxocariasis clear up without any treatment. VLM is primarily treated with antihelmintic drugs, such as; albendazole or mebendazole. Treatment of OLM is more difficult and usually consists of measures to prevent progressive damage to the eye like steroids. Laser photocoagulation and cryoretinopexy may also be used to treat severe cases. Since eradicating T.canis infection is difficult due to the complexity of its life cycle, prevention of toxocariasis is always preferred. Toxocara eggs have a strong protective layer which makes the eggs able to survive in the environment for months or

  7. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  8. X-ray absorption and resonance raman spectroscopy of human myeloperoxidase at neutral and acid pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, K T; Taylor, K L; Kinkade, J M; Sinclair, R B; Powers, L S

    1997-04-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important enzyme in the oxygen-dependent host defense system of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, utilizes hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the production of hypochlorous acid, an oxidizing bactericidal agent. While MPO shows significant sequence homology with other peroxidases and this homology is particularly striking among the active-site residues, MPO exhibits unusual spectral features and the unique ability to catalyze the oxidation of chloride ions. We have investigated the MPO active-site with X-ray absorption (XAS) and resonance Raman (RRS) spectroscopies at neutral pH and also at the physiological acidic pH (pH approximately 3) and have compared these results with those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At pH 7.5, XAS results show that the iron heme active site is 6-coordinate where the distal ligand is likely nitrogen or oxygen, but not sulfur. The heme is distorted compared to HRP, other peroxidases, and heme compounds, but at pH approximately 3, the distal ligand is lost and the heme is less distorted. RRS results under identical pH conditions show that the skeletal core-size sensitive modes and v3 are shifted to higher frequency at pH approximately 3 indicating a 6- to 5-coordination change of high spin ferric heme. In addition, a new band at 270 cm(-1) is observed at pH approximately 3 which is consistent with the loss of the sixth ligand. The higher symmetry of the heme at pH approximately 3 is reflected by a single v4 mode in the (RRS) spectrum. HRP also loses its loosely associated distal water at this pH, but little change in heme distortion is observed. This change suggests that loss of the distal ligand in MPO releases stress on the heme which may facilitate binding of chloride ion.

  9. Antioxidant activity of Calendula officinalis extract: inhibitory effects on chemiluminescence of human neutrophil bursts and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra; Falchi, Mario; Bertelli, Aldo; Morelli, Roberto; Lo Scalzo, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in natural chemical compounds from aromatic, spicy, medicinal and other plants with antioxidant properties in order to find new sources of compounds inactivating free radicals generated by metabolic pathways within body tissue and cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) whose overregulated recruitment and activation generate a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), leading to an imbalance of redox homeostasis and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine whether a propylene glycol extract of Calendula officinalis interferes with ROS and RNS during the PMN respiratory bursts, and to establish the lowest concentration at which it still exerts antioxidant activity by means of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was also used in order to confirm the activity of the C. officinalis extract. The C. officinalis extract exerted its anti-ROS and anti-RNS activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with significant effects being observed at even very low concentrations: 0.20 microg/ml without L-arginine, 0.10 microg/ml when L-arginine was added to the test with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 0.05 microg/ml when it was added to the test with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The EPR study confirmed these findings, 0.20 microg/ml being the lowest concentration of C. officinalis extract that significantly reduced 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. These findings are interesting for improving the antioxidant network and restoring the redox balance in human cells with plant-derived molecules as well as extending the possibility of antagonizing the oxidative stress generated in living organisms when the balance is in favor of free radicals as a result of the depletion of cell antioxidants.

  10. Dental Calculus Stimulates Interleukin-1β Secretion by Activating NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human and Mouse Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro Raudales, Jorge Luis; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Sm, Ziauddin; Kaneko, Takashi; Ozaki, Yukio; Ukai, Takashi; Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Latz, Eicke; Hara, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit associated with periodontitis. The bacterial components contained in dental calculus can be recognized by host immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and induce transcription of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β. Studies have shown that cellular uptake of crystalline particles may trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to the cleavage of the IL-1β precursor to its mature form. Phagocytosis of dental calculus in the periodontal pocket may therefore lead to the secretion of IL-1β, promoting inflammatory responses in periodontal tissues. However, the capacity of dental calculus to induce IL-1β secretion in human phagocytes has not been explored. To study this, we stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with dental calculus collected from periodontitis patients, and measured IL-1β secretion by ELISA. We found that calculus induced IL-1β secretion in both human PMNs and PBMCs. Calculus also induced IL-1β in macrophages from wild-type mice, but not in macrophages from NLRP3- and ASC-deficient mice, indicating the involvement of NLRP3 and ASC. IL-1β induction was inhibited by polymyxin B, suggesting that LPS is one of the components of calculus that induces pro-IL-1β transcription. To analyze the effect of the inorganic structure, we baked calculus at 250°C for 1 h. This baked calculus failed to induce pro-IL-1β transcription. However, it did induce IL-1β secretion in lipid A-primed cells, indicating that the crystalline structure of calculus induces inflammasome activation. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite crystals, a component of dental calculus, induced IL-1β in mouse macrophages, and baked calculus induced IL-1β in lipid A-primed human PMNs and PBMCs. These results indicate that dental calculus stimulates IL-1β secretion via NLRP3 inflammasome in human and mouse phagocytes, and that the crystalline structure has a partial role in

  11. Activation of human T cells by major histocompatability complex class II expressing neutrophils: proliferation in the presence of superantigen, but not tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Liu, C; Guyre, P M; Wardwell, K; O'Neil, J; Guo, T L; Christian, T P; Mudzinski, S P; Gosselin, E J

    1997-06-01

    The primary function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in the immune response appears to be acute phagocytic clearance of foreign pathogens and release of inflammatory mediators. Consistent with their assumed lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, PMN have not been considered to play a role in antigen presentation and T-cell activation. However, recent reports have shown that human PMN can express MHC class II molecules both in vitro and in vivo after stimulation with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Thus, under appropriate conditions, PMN could play a significant role in immune regulation, including T-cell activation. In this report, we demonstrate that human class II-expressing PMN can serve as accessory cells in superantigen (SAg)-mediated T-cell activation. This accessory activity for SAg presentation was present only after induction of MHC class II expression, and was especially pronounced following culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma, which acted synergistically to induce MHC class II molecules on PMN. Moreover, the level of MHC class II expression and the magnitude of SAg-induced T-cell responses were found to be highly correlated and distinctly donor dependent, with PMN from some donors repeatedly showing fivefold higher responses than PMN from other donors. On the other hand, culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma under conditions that resulted in optimal MHC class II expression did not enable them to function as antigen-presenting cells for either intact tetanus toxoid (TT) or for a TT peptide. These results delineate a new pathway for T-cell activation by SAg that may play an important role in the severity of SAg-induced inflammatory responses. They also identify a donor-specific polymorphism for induction of PMN MHC class II expression which may be of significance for therapies involving GM-CSF and IFN-gamma.

  12. [Human papillomaviruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  13. Modulatory Effect of Distillate of Ocimum sanctum Leaf Extract(Tulsi)on Human Lymphocytes Against Genotoxicants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIPANWITA DUTTA; S.SARAVANA DEVI; K.KRISHNAMURTHI; KOEL KUMAR; PRIYANKA VYAS; P.L.MUTHAL; P.NAOGHARE; T.CHAKRABARTI

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the modulatory effect of distillate of Ocimum sanctum(traditionally known as Tulsi)leaf extract (DTLE)on genotoxicants.Methods In the present investigation,we studied the antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic effect of distillate of Tlulsi leaf extract on(i)human polymorphonuclear leukocytes by evaluating the DNA strand break without metabolic activation against mitomycin C(MMC)and hexavalent chromium(Cr+6)and(ii)human peripheral lymphocytes (in vitro)with or without metabolic activation against mitomycin C(MMC),hexavalent chromium(Cr+6)and B[a]P by evaluating chromosomal aberration(CA)and micronucleus assay(MN).Three different doses of DTLE,50 μL/mL,100 μL/mL,and 200 μL/mL were selected on the basis of cytotoxicity assay and used for studying DNA strand break,chromosomal aberration and micronucleus emergence.The following positive controls were used for inducing genotoxicity and clastogenicity:MMC(0.29 μmol/L)for DNA strand break,chromosomal aberration and 0.51 μmol/L for micronucleus assay;Potassium dichromate(Cr+6)600 μmol/L for DNA strand break and 5 μmol/L for chromosomal aberration and micronucleus assay;Benzo[a]pyrene(30 μmol/L)for chromosomal aberration and 40 μmol/L for micronucleus assay.The active ingredients present in the distillate of Tulsi leaf extract were identified by HPLC and LC-MS.Results Mitomycin C(MMC)and hexavalent chromium(Cr+6) induced statistically significant DNA strand break of respectively 69%and 71%(P<0.001)as revealed by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding.Furthermore,thedamage could be protected with DTLE(50 μL/mL,100 μL/mL,and 200 μL/mL) on simultaneous treatment.Chromosomal aberration and micronucleus formation induced by MMC,Cr+6 and B[a]P were significantly protected(P<0.001)by DTLE with and without metabolic activation.Conclusion Distillate of Tulsi leaf extract possesses antioxidants contributed mainly by eugenol,luteolin and apigenin as identified by LC-MS.These active ingredients may have

  14. Doxycycline inhibits neutrophil (PMN)-type matrix metalloproteinases in human adult periodontitis gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L M; Sorsa, T; Lee, H M; Ciancio, S; Sorbi, D; Ramamurthy, N S; Gruber, B; Salo, T; Konttinen, Y T

    1995-02-01

    We previously reported that low-dose doxycycline (DOXY) therapy reduces host-derived collagenase activity in gingival tissue of adult periodontitis (AP) patients. However, it was not clear whether this in vivo effect was direct or indirect. In the present study, inflamed human gingival tissue, obtained from AP patients during periodontal surgery, was extracted and the extracts partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The extracts were then analyzed for collagenase activity using SDS-PAGE/fluorography/laser densitometry, and for gelatinase activity using type I gelatin zymography as well as a new quantitative assay using biotinylated type I gelatin as substrate. DOXY was added to the incubation mixture at a final concentration of 0-1000 microM. The concentration of DOXY required to inhibit 50% of the gingival tissue collagenase (IC50) was found to be 16-18 microM in the presence or absence of 1.2 mM APMA (an optimal organomercurial activator of latent procollagenases); this IC50 for DOXY was similar to that exhibited for collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and from gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of AP patients. Of interest, Porphyromonas gingivalis collagenase was also inhibited by similar DOXY levels (IC50 = 15 microM), however the collagenase activity observed in the gingival tissue extracts was found to be of mammalian not bacterial origin based on the production of the specific alpha A (3/4) and alpha B (1/4) collagen degradation fragments. In contrast, the inhibition of collagenase purified from culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (MMP-1) required much greater DOXY levels (IC50 = 280 microM). The predominant molecular forms of gelatinolytic activity presented in the AP patients gingival tissue extracts were found to closely correspond to the 92 kD PMN-type gelatinase (MMP-9) although small quantities of 72 kD fibroblast-type gelatinase (MMP-2), and some other low molecular weight gelatinases

  15. Human Development Report 1991: Financing Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    United Nations Development Programme, UNDP

    1991-01-01

    Lack of political commitment rather than financial resources is often the real barrier to human development. This is the main conclusion of Human Development Report 1991 - the second in a series of annual reports on the subject.

  16. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  17. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  18. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaran J. McCoy; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When expos...

  19. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  20. Scalability of human models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodarius, C.; Rooij, L. van; Lange, R. de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to create a scalable human occupant model that allows adaptation of human models with respect to size, weight and several mechanical parameters. Therefore, for the first time two scalable facet human models were developed in MADYMO. First, a scalable human male was

  1. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  2. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  3. From Human Past to Human Future

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic an...

  4. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  5. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLETON, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important ...

  6. Dysregulated immune profiles for skin and dendritic cells are associated with increased host susceptibility to Haemophilus ducreyi infection in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Lang; Li, Xiaoman; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Zhao, Qianqian; Li, Wei; McClintick, Jeanette; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Edenberg, Howard J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    In experimentally infected human volunteers, the cutaneous immune response to Haemophilus ducreyi is orchestrated by serum, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, T cells, and myeloid dendritic cells (DC). This response either leads to spontaneous resolution of infection or progresses to pustule formation, which is associated with the failure of phagocytes to ingest the organism and the presence of Th1 and regulatory T cells. In volunteers who are challenged twice, some subjects form at least one pustule twice (PP group), while others have all inoculated sites resolve twice (RR group). Here, we infected PP and RR subjects with H. ducreyi and used microarrays to profile gene expression in infected and wounded skin. The PP and RR groups shared a core response to H. ducreyi. Additional transcripts that signified effective immune function were differentially expressed in RR infected sites, while those that signified a hyperinflammatory, dysregulated response were differentially expressed in PP infected sites. To examine whether DC drove these responses, we profiled gene expression in H. ducreyi-infected and uninfected monocyte-derived DC. Both groups had a common response that was typical of a type 1 DC (DC1) response. RR DC exclusively expressed many additional transcripts indicative of DC1. PP DC exclusively expressed differentially regulated transcripts characteristic of DC1 and regulatory DC. The data suggest that DC from the PP and RR groups respond differentially to H. ducreyi. PP DC may promote a dysregulated T-cell response that contributes to phagocytic failure, while RR DC may promote a Th1 response that facilitates bacterial clearance.

  7. Enhanced killing of penicillin-treated gram-positive cocci by human granulocytes: role of bacterial autolysins, catalase, and granulocyte oxidative pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isturiz, R; Metcalf, J A; Root, R K

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococci pretreated with subminimal inhibitory concentrations (subMIC) of cell-wall active antibiotics exhibit increased susceptibility to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), even when phagosome information is impaired by the mold metabolite, cytochalasin B. To investigate the role of specific bacterial factors in the process, studies were carried out with organisms lacking catalase (streptococci) or cell-wall autolytic enzymes and compared to findings with Staphylococcus aureus 502A. Neutrophil factors were studied using inhibitors, oxygen radical scavengers, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-deficient PMNs, or PMNs from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Documentation of the enhanced susceptibility of the streptococcal strains to killing by PMNs following subMIC penicillin pretreatment required the use of cytochalasin B. Enhancement of killing occurred independent of the presence or absence of bacterial autolysins or catalase. SubMIC penicillin pretreatment of S. pneumoniae R36A specifically promoted the susceptibility of these organisms to killing by myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated mechanisms (enhancement lost using MPO-deficient or azide-treated cells). Factors other than MPO or toxic oxygen products generated by the PMN respiratory burst are responsible for enhanced killing of penicillin-pretreated S. aureus 502A (enhancement preserved using MPO-deficient, azide-treated, or chronic granulomatous disease patient cells). These studies define methods to study the interaction of antimicrobial agents and PMNs in the killing of microorganisms. They also demonstrate that penicillin treatment can change the susceptibility of gram-positive cocci to the action of specific PMN microbicidal mechanisms. The mechanism of the enhancement appears to be bacterial strain-dependent and not predictable by bacterial autolysin or catalase activity.

  8. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth.

  9. Effects of resolvin D1 on cell survival and cytokine expression of human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Mohamed; Shibani, Nouf-Al; Labban, Nawaf; Batarseh, Ghada; Song, Fengyu; Ruby, John; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-12-01

    Tissue breakdown in periodontitis is initiated by bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and is caused largely by host responses. Resolvins protect the host against acute inflammation by blocking the migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to initiate resolution. The effects of resolvins on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are unknown. This study examines the effects of resolvin D1 on HGF survival and cytokine expression when treated with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Cytotoxicity of resolvin D1 on HGFs with or without a toxic level of P. gingivalis supernatant was measured with lactate dehydrogenase assays. Cytokine arrays were performed on HGF-conditioned media treated with or without resolvin D1 and with or without P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 had no cytotoxic effects on HGFs at concentrations between 1 and 1,000 nM (all P > 0.05). Resolvin D1 (1,000 nM) significantly inhibited the toxic effects of 13.5% (v/v) P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs (P = 0.002). Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0.010) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (P = 0.04) in untreated fibroblasts. P. gingivalis (10%) supernatant significantly increased the expression levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte CSF, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, and monokine induced by γ-interferon. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced the expression of GRO (P = 0.04), marginally reduced the levels of MCP-1 (P = 0.10), and marginally increased the levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (P = 0.07) from HGFs treated with P. gingivalis supernatant. Resolvin D1 altered the cytotoxicity of P. gingivalis supernatant on HGFs. Resolvin D1 significantly reduced GRO, marginally reduced MCP-1, and marginally increased TGF-β1 from P. gingivalis-treated HGFs, which could alter the ability of P. gingivalis to induce inflammation.

  10. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  11. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects with and without CMV disease by using PCR and the SHARP Signal Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Murray, G; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Lazar, J G; Bergeron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We report the development of a simple and rapid PCR assay for quantitation of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Using this system, a very good correlation was found between a high number of CMV copies in the blood and the presence of CMV disease in subjects with AIDS.

  12. Assessment of attachment, ingestion, and killing of Escherichia coli by bovine polymorphonuclear cells with combined micromethods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainard, P

    1985-11-01

    A set of microassays separately measuring attachment, ingestion, and overall killing of Escherichia coli by bovine granulocytes was devised and its analytical potential used to test the effect of drugs which block intracellular killing: sodium azide, phenylbutazone, chloroquine phosphate were all inactive, suggesting that O2-dependent systems were not the sole pathway involved in the killing of E.coli by granulocytes. The microtechniques were also used to investigate the opsonic requirements for phagocytosis of two E.coli strains. Absorption of normal bovine serum with the homologous and the heterologous strains showed that specific antibodies were necessary to induce attachment of bacteria to phagocytes. Once bound to granulocytes, the unencapsulated strain P4 was engulfed, whereas for the encapsulated strain B117, complement was required for the internalization step of phagocytosis. With immune serum the need for complement was not absolute.

  13. Antibody inhibition of polymorphonuclear phagocytosis. Dissociation of bacterial attachment and bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J P; Valeri, C R

    1980-06-01

    The inhibition of killing of Staphylococcus aureus 502A by PMNs treated with the IgG fraction of serum from a group of patients with demonstrable leukocyte antibodies was investigated. The uptake of opsonized thymidine-labeled S. aureus 502A by PMNs treated with allogeneic antibody was essentially unimpaired, despite significantly decreased killing. The findings were similar to bacteria opsonized by serum complement or bacteria opsonized with specific lapine antibody. An increased proportion of PMN-bound bacteria susceptible to lysis by lysostaphin indicated a reduced rate of translocation of bacteria from the surface of allogeneic antibody-treated PMNs. Antibody did not stimulate the basal oxidative metabolism, but the oxidative metabolism of antibody-treated PMNs during phagocytosis was increased. Although the precise mechanism of inhibition of PMN killing by antibody is uncertain, the data suggest that the impairment of bacterial killing by PMNs treated with allogeneic leukocyte antibody is associated with inefficient translocation of bacteria into phagolysosomes rather than by interference with the binding of bacteria to specific PMN opsonic receptors.

  14. Role of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in the Pathophysiology of Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A. Exeni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx, through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS and neutrophils (PMN represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  15. Role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the pathophysiology of typical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A; Fernández, Gabriela C; Palermo, Marina S

    2007-08-10

    Thrombotic microangiopathy and acute renal failure are cardinal features of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). These conditions are related to endothelial and epithelial cell damage induced by Shiga toxin (Stx), through an interaction with its globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor. Although, Stx is the main pathogenic factor and necessary for HUS development, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that the inflammatory response is able to potentiate Stx toxicity. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and neutrophils (PMN) represent two central components of inflammation during a Gram-negative infection. In this regard, patients with high peripheral PMN counts at presentation have a poor prognosis. In the present review, we discuss the contribution of experimental models and patient's studies in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of HUS.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recognizes and responds aggressively to the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P.O.

    2009-01-01

    , the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can evade destruction by PMNs and thus cause persistent infections. In this study, we show that biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa recognize the presence of attracted PMNs and direct this information to their fellow bacteria through the quorum sensing (OS) signalling...... rhamnolipids surround the biofilm bacteria and on contact eliminate incoming PMNs. Our data strengthen the view that cross-kingdom communication plays a key role in P. aeruginosa recognition and evasion of the host defence....

  17. MicroRNA-941 Expression in Polymorphonuclear Granulocytes Is Not Related to Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Baslund, Bo; Cramer, Elisabeth Præstekjær

    2016-01-01

    granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) have lower expression of miR-941 than healthy control donors as a biological cause for higher JMJD3 levels. We found no significant difference in the degree of maturation of PMNs from GPA patients (n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 11) as determined from cell surface...... expression of the neutrophil maturation marker CD16 and gene expression profile of FCGR3B. The expression of PRTN3 and KDM6B mRNAs and miR-941 was not significantly different in GPA patients and healthy controls. Transfection of pre-miR-941 into the neutrophil promyelocyte cell line PLB-985 cells did...... not result in reduction of the KDM6B mRNA level as shown previously in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. The amount of PR3 in PMNs from GPA patients and healthy controls was comparable. In conclusion, we found that PRTN3 mRNA, KDM6B mRNA, and miR-941 expression levels in PMNs do not differ between GPA...

  18. Hidden truth of circulating neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in periodontally healthy smoker subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tobacco smoking is considered to be a major risk factor associated with periodontal disease. Smoking exerts a major effect on the protective elements of the immune response, resulting in an increase in the extent and severity of periodontal destruction. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess viability and phagocytic function of neutrophils in circulating blood of the smokers and nonsmokers who are periodontally healthy. Settings and Design: Two hundred subjects in the mean range of 20–30 years of age were included in the study population. It was a retrospective study carried out for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects were divided into four groups: 50 nonsmokers, 50 light smokers (15 cigarettes/day. Full mouth plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, and probing depths were measured. Percentage viability of circulating neutrophils and average number of phagocytosed Candida albicans were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Means and standard deviations were calculated from data obtained within the groups. Comparison between the smokers and nonsmokers was performed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA analysis. Comparison between smoker groups was performed using Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test. Results: Percentage viability of neutrophils was significantly less in heavy smokers (66.9 ± 4.0, moderate (76.6 ± 4.2, light smokers (83.1 ± 2.5 as compared to nonsmokers (92.3 ± 2.6 (P < 0.01. The ability of neutrophils to phagocytose, i.e., mean particle number was significantly less in light smokers (3.5 ± 0.5, moderate smokers (2.3 ± 0.5, and heavy smokers (1.4 ± 0.5 compared to nonsmokers (4.9 ± 0.7 (P < 0.01 with evidence of dose-response effect. Conclusions: Smoking significantly affects neutrophils viability and phagocytic function in periodontally healthy population.

  19. The Modulation of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Function by Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor Type 1 - Expressing Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    cytospin centrifuge and fixed with methanol. The cells were counter stained with Safranin O following fixation and air -dried. The percent of PMNs...final time and centrifuged for 2 min at 9,000 X g. The supernatant was aspirated and the pellet dried under an air stream and then resuspended in...patients." Microbiologia 10(3): 249-56. Bokoch, G. M. (1995). "Regulation of the phagocyte respiratory burst by small GTP- binding proteins." Trends Cell

  20. Physiology of polymorphonuclear neutrophils Fisiología de los polimorfonucleares neutrófilos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana García de Olarte

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Phagocytic cells. particularly neutrophils. are a fundamental part of the host response against aggression by infectious as well as non-infectious agents. and they are Involved In the generation of tissue damage during Inflammatory response. Cell responses of neutrophils depend on a series of closely related events like adherence to and diapedesis through endothelial cells. migration toward the sites of inflammation. phagocytósis and destruction of opsonized particles. All these actions are performed through the perfect integration between the systems of cellular activation and microbicidal mechanisms. Both oxygen-dependent and independent. A large portion of the biochemical. molecular and genetic mechanisms that lead to the physiologic response of neutrophils has been elucidated which permits the identification and understanding of the pathogenesis of disorders affecting these cells.

    Las células fagocíticas, en particular los neutrófilos son una pieza fundamental en la respuesta del huésped contra la agresión por diversos agentes, Infecciosos O no y están Involucradas en la generación de daño tisular durante la inflamación. Las respuestas celulares de los PMN dependen de una serie de hechos íntimamente relacionados, como la adherencia al endotelio vascular, la diapedesis a través de las células endoteliales, la migración hacia los sitios de Inflamación y la fagocitosis y ulterior destrucción de las partículas opsonizadas. Todo esto se logra mediante la integración perfecta entre los sistemas de activación celular y los mecanismos microbicidas, dependientes O no del oxígeno. Se ha esclarecido una gran parte de los mecanismos bioquímicos, moleculares y genéticos que llevan a la respuesta fisiológica de los neutrófilos lo cual ha permitido Identificar y entender la patogénesis de diferentes trastornos que los afectan.

  1. Physiology of polymorphonuclear neutrophils Fisiología de los polimorfonucleares neutrófilos

    OpenAIRE

    Diana García de Olarte; Pablo Javier Patiño Grajales

    1991-01-01

    Phagocytic cells. particularly neutrophils. are a fundamental part of the host response against aggression by infectious as well as non-infectious agents. and they are Involved In the generation of tissue damage during Inflammatory response. Cell responses of neutrophils depend on a series of closely related events like adherence to and diapedesis through endothelial cells. migration toward the sites of inflamma...

  2. Immune complex detection by immunofluorescence on polymorphonuclear leucocytes : an experimental and clinicopathological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Steffelaar (Jan Willem)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractDiseases, which are the result of immune reactions associated with tissue damage may be caused by several mechanisms. The immunologic mechanisms resulting in tissue damage have been categorized in 4 types (Gell and Coombs, 1968). 1. the anaphylactic type, mediated by IgE type of antibodi

  3. Depressed polymorphonuclear cell functions in periparturient cows that develop postpartum reproductive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Rafiqul; Kumar, Harendra; Singh, Gyanendra; Krishnan, Binsila B; Dey, Sahadeb

    2017-09-01

    The study was planned to see if there is any important and significant changes in the PMN function in cows suffering from postpartum reproductive diseases (PRD). Blood sampling was done from 41 pregnant cows on 15 days prepartum (-15d), calving day (0d), 15 days (15d) and 30 days (30d) postpartum and thorough gynaecological examination was performed on 0d, 15d, 30d and 45d for diagnosis of PRD like retained placenta (RP), clinical metritis (CM), clinical endometritis (CE) and delayed involution of uterus (DIU). The heparinised blood was used for isolation of PMN leukocytes for estimation of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in each group of cows. The SO production (ΔOD) was greater for normal (0.19 ± 0.05) than cows suffering from RP (-0.12 ± 0.09), CM (-0.15 ± 0.13) and CE (-0.07 ± 0.05) at -15d. The mean value was greater for normal cows (0.12) than the cows with PRD (0.05 to 0.9) at 30d. The H2O2 production was greater for normal than cows with PRD at all sampling days and significantly greater than cows with RP and CE at 15d (p < 0.01) and 30d (P < 0.05). The MPO activity (μmol/1 × 10(7)) was greater for normal (18.77 ± 1.27) than for RP (12.52 ± 2.57) and CM (11.31 ± 3.30) cows on 0d. The depressed capability of the PMN from the cows with PRD to produce SO, H2O2 and MPO during the periparturient period indicated their association with the development of RP, CM and CE.

  4. Nitric oxide production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in infected cystic fibrosis sputum consumes oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus Ernst;

    2014-01-01

    identified in the sputum. In addition, the production of the stable end-products of NO in CF sputum was correlated with the concentration of PMNs; NO(3)(-) (P ... (P 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM) (P 

  5. Human assisted robotic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  6. Human Use Index (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  7. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  8. Human Use Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the...

  9. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  10. Human Services Offices

    Data.gov (United States)

    Fairfax County, Virginia — This data contains point features representing the human services offices within Fairfax County.“HS_Region” is the office for each human services region, “DFS_Area”...

  11. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  12. The Growing Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  13. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  14. Monogenic human obesity syndromes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    .... This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  15. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    The article puts forward an aesthetic and psychoanalytic analysis of Titian's painting, The Flaying of Marsyas, arguing that the painting is a reflection on the human subject as a being constituted by skin and by a core of non-humanity. The analysis is partly an answer to Melanie Hart's (2007......) article 'Visualizing the mind: Looking at Titian's Flaying of Marsyas', addressing features of the painting not commented on by Hart, and supplementing Hart's (Kleinian) theoretical frame by involving Didier Anzieu's 'skin ego', Slavoj Zizek's concept of the 'non-human', Giorgio Agamben's term...

  16. Human productivity program definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  17. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  18. Human nature and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations.

  19. Human Document Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.; Abelmann, L.; Manz, A.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    “The Human Document Project” is a project which tries to answer all of the questions related to preserving information about the human race for tens of generations of humans to come or maybe even for a future intelligence which can emerge in the coming thousands of years. This document mainly focuss

  20. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  1. Has human evolution stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Alan R

    2010-07-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  2. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...

  3. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  4. Monogenic human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  5. From Human Past to Human Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with a refutation of the orthodox model of final Pleistocene human evolution, presenting an alternative, better supported account of this crucial phase. According to this version, the transition from robust to gracile humans during that period is attributable to selective breeding rather than natural selection, rendered possible by the exponential rise of culturally guided volitional choices. The rapid human neotenization coincides with the development of numerous somatic and neural detriments and pathologies. Uniformitarian reasoning based on ontogenic homology suggests that the cognitive abilities of hominins are consistently underrated in the unstable orthodoxies of Pleistocene archaeology. A scientifically guided review establishes developmental trajectories defining recent changes in the human genome and its expressions, which then form the basis of attempts to extrapolate from them into the future. It is suggested that continuing and perhaps accelerating unfavorable genetic changes to the human species, rather than existential threats such as massive disasters, pandemics, or astrophysical events, may become the ultimate peril of humanity.

  6. Humanity at the Edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.; Gjødsbøl, Iben M.; Dam, Mie S.

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of anthropology and the social sciences lies a notion of human existence according to which humans and animals share the basic need for food, but only humans have the capacity for morality. Based on fieldwork in a pig laboratory, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a dementia ...... human and animal value and agency with approaches that focus on human experience and virtue ethics, we argue that ‘the human’ at stake in the moral laboratory of feeding precarious lives puts ‘the human’ in anthropology at disposal for moral experimentation....

  7. Jordan Adjusted Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Human Development Index (HDI) and Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) In 1990, the United Nations Development Programme designed a Human Development Index composed of life expectancy at birth, level of education and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. In 2011, the UNDP ranked Jordan 95th out of 187 countries with a human development index of 0.698, up from 0.591 in 1990, making it the leading medium-range country for human development (fig. VIII.1). In 2010, the inequality adj...

  8. Human Beings And Water

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The writer of this paper on this writing is talking about the human beings and water. Water is one of the very fundamentally things that human beings need to keep their lives. Human beings sometimes do not realise that the water is very important for them because they actually cannot live their lives without the present of water. Human beings can keep their lives without rice, but cannot without water. For instances the use of water for human beings are domestic use, cooking, washing, bathing...

  9. Human rights and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  10. Human Milk Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  11. Human Capital and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of sustainability needs to consider the role of all forms of capital—natural, biological, social, technological, financial, cultural—and the complex ways in which they interact. All forms of capital derive their value, utility and application from human mental awareness, creativity and social innovation. This makes human capital, including social capital, the central determinant of resource productivity and sustainability. Humanity has entered the Anthropocene Epoch in which human changes have become the predominant factor in evolution. Humanity is itself evolving from animal physicality to social vitality to mental individuality. This transition has profound bearing on human productive capabilities, adaptability, creativity and values, the organization of economy, public policy, social awareness and life styles that determine sustainability. This article examines the linkages between population, economic development, employment, education, health, social equity, cultural values, energy intensity and sustainability in the context of evolving human consciousness. It concludes that development of human capital is the critical determinant of long-term sustainability and that efforts to accelerate the evolution of human consciousness and emergence of mentally self-conscious individuals will be the most effective approach for ensuring a sustainable future. Education is the primary lever. Human choice matters.

  12. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  13. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  14. Pneumococcal intracellular killing is abolished by polysaccharide despite serum complement activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Schweinle, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Normal human serum absorbed at 0 degrees C with pneumococcal serotype 1, 12, or 25 lost the ability to support polymorphonuclear leukocyte intracellular killing of some pneumococcal serotypes even if immunoglobulin was provided. The absorbed serum contained no organisms but had residual polysaccharide when measured by counterimmunoelectrophoresis against type-specific antisera. The influence of pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) on serum support of intracellular polymorphonuclear leukocyte kil...

  15. Chimeras and human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  16. Human Performance in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  17. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  18. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research......Todays expanding digital landscape constitutes an important research object as well as the research environment for the Humanities at the beginning of the 21st century. Taking this state of affairs as a starting point this inaugural lecture presents a vision for how the digital affects...

  19. Advancing Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2012-2015) was initiated after the successful conclusion of the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-2010).The Chinese government in late July published an assessment report on the implementation of the plan,elaborating on the full implementation of China's first-ever national program on human rights development,which was drafted in April 2009.

  20. Human hemoglobin genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  1. Modern Human Capital Management

    OpenAIRE

    Feldberger, Madita

    2008-01-01

    Title: Modern Human Capital Management Seminar date: 30th of May 2008 Course: Master thesis in Business Administration, 15 ECTS Authors: Madita Feldberger Supervisor: Lars Svensson Keywords: Human capital, SWOT Analysis, Strategic Map, Balanced Scorecard Research Problem: Despite of the success of Human Capital Management (HCM) in research it did not arrive yet in the HR departments of many companies. Numerous firms even have problems to set their strategic goals with focus on HR. The HR Bala...

  2. Robotics for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  3. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  4. Human Performance Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Biochemistry:Improvements in energy metabolism, muscular strength and endurance capacity have a basis in biochemical and molecular adaptations within the human body....

  5. Extraterritorial Human Rights Obligations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amsinck Boie, Hans Nikolaj; Torp, Kristian

    adequately be addressed without including the approach to the problem taken in practice; Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. The book therefore draws upon the concept of CSR and the approaches developed here and discusses whether states may utilize the CSR-based concept of human rights due diligence...... to fulfil their possible obligations to protect against human rights violations by corporations.......The book addresses the issue of corporate respect for human rights by examining if and how states are obligated to ensure that corporations originating from their jurisdiction respect human rights when they operate abroad. The existence of such a duty is much debated by academics at national...

  6. The psychology of humanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  7. The Human Toolmaker

    OpenAIRE

    Kassuba, Tanja; Kastner, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Do you enjoy building airplanes, cars, houses, or robots with Lego blocks? Humans are the only animal species that can create complicated constructions from simple Lego blocks – our Lego building ability is “human-specific,” since it is only found in human beings. What would our closest relatives, apes or monkeys, do with a box of Lego blocks? They would probably chew on them, and lose interest when they find out that they are not edible! Why are humans the only Lego builders in the animal ki...

  8. Photography after the Human

    OpenAIRE

    Zylinska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    How can we visualise and subsequently reimagine the abstraction that is the extinction of human species while there is still time? The article addresses this question by considering the existence of images – and, in particular, light-induced mechanical images known as photographs – after the human. The “after the human” designation does not just refer to the material disappearance of the human in some kind of distant future, but also to the present imagining of the disappearance of the human ...

  9. Refractoriness in human atria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Jespersen, Thomas; Christ, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    drugs. Cardiomyocyte excitability depends on availability of sodium channels, which involves both time- and voltage-dependent recovery from inactivation. This study therefore aims to characterise how sodium channel inactivation affects refractoriness in human atria. METHODS AND RESULTS: Steady......-state activation and inactivation parameters of sodium channels measured in vitro in isolated human atrial cardiomyocytes were used to parameterise a mathematical human atrial cell model. Action potential data were acquired from human atrial trabeculae of patients in either sinus rhythm or chronic atrial...... in pharmacological management of chronic atrial fibrillation....

  10. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung [Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon-Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Dental Regenerative Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute and School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung, E-mail: ccpperio@snu.ac.kr [Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  11. Humanities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, Internet studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    the interplay between four areas which until now to a certain extent have been separated: Traditional Hu- manities, Digital Humanities, Media studies, and Internet studies. The vision is followed by an outline of how it can be unfolded in concrete activities, in the form of research projects, research...

  12. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  13. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century

  14. Introduction to human factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  15. Human Capital and Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Alders

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the relation between human capital and retirement when the age of retirement is endogenous. This relation is examined in a life-cycle earnings model. An employee works full time until retirement. The worker accumulates human capital by training- on-the-job and by

  16. Cohabitation: Humans & Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodington, W.

    2012-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Cohabitation of humans and agriculture can be used to improve building climate, human health and the state of the world. It affects building design and requires new building components. This manual explains w

  17. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  18. Human Resource Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An interview is reported which discussed the implications for the hiring, recruiting, screening and development of employees in the light of human resource accounting, here defined as the identification, accumulation and dissemination of information about human resources in dollar terms. (SA)

  19. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.…

  20. The Human Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    with fundamental human values like intuition, vision and sensing; all the qualities the technology, the industrialisation and rationalisation, or in short modernity, has been criticized for having taken away from human existence. What technology has taken away now comes back through new technology as an aid...

  1. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  2. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  3. Human Rights Guaranteed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Report says China’s human rights plan successfully implemented According to a detailed assessment report published by China’s State Council Information Office (SCIO),all the measures outlined in the National Human Rights Action Plan of China (2009-10) had been successfully put into place by the end of 2010.

  4. Defects in Human Nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄靓

    2008-01-01

    By tracing the defects of society back to the defects of human nature, humanity's essence is proved to be inherent evil. Man's natural tendency to do evil remain harnessed through the controls and conventions imposed by civilization, however, when rules or civilization are weakened, man' s dark side is unleashed.

  5. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  6. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues its first white paper on human resources The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September 10, highlighting the country’s policies to cope with employment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents.

  7. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a Colo

  8. Humanism within Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  9. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    Passive humans (sitting or standing) might well be present on flooring-systems, footbridges or other structures that carry humans. An active croud of people might generate structural vibrations, and these might be problematic. The passive crowd of people, however, will interact with the structural...

  10. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  11. Translating the human microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Distefano, P.S.; Doré, J.; Huttenhower, C.; Knight, R.; Lawley, T.D.; Raes, J.; Turnbaugh, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, an explosion of descriptive analyses from initiatives, such as the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) and the MetaHIT project, have begun to delineate the human microbiome. Inhabitants of the intestinal tract, nasal passages, oral cavities, skin, gastrointestinal tract and urogenit

  12. Human Resource Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Centering on strategic objective of reform and development,CIAE formulated its objectives in human resource construction for the 13th Five-year Plan period,and achieved new apparent progress in human resource construction in 2015.1 Implementation of"LONGMA Project"

  13. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  14. Human Rights Improving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China issues a white paper on its human rights,highlighting freedom of speech on the Interne The Chinese Government released a white paper on its human rights in 2009 on September 26,highlighting the role of Internet freedom and the country’s efforts in safeguarding citizens’legitimate civil and political rights.

  15. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century lib

  16. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... a shared interdisciplinary research and educational collaboration. As a creative research initiative it focuses on change and innovative thinking. The innovativeness is a result of the strongly interdisciplinary perspective which is at the heart of Designing Human Technologies. Designing Human Technologies...

  17. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...... der mellem Human Relations (Hawthorne-eksperimenter ne) og Neo-Human Relations (behovsteorierne), men i denne fremstilling bruges Human Relations som en samlebetegnelse for begge disse – noget forskellige – forskningstraditioner. De har i dag opnået stor udbredelse og er praktisk talt obligatorisk...

  18. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vigeant

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely mode of transmission in this case.

  19. Human to Human Transmission of Brucella Melitensis

    OpenAIRE

    Patrice Vigeant; Jack Mendelson; Miller, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Human brucellosis is acquired mainly through contact with infected animal tissues, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or infected aerosols. Person to person transmission is still considered uncertain. The case of a woman diagnosed with proven brucellosis after her husband suffered a relapse of bacteremia with Brucella melitensis biotype 3, which was originally acquired abroad by eating goat cheese, is described. It was postulated that person to person spread of brucellosis is a likely ...

  20. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  1. Identification of a cell-penetrating peptide domain from human beta-defensin 3 and characterization of its anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jue Yeon Lee,1,* Jin Sook Suh,2,* Jung Min Kim,1 Jeong Hwa Kim,1 Hyun Jung Park,1 Yoon Jeong Park,1,2 Chong Pyoung Chung1 1Central Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC, Chungcheongbuk-do, Republic of Korea; 2Dental Regenerative Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Human beta-defensins (hBDs are crucial factors of intrinsic immunity that function in the immunologic response to a variety of invading enveloped viruses, bacteria, and fungi. hBDs can cause membrane depolarization and cell lysis due to their highly cationic nature. These molecules participate in antimicrobial defenses and the control of adaptive and innate immunity in every mammalian species and are produced by various cell types. The C-terminal 15-mer peptide within hBD3, designated as hBD3-3, was selected for study due to its cell- and skin-penetrating activity, which can induce anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. hBD3-3 penetrated both the outer membrane of the cells and mouse skin within a short treatment period. Two other peptide fragments showed poorer penetration activity compared to hBD3-3. hBD3-3 inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, and secretory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, hBD3-3 reduced the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. Further investigation also revealed that hBD3-3 downregulated nuclear factor kappa B-dependent inflammation by directly suppressing the degradation of phosphorylated-IκBα and by downregulating active nuclear factor kappa B p65. Our findings indicate that hBD3-3 may be conjugated with drugs of interest to ensure their proper translocation to

  2. Human Power Empirically Explored

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, A.J.

    2011-01-18

    Harvesting energy from the users' muscular power to convert this into electricity is a relatively unknown way to power consumer products. It nevertheless offers surprising opportunities for product designers; human-powered products function independently from regular power infrastructure, are convenient and can be environmentally and economically beneficial. This work provides insight into the knowledge required to design human-powered energy systems in consumer products from a scientific perspective. It shows the developments of human-powered products from the first introduction of the BayGen Freeplay radio in 1995 till current products and provides an overview and analysis of 211 human-powered products currently on the market. Although human power is generally perceived as beneficial for the environment, this thesis shows that achieving environmental benefit is only feasible when the environmental impact of additional materials in the energy conversion system is well balanced with the energy demands of the products functionality. User testing with existing products showed a preference for speeds in the range of 70 to 190 rpm for crank lengths from 32 to 95 mm. The muscular input power varied from 5 to 21 W. The analysis of twenty graduation projects from the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering in the field of human-powered products, offers an interesting set of additional practice based design recommendations. The knowledge based approach of human power is very powerful to support the design of human-powered products. There is substantial potential for improvements in the domains energy conversion, ergonomics and environment. This makes that human power, when applied properly, is environmentally and economically competitive over a wider range of applications than thought previously.

  3. Human pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  4. Enhancing human capacities

    CERN Document Server

    Savulescu, Julian; Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing Human Capacities is the first to review the very latest scientific developments in human enhancement. It is unique in its examination of the ethical and policy implications of these technologies from a broad range of perspectives. Presents a rich range of perspectives on enhancement from world leading ethicists and scientists from Europe and North America The most comprehensive volume yet on the science and ethics of human enhancement Unique in providing a detailed overview of current and expected scientific advances in this area Discusses both general conceptual and ethical issues

  5. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  7. Human dignity and bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By opening the field of bioethics followed a new wave of intense debate on the theological, philosophical and legal significance of the concept of human dignity . Exactly ten years ago (December 2003 American bioethicist Ruth Maclin has proposed to divest ourselves of the concept of human dignity because it is vague, useless and redundant and that, without any loss, we can replace it by the ethical principle of personal autonomy. Her article was followed by harsh reactions and opposite views. What is this term in so broad, almost inflationary and opposite use is not a reason to deprive him, but, on the contrary, it shows how important it is and that it should be determined at least outline. As universal values and general concept, the human dignity has no pre-defined and narrow, precise meaning. It is more an evaluation horizon, the guiding principle and regulatory ideas that must constantly define and codify by many guaranted human rights and fundamental freedoms. As generic notion of each reasonable law, it is their foundation and a common denominator, legitimising basis of natural but also of positive law. As intrinsic and static value which means the humaneness, the humanity it is absolute, inherent to every human being without distinction and conditioning, as a unique and unrepeatable creation. In this meaning, the dignity is the obligation and limitation of the state, society and each of us. As an ethical and dynamic category, it is not given to us, but it is assign to us, and it is not in us, but always before us, as a guide of our actions in accordance with virtues, to treat ourselves, each other and the nature in a human way. The century in which we live is named the century of molecular biology and genetic engineering because of the enormous potential but also risks to human dignity. Because of that human dignity has become a central principle in all international documents relating to the human genome, genetics and bioethics, adopted

  8. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  9. Influência de extratos hidroetanólicos de plantas medicinais sobre a quimiotaxia de leucócitos humanos Influence of some medicinal plant hydroethanolic extracts on human leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Presibella

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários métodos in vitro têm sido empregados para a investigação das atividades biológicas de plantas usadas na medicina popular para o tratamento de processos inflamatórios. Neste trabalho, investigou-se a influência dos extratos hidroetanólicos de Rauvolfia sellowii Muell. Arg, Hybanthus bigibbosus (St.-Hil Hassler e Anchieta pyrifolia (Mart. G. Don, conhecidas popularmente como pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado e cipó-suma, respectivamente, sobre a quimiotaxia de leucócitos humanos, estimulados a migrar contra um gradiente de caseína, utilizando-se o método de Boyden. A dexametasona foi utilizada como substância de referência da inibição da quimiotaxia leucocitária. Os resultados demonstraram efeito inibitório significativo de todos os extratos das plantas testadas, sobre a migração de polimorfonucleares, induzida por caseína. Entretanto, essa atividade variou de intensidade conforme a concentração e a espécie estudada. Efeitos máximos foram observados, nas concentrações de 1000, 10 e 1µg/ml com os extratos de pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado e cipó-suma, respectivamente, com migração de 81,6±3,9%; 85,4±2,4% e 91,7±2,2% dos polimorfonucleares, enquanto que, com a dexametasona, este efeito foi de 70,3±5,9%. Embora estudos mais aprofundados sejam necessários, os resultados apresentados podem servir como base preliminar de dados, contribuindo para esclarecer o mecanismo da atividade antiinflamatória atribuída às essas plantas na medicina caseira.Several in vitro methods have been used for the investigation of the biological activities of plants used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. In this study, we have investigated the ability of the hydroethanolic extracts from Rauvolfia sellowii Muell. Arg, Hybanthus bigibbosus (St.-Hil Hassler, and Anchieta pyrifolia (Mart. G. Don, locally known as pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado, and cipó-suma, respectively, in interfering with the human

  10. Human Capital Tracking Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — AVS is now required to collect, track, and report on data from the following Flight, Business and Workforce Plan. The Human Resource Management’s Performance Target...

  11. Human Research Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strategically, the HRP conducts research and technology development that: 1) enables the development or modification of Agency-level human health and performance...

  12. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to the Centers ... and how to prevent it. How to Prevent HPV: There are 3 types of HPV vaccine: Cervarix , ...

  13. Human Reliability Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  14. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  15. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  16. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  17. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  18. Human Resource Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  19. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  20. CHINESE OF HUMANITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Humanism Education in Language Class,Innovative model university English teaching,Analysis on Information Literacy of College English Teachers Based On Net Environment,Cultural Differences between E-C Idioms and Teaching of English Idioms

  1. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  2. Will Technology Humanize Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    The author considers the question of whether technology will cause humanization or dehumanization in the schools. He concludes that we can not stop tecchnology; we can only give it direction and purpose. (Author/MS)

  3. Report Details Human Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Chinese Government issued a white paper on its human resources on September I0, highlighting the coun-try's policies to cope with employ-ment pressures and a lack of "high-level innovative talents."

  4. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. The scientific evidence ... stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also known as research or therapeutic cloning), ...

  5. Science and Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Science and humanism are separated so completely as to bring about the creation of two cultures quite distinct from each other within contemporary civilization. Pragmatic, rational attitudes are needed on both sides to bring them together. (DF)

  6. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  7. [Demography and human ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, J M

    1993-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century the German biologist Ernest Haekel was the first scientist to use the term ecology, which was defined as the study of relationships of organisms or groups of organisms with the environment and indicated the interdependence of the living world, including plants, animals, and humans. This concept also indicates a continuous process of adaptation of organisms to their external environment. The basic concepts of scientific ecology, which developed at the end of the 19th century, can be attributed to Darwin: the relationships between living beings and the notion of the process of adaptation to their environment. The term human ecology appeared in the early 1920s. Human ecology embodies fundamental ideas: biotype, habitat, community, biocenosis, ecosystem, biomass, interchange and equilibrium, and circulation of energy. The accumulated knowledge about human ecology is broken down using the criteria of topography (ecology of humid forests, deserts, lakes, etc.); followed by the appearance of species; and the variants of classical division: auto ecology (influence of external factors on living beings) and sinecology (the study of groups of associated organisms, i.e., natural, animal, and vegetation communities). The species are considered on the basis of equality or sinecology (all of them have the same interests), while in human ecology a species is determined by its relation to a reference group--autoecology or anthropocentric ecology. In 1911, J. Thompson bridged the gap between biological knowledge and social sciences; in 1921, H. Barrows identified human ecology as a component of geography; in 1925, L. Bernard presented the classification of ecosystems; and in 1936, Ezra Park published his work, Human Ecology, followed in 1945 by the emergence of the Chicago school. Demography and human ecology are intimately connected because population is the result of natural and migratory movements, therefore the two sciences require a methodology

  8. Human Resources Accounting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 21 st century will be the epoch of knowled ge economy. Knowledge economy is to develop economy on the basis of knowledge will surely become the major resources of economy development. Therefore, human resources accounting which provides such information as the ebb and follow of hu man resources investment, the size of the human resources employment, will bec ome the main stream of accounting the time of knowledge economy. To face China 's reality, to develop economy, and to flourish enterprise...

  9. Human motricity and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sérgio Vieira e Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available If human motricity science intends to study motor conduct (or actions in which the human being pursues transcendence (or surmounting, it inevitably relates to the large realm of health. What are the aspects it evinces? Transdisciplinarity, solidarity among the various knowledge types (including poetical, complexity, (where the physical is integrated but surmounted and the firm belief that to be healthy is to have in ourselves, alive and working, the capacity for surmounting anything.

  10. Human Happiness Is Sensuous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕静

    2003-01-01

    All human happiness is biological happiness. That is strictly scientific. At the risk of being misunderstood. I must make it clearer: all human happiness is sensuous happiness. The spiritualists will misunderstand me. I am sure; the spiritualists and materialists must forever misunderstand each other, because they don’t talk the same language, or mean by the same word different things. Are we, too, in this problem

  11. Evolution and human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  12. Meeting human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  13. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  14. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  15. A WORLD BEYOND HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Abram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial project to investigate the relationship between magic and traditional medicine as practiced by shamans in Southern rural Asia, the focus of attention gradually shifted to an awareness of the negotiation traditional medicine people or shamans exert between the human community and the larger community of beings. This attentiveness to a more-than-human world does not occur at a supernatural domain above nature or inside her personal self but is the result of the shaman’s special ability to project her consciousness horizontally to other forms of sensibility with which human existence is interwoven. The ecological function of the shaman is to maintain a constant balance between what is taken and what is given from the human community to the larger community. The spirits of indigenous cultures are not defined in opposition to materiality but are essentially those modes of intelligence or awareness that do not possess a human form. By exploring different landscapes, and the sensibility living in them, a new sensitivity is awoken that allows for communication with those intelligences. However, the drowning of these other voices in Western culture, which reduces otherness to an object, creates an uneasiness that is hardly perceived except as an inability to interact with anything more-than-human and its dire consequences in the form of “civilization’s” destructive behavior.

  16. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  17. Human Milk Fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  18. Human Factors Review Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  19. Philosophical foundations of human rights

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    What makes something a human right? What is the relationship between the moral foundations of human rights and human rights law? What are the difficulties of appealing to human rights? This book offers the first comprehensive survey of current thinking on the philosophical foundations of human rights. Divided into four parts, this book focusses firstly on the moral grounds of human rights, for example in our dignity, agency, interests or needs. 'Secondly, it looks at the implications that different moral perspectives on human rights bear for human rights law and politics. Thirdly, it discusses specific and topical human rights including freedom of expression and religion, security, health and more controversial rights such as a human right to subsistence. The final part discusses nuanced critical and reformative views on human rights from feminist, Kantian and relativist perspectives among others. The essays represent new and canonical research by leading scholars in the field. Each part is comprised of a set...

  20. Why Geo-Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  1. [Human ehrlichiosis. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraga-Alvarado, C

    1994-12-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized tick-borne disease. Since 1935 Ehrlichia canis has been known as a cause of illness in dogs and other canine species, and for a few years it was related with human disease. In 1990, Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated from a man suspected of having ehrlichiosis. Partial sequencing of the rRNAS from the human isolate and E. canis, indicated that they are 98.7% related. More recently (May 1994) an "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis" have been reported in USA. PCR amplification and sequence of 16S rDNA, showed that the human isolate was virtually identical to those reported for E. phagocytophila y E. equi, organisms that cause ehrlichiosis in rumiant and in horses. Most patients shows fever, headache, malaise, nausea or vomiting, anorexia and in a minority of cases rash is present. Some of them have complications such as pulmonary infiltrates, gastrointestinal problems, renal dysfunction or failure, hepatoesplenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, DIC and some times death. Leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzyme values have been common findings. Tetracycline and cloramphenicol have been using in adults and children as especific theraphy.

  2. The human serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Psychogios

    Full Text Available Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca.

  3. Humanity and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available So far our open access publishing company MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute has published mainly science, medicine and technology journals. To become a multidisciplinary publisher, we launched the journal Sustainability [1]. More recently, we started to run several social science journals, including Societies [2], Religions [3], Administrative Sciences [4] and Behavioral Sciences [5]. Today we published the first paper [6] of the inaugural issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787. This will be an international open access journal, publishing scholarly papers of high quality across all humanities disciplines. As a publisher, I would like to publish journals surrounding the topics of sustainability and I believe the humanities as a discipline of academic studies are very important. As a scientist, I believed science and technology will only benefit human beings. I was raised in a small village, living a very primitive life in a peasant family: no electricity, no machines, of course no TV and no refrigerator. Now, the life of my children is completely different. Even my own life has completely changed. I have witnessed very rapid changes: more and more machines are used to consume mineral resources and energy and to pollute the environment, in order to produce more and more powerful machines (we are also launching a journal titled Machines, in which the relationship between Man and machine should be an interesting topic.. Machines are more and more like human individuals consuming resources themselves (we are launching a journal titled Resources. [...

  4. NOOSPHERE HUMAN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novozhilova Elena Olegovna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author dwells upon typical features of noosphere human communities, assessing prospects and hazards of genetic engineering, namely of recombinant DNA technology. Background: Socio-historical ecology ushers in a new approach to studying society in its relation to nature. This interrelation is regarded as a series of socio-ecological transformations ending up in certain types of socio-ecological systems being formed. One of such historical types is represented by a noosphere human community [1]. Results: A number of characteristic features of this kind of community have been outlined, namely: its existence and functioning on global scale, major role of information in making up social wealth, creation of living matter. Conclusion: The noosphere human community is currently the latest stage in the sequence of historical types of socio-ecological systems. Widespread use of information and genetic technology may enable noosphere people to create in future a totally man-made world superseding evolutionary biosphere.

  5. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    , men også arbejdssociologien, arbejdspsykologien og human resource development. Den første retning udsprang af de såkaldte Hawthorne-eksperimenter og psykologen Elton Mayos bearbejdelse af resultaterne derfra. Den anden er en løsere gruppering bestående af navne som Abraham Maslow og Frederick Herzberg......Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...

  6. [Human pulmonary trichomonoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboucher, Christophe; Caby, Stéphanie; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Pierce, Raymond; Capron, Monique; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2007-05-01

    Colonization of human lungs by various Trichomonas species is a frequent occurrence, but is unknown to most physicians. At this site of infection, the parasite develops into an amoeboid form that renders it unrecognizable. For this reason it has been overlooked until recently. Morphological identification is not feasible under these conditions and molecular tools provide the only means of identification. The species involved are not restricted to Trichomonas tenax, a saprophyte of the mouth that is usually cited in the rare cases of pleuropulmonary trichomoniasis reported in the literature. The recent discovery of species previously unknown in humans raises further questions, including the zoonotic potential of these microorganisms and the existence of species of animal origin that have adapted to humans. Anaerobiosis in poorly ventilated alveolar lumen, rather than immunodepression, seems to be the factor that promotes proliferation of this parasite. The diagnosis of trichomoniasis and its treatment by specific drugs will make it possible to evaluate the pathogenicity of these parasites.

  7. Scientists and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  8. Helicopter human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  9. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  10. Reflections on humanizing biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2008-01-01

    Although biomedicine is responsible for the "miracles" of modern medicine, paradoxically it has also led to a quality-of-care crisis in which many patients feel disenfranchised from the health-care industry. To address this crisis, several medical commentators make an appeal for humanizing biomedicine, which has led to shifts in the philosophical boundaries of medical knowledge and practice. In this paper, the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical boundaries of biomedicine and its humanized versions are investigated and compared to one another. Biomedicine is founded on a metaphysical position of mechanistic monism, an epistemology of objective knowing, and an ethic of emotionally detached concern. In humanizing modern medicine, these boundaries are often shifted to a metaphysical position of dualism/holism, an epistemology of subject knowing, and an ethic of empathic care. In a concluding section, the question is discussed whether these shifts in the philosophical boundaries are adequate to resolve the quality-of-care crisis.

  11. HUMAN MISSION OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Miovska Spaseva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the complex role and great responsibility of the education today in development of the moral strength and human values of the children and youth. At the beginning of the article the author reconsiders the pedagogical ideas of Maria Montessori and her concept of education for peace as an instrument for reconstruction of the society and for improvement of the human living. Than the analysis of the moral values in the contemporary society is made and several issues and dilemmas are discussed referring the value disorientation of the youth and the importance of the models of adult’s moral behavior in their search for personal identity. On the basis of this analysis, the human dimension of the education is elaborated enhancing the need for its understanding as support of development, which is based on several crucial elements: love, freedom and spirit of community.

  12. (Human) Resourcing For CI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; S., Jacob; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2005-01-01

    More and more, the ability to compete in today’s market is viewed as being dependent on human capital. One of the most challenging aspects of human resource management involves supplying the organization with the human capital necessary to fulfill its objectives. This task becomes especially...... challenging in organizations involved in change processes such as Continuous Improvement (CI), as the technical skills traditionally valued are no longer adequate. These companies are faced with the question: “What competencies should our employees possess in order to contribute to our success, given...... the change processes in which we are engaged?” Without a clear picture of the types of competencies required to implement CI, it is impossible for companies to make informed decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, and training of their workforce. The objective of this paper is therefore to define...

  13. Designing Human Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    and the design process, in ethical and society-related concerns, and in evaluating how designs fulfill needs and solve problems. Designing Human Technologies subscribes to a broad technology concept including information and communication, mobile, environmental/sustainable and energy technologies......, the Humanities, and Social Science. The initiative broadens the perspective of IS and recognize reflections on aesthetics, ethics, values, connections to politics, and strategies for enabling a better future as legitimate parts of the research agenda. Designing Human Technologies is a design-oriented Strategic...... and technologies relating to performances and experiences, urban design, climate adaptation, etc. The research takes a process-oriented and participatory approach and involves interaction between different user interests and designs. It is based on empirical, typical case- and action research-oriented studies...

  14. Abortion and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus.

  15. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  16. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  17. [Human rights and procreation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  18. Monogenic obesity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Until relatively recently, the small number of identifiable inherited human diseases associated with marked obesity were complex, pleiotropic developmental disorders, the molecular basis for which were entirely obscure. The molecular basis for many of these complex syndromes, such as Bardet Beidl syndrome, has been revealed, providing novel insights into processes essential for human hypothalamic function and energy balance. In addition to these discoveries, which were the fruits of positional cloning, the molecular constituents of the signaling pathways responsible for the control of mammalian energy homeostasis have been identified, largely through the study of natural or artificial mutations in mice. We discuss the increasing number of human disorders that result from genetic disruption of the leptin-melanocortin pathways that have been identified. Practical implications of these findings for genetic counseling, prognostication, and even therapy have already emerged.

  19. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  20. Social cognition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Frith, Uta

    2007-01-01

    We review a diversity of studies of human social interaction and highlight the importance of social signals. We also discuss recent findings from social cognitive neuroscience that explore the brain basis of the capacity for processing social signals. These signals enable us to learn about...... the world from others, to learn about other people, and to create a shared social world. Social signals can be processed automatically by the receiver and may be unconsciously emitted by the sender. These signals are non-verbal and are responsible for social learning in the first year of life. Social...... signals can also be processed consciously and this allows automatic processing to be modulated and overruled. Evidence for this higher-level social processing is abundant from about 18 months of age in humans, while evidence is sparse for non-human animals. We suggest that deliberate social signalling...