WorldWideScience

Sample records for benign positional vertigo

  1. Benign positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal ... ear has fluid-filled tubes called semicircular canals. When you ...

  2. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a common clinical disorder characterized by brief recurrent spells of vertigo often brought about by certain head position changes as may occur with looking up, turning over in bed, or straightening up after bending over. It is important to understand BPPV not only because it may avert expensive and often unnecessary testing, but also because treatment is rapid, easy, and effective in >90% of cases. The diagnosis of BPPV can be made based on the history and examination. Patients usually report episodes of spinning evoked by certain movements, such as lying back or getting out of bed, turning in bed, looking up, or straightening after bending over. At present, the generally accepted recurrence rate of BPPV after successful treatment is 40%-50% at 5 years of average follow-up. There does appear to be a subset of individuals prone to multiple recurrences.

  3. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Bloch, Sune Land

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) remains the most frequent cause of vertigo. The TRV chair is a mechanical device suited for optimization of managing complex cases of BPPV. Although the use of repositioning devices in the management of BPPV is increasing, no applicable guide for the TRV...

  4. Benign positional vertigo -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not work well for treating that actual vertigo. Self-care If vertigo returns, remember that you can easily ... treat yourself at home for BPPV. A physical therapist may be able to teach you other exercises ...

  5. Horizontal Canal Benign Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Najafi

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a syndrome characterized by transient episodes of vertigo in association with rapid changes in head position in Dix-Halpike Maneuver. This kind of vertigo is thought to be caused by migration of otoconial debris into canals other than the posterior canal, such as the anterior or lateral canals. It is also theoretically possible for many aberrant patterns of BPPV to occur from an interaction of debris in several canals, location of debris within the canal, and central adaptation patterns to lesions. The symptoms of BPPV are much more consistent with free-moving densities (canaliths in the posterior SCC rather than fixed densities attached to the cupula. While the head is upright, the particles sit in the PSC at the most gravity-dependent position. The best method to induce and see vertigo and nystagmus in BPPV of the lateral semicircular canal is to rotate head 90°while patient is in the supine position, nystagmus would appear in the unaffected side weaker but longer than the affected side. canal paresis has been described in one third of the patients with BPPV. Adaptation which is one of the remarkable features of BPPV in PSC is rarely seen in LSC. Rotations of 270° or 360° around the yaw axis (the so-called barbecue maneuver toward the unaffected ear are popular methods for the treatment of geotropic HC-BPPV. These maneuvers consist of sequential head turning of 90° toward the healthy side while supine. With these maneuvers, the free-floating otoconial debris migrates in the ampullofugal direction, finally entering the utricle through the nonampullated end of the horizontal canal. This kind of vertigo recovers spontaneously more rapidly and suddenly.

  6. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wensen, E; van Leeuwen, R B; van der Zaag-Loonen, H J; Masius-Olthof, S; Bloem, B R

    2013-12-01

    Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients with Parkinson's disease, with and without dizziness. 305 consecutive outpatients with PD completed the Movement Disorders Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinsons' Disease Rating Scale-motor score, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and a test for orthostatic hypotension. When positive for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, a repositioning maneuver was performed. Patients were followed for three months to determine the clinical response. 305 patients responded (186 men (61%), mean age 70.5 years (Standard Deviation 9.5 years)), of whom 151 (49%) complained of dizziness. 57 (38%) of the dizzy patients appeared to have orthostatic hypotension; 12 patients (8%) had a classical but previously unrecognized benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A further four patients (3%) had a more atypical presentation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Three months after treatment, 11 (92%) of patients with classical benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were almost or completely without complaints. We found no 'hidden' benign paroxysmal positional vertigo among patients without dizziness. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo among all patients with PD was 5.3%. Among Parkinson patients with symptoms of dizziness, up to 11% may have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, which can be treated easily and successfully. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensen, E. van; Leeuwen, R.B. van; Zaag-Loonen, H.J. van der; Masius-Olthof, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. AIM: To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal

  8. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and its variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, D; Masini, M; Mandalà, M

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common labyrinthine disorder caused by a mechanic stimulation of the vestibular receptors within the semicircular canals. It is characterized by positional vertigo and positional nystagmus, both provoked by changes in the position of the head with respect to gravity. The social impact of the disease and its direct and indirect costs to healthcare systems are significant owing to impairment of daily activities and increased risk of falls. The first description of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is from Robert Bárány in 1921, but the features of the syndrome and the diagnostic maneuver were well described by Dix and Hallpike in 1952. Since then, the gradually increasing interest of otolaryngologists and neurologists has led to a progressive advance in the knowledge of this labyrinthine disorder with regard to its epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects. Despite the often effective diagnosis and treatment of most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the physiopathologic explanations of the disease are mainly speculative. In this chapter, we describe the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Italian survey on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, A.; Casani, A.P.; Manfrin, M.; Guidetti, G.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common type of peripheral vertigo. BPPV often relapses after the first episode, with a recurrence rate between 15% and 50%. To date both the aetiopathogenetic processes that lead to otoconia detachment and the factors that make BPPV a relapsing disease are still unclear, but recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible association with cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present study (Sesto Senso Survey) was to e...

  10. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and comorbid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Helen S; Kimball, Kay T; Stewart, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of comorbid disease in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and the relationship of comorbid disease to symptoms of vertigo, disequilibrium, and anxiety. Patients who had posterior semicircular canal BPPV and who had been referred for vestibular rehabilitation at a tertiary care center completed a health status questionnaire and the Vertigo Symptom Scale, answered questions about level of vertigo, and were tested on computerized dynamic posturography. Subjects had high rates of diabetes, mild head trauma, and probable sinus disease. Balance was generally impaired, worse in diabetics and subjects with significant vestibular weakness. Subjects who smoked or had had mild head trauma had higher levels of anxiety. Comorbid conditions, particularly diabetes, mild head trauma, and sinus disease, are unusually prevalent in BPPV patients. Message: Patients with comorbid disease are at risk for having increased vertigo, anxiety, and disequilibrium compared to other patients. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Plain Language Summary: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Mahoney, Kathryn; O'Connor, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    This plain language summary serves as an overview in explaining benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, abbreviated BPPV. This summary applies to patients ≥18 years old with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV and is based on the 2017 "Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update)." The evidence-based guideline includes research to support more effective diagnosis and treatment of BPPV. The guideline was developed as a quality improvement opportunity for managing BPPV by creating clear recommendations to use in medical practice.

  12. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo After Nonotologic Surgery: Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kansu, Leyla; Aydin, Erdinc; Gulsahi, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common types of vertigo caused by peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Although head trauma, migraine, long-term bed rest, Ménière disease, viral labyrinthitis, and upper respiratory tract infections are believed to be predisposing factors, most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are idiopathic. Ear surgery is another cause, but after non-otologic surgery, attacks of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are rare. We describe thr...

  13. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barozzi, Stefania; Socci, Marina; Ginocchio, Daniela; Filipponi, Eliana; Martinazzoli, Maria Grazia Troja; Cesarani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In our clinical experience, some of the patients affected by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) reported the onset of tinnitus shortly before or in association with the positional vertigo. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and the clinical patterns of tinnitus episodes which occurred in association with BPPV and to suggest possible interpretative hypotheses. 171 normal hearing patients affected by BPPV (50 males and 122 females; age range: 25-77 years; mean age 60.3 years ± 14.9) underwent pure tone audiometry, immittance test and a clinical vestibular evaluation before and after repositioning manoeuvers. Those suffering from tinnitus were also assessed using visual analogue scales and tinnitus handicap inventory. 19.3% of the patients reported the appearance of tinnitus concurrently with the onset of the positional vertigo. It was mostly unilateral, localized on the same ear as the BPPV, slight in intensity and intermittent. Tinnitus disappeared or decreased in all patients except two, either spontaneously, before performing the therapeutic manoeuvers, or shortly after. A possible vestibular origin of tinnitus determined by the detachment of macular debris into the ductus reuniens and cochlear duct is discussed.

  14. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after nonotologic surgery: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansu, Leyla; Aydin, Erdinc; Gulsahi, Kamran

    2015-03-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common types of vertigo caused by peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Although head trauma, migraine, long-term bed rest, Ménière disease, viral labyrinthitis, and upper respiratory tract infections are believed to be predisposing factors, most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are idiopathic. Ear surgery is another cause, but after non-otologic surgery, attacks of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are rare. We describe three cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo attacks after non-otologic surgery (one patient after a nasal septoplasty and two patients after dental endodontic treatment) and discuss the pathophysiological mechanism of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seen after non-otologic surgery, its diagnosis and treatment.

  15. BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Guild Manayil John

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common disorders of the vestibular system, which maybe unilateral or involve both labyrinths. It can be effectively treated by Canalith Repositioning Manoeuvers (CRM, but lack of awareness leads to delay in effective treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was conducted in a tertiary care center where 184 patients with BPPV were subjected to positional test and CRM. RESULTS M:F ratio was 1:2.1. 85% of BPPV patients were relieved of symptoms with one sitting of CRM. CONCLUSION CRM is very effective in treatment of BPPV. General practitioners and specialists should be more educated about this condition, which will reduce the delay in correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

  16. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: An Integrated Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Parham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common cause of dizziness, occurs in all age groups. It presents with vertigo on head movement, but in older patients presentation may be typical and thus accounting for a low recognition rate in the primary care setting. It may be recurrent in up to 50% of cases. BPPV is associated with displacement of fragments of utricular otoconia into the semicircular canals, most commonly the posterior semicircular canal. Otoconia are composed of otoconin and otolin forming the organic matrix on which calcium carbonate mineralizes. Otoconia may fragment with trauma, age, or changes in the physiology of endolymph (e.g., pH and calcium concentration. Presentation varied because otoconia fragments can be displaced into any of the semicircular canals on either (or both side and may be free floating (canalolithiasis or attached to the cupula (cupulolithiasis. Most cases of BPPV are idiopathic, but head trauma, otologic disorders, and systemic disease appear to be contributory in a subset. Positional maneuvers are used to diagnose and treat the majority of cases. In rare intractable cases surgical management may be considered. A strong association with osteoporosis suggests that idiopathic BPPV may have diagnostic and management implications beyond that of a purely otologic condition.

  17. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: opportunities squandered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Kevin A

    2015-04-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) presentations are unique opportunities to simultaneously improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care. The test and treatment for BPPV--the Dix-Hallpike test (DHT) and the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM), respectively--are supported by two evidence-based guidelines (American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery and American Academy of Neurology). With these processes, patients can be readily identified and treated at the bedside, quickly and without expensive tests. Patients randomized to the CRM have a cure rate of 80% at 24 h, compared to only 10% of controls. Despite this large effect size, less than 10% of affected patients receive the treatment, which shows that the management of BPPV in routine care is suboptimal. Future research is necessary to disseminate and implement the DHT and the CRM into routine practice. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in 2 Children: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present the cases of 2 boys with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Patient A (11 years old) and Patient B (9 years old) had complaints of vertigo with position changes. Both exhibited left torsion upbeating nystagmus in the left Dix-Hallpike (DH) test and complaints of vertigo with reproduction of their symptoms, indicating BPPV. Both were treated with a left canalith repositioning maneuver and reported decreased incidence of positional vertigo upon reevaluation. Scores on the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and the Visual Analog Scale for Dizziness decreased after treatment for 1 of the boys. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is considered rare in children. Migraines may also cause vertigo. Differential diagnosis in these cases was made by performing the DH test. Children with vertigo should be screened for BPPV through use of history taking, and the DH test.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Dagkiran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the cause of peripheral vertigo, which only takes seconds posed by certain head and body position and led to severe attacks of vertigo. Therefore, it is a disturbance that causes a continuous fear of fall and anxiety in some patients. Although benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo, it may cause unnecessary tests, treatment costs and the loss of labor due to the result of the delay in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Diagnosis and treatment of this disease is easy. High success rates can be achieved with appropriate repositioning maneuvers after taking a detailed medical history and accurate assessment of accompanying nystagmus. The aim of this paper was to review the updated information about benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 555-564

  20. Italian survey on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, A; Casani, A P; Manfrin, M; Guidetti, G

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common type of peripheral vertigo. BPPV often relapses after the first episode, with a recurrence rate between 15% and 50%. To date both the aetiopathogenetic processes that lead to otoconia detachment and the factors that make BPPV a relapsing disease are still unclear, but recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible association with cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present study (Sesto Senso Survey) was to evaluate in the Italian population through an observational survey, the main demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with BPPV (first episode or recurrent) with particular focus on the potential cardiovascular risk factors. The survey was conducted in 158 vestibology centres across Italy on 2,682 patients (mean age 59.3 ± 15.0 years; 39.1% males and 60.9% females) suffering from BPPV, from January 2013 to December 2014. The results showed a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure (55.8%), hypercholesterolaemia (38.6%) and diabetes (17.7%), as well as a family history of cardiovascular disease (49.4%). A high percentage of patients also had hearing loss (42.9%), tinnitus (41.2%), or both (26.8%). The presence of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities were significantly related to recurrent BPPV episodes (OR range between 1.84 and 2.31). In addition, the association with diabetes and thyroid/autoimmune disease (OR range between 1.73 and 1.89) was relevant. The survey results confirm the significant association between cardiovascular comorbidities and recurrent BPPV and identify them as a potential important risk factor for recurrence of BPPV in the Italian population, paving the way for the evaluation of new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of this disease. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  1. Menopause and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Büki, Bela; Cohn, Edward S.; Janky, Kristen L.; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to examine the age and gender distribution and the effect of menopause in a large cohort of participants diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Methods We analyzed 1,377 BPPV patients and surveyed 935 women from this group, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the last decade. Results A detailed age- and gender- distribution analysis of BPPV onset showed that aging had a profound impact on BPPV occurrence in both genders, and that peri-menopausal women were especially susceptible to BPPV (3.2:1 female to male). The latter is a novel finding and was confirmed by a direct survey of female BPPV patients (168 participated). In addition, there was a pronounced female preponderance (6.8:1) for BPPV in the teenage group despite the low prevalence in this age group. Conclusions The data suggest that hormonal fluctuations (especially during menopause) may increase the tendency to develop BPPV. PMID:24496089

  2. [Management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in first care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, C; Muñoz-Proto, F; Rama-López, J; Ferrán-de la Cierva, L; Rodríguez-Villalba, R; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Mas-Mercant, S; Tomás-Barberán, M

    2014-01-01

    The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common disease in the group of peripheral vertigo. It's characterized by vertiginous sensation triggered by the positional changes of the head and usually lasts less than one minute. It is most frequently seen in middle-aged patients (40-50 years old) and in up 50% of cases we do not know the cause, so we refer to them as idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Because of the high incidence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in general population, it is of utmost importance to be aware of the differential diagnosis and to be able to treat this pathology with efficacy, because in most cases we can achieve excellent results performing specific and simple maneuvers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. [Clinical features of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhuang, Jian-hua; Zhao, Zhong-xin; Li, Yan-cheng; Jin, Zhe

    2012-12-01

    To explore the clinical features of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The clinical manifestations of 239 patients with horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from August 2003 to December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. 25.7% (239/931) of all the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients were the horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was involved. One hundred and ninety-seven patients showed geotropic nystagmus in head rolling test with a mean latency period of (0.88 ± 0.72) s and a mean duration period of (26.36 ± 19.71) s. Forty-two patients showed apogeotropic nystagmus in head rolling test with a mean latency period of (2.69 ± 1.83) s and a mean duration period of (53.48 ± 43.12) s. Among all the horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients, 39 (16.3%) presented horizontal nystagmus with slight upbeating component. The nystagmus latency in apogeotropic nystagmus group was longer than that in geotropic nystagmus group (t = -6.33, P paroxysmal positional vertigo was higher than expectation. Barbecue maneuver was applied to patients with geotropic nystagmus. While to the patients with apogeotropic nystagmus, head shaking maneuver should be performed firstly and then followed by Barbecue maneuver.

  4. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xizheng Shan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder and it may be idiopathic or secondary to some conditions such as surgery, but rare following laparoscopic surgery. Methods: We report two cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery, one after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 51-year-old man and another following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 60-year-old woman. Results: Both patients were treated successfully with manual or device-assisted canalith repositioning maneuvers, with no recurrence on the follow-up of 6 -18 months. Conclusions: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a rare but possible complication of laparoscopic surgery. Both manual and device-assisted repositioning maneuvers are effective treatments for this condition, with good efficacy and prognosis.

  5. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xizheng; Wang, Amy; Wang, Entong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder and it may be idiopathic or secondary to some conditions such as surgery, but rare following laparoscopic surgery. Methods: We report two cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery, one after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 51-year-old man and another following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 60-year-old woman. Results: Both patients were treated successfully with manual or device-assisted canalith repositioning maneuvers, with no recurrence on the follow-up of 6 -18 months. Conclusions: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a rare but possible complication of laparoscopic surgery. Both manual and device-assisted repositioning maneuvers are effective treatments for this condition, with good efficacy and prognosis. PMID:28255446

  6. Chiropractic management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anette R; Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes and discusses the case of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) characterized by severe vertigo with dizziness, nausea, and nystagmus, treated without the use of spinal manipulation by a doctor of chiropractic. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year......-old woman presented for care with complaints of acute vertigo and dizziness. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The patient was examined and diagnosed with left posterior canalolithiasis by means of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. She was treated successfully with the Epley maneuver once and subsequently discharged...

  7. benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (bppv) — a simple solution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    standing the symptomatology, the diagnostic Dix-Hallpike test and the treatment options. BPPV is .... a peripheral lesion, are as follows: • The patient must be symptomatic during the test. BENIGN POSITIONAL VERTIGO. May 2004 Vol.22 No.5 CME 261. Fig. 1. Ampulla (a .... legs over the side of the couch and at the same ...

  8. Prevalence of unrecognized benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zaag-Loonen, H. J.; van Leeuwen, R. B.; Bruintjes, Tj D.; van Munster, B. C.

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness is a relatively common complaint which occurs more often with increasing age. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an important cause which can easily be treated but is frequently not recognized by professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of unrecognized

  9. Demographic analysis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular problem. However, demographic analysis is few. Aim: The aim of this study was to document the demographic data of patients with BPPV regarding distribution of gender, age, associated problems, most common form, ...

  10. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jiang Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-BPPV on the ground. The pilot aeromedical evaluation and considerations are discussed.

  11. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Terry D; von Brevern, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo characterized by brief episodes provoked by head movements. The first attack of BPPV usually occurs in bed or upon getting up. Because it often begins abruptly, it can be alarming and lead to emergency department evaluation. The episodes of spinning often last 10 to 20 seconds, but may occasionally last as long as 1 minute. There are several forms of BPPV. In nearly all cases, highly effective treatment can be offered to patients. This article reviews the current state of our understanding of this condition and its management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subjective visual vertical after treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Mian Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. Objective: To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Methods: We evaluated 20 patients. The estimated position where a fluorescent line within a bucket reached the vertical position was measured before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: Before repositioning maneuver, 9 patients (45.0% had absolute values of the subjective visual vertical above the reference standard and 2 (10.0% after the maneuver; the mean of the absolute values of the vertical deviation was significantly lower after the intervention (p < 0.001. Conclusion: There is a reduction of the deviations of the subjective visual vertical, evaluated by the bucket test, immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  13. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo--a review of 101 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clara; Amorim, Ana Margarida; Paiva, António

    2015-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common vestibular disorders, with a lifetime prevalence of 2.4%. This study aimed to assess age, gender, lesion type and site, association with other vestibular diseases, progression and recurrence in a Portuguese population. This was a retrospective observational study of 101 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo by the same senior doctor, in a tertiary academic hospital, between January 2009 and May 2011. A total of 101 cases were pooled, with a mean age of 56.57±15.33 years (15-90 years). From these, 72.3% were women. The posterior canal was affected in 72.3%, the lateral in 24.7%, the anterior in 2% and multiple canals in 1%. Unilateral canal and left labyrinth involvement were more frequent. The therapeutic maneuver used most was Epley's. Recurrence was observed in 10.9% of the cases. It was idiopathic in 83.2% of cases. No association was found between the number of maneuvers necessary to treat benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and etiology. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is more frequent in female subjects, in the 6th decade and involves preferably the posterior semicircular canal of the right labyrinth. In most cases it is idiopathic and treatment with repositioning maneuvers has a mean success of 90%. Our results were in accordance with the literature; nevertheless, in this study the left labyrinth was most affected and the follow-up period was variable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  14. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Irradiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Shaoyan; Fan, Yunping; Guo, Liqing; Liang, Zibin; Mi, Jiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. It has been assumed that postirradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients are prone to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The purpose of this study was to better understand this clinical entity. Materials and Methods. From September 2003 to June 2011, we conducted a retrospective study of 11 irradiated NPC patients with BPPV in our institute. During the same period, 11 irradiated NPC patients without BPPV were randomly selected and enrolled as the control group. All m...

  15. Subjective visual vertical after treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maristela Mian; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We evaluated 20 patients. The estimated position where a fluorescent line within a bucket reached the vertical position was measured before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Before repositioning maneuver, 9 patients (45.0%) had absolute values of the subjective visual vertical above the reference standard and 2 (10.0%) after the maneuver; the mean of the absolute values of the vertical deviation was significantly lower after the intervention (pparoxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Classification, diagnostic criteria and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takao; Takeda, Noriaki; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Shigeno, Kohichiro; Asai, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2017-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vertigo and the posterior and/or lateral semicircular canals are usually affected. BPPV is characterized by brief attacks of rotatory vertigo associated with positional and/or positioning nystagmus, which are elicited by specific head positions or changes in head position relative to gravity. In patients with the posterior-canal-type of BPPV, torsional nystagmus is induced by the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. In patients with the lateral-canal-type of BPPV, horizontal geotropic or apogeotropic nystagmus is induced by the supine roll test. The pathophysiology of BPPV is canalolithiasis comprising free-floating otoconial debris within the endolymph of a semicircular canal, or cupulolithiasis comprising otoconial debris adherent to the cupula. The observation of positional and/or positioning nystagmus is essential for the diagnosis of BPPV. BPPV is treated with the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP). Through a series of head position changes, the CRP moves otoconial debris from the affected semicircular canal to the utricle. In this review, we provide the classification, diagnostic criteria, and examinations for the diagnosis, and specific and non-specific treatments of BPPV in accordance with the Japanese practical guidelines on BPPV published by the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiology of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Brevern, M; Radtke, A; Lezius, F; Feldmann, M; Ziese, T; Lempert, T; Neuhauser, H

    2007-07-01

    To examine the prevalence and incidence, clinical presentation, societal impact and comorbid conditions of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in the general population. Cross-sectional, nationally representative neurotological survey of the general adult population in Germany with a two stage sampling design: screening of 4869 participants from the German National Telephone Health Interview Survey 2003 (response rate 52%) for moderate or severe dizziness or vertigo, followed by validated neurotological interviews (n = 1003; response rate 87%). Diagnostic criteria for BPPV were at least five attacks of vestibular vertigo lasting vertigo. The lifetime prevalence of BPPV was 2.4%, the 1 year prevalence was 1.6% and the 1 year incidence was 0.6%. The median duration of an episode was 2 weeks. In 86% of affected individuals, BPPV led to medical consultation, interruption of daily activities or sick leave. In total, only 8% of affected participants received effective treatment. On multivariate analysis, age, migraine, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and stroke were independently associated with BPPV. BPPV is a common vestibular disorder leading to significant morbidity, psychosocial impact and medical costs.

  18. A Geriatric Perspective on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Kourosh; Kuchel, George A

    2016-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in older adults. Beyond the unpleasant sensation of vertigo, BPPV also negatively affects older adults' gait and balance and increases their risk of falling. As such it has a profound effect on function, independence, and quality of life. Otoconia are the inner ear structures that help detect horizontal and vertical movements. Aging contributes to the fragmentation of otoconia, whose displacement into the semicircular, most commonly posterior canals, can produce rotatory movement sensations with head movement. BPPV is more commonly idiopathic in older adults than in younger individuals, can present atypically, and has a more-protracted course and higher risk of recurrence. Medications such as meclizine that are commonly prescribed for BPPV can be associated with significant side effects. Dix-Hallpike and Head Roll tests can generally identify the involved canal. Symptoms resolve as otoconia fragments dissolve into the endolymph, but appropriate canalith repositioning (e.g., Epley maneuver) can expedite recovery and reduce the burden of this disorder. Observations suggesting an association between idiopathic BPPV and vitamin D deficiency and osteoporosis indicate that BPPV may share risk factors with other common geriatric conditions, which highlights the importance of moving beyond purely otological considerations and addressing the needs of older adults with vertigo through a systems-based multidisciplinary approach. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Canalith Repositioning Variations for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if variations in common treatments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) affected efficacy. Study Design Prospective, pseudo-randomized study. Setting Out-patient practice in a tertiary care facility Subjects and Methods Patients (n=118) with unilateral BPPV of the posterior canal, including 13 patients with BPPV of the lateral canal were tested at a tertiary care center on one of five interventions: canalith repositioning maneuver (CRP), CRP plus home exercise, modified CRP, CRP for patients with involvement of two semicircular canals, self-CRP home exercise. Self-CRP was also compared to previously published data on efficacy of the Brandt Daroff exercise. Main outcome measures were vertigo intensity and frequency, presence/ absence of Dix-Hallpike responses, Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale (VADL), computerized dynamic posturography. Results Vertigo intensity and frequency and Dix-Hallpike responses decreased significantly and posturography and VADL improved significantly from pre- to post tests. No other significant changes were found. The groups did not differ significantly. Vertigo intensity and frequency were not strongly related at pre-test but were related at post-test. Length of illness and age did not influence the results. Conclusions However the head is moved, as long as it is moved rapidly enough and through the correct planes in space repositioning treatments are likely to be effective. Therefore clinicians have a range of choices in selecting the treatment best suited for each patient’s unique needs. PMID:20723779

  20. [Positioning diagnosis of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo by VNG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Chen, Taisheng; Lin, Peng; Song, Wei; Dong, Hong

    2009-07-01

    To analyze the value of positioning diagnosis of VNG (Videonystagmograph) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). One hundred and twenty-six patients with BPPV were enrolled in this retrospective study. Their positional nystagmus recorded by VNG in Dix-Hallpike and roll tests were analyzed to summarize the characteristics of nystagmus on nystagmography of various BPPV. Of 126 patients with BPPV diagnosed in our center, the posterior semicircular canals (PSC) were involved in 98 patients (77.8%), whereas the horizontal semicircular canal (HSC) and anterior semicircular canal (ASC) were involved in 17 (13.5%) and 5 (3.9%), respectively. Six patients (4.8%) confirmed combined-BPPV had HSC-BPPV and ipsilateral PSC-BPPV. Twenty-eight patients with PSC-BPPV had reversal phase on nystagmography. The nystagmus of patients with P/ASC-canalithiasis showed upward/downward on the vertical phase of nystagmography and orientated the opposite side on horizontal phase in the head hanging position, and the nystagmus reversed when returned to sit. Nystagmus on horizontal phase could be provoked when the head turned to both sides of the roll tests in patients with HSC-BPPV. If the nystagmus and the head-turning shared the same direction, then HSC-canalithiasis was confirmed, and the direction of the head-turning which provoked the stronger nystagmus indicates the lesion side. If the nystagmus and the head-turning had the opposite direction, then HSC-cupulolithiasis was confirmed, and the direction of the head-turning which provoked the weaker nystagmus indicates the lesion side. Positional nystagmus can be recorded objectively using VNG, According to which positioning the semicircular canal involved would be easier and more accurate. The recording conserved also could be helpful for clinical diagnosis and repositioning of BPPV.

  1. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (BPPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Prida Purnamasari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most frequent Neurotology disorders. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is a vestibular disorder in which 17% -20% of patients complained of vertigo. In the general population the prevalence of BPPV is between 11 to 64 per 100,000 (prevalence 2.4%. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is a disturbance in the inner ear with positional vertigo symptoms that occur repeatedly with the typical nystagmus paroxysmal. The disorders can be caused either by canalithiasis or cupulolithiasis and could in theory be about three semicircular canals, although superior canal (anterior is very rare. The most common is the form of the posterior canal, followed by a lateral. The diagnosis of BPPV can be enforced based on history and physical examination, including some tests such as Dix-Hallpike test, caloric test, and Supine Roll test. The diagnosis of BPPV is also classified according to the types of channels. Management of BPPV include non-pharmacological, pharmacological and operations. Treatment is often used non-pharmacological includes several maneuvers such as Epley maneuver, Semount maneuver, Lempert maneuver, forced prolonged position and Brandt-Daroff exercises. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  2. Clinical analysis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin XU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV in patients of 40 years old or younger. Methods The clinical features of 40 patients (age ≤40 years with BPPV admitted from August 2009 to July 2011 were retrospectively analyzed, and compared with that of 286 middle and old-aged patients (age >40 years with BPPV admitted in the same period. Results The incidence of BPPV in young patients showed a relatively higher incidence (12.3%, with the sex ratio of male to female 1:3 and a mean age of 32.1±6.2 years. The mean latent period of vertigo attack was 1.2±1.3 seconds, and 10 patients (25% showed no obvious latent period. The median duration of vertigo was 10s. The posterior semicircular canal was involved in 27 patients (67.5%. Cupulolithiasis was found in 6 patients, and all the otolithiasis was found to involve the posterior semicircular canal. The proportion of BPPV with no obvious latency was higher in the young patients than in the middle and old-aged patients (25.0% vs 11.5%, χ2=5.554, P=0.018, but no significant difference in sex ratio, the course of disease, the ratio of involved semicircular canal, the latency and the duration of vertigo attack was found between two groups (P>0.05. Conclusions The incidence of BPPV is relatively higher in youth, more common in females, and the posterior semicircular canal is commonly involved. Compared with the middle and old-aged patients with BPPV, the proportion patients with no obvious latency of vertigo attack in young patients is higher, and the incidence of cupulolithiasis involving posterior semicircular canal is higher in the youth.

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update) Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Prasaad Steiner, Robert W; Tsai Do, Betty; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery featuring the "Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update)." To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 14 recommendations developed emphasize diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing, and increasing the appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  4. Treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Pérez-Vázquez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most frequent episodic vestibular disorder. It is due to otolith rests that are free into the canals or attached to the cupulas. Well over 90% of patients can be successfully treated with manoeuvres that move the particles back to the utriculus. Among the great variety of procedures that have been described, the manoeuvres that are supported by evidenced-based studies or extensive series are commented in this review. Some topics regarding BPPV treatment, such as controlling the accuracy of the procedures or the utility of post-manoeuvre restrictions are also discussed.

  5. Serum uric acid levels correlate with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikbilek, A; Gencer, Z K; Saydam, L; Zararsiz, G; Tanik, N; Ozkiris, M

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a frequently encountered condition that can severely affect the quality of life. In this study, we aimed to assess the possible relations between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and BPPV. Fifty patients with BPPV, and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. All the patients and controls underwent a complete audio-vestibular test battery including the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and supine roll test for posterior semicircular canal (PSC) and horizontal semicircular canal, respectively. Routine hematological and biochemical analyses were performed in both groups. In the BPPV group, measurements of SUA levels were repeated 1 month after the vertigo attack. The lipid profiles and SUA levels were higher in patients with BPPV than detected in controls (P vertigo attack compared with the values obtained during the attack (P 0.05). Elevated SUA is positively correlated with BPPV, requiring further efforts to clarify the exact mechanism. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  6. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after radiologic scanning: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Erdinc

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common type of vertigo. It is frequently seen in elderly patients, and the course of the attack may easily mimic cerebrovascular disease. A BPPV attack after a radiologic examination has not been reported previously. We report the cases of two patients who had BPPV attacks after radiologic imaging. Case presentation The first patient with headache and tremor was admitted to the radiology department for cranial computed tomography (CT imaging. During scanning, she was asked to lie in the supine position with no other head movements for approximately 10 minutes. After the cranial CT imaging, she stood up rapidly, and suddenly experienced a vertigo attack and nausea. The second patient was admitted to the radiology department for evaluation of his renal arteries. During the renal magnetic resonance angiography, he was in the supine position for 20 minutes and asked not to move. After the examination, he stood up rapidly with the help of the technician and suddenly experienced a vertigo attack with nausea and vomiting. The results of standard laboratory analyses and their neurologic examinations were within normal limits and Dix-Hallpike tests showed rotatory nystagmus in both cases. An Epley maneuver was performed to the patients. The results of a control Dix-Hallpike tests after 1 Epley maneuver were negative in both patients. Conclusion Radiologists and clinicians must keep in mind that after radiologic imaging in which the patient is still for some time in the supine position and then helped to stand up rapidly, a BPPV attack may occur.

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF CANALITH RE POSITIONING PROCEDURE VERSUS BRANDT DAROFF EXERCISES IN BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneel Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertigo is perception of motion, when no movement is present or abnormal perception of motion in response to movement. Vertigo is usually due to a disturbance in the vestibular System. Physical therapy plays an important role in reducing vertigo and nystagmus in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo subjects. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo(BPPV comes under the peripheral Vertigo which is the most common disease causing vertigo. Cawthrone and cooksy were the first clinicians to advocate exercises for persons suffering from vertigo. Canalith repositioning procedure was effective in treating BPPV. Brandt Daroff exercises were designed to habituate the central nervous system to provoking position and they dislodge and move the debris out of canal which is effective in treating BPPV. Hence this study compares the effectiveness of these two techniques in treating BPPV. Methods: Total number of 30 subjects was taken and they were divided into two groups by simple random sampling method with Pre test and post test experimental design . Group A subjects were treated with Canalith repositioning procedure and Group B subjects were treated with Brandt Daroff exercises. Outcome measure is dizziness handicap inventory (DHI Results: P-value is less than 0.05 which shows that there is significant difference between Canalith repositioning procedure and Brandt Daroff exercises. Conclusion: Canalith repositioning procedure is most effective and less time consuming procedure in treating the Benign Paroxysmal positional vertigo subjects and found to have less reoccurrence.

  8. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Koukoutsis, George; Aspris, Andreas; Fassolis, Alexandros; Moukos, Antonis; Economou, Nicolas C; Katotomichelakis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We studied the clinical characteristics, nystagmographic findings, and treatment outcome of a group of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to mild head trauma and compared them with a group of patients with idiopathic BPPV. The medical records of 33 patients with BPPV associated with mild head trauma were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic, and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Three hundred and twenty patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group. The patients with BPPV secondary to mild head trauma presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) lower mean age, with more intense symptoms; (2) increased rate of horizontal and anterior semicircular canal involvement and frequent multiple canal and bilateral involvement; (3) greater incidence of canal paresis and presence of spontaneous nystagmus; (4) poorer treatment results, attributed mainly to coexisting canal paresis in many patients, and higher rate of recurrence. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with mild head trauma differs from idiopathic BPPV in terms of several epidemiological and clinical features; it responds less effectively to treatment and is prone to recurrence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in outpatient practice: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Bestuzheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is one of the common reasons for visits to physicians of various specialties; the data of foreign investigations show that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is most frequently encountered.Objective: to study the causes of dizziness, to analyze the frequency of BPPV and the efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 80 patients, including 55 (68.7% women and 25 (31.3% men, aged 18 to 75 years (mean age 53.8±12.8 years, who complained of dizziness and sought for medical advice in the Therapeutic-and-Diagnostic Unit, A.Ya. Kozhevnikov Clinic of Nervous System Diseases, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University.Results. The most common causes of dizziness in outpatient practice were BPPV (46.2% and postural phobic vertigo (35%. The diagnosis of VPPV, if special positional testing (Dix-Hallpike and McClure-Pagnini tests was carried out, was shown to create no significant difficulties. The diagnosis was not established in the majority (97.5% of the patients; effective treatment was performed in one of the patients. Combined treatment, by performing the positional tests and using betaserc for 2 months, led to complete resolution of positional vertigo in most (97.3% patients.Discussion. The findings indicate the efficiency of examining patients with complaints of dizziness, by using the special otoneurological tests to detect BPPV. The purposeful questioning of patients with BPPV can suspect this disease in the majority of cases. Our investigation shows the high efficiency of rehabilitation maneuvers for BPPV, which agrees well with the data of other authors. Physicians’ poor awareness of BPPV among physicians and the high efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice are noted.

  10. The relationship between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Kamran; Yildirim, Tekin; Borekci, Hasan; Akin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Reha; Ozkiris, Mahmut

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been few studies concerning BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity and a positive relation was found between them, this study didn't find any relation between BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity. IT is thought that further large-scale studies must be done to clarify the relation. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) consists of ∼ 20% of vestibular disorders. Self-limited rotatory nystagmus with positional vertigo are the main findings of BPPV. Although canalolithiasis theory was confirmed by demonstrating freely floating debris in the endolymph of the posterior semicircular channel in following studies, currently, the etiology hasn't been explained totally. This study investigated the relation of BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity evaluated via measurement of serum thyroid autoantibodies. Fifty patients (37 female, 13 male) with BPPV (BPPV group), 52 patients (40 female, 12 male) with non-BPPV vertigo (non-BPPV group) and 60 otherwise normal control (38 female, 22 male) samples were enrolled in the study. All samples of BPPV, non-BPPV groups and controls had undergone a cochleovestibular test following thorough ENT examination. After blood samples were drawn from each subject, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab) levels were measured accordingly. In the study, eight patients of the BPPV group (16%) had a high thyroid antibody level. In the non-BPPV group, six patients (11.5%) had elevated thyroid antibodies. In the control group, 15 patients (25%) had elevated thyroid antibodies. TSH values of all subjects were detected to be within normal range. No statistical difference was found between the groups with respect to TG-Ab and TPO-Ab values (p-values = 0.729 and 0.812, respectively).

  11. Supine to prolonged lateral position: a novel therapeutic maneuver for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cheng-Ping; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2013-05-01

    The treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo often involves repositioning maneuvers and exercises; however, these procedures may not be suitable for patients with limb disabilities or back disorders, or for elder patients. We sought to develop a simple therapeutic maneuver as an alternative procedure, suitable for patients with a wide range of physical ability. A simple therapeutic maneuver, supine to prolonged lateral position, was developed based on the mechanism of canalolithiasis. Its efficacy in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was evaluated in a prospective study consisting of 81 objective and 13 subjective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients. A successful outcome was defined as a negative Dix-Hallpike test within 2 weeks followed by the continued absence of symptoms of vertigo or dizziness for the next 4 weeks. Seventy-two patients with objective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and all 13 patients with subjective posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were successfully treated: resolution rates were 88.9 and 100 %, respectively. In the objective group, negative Dix-Hallpike tests were obtained at 1 and 2 weeks in 66.7 and 88.9 % of patients, respectively. In the subjective group, the percentages of patients free of side-dependent vertigo illusions at 1 and 2 weeks were 84.6 and 100 %, respectively. These results suggest that the supine to prolonged lateral position maneuver, which is easy to perform and generally well tolerated, could be recommended as an alternative treatment modality for patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  12. Comorbidities and recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotti, P M; Lucidi, D; De Corso, E; Meucci, D; Sergi, B; Paludetti, G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and age, sex, trauma, presence of one or more comorbidities such as cardiovascular, neurological, endocrinological, metabolic, psychiatric diseases. Retrospective review of medical records (chart review). A total of 475 patients aged from 14 to 87 years, affected by BPPV. Recurrence of BPPV occurred in 139/475 patients (29.2%). The recurrence rate was significantly higher in female and older patients. Comorbidities were present in 72.6% of subjects with recurrent BPPV vs. 48.9% of patients with no recurrence (p disorders, followed by neurological and vascular diseases. Collecting a complete medical history is important for prognostic stratification and detection of potential underlying pathological conditions.

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Reality or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressi, Federica; Vella, Paola; Casale, Manuele; Moffa, Antonio; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Lopez, Michele Antonio; Carinci, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Salvinelli, Fabrizio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Relevant published studies about VR in BPPV were searched in PubMed, Google Scholar and Ovid using various keywords. We included trials that were available in the English language and did not apply publication year or publication status restrictions. Studies based on the VR in other peripheral and/or central balance disorders are excluded. Primary outcome was the effect on vertigo attacks and balance. Of 42 identified trials, only 12 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Three of them investigated the role of VR in patients with BPPV comparing with no treatment, two of them evaluated the efficacy of VR versus medications, seven of them have highlighted the benefits of the VR alone or in combination with canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) compared to CRP alone. The studies differed in type of intervention, type of outcome and follow-up time. VR improves balance control, promoting visual stabilization with head movements, improving vestibular-visual interaction during head movement and expanding static and dynamic posture stability. CRP and VR seem to have a synergic effect in patients with BPPV, especially in elderly patients. VR does not reduce the recurrence rate, but it seems to reduce the unpleasantness. So VR can substitute CRP when spine comorbidities contraindicate CRP and can reduce the uptake of anti-vertigo drugs post CRP. Further studies are needed to confirm these encouraging results.

  14. Vestibular rehabilitation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Reality or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressi, Federica; Vella, Paola; Casale, Manuele; Moffa, Antonio; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Lopez, Michele Antonio; Carinci, Francesco; Papalia, Rocco; Salvinelli, Fabrizio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Relevant published studies about VR in BPPV were searched in PubMed, Google Scholar and Ovid using various keywords. We included trials that were available in the English language and did not apply publication year or publication status restrictions. Studies based on the VR in other peripheral and/or central balance disorders are excluded. Primary outcome was the effect on vertigo attacks and balance. Of 42 identified trials, only 12 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Three of them investigated the role of VR in patients with BPPV comparing with no treatment, two of them evaluated the efficacy of VR versus medications, seven of them have highlighted the benefits of the VR alone or in combination with canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) compared to CRP alone. The studies differed in type of intervention, type of outcome and follow-up time. VR improves balance control, promoting visual stabilization with head movements, improving vestibular–visual interaction during head movement and expanding static and dynamic posture stability. CRP and VR seem to have a synergic effect in patients with BPPV, especially in elderly patients. VR does not reduce the recurrence rate, but it seems to reduce the unpleasantness. So VR can substitute CRP when spine comorbidities contraindicate CRP and can reduce the uptake of anti-vertigo drugs post CRP. Further studies are needed to confirm these encouraging results. PMID:28485653

  15. Migraine and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a single-institution review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixido, M; Baker, A; Isildak, H

    2017-06-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and migraine-associated dizziness are common. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seems to be higher in patients with migraine-associated dizziness than in those without migraine. A database of 508 patients seen at the primary author's balance clinic was analysed to determine the prevalence of migraine, as defined by International Headache Society criteria, in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The percentage of patients with dizziness or vertigo who met criteria for migraine was 33.7 per cent, with a prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of 42.3 per cent. When excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine frequently had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (66.7 per cent vs 55.8 per cent), although this finding was not statistically significant. The results for the entire sample suggest that, after excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine seem more likely to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; however, this association was not significant, probably because of the small sample size.

  16. Prevalence of unrecognized benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zaag-Loonen, H J; van Leeuwen, R B; Bruintjes, Tj D; van Munster, B C

    2015-06-01

    Dizziness is a relatively common complaint which occurs more often with increasing age. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an important cause which can easily be treated but is frequently not recognized by professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of unrecognized BPPV in older patients. Patients ≥70 years of age (n = 989) indicated whether they experienced dizziness, and if so whether the symptoms were typical for BPPV. If affirmed, a diagnostic maneuver was performed. Positive patients were treated at once. All suspected patients completed quality of life questionnaires and were followed for 3 and 6 months. Positive BPPV patients were compared with negative (but suspected) patients. Almost one quarter of the patients (226 patients, 23 %) suffered from dizziness, among whom 101 were suspected of BPPV. Less than half (n = 45) underwent the diagnostic maneuver, of whom 13 (29 %) were positive for BPPV. At follow-up, one patient developed BPPV, leading to a total of 14 positive patients (overall prevalence 1.4 %). BPPV positive patients did not differ from BPPV negative patients. Among a large group of older patients, one quarter experiences dizziness, and 1.4 % has definite BPPV.

  17. Awareness of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in central Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollak Lea

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its frequent occurrence and effective treatment options, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV still remains under-estimated in the community. Methods We reviewed referral letters and medical records of 120 patients who were treated for BPPV at our Dizziness Clinic during the years 2006–2008 and searched for factors that possibly contribute to missing this entity. Results The referral diagnosis could be clustered into four groups: BPPV (25.6%, further unspecified vertigo (36.6%, dizziness (27.5% and other (10%. BPPV was recognized more frequently by ENT doctors than by other specialists. Patients referred with the correct diagnosis of BPPV were significantly younger and the duration of their symptoms shorter than in other referral groups. Patients in the distinct referral groups did not differ in the presence of autonomic symptoms or a history of another serious disease. A history typical of BPPV could be obtained in all but 11 patients, but position dependence was noted by the referring physician only in 55 patients, 31 of them correctly assigned as possible BPPV. Only in two patients was the Dix-Hallpike test performed. Thirty two patients were diagnosed with BPPV in the past, but this did not influence the recognition of the recurrence of this clinical entity. About 40% of patients had an audiogram and/or brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Electronystagmography was performed in 7.5% and brain imaging in 14% of patients before referral. Conclusion Our results show that BPPV is still an under-recognized entity. Education and the demand on specialists to learn how to treat BPPV, could improve the situation.

  18. A New Variant of Posterior Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Nonampullary or Common Crus Canalolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clockwise or counterclockwise, rotational, upbeating nystagmus is seen in patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo during left or right head-hanging test, respectively. Rotating of nystagmus in opposite direction to the ear tested or even reversal of initial positioning rotational nystagmus is not usual and has never been reported before. We propose a new variant of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo due to unusual behavior and location of the otoliths inside the membranous labyrinth. Unexpected rotational direction may lead to confusion about the site. The examiner should be aware of this abnormal or atypical variant of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  19. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Management and Its Impact on Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumani, Kiran; Powell, Jason

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of dizziness in the elderly. This has been identified as a risk factor in falls. Falls are the leading cause of disability and the leading cause of death from injury among people over 75 in the UK. We assessed the effect of BPPV treatment on falls in an elderly population by retrospectively reviewing one unit's experience of BPPV management over an 8-year period from June 2008 to June 2016. We specifically assessed patients who were referred for the primary reason of falls and were aged over 65 years. These patients were evaluated and treated with particle repositioning maneuvers if their positional tests were positive. The frequency of falls prior to their visit and at 6-month clinic follow-up were reviewed. The total number of falls in the cohort reduced significantly ( P < .0001) after the procedure, from 128 to 46 falls (64% reduction). Associated comorbidities were also evaluated in this group. A prompt and effective treatment of BPPV is prudent to prevent devastating falls in older people in our communities.

  20. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Koukoutsis, George; Ganelis, Panayotis; Economou, Nicolas C; Moukos, Antonis; Aspris, Andreas; Katotomichelakis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to present the demographic, pathogenetic and clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to vestibular neuritis (VN). The medical records of 22 patients, who presented with BPPV within 12 weeks after the onset of VN, were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Two hundred and eighty-four patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group. The patients with BPPV secondary to VN presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) a lower mean age; (2) involvement of the posterior semicircular canal; (3) presence of canal weakness; (4) more therapeutic sessions needed for cure and a higher rate of recurrence. It may be, thus, concluded that BPPV associated with VN differs from idiopathic BPPV in regard to several epidemiological and clinical features, it responds less effectively to treatment and may follow a protracted course, having a tendency for recurrence.

  1. Visual dependence and spatial orientation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Maitreyi A; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Cohen, Helen S

    2018-01-01

    People with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) probably have otoconial particles displaced from the utricle into the posterior semicircular canal. This unilateral change in the inertial load distributions of the labyrinth may result in visual dependence and may affect balance control. The goal of this study was to explore the interaction between visual dependence and balance control. We compared 23 healthy controls to 17 people with unilateral BPPV on the Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance on compliant foam with feet together, the Rod-and-Frame Test and a Mental Rotation Test. In controls, but not BPPV subjects, subjects with poor balance scores had significantly greater visual dependence, indicating that reliance on visual cues can affect balance control. BPPV and control subjects did not differ on the mental rotation task overall but BPPV reaction time was greater at greater orietantions, suggesting that this cognitive function was affected by BPPV. The side of impairment was strongly related to the side of perceived bias in the Earth vertical determined by BPPV subjects, indicating the relationship between the effect of asymmetric otolith unloading with simultaneous canal loading on spatial orientation perception.

  2. Association of dementia in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, M-H; Lin, C-L; Chuang, E; Chuang, T-Y; Kao, C-H

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a cohort study to investigate whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is correlated with an increased risk of dementia. We established a case cohort comprising 7818 patients aged over 20 years who were diagnosed with BPPV from 2000 to 2010. In addition, we formed a control cohort by randomly selecting 31,272 people without BPPV and matched them with the BPPV patients according to gender, age, and index year. Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed to compute the hazard ratio (HR) of dementia after we adjusted for demographic characteristics and comorbidity. The prevalence of comorbidity was higher among patients with BPPV than among those without BPPV. In addition, patients with BPPV exhibited a 1.24-fold (95% confidence interval, CI 1.09-1.40; P < 0.001) higher risk of dementia than those without BPPV after we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidity. An analysis stratified according to demographic factors revealed that women with BPPV exhibited a 1.36-fold (95% CI 1.16-1.59; P < 0.001) higher risk of dementia. Patients with BPPV aged over 65 years exhibited a significantly higher risk of dementia (adjusted HR: 1.26; 95% CI 1.10-1.43; P < 0.001) than those without BPPV. Patients with BPPV exhibited a higher risk of dementia than those without BPPV. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical evaluation of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Titus S.; Rogers, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical peripheral vestibular disorder which may involve any of the three semicircular canals but principally the posterior. In as much as the literature has described theories to explain the mechanism of BPPV and also contains scholarly works that elucidate BPPV; its management remains an enigma to most clinicians. To this end, this work was aimed at outlining an evidence-based best practice for most common form of BPPV. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted between 1948 and June 2011 in PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane database through the online Library of the University of Cape Town. Seventy-nine worthy articles that addressed the study were selected on consensus of the two authors. Conclusion: There is consensus for the use of canalith repositioning procedures as the best form of treatment for posterior canal canalolithiasis. However, successful treatment is dependent on accurate identification of the implicated canal and the form of lithiasis. Furthermore, clinicians should note that there is no place for pharmacological treatment of BPPV; unless it is to facilitate repositioning. PMID:23271854

  4. Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseye Ayoola Ogun

    Full Text Available It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients' diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children. The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis, and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV.

  5. Experimental designs for a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Barreiro, Santiago; López-Fidalgo, Jesús

    2013-03-19

    The pathology of the Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is detected by a clinician through maneuvers consisting of a series of consecutive head turns that trigger the symptoms of vertigo in patient. A statistical model based on a new maneuver has been developed in order to calculate the volume of endolymph displaced after the maneuver. A simplification of the Navier-Stokes problem from the fluids theory has been used to construct the model. In addition, the same cubic splines that are commonly used in kinematic control of robots were used to obtain an appropriate description of the different maneuvers. Then experimental designs were computed to obtain an optimal estimate of the model. D-optimal and c-optimal designs of experiments have been calculated. These experiments consist of a series of specific head turns of duration Δt and angle α that should be performed by the clinician on the patient. The experimental designs obtained indicate the duration and angle of the maneuver to be performed as well as the corresponding proportion of replicates. Thus, in the D-optimal design for 100 experiments, the maneuver consisting of a positive 30° pitch from the upright position, followed by a positive 30° roll, both with a duration of one and a half seconds is repeated 47 times. Then the maneuver with 60° /6° pitch/roll during half a second is repeated 16 times and the maneuver 90° /90° pitch/roll during half a second is repeated 37 times. Other designs with significant differences are computed and compared. A biomechanical model was derived to provide a quantitative basis for the detection of BPPV. The robustness study for the D-optimal design, with respect to the choice of the nominal values of the parameters, shows high efficiencies for small variations and provides a guide to the researcher. Furthermore, c-optimal designs give valuable assistance to check how efficient the D-optimal design is for the estimation of each of the parameters. The experimental

  6. Sitting-up vertigo and trunk retropulsion in patients with benign positional vertigo but without positional nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büki, Béla; Simon, László; Garab, Sándor; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Jünger, Heinz; Straumann, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Presently, the unambiguous diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV) requires the detection of positioning or positional nystagmus provoked by Dix-Hallpike (for vertical semicircular canals) or supine roll (for horizontal semicircular canals) manoeuvres, which indicates canalo- or cupolithiasis of affected semicircular canals. There are patients, however, in whom--despite typical complaints of BPPV--no positional nystagmus can be documented; this is called 'subjective BPPV' (sBPPV). These patients usually complain of short vertigo spells during and after sitting up, sometimes with abnormal retropulsion of the trunk. In this study, the authors aimed to ascertain whether these patients in fact demonstrate abnormal sitting-up trunk oscillations when measured by posturography. Of 200 unselected patients with vertigo or dizziness, 43% had sBPPV with vertigo spells while sitting up, and 20% classical BPPV. Posturographic recordings were performed in 20 patients with sBPPV and sitting-up vertigo. Seven of the 20 patients had trunk oscillations during the act of sitting up and for a short time immediately afterwards. Based on their findings, the authors propose a new type of BPPV, the so-called Type 2 BPPV (typical complaints of BPPV, no nystagmus in Dix-Hallpike positions but short vertigo spell while sitting up), which may be the result of chronic canalolithiasis within the short arm of a posterior canal. Furthermore, the authors suggest that Type 2 BPPV, which could be identical to sBPPV or constitute a major subgroup of it, occurs frequently among patients with vertigo. For therapy, the authors recommend repetitive sit-ups from the Dix-Hallpike positions to liberate the short arm of the posterior canal from canaloliths.

  7. Diagnosis dan Tatalaksana Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Horizontal Berdasarkan Head Roll Test

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Edward; Yelvita Roza

    2014-01-01

    AbstrakLatar belakang: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) merupakan vertigo yang dicetuskan oleh perubahan posisi kepala atau badan terhadap gaya gravitasi. Diagnosis BPPV ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis dan manuver provokasi. Sering kali terjadi kesalahan dalam menegakkan diagnosis BPPV yang berakibat terhadap penatalaksanaan vertigo yang tidak adekuat. Tujuan: Untuk menjelaskan bagaimana diagnosis dan tatalaksana BPPV Kanalis Horizontal. Kasus: Seorang laki-laki berusia 56 tahun y...

  8. Nystagmus discordance with 2-dimensional videonystagmography in posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerHeyden, Crystal M; Carender, Wendy J; Heidenreich, Katherine D

    2015-04-01

    The Dix-Hallpike test is a standard component of the videonystagmography test battery and can diagnose posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of discordant, equivocal, and concordant nystagmus tracings in active posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo when compared directly with the eye video. Case series with chart review of patients diagnosed with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo by 2-dimensional videonystagmography from August 1, 2007, to August 1, 2012. A tertiary vestibular test laboratory. Ninety-six adults (4 had bilateral involvement) with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were included. A total of 100 videos with accompanying videonystagmography tracings were reviewed to determine nystagmus trajectory as well as globe position. Descriptive statistics were used to describe prevalence. Fisher exact test was used to compare proportions. Sixty-two percent of cases involved benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the right posterior semicircular canal, while 38% involved the left posterior semicircular canal. The prevalence of discordant, equivocal, and concordant tracings was 65% (65/100), 29% (29/100), and 6% (6/100). All tracing errors involved the horizontal channel. There was no association between tracing accuracy and the ear of involvement or globe position (P > .05). Two-dimensional videonystagmography tracings are not reliable for identifying nystagmus trajectory in posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  9. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning proced...

  10. Vestibular suppressants after canalith repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Beom; Lee, Hyun S; Ban, Jae H

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the characteristics of residual symptoms and to evaluate the effects of adjuvant vestibular suppressants on residual symptoms after successful canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs). Individual randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifty patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who achieved successful CRPs on initial visit participated in this study. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaires were completed before CRPs. All study populations were divided into three groups after successful CRPs on the initial visit day: the medication (V) group (treated with a vestibular suppressant [dimenhydrinate 50 mg per day]), the placebo (P) group, and the no medication (N) group. One week after successful CRPs, residual symptoms were checked and repeated DHI questionnaires were completed to compare residual symptoms. Among the 138 patients who did not show positional nystagmus at follow-up, 67 (48.5%) complained of residual symptoms. The presence of residual symptoms was more prevalent in the P and N group compared with the V group (P = .035, P = .017, respectively). The most frequent residual symptom was lightheadedness (n = 42). Moreover, in the V group, lightheadedness was significantly reduced compared with the P group (P = .029). However, in the analysis of DHI, total and subscale scores did not differ across the three groups before or after successful CRP. Vestibular suppressants significantly reduced residual symptoms compared to both placebo and no medication after CRP. However, there was no significant reduction in DHI score compared with the control group, suggesting that the residual symptoms could not be evaluated by DHI score alone. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Bin; Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Young Ju; Kim, Hyoung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Several studies have suggested a possible relationship between recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and altered calcium homeostasis in the endolymph of the inner ear. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between Ca2+ and vitamin D status and BPPV occurrence as well as the status of bone biochemical markers in osteoporotic patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic BPPV. Methods The study included total 132 patients who were referred to our clinic between August 2008 and October 2013. Based on the bone mineral density (BMD) results, the subjects were divided into three groups: normal BMD (n = 34), osteopenia (n = 40) and osteoporosis (n = 58). The biochemical markers of bone turnover including serum Carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (s-CTX), osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and urinary free deoxypyridinoline (u-DPD), were analyzed, along with the serum Ca2+ and vitamin D levels. Results The mean serum calcium, phosphate and creatinine clearance levels were within the standard laboratory reference range. The incidence of vitamin D deficiency was 11.8% (4/34) in the normal BMD group, 15% (6/40) in the osteopenia group and 43.1% (25/58) in the osteoporosis group. There was a positive correlation between the 25(OH)D and BMD results in the patients with BPPV. Among the bone turnover markers, the osteocalcin and u-DPD levels were significantly elevated in the osteoporotic patients with BPPV. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency were associated with BPPV. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the prevalence of BPPV in osteoporotic patients is associated with vitamin D deficiency and high bone turnover rates at systemic level, which could disturb local Ca2+ homeostasis in the inner ear. PMID:28467451

  12. Gender-Based Comorbidity in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Janky, Kristen L.; Cohn, Edward S.; Büki, Bela; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US) population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases) from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients’ diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children). The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis), and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV. PMID:25187992

  13. Utricular Dysfunction in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Simon I; Abouyared, Marianne; Snapp, Hillary; Jethanamest, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of otolith dysfunction in patients with refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Unmatched case control. Tertiary care institution. Patients included were diagnosed with BPPV, failed initial in-office canalith repositioning maneuvers (CRMs), and completed vestibular testing and vestibular rehabilitation (n = 40). Refractory BPPV (n = 19) was defined in patients whose symptoms did not resolve despite vestibular rehabilitation. These patients were compared with a control group of those with nonrefractory BPPV (n = 21) for results of a caloric test, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP), and subjective visual vertical (SVV). Forty-six of 251 patients failed initial treatment with in-office CRM. Forty patients met inclusion criteria. There was no significant difference between the cases (refractory BPPV) (n = 19) and controls (nonrefractory BPPV) (n = 21) in terms of age, duration of symptoms, laterality of BPPV, and BPPV symptoms. There was no difference in the prevalence of caloric weakness and cVEMP abnormalities (P > .05), with odds ratios (ORs [95% confidence interval (CI)]) of having abnormal results among cases vs controls of 1.1818 (0.3329-4.1954) and 4.3846 (0.7627-25.2048), for caloric and cVEMP, respectively. Abnormal eccentric SVV was more prevalent in refractory BPPV cases (58%) than in controls (14%) (P BPPV than those with nonrefractory BPPV. Patients with refractory BPPV are more likely to have abnormal eccentric SVV and thus underlying utricular dysfunction. This finding is important to take into account when designing rehabilitation strategies for patients with BPPV who fail CRM. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  14. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Masoom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Since utricle is the main damaged organ in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP may be an appropriate method to evaluate the utricule dysfunction and the effect of disease recurrence rate on it. This study aimed to record myogenic potential in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, ocular myogenic potential was recorded in 25 healthy subjects and 20 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo using 500 Hz-tone bursts (95 dB nHL.Results: In the affected ear, mean amplitude was lower and mean threshold was higher than those in the unaffected ear and in the normal group (p<0.05. Mean amplitude asymmetry ratio of patients was more than the healthy subjects (p0.05. Frequencies of abnormal responses in the affected ears were higher than in unaffected ears and in the normal group (p<0.05. Furthermore, the patients with recurrent vertigo showed more abnormalities than the patients with non-recurrent (p=0.030.Conclusion: In the recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential showed more damage in the utricle, suggesting this response could be used to evaluate the patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  15. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Steiner, Robert W Prasaad; Do, Betty Tsai; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with BPPV, and it applies to any setting in which BPPV would be identified, monitored, or managed. The target patient for the guideline is aged ≥18 years with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, minimizing potentially unnecessary return physician visits, and maximizing

  16. Decreased serum vitamin D in idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Ji-Soo; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Sungbo; Lee, Hajeong; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyunjin; Song, Junghan; Ghim, Yuna

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association of osteopenia/osteoporosis with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since vitamin D takes part in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus found in the body and plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure, decreased bone mineral density in patients with BPPV may be related to decreased serum vitamin D. We measured the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 100 patients (63 women and 37 men, mean age ± SD = 61.8 ± 11.6) with idiopathic BPPV and compared the data with those of 192 controls (101 women and 91 men, mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 11.3) who had lived in the same community without dizziness or imbalance during the preceding year. The selection of the controls and acquisition of clinical information were done using the data from the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008. The serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was lower in the patients with BPPV than in the controls (mean ± SD = 14.4 ± 8.4 versus 19.1 ± 6.8 ng/ml, p = 0.001). Furthermore, patients with BPPV showed a higher prevalence of decreased serum vitamin D (diabetes, proteinuria, regular exercise and the existence of decreased bone mineral density demonstrated that vitamin D insufficiency (10-20 ng/ml) and deficiency (<10 ng/ml) were associated with BPPV with the odds ratios of 3.8 (95 % confidence interval = 1.51-9.38, p = 0.004) and 23.0 (95 % confidence interval = 6.88-77.05, p < 0.001). Our study demonstrated an association between idiopathic BPPV and decreased serum vitamin D. Decreased serum vitamin D may be a risk factor of BPPV.

  17. Visual Suppression is Impaired in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 but Preserved in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Kishi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Positional vertigo is a common neurologic emergency and mostly the etiology is peripheral. However, central diseases may mimic peripheral positional vertigo at their initial presentation. We here describe the results of a visual suppression test in six patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, a central positional vertigo, and nine patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the major peripheral positional vertigo. As a result, the visual suppression value of both diseases differed significantly; e.g., 22.5% in SCA6 and 64.3% in BPPV (p < 0.001. There was a positive correlation between the visual suppression value and disease duration, cerebellar atrophy, and CAG repeat length of SCA6 but they were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the present study showed for the first time that visual suppression is impaired in SCA6, a central positional vertigo, but preserved in BPPV, the major peripheral positional vertigo, by directly comparing both groups. The abnormality in the SCA6 group presumably reflects dysfunction in the central visual fixation pathway at the cerebellar flocculus and nodulus. This simple test might aid differential diagnosis of peripheral and central positional vertigo at the earlier stage of disease.disease.

  18. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadder Korkmaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning procedures for treatment. METHODS: Data were obtained from the clinical records of 153 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Patients were treated by repositioning maneuvers. Demographic data and the factors including age, sex, canal type, duration of symptoms, comorbidities and number of repositioning maneuvers for relief were documented for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Age, sex, canal type and the duration of symptoms had no impact on the number of maneuvers. The most common comorbidity was spine problems. Hypertension was the only comorbidity that significantly associated with increased number of maneuvers. CONCLUSION: The presence of hypertension is a risk factor for repeated maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment. Physicians should be aware of the increased probability of repeated repositioning maneuvers in these group of patients. The role of comorbidities and vascular factors need to be further clarified in the course of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  19. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mukadder; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning procedures for treatment. Data were obtained from the clinical records of 153 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Patients were treated by repositioning maneuvers. Demographic data and the factors including age, sex, canal type, duration of symptoms, comorbidities and number of repositioning maneuvers for relief were documented for statistical analysis. Age, sex, canal type and the duration of symptoms had no impact on the number of maneuvers. The most common comorbidity was spine problems. Hypertension was the only comorbidity that significantly associated with increased number of maneuvers. The presence of hypertension is a risk factor for repeated maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment. Physicians should be aware of the increased probability of repeated repositioning maneuvers in these group of patients. The role of comorbidities and vascular factors need to be further clarified in the course of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between clinical features and therapeutic approach for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, K; Ogawa, Y; Inagaki, T; Shimizu, S; Konomi, U; Kondo, T; Suzuki, M

    2013-10-01

    To examine the clinical features, age and gender distribution of patients, treatment methods, and outcomes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. This paper reports a review of 357 patients treated for this condition at a single institution over a duration of 5 years. Patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were divided into two groups: one group underwent the Epley manoeuvre and the other received medication. The lateral canal canalolithiasis patients were also divided into two groups: one underwent the Lempert manoeuvre and the other received medication. Lastly, the lateral canal cupulolithiasis patients were treated with medication and non-specific physical techniques. For patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, resolution time was significantly shorter in the Epley manoeuvre group than in the medication group. For the lateral canal canalolithiasis patients, resolution time was significantly shorter in the Lempert manoeuvre group than in the medication group. Resolution time was significantly longer in the lateral canal cupulolithiasis patients than in the other patients. The average age of patients increased with the number of recurrences, as did predominance in females. Average age and rate of sensorineural hearing loss were significantly higher in patients with intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo compared with those in the curable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo group.

  1. How many Epley manoeuvres are required to treat benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Shakir, A; Goggins, S; Snow, D

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the total number of Epley manoeuvres required to provide symptomatic relief to patients newly diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. This retrospective audit assessed every patient referred to the audiology department for investigations of their symptoms over a period of one year. Only patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo confirmed via a positive Dix-Hallpike test result, with no suggestion of dual pathology, were included. Seventy patients with a positive Dix-Hallpike test result were identified. The total number of Epley manoeuvres required ranged from one to five. Thirty-three patients (47 per cent) were asymptomatic following one Epley manoeuvre. Eleven patients (16 per cent) needed 2 manoeuvres and 15 patients (21 per cent) required 3 manoeuvres for symptomatic control. Symptomatic control of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was obtained following a single Epley manoeuvre for 47 per cent of patients. The majority of patients (84 per cent) experienced symptomatic improvement following three Epley manoeuvres.

  2. Predictors for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with positive Dix?Hallpike test

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Kazutaka; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Toshihiko; Tsukamoto, Tomoko

    2011-01-01

    Kazutaka Noda, Masatomi Ikusaka, Yoshiyuki Ohira, Toshihiko Takada, Tomoko TsukamotoDepartment of General Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, JapanObjective: Patient medical history is important for making a diagnosis of causes of dizziness, but there have been no studies on the diagnostic value of individual items in the history. This study was performed to identify and validate useful questions for suspecting a diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).Methods: Constr...

  3. [Treatment outcome of patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss and concomitant benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haixiong; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Dadao; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcome of patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) with concomitant benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Out of 252 ISSHL patients, 96 patients were diagnosed with complicating vertigo and examined using electronystagmography. All patients were divided into three groups, namely, ISSHL without vertigo group (n=156), ISSHL with non-BPPV vertigo group (n=70) and ISSHL with BPPV group (n=26). All patients received daily intravenous infusion of 200,000 U urokinase for 3 consecutive days and 100,000 U for 3 additional days. Concomitant medications included intravenous Ginkgo biloba leave compound and vitamin B6 and intramuscular vitamins B1 and B12 for 2 weeks. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with BPPV on electronystagmography positioning test also received canalith repositioning maneuver. Vertigo-associated symptoms completely resolved after canalith repositioning maneuver in ISSHL patients with complicating BPPV. With respect to post-treatment hearing, ISSHL patients without vertigo exhibited a similar improvement as compared to those with BPPV, while those with non-BPPV vertigo had a significantly less improvement than those without vertigo and with BPPV. ISSHL patients with complicating BPPV exhibit a relatively favorable outcome with respect to hearing and vertigo-associated symptoms after medical and repositioning treatment.

  4. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Hengyong; Li, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) (otolith disease) is the most common neurological and position change related vertigo, accounting for 17–20% of peripheral vertigo. BPPV occur in the elderly. The high incidence age for BPPC was 50 to 70 years and mostly in female. According to the different parts of the lesions, it is divided into anterior canal BPPV (AC-BPPV), posterior canal BPPV (PC-BPPV), horizontal canal BPPV (HC-BPPV). Studies have shown that the incidence of PC-BPPV was 86.3...

  5. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Tzu-Pu; Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Chung, Hsien-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based cas...

  6. Arnold-Chiari type I malformation presenting as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, M; Bagdatoglu, C

    2007-03-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital hindbrain and spinal cord abnormalities characterized by herniation of the contents of the posterior cranial fossa caudally through the foramen magnum into the upper cervical spine. It is important to recognize Arnold-Chiari type I malformation in the differential diagnosis of adult vertigo cases. We present a 51-year-old patient with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation that was initially diagnosed as posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  7. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: modern concepts of its etiology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunel'skaya, N L; Mokrysheva, N G; Guseva, A L; Baibakova, E V; Manaenkova, E A

    The objective of the present review of the literature is the analysis of the currently available data concerning etiology and pathogenesis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The special emphasis is placed on the modern hypotheses of BPPV formation that collectively account for not more than 15% of all known cases of this condition. The best explored are the following causes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: vestibular neuronitis, head injuries, and disorders in the middle ear. During the recent years, much attention has been given to the role of disturbances of calcium metabolism and osteoporosis in etiology of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. It is supposed that pathogenesis of vertiginous attacks can be explained in terms of the canalolithiasis and cupulolithiasis theories.

  8. Effectiveness of the Parnes particle repositioning manoeuvre for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, B L; Leafman, J S

    2015-12-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder that negatively affects an individual's health-related quality of life. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the Parnes particle repositioning manoeuvre as an intervention for individuals with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The de-identified records of 155 individuals treated with the Parnes manoeuvre were examined. Descriptive statistics were calculated, including the frequency and valid per cent of participants whose nystagmus was resolved with the Parnes manoeuvre. In all, nystagmus was resolved with the Parnes manoeuvre in 145 participants (93.5 per cent). The mean number of manoeuvres needed to resolve the nystagmus was 1.3. The Parnes manoeuvre proved to be as effective as the Epley canalith repositioning manoeuvre, currently the most common intervention, in treating individuals with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  9. Malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Kulamarva, Gautham; Dispenza, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    An insidious percentage of paroxysmal positional vertigo appears to be intractable with canalith repositioning maneuver and also is not self-limiting. This type of positional vertigo is sustained by the action of intracranial tumors that mimics the clinical aspects of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.Aim of this study is to clarify the features of these forms of positional vertigo, which we indicate as malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of all the patients who presented with vertigo spells and were managed at our tertiary care referral centre over a three years period. Two hundred and eleven patients with diagnosis of positional paroxysmal vertigo were included in the final study. Seven patients were affected by intracranial tumors causing a positional vertigo and were classified as malignant paroxysmal positional vertigo patients after radiological and histological diagnosis. These patients were affected by an internal auditory canal mass alone or with extension in the cerebello pontine angle that mimicked a benign positional vertigo. We can conclude that the clinician should keep in mind the differentiation between benign positional vertigo and malignant positional vertigo. When the patients with positional vertigo presents a strange behaviour of symptoms, nystagmus or response to the canalith repositioning maneuver a radiological investigation must be undertaken in every doubtful case. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a female with arterial hypertension and meningioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestuzheva, N V; Parfenov, V A; Zamergrad, M V

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) often causes difficulties, in particular, in elderly people with concomitant diseases. The article presents a case of a 77 year-old woman with BPPV. A patient's complaint on vertigo was mistakenly diagnosed as brain ischemia because the patient had long suffered from uncontrolled arterial hypertension. MRI-study revealed leucoaraiosis and one lacuna as well as a meningioma which was mistakenly linked to vertigo. The diagnosis of BPPV, use of Epley maneuver with the following vestibular exercises resulted in complete stopping of vertigo. Effective treatment of arterial hypertension with the normalization of arterial pressure, use of aspirin and statins reduced the risk of stroke. Exclusion of BPPV is needed in all cases of vertigo with unclear etiology.

  11. Insights into horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from a human case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Margaret; Bance, Manohar

    2013-12-01

    For horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, determination of the pathologic side is difficult and based on many physiological assumptions. This article reports findings on a patient who had one dysfunctional inner ear and who presented with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, giving us a relatively pure model for observing nystagmus arising in a subject in whom the affected side is known a priori. It is an interesting human model corroborating theories of nystagmus generation in this pathology and also serves to validate Ewald's second law in a living human subject. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. The efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a rapid review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Scheer-Horst, Ellis S; van Benthem, Peter Paul G; Bruintjes, Tjasse D; van Leeuwen, Roeland B; van der Zaag-Loonen, Hester J

    2014-11-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation in addition to a canalith repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and EMBASE databases. A comprehensive search was performed up to July 2013. Two authors independently scanned the search results to identify randomized controlled trials of vestibular rehabilitation in addition to a canalith repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We included trials that were available in the English language and did not apply publication year or publication status restrictions. Studies were methodologically assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Primary outcome was the effect on vertigo attacks and balance. Of 76 identified trials, only 2 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria and were included in this review, involving 106 patients. One study was methodologically weak, the other strong. The studies differed in type of intervention, type of outcome, and follow-up time. Both studies reported no significant difference in the vertigo intensity between groups. A small effect was found on balance. Two level II studies in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo showed no effect of vestibular rehabilitation in addition to a canalith repositioning maneuver on vertigo intensity and a small, beneficial effect on balance. We therefore conclude that there is no evidence for an effect of vestibular rehabilitation in addition to a canalith repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  13. Epley and Semont maneuvers for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ao-Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Using network meta-analysis, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of Epley and Semont maneuvers as treatment options for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Network meta-analysis. Randomized controlled studies with a Jadad score ≥ 3 that used an Epley or Semont maneuver in posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients were analyzed in this project. The following efficacy outcomes included 1-week recovery rate and end of study recovery rate. Recurrence rate was used to assess the safety of each treatment. Of 589 articles, 12 studies that enrolled 999 posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients were selected. The pooled analysis revealed that the Epley maneuver was as efficacious as the Semont maneuver, in both the 1-week recovery rate and end of study recovery rate (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.48-7.00; OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.47-7.20), and had a similar recurrence rate (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.33-4.4). These two techniques were both better than sham-controlled treatment in the two efficacy indicators. No difference was observed in recurrence rate for treatments. The Epley maneuver was similar to the Semont maneuver in both efficacy and safety for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in short-term effects, and both were superior to the sham-controlled treatment. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. [The peculiar features of the clinical course of Meniere's disease associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal'chun, V T; Mel'nikov, O A; Levina, Yu V; Guseva, A L

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of occurrence and clinical features of vertigo spells in the patients presenting with Ménière's disease (MD) associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A total of 104 patients with MD were available for the observation. All of them underwent the comprehensive examination that included the audiological study and vestibular tests, such as the Dix-Hallpike test and the roll-test for BPPV diagnostics. A structured questionnaire was used to calculate the average number of vertigo spells per month during the period of 6 months and the mean duration of the vertigo spells; the presence or the absence of changes in hearing ability during the spells as well as the severity of vertigo were determined with the use of the 10-point visual analogue scale. The patients suffering from BPPV associated with Meniere's disease presented with the following clinical features which distinguished them from the patients with idiopathic BPPV (pvertigo spells in the patients having MD associated with BPPV occurred with an enhanced frequency; their mean duration was relatively short due to the presence of both long and short positional vertigo attacks characterized by the absence of hearing changes during the spells and the equal severity of vertigo (p < 0,05).

  15. Vertical nystagmus during the seated-supine positional (straight head-hanging) test in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetiser, S; Ince, D

    2014-08-01

    This study describes the clinical features of up-beating vertical nystagmus observed during the seated-supine positional (straight head-hanging) test in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A total of 190 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo symptoms who had presented between 2009 and 2012 were enrolled for this retrospective case series. Twelve patients with positional up-beating vertical nystagmus, as confirmed by video-nystagmography during the seated-supine positional test, were selected. The incidence and duration of symptoms of multiple canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were significantly lower compared with the other types of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (p = 0.029 and p = 0.048 respectively). Trauma was the leading aetiological factor in those patients (p = 0.012). The average number of therapeutic manoeuvres required for the relief of symptoms in patients with multiple canal involvement was significantly higher than in the other groups (p = 0.041). In patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the presence of vertical up-beating nystagmus while lying down is a unique peripheral sign and could indicate multiple canal involvement. Therefore, the seated-supine positional test should always be included in the test battery.

  16. Diagnosis dan Tatalaksana Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV Horizontal Berdasarkan Head Roll Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Edward

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV merupakan vertigo yang dicetuskan oleh perubahan posisi kepala atau badan terhadap gaya gravitasi. Diagnosis BPPV ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis dan manuver provokasi. Sering kali terjadi kesalahan dalam menegakkan diagnosis BPPV yang berakibat terhadap penatalaksanaan vertigo yang tidak adekuat. Tujuan: Untuk menjelaskan bagaimana diagnosis dan tatalaksana BPPV Kanalis Horizontal. Kasus: Seorang laki-laki berusia 56 tahun yang didiagnosis sebagai BPPV Kanalis Horizontal kiri tipe kanalolithiasis apogeotropik. Penatalaksanaan: Dilakukan barbeque maneuver terapi reposisi kanalith. Kesimpulan: Penatalaksanaan BPPV adalah berdasarkan lokasi kanal yang terlibat dengan terapi reposisi kanalith.Kata kunci: BPPV, kanalis horizontal, kanalolithiasis apogeotropik.AbstractBackground: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is vertigo that provoked by a position change of the head or body to the gravitation. The diagnosis of BPPV can be established by anamnesis and provocation maneuver. However, because BPPV frequently is misdiagnosed, it will implicate to an adequate therapeutic. Purposes: Explaining how to diagnose and manage a Horizontal Canal BPPV. Case : a man, 56 ages which diagnosed as a Left Horizontal Canal BPPV apogeotropic canalolithiasis type. Management: A barbeque maneuver was performed as canalith reposition treatment. Conclution: The management of BPPV is based on the involved canal with canalith repositioning treatment.Keywords: BPPV, horizontal canal, apogeotropic canalolithiasis.

  17. Does benign paroxysmal positional vertigo explain age and gender variation in patients with vertigo by mechanical assistance maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu; Jia, Xian-Hao; Tian, Liang; Richard-Vitton, Th

    2014-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common peripheral vestibular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of BPPV in vertigo patients and the characteristics of BPPV in diagnosis and repositioning using mechanical assistance maneuvers and to analyze and summarize the reasons showing these characteristics. Seven hundred and twenty-six patients with vertigo were enrolled in this study. All patients were inspected by TRV armchair (SYNAPSYS, model TRV, France). BPPV patients were identified by the examination results. The characteristics and results using TRV armchair in diagnosis and treatment of BPPV were compared and analyzed. Of 726 vertigo patients, 209 BPPV patients were diagnosed, including 58 men and 151 women, aged from 16 to 87 (mean 52.90 ± 11.93) years. There were significant differences in the proportion of BPPV in male and female vertigo patients (P = 0.0233), but no differences among all age groups (P = 0.3201). Of 209 BPPV patients, 208 cases were repositioned by TRV armchair and no one appeared to have otolithic debris relocated into another canal in the repositioning procedures. 202 cases (97.12 %) were successful and six cases (2.87 %) were effective. None of them failed. This study suggests that BPPV is one of the most common diseases in the young vertigo patients, just like that in the old ones. Female of the species has predilection for BPPV and the site of predilection is the right posterior semicircular canals (PC-BPPV). The results of repositioning are perfect using mechanical assistance maneuvers.

  18. Natural history of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is truly short.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Dae Bo; Ko, Kyung Min; Lee, Joon Hee; Park, Hong Ju; Song, Mee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to characterize the natural course of positional vertigo and nystagmus in patients with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (h-BPPV) and to analyze the difference in the natural course between the two variants of h-BPPV. We conducted a prospective study in 106 patients with geotropic type h-BPPV [h-BPPV (Geo)] (n = 43) and apogeotropic type h-BPPV [h-BPPV (Apo)] (n = 63) who agreed and signed the written informed consent of no treatment. All patients were asked to answer a detailed interview about the onset time of positional vertigo and to visit the hospital every 1-3 days. At every visit, they were interviewed about cessation time of positional vertigo and positional nystagmus was assessed. The mean period ± SD between the onset and remission of vertigo in the h-BPPV (Geo) was 6.7 ± 6.3 days, whereas that in the h-BPPV (Apo) was 3.7 ± 4.1 days. In addition, the mean period ± SD from the initial diagnosis to the disappearance of positional nystagmus in the h-BPPV (Geo) was 4.7 ± 3.9 days, whereas that in the h-BPPV (Apo) was 4.4 ± 5.0 days. Although the duration until natural remission of positional nystagmus did not differ between the two variants of h-BPPV, the remission of vertigo occurred faster in h-BPPV (Apo) than h-BPPV (Geo) (p positional vertigo disappeared faster in the h-BPPV (Apo) compared to the h-BPPV (Geo) unlike the positional nystagmus.

  19. Effect of Repositioning Maneuver Type and Postmaneuver Restrictions on Vertigo and Dizziness in Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupet, Michel; Ferrary, Evelyne; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. To compare the efficiency of Epley (Ep) and Sémont-Toupet (ST) repositioning maneuvers and to evaluate postmaneuver restriction effect on short-term vertigo and dizziness after repositioning maneuvers by an analog visual scale (VAS) in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV). Material and Methods. 226 consecutive adult patients with posterior canal BPPV were included. Patients were randomized into 2 different maneuver sequence groups (n = 113): 2 ST then 1 Ep or 2 Ep then 1 ST. Each group of sequence was randomized into 2 subgroups: with or without postmaneuver restrictions. Vertigo and dizziness were assessed from days 0 to 5 by VAS. Results. There was no difference between vertigo scores between Ep and ST groups. Dizziness scores were higher in Ep group during the first 3 days but became similar to those of ST group at days 4 and 5. ST maneuvers induced liberatory signs more frequently than Ep (58% versus 42% resp., P < 0.01, Fisher's test). After repositioning maneuvers, VAS scores decreased similarly in patients with and without liberatory signs. Postmaneuver restrictions did not influence VAS scores. Conclusion. Even if ST showed a higher rate of liberatory signs than Ep in this series, VAS scores were not influenced by these signs. PMID:22973168

  20. Effect of Repositioning Maneuver Type and Postmaneuver Restrictions on Vertigo and Dizziness in Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Toupet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To compare the efficiency of Epley (Ep and Sémont-Toupet (ST repositioning maneuvers and to evaluate postmaneuver restriction effect on short-term vertigo and dizziness after repositioning maneuvers by an analog visual scale (VAS in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV. Material and Methods. 226 consecutive adult patients with posterior canal BPPV were included. Patients were randomized into 2 different maneuver sequence groups (n=113: 2 ST then 1 Ep or 2 Ep then 1 ST. Each group of sequence was randomized into 2 subgroups: with or without postmaneuver restrictions. Vertigo and dizziness were assessed from days 0 to 5 by VAS. Results. There was no difference between vertigo scores between Ep and ST groups. Dizziness scores were higher in Ep group during the first 3 days but became similar to those of ST group at days 4 and 5. ST maneuvers induced liberatory signs more frequently than Ep (58% versus 42% resp., P<0.01, Fisher's test. After repositioning maneuvers, VAS scores decreased similarly in patients with and without liberatory signs. Postmaneuver restrictions did not influence VAS scores. Conclusion. Even if ST showed a higher rate of liberatory signs than Ep in this series, VAS scores were not influenced by these signs.

  1. Anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and positional downbeating nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Molina, Maria I; Gamiz, Maria J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features and video-oculographic findings in patients with anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This is a prospective case series. The study was set at an outpatient clinic in a general hospital. Fourteen individuals with symptoms of BPPV and positional downbeating nystagmus (pDBN) were included in the study. The diagnosis was based on a history of brief episodes of vertigo and the presence of pDBN confirmed in the video-oculographic examination during Dix-Hallpike test (DH) or head-hanging maneuver. Patients were treated by particle repositioning maneuver and the effectiveness was evaluated at 7, 30, and 180 days posttreatment. The treatment was repeated up to 4 times if pDBN was persistent. The main outcome measure is the number of patients without pDBN at 30 and 180 days. Video-oculography showed a predominant pDBN in response to DH. Of the 14 patients, 7 had arterial hypertension, and 5 of 14 cases presented abnormalities on the caloric test. Horizontal spontaneous nystagmus was found in 3 of 14 individuals. Positional nystagmus at different positional test was observed in 5 of 14 individuals, suggesting the involvement of several canals. Of the 14 patients, 10 (71%) did not present vertigo, and the positional tests were negative at 30 days. However, 3 cases presented a positive DH with persistence of BPPV episodes and pDBN at 30 days, and another developed a contralateral posterior canal affectation. One of the patients maintained a persistent pDBN at 180 days despite the repeated maneuvers. Video-oculography demonstrates that anterior canal BPPV is characterized by a predominant downbeating nystagmus in response to DH. These individuals may show alterations in the vestibular caloric, and they can have multicanal affectation.

  2. Teaching Patient-Centered Counseling Skills for Assessment, Diagnosis, and Management of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilla, Anna Marie; Roberts, Richard A; Johnson, Carole E

    2018-02-01

    Audiologists are an integral part of the management of those with dizziness and vestibular disorders. However, little research has been performed on counseling approaches for patients who present with dizziness as a primary concern. Accordingly, it is important that audiology students are provided with didactic and experiential learning opportunities for the assessment, diagnosis, and management of this population. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common vestibular disorder among adults. Doctor of Audiology students, at a minimum, should be provided with learning opportunities for counseling patients with this particular disorder. Implementation of patient-centered counseling is applied across various parts of the patient encounter from initial intake to treatment and patient education. The purpose of this article is to present the available evidence and to apply widely accepted theories and techniques to counseling those with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Didactic resources and experiential learning activities are provided for use in coursework or as a supplement to clinical education.

  3. Persistent positional nystagmus: a case of superior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kerber, Kevin A; Carender, Wendy J; Basura, Gregory J; Telian, Steven A

    2011-08-01

    Involvement of the superior semicircular canal (SSC) in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is rare. SSC BPPV is distinguished from the more common posterior semicircular canal (PSC) variant by the pattern of nystagmus triggered by the Dix-Hallpike position: down-beating torsional nystagmus in SSC BPPV versus up-beating torsional nystagmus in PSC BPPV. SSC BPPV may be readily treated at the bedside, which is a key component in excluding central causes of down-beating nystagmus. We present an unusual video case report believed to represent refractory SSC BPPV based on the pattern of nystagmus and the absence of any other central signs. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Demographic Analysis of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to document the demographic data of patients with BPPV regarding distribution of gender, age, associated problems, most ... Comparative analysis of average age between the two gender groups was not statistically significant (P ..... between the head‑lying side during sleep and the affected side by benign paroxysmal ...

  5. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Simultaneous Involvement of Multiple Semicircular Canals

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Dae Bo; Song, Chang Eun; Jung, Eun Jung; Ko, Kyung Min; Park, Jin Woo; Song, Mee Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) generally involves a single semicircular canal (single canal BPPV) but it has been reported that more than one semicircular canal on either the same or the opposite side can be involved in 6.8-20% of the cases (multiple canal BPPV). In this study, the clinical characteristics of multiple canal BPPV were analyzed and compared to those of single canal BPPV. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on 1054 co...

  6. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia: risk factors for recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Guilherme; Sens, Patrícia Maria; Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Cavalcante, José Diogo Rijo; Santos, Paula Regina Bonifácio dos; Silva, Ana Lívia Muniz da; Souza, Érica Carla Figueiredo de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Changes in carbohydrate metabolism may lead to recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of the disturbance of carbohydrate metabolism in the recurrence of idiopathic BPPV.METHODS: A longitudinal prospective study of a cohort, with 41 months follow-up. We analyzed the results of 72 glucose-insulin curves in patients with recurrence of BPPV. The curves were classified into intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and normal.RESULT...

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Anterior-Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzi, Ioanna; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In contrast to the posterior- and horizontal-canal variants, data on the frequency and therapeutic management of anterior-canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) are sparse. To synthesize the existing body of evidence into a systematic review regarding the incidence and treatment of AC-BPPV. Methods Systematic search of medical databases employing predefined criteria, using the term "anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo." Results The electronic search retrieved 178 unique citations, 31 of which were considered eligible for further analysis. Analysis of the collected data revealed an estimated occurrence of AC-BPPV among benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients of 3% (range 1-17.1%). No controlled therapeutic trials could be identified, and so the analysis was focused on uncontrolled case series. Treatment was categorized into three groups: Epley maneuver, Yacovino maneuver, and specific, nonstandard maneuvers described in individual articles. All three categories demonstrated success rates of over 75%, and the overall sample-size-weighted mean was 85.6%. Conclusions The present analysis demonstrated that AC-BPPV comprises about 3% of all BPPV cases. It can be treated safely using the Epley, Yacovino, and other maneuvers with rates of symptom resolution lying in the range of that reported for the other, more frequent canal variants. Multicenter controlled trials are needed in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of AC-BPPV. PMID:26022461

  8. [The efficacious algorithm for the diagnostics and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunel'skaya, N L; Guseva, A L; Baibakova, E V; Chistov, S D; Chugunova, M A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the prevalence of various forms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) among the patients with the complaints of dizziness who had applied for the medical aid. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the newly developed algorithm for the diagnostics and treatment of various forms of the disease. A total of 195 patients with the verified BPPD diagnosis were available for the examination. The fraction of the patients visiting the otoneurologist's office with complaints of this conditions is estimated at 17.8%. It was shown that the women suffer from benign paroxysmal positional vertigo 1.8 times more frequently than the men. The mean age of the patients of either sex experiencing this problem is above 50 years. Most of them have idiopathic pathology. The relationship between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and vascular neurological disorders or inner and middle ear diseases remains to be elucidated. The present study also included the assessment of the effectiveness of the combination of various repositioning maneuvers, self-assisted vestibular gymnastics in the domestic environment, and training in long lying on the unaffected side.

  9. Predictors for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with positive Dix–Hallpike test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Kazutaka Noda, Masatomi Ikusaka, Yoshiyuki Ohira, Toshihiko Takada, Tomoko TsukamotoDepartment of General Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, JapanObjective: Patient medical history is important for making a diagnosis of causes of dizziness, but there have been no studies on the diagnostic value of individual items in the history. This study was performed to identify and validate useful questions for suspecting a diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV.Methods: Construction and validation of a disease prediction model was performed at the outpatient clinic in the Department of General Medicine of Chiba University Hospital. Patients with dizziness were enrolled (145 patients for construction of the disease prediction model and 61 patients for its validation. This study targeted BPPV of the posterior semicircular canals only with a positive Dix–Hallpike test (DHT + BPPV to avoid diagnostic ambiguity. Binomial logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the items that were useful for diagnosis or exclusion of DHT + BPPV.Results: Twelve patients from the derivation set and six patients from the validation set had DHT + BPPV. Binomial logistic regression analysis selected a "duration of dizziness ≤15 seconds" and "onset when turning over in bed" as independent predictors of DHT + BPPV with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval of 4.36 (1.18–16.19 and 10.17 (2.49–41.63, respectively. Affirmative answers to both questions yielded a likelihood ratio of 6.81 (5.11–9.10 for diagnosis of DHT + BPPV, while negative answers to both had a likelihood ratio of 0.19 (0.08–0.47.Conclusion: A "duration of dizziness ≤15 seconds" and "onset when turning over in bed" were the two most important questions among various historical features of BPPV.Keywords: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, likelihood ratio, diagnosis, screening, prediction rules

  10. Effect on the disability index of adult patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo using vestibular rehabilitation and human movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chaverri Flores, Sofía; Chaverri Polini, Julián; Mora Campos, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Objective: determine the effect on the disability index of adult patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) using vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) and human movement. Subjects: six subjects with an average age of 49.5 ± 14.22 years who have been diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo by an otolaryngologist. Instruments: the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and a questionnaire to determine impact on the quality of life of patients with this pathology (Ceballos an...

  11. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Mediators in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güçlütürk, Mehmet Taylan; Ünal, Zeynep Nil; İsmi, Onur; Çimen, Mehmet Burak Yavuz; Ünal, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral cause of vertigo. It can be defined as transient vertigo induced by rapid changes in head position associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. The aim of this study was to search for the possible role of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of BPPV. Total antioxidant status as well as paraoxonase, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL) 6, and IL-1β levels were evaluated in peripheral venous serum samples of 30 BPPV and 30 control patients. Total antioxidant status levels were lower in the BPPV group than in the control group (p=0.008). After Epley's repositioning maneuver in the vertigo group, there was a statistically significant decline in IL-1β levels at the first and third month visits (p=0.014 for first month and p=0.013 for third month). Our findings suggested that IL-1β and oxidative stress contributed to the pathogenesis of BPPV.

  12. [Diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in common clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, N V; Zamergrad, M V; Parfenov, V A; Antonenko, L M

    To analyze typical medical practice in managing patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). 33 patients (5 men and 28 women; mean age, 58 years) with BPPV who had been referred for consultation to the Medical Diagnostic Department, Clinic of Nervous Diseases, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, regarding for vertigo, were examined. Information about the disease before visiting the clinic, such as the duration of vertigo, its pattern, and triggers, previously established diagnoses, prescribed treatment and its efficacy, concomitant diseases, was analyzed. BPPV was not timely diagnosed in 93.9% of cases. The cause of vertigo was most commonly mistakenly assumed to be cerebrovascular disease (66.6%) and cervical spine pathology (15.1%). During a primary examination, none of the patients underwent positional tests (otoneurological examination) that formed the basis for the diagnosis of BPPV. Alternatively, 90.3% of cases underwent instrumental examination: magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, X-ray of the cervical spine, and ultrasonic duplex scanning of the brachiocephalic arteries. Ineffective diagnosis led to the choice of nonoptimal treatment tactics: instead of therapeutic repositioning maneuvers (RM), the patients received therapy with drugs, such as various vasoactive agents (84.8%), nootropic and chondroprotective drugs (12%), or muscle relaxants (9.1%). After BPPV was detected, all patients underwent curative RM, which resulted in regression of the disease. One-year follow-up of the patients showed that the therapeutic effect of RM persisted. Lack of effective and timely diagnosis of BPPV reflects physicians' poor awareness that this condition is the most common cause of vestibular vertigo. The role of vascular and cervicogenic factors in the development of vertigo is overestimated. Most patients with BPPV undergo unreasonable examinations and receive ineffective treatment. It is necessary to raise awareness of BPPV among of

  13. Apogeotropic Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Some Clinical and Therapeutic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paolo; Pecci, Rudi; Giannoni, Beatrice; Di Giustino, Fabio; Santimone, Rossana; Mengucci, Arianna

    2015-01-01

    We lately reported the cases of patients complaining positional vertigo whose nystagmic pattern was that of a peripheral torsional vertical positional down beating nystagmus originating from a lithiasis of the non-ampullary arm of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC). We considered this particular pathological picture the apogeotropic variant of PSC benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since the description of the pilot cases we observed more than 150 patients showing the same clinical sign and course of symptoms. In this paper we describe, in detail, both nystagmus of apogeotropic PSC BPPV (A-PSC BPPV) and symptoms reported by patients trying to give a reasonable explanation for these clinical features. Moreover we developed two specific physical therapies directed to cure A-PSC BPPV. Preliminary results of these techniques are related. PMID:26557364

  14. Therapeutic effect of Epley maneuver on patients with posterior semicircular canal in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Dashti-Khadivaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is characterized by brief attacks of vertigo, nausea and/or positional nystagmus during head movements. Epley maneuver is one of the therapeutic processes for these patients and had various results in different studies. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of this procedure on treatment of patients with BPPV.Material and Methods: This study was performed from January 2008 till September 2009 in otolaryngology clinic of Khatam teaching hospital in Zahedan. The study was conducted among 67 patients (38 female, 29 male with p-BPPV between the ages of 27 and 68 years old. Epley maneuver with restriction was performed for treatment after diagnosis of BPPV and one week later, results evaluated using the Dix-Hallpike test.Result: 92.5% of patients had positive response to this type of treatment. Conclusions: The study revealed good efficacy of Epley maneuver on patients with BPPV

  15. Apogeotropic posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: some clinical and therapeutic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Vannucchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We lately reported the cases of patients complaining positional vertigo whose nystagmic pattern was that of a peripheral torsional vertical positional down beating nystagmus originating from a lithiasis of the non-ampullary arm of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC. We considered this particular pathological picture the apogeotropic variant of PSC benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Since the description of the pilot cases we observed more than 150 patients showing the same clinical sign and course of symptoms. In this paper we describe, in detail, both nystagmus of apogeotropic PSC BPPV (A-PSC BPPV and symptoms reported by patients trying to give a reasonable explanation for these clinical features. Moreover we developed two specific physical therapies directed to cure A-PSC BPPV. Preliminary results of these techniques are related.

  16. Residual dizziness after successful repositioning maneuver for idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Giommetti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a vestibular disorder cause of vertigo. The BPPV may be corrected mechanically by repositioning maneuvers but even after successful maneuvers, some patients report residual dizziness for a certain period afterward. Early recognition and treatment might decrease the incidence of residual dizziness in patients with BPPV, especially in those patients with psychiatric comorbidities and in the elderly, lowering the risk of falling. Many pathogenetic hypotheses for residual dizziness are under debate. The purpose of this review was to identify, evaluate and review recent researches about possible causal factors involved in residual dizziness and the implications on clinical practice. A literature search was performed using different databases such as Pubmed and Scopus. The following search terms were used: residual dizziness, otolithic membrane and BPPV. The search found a total of 1192 titles, which were reduced to 963 after a procedure of de-duplication of the found titles. The research was then restricted to an interval of time comprised between 2000 and 2016 for a total of 800 titles. Among these titles, only those including the terms benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were considered eligible for this review. Only publications in English language were taken into consideration and we excluded those with not available abstract. Finally, 90 abstracts were obtained and critically evaluated by two different Authors, and additional studies were identified by hand searching from the references of artiche of interest. Only 53 were included in this work.

  17. Do platelet indices have a role in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikbilek, Asuman; Tanik, Nermin; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Celikbilek, Mehmet

    2014-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a frequently encountered condition that can severely affect quality of life. Present study was undertaken to investigate whether the platelet (PLT) indices, including mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet crit (PCT), could serve as diagnostic tools in patients with BPPV. Consecutive 45 BPPV patients and age- and sex-matched 40 control subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional prospective study. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients underwent a complete audio-vestibular test battery including Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Routine laboratory analyses were performed in both of the groups. In BPPV patients, PLT, MPV, and PDW were found significantly higher than in controls (P vertigo attack than in those with first-ever attack (P < 0·001). A cutoff value of 8·75 for MPV and 16·65 for PDW parameters were obtained to identify the recurrence in BPPV patients in the receiving operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Elevated PLT indices were associated with BPPV requiring further efforts to better clarify this issue.

  18. Residual Dizziness after Successful Repositioning Maneuver for Idiopathic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenna, Ruggero; Panichi, Roberto; Mobaraki, Puya Dehgani; Longari, Fabrizio; Ricci, Giampietro; Faralli, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a vestibular disorder cause of vertigo. The BPPV may be corrected mechanically by repositioning maneuvers but even after successful maneuvers, some patients report residual dizziness for a certain period afterward. Early recognition and treatment might decrease the incidence of residual dizziness in patients with BPPV, especially in those patients with psychiatric comorbidities and in the elderly, lowering the risk of falling. Many pathogenetic hypotheses for residual dizziness are under debate. The purpose of this review was to identify, evaluate and review recent researches about possible causal factors involved in residual dizziness and the implications on clinical practice. A literature search was performed using different databases such as Pubmed and Scopus. The following search terms were used: residual dizziness, otolithic membrane and BPPV. The search found a total of 1192 titles, which were reduced to 963 after a procedure of de-duplication of the found titles. The research was then restricted to an interval of time comprised between 2000 and 2016 for a total of 800 titles. Among these titles, only those including the terms benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were considered eligible for this review. Only publications in English language were taken into consideration and we excluded those with not available abstract. Finally, 90 abstracts were obtained and critically evaluated by two different Authors, and additional studies were identified by hand searching from the references of artiche of interest. Only 53 were included in this work. PMID:28603599

  19. Co-existence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Meniere's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetişer, Sertaç

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies indicate interrelation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease (MD). These two entities may have different clinical characteristics. Five hundred thirty patients with BPPV evaluated between 2009-2015 were enrolled in the study. 351 patients who had no clear problem associated with BPPV (idiopathic) and 17 patients with MD were analyzed in detail. The age, sex, site of involvement, type of BPPV, symptom duration, and treatment outcome were compared. Meniere's disease + BPPV was more common in the female population (2/15; 7.5 v 127/224; 1.8, pparoxysmal positional vertigo associated with MD presented a divergent picture. It was more frequent in females. Lateral canal involvement was higher. Patients had MD before the development of BPPV and they had prolonged symptoms, which raised a question of diagnostic delay since these two problems were in the same ear in majority of patients. Finally, relief of symptoms required more attempts of repositioning maneuvers.

  20. Impact of Postmaneuver Sleep Position on Recurrence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhao; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background The necessity of postural restriction to patients suffering from benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is controversial. Objective To investigate the impact of the sleep position after the repositioning maneuver on BPPV recurrence. Methods 150 unilateral BPPV patients who were treated by repositioning maneuver were distributed into two groups. The patients in group A were instructed to sleep in a semi-sitting position at an angle of approximately 30 degrees and refrain from sleeping on their BPPV affected side for one week. The patients in group B were told to sleep in any preferred position. The comparison of recurrence rates according to different actual sleep positions in one week and one month was performed. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the sleeping side and the side affected by BPPV. Without instructions on postural restriction, most patients (82.9%, 73/88) avoided sleeping on their affected side. The patients sleeping on their affected side had a higher recurrence rate (35.3%) than ones sleeping in other positions in the first week after the repositioning maneuver (pposition (ppositions in first week after the repositioning maneuver. PMID:24367602

  1. Simultaneous and spontaneous reversal of positional nystagmus; an unusual peripheral sign of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Direction-changing positional nystagmus is generally thought to be of central origin. Reversal of initial positional nystagmus during maintaining the head position in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is quite unusual and could be a sign of peripheral pathology. Vestibular reflex adaptation, simultaneous co-existence of canalolithiasis and cupulolithiasis in the same or both ears and changing in direction of debris movement have been proposed for the mechanism of this phenomenon. This can be a sign of simultaneous ampullopedal and ampulofugal flows during single head movement. This double-phase pattern of flow causing reversal of positional nystagmus could be related with the amount, location and dispersal of otolithic debris inside the membranous labyrinth. Four patients (3 lateral canal canalolithiasis and 1 posterior canal with reversing spontaneous nystagmus among 530 patients with BPPV have been identified in our clinic. They have been cured with standard re-positioning maneuvers. Endolymphatic reflux theory has been proposed as the underlying mechanism for unusual behavior of otolithic debris.

  2. Is it important to repeat the positioning maneuver after the treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vestibular dysfunction.OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the performance of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver after the Epley positioning maneuver has prognostic value in the evolution of unilateral ductolithiasis of posterior semicircular canal.METHODS: A prospective cohort study in monitored patients at otoneurology ambulatory with a diagnosis of BPPV; they were submitted to the therapeutic maneuver and then to a retest in order to evaluate the treatment effectiveness; all cases were reassessed one week later and the retest prognostic value was evaluated.RESULTS: A sample of 64 patients which 47 belonging to negative retest group and 17 belonging to positive retest. Performed the maneuver in all patients, the retest presented 51.85% sensitivity, 91.89% specificity, 82.35% positive predictive value and 72.34% negative predictive value.CONCLUSION: The study shows that doing the retest after repositioning maneuver of particles in BPPV is effectual, since it has high specificity.

  3. Comparison between epleys maneuvre and prochlorperazine maleate in treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niazi, K.O.K.; Dastgir, M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to compare the efficacy of Epley's maneuver and vestibular sedative, prochlorperazine maleate in the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Study Design: Randomized Control Trial. Place and Duration of Study: ENT department, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from 1st May 2011 to 1st November 2011. Patients and Methods: After consent, 60 patients of BPPV fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomly allotted two groups. Group A was treated with Epley's maneuver (n=30) while group B with prochlorperazine maleate (n=30). Outcomes were analyzed on disappearance of vertigo at follow-up examination. Results: 24 (80%) cases managed by Epley's maneuver showed relief of symptoms while only 14 (47%) treated by rochlorperazine maleate showed recovery after 15 days. Conclusion: Epley's maneuver was more effective than vestibular sedatives like prochlorperazine maleate in treating patients of BPPV. (author)

  4. EFFICACY OF EPLEY’S MANOEUVRE IN POSTERIOR CANAL BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Guild Manayil John

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common disorders of vestibular system. Quality of life is significantly affected in vertigo. Purpose of this project was to study the causes of posterior canal BPPV in our patients and to assess the effectiveness of Epley’s manoeuvre in its treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty patients who showed features of posterior canal BPPV on Dix-Hallpike test were included in the study. Epley’s manoeuvre was done in all patients and they were re-examined after one week and one month. RESULTS Our study showed a female preponderance for BPPV with a mean age of 48.32 years. In 94% patients, BPPV was idiopathic. Single Epley’s manoeuvre corrected BPPV in 80% patients. CONCLUSION Epley’s manoeuvre is a safe and effective treatment for BPPV.

  5. Efficacy of Applying Postural Restrictions after Epley Maneuver in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Dashti-Khavidaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of applying postural restrictions after Epley maneuver on therapeutic success in patients with BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial study was conducted in among 118 patients with BPPV at Khatam-al-Anbia hospital in Zahedan. First group treated with postural restrictions and the second with no restrictions. After one week the presence of BPPV examined and data were analyzed. Results: In first group 84.7% did not show symptoms of vertigo, as well as 45 patients in second group. Results did not show any significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: This study showed that instructions had no significant effect on the patients’ treatment outcomes.

  6. Risk factors for poor outcome of a single Epley maneuver and residual positional vertigo in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Go; Sekine, Kazunori; Matsuda, Kazunori; Takeda, Noriaki

    2013-11-01

    The findings suggest that in patients with posterior semicircular canal (PSCC) benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (P-BPPV), head trauma and prolonged bedrest, but not inner ear disease, are risk factors for poor outcome of a single Epley maneuver and persistent residual positional vertigo. We first examined the efficacy of a single Epley maneuver and then assessed the time course in remission of residual positional vertigo in patients with idiopathic P-BPPV and secondary P-BPPV. A total of 157 patients with idiopathic P-BPPV and 40 patients with secondary P-BPPV (secondary to head trauma in 8 patients, to prolonged bedrest in 14 patients, and to inner ear disease in 18 patients) were treated with a single Epley maneuver. The negative rates of the Dix-Hallpike test on day 7 after a single Epley maneuver in both patients with P-BPPV secondary to head trauma (25%) and those with prolonged bedrest (36%) were significantly lower than that (73%) in patients with idiopathic P-BPPV. Additionally, the remission of residual positional vertigo in the former groups of patients was significantly delayed in comparison with that of the latter group. However, there were no significant differences in the efficacy of a single Epley maneuver and persistent residual positional vertigo between idiopathic P-BPPV and P-BPPV secondary to inner ear disease.

  7. Epley's Maneuver in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Series of Cases Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is probably the most common cause of vertigo in women. Objective: To report the result of Epley's maneuver when treating BPPV patients. Method: Study of a series of 9-month-long cases of five female individuals aged between 46 and 64 with BPPV, who were submitted to Epley's maneuver at a scholar clinics, having the positive Dix-Hallpike maneuver at the first consultation as an inclusion criterion, and evaluations were repeated in a six and nine-month term. Results: Only one Epley's maneuver, as the only therapeutic procedure, was enough to eliminate nystagmus and positional vertigo in 4 patients, who did not show a positive Dix-Hallpike maneuver in the two reevaluations performed. Only one patient showed BPPV in the first reevaluation of the study term, and nystagmus reoccurred in the second evaluation only. Conclusion: Epley's repositioning maneuver proved to be a simple and effective BPPV treatment method for this study's patients at length.

  8. Canal switch after canalith repositioning procedure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Giant C; Basura, Gregory J; Wong, Hiu Tung; Heidenreich, Katherine D

    2012-09-01

    Canal switch is a complication following canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Instead of being returned to the utricle, the loose otoconia migrate into the superior or horizontal semicircular canal. Patients remain symptomatic, and treatment can be ineffective unless the switch is recognized and additional repositioning maneuvers directed toward the appropriate semicircular canal are performed. This report provides the first videographic documentation of canal switch involving conversion of unilateral posterior semicircular canal BPPV to geotropic horizontal canalithiasis. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Application of DSA and ultrasonic blood rheography (Doppler) to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Nobuya; Wada, Yoshiro; Suzumura, Shigeo; Matsunaga, Takashi (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Fourteen cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) were studied with cervical circulation using DSA and Doppler. DSA study showed 7 abnormal cases out of 10 cases of BPPV. The abnormal findings included 5 cases of stenosis and 5 cases of coiling and kinking in cervical vertebral arteries. Doppler study showed that vertebral a. and also carotid a. had low volume and high laterality of cervical blood circulation in parameter of flow and velocity. These findings suggest the cervical circulation disorder was one of background factors in pathogenesis of BPPV. (author).

  10. [Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the anterior semicircular canal: clinical aspects and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, P

    2005-01-01

    To describe the videonystagmographic characteristics and the treatment of the patients reached with a canalolithiasis or a cupulolithiasis of the anterior semicircular canal. Retrospective study concerning patients treated for a Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) of the anterior semicircular canal. Each patient after analysis under videonystagmoscopy (VNS) and under videonystagmography (VNG) was treated by maneuvers. On 462 observations of typical BPPV 6 cases of VPPB of the anterior semicircular canal were treated concerning 5 patients (1.3%). The BPPV of the anterior semicircular canal are rare. We modified our method of diagnosis, and our therapeutic techniques could be validated with the help of the two-dimensional videonystagmography.

  11. Observation of curative effect of modified canalith reposition on 48 cases with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAN Jun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the canalith repositioning maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Methods The modified Epley procedure, Semont maneuver and Barbecue maneuver were applied in 48 cases of BPPV. Followed for one year, the curative effects were observed. Results After treatment in modified canalith reposition, the recovery rate was 89.58% , and effective rate was 100% . Followed for one year, the recurrence rate was 6.25% . Conclusion Modified canalith reposition for BPPV has no contraindications, and no special adverse reactions. It is simple and can fastly relieve symptoms. The cost and recurrence rate are low. It is suitable for clinical application.

  12. New treatment strategy for apogeotropic horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Zuma e Maia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV is attributed to canalithiasis of the anterior arm or cupulolithiasis. Despite some therapeutic maneuvers, I propose a new treatment strategy for apogeotropic HCBPPV that is designed to detach both the otoconial debris from the anterior arm of the semicircular canal and the debris that is attached to the utricular side of the cupula using inertia and gravity and based on simulations with a 3D biomechanical model.

  13. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hengyong; Li, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) (otolith disease) is the most common neurological and position change related vertigo, accounting for 17–20% of peripheral vertigo. BPPV occur in the elderly. The high incidence age for BPPC was 50 to 70 years and mostly in female. According to the different parts of the lesions, it is divided into anterior canal BPPV (AC-BPPV), posterior canal BPPV (PC-BPPV), horizontal canal BPPV (HC-BPPV). Studies have shown that the incidence of PC-BPPV was 86.36%, the incidence of HC-BPPV was 11.37%, the incidence rate of AC-BPPV was 2.27%. Treatment for PC-BPPV includes manual reduction, drug treatment, psychological treatment, and surgical treatment. Repositioning is the preferred method for the treatment of PC-BPPV with high effective rate and low risk. The mechanism is through the different changes of head position to make the otolith back to utricle. Many manual reduction methods have been reported in clinical treatment of PC-BPPV. With the increasing emphasis on the BPPV, a variety of new methods are being developed and designed. PMID:28962176

  14. Impact of postmaneuver sleep position on recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The necessity of postural restriction to patients suffering from benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is controversial. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the sleep position after the repositioning maneuver on BPPV recurrence. METHODS: 150 unilateral BPPV patients who were treated by repositioning maneuver were distributed into two groups. The patients in group A were instructed to sleep in a semi-sitting position at an angle of approximately 30 degrees and refrain from sleeping on their BPPV affected side for one week. The patients in group B were told to sleep in any preferred position. The comparison of recurrence rates according to different actual sleep positions in one week and one month was performed. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant correlation between the sleeping side and the side affected by BPPV. Without instructions on postural restriction, most patients (82.9%, 73/88 avoided sleeping on their affected side. The patients sleeping on their affected side had a higher recurrence rate (35.3% than ones sleeping in other positions in the first week after the repositioning maneuver (p<0.05, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. The patients sleeping randomly in following 3 weeks had a lower recurrence rate than ones sleeping in other position (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test. CONCLUSIONS: BPPV patients had a poor compliance to postural instructions. The habitual sleep side was associated with the side affected by BPPV. The patients sleeping on their affected side had a higher recurrence rate than those sleeping in other positions in first week after the repositioning maneuver.

  15. A 3D benign paroxysmal positional vertigo model for study of otolith disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Teixido

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a three-dimensional study tool of the membranous labyrinth in order to study the pathophysiology, diagnostic workup and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Its diagnosis and treatment depend on an understanding of the anatomy of the vestibular labyrinth and its position relative to the head. To date, many illustrations have been made to explain principals of diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, but few have been based on anatomical studies of the membranous labyrinth. Methods: A cadaveric human membranous labyrinth was axially sectioned at 20 μm resolution, stained and segmented to create a high-resolution digital model. The model was cloned to create an enantiomeric pair of labyrinths. These were associated a 3D model of a human skull, segmented from MRI data, and were oriented according to established anatomic norms. Canal markers representing otoliths were created to mark canalith position during movement of the model within the 3D environment. Results: The model allows visualization of true membranous labyrinth anatomy in both ears simultaneously. The dependent portion of each semicircular duct and of the utricle can easily be visualized in any head position. Moveable markers can mark the expected progress of otolith debris with changes in head position and images can be captured to document simulations. The model can be used to simulate pathology as well as diagnostic maneuvers and treatment procedures used for BPPV. The model has great potential as a teaching tool. Conclusion: A simple model based on human anatomy has been created to allow careful study of BPPV pathophysiology and treatment. Going forward, this tool could offer insights that may lead to more accurate diagnosis and treatment of BPPV. Keywords: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Modeling, Anatomy, Histology, Model, 3D

  16. Persistent spontaneous nystagmus following a canalith repositioning procedure in horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kyung Min; Song, Mee Hyun; Kim, Ji Hong; Shim, Dae Bo

    2014-03-01

    Nystagmus can occur spontaneously from multiple causes. Direction-changing positional nystagmus on the supine roll test is a characteristic clinical feature in horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. One of several mechanisms of spontaneous nystagmus is plugging of the otoconia, which has been described as a canalith jam. We evaluated a 52-year-old woman with a history of geotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on the right side who had been treated with a modified Lempert maneuver 3 months earlier. The patient had persistent spontaneous nystagmus, despite a positional change after the canalith repositioning procedure. A bithermal caloric test result demonstrated unilateral canal paresis on the right side. The following day, the patient's symptoms and nystagmus had subsided. On a repeated bithermal caloric test, a normal response was demonstrated on both sides. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case that shows on video persistent nystagmus findings consistent with a canalith jam. We discuss a possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

  17. Efficacy of Epley maneuver in treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babac Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most frequent peripheral vestibular system disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of the Epley maneuver in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the posterior semicircular canal (p- BPPV and to discover possible causes of failure. Methods. This prospective study included 75 patients. In all the cases medical history showed and the positioning Dix-Hallpike test confirmed the diagnosis of p-BPPV. We also performed clinical ENT examination, searching for spontaneous nystagmus, vestibulospinal tests, caloric test, and audiometry. All the patients were treated by the modified Epley canalith repositioning maneuver. The patients were followed up at the intervals of seven and, fourteen days, and one, tree, and six months and one year. The maneuver was repeated if vertigo and nystagmus on control positioning test persisted. The transition from positive into negative Dix Hallpike test after one or two Epley maneuver was considered as success in treatment. Results. After the initial Epley maneuver the recovery rate was 90.7%, and after the second 96%. In three (4% patients with secondary p-BPPV, symptoms did not cease even after the second repositioning maneuver. The etiology of p-BPPV had a significant effect on the maneuver’s success rate (p < 0.01, whereas duration of symptoms, age and gender had no effect (p > 0.05. After a successful treatment 11 (14.66% patients had recurrent attack of BPPV during the first year. Conclusion. The Epley maneuver is very successful repositioning procedure in treating p- BPPV. The patients with idiopathic form p-BPPV showed higher success rate with Epley maneuver than those with secondary p-BPPV.

  18. The risk factors of acute attack of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiei Sohrab

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Many people suffer from vertigo. Its origin in 85% of cases is otological while in 15% is central etiology. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common cause of the true vertigo. In this research we evaluated the risk factors of acute attack of BPPV. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 322 patients, presenting with BPPV. Diagnosis was confirmed by history and Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. The underling risk factors documented carefully. Data analyzed by SPSS and K.square test. Results: Number of 321 patients (including 201 females and 120 males with BPPV included in our study. Their average age was 41. They showed symptoms for 1 month to 15 years (mean 8 months. Emotional stress was positive in 34% and trauma was the only risk factor in 8.12% patients. Ear surgery and prolonged journey were respectively the main risk factors in 7.2 and 12.8% of patients. Conclusion: The confirmed risk factors of acute attack of BPPV were as trauma, major surgery and ear surgery especially stapedotomy, vestibular  neuronitis and prolonged bedrestriction. Meniere was not considered as risk factor. In our study the psychological conflict was the major risk factor for BPPV. Other new risk factors which introduced for first time included; sleep disorder, fatigue, professional sport, starving and prolonged journey.

  19. Rapid Systematic Review of Normal Audiometry Results as a Predictor for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorresteijn, Paul M; Ipenburg, Norbertus A; Murphy, Kathryn J; Smit, Michelle; van Vulpen, Jonna K; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate whether absence of hearing loss on pure-tone audiometry (PTA) is reliable as a diagnostic test for predicting benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in adult patients with vertigo. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. A systematic literature search was conducted on December 10, 2013. Relevant publications were selected based on title, abstract, and full text. Selected articles were assessed for relevance and risk of bias using predetermined criteria. Prevalence and the positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) were extracted. Of 603 retrieved publications, 1 article with high relevance and moderate risk of bias was included. In this study, the prevalence of BPPV was 28%. The PPV of hearing loss assessed by PTA was 31% (95% CI, 17-49) and the NPV was 73% (95% CI, 61-83). The absence of hearing loss on PTA decreased the risk of BPPV by 1%. There is insufficient high-quality evidence regarding the diagnostic value of the absence of hearing loss, assessed by PTA, for predicting BPPV in adult patients with vertigo. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  20. New scoring system of an interview for the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takao; Higashi-Shingai, Kayoko; Takimoto, Yasumitsu; Masumura, Chisako; Hattori, Kenji; Inohara, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion This study investigated a novel instrument to diagnose benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Objective To develop a new scoring system of an interview for the diagnosis of BPPV. Methods The answers to questions on dizziness and/or vertigo (D/V) (571 patients) were analyzed and the questions for which the answers differed significantly between the patients with and without BPPV were selected. Results This study established an intensive questionnaire with a scoring system. It consists of the following questions: (1) Is rotary vertigo a characteristic of your D/V? (2) Is your D/V triggered when you roll your head over in a supine position? (3) Does your D/V disappear within 5 min? (4) Have you previously experienced hearing loss in one ear, or have you experienced hearing loss, tinnitus, or ear fullness with this D/V? One point each was given to an answer of 'yes' to questions (1) and (2). Two points were given to an answer of 'yes' to question (3). One point was subtracted upon an answer of 'yes' to question (4). When the total score was greater than two points, the patient was diagnosed with BPPV. The sensitivity of the diagnosis of BPPV by this scoring system was 81% and the specificity was 69%.

  1. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo of Lateral Semicircular Canal: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly M. Nagy El-Makhzangy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo of peripheral origin. The lateral semicircular canal (LSCC follows the posterior semicircular canal (PSCC as the site of pathology in the majority of patients. Therapy, aiming at relocating particles causing aberrant LSCC stimulation has been applied by forced prolonged positioning, barbecue, and particle repositioning maneuvers. Results of the different techniques are variable. This systematic review/meta-analysis aimed to find out which therapy technique yields higher cure rates. MedLine database provided at National Library of Medicine was searched for randomized controlled trials comparing results of different therapeutic techniques for patients with LSCC BPPV. For studies included in qualitative analysis/synthesis, the following were collected independently by the author: number of participants, count of patients with geotropic and apogeotropic LSCC in each treatment group, and resolution of vertigo/nystagmus assessed by symptomatic improvement and negative supine roll test 1–24 hours following intervention considering the type of LSCC BPPV (geotropic/apogeotropic. Level Ia evidence (systematic review of RCTs shows superiority of Gufoni maneuver over sham for both geotropic and apogeotropic LSCC BPPV. Comparisons between different therapeutic maneuvers for LSCC BPPV based on results of published RCTs could not be set.

  2. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: diagnosis and treatment of 37 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most frequent cause of vertigo is associated with high morbidity in the elderly population. The most common form is linked to debris in the posterior semicircular canal. However, there has been an increasing number of reported BPPV cases involving the horizontal canals. The purpose of this article is to highlight the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment in 37 patients with horizontal canal BPPV; twenty-six with geotropic nystagmus, and eleven with the apogeotropic form. Treatment consisted of the Gufoni manoeuver in eighteen patients (48.6%, the barbecue 360° maneuver in twelve patients (32.4%, both manoeuvers in four patients (10.8%, both manoeuvers plus head shaking in one patient (2.7%, and the Gufoni maneuver plus head shaking in two patients. Cupulolithiasis patients were asked to sleep in a forced prolonged position. We obtained a complete resolution of vertigo and nystagmus in 30 patients (81.0% on the initial visit.

  3. Can the affected semicircular canal be predicted by the initial provoking position in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Dae Bo; Ko, Kyung Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Lee, Won-Sang; Song, Mee Hyun

    2013-09-01

    The study evaluated the relationship between the position that initially provoked vertigo and the affected semicircular canal (SCC) in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and aimed to predict the side affected by BPPV through history taking regarding the provoking position. Prospective study at a tertiary hospital. A total of 521 patients with BPPV involving the posterior or horizontal SCCs performed questionnaires at initial visit asking to choose the initial provoking position among the 10 positions corresponding to one of the three planes (roll, pitch, or yaw). After excluding 45 patients showing signs of simultaneous multiple canal or anterior canal involvement, the frequency of the provoking positions and the correlation between the side of the provoking position and the ear affected by BPPV were analyzed. There were 239 patients with posterior SCC BPPV (p-BPPV) and 237 patients with horizontal SCC BPPV (h-BPPV). The waking-up position was the most common provoking position in both types of BPPV. Statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the side of the provoking position at the onset of vertigo and the affected side by BPPV (P position at the onset of vertigo may help predict the side affected by BPPV in p-BPPV and h-BPPV (Geo). When h-BPPV (Apo) is suspected, further detailed examinations using additional localization methods should be performed. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Physical Activity in the Prevention of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Probable Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazoni, Jéssica Aparecida

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many age-related diseases and symptoms such as dizziness and vertigo. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the possible association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV and regular physical activity in elderly subjects. Methods This cross-sectional study included 491 elderly individuals who lived independently. Physical exercise was assessed through a questionnaire and BPPV by history and the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Results The present study indicates no significant association between BPPV with lack of physical activity in men and in the total population. We have confirmed associations between BPPV with lack of physical activity in women (p = 0.01. Women with a sedentary lifestyle who do not practice physical activity are 2.62 more likely to have BPPV than those with regular physical activity. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for BPPV that can be modified through specific interventions. Regular physical activity is a lifestyle with potential to decrease the risk of vertigo in women.

  5. Diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Evren

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. The Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers are used to diagnose BPPV. Objective: This study aims to investigate the diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers in BPPV. Methods: We performed Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in patients who admitted with peripheral vertigo anamnesis and met our criteria. The present study consists of 207 patients ranging in age from 16 to 70 (52.67 ± 10.67. We conducted the same maneuvers sequentially one more time in patients with negative results. We detected patients who had negative results in first maneuver and later developed symptom and nystagmus. We evaluated post-treatment success and patient satisfaction by performing Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI at first admittance and two weeks after treatment in all patients with BPPV. Results: Of a total of 207 patients, we diagnosed 139 in first maneuver. We diagnosed 28 more patients in sequentially performed maneuvers. The remaining 40 patients were referred to imaging. There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment DHI scores in patients with BPPV (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Performing the diagnostic maneuvers only one more time in vertigo patients in the first clinical evaluation increases the diagnosis success in BPPV. Canalith repositioning maneuvers are effective and satisfactory treatment methods in BPPV.

  6. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Elderly Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Vertigo in the elderly is relatively common, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR therapy is an important therapeutic option in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on vertigo symptoms in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional analytic design, 46 patients older than 60 years (aged 61 to 72 years with BPPV who referred to the ENT center of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahwaz, were studied. After an otologic evaluation, videonystagmography and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI evaluations were performed for each case. Then, vestibular rehabilitation (VR therapy was carried out by means of Epley maneuver. Efficacy of a VRT was tested by comparing pre-treatment with post-treatment VNG and DHI assessments. The data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 67.28 ± 4.5 years. VR caused normal Hallpike findings in 31 (67.4 % and noticeable reduction in nystagmus amplitudes in 9 patients. We found a significant correlation between nystagmus amplitudes and DHI scores (r=0.77. The mean DHI scores decreased from 53.26±16.12 points to 15.36±9.23 points (p<0.001 at the end of the treatment course. Conclusion: Our investigation revealed that VR plays an important role in reducing vertigo in at-risk elderly patients. Lack of appropriate treatment in this population may cause a serious balance problem (such as bone fracture and long-term handicap that may interfere with their daily activities. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;18(1:33-36

  7. Surgical management for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the superior semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, James G; Eisen, Marc D

    2015-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the superior semicircular canal is a rare form of BPPV. It accounts for 1% to 3% of cases. The characteristic nystagmus is positional, down-beating, with a torsional component elicited by the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Symptoms of superior semicircular canal BPPV often resolve spontaneously; however, it can be refractory to repositioning maneuvers. Surgical management is described for posterior semicircular canal BPPV. To date, however, there is only one reported case of surgical management for superior semicircular canal BPPV. Here we show video documentation of positional, down-beating nystagmus and describe a case of superior semicircular canal BPPV requiring canal occlusion with successful resolution of symptoms. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Performance of DHI score as a predictor of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in geriatric patients with dizziness/vertigo: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrish Saxena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dizziness/vertigo is one of the most common complaint and handicapping condition among patients aged 65 years and older (Geriatric patients. This study was conducted to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo on the quality of life in the geriatric patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was performed in a geriatric outpatient clinic of a rural teaching tertiary care hospital in central India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In all consecutive geriatric patients with dizziness/vertigo attending geriatric outpatient clinic, DHI questionnaire was applied to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo and dizziness associated handicap in the three areas of a patients' life: physical, functional and emotional domain. Later, each patient was evaluated and underwent Dix-Hallpike maneuver by the physician who was blind of the DHI scoring of the patient. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: We compared means and proportions of variables across two categories of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV and non-BPPV. For these comparisons we used Student's t-test to test for continuous variables, chi-square test for categorical variables and Fisher's exact test in the case of small cell sizes (expected value<5. RESULTS: The magnitude of dizziness/vertigo was 3%. Of the 88 dizziness/vertigo patients, 19 (22% and 69(78% cases, respectively, were attributed to BPPV and non-BPPV group. The association of DHI score ≥50 with the BPPV was found to be statistically significant with x(2 value = 58.2 at P<0.01. CONCLUSION: DHI Score is a useful tool for the prediction of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Correct diagnosis of BPPV is 16 times greater if the DHI Score is greater than or equal to 50. The physical, functional and emotional investigation of dizziness, through the DHI, has demonstrated to be a valuable and useful instrument in the clinical routine.

  9. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yu, Dongzhen; Song, Ningying; Su, Kaiming; Yin, Shankai

    2014-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the current status of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) management and the advantages of repositioning maneuvers as well as to facilitate the accurate and efficient diagnosis and management of BPPV. Of 131 participants with severe dizziness/vertigo who were examined and treated, 31 (23.7%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for BPPV. All patients in the study had a diagnosis of BPPV confirmed by their history, typical subjective symptom reports, and characteristic positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike test and/or roll test. All participants were comprehensively interviewed regarding their medical history, characteristics of the first attack of vertigo, associated symptoms, previous financial costs, and number of hospital visits. The average duration from the appearance of the first symptoms until a final diagnostic positional maneuver was >70 months. On average, patients visited hospitals more than eight times before the final diagnosis due to initial visits to inappropriate departments, including neurology, emergency, orthopaedic surgery, and Traditional Chinese Medicine, with a corresponding average financial cost of more than 5,000 RMB. The canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) was effective in 80.65% of patients after the first repositioning maneuver. Our data demonstrated that despite the significant prevalence of BPPV, delays in diagnosis and treatment frequently occur, which have both cost and quality-of-life impacts on both patients and their caregivers. The CRP is very effective for patients with BPPV. It is important for patients to pay more attention to the impact of BPPV on their lives and recognize its nature to ensure compliant follow-up in otolaryngology.

  10. [Clinical study of aged patients with secondary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z J; Wei, L P; Xu, Z X; Xu, H J; Liu, Q; Luo, N

    2017-09-07

    Objective: To investigate the clinical features and evaluate the efficacy of manual reduction in treatment of age patients with secondary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (s-BPPV). Methods: Thirty-two cases of aged patients ( the s-BPPV group: including 19 cases of female and 13 males, age from 60 to 86 years old)with secondary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from Jul. 2013 to Sep. 2015 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. The results were compared with 121 patients( the primary group: including 82 cases of female and 39males, aged from 60 to 86 years old)with aged primary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo(p -BPPV). All the patients were followed up for 12 months. Statistical data analysis was carried out with SPSS 19.0. Results: 20.92%(32/153)of all the observed elderly patients with BPPV was the aged s-BPPV. The sex ratio and onset age had no significant difference between the two groups(χ(2)=0.79, P >0.05; t =0.37, P >0.05). The rate of two or more semicircular canal involvement in the secondary group(21.88%) was higher than that in primary group(6.61%)(χ(2)=6.67, P 0.05). The numbers of circulation of the first successful manual reduction management were (3.9±1.3)times in secondary group and (2.1±1.1)times in primary group, the difference was significant( t =3.15, P BPPV is not rare in clinical practice, sudden deafness and head trauma are frequent more than other reasons. The aged patients with secondary BPPV are prone to injury in multi-semicircular and bilateral canal compared with the primary BPPV. The effective rate after first manual reduction of secondary BPPV is lower than primary BPPV, it's needed more circulation of first success in manual reduction management. The total effective rates are not significant in two groups and recurrence rate is relatively high in secondary group.

  11. Evaluation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, K; Akdeniz, S S; Koç, A Ö; Uçkan, S; Ozluoğlu, L N

    2017-03-01

    The Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformities. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common vestibular end organ disorder characterized by short, often recurrent episodes of vertigo. Head trauma is one of the known causes of BPPV. During pterygoid osteotomy, the surgical trauma induced by percussion with the surgical mallet and osteotomes can displace otoliths into the semicircular canal, resulting in BPPV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential risk of occurrence of BPPV in individuals undergoing Le Fort I osteotomy. Twenty-three patients were included in this study. The Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre, positional tests using electronystagmography, and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests were performed 1 week before surgery (T0), 1 week after surgery (T1), and 1 month after surgery (T2). The results were compared statistically. BPPV was observed in three patients. Eleven patients had nystagmus at the T1 evaluation and seven at the T2 evaluation. The difference between the T0 and T1 time points was statistically significant (P=0.001). BPPV is a possible complication of Le Fort I osteotomy. Surgeons should be aware of this complication, and the diagnosis of BPPV should be considered in patients who have undergone Le Fort I osteotomy. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety of semicircular canal occlusion for intractable horizontal semicircular benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiubei; Liu, Chang; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Xian; Liu, Tao; Lin, Shunzhang; Fan, Jingping

    2015-04-01

    Some studies have suggested that semicircular canal occlusion is effective and safe for treating intractable posterior semicircular benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PSC-BPPV), and adverse effects of canal occlusions for intractable horizontal semicircular BPPV (HSC-BPPV) were rarely reported. The aim of this study was to retrospectively discuss the efficacy of semicircular canal occlusion for intractable HSC-BPPV with at least 2 years of follow-up. From 2000 to 2011, 3 female patients (average age=60±6.9 years), with a diagnosis of HSC-BPPV refractory to head-shake and barbecue roll maneuver, underwent semicircular canal occlusion treatment in our hospital. The supine roll test was performed to diagnose HSC-BPPV and evaluate the treatment efficacy. All patients with intractable HSC-BPPV had complete resolution of their positional vertigo after semicircular canal occlusion with a negative supine roll test. All patients reported transient postoperative disequilibrium, nausea, and vomiting, which resolved within 2 weeks. In addition, 1 patient (33.3%) had transient tinnitus, which resolved after 4 months. There were no other significant long-term complications. Semicircular canal occlusion appears to be a safe and well-tolerated treatment modality for intractable HSC-BPPV. However, further studies with large sample sizes are needed to confirm our conclusion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. A familial form of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo maps to chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Martin S; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Grewal, Raji P

    2015-01-01

    Benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by short-lived episodes of vertigo in association with rapid changes in head position, most commonly extension and rotation of the neck while supine. It has been clinically observed that there is a subgroup of patients in whom the BPPV disease is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. However, little is known about the familial/genetic factors that may contribute to a predisposition to develop the disease. We ascertained and performed a genome-wide scan on a three-generation family in which multiple family members developed BPPV. We performed whole genome mapping with 400 microsatellite repeat markers and analyzed this trait using both autosomal dominant and recessive models of inheritance. Two point linkage analysis showed LOD scores of one or greater than one on chromosomes 7, 15, 16 and 20. Independent of the model of inheritance, the highest two-point LOD scores localized to same marker on chromosome 15. Multipoint linkage analysis showed the highest LOD score of 2.84 to markers on chromosome 15 with the autosomal dominant model. Haplotype reconstruction indicates that the BPPV gene in this family maps to a critical chromosomal 15 interval between markers GATA151F03N and GATA85D02. Discovery of a BPPV gene (or genes) will facilitate a better understanding of not only BPPV, but also the vestibular system. In addition, with improved understanding of the pathophysiology the potential development of alternative therapies for BPPV may be possible.

  14. Vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with superior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas; Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel

    2014-05-01

    The function of all the semicircular canals in patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in whom otoconial debris is located in the superior semicircular canal (SSC) is normal. BPPV of SSC is an infrequent entity in which otoconial debris evokes vertigo and nystagmus in the head-hanging position and during anterior flexion of the patient. We studied the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in 12 patients with this particular type of BPPV. The reflex was evoked by rapid head impulses in the plane of the three semicircular canals in the affected and the normal ear. The reflex was evaluated with a video system that analyzes the head and eye velocity: the gain (the relation between both magnitudes) was the objective measure. The mean gain of VOR was within normal limits for the six semicircular canals and there were no significant differences between the same canals on each side of patients with BPPV in whom canalolithiasis was located in the SSC. However, gain asymmetry was different for each pair of canals.

  15. [The roles of otolith organs in the recurrence primary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjun; Wu, Ziming; Liu, Xinjian; Chen, Xianbing

    2015-09-01

    To explore the roles of otolith organs in the occurrence and recurrence of primary benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test. We enrolled 17 recurrent primary BPPV patients and 42 non-recurrent primary BPPV patients between September 2014 and November 2014. All patients underwent VEMP tests, including cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) tests. The abnormal case was defined as non-elicitation or asymmetry rate between bilateral sides is larger than 29%. Significant difference was found in abnormal rate between cVEMP and oVEMP (P 0.05). No significant difference was found in sex and age between recurrent and non-recurrent groups (P > 0.05). The impairment of otolith organs, especially the utricle, is related to primary BPPV. Dysfunction of utricle may play a role in recurrence of BPPV. Recurrence of BPPV is not correlated with sex and age.

  16. Association between osteoporosis and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing recent evidence has implicated osteoporosis as a risk factor for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). We conducted a systematic review to examine the association between osteoporosis and BPPV. Methods Four electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and the China Network Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched to identify all papers, published in either English or Chinese, examining the association between osteoporosis (osteopenia) and BPPV. Results Seven studies were eligible for analysis, though these studies included some weaknesses. Most of the studies demonstrated a correlation between osteoporosis (osteopenia) and the occurrence and recurrence of BPPV, especially in older women. Patients with osteoporosis may require more canalith-repositioning procedures. Conclusions This systematic review provides insight into currently available evidence and elucidates the possible existence of an association between BPPV and osteoporosis (osteopenia). However, the evidence supporting that conclusion is not strong, and further studies are needed to clarify the association between these conditions. PMID:24886504

  17. Treatment of Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A New Rehabilitation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new technical variant applied to the Gufoni's manoeuvre, in the treatment of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HSC-BPPV. 87 patients with BPPV of HSC (55 women and 32 men, aged between 21 and 80 years, were randomized either to modified Gufoni's manoeuvre or to the Gufoni's manoeuvre. 93% of patients treated with modified Gufoni's manoeuvre was cured after the first treatment session, of which only 2% had a conversion into PSC-BPPV, while the Gufoni's manoeuvre led to a symptoms resolution in 88% of cases, of which 16% had a conversion into PSC-BPPV. Therefore, the modified Gufoni's manoeuvre shows the same effectiveness in the resolution of symptoms of Gufoni's manoeuvre, but it appears more effective than the latter to reduce the percentage of conversion of the HSC-BPPV into PSC-BPPV (χ2=6.13, P=0.047.

  18. Evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery changes in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daopei; Zhang, Shuling; Zhang, Hongtao; Xu, Yuming; Fu, Shengqi; Yu, Meng; Ji, Peng

    2013-09-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) lesions in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by magnetic resonance angiography. VBA lesions in patients older than 65 years of age with BPPV were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography. Vascular risk factors, blood vessel changes, and vertigo severity were recorded. Age-matched individuals without BPPV were included in the control group. Of 126 patients screened for this study, 104 were included. Relevant comorbidities included diabetes (12 patients), hypertension (23 patients), and dyslipidemia (20 patients). Findings included left or right vertebral artery (VA) stenosis or occlusion (22 patients, 21.2%), VA tortuosity (25 patients, 24.0%), VA dominance (20 patients, 19.2%), basilar artery (BA) stenosis or occlusion (nine patients, 8.6%), and BA tortuosity (12 patients, 11.5%). These abnormal vessels differed between BPPV patients and the control group (all PVertigo did not differ between the abnormal VA and abnormal BA groups (P>0.05), but did differ between the normal group and the abnormal VA or BA group (PVertigo severity correlated with VA stenosis or occlusion, VA dominance, and unilateral or bilateral VA tortuosity. VBA tortuosity and VA dominance were common in BPPV patients and may contribute toward BPPV.

  19. Association of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Deficiency: A Case Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Abdullah; Acar Yüceant, Gülşah; Yüce, Turgut; Hacı, Cemal; Cebi, Işıl Taylan; Salviz, Mehti

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common type of vertigo caused by the peripheral vestibular system. The majority of cases are accepted as idiopathic. Calcium metabolism also plays a primary role in the synthesis/absorption of otoconia made of calcium carbonate and thus might be an etiological factor in the onset of BPPV. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of osteoporosis and vitamin D in the etiology of BPPV by comparing BPPV patients with hospital-based controls. This is a case-control study comparing the prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in 78 BPPV patients and 78 hospital-based controls. The mean T-scores and serum vitamin D levels were compared. The risk factors of osteoporosis, physical activity, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and blood pressure were all compared between the groups. To avoid selection bias, the groups were stratified as subgroups according to age, sex, and menopausal status. In this study, the rates of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency detected in BPPV patients were reasonably high. But there was no significant difference in mean T-scores and vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency prevalence between the BPPV group and controls. The prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is reasonably high in the general population. Unlike the general tendencies in the literature, our study suggests that osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency are not risk factors for BPPV; we conclude that the coexistence of BPPV with osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is coincidental.

  20. The effects of betahistine in addition to epley maneuver in posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneri, Enis Alpin; Kustutan, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver on the quality of life of patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the canalithiasis type. Double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Academic university hospital. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. The first group was treated with Epley maneuver only. The second group received placebo drug 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver, and the third group received 24 mg betahistine 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver. The effectiveness of the treatments was assessed in each group as well as between them by analyzing and comparing data of 4 different vertigo symptom scales. Epley maneuver, alone or combined with betahistine or placebo, was found to be very effective with a primary success rate of 86.2%. The symptoms were significantly reduced in group 3 patients overall, and those patients younger or older than 50 years of age who had hypertension, with symptom onset <1 month, and with attack duration of less than a minute did significantly better with the combination of betahistine 48 mg daily. Betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver is more effective than Epley maneuver alone or combined with placebo with regard to improvement of symptoms in certain patients. However, future clinical studies covering more patients to investigate the benefit of medical treatments in addition to Epley maneuver are needed.

  1. Effects of Semont maneuver on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Qian, Xiaoyun; Lu, Ling; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jing; Lin, Chuanyao; Gao, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common type of peripheral vertigo. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the Semont maneuver (SM) for BPPV treatment, compared with other methods. Studies were selected in relevant databases under pre-defined criteria up to June 2015. The Cochrane evaluation system was used to assess the quality of the studies. Effect size was indicated as a risk-ratio (RR) with corresponding 95% confidential interval (CI). Statistical analysis was conducted under a randomized- or fixed-effects model. Sub-group analysis was performed. Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. All of the studies presented a low attrition bias, but a high selection and reporting bias. SM had a much higher recovery rate (SM vs no treatment: RR = 2.60, 95% CI = 1.97-3.44, p < 0.01; SM vs sham: RR = 4.89, 95% CI = 3.01-7.94, p < 0.01), and lower recurrence rate than those from controls (SM vs no treatment: RR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.04-0.31, p < 0.01). Overall, SM had similar outcomes with Epley maneuver (EM) and Brandt-Daroff exercise (BDE) in terms of recovery rate, recurrence rate, and side-effects. SM is as effective as EM and BDE for BPPV treatment.

  2. Variables Affecting Canalith Repositioning Maneuver (CRM Trend for Treating Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Entezari

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to identify variables affecting outcome in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV treated with canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM. Methods: This interventional study was conducted on 58 patients (14 males, 44 females, mean age 48.12+13.22 referred to the Vertigo Rehabilitation Clinic of the Rehabilitation School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 2002 to 2004. All patients were treated with CRM. According to the treatment efficacy the patients were allocated in three groups: completely treated, partially treated, and not treated. The effect of factors including age, sex, etiology, duration of BPPV, unilateral or bilateral disease, number of maneuvers, and number of sessions on outcome in patients was evaluated. Results: Forty-nine patients (84.5% were completely cured. Age, sex, etiology, and duration did not significantly affect the treatment outcome. Unilateral BPPV can be treated significantly better than bilateral BPPV. Forty-seven patients who were completely treated needed 1 session and thirty-seven of them required 2 maneuvers. Conclusion: CRM is significantly effective for BPPV treatment. Treating unilateral BPPV is expected to be easier. As most of the patients will be cured by 1 or 2 maneuvers or in 1 session, patients who required more sessions or more maneuvers may not be completely treated.

  3. Diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cenk; Demirbilek, Nevzat; Elbistanlı, Mustafa Suphi; Köktürk, Füruzan; Çelik, Mustafa

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. The Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers are used to diagnose BPPV. This study aims to investigate the diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers in BPPV. We performed Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in patients who admitted with peripheral vertigo anamnesis and met our criteria. The present study consists of 207 patients ranging in age from 16 to 70 (52.67±10.67). We conducted the same maneuvers sequentially one more time in patients with negative results. We detected patients who had negative results in first maneuver and later developed symptom and nystagmus. We evaluated post-treatment success and patient satisfaction by performing Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) at first admittance and two weeks after treatment in all patients with BPPV. Of a total of 207 patients, we diagnosed 139 in first maneuver. We diagnosed 28 more patients in sequentially performed maneuvers. The remaining 40 patients were referred to imaging. There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment DHI scores in patients with BPPV (pvertigo patients in the first clinical evaluation increases the diagnosis success in BPPV. Canalith repositioning maneuvers are effective and satisfactory treatment methods in BPPV. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Canal Paresis in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bin; Choi, Seong Jun

    2015-12-01

    To review the clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and to analyze the correlation between canal paresis and the effectiveness of canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs) for the treatment. Study case series with chart review. Academic university hospital. We retrospectively reviewed 277 patients with BPPV. For sudden SNHL with a recent vertigo, patients underwent electronystagmography and bithermal caloric tests. We investigated the clinical characteristics including causes, type of involved semicircular canal, frequency of CRPs, treatment results, and canal paresis (CP). The diagnosis of BPPV accompanied by same-sided sudden SNHL was based on the results of head roll and Dix-Hallpike tests. Of 277 patients with BPPV, 24 (8.7%) had sudden SNHL. Multiple-canal involvement most commonly developed in post-sudden SNHL BPPV (p BPPV received a greater number of CRPs (2.95) than those with idiopathic BPPV (1.58) (p = 0.043). In patients with post-sudden SNHL BPPV, the average number of CRPs was 3.31 in the presence of CP and 2.1 sessions in the absence of CP (p = 0.030); the CP value was correlated with the frequency of CRPs (p = 0.020). In post-sudden SNHL BPPV, the worse the canal paresis becomes, the greater the number of CRPs will be needed for treatment; the simultaneous involvement of the posterior semicircular canal and horizontal semicircular canal is most common.

  5. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia: risk factors for recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Webster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Changes in carbohydrate metabolism may lead to recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of the disturbance of carbohydrate metabolism in the recurrence of idiopathic BPPV.METHODS: A longitudinal prospective study of a cohort, with 41 months follow-up. We analyzed the results of 72 glucose-insulin curves in patients with recurrence of BPPV. The curves were classified into intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and normal.RESULTS: The RR for hyperinsulinism was 4.66 and p = 0.0015. Existing hyperglycemia showed an RR = 2.47, with p = 0.0123. Glucose intolerance had a RR of 0.63, with p = 0.096. When the examination was within normal limits, the result was RR = 0.2225 and p = 0.030.DISCUSSION: Metabolic changes can cause dizziness and vertigo and are very common in people who have cochleovestibular disorders. However, few studies discuss the relationship between idiopathic BPPV and alterations in carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we found that both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are risk factors for the recurrence of BPPV, whereas a normal test was considered a protective factor; all these were statistically significant. Glucose intolerance that was already present was not statistically significant in the group evaluated.CONCLUSION: Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia are risk factors for the recurrence of idiopathic BPPV and a normal exam is considered a protective factor.

  6. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia: risk factors for recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Guilherme; Sens, Patrícia Maria; Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Cavalcante, José Diogo Rijo; Santos, Paula Regina Bonifácio dos; Silva, Ana Lívia Muniz da; Souza, Érica Carla Figueiredo de

    2015-01-01

    Changes in carbohydrate metabolism may lead to recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. To evaluate the influence of the disturbance of carbohydrate metabolism in the recurrence of idiopathic BPPV. A longitudinal prospective study of a cohort, with 41 months follow-up. We analyzed the results of 72 glucose-insulin curves in patients with recurrence of BPPV. The curves were classified into intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and normal. The RR for hyperinsulinism was 4.66 and p=0.0015. Existing hyperglycemia showed an RR=2.47, with p=0.0123. Glucose intolerance had a RR of 0.63, with p=0.096. When the examination was within normal limits, the result was RR=0.2225 and p=0.030. Metabolic changes can cause dizziness and vertigo and are very common in people who have cochleovestibular disorders. However, few studies discuss the relationship between idiopathic BPPV and alterations in carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we found that both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are risk factors for the recurrence of BPPV, whereas a normal test was considered a protective factor; all these were statistically significant. Glucose intolerance that was already present was not statistically significant in the group evaluated. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia are risk factors for the recurrence of idiopathic BPPV and a normal exam is considered a protective factor. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuvers and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Figueiredo Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is highly prevalent in elderly people. This condition is related to vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, poor balance, gait disturbance, and an increase in risk of falls, leading to postural changes and quality of life decreasing. Objective To evaluate the outcomes obtained by clinical trials on the effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in the treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in elderly. Methods The literature research was performed using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and PEDro databases, and included randomized controlled clinical trials in English, Spanish and Portuguese, published during January 2000 to August 2016. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by PEDro score and the outcomes analysis was done by critical revision of content. Results Six studies were fully reviewed. The average age of participants ranged between 67.2 and 74.5 years. The articles were classified from 2 to 7/10 through the PEDro score. The main outcome measures analyzed were vertigo, positional nystagmus and postural balance. Additionally, the number of maneuvers necessary for remission of the symptoms, the quality of life, and the functionality were also assessed. The majority of the clinical trials used Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (n = 5 and 3 articles performed Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in addition to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver or pharmacotherapy. One study showed that the addition of movement restrictions after maneuver did not influence the outcomes. Conclusion There was a trend of improvement in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo symptomatology in elderly patients who underwent Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. There is sparse evidence from methodologically robust clinical trials that examined the effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises for treating Benign Paroxysmal

  8. Effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuvers and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Karyna Figueiredo; Oliveira, Bruna Steffeni; Freitas, Raysa V; Ferreira, Lidiane M; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo O

    2017-06-29

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is highly prevalent in elderly people. This condition is related to vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, poor balance, gait disturbance, and an increase in risk of falls, leading to postural changes and quality of life decreasing. To evaluate the outcomes obtained by clinical trials on the effectiveness of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in the treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in elderly. The literature research was performed using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and PEDro databases, and included randomized controlled clinical trials in English, Spanish and Portuguese, published during January 2000 to August 2016. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed by PEDro score and the outcomes analysis was done by critical revision of content. Six studies were fully reviewed. The average age of participants ranged between 67.2 and 74.5 years. The articles were classified from 2 to 7/10 through the PEDro score. The main outcome measures analyzed were vertigo, positional nystagmus and postural balance. Additionally, the number of maneuvers necessary for remission of the symptoms, the quality of life, and the functionality were also assessed. The majority of the clinical trials used Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (n=5) and 3 articles performed Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises in addition to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver or pharmacotherapy. One study showed that the addition of movement restrictions after maneuver did not influence the outcomes. There was a trend of improvement in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo symptomatology in elderly patients who underwent Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. There is sparse evidence from methodologically robust clinical trials that examined the effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation exercises for treating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the elderly. Randomized controlled clinical trials with

  9. Spontaneous nystagmus in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: is it a new sign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Hajiabolhassan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is a condition that indicates a benign inner ear disorder. It is generally believed that BPPV is due to the dislodged otoconial particles from otolith organs and unusual collection of them within any of semicircular canals or even in all three semicircular canals. Although the typical features of nystagmus in BPPV have been well-studied, very few studies (just four articles have highlighted the presence of spontaneous nystagmus in BPPV recently. During the past 10 years, 2850 patients have been examined at the audiology unit of our department, and 254 patients have received diagnoses of BPPV but recently 2 patients presented with BPPV and spontaneous nystagmus, a new symptom that has been never observed in our clinical records. We herein describe this rare symptom in 2 case of BPPV. A 50-year-old woman with BPPV who showed an 18 degree spontaneous nystagmus treated with Epley maneuver and a 53-year-old man with 3 degree spontaneous nystagmus.

  10. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo commonly occurs following repair of superior canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel R; Cheng, Yew Song; Owoc, Maryanna; Lin, Brian M; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Repair of superior canal dehiscence (SCD) often results in the resolution of preoperative auditory and vestibular symptoms; however, many patients experience dizziness in the postoperative period. Postoperative dizziness may be the result of new-onset benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This study aims to investigate the prevalence of BPPV before and following SCD repair. Retrospective chart review at a tertiary care center. Electronic medical records were reviewed for patients with a diagnosis of SCD syndrome (SCDS) between January 2002 and May 2015. Collected information included demographic data, incidence of BPPV diagnosed by Dix-Hallpike maneuver before and following surgery, operative technique, repair material, and the duration of time to BPPV onset. A total of 180 patients with a diagnosis of SCDS were identified: 84 patients underwent surgery (operated subjects) and 96 were observed (nonoperated, control group). In operated subjects, 20 of 84 (23.8%) developed BPPV following SCD repair versus 6.2% of nonoperated (P paroxysmal positional vertigo lateralized to the operated side in all but one subject whose laterality was unknown (P < 0.0001). There were no associations of BPPV with surgical approach (P = 0.50) or repair material (P = 0.33). The majority of subjects (58%) were diagnosed with BPPV within 3 months of surgery. New-onset BPPV occurs commonly after SCD repair and may be the result of mobilized otoliths from inner ear pressure changes. Although the exact etiology of post-SCD repair BPPV remains unknown, postoperative dizziness is important to discuss with patients during preoperative counseling. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2092-2097, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Comparison between objective and subjective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: clinical features and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yun; Kim, Se-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Objective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (O-BPPV) and subjective BPPV (S-BPPV) have similar demographic and clinical features. Canalith repositioning manoeuvres (CRMs) can be an effective treatment for patients with S-BPPV, and a diagnosis of positional nystagmus is not essential for considering CRMs. This study supports the use of CRMs as the primary treatment for S-BPPV. To examine differences in demographic and clinical features, as well as treatment outcomes, between O-BPPV and S-BPPV. The medical records of 134 patients with BPPV were reviewed for demographic characteristics, past medical history, associated symptoms, response to CRMs, interval between symptom onset and the first medical visit, and recurrence rate. The O-BPPV group (n = 101) comprised patients who experienced vertigo and accompanying autonomic symptoms, and showed typical nystagmus. The S-BPPV group (n = 33) comprised patients who, when subjected to a provoking manoeuvre, showed all of the classic BPPV symptoms but did not show nystagmus. All patients had at least 3 years of follow-up. The demographics (age and sex ratio), past medical history, and associated symptoms were not significantly different between the two groups. Posterior semi-circular canal BPPV appeared more than twice as often as horizontal semi-circular canal BPPV in patients with S-BPPV. However, both canals were affected to a similar proportion in patients with O-BPPV, and the difference was marginally significant (p = 0.073). Overall improvement was better in O-BPPV than in S-BPPV; however, there was no significant difference. The total numbers of manoeuvres for recovery and the interval between symptom onset and the first medical visit also did not show any significant inter-group differences. During a 3-year follow-up, the recurrence rate was 13.8% for O-BPPV and 21.2% for S-BPPV.

  12. Performance of DHI Score as a Predictor of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Geriatric Patients with Dizziness/Vertigo: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amrish; Prabhakar, Manish Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness/vertigo is one of the most common complaint and handicapping condition among patients aged 65 years and older (Geriatric patients). This study was conducted to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo on the quality of life in the geriatric patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic. Settings and Design A cross-sectional study was performed in a geriatric outpatient clinic of a rural teaching tertiary care hospital in central India. Materials and Methods In all consecutive geriatric patients with dizziness/vertigo attending geriatric outpatient clinic, DHI questionnaire was applied to assess the impact of dizziness/vertigo and dizziness associated handicap in the three areas of a patients’ life: physical, functional and emotional domain. Later, each patient was evaluated and underwent Dix-Hallpike maneuver by the physician who was blind of the DHI scoring of the patient. Statistical Analysis Used We compared means and proportions of variables across two categories of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and non-BPPV. For these comparisons we used Student’s t-test to test for continuous variables, chi-square test for categorical variables and Fisher’s exact test in the case of small cell sizes (expected valuevertigo was 3%. Of the 88 dizziness/vertigo patients, 19 (22%) and 69(78%) cases, respectively, were attributed to BPPV and non-BPPV group. The association of DHI score ≥50 with the BPPV was found to be statistically significant with x2 value = 58.2 at Pparoxysmal positional vertigo. Correct diagnosis of BPPV is 16 times greater if the DHI Score is greater than or equal to 50. The physical, functional and emotional investigation of dizziness, through the DHI, has demonstrated to be a valuable and useful instrument in the clinical routine. PMID:23472142

  13. Spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change in the horizontal canal variant of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Ichimura, Akihide; Otsuka, Koji; Hagiwara, Akira; Inagaki, Taro; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Nagai, Noriko; Itani, Shigeto; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the neuro-otological findings, including nystagmus, and the clinical course of patients with the horizontal canal variant of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV), who showed spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change. Furthermore, we speculated on the possible mechanism of spontaneous inversion of nystagmus without a positional change. The characteristics of spontaneous inversion of positional nystagmus without a positional change were analyzed in 7 patients with HC-BPPV. All patients were diagnosed as having HC-BPPV. During the positional test, the spontaneous inversion of nystagmus was observed in the same head position in all patients. Spontaneous inversion was observed on both sides in 5 patients, and only on 1 side in 2 patients. All patients presented with geotropic nystagmus in the first phase, and ageotropic nystagmus in the second phase. The coexistence of cupulolithiasis and canalolithiasis appears to be a possible mechanism of the spontaneous inversion of positional nystagmus.

  14. Effect of a hybrid maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Wanees M A; Gad El-Mawla, Ebtessam K; Chedid, Ahmed E F; Mustafa, Ahmed H A

    2015-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the vestibular system of the inner ear, which is a vital part of maintaining balance. Although the efficacy of the Epley maneuver-also known as the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM)-is well established, data comparing CRM versus a hybrid treatment are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a hybrid treatment, the Gans repositioning maneuver (GRM) either with or without postmaneuver restrictions, compared with CRM on treatment of posterior canal BPPV (PC-BPPV). Study design was a randomized controlled trial. A total of 45 patients (30 males and 15 females) with unilateral PC-BPPV were randomly allocated to one of three equal groups on the basis of the date of the first visit with matched assignment for gender: a GRMR group (GRM with postmaneuver restrictions), a GRM group, and a CRM group. Patients received weekly administration of the maneuver until resolution of symptoms. The Dix-Hallpike test was performed before treatment at every appointment, and finally after 1 mo from the last maneuver. Nystagmus duration and vertigo intensity were recorded. The supine roll test was performed in case the Dix-Hallpike test was negative to test otoconial migration. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t-tests with a Bonferroni correction, and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. All patients showed improvement within the groups, and PC-BPPV symptoms were resolved by an average of 2, 1.7, and 1.6 maneuvers for GRMR, GRM, and CRM, respectively, with no statistical differences among the three groups (p > 0.05). Only two patients had recurrence, and one patient had horizontal BPPV at 1 mo follow-up. We demonstrated that the GRM as a new treatment is effective in treating PC-BPPV with no benefits to postmaneuver restrictions. American Academy of Audiology.

  15. Anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a series of 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbaud-Genieys, S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the diagnostic criteria for anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) based on clinical data and the available anatomical and pathophysiological data. Between July 2006 and June 2007, 4320 patients consulting for otoneurological disease were investigated by otological examination, videonystagmography and neurological examination. BPPV was diagnosed in 1430 patients, involving the posterior semicircular canal in 1325 patients, the horizontal semicircular canal in 85 patients, the posterior semicircular canal and ipsilateral anterior (superior) semicircular canal in 19 patients and the anterior semicircular canal only in one patient. In the 20 patients with anterior semicircular canal BPPV, the Dix-Hallpike (DH) test induced ageotropic horizontal torsional nystagmus beating towards the uppermost ear in the lateral supine position with reversal on standing. The modified Epley manoeuvre was effective in 94.1% of cases on the 8th day and in 97.5% of cases at 1 month. Nystagmus beating towards the uppermost ear on the DH test is consistent with BPPV involving the anterior semicircular canal of the uppermost ear. The torsional component of nystagmus and not just the vertical component must be taken into account to facilitate the diagnosis with videonystagmoscopy glasses and identify the affected side. The anterior semicircular canal is rarely affected due to its anatomical position. Settling of otoconia in this canal requires hyperextension of the head. Treatment is simple, consisting of the modified Epley particle repositioning manoeuvre. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Otolith organ function according to subtype of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun K; Kim, Su J; Park, Moon S; Byun, Jae Y

    2014-04-01

    The clinical features and treatment outcomes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) are known to be different depending on the type of and involved canal. This difference could be due to differences in the functional change of the otolith organ. Case series. Forty-nine patients were diagnosed to primary BPPV; 18 were categorized as posterior canal canalolithiasis (PC canalolithiasis), and 31 were categorized as horizontal canal (HC) BPPV with canalolithiasis or cupulolithiasis (HC canalolithiasis or HC cupulolithiasis). Diagnostic interventions to measure vestibular functions were performed such as electronystagmography (ENG), videonystagmography (VNG), and static and dynamic subjective visual vertical (SVV). BPPV was confirmed with nystagmus during positioning/positional test under ENG and VNG. Static SVV was recorded with a light-emitting diode (LED) bar located in front of the patients before eccentric rotation and dynamic SVV was recorded during eccentric rotation with the LED bar. SVV angles were read by the examiner and analyzed. The measured values were compared to those of normal controls and each other. Dynamic SVV toward the lesion side in all subtypes of BPPV were significantly different from those of the controls; HC cupulolithiasis showed significantly lower values than those of PC canalolithiasis and HC canalolithiasis. HC cupulolithiasis shows a lesser degree of utricular dysfunction compared with other subtypes. It could postulate the difference of pathophysiology between canalolithiasis and cupulolithiasis. 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Modifications of the Epley (canalith repositioning) manoeuvre for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, William T; Zimmermann, Eleanor F; Hilton, Malcolm P

    2012-04-18

    Benign paroxsymal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a syndrome characterised by short-lived episodes of vertigo associated with rapid changes in head position. It is a common cause of vertigo presenting to primary care and specialist otolaryngology (ENT) clinics. BPPV of the posterior canal is a specific type of BPPV for which the Epley (canalith repositioning) manoeuvre is a verified treatment. A range of modifications of the Epley manoeuvre are used in clinical practice, including post-Epley vestibular exercises and post-Epley postural restrictions. To assess whether the various modifications of the Epley manoeuvre for posterior canal BPPV enhance its efficacy in clinical practice. We searched the Cochrane ENT Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 15 December 2011. Randomised controlled trials of modifications of the Epley manoeuvre versus a standard Epley manoeuvre as a control in adults with posterior canal BPPV diagnosed with a positive Dix-Hallpike test. Specific modifications sought were: application of vibration/oscillation to the mastoid region, vestibular rehabilitation exercises, additional steps in the Epley manoeuvre and post-treatment instructions relating to movement restriction. Two authors independently selected studies from the search results and the third author reviewed and resolved any disagreement. Two authors independently extracted data from the studies using standardised data forms. All authors independently assessed the trials for risk of bias. The review includes 11 trials involving 855 participants. A total of nine studies used post-Epley postural restrictions as their modification of the Epley manoeuvre. There was no evidence of a difference in the results for post-treatment vertigo intensity or subjective

  18. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV): History, Pathophysiology, Office Treatment and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo. It most often occurs spontaneously in the 50 to 70 year age group. In younger individuals it is the commonest cause of vertigo following head injury. There is a wide spectrum of severity from inconsistent positional vertigo to continuous vertigo provoked by any head movement. It is likely to be a cause of falls and other morbidity in the elderly. Misdiagnosis can result in unnecessary tests. The cardinal features and a diagnostic test were clarified in 1952 by Dix and Hallpike. Subsequently, it has been established that the symptoms are attributable to detached otoconia in any of the semicircular canals. BPPV symptoms can resolve spontaneously but can last for days, weeks, months, and years. Unusual patterns of nystagmus and nonrepsonse to treatment may suggest central pathology. Diagnostic strategies and the simplest “office” treatment techniques are described. Future directions for research are discussed. PMID:21808648

  19. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidi, Matteo; Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Aglioti, Salvatore M; Minio-Paluello, Ilaria; Alessandrini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical-cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (vestibular neuritis - VN - and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo - BPPV) with respect to healthy matched controls (C). We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: (i) mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation) thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and (ii) mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation) thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations.

  20. Postural sway in individuals with type 2 diabetes and concurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Kluding, Patricia M; Whitney, Susan L; Dai, Hongying; Santos, Marcio

    2017-12-01

    diabetes has been shown to affect the peripheral vestibular end organs and is associated with an increase in the frequency of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). People with diabetes have higher postural sway; however, the impact of symptomatic BPPV on postural sway in individuals with diabetes is unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine postural sway in people with type 2 diabetes who have symptomatic, untreated BPPV (BPPVDM). fifty-two participants (mean age 56.9 ± 5.6 years) were enrolled: controls (n = 14), diabetes (n = 14), BPPV only (n = 13) and BPPVDM (n = 11). An inertial motion sensor was used to detect pelvic acceleration across five standing conditions with eyes open/closed on firm/foam surfaces. Range of acceleration (cm/s 2 ), peak velocity (cm/s) and variability of sway [root mean square (RMS)] in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions were used to compare postural sway between groups across conditions. participants with BPPVDM had higher ranges of acceleration in the AP (p = 0.02) and ML (p = 0.02) directions, as well as higher peak velocity (p diabetes groups. Standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem stance were challenging conditions for people with BPPVDM. clinicians may consider using standing on foam with eyes closed and tandem standing with eyes open to assess postural control in people with BPPVDM to identify postural instability.

  1. [Investigation of the relationship between chronic diseases and residual symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fengjie; Fu, Min; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Ye; Ge, Ying

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the prognosis-related influence factors of the residual symptoms after the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in the second affiliated hospital of dalian medical university. Among patients who were diagnosed with BPPV and treated by CRP, the one that still show residual symptoms were enrolled in our study, then make a follow-up irregularly about the tendency of their residual symptoms' self-healing,and respectively record in their gender, age and chronic diseases and so on. Single-factor analysis and multi-factors analysis was utilized to investigate the residual symptoms' related influencing factors. In this study, 149 cases of patients were in record, for the residual symptoms, 71 patients can go to self-healing, 78 patients can not; age is 23-88, 30 cases in the young group, 46 cases in the middle aged group, 47 cases in the young elderly group, 26 cases in the elderly group; patients suffering from high blood pressure are 76 cases, 76 cases had diabetes, 47 cases had hyperlipidemia, 110 cases had heart disease, 43 cases had ischemic encephalopathy. The residual symptoms in the elderly females patients and patients suffering from the hypertension, diabetes, heart disease patients and ischemic encephalopathy are not easy to heal by itself, in which, the older and the fact suffering from the hypertension and diabetes are the risk factors influencing the prognosis of the residual symptoms.

  2. An analysis of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetiser, Sertac; Ince, Dilay; Gul, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) selectively test the vestibular end-organ. The aim of this study was to analyze how the site of the diseased canal, type of particulate deposition, duration of symptoms, severity of nystagmus, recurrence, and age affect the VEMP in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). One hundred two patients were enrolled in the study between 2009 and 2012. There were 36 men and 66 women with ages ranging from 16 to 71 years (mean age, 42.28 ± 11.29 years). Patients with BPPV were tested with roll-on and head-hanging maneuvers under video-electronystagmography monitoring and with air conduction cervical VEMP testing. Patients were grouped for duration, severity, recurrence, age, site of canal involvement, and so on, and the results were compared in each subgroup. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for the comparative analysis. Twenty-four patients (23.5%) had a gross VEMP abnormality (absence of VEMP in 6 and greater than 25% depression of the amplitude in 18). Abnormality of VEMPs was not correlated with factors including age, severity of nystagmus, number of maneuvers applied, and the site of canal involvement (P < .05). However, persistence or recurrence of symptoms has an effect on VEMP results (P = .016). Vestibular evoked myogenic potential is a useful tool to study the otolithic function in patients with BPPV and should be included in the test battery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Clinical implication of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mun Young; Shin, Ji Ho; Oh, Kyung Hyun; Hong, Young Ho; Mun, Seog-Kyun

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the value of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) as a prognostic factor for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). We reviewed 65 patients with BPPV who underwent cVEMP. Patients were divided into two groups according to resistance to the repositioning maneuver. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed with age, gender, affected semicircular canal, affected side and cVEMP parameters to find the associated factors for resistance to the repositioning maneuver. From univariable analysis, cVEMP interaural amplitude difference (IAD) ratio, the affected semicircular canal and the affected side showed a better association (p<0.10) with resistance to the repositioning maneuver. With multivariable analysis, decreased cVEMP IAD ratio at the affected side (⩽-25%) (p=0.043, OR=4.934) and the posterior semicircular canal (p=0.049, OR=3.780) remained as associated factors. Decreased cVEMP IAD ratio at the affected side is associated with resistance to the repositioning maneuver. BPPV patients with decreased cVEMP IAD ratio at the affected side have a higher likelihood of their BPPV persisting after a single repositioning maneuver. cVEMP test may provide a prognosis of BPPV. A decreased cVEMP IAD ratio at the affected side may be prognostic of BPPV not resolving after a single repositioning maneuver. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Osteoporosis as a risk factor for the recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Shirota, Shiho; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) frequently occurs in females over 50 years old, suggesting that a postmenopausal decrease in estrogen secretion might be involved in its onset. An estrogen deficiency is generally known to cause osteoporosis through a reduction in bone mass. This study was designed to investigate a clinical association between idiopathic BPPV and osteoporosis. Case-control study. We measured the bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar vertebrae in 61 patients with idiopathic BPPV who were postmenopausal women over 50 years old using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. After being treated with the canalith repositioning maneuver, the patients were followed up for at least 1 year. Our results showed that the incidence of osteoporosis in patients with BPPV was 26.2%, which was similar to those observed in epidemiological surveys conducted in Japan. However, we found that in BPPV patients with osteoporosis, the incidence of recurrence was 56.3%, which was significantly higher than that observed in patients with normal bone mineral density (16.1%). Furthermore, the frequency of BPPV recurrence increased as BMD decreased. These results suggest that osteoporosis is a risk factor for BPPV recurrence. The prognosis of BPPV might be clinically predicted by BMD reduction. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eCandidi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical-cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (Vestibular Neuritis – VN- and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo – BPPV with respect to healthy matched controls (C. We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: i mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and ii mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations.

  6. Image-based computer-assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohigashi, Satoru; Nakamae, Koji; Fujioka, Hiromu

    2005-04-01

    We develop the image based computer assisted diagnosis system for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) that consists of the balance control system simulator, the 3D eye movement simulator, and the extraction method of nystagmus response directly from an eye movement image sequence. In the system, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated by searching the database for record matching with the nystagmus response for the observed eye image sequence of the patient with BPPV. The database includes the nystagmus responses for simulated eye movement sequences. The eye movement velocity is obtained by using the balance control system simulator that allows us to simulate BPPV under various conditions such as canalithiasis, cupulolithiasis, number of otoconia, otoconium size, and so on. Then the eye movement image sequence is displayed on the CRT by the 3D eye movement simulator. The nystagmus responses are extracted from the image sequence by the proposed method and are stored in the database. In order to enhance the diagnosis accuracy, the nystagmus response for a newly simulated sequence is matched with that for the observed sequence. From the matched simulation conditions, the causes and conditions of BPPV are estimated. We apply our image based computer assisted diagnosis system to two real eye movement image sequences for patients with BPPV to show its validity.

  7. A survey of the nature of trauma of post-traumatic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Valerio; Mazzone, Sara; Di Mauro, Roberta; Giacomini, Pier Giorgio; Di Girolamo, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    A clinical description of post-traumatic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (t-BPPV) in a large cohort is reported, sometimes caused by apparently insignificant minor head traumas. The aim of the study was to carefully assess the prevalence of t-BPPV and the main outcomes belonging to specific traumatic events. Retrospective analysis of medical records of t-BPPV cases among patients suffering from BPPV. Among 3060 patients with a clinical diagnosis of BPPV, we reviewed 716 clinical cases in which a clear association to a traumatic event was present. A traumatic event was identified in 23.4% of total enrolled BPPV patients. Some minor head traumas could be more prone to determine BPPV in females. We confirmed that t-BPPV appeared significantly more difficult to treat than idiopathic form. Posterior canal t-BPPV cases required more treatment sessions before obtaining therapeutic success, while horizontal ones recovered at most after two repositioning maneuvers. Post-traumatic BPPV is considered one of the most common known etiologies. An accurate understanding of trauma mechanism, gender prevalence, and therapeutic success rates of each event, could be useful in adequately treating and planning follow-up examinations.

  8. Influence of supplemental vitamin D on intensity of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A longitudinal clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhzadeh, Mahboobeh; Lotfi, Yones; Mousavi, Abdollah; Heidari, Behzad; Monadi, Mohsen; Bakhshi, Enayatollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is linked to vitamin D deficiency. This clinical trial aimed to determine the influence of vitamin D supplementation on intensity of BPPV. Methods: The study population was selected consecutively and the diagnosis of BPPV was made by history and clinical examination and exclusion of other conditions. Intensity of BPVV was assessed based on VAS score (0-10). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was measured using ELISA method and levels BPPV decreased significantly as compared with control (P=0.001 for both groups) but at endpoint, the intensity of BPPV aggravated and regressed to the baseline value in vitamin D deficient non-treated group (P=0.001) whereas, in vitamin D treated group, improvement of BPPV remained stable and unchanged over the study period. Conclusion: This study indicates that correction of vitamin D deficiency in BPPV provides additional benefit to rehabilitation therapy (Epley maneuver) regarding duration of improvement. These findings suggest serum 25-OHD measurement in recurrent BPPV. PMID:27386060

  9. Efficacy of the Li maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrang; Tian, Shiyu; Zou, Shizhen

    2017-06-01

    The Li maneuver is a safe, effective, and simple repositioning method for the treatment of BPPV. It is simple to master and exerts an exact effect. As a rapid repositioning method, the Li maneuver can result in reduced treatment times and increased treatment efficacy, and is, therefore, especially suitable for patients with limited cervical spine movement. To compare the short-term efficacies of the Li and Epley maneuvers in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV). A total of 120 patients with PC-BPPV were randomly treated by either the Li or Epley maneuvers at our department between May 5, 2014 and July 30, 2015. Follow-up examinations were performed 3 days and 1 week after the first repositioning. Of the 120 patients initially enrolled, 113 (72 females; 41 males; average age = 52 years; Li and Epley maneuver groups, 56 and 57 cases, respectively) satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria of this study. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups of patients in terms of the success rates of treatment at either the 3-day or 1-week follow-ups (p = .756 and .520, respectively).

  10. Management of 210 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: AMC protocol and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Il; Kang, Byung Chul; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Chung, Jong Woo; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Park, Hong Ju

    2015-05-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could be treated with specific maneuvers for the involved canals. Management on a daily basis gave earlier relief than weekly treatment, especially in apogeotropic BPPV. Apogeotropic and multi-canal BPPVs were related to the increased numbers of follow-ups and trauma was related to the increased recurrence. We aimed to report the short-term outcomes of our protocol for BPPV and evaluate the factors influencing the results and recurrence. In 210 BPPV patients, posterior semicircular canal (PSCC), geotropic and apogeotropic lateral canal BPPVs were treated with the Epley maneuver, barbecue maneuver, and barbecue maneuver after head-shaking. The total number of follow-ups needed to have no provoked nystagmus, success rates at 1 week and 1 month, and factors for repeated maneuvers or recurrence were identified. Apogeotropic and multi-canal BPPV needed more follow-ups than PSCC BPPV. Multi-canal BPPV showed a significantly lower 1-week success rate than other types. Anterior and multi-canal BPPV showed significantly lower 1-month success rates than other types. The 1-week success rates for PSCC and geotropic and apogeotropic BPPV in patients followed up on a daily basis were higher than those in patients with weekly follow-up and the difference was significant only in apogeotropic BPPV. The overall 1-year recurrence rate was 16% and higher recurrence rate was related to trauma.

  11. Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Abnormalities in Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebe Fallahnezhad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, involving the semicircular canals, is one of the most common diseases of the inner ear. The video head impulse test (vHIT is a new test that examines the function of the canals. This study aimed to investigate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain, gain asymmetry and saccades after stimulating all six canals in patients definitively diagnosed with posterior semicircular canal BPPV (PSC-BPPV.   Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine unilateral PSC-BPPV patients with normal oculographic and caloric results were enrolled in this study. vHIT was performed on six canals, and VOR gain, gain asymmetry and saccades were measured.   Results: Sixteen (55.17% patients had abnormal posterior canal VOR gains in the ipsilesional ear. VOR gains in both horizontal canals were within normal limits. Superior canal VOR gains were mostly lower than normal and were not correlated to PSC abnormalities (P>0.05. No corrective saccades could be observed.   Conclusion: VOR gain in the direction of the posterior semicircular canal may be reduced in PSC-BPPV patients. Evaluation of PSC-VOR parameters could be beneficial, although superior canal measurements should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Abnormalities in Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahnezhad, Tayyebe; Adel Ghahraman, Mansoureh; Farahani, Saeid; Hoseinabadi, Reza; Jalaie, Shohreh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), involving the semicircular canals, is one of the most common diseases of the inner ear. The video head impulse test (vHIT) is a new test that examines the function of the canals. This study aimed to investigate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain, gain asymmetry and saccades after stimulating all six canals in patients definitively diagnosed with posterior semicircular canal BPPV (PSC-BPPV). Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine unilateral PSC-BPPV patients with normal oculographic and caloric results were enrolled in this study. vHIT was performed on six canals, and VOR gain, gain asymmetry and saccades were measured. Results: Sixteen (55.17%) patients had abnormal posterior canal VOR gains in the ipsilesional ear. VOR gains in both horizontal canals were within normal limits. Superior canal VOR gains were mostly lower than normal and were not correlated to PSC abnormalities (P>0.05). No corrective saccades could be observed. Conclusion: VOR gain in the direction of the posterior semicircular canal may be reduced in PSC-BPPV patients. Evaluation of PSC-VOR parameters could be beneficial, although superior canal measurements should be interpreted with caution. PMID:28955674

  13. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): it may occur after dental implantology. A mini topical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, S; Signorini, L; Bonanome, L; Severino, M; Corpaci, F; Cielo, A

    2015-10-01

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most frequent vestibular disorders. BPPV as a complication of Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation (OSFE) is a complication that rarely occurs. The aim of this paper is to better understand the mechanisms underlying the BPPV after SFE with the osteotomes. This could be important for all the dental and maxillofacial surgeons that should know and manage this clinical occurrence. The osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE), firstly described by Summers requires the use of a surgical mallet for striking the bone, until the optimal depth is reached. The surgical mallet develops a mechanical trauma, even if the striking is performed with a gentle percussion. The recent literature describes an average occurrence of OSFE-induced BPPV quite low, but the symptoms show to be unpleasant and severe, often able to alter the patient's daily life. A successful remission of BPPV following treatment with a particle repositioning maneuver will be necessary and relatively urgent for the surgeons who have experienced this clinical complication. The surgeons, therefore, must be aware of these complications and about the ways to manage them.

  14. Low bone mineral density and vitamin D deficiency in patients with benign positional paroxysmal vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Hossam Sanyelbhaa; Abuhadied, Ghada; Talaat, Ahmed Sanyelbhaa; Abdelaal, Mohamed Samer S

    2015-09-01

    Several studies indicated the association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) with osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency implying that abnormal calcium metabolism may underlie BPPV. The aim of the present study is to confirm the correlation between BPPV and both decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) and vitamin D deficiency. The study group included 80 patients with idiopathic BPPV (52 females, 28 males), with age range 31-71 years (47.6 ± 9.1). The patients were divided into two groups; recurrent BPPV group including 36 subjects and non-recurrent group including 44 subjects. The control group included 100 healthy volunteers with age and gender distribution similar to the study group. All the subjects in the study were examined using Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to assess BMD, and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for vitamin D assessment. The accepted normal levels were T-score > -1, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D > 30 ng/ml. Twenty-six (26 %) subjects showed abnormal T-score in the control group; 26 (59 %) in the non-recurrent BPPV and 22 (61 %) in the recurrent BPPV group. Chi square test showed significant difference between the control group and both BPPV groups. The control group had significantly higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels than the BPPV subgroups (p disorders in cases with recurrent BPPV.

  15. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and digital vectoelectronystagmography's study in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lira-Batista, Marta Maria da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is a very common vestibular disorder characterized by brief but intense attacks of rotatory vertigo triggered by simple rapid movement of the head. The integrity of the vestibular pathways can be assessed using tests such as digital vectoelectronystagmography (VENG and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Aim: This study aimed to determine the VEMP findings with respect to latency, amplitude, and waveform peak to peak and the results of the oculomotor and vestibular components of VENG in patients with BPPV. Method: Although this otoneurological condition is quite common, little is known of the associated VEMP and VENG changes, making it important to research and describe these results. Results: We examined the records of 4438 patients and selected 35 charts after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of these, 26 patients were women and 9 men. The average age at diagnosis was 52.7 years, and the most prevalent physiological cause, accounting for 97.3% of cases, was ductolithiasis. There was a statistically significant association between normal hearing and mild contralateral sensorineural hearing loss. The results of the oculomotor tests were within the normal reference ranges for all subjects. Patients with BPPV exhibited symmetrical function of the semicircular canals in their synergistic pairs (p < 0.001. The caloric test showed statistically normal responses from the lateral canals. The waveforms of all patients were adequate, but the VEMP results for the data-crossing maneuver with positive positioning showed a trend toward a relationship for the left ear Lp13. There was also a trend towards an association between normal reflexes in the caloric test and the inter-peak VEMP of the left ear. It can be concluded that although there are some differences between the average levels of the VENG and VEMP results, these differences were not statistically significant

  16. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pu Chang

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation.Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls.In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001. After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47. This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26.Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a

  17. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Pu; Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Chung, Hsien-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26). Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a risk factor

  18. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  19. Clinical significance of orthostatic dizziness in the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun-Ju; Park, Yong-Soo; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Nam, In-Chul; Chang, Ki-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic dizziness (OD) and positional dizziness (PD) are considerably common conditions in dizziness clinic, whereas those two conditions are not clearly separated. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of simple OD and OD combined with PD for the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and orthostatic intolerance (OI). Patients presenting with OD (n=102) were divided into two groups according to their symptoms: group PO, presenting with PD as well as OD; group O, presenting with OD. A thorough medical history, physical examination, and vestibular function tests were performed to identify the etiology of the dizziness. Orthostatic vital sign measurement (OVSM) was used to diagnose OI. The majority of patients were in group PO (87.3%). BPPV was the most common cause of OD for entire patients (36.3%) and group PO (37.1%), while OI was most common etiology for group O (38.5%). Total of 17 (16.7%) OI patients were identified by OVSM test. Orthostatic hypotension (n=10) was most frequently found, followed by orthostatic hypertension (n=5), and orthostatic tachycardia (n=2). Group O showed significantly higher percentage (38.5%) of OI than group PO (13.5%) (P=0.039). It is suggested that orthostatic testing such as OVSM or head-up tilt table test should be performed as an initial work up for the patients with simple OD. Positional tests for BPPV should be considered as an essential diagnostic test for patients with OD, even though their dizziness is not associated with PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliability of an anamnestic questionnaire for the diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenna, Ruggero; Faralli, Mario; Del Zompo, Maria Rita; Cipriani, Laura; Mobaraki, Puya Dehgani; Ricci, Giampietro

    2016-10-01

    There is common agreement in the literature that it can result in an underestimation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in the elderly. The aim of this work was to analyze the role of anamnesis in the diagnosis of BPPV in patients of different ages through the development and validation of a scored questionnaire. The questionnaire is based on the presence/absence of six typical anamnestic features of BPPV. The Mini-Mental State Exam (MMS) was also administered to patients over 65 years of age. Bedsides, examination for BPPV was then carried out, assigning the outcome of the questionnaire and eventual MMS to the final diagnosis for each patient. The sensitivity and specificity of the questionnaire for high scores (>8) were found to be, respectively, 86 % and 80 % in all patients, 94 and 71 % in those under 65 years of age, 78 and 90 % in patients over 65, and, in particular, 63 and 83 % in those with MMS >24 and 100 and 100 % in those with MMS ≤24. The reliability and average score of the questionnaire were statistically significantly lower in the group of elderly patients without cognitive deficits. The lower reliability of the questionnaire in the geriatric population, rather than the presence of cognitive deterioration, seems to correlate with other comorbidities or simply to a lower mobility of the head triggering positional symptoms. The use of the questionnaire could however reduce the risk of a missed diagnosis of BPPV given its good reliability across all ages.

  1. Canalith repositioning in apogeotropic horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Do we need faster maneuvering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Minho; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kang, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Dasom; Lee, Sae-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Han

    2015-11-15

    A correct diagnosis and a proper treatment may yield a rapid and simple cure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Although the Gufoni maneuver is widely used to treat apogeotropic horizontal-canal BPPV (HC-BPPV), few studies have clarified the relationship between the speed and intensity of maneuver execution and successful canalith reposition. To evaluate the effect of accelerated execution of the Gufoni maneuver, a prospective randomized controlled study was conducted with HC-BPPV patients in a single dizziness clinic. The patients had been diagnosed with apogeotropic HC-BPPV and were undergoing treatment at the dizziness clinic of a tertiary university hospital from January 2013 to August 2014. Two groups were treated with the maneuver performed at different speeds and the resolution rate was compared. The accelerated maneuver group was subjected to faster position changing-within 1s-during the reposition maneuver, while the non-accelerated maneuver group underwent slower maneuvers. Therapeutic efficacy was defined as dizziness relief or resolution of nystagmus within 1h. Fifty patients with apogeotropic HC-BPPV were enrolled and treated with the Gufoni maneuver in two groups of 25 patients. The overall resolution rate was 48% (24 of 50; p=1.00), regardless of acceleration. Our results suggest that a faster, more intense execution of the Gufoni maneuver provides little benefit in treating apogeotropic HC-BPPV. Detachment of the otolith from the cupula or the gravitational force-when the otolith is in the anterior arm of the HC-may be more important contributors to treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Importance of accurate diagnosis in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovara, Siniša; Vešligaj, Tihana; Butković Soldo, Silva; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Maslovara, Karmela; Mirošević Zubonja, Tea; Soldo, Anamarija

    2014-08-01

    To determine the importance of accurate topological diagnostics of the otolith and the differentiation of certain clinical forms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A prospective study was conducted at the County General Hospital Vukovar in the period from January 2011 till January 2012. A total of 81 patients with BPPV, 59 females (72.84%) and 22 (27.16%) males (p less than 0.001), mean age 60.1 (± 12.1) were examined. The diagnosis was confirmed and documented by videonystagmography (VNG). The disability due to disease and risk of falling were monitored by filling in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of the repositioning treatment. In 79 (97.3%) patients posterior semicircular canal was affected, and in a small number of patients, two (2.47%) the lateral one. After the repositioning procedures were performed, there was a significant reduction or complete elimination of symptoms in the majority of subjects, 76 (93.82%). The median total DHI sum amounted to 50.5 (± 22.2) at the beginning and 20.4 (± 18.5) at the end of the study (p less than 0.00). Similarly, the results of ABC questionnaires at the beginning of the study demonstrated a result of 59.2% (± 22.4%), and at the end of the treatment the average result of examinees was significantly higher, 84.9% (± 15.2%) (p less than 0.00). Although a subjectively positive Dix-Hallpike or a "supine roll" test is sufficient for the diagnosis of BPPV, it is necessary perform the VNG as well in order to precisely determine the exact localization of the otolith, so that an appropriate repositioning procedure can be applied.

  3. Otolith Dysfunction in Persons With Both Diabetes and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼSilva, Linda J; Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Maddux, Christy; Ferraro, John; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-03-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes (DM) that may contribute to increased fall risk. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with DM. The impact of DM on the otolith organs of the vestibular system in people with BPPV is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze otolith function using vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests in people with DM and concurrent BPPV (BPPV + DM), and to examine the relationships between VEMP variables and diabetes-related variables. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Tertiary academic medical center. Participants 40 to 65 years were recruited in four groups: controls (n = 20), people with DM (n = 19), BPPV (n = 18), and BPPV + DM (n = 14). Saccule and utricle function were examined using cervical VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP), respectively. Diabetes-related variables such as HbA1c, duration of diabetes, and presence of sensory impairment due to diabetes were collected. The frequency of abnormal cVEMP responses was higher in the DM (p = 0.005), BPPV (p = 0.003), and BPPV + DM (p diabetes, higher HbA1c levels were correlated with prolonged P1 (p = 0.03) and N1 latencies (p = 0.03). The frequency of abnormal oVEMP responses was not different between groups (p = 0.2). Although BPPV and DM may independently affect utricle and saccule function, they do not seem to have a distinct cumulative effect.

  4. Recurrence in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Large, Single-Institution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luryi, Alexander L; Lawrence, Juliana; Bojrab, Dennis I; LaRouere, Michael; Babu, Seilesh; Zappia, John; Sargent, Eric W; Chan, Eleanor; Naumann, Ilka; Hong, Robert S; Schutt, Christopher A

    2018-04-11

    To report rates of recurrence in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and associated patient and disease factors. Retrospective chart review. Single high-volume otology practice. Patients diagnosed with BPPV from 2007 to 2016 with documented resolution of symptoms. Diagnostic and particle repositioning maneuvers for BPPV. BPPV recurrence, time to recurrence, and ear(s) affected at recurrence. A total of 1,105 patients meeting criteria were identified. Of this population, 37% had recurrence of BPPV in either ear or both ears. Overall same-ear recurrence rate was 28%; 76% of recurrences involved the same ear(s) as initial presentation. Recurrences that occurred after longer disease-free intervals were more likely to involve the opposite ear than early recurrences (p = 0.02). Female sex (40.4% versus 32.7%, p = 0.01) and history of previous BPPV (57.5% versus 32.4%, p diabetes mellitus, and traumatic etiology were not. Approximately, half (56%) of recurrences occurred within 1 year of resolution. A large single-institution study of recurrence in BPPV is presented along with Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival curves. Female sex and history of previous BPPV were associated with increased recurrence, while previously suspected risk factors for recurrence including history of Menière's disease, diabetes, and trauma were not. Remote recurrence is more likely to involve the contralateral ear than early recurrence. These data solidify the expected course of treated BPPV allowing for improved clinical care and patient counseling.

  5. Otoconia and otolithic membrane fragments within the posterior semicircular canal in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wee Tin K; Parnes, Lorne S; Chole, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common vestibular disorder with an incidence between 10.7 and 17.3 per 100,000 persons per year. The mechanism for BPPV has been postulated to involve displaced otoconia resulting in canalithiasis. Although particulate matter has been observed in the endolymph of affected patients undergoing posterior canal occlusion surgery, an otoconial origin for the disease is still questioned. In this study, particulate matter was extracted from the posterior semicircular canal of two patients and examined with scanning electron microscopy. The samples were obtained from two patients intraoperatively during posterior semicircular canal occlusion. The particles were fixed, stored in ethanol, and chemically dehydrated. The samples were sputter coated and viewed under a scanning electron microscope. Digital images were obtained. Intact and degenerating otoconia with and without linking filaments were found attached to amorphous particulate matter. Many otoconia appeared to be partially embedded in a gel matrix, presumably that which encases and anchors the otoconia within the otolith membrane, whereas others stood alone with no attached filaments and matrix. The otoconia measured roughly 2 to 8 μm in length and displayed a uniform outer shape with a cylindrical bulbous body and a 3 + 3 rhombohedral plane at each end. These findings suggest that the source of the particulate matter in the semicircular canals of patients with BPPV is broken off fragments of the utricular otolithic membrane with attached and detached otoconia. NA Laryngoscope, 127:709-714, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Symptom Resolution Rates of Posttraumatic versus Nontraumatic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Margaret; Lea, Jane; Nakku, Doreen; Westerberg, Brian D

    2015-11-01

    To determine the rate of symptom resolution in patients with posttraumatic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to determine if it differs from resolution rates in patients with BPPV and without a history of head trauma. Systematic review of the literature was performed using Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. English and French articles meeting inclusion criteria and published between 1946 and October 2014 were included. Data were independently extracted from the articles by 2 reviewers using data collection forms developed a priori. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were decided a priori. Studies were included if they reported on at least 1 case of posttraumatic BPPV (t-BPPV), reported on outcomes of all patients with t-BPPV, had a clearly defined inception point, and provided a clear diagnosis of BPPV (defined a priori by reviewers). A total of 3017 titles, 362 abstracts, and 67 articles were reviewed, from which 16 articles met inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction. There were a total of 207 patients with posttraumatic BPPV identified. Among the 207 patients, 151 (73%) had resolution of symptoms. The T-BPPV patients may have more multi-canal involvement and may require more repositioning maneuvers for resolution compared to patients with nontraumatic BPPV. Available evidence does not support the notion that symptom resolution rates in patients with posttraumatic BPPV are worse than those with nontraumatic BPPV. However, well-designed studies with adequate cohorts are lacking. Additional well-executed studies are needed to confirm this lack of difference in resolution rates. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. Otolith Dysfunction in persons with both Diabetes and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J.; Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Maddux, Christy; Ferraro, John; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vestibular dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes (DM) that may contribute to increased fall risk. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with DM. The impact of DM on the otolith organs of the vestibular system in people with BPPV is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze otolith function using vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests in people with DM and concurrent BPPV (BPPV+DM), and to examine the relationships between VEMP variables and diabetes-related variables. Study Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center Subjects and Methods Participants 40-65 years, were recruited in four groups: controls (n=20), people with DM (n=19), BPPV (n=18), and BPPV+DM (n=14). Saccule and utricle function were examined using cervical VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP), respectively. Diabetes related variables such as HbA1c, duration of diabetes and presence of sensory impairment due to diabetes were collected. Results The frequency of abnormal cVEMP responses was higher in the DM (p=0.005), BPPV (p=0.003), and BPPV+DM (p<0.001) groups compared to controls. In the participants with diabetes, higher HbA1c levels were correlated with prolonged P1 (p=0.03) and N1 latencies (p=0.03). The frequency of abnormal oVEMP responses was not different between groups (p=0.2). Conclusion Although, BPPV and DM may independently affect utricle and saccule function, they do not appear to have a distinct cumulative effect. PMID:27930443

  8. Features of Residual Dizziness after Canalith Repositioning Procedures for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellucci, Salvatore; Pagliuca, Giulio; de Vincentiis, Marco; Greco, Antonio; De Virgilio, Armando; Nobili Benedetti, Ferdinando Maria; Gallipoli, Camilla; Rosato, Chiara; Clemenzi, Veronica; Gallo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    To assess factors related to residual dizziness (RD) in patients who underwent successful canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs) for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Prospective cohort study. Academic center. Ninety-seven consecutive patients with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal were initially enrolled. Diagnosis was assessed according to clinical history and bedside evaluation. All patients were treated with CRPs until nystagmus disappeared. Three days after the successful treatment, presence of RD was investigated. If RD was present, patients were monitored every 3 days until the symptoms disappeared. Subjects who required ≥4 CRPs or who failed to meet the follow-up visit were excluded. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) was obtained from patients at the time of diagnosis and at every subsequent visit. At the end of selection, 86 patients were included; 33 (38.36%) reported RD after successful treatment. A significant difference in the incidence of RD was observed in consideration of the age of the subjects (P = .0003) and the DHI score at the time of diagnosis (P < .001). A logistic regression analysis showed that the probability of RD occurrence increased with the increase of the emotional subdomain score of the DHI questionnaire. RD is a common self-limited disorder, more frequent in the elderly, which may occur after the physical treatment for BPPV. The DHI score at the time of BPPV diagnosis represents a useful tool to quantify the impact of this vestibular disorder on the quality of life and to estimate the risk of RD after CRPs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Simultaneous Involvement of Multiple Semicircular Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Dae Bo; Song, Chang Eun; Jung, Eun Jung; Ko, Kyung Min; Park, Jin Woo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) generally involves a single semicircular canal (single canal BPPV) but it has been reported that more than one semicircular canal on either the same or the opposite side can be involved in 6.8-20% of the cases (multiple canal BPPV). In this study, the clinical characteristics of multiple canal BPPV were analyzed and compared to those of single canal BPPV. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on 1054 consecutive patients diagnosed with BPPV. Multiple canal BPPV was diagnosed when the combination of typical nystagmus was provoked by the Dix-Hallpike and supine head roll tests. Canalith repositioning maneuver was performed sequentially starting with the semicircular canal causing more severe nystagmus or symptoms. Clinical characteristics and the treatment course were statistically compared between single canal BPPV and multiple canal BPPV. Results Among the 1054 patients, single canal BPPV was diagnosed in 1005 patients (95.4%) while multiple canal BPPV was diagnosed in 49 patients (4.6%). BPPV involving semicircular canals on the same side was more common (79.6%) than BPPV with bilateral involvement. The most common combination of the involved canals was ipsilateral posterior and horizontal semicircular canals (63.3%). Multiple canal BPPV was significantly more associated with underlying otologic diseases, especially labyrinthitis. Multiple canal BPPV required more treatment sessions and longer duration of treatment to achieve resolution of nystagmus and symptoms. Conclusions As all cases of multiple canal BPPV were treated successfully although a longer duration of treatment and more treatment sessions were required compared to single canal BPPV, the results of our study could aid in making an accurate diagnosis and providing appropriate treatment of multiple canal BPPV. PMID:25558406

  10. [Objective characteristics of nystagmus in horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei-yun; Chen, Tai-sheng; Wen, Chao; Li, Shan-shan; Lin, Peng; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    To discuss the objective characteristics and mechanism of nystagmus direction, intensity and time in horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HSC-BPPV) . A total of 233 patients with HSC-BPPV, whereas 179 horizontal semicircular canalithasis (HSC-Can) and 54 horizontal semicircular cupulolithiasis (HSC-Cup) were involved respectively. The induced nystagmus in roll tests recorded by video-nystagmograph(VNG) , whose direction, intensity and time characteristics were compared in various BPPV. Horizontal nystagmus was both induced by turning left or right in HSC-BPPV roll tests. The direction of the induced nystagmus was the same with turning in HSC-Can. The latency, duration time and intensity ([AKx(-)D] ± s) turning to lesion and normal side were (1.922 ± 1.501)s and (1.447 ± 0.855)s, (25.620 ± 10.409)s, and (22.110 ± 10.931)s, (56.441 ± 33.168)°/s and (24.239 ± 13.892) °/s in HSC-Can. The latency, duration time and intensity turning to lesion side were larger than normal side (t = 3.715, 15.219 and 4.070, P 0.05). The induced nystagmus intensity of head to two sides in roll tests for HSC-BPPV both follow Ewald's law, and the ratio between stronger and weaker are both 2: 1. These nystagmus parameters of VNG in roll tests are an objective guideline for BPPV diagnosis.

  11. The Patterns of Recurrences in Idiopathic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Self-treatment Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jung Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesBenign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV recurs frequently. This study aims to determine that each patient with BPPV has a predilection for a specific canal and the type of recurred BPPV can be predicted from that observed during the previous attack.MethodsThe involved side (right, left, and bilateral and affected canal (posterior, geotropic horizontal, apogeotropic horizontal, anterior, and mixed were analyzed in 224 pairs of consecutive attacks of BPPV confirmed in 167 patients at the Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2017. We defined the recurrence when patients had the redevelopment of BPPV at least 1 week after resolution of the previous one.ResultsDuring the initial attack, the involved canals were posterior in 134 (59.8%, geotropic horizontal in 53 (23.7%, apogeotropic horizontal in 27 (12.1%, anterior in 5 (2.2%, and mixed in 5 (2.2%. The right ear was more commonly affected than the left ear [132 (58.9% vs. 90 (40.2%]. Two patients (0.9% showed bilateral involvements. During the recurrences, the proportions of involved canals and affected side were similar irrespective of those during the former event. Only 24% of the patients showed the recurrence in the same canal on the same side.ConclusionThe patterns of recurrences are usually discordant in patients with BPPV. Instruction for self-administration of a specific canalith repositioning procedure based on the previous type of BPPV may have a limited efficacy in this frequently recurrent disorder.

  12. Factors Associated with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Chinese Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Junliang; Dai, Jinsheng; Li, William A.; Hu, Wenli

    2017-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common and most successfully treated vestibular disorders. However, there is a lack of predictive factors for BPPV in clinical practice. We aimed to explore several possible predictive factors for BPPV in the Chinese population. Material/Methods We enrolled 240 patients with BPPV from Beijing Chaoyang Hospital between July 2013 and July 2016. Biochemical and hematological markers were obtained along with the history of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Results Serum uric acid (SUA) [279.0±84.7 vs. 331.0±82.7], hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) [5.75±1.17 vs. 6.61±1.00], albumin [38.1±3.71 vs. 40.9±4.1], and creatinine [68.4±19.3 vs. 81.5±24.1] were significantly lower in patients with BPPV compared with controls (PBPPV (PBPPV [OR=0.999 (95% CI 0.991–1.006), P=0.713]. There were no significant differences between the parameters of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood routine examination, lipid profiles, homocysteine, pre-albumin, and blood urea nitrogen in patients with BPPV vs. controls (P>0.05). Conclusions Lower levels of HbA1c and albumin were independently associated with BPPV. Although the level of SUA was lower in BPPV patients, SUA was not an independent risk factor for BPPV. PMID:28800356

  13. Self-treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with DizzyFix, a new dynamic visual device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Detlef

    2010-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is one of the most common disorders of the vestibular system. It is characterized by episodes of recurrent vertigo triggered by head movements or position changes associated with nystagmus. There is scientific evidence that in the majority of cases this condition responds well to the particle repositioning maneuver (PRM) correctly performed by the physician. However, the PRM needs to be repeated in approximately 30% of the cases. Although the maneuver is simple, patients often find it difficult to perform correctly as self-treatment, with the result that it fails to bring about an improvement in the symptoms. DizzyFix (Clearwater Clinical Limited, Canada) is the name given to a new dynamic visual device designed to provide a visual representation of the PRM based on the canalith theory. The DizzyFiX consists of a specially curved acrylic tube containing a nontoxic viscous fluid and a bead, the purpose of which is to help the patient and the inexperienced physician to perform the PRM correctly. A randomized clinical trial has shown that it reliably enables the maneuver to be performed correctly, and a study investigating the effectiveness of patient self-treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with the device in comparison with standard office treatment revealed both techniques to be equally effective. The device has now been approved by the US FDA.

  14. [The treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal by Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tan; An, Fengwei; Xie, Cuili; Chen, Jianqiu; Zhu, Chunsheng; Wang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semi-circular canal by Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver. One hundred and fifty patients with benign positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal were randomly divided into three groups: group A, B and C. Patients in group A were treated by Epley maneuver and patients in group B were treated by Semont maneuver. Patients in group C were received the treatment of Epley maneuver combined with Semont ma- neuver. We recorded the times of treatments in different groups respectively. Statistics of treatment effects and follow-up studies with 3 months after the recovery were assessed. The cure rate of the canalith repositioning on the primary, secondary and tertiary treatment in group A was respective 72% (38/53) and 81% (43/53) and 85% (45/53), in group B was 68% (30/44) and 80% (35/44) and 84% (37/44), in group C was 89% (47/53) and 94% (50/53) and 98% (52/53). The cure rate in group C is significantly higher than group A and group B (χ2 = 6.777, P positional paroxysmal vertigo of posterior semicircular canal, the primary cure rate was increased and the numbers of treatments were reduced and the relapse was decreased. It is suitable to use Epley maneuver combined with Semont maneuver in the clinic.

  15. Effects of postural restriction after modified Epley maneuver on recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikci, Hasan Huseyin; Ozbay, Isa

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, we calculated the success rate of the modified Epley maneuver and determined the effectiveness of post-maneuver positional restriction in terms of the prevention of early and late recurrence. The present study was conducted on 78 patients who had unilateral benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the posterior semicircular canal (SCC) and who were treated in the Otorhinolaryngology Department of Susehri State Hospital. The Dix-Hallpike test was performed on all patients. After the involved canal was identified using this test, we guided patients through the modified Epley repositioning maneuver. A maximum of two maneuvers were performed in the same session. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group was not advised any positional restriction, while the second group was advised positional restriction for 10 days after the procedure. Recurrences during 1-90 days after the treatment were noted as early recurrences, while those that occurred after 90 days were noted as late recurrences. In the restriction group (n=39), repositioning was successful after a single maneuver in 32 (82.05%) patients and after two maneuvers in 5 (12.8%) patients. Repositioning failed in two (5.1%) patients. In the non-restriction group (n=39), repositioning was successful after a single maneuver in 31 (79.4%) patients and after two maneuvers in 6 (15.3%) patients. Repositioning failed in two (5.1%) patients. Thus, the success rate was 94.8% in each group. Early recurrence occurred in 3 (8.1%) of 37 patients in the restriction group and 2 (5.4%) of 37 patients in the non-restriction group (p>0.05). Late recurrence occurred in 5 (13.5%) of 37 patients in both the restriction and non-restriction groups (p>0.05). Postural restriction after a canalith repositioning procedure does not improve procedural success or decrease early and late recurrence rates. However, the number of patients was too small to detect a difference between both treatment

  16. Unilateral posterior canal-plugging surgery for intractable bilateral posterior canal-type benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Sayaka; Imai, Takao; Higashi-Shingai, Kayoko; Okazaki, Suzuyo; Okumura, Tomoko; Uno, Atsuhiko; Ohta, Yumi; Morihana, Tetsuo; Sato, Takashi; Inohara, Hidenori

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of unilateral posterior semicircular canal (PSCC)-plugging surgery for patients with intractable bilateral PSCC-type benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (P-BPPV). From July 2011 to December 2015, we diagnosed 136 patients with P-BPPV. Of these, 3 patients had bilateral P-BPPV, and in 2 of the 3, the condition had been refractory to conservative treatment for more than 1 year. We planned a staged PSCC-plugging surgery for these 2 patients; initially one side was treated, and the contralateral side was treated 6 months later. After the first surgery, both patients experienced improvement in symptoms of vertigo and nystagmus on the operated side and no change on the non-operated side. Patients underwent the Epley maneuver for the non-operated side. In one case, the non-operated side was cured. In the other case, although the P-BPPV was not completely resolved, the patient was satisfied with the result of unilateral surgery because he was now able to turn in bed to the operated side without vertigo. Before surgery, he had experienced vertigo when turning even slightly in bed. We propose that even unilateral PSCC-plugging surgery is effective for some patients with intractable bilateral P-BPPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Relationship between serum level of uric acid and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Junliang; Chen, Yili; Chen, Yudan; Niu, Shiqin; Li, Shujuan; Dong, Qian; Hu, Wenli

    2015-02-03

    To confirm the possible relationships between serum level of uric acid (UA) and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A total of 87 patients with BPPV and 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects were recruited from our hospital between July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014. All patients underwent a complete audio-vestibular test battery, such as Dix-Hallpike maneuver for posterior semicircular canal and supine roll test for horizontal semicircular canal. All risk factors such as the histories of heart and cerebral vascular diseases, and routine hematological and biochemical analyses were analyzed between two groups. No significant inter-group differences existed in age, gender, histories of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, smoking or drinking (P > 0.05). No significant differences existed between systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, ejection fraction, whole blood count, lipid profile, homocysteine, prealbumin and blood urea nitrogen in patients with BPPV compared with controls (P >0. 05). However, the values of UA (267 ± 86 vs 325 ± 75) µmol/L, hemoglobin ale (5.6 ± 1. 4 vs 6.5 ± 1. 0)%, albumin (36 ± 4 vs 40 ± 4) g/L and creatinine (72 ± 20 vs 81 ± 22) µmol/L were much lower in patients with BPPV versus controls (P < 0. 05). According to multiple Logistic regression model, the lower levels of hemoglobin ale and albumin were independently associated with BPPV (P <0. 05) with the odds ratio of 1. 473 (95% CI 1. 066 - 2. 037) and 1. 162 (95% CI 1. 025 - 1. 318), respectively. However, the level of UA was not independently correlated with the occurrence of BPPV [OR = 1. 005 (95% CI 1. 000 - 1. 011), P =0. 063]. The lower levels of hemoglobin alc and albumin are independently associated with BPPV. Although the value of UA is lower in patients with BPPV versus controls, it is not an independent risk factor for BPPV. Due to limited patient data, further studies are needed to clarify the association in a

  18. Clinical features of recurrence and osteoporotic changes in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Han, Seung Hoon; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Several previous studies have demonstrated that comorbidities, secondary causes, physical inactivity, and osteoporosis may cause recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, there has also been some controversy over the clinical course(s) and cause(s) of recurrent BPPV (rBPPV). We identified clinical features and associated factors, including decreased bone mineral density, in the recurrence of BPPV. In total, 198 patients with idiopathic BPPV, diagnosed at the otolaryngology clinics of Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, were enrolled. The medical data of these patients were reviewed retrospectively. Recurrent BPPV was defined as the recurrence of BPPV after at least 1 month of a symptom-free interval following previous successful treatment. Of the BPPV patients, 67 (33.8%) were classified as rBPPV. Among them, about 16% showed changes in the involved semicircular canals and about 6% showed multiple semicircular canal involvement. rBPPV was more common in patients with comorbidities (P<0.001). Involved semicircular canals showed no statistically significant difference according to the recurrence of BPPV. The mean symptom-free interval of the rBPPV group varied from 1 to 50.2 (mean, 11.6) months; however, 90% of BPPV recurrence occurred within 24 months. Bone mineral density in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was markedly decreased in BPPV patients versus normal controls, but there were no significant differences according to BPPV recurrence. The incidence of rBPPV in idiopathic BPPV patients was 33.8% in the present study. The mean period of recurrence after a symptom-free interval was about 11.6 months; most patients showed recurrence within 2 years after the first attack of BPPV. Furthermore, about 16% of patients suffered from rBPPV at a different kind or type of canal from the semicircular canal of the initial BPPV attack. Comorbidities, but not age, gender, or the involved semicircular canal, might be correlated

  19. Reduction of recurrence rate of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo by treatment of severe vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Hossam Sanyelbhaa; Kabel, Abdel-Magied Hasan; Khaliel, Lobna Hamed; Abuhadied, Ghada; El-Naga, Heba Abd El-Rehem Abo; Talaat, Ahmed Sanyelbhaa

    2016-06-01

    Several studies correlated between vitamin D deficiency and the development, and the recurrence of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV), but none of them proved that treatment of vitamin D deficiency would reduce the recurrence rate of BPPV. This study aims to detect the effect of treatment of severe vitamin D deficiency on the recurrence rate of BPPV. The inclusion criteria of the study group were: (1) Unilateral, idiopathic, posterior canal BPPV with no history suggestive of secondary BPPV and (2) 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level ≤10 ng/ml. All subjects enrolled in the current study underwent detailed clinical history, audiovestibular evaluation consisting of pure-tone audiometry, Immittancemetry, Videonystugmography, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 assessment, and Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Vitamin D therapy was prescribed for the study group. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level was evaluated twice, on recruitment into the study group and 3 months after commencing vitamin D therapy. According to the results of the second evaluation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, the study group was subdivided into two subgroups: Subgroup (I): including 28 subjects who disclosed elevation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level; improvement ≥10 ng/ml. Subgroup (II): including 65 patients who disclosed elevation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels BPPV. The differences between both study subgroups (I) & (II) regarding age, sex distribution, and bone mineral density were insignificant. The number of subjects who had recurrence of BPPV in subgroup (I) was 4 (14%) versus 28 subjects (43%) in subgroup (II). The mean values for recurrent attacks/subject in subgroups (I) & (II) were 0.18, and 0.66 attack/subject respectively; these differences between both subgroups were of high statistical significance (pBPPV in subjects with severe vitamin D deficiency was 4.54 (95% CI: 1.41-14.58, pBPPV affected both ears irrespective of the ear showing the original BPPV attack. The present

  20. First-referral presentations of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who were negative on positional testing and who lacked nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Yu, Dongzhen; Feng, Yanmei; Song, Qiang; You, Jin; Shi, Haibo; Yin, Shankai

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the demographic, clinical, and pathogenetic features; and treatment outcomes of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) who were negative upon positional testing at their first referral. A total of 133 patients presented with histories of BPPV but were negative, in our hands, upon positional testing. Patients were told to cease taking vestibular suppressant medication (if any) and were to return for re-examination when positional vertigo symptoms recurred. If BPPV was diagnosed, the appropriate repositioning maneuver was applied and patients were re-examined weekly until the characteristic nystagmus and vertigo disappeared. Follow-up was performed 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after diagnosis. The 133 patients were compared with a group of 250 patients with typical BPPV. Sixty-five of the 133 patients (termed the n-BPPV group) were subsequently identified with typical BPPV. Such diagnoses were made within 10 days of the first referral in 37 (56.9%) cases. Patients of the n-BPPV group had a longer duration of the last episode of vertigo than did others (39.7 ± 38.4 vs. 26.1 ± 36.7 days, p positional testing at first referral were quite common, accounting for 26% of all typical BPPV patients. No significant difference in either treatment outcome or recurrence rate was evident between n-BPPV and typical BPPV positions. Positional vertigo and nystagmus are not always present as BPPV progresses.

  1. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is associated with an increased risk of fracture: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Ling; Chang, Tzu-Pu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    A nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study. To investigate whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is associated with an increased risk of fracture. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a brief rotational vertigo induced by head position change that may increase the risk of falls and, therefore, fracture. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used for this study. We selected a case cohort comprising 3796 patients aged over 20 years who were newly diagnosed with BPPV between 2000 and 2006. In addition, we randomly selected a control cohort of 15 184 individuals without BPPV. Patients with BPPV were matched to individuals in the control group according to sex, age, and index year. A Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to compute the hazard ratio of fracture, after adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The prevalence of comorbidities was higher among patients with BPPV. After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, patients with BPPV exhibited a 1.14-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.25; PBPPV. Trunk fracture (vertebra, rib, and pelvis) was the fracture type with the highest adjusted hazard ratio (1.24; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.45; PBPPV relative to those without BPPV. An analysis stratified according to demographic factors revealed that men with BPPV exhibited a 1.43-fold (95% CI: 1.22, 1.66; PBPPV aged over 65 years exhibited a significantly higher risk of fracture (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.33; PBPPV. Patients with BPPV exhibited a higher risk of fracture than did those without BPPV. Prognosis, level 2b.

  2. Age-Related Increases in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Are Reversed in Women Taking Estrogen Replacement Therapy: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ding-Hao; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Wang, Chia-To; Chiu, Ch-Chih; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, De-Kuang; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Numerous investigations have reported an increased BPPV incidence in females and in the aged population. The hormonal characteristics of BPPV patients have not been previously investigated. This study aimed to determine the risk of BPPV in relation to menopause in a population-based study. Materials and Methods: This retrospective population-based study was designed to use a nationwide longitudinal hea...

  3. [Short and long term effect of quick repositioning maneuver for patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo induced in the straight head-hanging test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengfei; Li, Jinrang

    2015-07-07

    To investigate the clinical characteristics, short and long term effect of quick repositioning maneuver along the sagittal plane for patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who were induced vertigo in the straight head-hanging test. The clinical data of 38 patients affected by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who were induced vertigo in the straight head-hanging test from July 2009 to July 2014 in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery of Navy General Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. After diagnosis, the patients were underwent quick repositioning maneuver along the sagittal plane. Of the 38 cases studied, 15 patients (39.5%) were males and 23 patients (60.5%) were females. The age of the patients ranged from 33 to 71 years with a mean of 55 ± 12 years. The median duration between symptoms and diagnosis was 8 days. The total improvement was 33 cases (86.8%) in patients with superior semicircular canal BPPV when they were re-evaluated at 1 week and 32 cases (84.2%) at 3 months time. Quick repositioning maneuver along the sagittal plane is an effective, easy alternative for treatment of the patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo induced vertigo in the straight head-hanging test. It is not necessary to identify the directions of the nystagmus.

  4. Diagnosis of Single- or Multiple-Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo according to the Type of Nystagmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatsouras, Dimitris G.; Koukoutsis, George; Ganelis, Panayotis; Korres, George S.; Kaberos, Antonis

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common peripheral vestibular disorder encountered in primary care and specialist otolaryngology and neurology clinics. It is associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus, which can be elicited with specific diagnostic positional maneuvers, such as the Dix-Hallpike test and the supine roll test. Current clinical research focused on diagnosing and treating various types of BPPV, according to the semicircular canal involved and according to the implicated pathogenetic mechanism. Cases of multiple-canal BPPV have been specifically investigated because until recently these were resistant to treatment with standard canalith repositioning procedures. Probably, the most significant factor in diagnosis of the type of BPPV is observation of the provoked nystagmus, during the diagnostic positional maneuvers. We describe in detail the various types of nystagmus, according to the canals involved, which are the keypoint to accurate diagnosis. PMID:21792356

  5. Characteristics of Patient with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from 2009‒2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Datya Kirana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is a vestibular disorder marked by episodes of vertigo and triggered by a change in the head position. It is characterized by short yet severe episodes of vertigo and possibly accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The BPPV is usually idiopathic and found among people aged 46‒50 years old. There are pharmacological and non pharmacological treatment used for BPPV. Non-pharmacological treatment includes Epley, Semont, Lempert, Forced Prolonged Position, and Brandt-Daroff maneuvers and pharmacological onebenzodiazepine and antihistamines. This study aimed to examine the characteristics of patient with BPPV based on their complaint and prescribed treatment. Methods: This was a descriptive-retrospective study conducted on April–June 2014 using secondary data from medical records of patient with BPPV in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from 2009‒2013. The variables include gender, age, occupation, accompanying disease, complaints, supporting examinations, and treatment. Results: There were 74 subjects; 66.22% were female and 33.78% were male. Most of patients with BPPV aged around 41‒50 years old (39.19%. Furthermore, 93.24% had a major complaint of headache and spinning sensation, and >60% nausea and vomiting. The most prescribed therapy was Betahistine (86.49%. Meanwhile, a maneuver of non-pharmacological treatment was rarely done (8.11%. Conclusions: The BPPV occurs more in older women. The major complaint is headache and spinning sensation affected by the head position and accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Lastly, non-pharmacological treatment is rarely performed in handling patient with BPPV.

  6. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF POSITIONAL VERTIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Vertigo is a very common symptom with which patients see a doctor in clinical practice. It is defined as “subjective sense of imbalance”. Vertigo can be broadly classified into Subjective and Objective types. Each can be again divided into episodic lasting for seconds or hours and prolonged lasting for weeks. A common presenting form of vertigo is that which is experienced when the patient turns his head in a particular position i.e. the positional vertigo, in some cases the vertiginous symptoms are also accompanied by a positional nystagmus. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one the most common causes of vertigo. In the present study 100 patients were evaluated for Positional Vertigo. The aim of the study is to analyse patients presenting with positional vertigo and to evaluate the Effectiveness of Epley’s manoeuvre in BPPV and Medical management in patients with negative Dix Hallpike’s Positional test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 100 consecutive patients diagnosed with positional vertigo. A detailed history and general examination and ENT examination was done including vestibular function evaluation. X-Ray cervical spine, P T A and caloric test (cold were done. CT scan and MRI performed. Positional test positive patients were treated with Epley’s manoeuvre and results analysed. RESULTS 100 patients with positional vertigo and among them 70 with BPPV were included in the present study. The mean age of the patient’s was 42.34±4.6 years. 30% of the patients belonged to the age group of 51 to 60 years, 25% to the age group of 41 to 50 years, and 20% to the age group of 31 to 40 years. 70/100 patients were treated with Epley’s manoeuvre. The response to Epley’s manoeuvre in the study showed that 65 patients were symptom free after 2 weeks, 67 after 1 month and 69 after 3 to 6 months period. CONCLUSION BPPV is one of the major causes of Positional Vertigo and that it could be very effectively

  7. Effectiveness of the Epley's maneuver performed in primary care to treat posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballve Moreno, José Luis; Carrillo Muñoz, Ricard; Villar Balboa, Iván; Rando Matos, Yolanda; Arias Agudelo, Olga Lucia; Vasudeva, Asha; Bigas Aguilera, Olga; Almeda Ortega, Jesús; Capella Guillén, Alicia; Buitrago Olaya, Clara Johanna; Monteverde Curto, Xavier; Rodero Perez, Estrella; Rubio Ripollès, Carles; Sepulveda Palacios, Pamela Catalina; Moreno Farres, Noemí; Hernández Sánchez, Anabella María; Martin Cantera, Carlos; Azagra Ledesma, Rafael

    2014-05-21

    Vertigo is a common medical condition with a broad spectrum of diagnoses which requires an integrated approach to patients through a structured clinical interview and physical examination. The main cause of vertigo in primary care is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which should be confirmed by a positive D-H positional test and treated with repositioning maneuvers. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Epley's maneuver performed by general practitioners (GPs) in the treatment of BPPV. This study is a randomized clinical trial conducted in the primary care setting. The study's scope will include two urban primary care centers which provide care for approximately 49,400 patients. All patients attending these two primary care centers, who are newly diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, will be invited to participate in the study and will be randomly assigned either to the treatment group (Epley's maneuver) or to the control group (a sham maneuver). Both groups will receive betahistine. Outcome variables will be: response to the D-H test, patients' report on presence or absence of vertigo during the previous week (dichotomous variable: yes/no), intensity of vertigo symptoms on a Likert-type scale in the previous week, total score on the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and quantity of betahistine taken. Positive results from our study will highlight that treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can be performed by trained general practitioners (GPs) and, therefore, its widespread practice may contribute to improve the quality of life of BPPV patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01969513.

  8. Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Presenting with Torsional Downbeating Nystagmus: An Apogeotropic Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Vannucchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to verify the hypothesis that free-floating particles could sometimes localize into the distal portion of the non ampullary arm of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC so that assuming the Dix-Hallpike’s positions, the clot could move towards the ampulla eliciting a inhibitory torsional-down beating paroxysmal positional nystagmus (PPNy, instead of typical excitatory torsional-up beating PPNy. Among 45 patients with vestibular signs suggesting anterior semicircular canal paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV, collected from February 2003 to August 2006, we detected a group of 6 subjects whose clinical findings showed a singular behaviour during follow-up. At the first check-up, all patients were submitted to different types of physical manoeuvres for ASC canalolithiasis. Patients were controlled during the same session and after one week. When we found that nystagmus was qualitatively changed we adopted the appropriate physical therapies for that sign. At a next check-up, after having performed some physical therapies, all patients had a typical PSC PPNy of the opposite side, with respect to that of the ASC initially diagnosed. Basing on these observations we conclude that PSC PPV, similarly to lateral semicircular canal PPV, could manifests in a apogeotropic variant.

  9. [CROATIAN GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (BPPV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovara, Sinisa; Butković-Soldo, Silva; Drvis, Petar; Roje-Bedeković, Marina; Trotić, Robert; Branica, Srećko; Habek, Mario; Cvjetko, Tereza; Vesligaj, Tihana; Adamec, Ivan; Gabelić, Tereza; Jurić, Stjepan; Vceva, Andrijana; Vranjes, Zeljko; Sarić, Ingrid; Cejić, Olivera; Zivić, Tihomir

    2015-01-01

    BPPV is generally the most common cause of vertigo, caused by a pinch-off of tiny calcium carbonate crystals (called the otoconia or the otoliths) from the macula utriculi, most frequently due to the degenerative processes or a trauma, whereby the crystals, under the action of gravity in certain head positions coinciding with its direction, arrive to some of the semicircular canals, usually the posterior one, due to the existent anatomical circumstances and relationships, thus creating an inadequate stimulus of the cupular senses while floating through the endolymph and provoking symptoms of a strong and short-term dizziness. Two main clinical forms can be distinguished: canalolythiasis, with an accommodation of otolithic debris in the semicircular canal, and cupulolythiasis, with their location immediately next to the cupular sense. The diagnosis is established by a positive positioning test, Dix-Hallpike for the posterior and the supine roll for the lateral canal. Although one can expect a spontaneous recovery subsequent to few weeks or months, various methods of otolith repositioning to a less sensitive place lead to a prompt improvement while reducing or withdrawing the symptoms completely. These guidelines are intended for all who treat the BPPV in their work, with an intention to assist in the diagnosis and application of an appropriate therapeutic method.

  10. The impact of diabetes on mobility, balance, and recovery after repositioning maneuvers in individuals with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Whitney, Susan L; Santos, Marcio; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with type 2 diabetes (DM). The impact of DM on mobility, balance, and management of BPPV is unknown. This prospective study compared symptom severity, mobility and balance before and after the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM) in people with posterior canal BPPV canalithiasis, with and without DM. Fifty participants, BPPV (n=34) and BPPV+DM (n=16) were examined for symptom severity (dizziness handicap inventory, DHI), mobility (functional gait assessment, FGA), and postural sway (using an accelerometer in five conditions) before and after the CRM. The number of maneuvers required for symptom resolution was recorded. At baseline, no differences in DHI or FGA scores were seen between groups, however, people with BPPV+DM had higher sway velocity in the medio-lateral direction in tandem stance (pdiabetes, as well as the influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on functional performance are essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An iPhone-assisted particle repositioning maneuver for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Brock; Liu, Hao; Bromwich, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The Epley particle repositioning maneuver (PRM) is an effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common cause of peripheral vertigo in primary care settings. The goal of this study was to determine whether the use of an iPhone application (DizzyFIX; Clearwater Clinical Ltd, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) by medical students had a significant impact on the performance of the PRM. We recruited senior medical students who had previously been trained in the management of BPPV and asked them to perform the PRM on a healthy volunteer. One half of the students used a real iPhone application, whereas the others used a sham application. The PRM performance scores of the 2 groups were compared. iPhone application users scored significantly higher on their PRM performance compared with controls (P iPhone application. This application represents a significant improvement from standard medical school training using written instructions. Family physicians could also use this iPhone application for the quick and effective treatment of BPPV. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Curing a 96-year-old patient afflicted with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on a motorized turntable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockisch CJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Christopher J Bockisch,1–3 Dominik Straumann,1,4 Konrad P Weber1,2 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, 4Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Dizziness in the elderly is a serious health concern due to the increased morbidity caused by falling. The most common cause of dizziness in the elderly, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, is frequently undiagnosed, and bedside treatment of these patients can be difficult due to neck and back stiffness, which makes repeated and accurate repositioning maneuvers difficult. Case presentation: After a fall, a 96-year-old woman was referred by a resident neurologist for intractable BPPV. The patient was placed on a motorized turntable and repositioned to remove the calcite particles from the affected posterior semicircular canal. Video monitoring of the eyes allowed confirmation of the diagnosis, as well as an immediate evaluation of the effectiveness of the maneuver. Conclusion: Every patient with dizziness or imbalance, even in the absence of typical complaints of BPPV, should be tested with provocation maneuvers, because the clinical picture of BPPV is not always typical. Even if elderly patients with dizziness are very frail, the completion of provocation maneuvers is imperative, since the therapeutic maneuvers are extremely effective. A motorized turntable is very helpful to perform the repositioning accurately and safely. Keywords: vestibulo ocular reflex, nystagmus, vertigo

  13. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo comorbid with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Deng, Yuxiao; Zhang, Tianyu; Wang, Menghong

    2017-05-01

    Patients with BPPV comorbid with hypertension (h-BPPV) tend to receive a delayed diagnosis of BPPV. Comorbidity with hypertension did not influence the efficacy of the repositioning maneuver; however, comorbidity with hypertension was associated with an increased recurrence rate of BPPV. To determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of h-BPPV, as well as the clinical differences between h-BPPV and idiopathic BPPV (i-BPPV). The authors reviewed the medical records of 41 consecutive patients with h-BPPV (the h-BPPV group) from March to December 2014 and 47 patients with i-BPPV (the i-BPPV group) during the same period. There were no significant differences in age, sex ratio, or the affected side between the h-BPPV and i-BPPV groups. The proportion of patients reporting an initial episode of positional vertigo was significantly lower in the h-BPPV group (51.22% vs 74.47%; p = .024). Patients in the h-BPPV group reported a longer median episode duration than did those in the i-BPPV group (60 days vs 15 days; p = .017). The results of treatment using repositioning maneuvers were similar between the two groups. At follow-up, 13 patients in the h-BPPV group were diagnosed with recurrent BPPV compared with six in the i-BPPV group (p = .031).

  14. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Features and Response to Therapy in 110 Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jacob R; Lipson, Sophie; Wilber, Jared; Zhou, Guangwei

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features and outcomes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in the pediatric population. Retrospective case review. Tertiary care center. One hundred ten patients, aged 5 to 19 years old, diagnosed with BPPV. Patient demographics, comorbidities, canal involvement, response to treatment, and incidence of recurrence. BPPV was diagnosed in 19.8% of patients seen for dizziness during the study period. Patient age ranged 5 to 19 years old (mean =13.4 ± 3.4 yr). Female:male ratio was 3:2. The most prevalent comorbidities were concussion (n = 42, 38.2%) and migraine disorders (n = 33, 30.0%). Average time to diagnosis from symptom onset was 178.2 ± 190.8 days. The posterior canal was most frequently affected (n = 80, 72.7%), followed by the lateral canal (n = 37, 33.6%) and superior canal (n = 21, 19.1%), and 36.4% (n = 40) of patients had multiple canals affected. Treatment requiring more than or equal to five maneuvers to achieve resolution was observed in 11.8% of cases (n = 13). Recurrence was observed in 18.2% of cases. A logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients with vestibular migraine or benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood had five times higher odds of recurrence of BPPV, p = 0.003, 95% [1.735, 15.342], than those who did not have either. BPPV is a relatively common cause of dizziness in the pediatric population. Children and adolescents with BPPV can be successfully treated with repositioning maneuvers but may be at risk for treatment resistance and recurrence. Increased awareness of BPPV in pediatric patients may reduce delays in identification and treatment.

  15. Diagnostic Role of Head-Bending and Lying-Down Tests in Lateral Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetiser, Sertac; Ince, Dilay

    2015-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of the head-bending test (HBT), lying-down positioning test (LDPT) and patient's report to identify the affected canal in video-nystagmographically (VNG) confirmed patients with lateral canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (LC-BPPV). Case series with chart review. Head-bending, lying-down positioning and the head-roll maneuver (HRM) under VNG guidance. The data were collected in a referral community hospital. Seventy-eight patients (32 apogeotropic and 46 geotropic nystagmus) with LC-BPPV who had been recruited between 2009 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. Patients were tested with the HRM and then were asked about subjectively worse side. Later, they were subjected to HBT when sitting and the LDPT. The results were compared and studied with the 1-way ANOVA and chi-square tests. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Affected side was identified by HRM in 75% of patients with apogeotropic nystagmus and 95.6% of patients with geotropic nystagmus. Approximately 65.6% of patients with apogeotropic and 52% of patients with geotropic nystagmus had nystagmus during LDPT. However, its comparability with HRM was low. However, treatment plan based on LDPT results alone provided relief of symptoms in additional 12.5% of patients with apogeotropic and in 2.2% of patients with geotropic nystagmus. Approximately 63% of patients with apogeotropic and 56% of patients with geotropic nystagmus were able to tell the worse side. Nystagmus comparable with HRM during HBT was low and not diagnostic. HRM has the greatest diagnostic value of positioning tests in LC-BPPV in this study. LDPT provides some contribution in the diagnosis of LC-BPPV but much less than HRM. Patients' subjective feeling of vertigo was also a useful test. However, HBT was not as sensitive as other measures in uncertain cases.

  16. Detection of utricular dysfunction using ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Toru; Saka, Naoki; Ohta, Shigeto; Sakagami, Masafumi

    2013-08-29

    The ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) is thought to originate from the contralateral utricular organ. However, the clinical use of oVEMP has not yet been established. This study aimed to clarify whether oVEMP could be used to detect utricular dysfunction in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Sixteen patients with BPPV underwent oVEMP measurements. Recordings were made on 2 separate occasions: when typical nystagmus was confirmed (pretreatment oVEMP) and 1 week after performing Epley's maneuver (posttreatment oVEMP). Results were evaluated using the asymmetry ratio (AR) of n1-p1 wave peak-to-peak amplitude and defined as reduced oVEMP when AR was >31.6%, or augmented oVEMP when AR was positional vertigo (p>0.05, Fisher's exact test). Three out of 4 patients (75.0%) with continuing unsteadiness had abnormal results (reduced response) on the posttreatment oVEMP. The oVEMP measurements indicated abnormal function of the utricle in patients with BPPV. Reduced oVEMP is thought to originate from the partial degeneration of utricular hair cells. Conversely, augmented oVEMP in the affected ear is thought to originate from a hypermobility of the stereocilia due to the detachment of otoconia within the utricle. The above-mentioned utricular dysfunction should be independent of the existence of otoconia in the semicircular canal; thus, the results of oVEMP were not related to the recovery of symptoms. oVEMP can be reliably used to detect utricular lesions in patients with BPPV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vertiginous Symptoms and Objective Measures of Postural Balance in Elderly People with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Submitted to the Epley Maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Camila Nicácio da

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common and treatable causes of peripheral vestibular vertigo in adults. Its incidence increases with age, eventually leading to disability and a decreased quality of life. Objective The research aims to assess short-term effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (ORM on dizziness symptoms, quality of life, and postural balance in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods A quasi-experimental study, which evaluated 14 elderly people that underwent the Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and reevaluation after one week. The authors performed statistical analysis by descriptive analysis of central tendency and dispersion; for pre- and post-treatment conditions, the authors used the Wilcoxon test. Results All aspects of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (physical, functional, emotional, and total scores as well as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS decreased after therapy (p < 0.05 and p = 0.001, respectively. However, more than half of the elderly participants did not achieve negative Dix-Hallpike. Regarding static and dynamic balance, there were significant differences in some parameters of the modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, Limits of Stability and gait assessment measured by the Dizziness Gait Index (p < 0.05. Conclusion Results reveal clinical and functional benefits in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo submitted to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. However, most of the participants did not overcome Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and not all aspects of postural balance improved. Therefore, a longer follow-up period and a multidisciplinary team are required to establish comprehensive care for elderly patients with dizziness complaints.

  18. Vertiginous Symptoms and Objective Measures of Postural Balance in Elderly People with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Submitted to the Epley Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Camila Nicácio da; Ribeiro, Karyna Myrelly O. B. de Figueiredo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Britho Macedo; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common and treatable causes of peripheral vestibular vertigo in adults. Its incidence increases with age, eventually leading to disability and a decreased quality of life. Objective The research aims to assess short-term effects of Otolith Repositioning Maneuver (ORM) on dizziness symptoms, quality of life, and postural balance in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Methods A quasi-experimental study, which evaluated 14 elderly people that underwent the Otolith Repositioning Maneuver and reevaluation after one week. The authors performed statistical analysis by descriptive analysis of central tendency and dispersion; for pre- and post-treatment conditions, the authors used the Wilcoxon test. Results All aspects of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (physical, functional, emotional, and total scores) as well as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) decreased after therapy (p < 0.05 and p = 0.001, respectively). However, more than half of the elderly participants did not achieve negative Dix-Hallpike. Regarding static and dynamic balance, there were significant differences in some parameters of the modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, Limits of Stability and gait assessment measured by the Dizziness Gait Index (p < 0.05). Conclusion Results reveal clinical and functional benefits in elderly people with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo submitted to Otolith Repositioning Maneuver. However, most of the participants did not overcome Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and not all aspects of postural balance improved. Therefore, a longer follow-up period and a multidisciplinary team are required to establish comprehensive care for elderly patients with dizziness complaints. PMID:26722348

  19. Efficacy of particle repositioning manoeuvres in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo: A revision of 176 cases treated in a tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Claudio; Arancibia-Tagle, Diego J; Rizzo-Riera, Elena; Til-Perez, Guillermo; Sarría-Echegaray, Pedro L; Rama-Lopez, Julio J; Quer-Canut, Santiago; Fermin-Gamero, German; Tomas-Barberan, Manuel D

    2017-09-28

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common peripheral vertigo disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results obtained with the different specific particle repositioning manoeuvres, evaluating the possible risk factors linked to a poorer prognosis. One hundred and seventy-six patients with a diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were reviewed retrospectively, of whom 150 had vertigo of the posterior canal, 20 had vertigo of the horizontal canal, 3 had vertigo of the superior canal, and 3 had a double vertigo. The Epley manoeuvre was used to treat the posterior and superior canals, and Lempert manoeuvre was used to treat the horizontal canal. An imaging study by nuclear magnetic resonance with gadolin was always used in refractory cases. The Epley manoeuvre showed an efficacy of 74.6 and 100% at first attempt for posterior and superior canals respectively. The efficacy of the Lempert manoeuvre for the horizontal canal was 72.72% in the patients with canalolithiasis, and 58.33% in the patients with cupulolithiasis. The treatment of patients with more than one affected canal and a history of surgery in the previous month was more difficult. Particle repositioning manoeuvres show a very high success rate, allowing better results in the treatment of the posterior canal. We need more studies to confirm the suspicion that surgery may be a factor of poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in medical patients admitted with falls in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Joel; Tomassen, Sylvia; Lane, Laura; Bishop, Katie; Thomas, Nibu

    2016-08-01

    Having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) puts patients at a significantly higher risk of falling. It is poorly recognised and diagnosis is frequently delayed. BPPV has been studied in outpatient settings, but there have been no studies looking at the prevalence in patients admitted with falls. This study aims to establish how common BPPV is in these patients.For a 4-month period, patients admitted on an unselected medical take were screened for an admission precipitated by a fall. Patients who consented were assessed for BPPV using the Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. Patients who tested positive were treated using the Epley manoeuvre. The assessments were carried out by specialist physiotherapists who were experienced at assessing and diagnosing patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Out of the 111 patients initially identified, 37 (33%) were considered to be appropriate and consented to be part of the study. Of these, 20 patients (54%) had a positive Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre.Of the patients included in the study, over half tested positive for BPPV. This merits further study. Potentially, there is a proportion of patients admitted with falls who have an easily treatable contributing factor that is not being identified with standard practice. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  1. [Analysis of clinical features with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in elderly patients and precautions for canalith repositioning procedure treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Wang, Yanjun; Wang, Ningyu

    2015-01-01

    To analyze clinical features with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and discuss the attentions in the canalith repositioning procedures. A total of 76 male and female patients aged 80 and over with BPPV (elderly group) and 76 patients aged 60-65 years old with BPPV (older group) was retrospectively analyzed. (1)Semicircular canal condition: in elderly group, posterior semicircular canal was involved in 72 cases, whereas the horizontal semicircular 4 cases. In older group, posterior semicircular canal was involved in 70 cases, whereas the horizontal semicircular and multiple canals in 5 cases and 1 case respectively. (2) Precipitating factors: precipitating factors of elderly were variety. Its closely related with emotion, infection, seasonal alternation surgery, and trauma. There were significant differences between the two groups (P0. 05). (5) The elderly always accompanied with other medical condition and had risk factors of cerebrovascular disease. The efficacy was not associated with the complication(P>0.05). However, it was most likely to overtreatment caused by emphasizing other medical conditions treatment. BPPV was easy to ignore and misdiagnose, meanwhile, delayed the diagnosis and increased the medical costs. (6) Many elderly were accompanied cervical spondylosis, lumbar spondylosis body stiffness and fear of vertigo which increased the difficulty of repositioning treatment. (7) Recurrence: we followed up 2 years after treatment. In older group, 11 patients (14. 5%)were relapsed. In elderly group, 29 patients (38. 2%) relapsed. There were significant differences between the two groups (P<0. 05). There are various precipitating factors in elderly patients with BPPV, the most frequent precipitating factors were related to psychological factor and overfatigue. The symptoms of the patients attack BPPV was always mask with other diseases, but do not impact on the efficacy of Canalith repositioning at the first time; Even the efficacy of repositioning

  2. [Clinical research of the otolith abnormal migration during canalith repositioning procedures for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yongkang; Zheng, Yiging; Zhu, Honglei; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Junwei; Tang, Xiaowu; Huang, Qiuhong; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the risk factor,type and characteristic nystagmus of the otolith abnormal migration during diagnosis and treatment for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PSC-BPPV). The therapy and prevention is also discussed. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients with PSC-BPPV were treated by Epley's canalith repositioning procedures(CRP) from March 2009 to March 2012. We observed otolith abnormal migration complicating during diagnosis and treatment. According the type of otolith abnormal migration, the additional repositioning maneuver was performed. The rate of complication was 8. 1%(39/479), with canal conversion in 5.4%(26/479) and primarily canal reentry in 2.7%(13/479). The rate of incidence of conversion to horizontal canal conversion and anterior canal were 4. 8%(23/479)and 0. 6%(3/479) respectively. All the patient was cured in follow up. The risk factors were unappropriated head movement during or after CRP, including another Dix-Hallpike were performed immediately. To prevent the complications,the pathognostic positioning sequence and angle of head rotation are commenced during CRP. Appropriate short time postural restrictions post-treatment is necessary. Careful observation of nystagrnus variation is crucial to determine the otolith abnormal migration.

  3. Significance of the 'bow and lean test' for the diagnosis of benign horizontal semicircular canal paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying CHEN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe and assess the positive rate and accuracy of 'bow and lean test' in the horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HSC-BPPV. Methods Ninety-two HSC-BPPV patients who were diagnosed by head roll test (HRT were enrolled, and then further tested with 'bow and lean test' (BLT between Oct 1, 2010 and Sep 30, 2011. They were treated by Barbecue maneuver or Brandt-Daroff exercise on the basis of HRT and BLT tests. The positive rate of BLT test was analyzed, and its accuracy for diagnosis and success rate for treatment of HSC-BPPV were compared between HRT and BLT. Results Among the 92 patients, 83(90.2% of them showed BLT nystagmus. Fifty-seven of 83 (68.7% patients showed both bowing nystagmus and leaning nystagmus, and 18(21.7% and 8(9.6% respectively showed bowing nystagmus alone or leaning nystagmus alone. Among 92 patients, 74(80.4% of them the affected side could be determined by HRT with 69 BLT positive and 5 BLT negative. Among the 69 BLT-positive patients, 60 patients showed the same result of HRT, and successful result was achieved by manipulation. 9 patients showed different result between BLT and HRT, in whom manipulation failed according to the result of HRT, but succeeded when manipulation was performed according to BLT. In 18 patients(19.6% it was not able to determine the affected side by HRT, but in 14 patients manipulation was successful when BLT result was applied. In 4 patients BLT failed to evoke nystagmus, but after practicing Brandt-Daroff exercise, vertigo and HRT nystagmus disappeared 3 days later. Among the 92 patients, 65(70.7% were cured according to HRT, while 83(90.2% got successful result according to BLT(P < 0.05. Conclusion The positive rate and accuracy for HSC-BPPV by BLT are high. It is a useful method for determining the affected side in HSC-BPPV, and to provide the basis for selecting effective manipulation treatment.

  4. [Video head impulse test for evaluation of vestibular function in patients with vestibular neuritis and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qiongfeng; Zhang, Lisan; Hong, Wenke; Yang, Yi; Chen, Zhaoying; Zhang, Dan; Hu, Xingyue

    2017-01-25

    Objective: To assess the clinical application of video head impulse test (vHIT) for vestibular function in vestibular neuritis (VN) and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) patients. Methods: Thirty-three patients with VN and 43 patients with BPPV were enrolled from Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital and Ningbo Second Hospital from March 15 to September 10, 2015; and 50 healthy controls were also enrolled in the study. vHIT was used to quantitatively test the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gains of a pair of horizontal semicircular canals. VOR gains two pairs of vertical semicircular canals, and the corresponding asymmetrical value of three VOR gains. The saccades information was also recorded. Results: Compared with the healthy control group and BPPV patients, the affected horizontal and vertical VOR gains were declined and the corresponding asymmetries were increased in VN patients (all P 0.05). The sensibility of vHIT in diagnosis of VN was 87.9%. Among 33 VN patients, 22 were diagnosed with superior vestibular nerve dysfunction, 7 were found with inferior vestibular nerve dysfunction and 3 were with both dysfunction; and 1 case was not distinguished. Conclusion: Video head impulse test can quantitatively evaluate the vestibular dysfunction of VN and can help early diagnosis of VN, which may be widely used in clinic.

  5. Investigating the role of Sirt1-modulated oxidative stress in relation to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kun-Ling; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Lee, Yi-Yen; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2015-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most frequently encountered primary complaints in dizziness clinics. The incidence of BPPV has been proven to increase with age. The relationship between BPPV and another neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), has not been previously discussed. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of BPPV and PD with oxidative stress. A total of 30,811 subjects participated in our cohort study. The study cohort comprised 5057 BPPV patients and a comparison cohort of 25,754 nonBPPV patients. SIRT1 axis gene expression was investigated in BPPV patient blood samples and a PD cell model of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PC-12 cells to elucidate the potential in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of degeneration in PD and BPPV. Our data suggest that BPPV patients with histories of head injuries show a significantly higher hazard to develop subsequent PD (hazard ratio, 3.942; confidence interval, 1.523-10.205, p = 0.005). We also observed that oxidative status is increased in blood samples from patients with BPPV. Our in vitro study suggests that SIRT1 function is inhibited by oxidative stress, which thereby promotes 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with an increased risk of PD. This finding may be attributed to oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of SIRT1 expression levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ocular VEMPs indicate repositioning of otoconia to the utricle after successful liberatory maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    BREMOVA, TATIANA; BAYER, OTMAR; AGRAWAL, YURI; KREMMYDA, OLYMPIA; BRANDT, THOMAS; TEUFEL, JULIAN; STRUPP, MICHAEL

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions This study showed a transient increase of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) amplitudes in the affected ear after successful liberatory maneuvers and no changes in cervical VEMP (cVEMP) amplitudes. These findings support the hypothesis that successful liberatory maneuvers can lead to a repositioning of otoconia to the utricle. Objectives To evaluate whether oVEMP amplitudes increase after successful liberatory maneuvers in patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (pc-BPPV), while cVEMP amplitudes do not change. These findings may indicate a successful repositioning of dislodged otoconia to the utricular macula, but not to the saccular macula. Methods Thirty patients with unilateral pc-BPPV were prospectively examined with bone-conducted oVEMP and air-conducted cVEMP at four time points: before, after, 1 week after, and 1 month after the liberatory maneuvers (Sémont maneuvers). Results At the 1-week follow-up, 20 of 30 patients were asymptomatic (responders); BPPV could still be induced in the other 10 (non-responders). In responders the mean n10 amplitude on the affected side increased from 12 ± 6.5 μV at baseline (before the treatment) to 15.9 ± 7.1 μV at 1 week after treatment; this increase was significantly (p = 0.001) higher in responders than in non-responders. cVEMP did not differ significantly. PMID:24245699

  7. Treating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Patient With Traumatic Brain Injury: Effectiveness of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchterlony, Donna; Masanic, Cheryl; Michalak, Alicja; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Rutka, John A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) among patients after mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury. An unblinded, nonrandomized, case comparison interventional study with repeated measures (1, 5, 9, and 12 weeks postenrollment) of three groups of patients with traumatic brain injury (BPPV, n = 21; nonspecific dizziness, n = 23; no dizziness, n = 12) was conducted. Patients in the BPPV group received the CRP at baseline and repeatedly until a negative Dix-Hallpike Maneuver was observed. Participants in the other two groups did not receive the CRP. Symptom resolution at the 12-week follow-up was observed in 75% of patients in the BPPV group versus 8.3% in the nonspecific dizziness group (p = .0006). A significant Group × Time interaction was observed for the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (F = 4.2, p = .003) and 36-item Short Form Health Questionnaire physical component scores (F = 2.16, p = .035) with the BPPV group showing significantly improved scores by the 12-week follow-up. Although there were between-group differences on the 36-item Short Form Health Questionnaire mental health component scores (F = 4.06, p = .022), changes over time were not significant in the groups. Treatment with the CRP for posttraumatic BPPV resulted in significant symptom resolution and improvement in perceived physical health status.

  8. [The change of female progesterone level and blood calcium concentration in perimenopausal women with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S F; Zhang, L; Li, G H; Zhang, W W; Wang, Y P; Geng, B

    2017-04-07

    Objective: The estrogen level and blood calcium concentration changes were studied on menopausal women with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Methods: Between January 2015 and January 2016, 70 menopause women with BPPV in outpatient clinics of Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Inner Mongolia Medical University Affiliated Hospital were included in this study as research group, while 30 menopause healthy women who came to hospital for check-up were included as control group. Serum levels of estradiol (E2), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), progesterone (PRO), testosterone (T), serum prolactin (PRL) and the calcium concentration were analysed and comparied between research group and control group. SPSS17.0 statistical software was used to analyze the data. χ(2) test was used to compare the percentage of decreased serum level of sex hormone, and t test was used to compare the serum level of sex hormone and calcium concentration of two groups. Results: In research group, sex hormone decreased proportion of E2 (91%) and PRO (67%) were obviously higher than those in control group (χ(2) value was 8.13, 10.28, respectively, all P 0.05). Conclusion: The level of E2 and PRO decrease obviously in postmenopausal women with BPPV, which can cause the inner ear microcirculation disorder , may be one of the risk factors of BPPV.

  9. Effectiveness of the Epley’s maneuver performed in primary care to treat posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Vertigo is a common medical condition with a broad spectrum of diagnoses which requires an integrated approach to patients through a structured clinical interview and physical examination. The main cause of vertigo in primary care is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which should be confirmed by a positive D-H positional test and treated with repositioning maneuvers. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Epley’s maneuver performed by general practitioners (GPs) in the treatment of BPPV. Methods/Design This study is a randomized clinical trial conducted in the primary care setting. The study’s scope will include two urban primary care centers which provide care for approximately 49,400 patients. All patients attending these two primary care centers, who are newly diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, will be invited to participate in the study and will be randomly assigned either to the treatment group (Epley’s maneuver) or to the control group (a sham maneuver). Both groups will receive betahistine. Outcome variables will be: response to the D-H test, patients’ report on presence or absence of vertigo during the previous week (dichotomous variable: yes/no), intensity of vertigo symptoms on a Likert-type scale in the previous week, total score on the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and quantity of betahistine taken. We will use descriptive statistics of all variables collected. Groups will be compared using the intent-to-treat approach and either parametric or nonparametric tests, depending on the nature and distribution of the variables. Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test will be conducted to compare categorical measures and Student’s t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test will be used for intergroup comparison variables. Discussion Positive results from our study will highlight that treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can be performed by trained general practitioners (GPs) and

  10. Quedas em idosos com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna Elderly falls associated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB pode causar quedas, principalmente em pacientes idosos. OBJETIVO: Verificar se o número de quedas em idosos com VPPB diminui após a realização de manobras de reposicionamento de partículas (MRP. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo em que foram incluídos idosos com VPPB que tenham apresentado queda no último ano. Todos os pacientes submeteram-se à MRP de acordo com o canal semicircular (CSC acometido. Após a abolição da vertigem e do nistagmo de posicionamento, os pacientes foram acompanhados ao longo de 12 meses e investigados em relação ao número de quedas neste período. Para comparar o número de quedas antes e após as MRP utilizou-se avaliação estatística por meio do teste de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 121 pacientes. Cento e um pacientes apresentaram acometimento do CSC posterior, 16 do lateral e quatro do anterior. Verificou-se redução do número de quedas após as MRP, com diferença estatisticamente significante na amostra geral (pBenign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV can cause falls, especially in the elderly. AIM: to study whether or not elderly patients with BPPV have a reduction on their falls after the particle repositioning maneuver (PRM. MATERIALS AND METHODS: retrospective study including elderly with BPPV who had fall(s during the last year. All patients were submitted to the PRM according to the affected semicircular canal (SCC. After the abolition of positioning vertigo and nystagmus, the patients were submitted to a 12 month follow-up and were investigated about the number of fall(s. Wilcoxon's test was performed to compare the number of fall(s before and after 12 months of the PRM. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty one patients were included in the study. One hundred and one patients presented involvement of the posterior SCC, 16 of the lateral and four of the anterior. We noticed a reduction on the number of falls, with statistically

  11. Repositioning intervals in the modified Epley's maneuver and their effect on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Serif Samil; Yildirim, Yavuz Selim; Tugrul, Selhattin; Ozturan, Orhan

    2017-05-01

    This study showed that short and long interval treatments achieved comparable success rates. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of early and late recurrences between the two groups. Modified Epley maneuver can be applied in a short interval time with comparable success and recurrence rates which are as effective as in a long interval time. The Epley maneuver is called the particle repositioning or canalith repositioning procedure. If a short time interval in each position is effective, it will allow for reduced time and avoid unnecessary physical burden. How long of a stay in each position is not determined in the literature. There is an absence of comparative studies of the BPPV repositioning time. The aim of this study is to compare the treatment time in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Longitudinal prospective study. Outpatient practice in a tertiary care facility. Sixty consecutive patients with BPPV were included in this study. These patients were sequentially allocated to one of two groups (A or B). The interval times between each position in group A and B were 15 and 120 s, respectively. Modified Epley maneuver was performed in all patients. The maneuvers in both groups were exactly the same sequence of movements, except interval times. The mean age of the patients was 49.25 years (range =19-76 years). Of the 60 patients, 48 (80%) were women and 12 (20%) were men. Successful outcome was achieved in 26 patients (86.7%) after the first modified Epley maneuver in both groups. Three patients from each group (total six patients) responded to the third modified Epley maneuver and the remaining two patients did not respond to any modified Epley maneuver. Therefore, the Semont maneuver was applied with a successful result.

  12. One-third of vertiginous episodes during the follow-up period are caused by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients with Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taura, Akiko; Funabiki, Kazuo; Ohgita, Hideaki; Ogino, Eriko; Torii, Hiroko; Matsunaga, Mami; Ito, Juichi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, about one-third of patients with Meniere's disease developed benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)-like attacks. Additionally, more than one-third of all vertigo attacks were BPPV-like attacks. Thus, vertigo attacks in patients with Meniere's disease must be carefully treated because the therapy for such vertigo attacks is totally different from the therapy for BPPV. Physicians sometimes encounter patients with previously diagnosed Meniere's disease who develop BPPV attacks during the course of clinical follow-up. In this study, we explored the frequency with which BPPV was involved in all vertiginous episodes among patients with Meniere's disease. This retrospective study involved 296 patients with Meniere's disease who visited Kyoto University Hospital. The diagnosis of Meniere's disease was based on the guidelines for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease proposed by the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium. We judged the cause of vertigo as one of the following five types: (1) definite Meniere's disease attack, (2) suspicious Meniere's disease attack, (3) definite BPPV attack, (4) suspicious BPPV attack, or (5) unknown. In all, 96 patients (32.8%) developed BPPV-like attacks, and 187 vertiginous episodes (37.9%) were caused by BPPV. The lateral semicircular canal was the most frequently involved canal.

  13. Prospective clinical investigation of the relationship between idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and bone turnover: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Kourosh; Leonard, Gerald; Feinn, Richard S; Lafreniere, Denis; Kenny, Anne M

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a strong indicator of decreased bone density (osteopenia/osteoporosis) in postmenopausal women, and there is a correlation between BPPV and serum levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover. Prospective pilot clinical trial. Two groups of postmenopausal women were recruited. The BPPV group consisted of 16 women with a diagnosis of BPPV. The OSTEO group consisted of 13 women with history of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan results were compared, along with serum levels of ionized calcium (iCa), vitamin D, aminoterminal propeptide of protocollagen type I (P1NP), and aminoterminal telopeptides of collagen (sNTX). Prevalence of decreased bone mass density among BPPV subjects was 81%, and prevalence of BPPV among OSTEO subjects was 31%. BPPV subjects had higher P1NP levels. Multiple regression analysis showed that among BPPV subjects, there was positive correlation between P1NP and sNTX and a negative correlation between P1NP and vitamin D level. Age was positively correlated with serum levels of both biomarkers among the BPPV subjects. T score, serum iCa, and serum vitamin D levels did not appear to correlate with presence of BPPV. Idiopathic BPPV subjects have a high prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover correlate with presence of BPPV. Our results, based on a sample of U.S. subjects, support an association between idiopathic BPPV and disorders of bone turnover. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Effects of balance Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy in elderly with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Karyna Myrelly Oliveira Bezerra de Figueiredo; Freitas, Raysa Vanessa de Medeiros; Ferreira, Lidiane Maria de Brito Macedo; Deshpande, Nandini; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate short-term effects of balance Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT) on balance, dizziness symptoms and quality of life of the elderly with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). In this randomized, single-blind and controlled trial, older adults with chronic BPPV were randomized into two groups, the experimental group (n = 7, age: 69 (65-78) years) and the control group (n = 7, age: 73 (65-76) years). Patients in the experimental group underwent balance VRT (50 min per session, two times a week) and Canalith Repositioning Maneuver (CRM) as required, for 13 weeks. The control group was treated using only CRM as required. Standing and dynamic balance, dizziness symptoms and quality of life were measured at the baseline, and at one, five, nine and thirteen weeks. There were no between-group differences in dizziness, quality of life and standing balance over the 13 weeks. Significant differences were observed in dynamic balance measures between groups (p CRM. Implications for Rehabilitation The findings that balance VRT in addition to CRM improves dynamic balance in elderly people with BPPV should be useful in guiding rehabilitation professionals' clinical decision making to design interventions for seniors suffering from BPPV; Improvements in tests of dynamic balance suggest that the risk of adverse consequences of BPPV in the elderly such as falls and fractures can be potentially reduced through implementation of CRM in conjunction with balance VRT; Lack of additional improvement in Visual Analogue Scale of dizziness and Dizziness Handicap Index suggests that addition of balance VRT does not influence dizziness symptomatology, per se, and CRM alone is effective to ameliorate vertiginous symptoms and potentially improve quality of life.

  15. Canal switch and re-entry phenomenon in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: difference between immediate and delayed occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispenza, F; DE Stefano, A; Costantino, C; Rando, D; Giglione, M; Stagno, R; Bennici, E

    2015-04-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate the differences between immediate and delayed canal re-entry of otoliths after therapeutic manoeuvres in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). A total of 196 patients with BPPV were visited and 127 matched our inclusion criteria. The mean age was 54.74 years. The horizontal semicircular canal (HSC) was involved in 30 cases and the posterior semicircular canal (PSC) in 97 patients. Patients with hearing loss in the ear affected by BPPV have a more recurrent form, compared to those with normal hearing. An immediate canal re-entry was recorded in 3 patients with HSC BPPV, all with geotropic nystagmus. In 7 patients with PSC BPPV, the immediate canal re-entry was detected and the delayed form was noted in 5 patients. The patients with the delayed canal re-entry underwent more than 2 previous manoeuvres. The canal re-entry was not related to the manoeuvre performed. The timing of the Dix-Hallpike test to verify the resolution of the BPPV had a significant role in immediate canal re-entry. A recurrence in the follow-up at least one month after treatment was recorded in 20 patients and was more frequent in patients that had canal re-entry. The canal re-entry or canal switch is a clinical entity that should be kept in mind of the neurotologist when approaching BPPV patients. It is important to distinguish it from recurrence when delayed and from manoeuvre failure when immediate. The timing of manoeuvre performing, in particular the final verification test after therapeutic sessions, is important to prevent the immediate reflux of particles into canals.

  16. [Efficacy of quick repositioning maneuver for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in different age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Jinrang; Guo, Pengfei; Tian, Shiyu; Li, Keliang

    2015-12-01

    To observe the short and long-term efficacy of quick repositioning maneuver for posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV) in different age groups. The clinical data of 113 adult patients with single PC-BPPV who underwent quick repositioning maneuver from July 2009 to February 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The quick repositioning maneuver was to roll the patient from involved side to healthy side in the coronal plane for 180° as quickly as possible. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to different ages: young group (age group (45 ≤ age group (≥ 60 years). The short and long term outcomes of the three groups were observed. The left ear was involved in 58 cases (51.3%) and the right ear in 55 cases (48.7%). The short term improvement rates of the young, middle-age and the old groups were 92.5%, 93.6% and 92.3% respectively, and the long term improvement rate was 90.0%, 85.1% and 73.1% respectively. There was no significant difference among the three groups in short and long term outcomes (P > 0.05). The recurrence rate of the three groups was 5.0%, 6.4% and 15.4% respectively, also no significant difference (P > 0.05). The quick repositioning maneuver along the coronal plane for PC-BPPV has a definite effect for every age groups. The method is simple, rapid and easy to master, and the patients are tolerated the maneuver well without evident side effect.

  17. A multicenter randomized double-blind study: comparison of the Epley, Semont, and sham maneuvers for the treatment of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Shim, Dae Bo; Park, Hong Ju; Song, Chan Il; Kim, Min-Beom; Kim, Chang-Hee; Byun, Jae Yong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Kim, Tae Su; Park, Kye Hoon; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Shim, Byoung Soo; Lee, Joon Han; Lim, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Eun-Ju

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the short-term efficacy of Epley, Semont, and sham maneuvers for resolving posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in a prospective multicenter randomized double-blind controlled study. Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: Epley (36 patients), Semont (32 patients), and sham (Epley maneuver for the unaffected side, 31 patients). Out of 14 institutes which participated in this study, 5 institutes had previous experience of the Epley but not the Semont maneuver and the other 9 had previous experience of both maneuvers. Each maneuver was repeated twice if there was still positional vertigo or nystagmus on day 0, and the presence of nystagmus and vertigo on positional testing were evaluated immediately, 1 day, and 1 week after treatment. After the first maneuver, the Epley group showed a significantly higher resolution rate of positional nystagmus than the Semont or sham groups (63.9, 37.5, and 38.7%, respectively). After the second maneuver, the resolution rate (83.3%) of the Epley group was significantly higher than that (51.6%) of the sham group. At 1 day and 1 week after treatment, the resolution rate of the Epley group was significantly higher than those of the other groups. Similar results were seen for the resolution of positional vertigo. The Epley maneuver showed persistent resolution rates of positional vertigo and nystagmus without a fatigue phenomenon. The Epley maneuver was significantly more effective per maneuver than Semont or sham maneuvers for the short-term treatment of posterior canal BPPV. The Semont maneuver showed a higher success rate than the sham maneuver, but it was not significantly different. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A 9-Year Follow-up Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan eKao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a common form of vertigo and is characterized by episodic dizziness related to changes in head position relative to gravity. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo symptoms can be similar to those of central nervous system vascular diseases. The association between BPPV and ischemic stroke has not yet been investigated. The study cohort consisted of patients who were diagnosed with BPPV at least twice in the previous year as an outpatient or for whom BPPV was the primary diagnosis as an inpatient (n = 4104. An age- and gender-matched sample that excluded patients with a diagnosis of any form of vertigo was selected as the comparison cohort (n = 8397. All cases were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008. The demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities and use of medications in both groups were investigated using chi-square tests. A stratified analysis of stroke risk factors was performed to determine the hazard ratios of BPPV. During the 9-year follow-up period, 185 of the 4104 (4.5% subjects with BPPV and 240 of the 8379 (2.9% subjects without BPPV developed ischemic strokes. The crude hazard ratio of BPPV for developing ischemic strokes was 1.708. After adjusting for stroke risk factors, the risk of developing ischemic strokes in BPPV subjects was 1.415-fold higher than the risk among those without BPPV (confidence interval: 1.162-1.732, p = 0.001. After a subgroup analysis stratified according to stroke risk factors, BPPV remained independently associated with a higher risk of developing future ischemic stroke. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with a risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. More aggressive control of modifiable risk factors for ischemic strokes should be conducted in patients with BPPV.

  19. Unintentional conversion of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo caused by repositioning procedures for canalithiasis: transitional BPPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Borivoj B; Jesic, Snezana D; Milovanovic, Jovica D; Arsovic, Nenad A

    2014-05-01

    (transitional Hc cupulolithiasis) or by the subsequent controlling positional test (transitional Hc canalithiasis and common crux reentry); underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  20. [The exploration on optimization of two alternatives between roll test and Dix-Hallpike test in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, R; Chen, T S; Wang, W; Xu, K X; Li, S S; Wen, C; Liu, Q; Lin, P

    2017-06-07

    Objective: To analyze the objective characteristics of roll test and Dix-Hallpike test in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo(BPPV)patients, discussing the premier solution of positional test. Methods: A total of 230 patients with BPPV, whereas 170 posterior semicircular canal canalithiasis (PSC-Can) BPPV and 60 horizontal semicircular canal canalithiasis (HSC-Can) BPPV were involved respectively. The induced nystagmus in roll test and Dix-Hallpike test was recorded by video nystagmuo graph (VNG), and the direction, intensity and time characteristics of nystagmus were compared in various BPPV.SPSS19.0 software was used for statistical analysis. Results: Vertically upward nystagmus was induced by hanging in 170 PSC-Can Dix-Hallpike test, and the nystagmus reversed and turned weaker when the subjects came to sit. The intensity of nystagmus at turning to lesion side by hanging and sitting were (30.3±14.1)°/s and (12.6±7.5)°/s respectively, the difference was statistically significant ( t =20.153, P <0.05). However, no nystagmus was induced in PSC-Can roll test. Horizontal nystagmus in the same direction with turning was induced in 60 HSC-Can roll test. The intensity of nystagmus at turning to lesion side and normal side was (42.0±18.0)°/s and (20.3±8.7)°/s respectively, the difference was statistically significant ( t =12.731, P <0.05). Furthermore, horizontal nystagmus in the same direction with turning was induced in 57 HSC-Can Dix-Hallpike. The coherence was 95% with the results of roll test. Conclusions: Dix-Hallpike test can not only be used to diagnose PSC-Can, but also induce nystagmus in HSC-Can effectively. Whereas the roll test only show significance in diagnosing HSC-Can. To avoid uncomfortable stimulation to patients as much as possible, we suggest to use Dix-Hallpike test at first, and to judge whether using roll test based on the result of the horizontal nystagmus.

  1. Presence of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Affects the First Time Treatment Efficacy and Recurrence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesTo investigate the possible effects of anxiety and/or depression symptoms on the treatment outcomes and recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV.MethodsThis is a retrospective study conducted at a single institution. 142 consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic BPPV at the Department of Otology in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University between October 2016 and July 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. 127 patients were finally included in this study. Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS and Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS were used to evaluate the presence of anxiety and/or depression, respectively, in our BPPV patients. A significant score (at or above 50 for SAS and 53 for SDS represents the presence of clinically significant symptoms. Two-tailed Student’s t-test, χ2 test, and logistic regression analysis were used as appropriate. A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.ResultsThe prevalence of anxiety and/or depression symptoms in BPPV patients in the present study was 49.61%. The effectiveness of the first time canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM was 70.08%. With weekly follow-up treatments of CRM, the success rate increased to 97.64% by 1 month. The total recurrence rate at 6-month follow-up post-cure was 14.17%. Holding all other variables constant, patients with psychiatric symptoms (Relative-risk ratio: 3.160; p = 0.027 and patients with non-posterior semicircular canal (PSC involvement (Relative-risk ratio: 7.828, p = 0.013 were more likely to experience residual dizziness (RD even after effective CRM treatment. Psychiatric symptoms (Relative-risk ratio: 6.543; p = 0.001 and female gender (Relative-risk ratio: 4.563; p = 0.010 are risk factors for the failure of first time CRM. In addition, BPPV patients with psychiatric symptoms (Odds ratio: 9.184, p = 0.008 were significantly more likely to experience recurrences within the first 6

  2. Presence of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Affects the First Time Treatment Efficacy and Recurrence of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Sayyid, Zahra N; Ma, Xiulan; Wang, Tian; Dong, Yaodong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the possible effects of anxiety and/or depression symptoms on the treatment outcomes and recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This is a retrospective study conducted at a single institution. 142 consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic BPPV at the Department of Otology in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University between October 2016 and July 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. 127 patients were finally included in this study. Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used to evaluate the presence of anxiety and/or depression, respectively, in our BPPV patients. A significant score (at or above 50 for SAS and 53 for SDS) represents the presence of clinically significant symptoms. Two-tailed Student's t -test, χ 2 test, and logistic regression analysis were used as appropriate. A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The prevalence of anxiety and/or depression symptoms in BPPV patients in the present study was 49.61%. The effectiveness of the first time canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM) was 70.08%. With weekly follow-up treatments of CRM, the success rate increased to 97.64% by 1 month. The total recurrence rate at 6-month follow-up post-cure was 14.17%. Holding all other variables constant, patients with psychiatric symptoms (Relative-risk ratio: 3.160; p  = 0.027) and patients with non-posterior semicircular canal (PSC) involvement (Relative-risk ratio: 7.828, p  = 0.013) were more likely to experience residual dizziness (RD) even after effective CRM treatment. Psychiatric symptoms (Relative-risk ratio: 6.543; p  = 0.001) and female gender (Relative-risk ratio: 4.563; p  = 0.010) are risk factors for the failure of first time CRM. In addition, BPPV patients with psychiatric symptoms (Odds ratio: 9.184, p  = 0.008) were significantly more likely to experience recurrences within the first 6 months after a successful

  3. Analysis of effect of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiang; Dong, Feilin; Gu, Jianhua

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the curative effect of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 on the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Fifty BPPV patients diagnosed in the ENT Department of Anzhen Hospital from October 2015 to December 2016 were randomly selected as the treatment group, and treated with 0.25 µg 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 once per day, in addition to the routine diagnosis and treatment. Moreover, 50 BPPV patients in the same period were selected as the control group, and received the routine diagnosis and treatment. The detection results of bone mineral density (BMD) t-value, vitamin D3 and bone metabolic markers before and after treatment were compared, and statistical analysis was performed on the results. There were no differences in the general data between treatment group and control group. There were no statistically significant differences in the BMD and age distribution of males and females between treatment group and control group (P>0.05). The BMD of male BPPV patients in each age group in the treatment group was significantly increased after treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05). The BMD of female BPPV patients in each age group in treatment group was increased after treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05). The average BMD of female BPPV patients in each age group was significantly lower than that of male patients, and the difference was statistically significant (Pdiabetes mellitus, age (>50 years), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and osteopenia/osteoporosis, as the independent variables, and the results suggested that the level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and osteopenia/osteoporosis are the clinical features of whether the BPPV treatment is effective (P<0.05). The results showed that the treatment of BPPV with 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 can effectively improve the symptoms of patients, and the level of vitamin D3 and the occurrence of osteopenia/osteoporosis are the clinical indexes of whether

  4. Analysis of effect of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiang; Dong, Feilin; Gu, Jianhua

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the curative effect of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 on the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Fifty BPPV patients diagnosed in the ENT Department of Anzhen Hospital from October 2015 to December 2016 were randomly selected as the treatment group, and treated with 0.25 µg 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 once per day, in addition to the routine diagnosis and treatment. Moreover, 50 BPPV patients in the same period were selected as the control group, and received the routine diagnosis and treatment. The detection results of bone mineral density (BMD) t-value, vitamin D3 and bone metabolic markers before and after treatment were compared, and statistical analysis was performed on the results. There were no differences in the general data between treatment group and control group. There were no statistically significant differences in the BMD and age distribution of males and females between treatment group and control group (P>0.05). The BMD of male BPPV patients in each age group in the treatment group was significantly increased after treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (PBPPV patients in each age group in control group was somewhat increased after treatment, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The BMD of female BPPV patients in each age group in treatment group was increased after treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (PBPPV patients in each age group in control group was somewhat increased after treatment, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The average BMD of female BPPV patients in each age group was significantly lower than that of male patients, and the difference was statistically significant (PBPPV was effective or not as a dependent variable, and six items, including the sex (female), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, age (>50 years), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and osteopenia/osteoporosis, as the independent variables, and the results

  5. Office-based differential diagnosis of transient and persistent geotropic positional nystagmus in patients with horizontal canal type of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Suzuyo; Imai, Takao; Higashi-Shingai, Kayoko; Matsuda, Kazunori; Takeda, Noriaki; Kitahara, Tadashi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Horii, Arata; Ohta, Yumi; Morihana, Tetsuo; Masumura, Chisako; Nishiike, Suetaka; Inohara, Hidenori

    2017-03-01

    A 30 s observation of geotropic positional nystagmus is sufficient to distinguish persistent geotropic positional nystagmus (PGPN) from transient geotropic positional nystagmus (TGPN) in patients with horizontal canal type of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (H-BPPV) in ENT office. As a canalith repositioning procedure effectively treats H-BPPV with TGPN, but not PGPN, the differentiation between patients with PGPN and with TGPN is essential. The purpose of this study is to determine the observation period enough to distinguish TGPN from PGPN. This study first analyzed positional nystagmus images recorded with an infrared CCD camera three-dimensionally in 47 patients with H-BPPV. PGPN is distinguished from TGPN in patients with H-BPPV precisely by means of time constant calculated form analysis of positional nystagmus. Ten-second and 30-s movies were made of positional nystagmus of the all 47 patients. Ten independent otolaryngologists were then asked to distinguish TGPN from PGPN after a 10 s or 30 s observation of the geotropic positional nystagmus images in 47 patients with H-BPPV. The sensitivity and specificity to distinguish TGPN from PGPN was 100% and 97% after 30 s observation, but 100% and 40% after 10 s observation, respectively.

  6. Evaluation of quality of life pre- and post-vestibular rehabilitation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with Meniere's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzi, Viviane Jacintha Bolfe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vertigo is a symptom that impacts the patients' quality of life and may force them to cease performing activities of daily living. Here, we discuss benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV and Meniere's disease (MD, which show exacerbated symptoms when they appear in association. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR is an effective treatment in reducing vertigo, especially in conjunction with other therapies. Aim: To evaluate the quality of life of patients with BPPV and MD before and after VR. Method: We conducted a descriptive observational qualitative and quantitative case study with 12 patients aged 35 to 86 years. All patients diagnosed with BPPV and MD received treatment in the ENT clinic. The Brazilian DHI questionnaire, which assesses the quality of life with a focus on physical, emotional, and functional aspects, was used for data collection, and was completed by patients before the first session and after the fifth session of VR. Data were tested using the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, followed by Wilcoxon, Friedman, and Spearman correlation tests (p < 0.05. Results: There were significant improvements in scores for all aspects, with median changes ranging from 12 to 0 in the physical, 6 to 1 in the emotional, and 11 to 1 in the functional aspect. There were no correlations between the scores and sample characteristics. Conclusion: VR was an effective method for the treatment of patients with BPPV and MD; it improves quality of life and shows the maximal influence on physical aspect scores, regardless of age or gender.

  7. A multicenter observational study on the role of comorbidities in the recurrent episodes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Alessandro; Dispenza, Francesco; Suarez, Hamlet; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Ban, Jae Ho; Kim, Min-Beom; Kim, Min Beom; Strupp, Michael; Feil, Katharina; Oliveira, Carlos A; Sampaio, Andres L; Araujo, Mercedes F S; Bahmad, Fayez; Ganança, Mauricio M; Ganança, Fernando F; Dorigueto, Ricardo; Lee, Hyung; Kulamarva, Gautham; Mathur, Navneet; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Petrucci, Anna Grazia; Staniscia, Tommaso; Citraro, Leonardo; Croce, Adelchi

    2014-02-01

    Primary objective of this study was to find a statistical link between the most worldwide comorbidities affecting the elderly population (hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis and depression) and recurrent episodes of BPPV. Secondary objective was defining possible "groups of risk" for people suffering recurrent positional vertigo related to the presence of a well documented comorbidity. This was an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter, spontaneous, non-pharmacological study. The data of 1092 patients suffering BPPV evaluated in 11 different Departments of Otolaryngology, Otoneurology and Neurology, referring Centers for positional vertigo evaluation, were retrospectively collected. Regarding evaluated comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis and depression), data analysis showed the presence of at least one comorbid disorder in 216 subjects (19.8%) and 2 or more in 408 subjects (37.4%). Moreover there was a statistical significant difference between the number of comorbidities and the number of recurrences, otherwise said as comorbidity disorders increased the number of relapses increased too. The presence of a systemic disease may worsen the status of the posterior labyrinth causing a more frequent otolith detachment. This condition increases the risk for patients suffering BPPV to have recurrent episodes, even if correctly managed by repositioning maneuvers. The combination of two or more of aforementioned comorbidities further increases the risk of relapsing BPPV, worsened by the presence of osteoporosis. On the basis of this results it was possible to define "groups of risk" useful for predicting BPPV recurrence in patients with one or more comorbidity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Validation of 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in Chinese version of Dizziness Handicap Inventory for screening objective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shu, Liang; Wang, Qian; Pan, Hui; Wu, Jing; Fang, Jie; Sun, Xu-Hong; Zhai, Yu; Dong, You-Rong; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2016-08-01

    As possible candidate screening instruments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), studies to validate the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) sub-scale (5-item and 2-item) and total scores are rare in China. From May 2014 to December 2014, 108(55 with and 53 without BPPV) patients complaining of episodic vertigo in the past week from a vertigo outpatient clinic were enrolled for DHI evaluation, as well as demographic and other clinical data. Objective BPPV was subsequently determined by positional evoking maneuvers under the record of optical Frenzel glasses. Cronbach's coefficient α was used to evaluate the reliability of psychometric scales. The validity of DHI total, 5-item and 2-item questionnaires to screen for BPPV was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. It revealed that the DHI 5-item questionnaire had good internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = 0.72). Area under the curve of total DHI, 5-item and 2-item scores for discriminating BPPV from those without was 0.678 (95 % CI 0.578-0.778), 0.873(95 % CI 0.807-0.940) and 0.895(95 % CI 0.836-0.953), respectively. It revealed 74.5 % sensitivity and 88.7 % specificity in separating BPPV and those without, with a cutoff value of 12 in the 5-item questionnaire. The corresponding rate of sensitivity and specificity was 78.2 and 88.7 %, respectively, with a cutoff value of 6 in 2-item questionnaire. The present study indicated that both 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in the Chinese version of DHI may be more valid than DHI total score for screening objective BPPV and merit further application in clinical practice in China.

  9. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A 9-Year Follow-Up Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common form of vertigo and is characterized by episodic dizziness related to changes in head position relative to gravity. BPPV symptoms can be similar to those of central nervous system vascular diseases. The association between BPPV and ischemic stroke has not yet been investigated. The study cohort consisted of patients who were diagnosed with BPPV at least twice in the previous year as an outpatient or for whom BPPV was the primary diagnosis as an inpatient (n = 4104). An age- and gender-matched sample that excluded patients with a diagnosis of any form of vertigo was selected as the comparison cohort (n = 8397). All cases were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008. The demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, and use of medications in both groups were investigated using chi-square tests. A stratified analysis of stroke risk factors was performed to determine the hazard ratios of BPPV. During the 9-year follow-up period, 185 of the 4104 (4.5%) subjects with BPPV and 240 of the 8379 (2.9%) subjects without BPPV developed ischemic strokes. The crude hazard ratio of BPPV for developing ischemic strokes was 1.708. After adjusting for stroke risk factors, the risk of developing ischemic strokes in BPPV subjects was 1.415-fold higher than the risk among those without BPPV (confidence interval: 1.162–1.732, p = 0.001). After a subgroup analysis stratified according to stroke risk factors, BPPV remained independently associated with a higher risk of developing future ischemic stroke. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with a risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. More aggressive control of modifiable risk factors for ischemic strokes should be conducted in patients with BPPV. PMID:24917815

  10. Analysis of non-posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients treated using the particle repositioning chair: A large, single-institution series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luryi, Alexander L; Wright, David; Lawrence, Juliana; Babu, Seilesh; LaRouere, Michael; Bojrab, Dennis I; Sargent, Eric W; Zappia, John; Schutt, Christopher A

    2018-03-07

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) involving the horizontal and superior semicircular canals is difficult to study due to variability in diagnosis. We aim to compare disease, treatment, and outcome characteristics between patients with BPPV of non-posterior semicircular canals (NP-BPPV) and BPPV involving the posterior canal only (P-BPPV) using the particle repositioning chair as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Retrospective review of patients diagnosed with and treated for BPPV at a high volume otology institution using the particle repositioning chair. A total of 610 patients with BPPV were identified, 19.0% of whom had NP-BPPV. Patients with NP-BPPV were more likely to have bilateral BPPV (52.6% vs. 27.6%, p chair. NP-BPPV affects 19% of patients with BPPV, and these patients are more likely to have bilateral BPPV and to require more treatment visits but have similar outcomes to those with P-BPPV. NP-BPPV is common and should be part of the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with positional vertigo. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Retrospective data suggests that the higher prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in individuals with type 2 diabetes is mediated by hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Linda J; Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Sykes, Kevin J; Phadnis, Milind A; McMahon, Tamara M; Connolly, Dan; Sabus, Carla H; Whitney, Susan L; Kluding, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) has been linked to comorbidities like diabetes and hypertension. However, the relationship between type 2 diabetes (DM) and BPPV is unclear. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the relationship between DM and BPPV in the presence of known contributors like age, gender and hypertension. A retrospective review of the records of 3933 individuals was categorized by the specific vestibular diagnosis and for the presence of type 2 DM and hypertension. As the prevalence of BPPV was higher in people with type 2 DM compared to those without DM, multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify variables predictive of BPPV. The relationship between type 2 DM, hypertension and BPPV was analyzed using mediation analysis. BPPV was seen in 46% of individuals with type 2 DM, compared to 37% of individuals without DM (pdiabetes affects the vestibular system. Individuals with complaints of dizziness, with comorbidities including hypertension and diabetes, may benefit from a screening for BPPV.

  12. A safe-repositioning maneuver for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Gans vs. Epley maneuver; a randomized comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Alia; Nemati, Shadman; Sabnan, Salah; Mollahoseini, Fatemeh; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Some repositioning maneuvers have been described for its management. The aim of this study was comparing the therapeutic effect of Epley and Gans maneuvers in BPPV. This randomized clinical trial was performed from September to December 2015. 73 patients with true vertigo diagnosed as BPPV enrolled the study. They randomly assigned in quadripartite blocks to modified Epley maneuver group (E) or Gans maneuver group (G). 1 day and 1 week after intervention, the objective and subjective responses to treatment were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and regression model in the SPSS software version 21. Thirty patients enrolled each group with a mean age of 46.9 ± 13.4 (E group) and 46.7 ± 7.5 year (G group). 23.3 % of E group and 26.7 % of G group were men (p = 0.766). In E and G groups in the first day, subjective outcomes revealed 86.7 and 60 % rate of success (p = 0.02); and 86.7 and 56.7 % of patients exhibited objective improvement, respectively (p = 0.01). After 1 week, the subjective and objective outcomes revealed improvement among 70 % of E group and 46.7 % of G group (p = 0.067). The only complication with significant difference was cervical pain with a higher rate in E group (23.3 vs. 0.0 %, p = 0.005). These results revealed the similar long-term efficacy of Epley and Gans maneuver for the treatment of BPPV. Cervical pain was most frequent complication of Epley maneuver.

  13. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Neves-Souza, Rejane Dias; Costa, Viviane de Souza Pinho; Meneses-Barriviera, Caroline Luiz; Franco, Pricila Perini Rigotti; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) associated with feeding habits. Methods Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62%) had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21%) had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p = 0.3064). However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p = 0.0419) and insufficient fiber intake (p = 0.03), and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.0084). Conclusion These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly.

  14. Is There a Possible Association between Dietary Habits and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Elderly? The Importance of Diet and Counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz, Adriane Rocha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Poor diet habits and inadequate intake of nutrients are a concern in the elderly. Nutritional education with guidance may improve the results of the treatment of vertigo. Objective Evaluate the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV associated with feeding habits. Methods Cross-sectional study with elderly people living independently. We evaluated nutritional habits through the method of dietary 24-hour recall and manipulation of Dix-Hallpike. Results Based on a sample of 487 individuals, 117 had BPPV. Among the 117 elderly patients with BPPV, 37 (31.62% had inadequate feeding. From those 370 individuals without BPPV, 97 (26.21% had inappropriate feeding. No significant association between nutritional habits and BPPV in the total population was observed (p = 0.3064. However, there was significant relation between BPPV and inadequate carbohydrate intake (p = 0.0419 and insufficient fiber intake (p = 0.03, and the diet of these subjects was rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.0084. Conclusion These data correlate with the dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia status, making it extremely important to reduce the intake of fats and carbohydrates and increase the fiber intake to stabilize triglycerides and thus minimize harmful effects on the inner ear. Food readjustment is suggested in patients with BPPV, along with the work of a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of the elderly.

  15. Age-Related Increases in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Are Reversed in Women Taking Estrogen Replacement Therapy: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding-Hao; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Wang, Chia-To; Chiu, Ch-Chih; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, De-Kuang; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2017-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Numerous investigations have reported an increased BPPV incidence in females and in the aged population. The hormonal characteristics of BPPV patients have not been previously investigated. This study aimed to determine the risk of BPPV in relation to menopause in a population-based study. Materials and Methods: This retrospective population-based study was designed to use a nationwide longitudinal health insurance database to follow and analyze the incidence of and protective factors against BPPV in a Taiwanese population. Data Analyses: Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to calculate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for the incidence of BPPV using Cox-proportional regression models. Results: In the multivariate analyses, we found that older people (older than 65 years old) were more prone to develop BPPV (aHR: 5.37, 95% CI: 0 4.83–5.97, p BPPV was analyzed in two specific age subgroups of elderly females. Results revealed that in both age groups (45–65 years old and >65 years old), patients who took estrogen for menopausal syndromes had a significantly lower incidence of BPPV (aHR; 0.01, 95% CI: 0.06–0.23, p BPPV. Further studies may focus on the pathophysiological mechanism of estrogen in BPPV patients and the development of new drugs for the prevention and treatment of BPPV. PMID:29311896

  16. Age-Related Increases in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Are Reversed in Women Taking Estrogen Replacement Therapy: A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hao Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Numerous investigations have reported an increased BPPV incidence in females and in the aged population. The hormonal characteristics of BPPV patients have not been previously investigated. This study aimed to determine the risk of BPPV in relation to menopause in a population-based study.Materials and Methods: This retrospective population-based study was designed to use a nationwide longitudinal health insurance database to follow and analyze the incidence of and protective factors against BPPV in a Taiwanese population.Data Analyses: Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to calculate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR for the incidence of BPPV using Cox-proportional regression models.Results: In the multivariate analyses, we found that older people (older than 65 years old were more prone to develop BPPV (aHR: 5.37, 95% CI: 0 4.83–5.97, p < 0.001. The risk of BPPV was analyzed in two specific age subgroups of elderly females. Results revealed that in both age groups (45–65 years old and >65 years old, patients who took estrogen for menopausal syndromes had a significantly lower incidence of BPPV (aHR; 0.01, 95% CI: 0.06–0.23, p < 0.001.Conclusion: Our study provides a novel etiology and possible treatment method for the prevention of BPPV. Further studies may focus on the pathophysiological mechanism of estrogen in BPPV patients and the development of new drugs for the prevention and treatment of BPPV.

  17. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo recurrence and persistence Recorrência e persistência da vertigem posicional paroxística benigna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo S Dorigueto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common vestibular disorders. AIM: To study the recurrence and persistence of BPPV in patients treated with canalith repositioning maneuvers (CRM during the period of one year. STUDY DESIGN: longitudinal contemporary cohort series. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred patients with BPPV were followed up during 12 months after a treatment with CRM. Patients were classified according to disease evolution. Aquatic physiotherapy for vestibular rehabilitation (APVR protocol was applied in cases of persistent BPPV. RESULTS: After CRM, 96% of the patients were free from BPPV's typical nystagmus and dizziness. During the follow up period of 1 year, 26 patients returned with typical BPPV nystagmus and vertigo. Nystagmus and vertigo were persistent in 4% of the patients. Persistent BPPV presented improvement when submitted to APVR. Conclusion: During the period of one year, BPPV was not recurrent in 70% of the patients, recurrent in 26% and persistent in 4%.A vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB é das vestibulopatias mais comuns. OBJETIVO: Verificar a recorrência e a persistência da VPPB no período de um ano em pacientes que foram tratados com manobras de reposicionamento de estatocônios (MRE. FORMA DE ESTUDO: coorte contemporânea longitudinal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Cem pacientes com VPPB foram acompanhados durante 12 meses após o tratamento com MRE. Os pacientes foram classificados de acordo com a evolução da doença no período de um ano. O protocolo de fisioterapia aquática para reabilitação vestibular (FARV foi aplicado nos pacientes com VPPB persistente. RESULTADOS: Após as MRE, 96% dos pacientes aboliram o nistagmo e a vertigem de posicionamento. Destes pacientes, 26 apresentaram recorrência da VPPB, no período de um ano. Em 4% dos pacientes, a VPPB foi persistente. Os pacientes com VPPB persistente apresentaram melhora clínica após a realização da FARV. CONCLUS

  18. Características audiológicas de idosos com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna Audiologic features of elderly with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali Singaretti Moreno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB é uma das causas mais comuns de tontura, sendo a desordem vestibular mais comum em idosos vertiginosos. Seu quadro clínico característico é tontura ao movimentar a cabeça, com ausência de alterações auditivas. OBJETIVO: Este trabalho tem como objetivo verificar as características audiológicas de idosos com VPPB de canal posterior. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma análise retrospectiva de exames de audiometria tonal limiar de 37 idosos com VPPB de canal posterior e de 37 idosos sem nenhuma queixa de tontura e/ou vertigem, sendo observadas as características audiológicas dos dois grupos estudados. RESULTADOS: Ambos os grupos apresentaram altos índices de perda auditiva, sendo observada, predominantemente, perda auditiva do tipo neurossensorial descendente, não havendo diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Diante desses dados, podemos concluir que a VPPB de canal posterior não tem influência sobre as características da perda auditiva em idosos, porém, devido à degeneração espontânea do sistema vestíbulo-coclear, tal população tem prevalência de perda auditiva.Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common causes of dizziness; it constitutes the most common vestibular disorder in the elderly with vertigo. Its characteristic clinical aspect is dizziness at head movement, with not hearing alteration. AIM: This paper aims at studying the audiologic characteristics of elderly with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of threshold tonal audiometry exams of 37 senior citizens with posterior semicircular canal BPPV and also of 37 elderly without complaints of dizziness and/or vertigo, and we studied the audiologic characteristics of the two groups. RESULTS: Both groups had high rates of hearing loss, especially the descending curve sensorineural type, and

  19. The evaluation of anxiety and panic agarophobia scores in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on initial presentation and at the follow-up visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Serif Samil; Arli, Cengiz; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Colak, Sait

    2017-05-01

    Patients with BPPV experienced short but intense anxiety and/or panic disorder, especially at the initial visit, but most patients recovered without medication with successful treatment. Recent studies have shown that people with dizziness report some psychological problems such as panic and agoraphobia and anxiety. The aim of this study was to evaluate anxiety and panic agorophobia levels in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo on initial presentation and at the follow-up visit and compare the scores with the control group. All the 32 patients in the study had a diagnosis of BPPV confirmed by their history, typical subjective symptom reports, and characteristic positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike test and/or Roll test. The patients were instructed to complete the standard forms of Beck anxiety inventory and panic agoraphobia scale questionnaire before and at 7 and 14 days after the canalith repositioning treatment. The validity scores of panic agoraphobia were statistically significantly higher in patients with BPPV than in the control group in each period (p < .001) and the validity scores of the Beck anxiety inventory were statistically significantly higher in patients with BPPV than in the control group at the first and second evaluation (p < .001).

  20. [The importance of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials for the assessment of the otolith function in the patients presenting with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunel'skaya, N L; Baybakova, E V; Guseva, A L; Chugunova, M A; Manaenkova, E A

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the otolith function in the patients presenting with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (pBPPV) attributable to the occlusion of the posterior semicircular canal (PSCC) of the inner ear with the use of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). Cervical (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) were measured in 34 patients with idiopathic pBPPV before and 7 days after the treatment by means of reposition maneuvers. The results of the repeated Dix-Hallpike test performed 7 days after the repositioning maneuver were negative in 27 patients and positive in 7 patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the amplitude of cervical VEMP between the healthy and affected ears either before or after the repositioning treatment. The measurement of oVEMP revealed a reduction of the response amplitude on the affected side. The average values of the plnl on the healthy side were 12.84±1.09 and those on the affected side 4.62±0.69 (potolith function.

  1. Manobras de reposicionamento no tratamento da vertigem paroxística posicional benigna Treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with repositioning manevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto A. Maia

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Vertigem paroxística posicional benigna (VPPB é uma das mais freqüentes patologias do sistema vestibular. Caracteriza-se clinicamente pela presença de episódios recorrentes de tonturas rotatórias, tipicamente desencadeados por determinados movimentos cefálicos, realizados pelo paciente. A confirmação diagnóstica é obtida exclusivamente pela manobra de Dix-Hallpike. Nessa manobra, observa-se sistematicamente o desencadeamento de nistagmo. Forma de estudo: Prospectivo clínico não randomizado. Material e método: No total, sete pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de VPPB são submetidos a tratamento pela manobra de reposicionamento de Epley. Resultado: Desses sete pacientes avaliados, cinco apresentaram ótima recuperação; dois, com resultado bom; e um, com mau resultado; para este último caso, outras formas de tratamento são apresentadas. Conclusão: O exame otoneurológico, realizado em todos os pacientes, demonstrou ser de interessante valor prognóstico quanto ao resultado do tratamento proposto. A manobra de reposicionamento de Epley demonstrou ser um método de tratamento da VPPB simples, e eficaz na grande maioria dos pacientes aqui relatados.Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is among the most common vestibular disorders. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of vertigo induced by changes in head position. The condition is readly diagnosed by performing the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Nystagmus is always present by this way. Study design: Prospective results clinical not randomized. Material and method: A total of seven patients diagnosed with BPPV received the repositioning maneuver of Epley. Five out of seven patients had excellent recovery, two patients had good results and one had a bad result. For this last one different treatments are discussed. Conclusion: We performed otoneurological examination in all patients; this test seems to be an intersting prognosis method for seeking the

  2. Clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo Vertigem posicional paroxística benigna: caracterização clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Azevedo Caldas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV is considered as the most common vestibular disease. AIM: to evaluate the age, gender, type and site of the lesion, association with other vestibular diseases, progression, and recurrence in these patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A retrospective series study. Data from medical reports of BPPV patients examined in series during the past six years were analyzed. RESULTS: prevalences of BPPV were: at age 41-60 years (42.2 %; in females (62.8 %, wit nystagmus and positioning vertigo (81.3%; affecting the posterior canal (87%, unilateral (91.8 %, the right labyrinth (60.2% - pA vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB é considerada a mais comum das vestibulopatias. OBJETIVO: Avaliar pacientes com VPPB quanto à idade, gênero, tipo e localização da lesão, associação com outras vestibulopatias, dados evolutivos e recorrência. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de séries retrospectivo. Foram analisados os prontuários de 1271 pacientes consecutivos examinados nos últimos seis anos com VPPB. RESULTADOS: A VPPB apresentou prevalência de faixa etária entre 41 e 60 anos (42,2%, gênero feminino (62,8%, presença de nistagmo e vertigem de posicionamento (81,3%, comprometimento do canal posterior (87,0%; p<0,001, unilateral (91,8%, do labirinto direito (60,2%; p<0,001, por ductolitíase (97,5%, forma idiopática (74,8%, associação com a doença de Ménière em relação a outras afecções (55,4%; p<0,001, cura ou melhora por meio de manobra de reposicionamento de partículas (77,9%; e pela possibilidade de recorrência (21,8%, em um ano de acompanhamento. CONCLUSÃO: A VPPB é caracterizada pela prevalência de faixa etária entre 41 e 60 anos, gênero feminino, presença de nistagmo e vertigem de posicionamento, comprometimento do canal posterior unilateral do labirinto direito por ductolitíase, forma idiopática, associação com a doença de Ménière em relação a outras afecções, cura ou melhora

  3. Active head rotation in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo Da rotação cefálica ativa na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most common vestibular diseases and the active head rotation test one of the most modern methods of vestibular function assessment. AIM: this study aims to verify if the active head rotation test may reveal signs of horizontal and/or vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex dysfunction in vertigo patients suspected for BPPV. STUDY DESIGN: retrospective series study. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Neurotological evaluation including computerized electronystagmography and active head rotation on the horizontal and vertical axes were conducted in 100 patients suspected for BPPV patients. Results: Isolated or associated abnormalities of the horizontal and/or vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex gain, phase and symmetry were indicative of vestibular involvement and found in 77.0% of the BPPV patients. CONCLUSION: the active head rotation test revealed horizontal and/or vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex dysfunctions in a relevant number of BPPV patients.A vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB corresponde a uma das vestibulopatias mais comuns e a rotação cefálica ativa um dos métodos mais modernos de avaliação da função vestibular. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desta pesquisa foi verificar se a prova de rotação cefálica ativa pode revelar sinais de disfunção do reflexo vestíbulo-ocular horizontal e/ou vertical em pacientes vertiginosos com hipótese diagnóstica de VPPB. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Estudo de série retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Uma avaliação otoneurológica incluindo a eletronistagmografia computadorizada e a prova de rotação cefálica ativa, no plano horizontal e vertical foi conduzida em 100 pacientes com hipótese diagnóstica de VPPB. Resultados: Alterações isoladas ou associadas de ganho, fase e assimetria do reflexo vestíbulo-ocular horizontal e/ou vertical, foram os achados indicativos de comprometimento vestibular em 77,0% dos casos de VPPB. CONCLUSÃO: A prova de rota

  4. Nystagmus intensity and direction in bow and lean test: an aid to diagnosis of lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, V

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to evaluate nystagmus intensity and direction (NID) during bow and lean test (BLT) in subjects suffering from idiopathic lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (LSC-BPPV), in order to differentiate between the geotropic and the apogeotropic form and to determine the affected ear before using classic diagnostic procedures. The BLT was performed in 32 subjects affected by LSC-BPPV. "Nystagmus intensity" evaluation allows distinguishing the geotropic variant from the apogeotropic one, while the "nystagmus direction" allows identification of the side. In particular, a more intense nystagmus in the bow position compared to the lean position indicates an ampullipetal flow caused by the presence of free-floating particles in the non-ampullary arm, and is suggestive of geotropic form. In this case, if the nystagmus in the bow position is left beating, the free-floating particles necessarily occupy the left LSC non-ampullary arm, while a right-beating nystagmus indicates the right LSC involvement. In contrast, a more intense nystagmus in the lean position compared to the bow position indicates an ampullifugal flow due to the presence of particles adherent to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) or free-floating in the ampullary arm (canalolithiasis), suggesting an apogeotropic form. In this situation, if the nystagmus in the lean position is left beating, the particles are in the left LSC ampullar arm or are coated on the left LSC cupula; vice versa, a right-beating nystagmus in the lean position is suggestive of the involvement of the right LSC. As a general rule, in both forms the direction of the more intense nystagmus points to the affected side. "NID-BLT" was effective in identifying the form and the side in 22/28 subjects (79% of the study population). The proper execution and interpretation of the "NID-BLT" helps to establish the form (geotropic versus apogeotropic) and side (right versus left) in most cases of LSC-BPPV. Unlike

  5. The effects of abnormality of cVEMP and oVEMP on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinabadi, Reza; Pourbakht, Akram; Yazdani, Nasrin; Kouhi, Ali; Kamali, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The presence of utricular and saccular dysfunction impairs quality of life (QoL) in patients. The aims of the present study were to examine the effect of repositioning maneuvers on QoL of patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to describe the effect of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) or ocular VEMP (oVEMP) abnormalities on patient recovery after rehabilitation. Thirty idiopathic BPPV patients with/without otolith dysfunctions (n = 15, each group) were included in this clinical trial study. Otolith dysfunction was determined using oVEMP and cVEMP abnormalities. EcochG and caloric tests were performed to rule out other causes of secondary BPPV. The QoL in groups of patients with idiopathic BPPV was assessed using a Persian version of the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI-P) before and after treatment with Epley's maneuver. Pre-treatment results showed significant handicaps in both groups. DHI-P scores were higher in BPPV patients with otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 34.13, 11.20, 7.06, 15.86, respectively) than those in patients without otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 25.46, 7.86, 6.13, 11.46, respectively, P < 0.05). After treatment, DHI-P scores decreased in both groups. However, in the otolith dysfunction group, DHI-P scores (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 9.20, 3.33, 1.33, 4.53, respectively) were higher than those in patients without otolith dysfunction (total, functional, emotional, physical score: 4.13, 0.93, 1.06, 2.00, respectively). In BPPV patients with cVEMP or oVEMP abnormalities, QoL is more compromised in comparison with that in BPPV patients without these dysfunctions. Otolith dysfunction enhances the negative effects of BPPV on QoL.

  6. Posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Roberta Gesteira Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A posturografia tem sido utilizada na avaliação de pacientes com vestibulopatias. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o equilíbrio corporal à posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM em pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB. Desenho de Estudo: Caso controle prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo transversal controlado em 45 pacientes com VPPB e por um grupo controle homogêneo constituído de 45 indivíduos hígidos. Os pacientes foram submetidos à avaliação otoneurológica, incluindo a posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM. RESULTADOS: A média dos valores da área de elipse e da velocidade de oscilação no grupo experimental foi significantemente maior (p Posturography has been used in the evaluation of patients with vestibular disorders. AIM: To evaluate balance control with the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography in patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Study design: Prospective case-control. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional controlled study was carried out in 45 patients with BPPV, and a homogeneous control group consisting of 45 healthy individuals. Patients were submitted to a balance function evaluation by means of the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography. RESULTS: The mean values of the ellipse area and the sway velocity in a firm surface and saccadic stimulation (p = 0.060. CONCLUSION: The Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography enables to identify postural control abnormalities in patients with BPPV.

  7. Clinical decision-making to address poor outcomes in persistent horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian M

    2017-05-01

    Horizontal semicircular canal BPPV (HSC-BPPV) can occur in 10-30% of BPPV cases. Lower success rates are reported for HSC-BPPV. The apogeotropic form of HSC-BPPV is more difficult to treat, as 5-40% of cases are described to be refractory to repositioning maneuvers. To describe the assessment and treatment of a patient presenting with HSC-BPPV and to demonstrate the potential use of Forced-Prolonged Positioning (FPP) as a home exercise program (HEP) for persistent HSC-BPPV in an elderly patient. An 89-year-old female referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of BPPV. She experienced dizziness with positional changes and was found to have apogeotropic form of HSC-BPPV. To supplement maneuvers performed in the clinic, the patient was provided instructions for the FPP as her HEP. With continued symptoms and positive positional tests by week four of treatment, the patient was instructed to switch the FPP with the opposing ear directed toward the floor. Following 2 weeks of performing FPP on the opposite side, the patient reported symptoms had resolved and positional testing confirmed resolution of HSC-BPPV. There is a potential benefit of using FPP as a HEP to supplement maneuvers used in the clinic to improve outcomes in patients with HSC-BPPV that are refractory to traditional repositioning maneuvers. Prescribing the FPP maneuver as a HEP is feasible, and clinicians should consider the FPP technique as a HEP to adjunct repositioning maneuvers performed in the clinic to address persistent HSC-BPPV.

  8. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: comparison of two recent international guidelines Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna: comparação de duas recentes diretrizes internacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís dos Santos Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is characterized by vertigo, lasting for a few seconds and usually managed by head positioning maneuvers. To educate clinicians concerning the state-of-the art knowledge about its management, the international societies developed guidelines. AIM: the aim of this paper is to discuss, in a practical fashion, the current options available to manage BPPV. METHOD: Study design: non-systematic review. This study reviews two recent guidelines regarding the evaluation and treatment of BPPV. The first one was published by the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck surgery (AAO-HNS and the other by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN. The similarities were presented in different tables. RESULTS: Those guidelines presented differences regarding methods. Only the AAO-HNS guidelines recommend the Dix-Hallpike test for the diagnosis of BPPV. Only canalith repositioning maneuver, Semont maneuver and vestibular rehabilitation had showed some benefit and were recommended as good treatment options. CONCLUSIONS: Both guidelines fulfilled all the aspects required for clinicians to diagnosed and manage BPPV; only the AAO-HNS's guidelines were more comprehensive and of better quality.A Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB é caracterizada por tontura rotatória com duração de segundos e tratada com manobras cefálicas. Para sistematizar a conduta e conduzir os clínicos no atual conhecimento no seu controle, sociedades internacionais desenvolveram diretrizes. OBJETIVO: Discutir de forma prática e didática o estado da arte da abordagem atualmente disponível para VPPB. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Revisão assistemática com análise crítica comparando os resultados de duas recentes diretrizes internacionais a respeito da avaliação e controle da VPPB. Uma pesquisa foi elaborada pela American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO-HNS e a outra preparada pela American Academy of Neurology (AAN. Os tópicos em

  9. Vertigem posicional paroxística benigna sem nistagmo: diagnóstico e tratamento Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo without nystagmus: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Assumpção Alvarenga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O aparecimento do nistagmo nos testes para diagnosticar a VPPB ainda é considerado importante na caracterização clínica da VPPB. Contudo, na prática cotidiana, existem casos de vertigem gerada pelos movimentos cefálicos, que não se acompanham deste sinal na manobra de Dix-Hallpike e no teste de girar. OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a VPPB sem nistagmo, bem como a condução terapêutica nesta situação. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Revisão não sistemática do diagnóstico e tratamento da Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB sem nistagmo nos sites e nas bases de dados PUBMED, Registro de Estudos Controlados Cochrane, SCIELO, BIREME, MEDLINE e LILACS referentes aos anos entre 2001 e 2009. RESULTADOS: Foram localizados nove artigos que abordam a VPPB sem nistagmo, cujo diagnóstico foi baseado exclusivamente na história clínica e no exame físico. O tratamento da VPPB sem nistagmo foi realizado pelas manobras de Epley, Sémont, liberatória modificada para canal semicircular posterior e exercícios de Brandt-Daroff. CONCLUSÃO: De 50% a 97,1% dos pacientes com VPPB sem nistagmo tiveram remissão dos sintomas, enquanto, nos pacientes com VPPB com nistagmo, a remissão dos sintomas variou de 76% a 100%, diferenças que podem não ser significativas, o que demonstra a necessidade de mais estudos sobre a VPPB sem nistagmo.Nystagmus tests to diagnose BPPV are still relevant in the clinical evaluation of BPPV. However, in everyday practice, there are cases of vertigo caused by head movements, which do not follow this sign in the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and the turn test. AIM: To characterize BPPV without nystagmus and treatment for it. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A non-systematic review of diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV without nystagmus in the PubMed, SciELO, Cochrane, BIREME, LILACS and MEDLINE databases in the years between 2001 and 2009. RESULTS: We found nine papers dealing with BPPV without nystagmus, whose

  10. Efficacy of cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of posterior semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Apeksha, Kumari

    2016-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) constitutes a major proportion of the population with peripheral vestibulopathies. Although the freely floating otoconia within the semicircular canals is responsible for the symptoms of BPPV, the source of the otoconia debris is mainly believed to be the otolith organs. Therefore, the pathology in either or both the otolith organs appears a logical proposition. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP), being the tests for functional integrity of the otolith organs, appear promising for investigating otolith involvement in BPPV. While recent evidences are suggestive of equivocal findings for cVEMP, there are only a few studies on oVEMP. Additionally, both these potentials have never been explored in the same set of individuals with BPPV. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the functional integrity of the otolith organs through cVEMP and oVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV. Thirty-one individuals with unilateral posterior canal BPPV and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent 500 Hz tone-burst-evoked cVEMP and oVEMP. The results demonstrated no significant group difference on any of the cVEMP parameters (p > 0.05). A similar trend was noticed for the latency-related parameters of oVEMP. However, the peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly smaller in the affected ears of individuals with BPPV than their unaffected ears and the ears of healthy controls (p < 0.05). The BPPV group showed significantly higher inter-aural amplitude difference ratio than the healthy controls (p < 0.05). Further, the sensitivity and specificity of oVEMP were also found to be far superior to those of cVEMP. Thus, the outcome of the present study revealed involvement of utricle rather than saccule in posterior canal BPPV, and therefore, oVEMP appears to be better suited to clinical investigation than cVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV.

  11. [The relationship between the recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and the level of bone mineral as well as estrogen in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y M; Yang, Z D; Li, W X; Shi, C; Yu, Y F

    2017-12-07

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo(BPPV) and the levels of bone mineral density(BMD) and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 38 postmenopausal women with recurrent BPPV were recruited as study group, in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University from December 2013 to June 2017. Meanwhile, 49 normal menopausal women were included as control. All patients were natural menopausal for over one year.The patients were diagnosed as BPPV based on results of Dix-Hallpike test and Roll-test, with at least two episodes of recurrent onset. In the subjects, BMD was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry of lumbar vertebrae. Estrogen levels were obtained by testing serum estradiol (E2) levels in early morning fasting venous blood. In the present study, we compared the level of E2 and the value of BMD in two groups by SPSS 21.0. In the study group, patients with decreased BMD were divided into two groups: treatment and untreated group. The recurrence rate of BPPV was compared between the two groups within 12 months. Results: ①The averagel levels of E2 and BMD in the study group were (16.21±11.00)ng/L and -1.68±0.98) respectively, which were significantly lower than those in the control group ( t value was 7.03 and 8.05 respectively, both P <0.05). The averagel levels of E2 and BMD incontrol group were(28.52±6.34)ng/L and -0.18±0.77 respectively. ②The number of patients with decreased BMD in the study group (30 cases) was more than that in control group (6 cases), and the difference was statistically significant ( P <0.05). ③ The recurrence rate of BPPV in treatment group [17.6%(3/17)] was significantly lower than that of untreated group [61.5%(8/13)], and the difference was statistically significant ( P <0.05). Conclusion: Recurrent BPPV in postmenopausal women usually accompany with low levels of estrogen and BMD. Active treatment is helpful for their recurrence of BPPV.

  12. Resultados do Balance Rehabilitation Unit na Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna Results from the Balance Rehabilitation Unit in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Akemi Kasse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A posturografia é um instrumento útil e novo para o estudo da influência das doenças vestibulares no equilíbrio corporal. OBJETIVO: Comparar os resultados da posturografia estática do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU em idosos com Vertigem Postural Paroxística Benigna (VPPB pré e pós a manobra de Epley. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo de 20 pacientes idosos com diagnóstico de VPPB. Os pacientes foram submetidos à posturografia estática do BRU, e o limite de estabilidade (LE e a área de elipse foram medidos. Aplicou-se também o questionário "Dizziness Handicap Inventory" versão brasileira (DHI para verificar a eficácia do tratamento. RESULTADOS: 80% pacientes eram do gênero feminino, com a média etária de 68,15 anos. Após a manobra, o LE aumentou significantemente (p=0,001. A área de elipse nas condições de conflitos sensoriais, visuais e vestibulares da BRU (condições 2,7,8,9 e o escore do DHI diminuíram significantemente (pPosturography is a useful new tool to study the influence of vestibular diseases on balance. AIM: to compare the results from the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU static posturography in elderly patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV, before and after Epley's maneuver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: a prospective study of 20 elderly patients with a diagnosis of BPPV. The patients underwent static posturography and the limit of stability (LE and ellipse area were measured. We also applied the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI questionnaire to study treatment effectiveness. RESULTS: 80% were females, with a mean age of 68.15 years. After the maneuver, the LE increased significantly (p=0.001. The elliptical area of somatosensory, visual and vestibular conflicts (2,7,8,9 situations in BRU and the DHI scores decreased significantly (p<0.05 after treatment. CONCLUSION: the study suggests that elderly patients with BPPV may present static postural control impairment and that the maneuver

  13. Quantas manobras são necessárias para abolir o nistagmo na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna? The number of procedures required to eliminate positioning nystagmus in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schaffeln Dorigueto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o número de manobras necessárias para abolir o nistagmo posicional em pacientes com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna e verificar possíveis influências do substrato fisiopatológico e/ou canal semicircular acometido. FORMA DE ESTUDO: clínico prospectivo com coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Sessenta pacientes com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna foram tratados por meio das manobras de reposicionamento de estatocônios, repetidas semanalmente até a abolição do nistagmo. A Análise de Variância foi aplicada para verificar diferenças entre as variáveis dos fatores "substrato fisiopatológico" e "canal semicircular acometido". RESULTADOS: Foram necessárias de 1 a 8 manobras, em média 2,13 para abolir o nistagmo posicional. A cupulolitíase necessitou de um número maior de manobras que a ductolitíase (p=0,0002* e não houve diferença entre os canais semicirculares (p=0,5213. Nos canais anterior e posterior, a ductolitíase precisou em média de uma a duas manobras e a cupulolitíase precisou em média de três manobras. No canal lateral, tanto a ductolitíase quanto a cupulolitíase precisaram de duas manobras, em média. CONCLUSÕES: São necessárias de uma a oito manobras semanais de reposicionamento de estatocônios, em média duas, para eliminar o nistagmo posicional na Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna. A cupulolitíase necessita de maior número de manobras que a ductolitíase. O canal semicircular acometido não influencia o número de manobras terapêuticas.AIM: To evaluate the number of weekly canalith repositioning procedures needed to eliminate positioning nystagmus in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and to verify influences of canalithiasis or cupulolithiasis and/or semicircular canal involvement. STUDY DESIGN: clinical prospective with transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Sixty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were consecutively

  14. Reabilitação Vestibular em portadores de Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna Vestibular rehabilitation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Simão de Melo Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar, por meio do questionário handicap de tontura, o efeito de um protocolo de Reabilitação Vestibular (RV em portadores de Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB sete dias após primeira intervenção e seis meses após a segunda intervenção. MÉTODO: pacientes submetidos à confirmação diagnóstica de VPPB pela positividade da manobra Dix-Hallpike foram avaliados (coleta pelo questionário Dizziness Handicap Inventory - brasileiro (DHI-brasileiro, antes da primeira intervenção, após a segunda (intervalo de sete dias e seis meses após a segunda intervenção. As intervenções constavam de relaxamento cervical, manobra de Epley e restrições posturais e foram aplicadas logo após a primeira avaliação e antes da segunda avaliação, com intervalo de sete dias. Os resultados obtidos foram submetidos à análise estatística. RESULTADOS: nove mulheres com média de 63 anos (desvio padrão 4,6 fizeram parte da amostra. Foram encontradas as seguintes pontuações no DHI-brasileiro: Aspecto Físico - apresentou média na coleta 1 de 2,6a(±0,17; coleta 2 de 0,82b (±0,24; coleta 3 de 1,43b(±0,43 com pPURPOSE: to evaluate, by means of the dizziness handicap questionnaire, the effect of a Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR protocol in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, seven days after the first intervention and six months after the second intervention. METHOD: patients undergoing BPPV diagnosis confirmation by a positive Dix-Hallpike maneuver were assessed (collection by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory - Brazilian (DHI-Brazilian before the first intervention, after the second (seven day interval and six months after the second one. The interventions consisted of cervical relaxation, Epley and postural restrictions were applied after the first assessment and before the second evaluation, with an interval of seven days. The results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: nine women with an average

  15. Manobra de Epley na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna associada à doença de Ménière Epley’s maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with Meniere’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Freitas Ganança

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos da manobra de Epley na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB associada à doença de Ménière são controvertidos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a vertigem e o nistagmo de posicionamento após uma ou mais manobras de Epley na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB associada à doença de Ménière e na recorrência da VPPB. MATERISL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo de 62 pacientes com VPPB associada à doença de Ménière submetidos à manobra de Epley e acompanhados durante 12 meses após a extinção do nistagmo de posicionamento. RESULTADOS: Para abolir o nistagmo de posicionamento, foi necessária uma manobra de Epley em 80,7% dos pacientes, duas em 16,1% e três em 3,2%. A vertigem foi eliminada em 71,0% dos pacientes, melhorou em 27,4% e permaneceu inalterada em 1,6%. Quatro semanas após a extinção do nistagmo de posicionamento, todos os pacientes ficaram assintomáticos. Recorrência da VPPB foi observada em 19,4% dos casos, com eliminação da vertigem e nistagmo de posicionamento à manobra específica para o canal afetado. CONCLUSÕES: Na VPPB associada à doença de Ménière, vertigem e nistagmo de posicionamento foram eliminados com uma, duas ou três manobras de Epley. A recorrência da VPPB foi resolvida com uma manobra para o canal envolvido.The effects of Epley’s maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV associated with Menière’s disease are controversial. AIMS: To evaluate the progression of positional vertigo and nystagmus after one or more of Epley’s maneuvers in BPPV associated with Menière’s disease, and the recurrence of BPPV. METHOD: a retrospective study of 62 patients with BPPV associated with Menière’s disease, that underwent Epley’s maneuver, and that were monitored during 12 months after elimination of positional nystagmus. RESULTS: One Epley’s maneuver was required to eliminate positional nystagmus in 80.7% of the patients, two in 16.1%, and three in 3.2%; after

  16. Vascular Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Hashemilar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint in neurology and medicine. The most common causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s disease, and vascular disorders. Vertigo of vascular origin is usually limited to migraine, transient ischemic attacks, and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Vascular causes lead to various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo. This review provides an overview of epidemiology and clinical syndromes of vascular vertigo. Vertigo is an illusion of movement caused by asymmetrical involvement of the vestibular system by various causes. Migraine is the most frequent vascular disorder that causes vertigo in all age groups. Vertigo may occur in up to 25% of patients with migraine. The lifetime prevalence of migrainous vertigo is almost 1%. Cerebrovascular disorders are estimated to account for 3% to 7% of patients with vertigo. Vestibular paroxysmia has been diagnosed in 1.8% to 4% of cases in various dizziness units. Vasculitic disorders are rare in the general population, but vertigo may be seen in almost up to 50% of patients with different vasculitic syndromes. Conclusions: Migraine, cerebrovascular disorders especially involving the vertebrobasilar territory, cardiocirculatory diseases, neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve, and vasculitis are vascular causes of vertigo syndromes.

  17. Neurally mediated syncope presenting with paroxysmal positional vertigo and tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Iwao; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2012-10-01

    A 72-year-old man with positional vertigo and tinnitus was referred to us. He did not want to perform provoking test except once due to his fear. No positional nystagmus was provoked. He found that his attacks usually occurred when he lay on his right ear. From his clinical history, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was suspected. Conventional pharmacotherapy as well as non-specific physical therapy did not have significant effect. His feeling of positional vertigo with pyrosis was actually presyncope. We suspected cardiovascular disorders, and referred him to a cardiologist. Portable cardiogram monitoring revealed paroxysmal bradycardia. He was diagnosed with neurally mediated syncope, and a pacemaker was implanted. His paroxysmal dizziness soon disappeared. It is important to study the clinical history of the patients in detail, as they are not always able to accurately explain their symptoms. We should carefully rule out cardiovascular disorders, especially when we see the patients with suspected BPPV without the characteristic positional nystagmus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical evaluation of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical peripheral vestibular disorder which may involve any of the three semicircular canals but principally the posterior. In as much as the literature has described theories to explain the mechanism of BPPV and also contains scholarly works that elucidate ...

  19. Efeito da manobra de Epley na qualidade de vida dos pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Effect of Epley's maneuver on the quality of life of paroxismal positional benign vertigo patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Botelho Pereira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A vertigem produz impactos significativos na qualidade de vida (QV. É necessário mensurar os efeitos das terapêuticas antivertiginosas na QV. OBJETIVO: Investigar o efeito da manobra de reposicionamento na qualidade de vida de pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo, através da revisão dos prontuários de 21 pacientes com VPPB atendidos no serviço de Reabilitação Vestibular (RV de uma clínica escola de Belo Horizonte atendidos em 2007-2008. Foram analisados os escores físicos, funcionais e emocionais, pré e pós-terapia de RV com realização de manobras de reposicionamento de Epley, por meio do questionário Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, específico para avaliação da interferência da tontura na QV. RESULTADOS: O intervalo mediano entre as avaliações foi de 21 dias. O número médio de manobras foi 2,3±1,1. A aplicação do DHI mostrou um significante impacto da VPPB na QV dos pacientes em todas as dimensões da vida diária, com os seguintes escores médios pré e pós-terapia: físico (17,5/3,7, funcional (17,3/3,9, emocional (13,2/3,2 e total (48,1/10,9, respectivamente (pQuality of life (QoL is significantly impaired by vertigo. The effect of specific treatments on QoL deserves investigation. AIM: To assess the effect of repositioning maneuvers on the QoL of benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study design consiting of reviews of charts of BPPV patients in a vestibular rehabilitation unit at a teaching institution in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, from 2007 to 2008. Pre- and post-therapy (Epley's repositioning maneuver scores on the physical, functional and emotional dimensions of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included, eighteen (86% were females; the average age was 53.2 years. Ten patients presented bilateral BPPV; in eleven it was unilateral

  20. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Møller, Martin Nue

    2016-01-01

    %) experienced relapse within the ½-year follow-up period. Horizontal cupulolithiasis and multi-canal affection constituted the most resilient cases. The literature search identified 9 repositioning chair studies. The EO and the TRV are highly valuable assets in diagnosis and management of BPPV of particularly...

  1. Aspectos clínicos e funcionais do equilíbrio corporal em idosos com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Clinical and functional aspects of body balance in elderly subjects with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Patricia Vaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB pode alterar o equilíbrio corporal em pacientes idosos. OBJETIVO: Observar os efeitos da manobra de Epley em idosos com VPPB, avaliando os aspectos clínicos e funcionais do equilíbrio corporal. Forma de estudo: clínico e prospectivo. MÉTODO: Após o diagnóstico da doença (teste de DixHallpike, os testes Time Up and Go (TUGT, Clinical test of Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB e o teste de membros inferiores (MMI foram realizados antes e após a manobra de reposicionamento de Epley modificada. RESULTADOS: O gênero feminino foi o mais prevalente e a média etária foi de 70,10 anos (DP = 7,00. Todos os pacientes apresentaram ductolitíase de canal posterior. Os seguintes sintomas melhoraram após a manobra: a instabilidade postural (p = 0,006, náusea e vômito (p = 0,021 e zumbido (p = 0,003. Em relação ao TUGT e o escore do teste de MMII, observou-se diminuição significante do tempo pós-manobra de Epley (p Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV may compromise the balance of elderly subjects. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of the Epley maneuver in elderly subjects with BPPV and assess clinical and functional aspects of body balance. METHOD: This is a prospective clinical study. Patients diagnosed with BPPV (Dix-Hallpike test were submitted to the Timed Up & Go (TUG test, the Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB, and lower limb testing before and after they were repositioned using the modified Epley maneuver. RESULTS: Most subjects were females, and the group's mean age was 70.10 years (SD = 7.00. All patients had canalithiasis of the posterior canal. The following symptoms improved after the maneuver: postural instability (p = 0.006, nausea and vomiting (p = 0.021, and tinnitus (p = 0.003. Subjects improved their times significantly in the TUG and lower limb tests after the Epley maneuver (p < 0.001. Patients performed better on the CTSIB after the Epley

  2. Manobras para o tratamento da vertigem posicional paroxística benigna: revisão sistemática da literatura Maneuvers for the treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Juliano Teixeira

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB é uma das mais freqüentes patologias do sistema vestibular e é caracterizada por episódios de vertigens recorrentes desencadeados por movimentos da cabeça ou mudanças posturais. Há várias opções para o seu tratamento, porém as efetividades terapêuticas das mesmas permanecem controversas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a efetividade terapêutica das manobras específicas disponíveis para o tratamento da VPPB. METODOLOGIA: Realizou-se uma busca eletrônica nas principais bases de dados, selecionando-se estudos clínicos randomizados envolvendo adultos com diagnóstico de VPPB confirmado com o teste de Dix-Hallpike e tratamento com manobras específicas (Epley ou Semont, por exemplo. Considerou-se como desfecho clínico a negativação do teste de Dix-Hallpike e a melhora das queixas subjetivas. Agruparam-se em metanálise os estudos com Escala de Jadad igual ou superior a três. RESULTADOS: Cinco estudos clínicos preencheram os critérios de inclusão, ou seja, ensaios randomizados de fase I comparando a manobra de Epley com placebos e controles. A metanálise mostra evidência dos efeitos benéficos da manobra de Epley para o tratamento do canal semicircular posterior (magnitude do efeito de 0,11 [IC 95% 0.05, 0.26] de melhora objetiva (Dix-Halpike após uma semana, 0.24 [IC 95% 0.13, 0.45] após um mês e 0.16 [IC 95% 0.08, 0.33] de melhora referida pelos pacientes após a primeira semana. CONCLUSÃO: Evidencia-se boa eficácia clínica da manobra de Epley para o tratamento da VPPB do canal semicircular posterior. Contrariamente, trabalhos com a manobra de Semont e as propostas de manejo dos demais canais semicirculares não obtiveram qualidade metodológica satisfatória, não sendo possível demonstrar a efetividade dos mesmos.Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most frequent diseases of the vestibular system and it is characterized by episodes of recurrent vertigo

  3. Bilateral posterior semicircular canal aplasia and atypical paroxysmal positional vertigo: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, LE; Nath, V; Krombach, GA; Di Martino, E

    2008-01-01

    Summary Isolated congenital malformations of semicircular canals are rare abnormalities. Most inner ear abnormalities occur in syndromes and are associated with hearing loss. Unilateral or bilateral single aplasia of one semicircular canal does not usually result in vertigo, but these become clinically important if there are clinical complaints of vertigo. Computed tomography imaging and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging may reveal inner ear abnormalities. The case is presented here of a 46-year-old male with a 10-year history of recurrent positional vertigo with strong onset when changing position to the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear showed a bilateral posterior semicircular canal aplasia as well as an enlarged vestibule on both sides. Dix-Hallpike positional manoeuvre revealed a positional nystagmus in the left head-hanging position of short duration and latency of a few seconds. When rising, vertigo occurred, but no nystagmus was visible. The fast phase of the nystagmus was mainly vertical down-beating with a slight torsional component to the uppermost ear. Although benign paroxysmal vertigo of the anterior canal was suspected, physical therapy was not effective using a modified liberatory manoeuvre. Brandt-Daroff therapy was effective permanently. PMID:18669072

  4. Paroxysmal positional vertigo despite complete vestibular impairment: the role of instrumental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casani, A P; Cerchiai, N; Navari, E

    2018-02-28

    Lindsay and Hemenway syndrome is characterised by a posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following a partial unilateral vestibular loss affecting the same side. The syndrome is caused by damage of structures innervated by the superior division of the vestibular nerve and perfused by the anterior vestibular artery; the detached otoconia can cause vertigo in the still intact posterior semicircular canal. The most recent vestibular instrumental techniques allow reaching an accurate topodiagnosis in case of peripheral vestibular failure. We report on two cases of Lindsay-Hemenway syndrome despite complete vestibular failure demonstrated by vestibular instrumental assessment. After making some critical considerations on these findings, we underline the importance of not disregarding the diagnosis of paroxysmal positional vertigo in an established complete labyrinthine loss of function. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  5. Onset of positional vertigo during exposure to combined G loading and chest-to-spine vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Dorion B; Adelstein, Bernard D; Stone, Leland S

    2014-02-01

    Aerospace environments commonly expose pilots to vibration and sustained acceleration, alone and in combination. Of 16 experimental research participants, 3 reported symptoms of vertigo and signs of torsional nystagmus during or shortly following exposure to sustained chest-to-spine (+3.8 Gx) acceleration (G loading) and chest-to-spine (0.5 g(x)) vibration in the 8-16 Hz band. Two of the participants reported intermittent vertigo for up to 2 wk, were diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and were treated successfully with the Epley Maneuver. On a follow-up survey, a third participant reported transient BPPV-like vertigo, which resolved spontaneously. The follow-up survey also prompted participants to self-report other effects following research protocol exposure to vibration and G loading, revealing details about other minor and transient, but more common, effects that resolved within 3 h. Our studies indicated a significantly elevated incidence of BPPV following exposure to vibration plus G loading compared to vibration alone that was positively correlated with participant age. One mechanism for the rolling sensation in BPPV involves broken or dislodged otoconia floating within one of the posterior semicircular canals, making the canal gravity-sensitive. Our observations highlight a heretofore unforeseen risk of otolith damage sustained during launch, undetectable in space, potentially contributing to vertigo and perceived tumbling upon re-entry from microgravity.

  6. Vertigo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Rävala pst. 4 asuva restorani Vertigo sisekujundus. Sisearhitektid Janno Roos ja Andres Labi (Ruumilabor OÜ). Sisearhitektidest, nende koos teostatud projektid. Kaks plaani, 8 värv. sisevaadet, fotod sisearhitektidest

  7. Qualidade de vida em pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna e/ou doença de Ménière Quality of life in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and/or Ménière's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Rumi Handa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna e/ou doença de Ménière relatam prejuízos na qualidade de vida. OBJETIVO: Comparar o impacto da tontura na qualidade de vida destes pacientes e avaliar a influência do gênero, faixa etária e canal semicircular afetado. FORMA DE ESTUDO: clínico com coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo realizado na Universidade Federal de São Paulo, em 2003/04. O Dizziness Handicap Inventory foi aplicado em 70 pacientes com vertigem posicional, 70 com doença de Ménière e 15 com ambas. Utilizou-se o teste de igualdade de duas proporções e a análise de variância para a avaliação estatística. RESULTADOS: Os escores obtidos com a aplicação do questionário foram superiores, na crise e fora dela, no grupo com doença de Ménière, em relação ao com vertigem posicional, mas apenas na crise em relação ao grupo com associação (pPatients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and/or Ménière's disease relate damages in quality of life. AIM: To compare the impact of dizziness on quality of life, in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and/or Ménière's disease, in crisis and out of crisis, and to evaluate the influence of gender, age and impaired semicircular canal. STUDY DESIGN: clinical with transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The prospective study was realized in 2003/04 at Federal University of São Paulo. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory was applied in seventy patients with positional vertigo, seventy with Ménière's disease and fifteen with both. Two-proportion equality test and the Analysis of variance were employed in this study. RESULTS: When comparing the groups, Dizziness Handicap Inventory results evidenced higher averages in crisis and out of crisis for Ménière's disease group than for positional vertigo group. The same occurred only during the crisis period in the group when comparing with both disorders (p<0,05. No significant

  8. Avaliação da manobra de reposicionamento de Epley em indivíduos com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Assessing Epley's maneuver for benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane de Souza Pinho Costa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os parâmetros estabilométricos após a manobra de reposicionamento de Epley em indivíduos com Vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB previamente confirmada através da manobra de Dix-Hallpike. MÉTODOS: estudo experimental que incluiu pacientes que apresentaram VPPB com nistagmo de posicionamento à prova de Dix-Hallpike, avaliados no ano de 2008, no Ambulatório Multidisciplinar de Vertigem, e que foram submetidos à manobra de reposicionamento de Epley e avaliados quanto ao equilíbrio postural pelo exame de Estabilometria, antes e após a citada manobra. RESULTADOS: os 13 indivíduos do gênero feminino com idade variando de 15 a 78 anos com VPPB, previamente confirmados e selecionados para a pesquisa, apresentaram melhora estatisticamente significante em parâmetros estabilométricos verificados da primeira para a segunda avaliação, confirmando melhora do equilíbrio postural, após a manobra de Epley. CONCLUSÃO: nesta pesquisa a manobra de reposicionamento de Epley mostrou-se como um procedimento de intervenção importante para a melhora das respostas do equilíbrio postural em indivíduos com VPPB avaliados pela estabilometria.PURPOSE: to evaluate the stabilometry parameters after Epley's maneuver in individuals with BPPV previously confirmed through Dix-Hallpike maneuver. METHODS: an experimental study which included patients with BPPV with positional nystagmus taking Dix-Hallpike's test and assessed in 2008, at the Multidisciplinary Vertigo Ambulatory, and who were also submitted to Epley's maneuver and assessed as for their postural balance through a stabilometry exam, both before and after such maneuver. RESULTS: the 13 female subjects with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years with previously confirmed BPPV, who were selected for the research, showed a significant statistically improvement regarding their postural balance after Epley's maneuver in all analyzed parameters as for both exams. CONCLUSION: in

  9. Intracranially protruded bilateral posterior and superior SCCs with multiple dehiscences in a patient with positional vertigo: CT and MR imaging findings and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal G Kundaragi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of intracranially protruded posterior and superior semicircular canals beyond the margins of temporal bone with bony roof dehiscence in bilateral posterior and left superior semicircular canals in a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV.

  10. Vascular vertigo: epidemiology and clinical syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    vertigo is a common complaint in medicine. The most common causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere's syndrome, and vascular disorders. Vertigo of vascular origin is usually limited to migraine, transient ischemic attacks, and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Vascular causes lead to various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo. This study provides an overview of epidemiology and clinical syndromes of vascular vertigo. vertigo is an illusion of movement caused by asymmetrical involvement of the vestibular system by various causes. Migraine is the most frequent vascular disorder that causes vertigo in all age groups. Vertigo may occur in up to 25% of patients with migraine. The lifetime prevalence of migrainous vertigo is almost 1%. Cerebrovascular disorders are estimated to account for 3% to 7% of patients with vertigo. Vestibular paroxysmia has been diagnosed in 1.8% to 4% of cases in various dizziness units. Vasculitic disorders are rare in the general population, but vertigo may be seen in almost up to 50% of patients with different vasculitic syndromes. migraine, cerebrovascular disorders especially involving the vertebrobasilar territory, cardiocirculatory diseases, neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve, and vasculitis are vascular causes of vertigo syndromes.

  11. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  12. The Clinical Differentiation of Cerebellar Infarction from Common Vertigo Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson, James A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the emergency department approach to diagnosing cerebellar infarction in the patient presenting with vertigo. Vertigo is defined and identification of a vertigo syndrome is discussed. The differentiation of common vertigo syndromes such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, and vestibular neuritis is summarized. Confirmation of a peripheral vertigo syndrome substantially lowers the likelihood of cerebellar infarction, as do indicators of a peripheral disorder such as an abnormal head impulse test. Approximately 10% of patients with cerebellar infarction present with vertigo and no localizing neurologic deficits. The majority of these may have other signs of central vertigo, specifically direction-changing nystagmus and severe ataxia.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:273-277.

  13. Manobra de Epley repetida em uma mesma sessão na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Epley’s maneuver in the same session in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Polacow Korn

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se a repetição de manobras de Epley em uma mesma sessão resulta em um menor número de sessões para abolir o nistagmo de posicionamento do que uma única manobra por sessão. MÉTODO: A manobra de Epley foi realizada em 123 pacientes com VPPB unilateral por ductolitíase do canal posterior. O grupo I foi composto por 75 pacientes submetidos a uma única manobra de Epley por sessão semanal e o grupo II foi constituído por 48 pacientes submetidos a quatro manobras na primeira sessão. RESULTADOS: O grupo II apresentou latência e duração do nistagmo maiores do que o grupo I (pAIM: To assess whether more than one Epley’s maneuver in the same session, compared to a single one, decreases the number of sessions necessary to suppress positional nystagmus. METHOS: Epley’s maneuver was done in 123 patients with BPPV due to unilateral posterior semicircular canal canalolithiasis. The number of sessions for positional nystagmus suppression was compared in two groups of patients. Group I consisted of 75 patients submitted to a single Epley’s maneuver on weekly sessions and group II consisted of 48 patients that were submitted to four Epley’s maneuvers during the first session. RESULTS: Group II showed greater nystagmus latency and duration than group I (p<0.05. The number of sessions and standard deviation showed by group I was greater than in group II (p=0.008. We observed a significant association between number of sessions and group (p=0.039 studied. Group II had 21.4% more nystagmus-free patients following only one session (CI95% [7.7% - 35.1%]. CONCLUSION: Repeated Epley’s maneuvers in less sessions rendered more positional nystagmus-free patients when compared to those submitted to more sessions of single maneuvers.

  14. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss with positional vertigo: Initial findings of positional nystagmus and hearing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Shin, Jung Eun; Yang, Young Soo; Im, Donghyuk

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the initial findings of positional nystagmus in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and positional vertigo, and to compare hearing improvement among patients with different types of positional nystagmus. The characteristics of positional nystagmus upon initial examination were analysed, and the initial mean pure-tone audiometry (PTA) threshold was compared with that at three months after treatment. Forty-four SSNHL patients with concomitant positional vertigo were included. Positional nystagmus was classified into five subgroups; persistent geotropic direction-changing positional nystagmus (DCPN) in head-roll test (HRT) and negative Dix-Hallpike test (DHT), persistent apogeotropic DCPN in HRT and negative DHT, positive DHT and negative HRT, persistent geotropic DCPN in HRT and positive DHT, and persistent apogeotropic DCPN in HRT and positive DHT. PTA threshold improvement was significantly greater in SSNHL patients with negative DHT than with positive DHT (p = 0.027). When geotropic DCPN was elicited by HRT, the nystagmus was persistent, which suggests that alteration of specific gravity of the endolymph, rather than the lateral canal canalolithiasis, may be a cause of this characteristic positional nystagmus. Positive DTH may be a prognostic factor for worse hearing recovery among patients with SSNHL and positional vertigo.

  15. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo predominantly affects the right labyrinth

    OpenAIRE

    von Brevern, M; Seelig, T; Neuhauser, H; Lempert, T

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen studies with a total of 3426 patients were identified. In our own series the right side was affected in 54 of 80 patients (right/left ratio 2.08). Altogether, in 3506 patients the right labyrinth was involved 1.41 times more often than the left (95% CI 1.37 to 1.45). We think that the reason for the predominant involvement of the right ear in BPPV is the habit—of most patients—of sleeping on the right side.

  16. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  17. An approach to acute vertigo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conditions such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which respond well to ... neurological (if dysequilibrium), psychiatric or metabolic causes. However ... Contrary to this prevalent view, in recent years advances in the diagnosis and management of common vestibular disorders have made the clinical ...

  18. Vertigo in childhood: a clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbek, Seyra H; Erbek, Selim S; Yilmaz, Ismail; Topal, Ozgul; Ozgirgin, Nuri; Ozluoglu, Levent N; Alehan, Fusun

    2006-09-01

    Vertigo in childhood is a complaint consisting of a wide spectrum of diagnoses. The aim of this study was to evaluate pediatric patients with vertigo with normal eardrum and middle ear findings and discuss the differential diagnoses. Patient records of 50 children under 18 years of age with vertigo as the chief complaint, examined at the Baskent University, Research and Application Centers at Konya and Adana otorhinolaryngology clinics between May 2003 and October 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. The questionnaires, laboratory tests including blood samples, audiological and vestibular tests, and final diagnoses were analyzed. Patients with perforated eardrums, otitis media with effusion, and acute upper respiratory tract infections were not included in the study. The study group consisted of 50 patients (33 females, 66%; 17 males, 34%), between 4 and 17 years of age (mean age, 11.5+/-3.9 years). Severe sensorineural hearing loss was present in one patient unilaterally (2%) and one patient bilaterally (2%). Bilateral low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss was present in one patient (2%). Electronystagmography revealed central vestibular abnormalities in three patients (6%). Canal paresis was established in six patients (12%). The Dix-Hallpike test was positive in six patients (12%). The most frequent cause of vertigo was migraine, occurring in 34% of patients (n=17). Other less-frequent etiologies of vertigo were benign paroxysmal vertigo (n=6; 12%), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (n=6; 12%), psychogenic vertigo (n=5; 10%), epilepsy (n=3; 6%), metabolic disorders (n=3; 6%), vestibular neuritis (n=2; 4%), Meniere's disease (n=1; 2%), perilymphatic fistula (n=1; 2%), amblyopia (n=1; 2%), and unclassifiable (n=5; 10%). Migraine was found to be the most frequent presenting diagnosis in childhood vertigo, although several peripheral vestibular disorders also were diagnosed. Evaluation of vertigo in childhood should begin with a thorough neuro

  19. Incidence of DWI-positive stroke in patients with vertigo of unclear etiology, preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leker, Ronen R; Hur, Tamir Ben; Gomori, John M; Paniri, R; Eichel, Roni; Cohen, Jose E

    2013-03-01

    Acute vertigo may be secondary to stroke or to non-ischemic causes. Accurate identification of vertigo secondary to ischemia may lead to appropriate timely intervention that can minimize stroke-related damage and can help in tailoring the most appropriate individual therapy for affected patients. Diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) is very accurate for diagnosing stroke and we therefore aimed to test whether it can aid in making a correct diagnosis of vertigo secondary to stroke. All patients presenting with vertigo in which the diagnosis of stroke was considered underwent DWI only MRI. Data regarding the symptoms and neurological deficits, vascular risk factors, imaging findings, and outcomes was accrued. Patients with stroke on DWI were compared with those without ischemia. Between June 2010 and August 2011, 28 patients fulfilling the entry criteria were identified with a mean age of 62·2±12·8 (60% male). The final diagnosis was stroke in 11 patients (39%). Patients with stroke did not differ from those without stroke in their risk factor profile. However, patients with stroke more often tended to present with vertigo accompanied by other neurological symptoms (73% versus 12% respectively, P = 0·001). After adjusting for age and the presence of diabetes, the presence of multiple symptoms remained the only variable that was associated with a positive DWI scan (odds ratio: 30: 95% confidence interval: 2·6-349). Most patients with stroke had very mild strokes with a median admission NIHSS score of 3 and DWI lesion volumes >2 cm were found in only three patients. Most stroke patients made a good recovery (modified Rankin score ≤2 in seven of nine patients with 90 day data). The most common diagnosis in patients without stroke was of vertigo of peripheral origin (14/17). DWI only MRI can be used to rapidly screen patients presenting with vertigo and suspected vertebrobasilar stroke. The occurrence of vertigo in combination with other focal neurological symptoms may

  20. Migraine Related Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagatti, Vithal D; Dinesh Kumar, Rajendran

    2017-12-01

    Migraine related vertigo (MRV) is largely accepted in the vestibular community and probably represents the second most common cause of vertigo after benign positional vertigo by far exceeding Meniere's disease. The data on vestibular migraine management is still relatively poor, despite its enormous importance in daily practice. A 55-year old male presented with history of giddiness, imbalance, sweating and sensation of nausea with severe pulsating headache of one day duration. Ear, Nose and Throat examination was normal. Neurological tests were negative. Audiogram and Electronystagmography were within normal limits. Nystagmus was positive on turning his head to left side. By reviewing the available literature on MRV, the report aims to outline a protocol for future management. The patient and caretakers were thoroughly counseled and educated, started on Flunarizine 10 mg and Dimenhydrinate 50 mg; advice healthy life style, necessary precautions, compliance to treatment. Patient was reportedly followed up and was symptom free over a period of 9 years. There is a call for proper diagnosis to address the complaint and manage of symptoms in acute attack and prophylaxis. In addition, this case highlight the ongoing need for proper systematic evaluation, therapeutic management, follow up by ensuring compliance to medication, necessary precautions and life style modification.

  1. Epidemiology of paroxysmal positioning vertigo: correlation with seasons, climate, and pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Paolo; Pelagatti, Matteo; Hahn, Ales; Alpini, Dario

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article was to evaluate the time course of paroxysmal positioning vertigo (PPV) and to investigate correlations with environmental and seasonal factors through a retrospective statistical analysis spanning 4 years (2001-2004). Applying rigorous diagnostic criteria, we selected 575 patients (429 women and 146 men; age range, 17-94 years; mean age, 55 years for men and 56 years for women). Statistical analysis included events per month and per year. We conducted a descriptive statistical analysis to investigate the correlation between vertigo events and main environmental factors: air pollution as expressed by daily concentration of nitric monoxide and ultrafine particles; air pressure; mean temperature and sun radiation; and humidity. We referred the environmental data, collected by Regione Lombardia (the regional government of Lombardy), to the greater Milan homogeneous area. We performed an analysis of variance test and observed that PPV is more frequent in middle-aged women (in or around their fifties) and on the right side. PPV is clearly negatively correlated with temperature, and frequency of attacks depends on temperature variations. The role of air pollution, especially particles, is suspected, but it is not yet clearly identified. Factors that link climate and otoconia metabolism require further investigation.

  2. [An etiological analysis of 367 neurological outpatients with complaint of vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Qi, Xiao-Kun

    2012-05-01

    To explore the etiology of patients with chief complaint of vertigo in the department of neurology in order to reduce the rate of misdiagnosis. A total of 367 patients with chief complaint of vertigo in our department of neurology were followed up. The associated medical history, symptoms and physical examination were obtained. The main diagnoses for the 367 patients were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) (219, 59.7%), posterior circulation ischemia (PCI) (65, 17.7%), migraine (31, 8.4%), hypertension (18, 4.9%) and psychogenic vertigo (17, 4.6%). Presentation of vertigo can be clinically diagnosed in most diseases, with the most common cause of BPPV. Combination of the prominent clinical features, physical examinations and especially Dix-Hallpike maneuver may guide the general physicians to a most proper cause of vertigo.

  3. Peripheral vestibular vertigo: clinical spectrum and review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo 33 (25%), Labyrinthitis 23(17%), menieres disease 19(14%) and cervical spondylosis 14(10.5%) were the leading clinical diagnoses. Trauma accounted for 35% of the aetiological factors while17%was idiopathic. Clinical examination remains the prime technique in accurate diagnosis ...

  4. A specialized approach to diagnosing and treating vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is one of the most common reasons for visits to physicians of different specialties. Thorough collection of history data and neurovestibular examination by a set of simple clinical tests are of great importance for the diagnosis of diseases of the vestibular system. The paper gives an update on the principles of diagnosis of different forms of vertigo, diagnostic errors, and treatment of major diseases manifesting by vertigo. The authors present their own data concerning the diagnosis and treatment of the most common vestibular disorders, such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and postural phobic instability. They also describe a clinical case of a female patient with vestibular neuronitis, in whom a specialized examination (neurovestibular examination, videonystagmography, and caloric testing could identify right labyrinthine hypofunction that could not be detected prior to the examination in the clinic.

  5. Anxiety and Depression Among Patients With Different Types of Vestibular Peripheral Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Yu, Lisheng; Shi, Dongmei; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have been published on comorbid anxiety and depression in patients with vertigo. However, very few studies have separately described and analyzed anxiety or depression in patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo. The present study investigated anxiety and depression among patients with 4 different types of peripheral vertigo. A total of 129 patients with 4 types of peripheral vertigo, namely, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 49), migrainous vertigo (MV, n = 37), Menière disease (MD, n = 28), and vestibular neuritis (VN, n = 15), were included in the present study. Otological and neurootological examinations were carefully performed, and self-rating anxiety scale and self-rating depression scale were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the vestibular function: normal and abnormal vestibular function. There was no significant difference in the risk of anxiety/depression between these 2 groups. However, for patients with the 4 different vertigo types, the prevalence of anxiety (MV = 45.9%, MD = 50%) and depression (MV = 27%, MD = 28.6%) was significantly higher in the patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo. PMID:25654382

  6. Persistent otolith dysfunction even after successful repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui-Joong; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Yang, Si-Young

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate utricular and saccular function during the acute and resolved phases of BPPV, ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were studied in 112 patients with BPPV and 50 normal controls in a referral-based University Hospital. Ocular (oVEMPs) and cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) were induced using air-conducted sound (1000Hz tone burst, 100dB normal hearing level) at the time of initial diagnosis and 2 months after successful repositioning in patients with BPPV, and the results were compared with those of the controls. Abnormalities of cVEMPs and oVEMPs in patients with BPPV were prevalent and significantly higher compare to the healthy control group (potolithic dysfunction was often shown by persistently reduced or absent cervical and ocular VEMPs, suggesting that BPPV may be caused by significant bilateral damage to the otolith organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Resolution of Persistent Post-Stapedotomy Vertigo With Migraine Prophylactic Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshtaghi, Omid; Mahboubi, Hossein; Haidar, Yarah M; Sahyouni, Ronald; Lin, Harrison W; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2017-12-01

    To describe persistent post-stapedotomy vertigo (PSV) and its treatment using migraine prophylaxis. A retrospective review of all patients with persistent PSV spanning 10 years at a tertiary academic hospital was performed. Patients who experienced persistent vertigo for a minimum of 3 months after surgery were included. Those with possible perilymph fistula, long prosthesis, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were excluded. All patients received instructions on migraine dietary and lifestyle changes and Vitamin B2 and magnesium. In addition, prophylactic treatment with nortriptyline, verapamil, or a combination thereof was started. Changes in vertigo frequency was the main outcome variable. The secondary outcome variables included the time period and medications necessary to achieve symptomatic resolution. Four women and one man with an average age of 53 years were identified that met criteria for persistent PSV indicating an incidence of 0.9% at our institution. The onset of vertigo symptoms was on average 20 days postoperatively. All five patients had daily vertigo episodes and experienced complete resolution with no vertigo episodes after treatment. Symptomatic resolution was achieved over an average of 9 weeks after initiating treatments. Persistent PSV beyond 3 months is a rare occurrence and its treatment can be challenging when there is no evidence of an underlying pathology. This subset of patients may be suffering from migraine, which was triggered postoperatively. Treatment with migraine prophylaxis in this cohort of patients may result in resolution of vertigo.

  8. Recent surgical options for vestibular vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Dazert, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is not a well-defined disease but a symptom that can occur in heterogeneous entities diagnosed and treated mainly by otolaryngologists, neurologists, internal medicine, and primary care physicians. Most vertigo syndromes have a good prognosis and management is predominantly conservative, whereas the need for surgical therapy is rare, but for a subset of patients often the only remaining option. In this paper, we describe and discuss different surgical therapy options for hydropic inner ear diseases, Menière’s disease, dehiscence syndromes, perilymph fistulas, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. At the end, we shortly introduce the most recent developments in regard to vestibular implants. Surgical therapy is still indicated for vestibular disease in selected patients nowadays when conservative options did not reduce symptoms and patients are still suffering. Success depends on the correct diagnosis and choosing among different procedures the ones going along with an adequate patient selection. With regard to the invasiveness and the possible risks due to surgery, in depth individual counseling is absolutely necessary. Ablative and destructive surgical procedures usually achieve a successful vertigo control, but are associated with a high risk for hearing loss. Therefore, residual hearing has to be included in the decision making process for surgical therapy. PMID:29279721

  9. Vertigo and dizziness in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eFernandez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of vertigo and dizziness in people aged more than 60 years reaches 30%, and due to aging of world population, the number of patients is rapidly increasing. The presence of dizziness in the elderly is a strong predictor of falls, which is the leading cause of accidental death in people older than 65 years. Balance disorders in the elderly constitute a major public health problem, and require an adequate diagnosis and management by trained physicians. In the elderly, common causes of vertigo may manifest differently, as patients tend to report less rotatory vertigo and more nonspecific dizziness and instability than younger patients, making diagnosis more complex. In this mini review, age-related degenerative processes that affect balance are presented. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches oriented to the specific impaired system, including visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular pathways are proposed. In addition, presbystasis -the loss of vestibular and balance functions associated with aging-, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and stroke (in acute syndromes should always be considered.

  10. The burden and impact of vertigo: findings from the REVERT patient registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike eBenecke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite the high prevalence of vertigo globally and an acknowledged, but underreported, effect on an individual’s wellbeing, few studies have evaluated the burden on healthcare systems and society. This study was aimed to quantitatively determine the impact of vertigo on healthcare resource use and work productivity. Methods: The economic burden of vertigo was assessed through a multi-country, non-interventional, observational registry of vertigo patients: the Registry to Evaluate the Burden of Disease in Vertigo (REVERT. Patients included were those with a new diagnosis of Meniere’s disease (MD, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, other vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin or peripheral vestibular vertigo of unknown origin. Results: A total of 4,294 patients at 618 centers in 13 countries were included during the registry. Of the 4,105 patients analyzed, only half were in employment. Among this working patient population, 69.8% had reduced their workload, 63.3% had lost working days and 4.6% had changed and 5.7% had quit their jobs, due to vertigo symptoms. Use of healthcare services among patients was high. In the 3 months preceding Visit 1, patients used emergency services 0.4 ± 0.9 times, primary care consultations 1.6 ± 1.8 times and specialist consultations 1.4 ± 2.0 times (all mean ± SD. A mean of 2.0 ± 5.4 days/patient was also spent in hospital due to vertigo.Conclusions: In addition to the negative impact on the patient from a humanistic perspective, vertigo has considerable impact on work productivity and healthcare resource use.

  11. [Vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwergal, A; Möhwald, K; Dieterich, M

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common chief complaints in the emergency department. Etiologies can be categorized into three subgroups: neurootological (vestibular), medical (especially cardiovascular, metabolic), and psychiatric disorders. The diagnostic approach in the emergency department is based on a systematic analysis of case history (type, time course of symptoms, modulating factors, associated symptoms), clinical examination of the vestibular, ocular motor, and cerebellar systems (head impulse test, nystagmus, skew deviation, positioning maneuver, test of gait and stance), as well as a basal monitoring (vital signs, 12-lead ECG, blood tests). For differentiation of peripheral and central etiologies in acute vestibular syndrome, the HINTS exam (head impulse test, nystagmus, test of skew) and examination of smooth pursuit and saccades should be applied. Nonselective use of neuroimaging is not indicated due to a low diagnostic yield. Cranial imaging should be done in the following constellations: (1) detection of focal neurological or central ocular motor and vestibular signs on clinical exam, (2) acute abasia with only minor ocular motor signs, (3) presence of various cardiovascular risk factors, (4) headache of unknown quality as an accompanying symptom. Besides the symptomatic therapy of vertigo and dizziness with antiemetics or analgesics, further diagnostic differentiation is urgent to guide proper treatment. Examples are the acute therapy in cerebral ischemia, the execution of positioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, the use of corticosteroids in acute unilateral vestibulopathy, as well as the readjustment of metabolic homeostasis in medical disorders.

  12. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Parfenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central vestibular vertigo in migraine-associated dizziness and in acute cerebrovascular accident. Of great importance is a combination of drug therapy and the current rehabilitation methods for vestibular diseases, which contribute to prompter and complete recovery of vestibular function. Biofeedback instrumental rehabilitation techniques using a stabilographic platformare highly effective. Successful treatment depends on the correctness of the established diagnosis. The diagnosis of peripheral and central vestibular vertigo frequently poses challenges. The essential reason for this is physicians’ unawareness about outpatient methods for the diagnosis of major vestibular diseases when the patient is at a doctor. It is important to follow a vestibular system study protocol since the use and correct assessment of diagnostic tests in most cases make it possible to estimate the degree of vestibular analyzer injury and to make an accurate diagnosis. The paper describes the diseases that are the most common causes of vestibular vertigo. The most effective methods for their treatment and current rehabilitation methods are discussed.

  13. [Vertigo due to enlarged vestibule with lateral semicircular canal dysplasia: an analysis of clinical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang-li; Li, Peng; Kong, Qing-cong; Li, Yong-qi; Li, Zhi-cheng; Cen, Jin-tian; Wang, Shu-fang; Liu, Xian; Zhang, Ge-hua

    2011-12-13

    To explore the clinical characteristics and possible pathological mechanisms of vertigo due to enlarged vestibule with lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. A retrospective review was conducted for 5 cases of peripheral vertigo due to enlarged vestibule with lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. Their characteristics of medical history, precipitating factors, course of vertigo, auditory tests, vestibular tests and imaging examine results were analyzed. The clinical characteristics were as follows. (1) Specifics of medical history: 4 cases suffered delays in gross motor development and potential equilibrium dysfunctions. One case failed to recount an earlier medical history, but could maintain normal hearing and vestibular functions for a long time in adulthood. (2) Most cases could identify the precipitating factors of initial attacks, such as head-bumping, nose-blowing and constipation, etc. resulting in sudden rises of intracranial or abdominal pressures. (3) Paroxysmal vertigo and progressive hearing loss were mimicking Meniere disease or large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. But its course of vertigo was different from those of Meniere disease and large vestibular aqueduct syndrome with regards to hearing levels and audiograms. (4) Some cases had positional vertigo. But the results of Dix-Hallpike and Roll tests were different from benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV). (5) The inner ear imaging showed enlarged vestibule with lateral semicircular canal dysplasia. The enlarged vestibule with lateral semicircular canal dysplasia is a rare etiology of peripheral vertigo. The history of delays in gross motor development and potential equilibrium dysfunctions in childhood may offer important diagnostic clues. And audiological and vestibular tests, high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance may help to ascertain the diagnosis.

  14. Clinical Management of a Patient with Chronic Recurrent Vertigo Following a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Ultimately, the patient was successfully managed by performing two canalith repositioning maneuvers during a single clinical session. The patient reported 100% resolution of symptoms upon reexamination the following day, and the Hallpike-Dix test was negative. Continued symptom resolution was subjectively reported 10 days postintervention via telephone consultation. This case report supports previous publications concerning the presence of BPPV following TBI and the need for inclusion of vestibular system examination during medical consultation.

  15. Etiology of vertigo in Thai patients at Thammasat Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunasuwan, Parichat; Bunbanjerdsuk, Sacarin; Nilsuwan, Amornwan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the causes of vertigo in the patients at Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital. The data of these patients, collected from the medical records between January 2010 and January 2011, were reviewed and analyzed. From one hundred and forty-nine cases, 49 cases (33%) were men and 100 cases (67%) were women, which yielded the male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The average age of patients was 55 year olds. The most common diagnostic category was peripheral vestibular disorders (80.5%). Other causes were central vestibular disorders (4.7%) and non-vestibular related (4%), whereas the remaining (10.1%) was undiagnosed. The causes of vertigo included benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: BPPV (53%), Meniere's disease (10.1%) and recurrent vestibulopathy (8.1%), while the underlying diseases found were diabetes mellitus (11.4%), hypertension (32.2%) and dyslipidemia (34.2%). In Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital, the peripheral vestibular disorders was the main etiology of vertigo, while the three most common causes were BPPV Meniere's disease, and recurrent vestibulopathy respectively.

  16. Clinical and Demographic Features of Vertigo: Findings from the REVERT Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Sam; Benecke, Heike; Thum, Cornelia; Strupp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite being a common disease, data on vertigo management in a real-world setting are scarce. Aims: To provide information on the vertigo and its management in a real-world setting. Methods: Data were collected from 4,294 patients with vertigo in 13 countries over 28 months via a multi-national, non-interventional observational study (the so-called REVERT registry). Data included medical history and details of anti-vertigo therapy. “Clinical global impression” (CGI) of severity (CGI-S) was assessed at baseline (V1) and then at 6 months follow-up (V2) along with CGI change (CGI-C). All variables were analyzed descriptively. Results: The majority of patients were female, >40 years of age, and almost half had co-morbid cardio-vascular disease. Diagnoses were split into four categories: 37.2% “other vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin,” 26.9% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 20.5% “peripheral vestibular vertigo of unknown origin,” and 15.4% Ménière’s disease (MD). Betahistine was the most commonly prescribed therapy prior to and after enrollment, and was followed by piracetam, ginkgo biloba, and diuretics. MD had the highest proportion of betahistine treated patients. Almost half of patients were “moderately ill” at V1 based on CGI-S. At V2, patient distribution moved toward “less severe illness” (91.0% improved). The greatest improvements were in the more severely ill, and those with BPPV or “other vertigo of peripheral origin.” Conclusion: There was a reduction in illness severity over the course of the study, some of which is likely to be due to pharmacological intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:23675366

  17. Clinical and demographic features of vertigo: findings from the REVERT registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam eAgus

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDespite being a common disease, data on vertigo management in a real-world setting are scarce. AimsTo provide information on the vertigo and its management in a real-world setting.Materials and MethodsData were collected from 4,294 patients with vertigo in 13 countries over 28 months via a multi-national, non-interventional observational study (the so-called REVERT registry. Data included medical history and details of anti-vertigo therapy. ‘Clinical global impression’ (CGI of severity (CGI-S was assessed at baseline (V1 and then at 6 months follow-up (V2 along with CGI change (CGI-C. All variables were analysed descriptively. ResultsThe majority of patients were female, >40 years of age, and almost half had co-morbid cardiovascular disease. Diagnoses were split into 4 categories: 37.2% ‘other vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin’, 26.9% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 20.5% ‘peripheral vestibular vertigo of unknown origin’ and 15.4% Menière’s disease (MD. Betahistine was the most commonly prescribed therapy prior to and after enrolment, and was followed by piracetam, ginkgo biloba and diuretics. MD had the highest proportion of betahistine treated patients. Almost half of patients were ‘moderately ill’ at V1 based on CGI-S. At V2, patient distribution moved towards ‘less severe illness’ (91.0% improved.The greatest improvements were in the more severely ill, and those with BPPV or ‘other vertigo of peripheral origin’. ConclusionsThere was a reduction in illness severity over the course of the study, some of which is likely to be due to pharmacological intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  18. Headache and Central Positioning Vertigo in a Middle Aged Female-a Case of Solitary Cerebellar Tuberculoma Involving Left Cerebellar Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakya Bhattacharjee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old female presented with headache and an illusory sensation of spinning of head in respect to environment for last 8 weeks. Her head spinning or vertigo had no particular direction or not precipitated by any specific head posture. Headache is non- specific in nature and intensified in last few days.Her neurological examination revealed a central positional vertigo with horizontal gaze evoked nystagmus and ataxia. Her MRI scan brain showed the presence of a large solitary ring enhancing lesion in the left cerebellar hemisphere. The lesion was surgically excised and was examined histopathologicaliy that revealed a chronic inflammatory granuloma with caseation necrosis and multinucleated giant cells suggestive of tuberculosis

  19. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oki, Hiroshi; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD) is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. This was an observational study. Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic) in Japan. The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%). During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo) and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6-232.6) per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2-142.6) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere's disease among the 76 PVD patients. We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo.

  20. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Oki, Hiroshi; Kajii, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dizziness and vertigo are highly prevalent symptoms among patients presenting at primary care clinics, and peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD) is their most frequent cause. However, the incidence of PVD has not been well documented. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD among patients presenting at a primary care clinic. Design This was an observational study. Setting and participants Between November 2011 and March 2013, we observed 393 patients, all at least 20 years old, who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months at a primary clinic (Oki Clinic) in Japan. Outcome The main outcome of interest was new incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and PVD events. During the 1-year follow-up period, the otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported new PVD events. Results The mean age of the 393 participants at entry was 65.5 years. Of the study participants, 12.7%, 82.4%, and 92.6% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. We followed up all the participants (100%). During the 662.5 person-years of follow-up, 121 cases of dizziness or vertigo (dizziness/vertigo) and 76 cases of PVD were observed. The incidence of dizziness/vertigo and PVD was 194.7 (95% confidence interval: 161.6–232.6) per 1,000 person-years and 115.7 (95% confidence interval: 92.2–142.6) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. There were 61 cases of acute peripheral vestibulopathy, 12 of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere’s disease among the 76 PVD patients. Conclusion We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo. PMID:25931828

  1. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SEMONT LIBERATORY MANEUVER IN ACUTE BENINGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyutha Kiran Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with vestibular dysfunction complain of problems with balance and dizziness which creates a negative impact on the people and affects their quality of life. Medications help in the control of symptoms. There has been an increase in the implementation of many protocols for the rehabilitation of vestibular patients with follow up exercises for the treatment of BPPV. Methods: Thirty BPPV patients were identified by doing Dix- Hall pike positioning and their DHI scores were recorded. All patients were exclusively treated with Semont Liberatory maneuver. The effectiveness of the treatment was documented at 1 week and 1 month. Repeated procedures were performed if necessary. Results: After the treatment session of Semont Liberatory maneuver, the symptoms disappeared in 20 patients and have negative DHI test by 1st week, and of patients have negative DHI test by 1 month. The first success rate was 78% and the total success rate was 89%. Semont Liberatory maneuver also showed decrease in score of DHI [post-test] in 1 month duration. The patient who visited within one week after the onset of symptoms had good prognosis with Semont Liberatory maneuver. This protocol was ineffective in 4 patients. Conclusion: The Semont Liberatory maneuver is a safe and effective technique for treating BPPV patients.

  2. Inner Ear Disease and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Critical Review of Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study is a review of the incidence, clinical characteristics, and management of secondary BPPV. The different subtypes of secondary BPPV are compared to each other, as well as idiopathic BPPV. Furthermore, the study highlights the coexistence of BPPV with other inner ear pathologies. Methods. A comprehensive search for articles including in the abstract information on incidence, clinical characteristics, and management of secondary BPPV was conducted within the PubMed library. Results. Different referral patterns, different diagnostic criteria used for inner ear diseases, and different patient populations have led to greatly variable incidence results. The differences regarding clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes may support the hypothesis that idiopathic BPPV and the various subtypes of secondary BPPV do not share the exact same pathophysiological mechanisms. Conclusions. Secondary BPPV is often under-diagnosed, because dizziness may be atypical and attributed to the primary inner ear pathology. Reversely, a limited number of BPPV patients may not be subjected to a full examination and characterized as idiopathic, while other inner ear diseases are underdiagnosed. A higher suspicion index for the coexistence of BPPV with other inner ear pathologies, may lead to a more integrated diagnosis and consequently to a more efficient treatment of these patients.

  3. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): influence of pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapy on patients' recovery rate and life quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovara, Sinisa; Soldo, Silva Butkovic; Puksec, Mirjana; Balaban, Branka; Penavic, Ivana Pajic

    2012-01-01

    This prospective clinical study includes 96 BPPV patients with the results of DHI testing ≥ 40 points. They were segregated to be taken into this study and randomly divided into two therapy groups: 48 patients in Group I were treated pharmacotherapeutically with Betahistine Chloride (BC) and 48 patients in Group II underwent a rehabilitation treatment by performing an Epley maneuver. Total study duration was eight weeks, during which the patients were first examined upon arrival, checked after one, and rechecked after eight weeks. The tests included otoneurological examination and VNG, as well as completing three questionnaires: DHI, SF-36®, and HADS®. During the first checkup after one week, 86.96% of patients in Group I and 93.33% in Group II had negative results at the Dix-Hallpike test. During the second checkup after an eight weeks' treatment, 95.65% in Group I and 97.78% patients in Group II had a negative result. At the beginning of the study, the values of patients' physical, emotional, and functional health (QoL) were equally distributed in both therapy groups, compared to standardized values of healthy population. During the first checkup, the values were significantly higher and by the second checkup, reached the statistic average, which corresponds with the healthy population. There was an obviously faster and more complete recovery of the patients in Group II, who underwent a rehabilitation treatment.

  4. [Cardiovascular aspects of vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeet, Th

    2002-09-01

    True vertigo described as a sensation of body or surrounding objects rotation is seldom of cardiovascular origin. The main causes are caused by ear pathology, neurologic pathology or are of toxic origin. Patients talk frequently of vertigo to describe symptoms in relation with a fall of the brain blood output. These dizziness feelings are frequently of cardiovascular origin and may be associated with syncope which represents a more important fall in the brain blood pressure. Medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram represents the cornerstones of the cardiological workout allowing about 50% of likely diagnosis. The cardiologist will also have to distinguish between a disease of benign prognosis and a disease possibly associated with future sudden cardiac death. The main cardiological causes are: neurally mediated hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, other cardiac or pulmonary diseases. Neurological, metabolic or psychiatric causes occur much less frequently. Most commonly used diagnostic tests include the resting electrocardiogram, the stress test, cardiac echography, holter techniques, tilt testing, cardiac and coronary angiography, electrophysiologic testing. However, despite an extensive workout some causes of dizziness or syncope remain unclear.

  5. Benign lymphoepithelial cysts of the parotid glands in HIV-positive patients. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piqueras, R.M.; Marco, S.F.; Lazaro, S.; Gonzlez, M.

    1997-01-01

    Benign parotid lymphoepithelial cysts (BPLEC) with cervical lymph node involvement are a recently reported radiological sign of HIV infection in head and neck in patients ar risk for developing AIDS. These cysts lesions present in the parotid glands of HIV-positive individuals and are associated with cervical lymph node involvement. We present a case of BPLEC in a HIV-positive patients that was studied by ultrasound and computerized tomography. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy. We describe the radiological signs of this lesion as detected by the imaging techniques employed and we establish the differential diagnosis. (Author) 14 refs

  6. Cervicogenic vertigo: etiology, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Tavanai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cervicogenic dizziness is induced by a specific neck position and the earth’s gravity has no effect on provoking of it. The precise incidence of cervicogenic dizziness is not certain but, 20-58% of patients following sudden head injuries experience its symptoms . In this article, the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of cervicogenic vertigo is discussed. Methods: At first, articles of cervicogenic dizziness from electronic databases of Google scholar , PubMed, Scopus, Ovid and CINAHL were searched from 1987 up to 2012. Then, the articles in them vertigo, disequilibrium or nystagmus were consistent with neck disorders were searched. Conclusion: Articles with title of cervicogenic vertigo (cervical vertigo were limited. Clinical researches about cervicogenic vertigo up to now implicate on several points; all signify that we cannot diagnose it certainly and there is not any specific single test for that. Recently, smooth pursuit neck torsion test (SPNTT has introduced for diagnosis of cervicogenic vertigo that is not valid yet. There is no protocol for diagnosis of cervicogenic vertigo and diagnosis is often based on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Physiotherapy, medication and manual therapies are options for treatment but there is no distinct and effective treatment for it and in just one article, a combination of treatments for cervicogenic vertigo as a protocol has recommended.

  7. Left-sided thoracoscopy in the prone position for surgery of distal esophageal benign pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Issaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of the distal esophagus can be achieved by a wide variety of surgical approaches. The standard procedure is mostly by laparoscopy. In cases where laparoscopy is relatively contraindicated, thoracoscopy is preferred. In this case, exposure of the distal esophagus from the aorta, heart and lung is technically challenging using thoracoscopy in the right lateral decubitus position. Surgery in the prone position for esophageal cancer has been successfully described in previous literature. We present our experience with left-sided thoracoscopy in the prone position in three patients with benign distal esophageal pathologies. This approach provided a much better exposure of the distal esophagus and enabled a successful surgery to be done in all patients with less manipulation of the lung.

  8. Patient positioning for robot-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecologic surgery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takmaz, Ozguc; Asoglu, Mehmet Resit; Gungor, Mete

    2018-04-01

    Robotic surgical platforms are now in widespread use in the practice of gynecology all over the world. The introduction of robotic surgery has required some modifications of patient positioning when compared to standard laparoscopic surgery. Optimal patient positioning is likely to be the most essential step of robotic surgery as it provides the technical feasibility to have adequate access to the pelvic structures for performing the surgery. It is prudent to pay attention to preventing patient shifting in Trendelenburg position because of tendency of sliding down toward the direction of the head. Inappropriate patient positioning is associated with inadequate exposure of the operative field as well as detrimental complications that may lead to long-term side effects. These issues can be reduced with use of proper or strategic positioning technique. The purpose of this review is to highlight important points to properly position patient for robot-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecologic surgery and protect patient from position-related injuries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  10. Benign and malignant neoplasias in 261 necropsies for HIV-positive patients in the period of 1989 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, Adilha Rua; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Silva, Gisele Barbosa E; Silva, Ana Cristina Araújo Lemos da; Silva-Vergara, Mário Leon; Murta, Eddie Fernando Cândido; Adad, Sheila Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Considering that there are some studies with autopsies from AIDS describing only malignant neoplasias and that changes can occur after the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), our objectives were to analyze the frequency of benign and malignant neoplasms in AIDS patients in the periods of both pre- and post-HAART. This is a retrospective study with 261 autopsies of HIV-positive patients between 1989 and 2008 in Uberaba, Brazil. Sixty-six neoplasms were found (39 benign, 21 malignant and six premalignant) in 58 patients. The most frequent malignant neoplasms were lymphoid, in 2.7% (four Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, one Hodgkin, one multiple myeloma and one plasmablastic plasmacytoma), and Kaposi's Sarcoma, in 2.3% (six cases). The most frequent benign neoplasms were hepatic hemangiomas in 11 (4.2%) of 261 cases and uterine leiomyoma in 11 (15.7%) of 70 woman. In the pre-HAART period eight (9.8%) benign neoplasias and four (4.9%) malignant occurred in 82 patients; in the post-HAART period, 29 (16.2%) benign and 17 (9.5%) malignant were present; however, the differences were not significant. We conclude that the introduction of HAART in our region doesn't look to have modified the frequency of neoplasms occurring in patients with HIV.

  11. Incidence of dizziness and vertigo in Japanese primary care clinic patients with lifestyle-related diseases: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada M

    2015-04-01

    benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and three of Meniere's disease among the 76 PVD patients. Conclusion: We reported the incidence of dizziness/vertigo among Japanese primary care clinic patients, which was higher than that usually observed in the general population. Furthermore, we described the incidence of PVD and found that it was a major cause of dizziness/vertigo. Keywords: dizziness, incidence, primary health care, observational study

  12. Benign thyroid and neck lesions mimicking malignancy with false positive findings on positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ye Ri; Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deuk Young [Dept. of Surgery, Younsei Angelot Women' s Clinic, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The increasing use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) has led to the frequent detection of incidental thyroid and neck lesions with increased 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Although lesions with increased FDG uptake are commonly assumed to be malignant, benign lesions may also exhibit increased uptake. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate that benign thyroid and neck lesions can produce false-positive findings on PET/CT, and to identify various difficulties in interpretation. It is crucial to be aware that differentiating between benign and malignant lesions is difficult in a considerable proportion of cases, when relying only on PET/CT findings. Correlation of PET/CT findings with additional imaging modalities is essential to avoid misdiagnosis.

  13. Vertigem no idoso: relato de caso Vertigo in elderly: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Alpino Levandowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: investigar a vertigem em paciente idosa com vários comprometimentos sistêmicos e avaliar a efetividade terapêutica para o tratamento da vertigem Posicional Paroxística Benigna (VPPB. PROCEDIMENTOS: estudo de caso longitudinal de paciente do sexo feminino com vertigem submetido à terapia fonoaudiológica com exercícios de habituação vestibular. RESULTADOS: no período de seis meses, observou-se melhora no quadro vertiginoso da paciente. CONCLUSÃO: a reabilitação vestibular com exercícios de habituação vestibular mostrou eficácia no tratamento da VPPB da paciente.BACKGROUND: to investigate the vertigo in elderly woman with several systemic commitments and evaluate treatment effectiveness for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV. PROCEDURES: longitudinal clinical study of a female patient with vertigo submitted to speech and hearing therapy with vestibular habituation exercises. RESULTS: after six months the patient had clinical improvement. CONCLUSION: vestibular rehabilitation with vestibular habituation exercises showed effectiveness in the treatment of this patient with BPPV.

  14. Current diagnostic procedures for diagnosing vertigo and dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is a multisensory syndrome that otolaryngologists are confronted with every day. With regard to the complex functions of the sense of orientation, vertigo is considered today as a disorder of the sense of direction, a disturbed spatial perception of the body. Beside the frequent classical syndromes for which vertigo is the leading symptom (e.g. positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Menière’s disease), vertigo may occur as main or accompanying symptom of a multitude of ENT-related diseases involving the inner ear. It also concerns for example acute and chronic viral or bacterial infections of the ear with serous or bacterial labyrinthitis, disorders due to injury (e.g. barotrauma, fracture of the oto-base, contusion of the labyrinth), chronic-inflammatory bone processes as well as inner ear affections in the perioperative course. In the last years, diagnostics of vertigo have experienced a paradigm shift due to new diagnostic possibilities. In the diagnostics of emergency cases, peripheral and central disorders of vertigo (acute vestibular syndrome) may be differentiated with simple algorithms. The introduction of modern vestibular test procedures (video head impulse test, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) in the clinical practice led to new diagnostic options that for the first time allow a complex objective assessment of all components of the vestibular organ with relatively low effort. Combined with established methods, a frequency-specific assessment of the function of vestibular reflexes is possible. New classifications allow a clinically better differentiation of vertigo syndromes. Modern radiological procedures such as for example intratympanic gadolinium application for Menière’s disease with visualization of an endolymphatic hydrops also influence current medical standards. Recent methodical developments significantly contributed to the possibilities that nowadays vertigo can be better and more quickly clarified in particular in

  15. Migrainous vertigo: prevalence and impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, H K; Radtke, A; von Brevern, M; Feldmann, M; Lezius, F; Ziese, T; Lempert, T

    2006-09-26

    To investigate the epidemiology of migrainous vertigo (MV) in the general population by assessing prevalence, clinical features, comorbid conditions, quality of life, and health care utilization. We screened a representative sample of the adult population in Germany (n = 4,869) for moderate or severe dizziness/vertigo and followed up with validated neurotologic telephone interviews (n = 1,003). Diagnostic criteria for MV were as follows: 1) recurrent vestibular vertigo; 2) migraine according to the International Headache Society; 3) migrainous symptoms during at least two vertiginous attacks (migrainous headache, photophobia, phonophobia, or aura symptoms); and 4) vertigo not attributed to another disorder. In a concurrent validation study (n = 61) the interviews had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 94% for vestibular vertigo and 81% and 100% for migraine. The lifetime prevalence of MV was 0.98% (95% CI 0.70 to 1.37), the 12-month prevalence 0.89% (95% CI 0.62 to 1.27). Spontaneous rotational vertigo was reported by 67% of participants with MV while 24% had positional vertigo. Twenty-four percent always experienced headaches with their vertigo. Logistic regression analysis comparing participants with MV with dizziness-free migraineurs showed an independent association with coronary heart disease but not with sex, age, migrainous aura, education, stroke, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, body mass index, or depression. Age-adjusted health-related quality of life scores (SF-8 Health Survey) were consistently lower in participants with MV compared to dizziness-free controls. Two thirds of participants with MV had consulted a doctor but only 20% of these were diagnosed with MV. Migrainous vertigo is relatively common but underdiagnosed in the general population and has considerable personal and healthcare impact.

  16. [Results evaluation in cervical vertigo kinesitherapy--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielińska, Marzena; Olszewski, Jurek

    2009-09-01

    The work aimed at analyzing results of kinesitherapeutic procedures in patients with cervical vertigo as well as evaluating a mobility range of the cervical spine. The study was conducted on 23 people, including 17 women and 6 men suffering from cervical vertigo, at the age of 23-73 (the average age of 49.5). All the patients had an individually selected cycle of kinesitherapeutic exercises through the period of 2 months. The objective efficiency evaluation of the applied therapy was made on the grounds of the videonystagmographic examination (VNG). Additionally, the range of active mobility of the cervical spine was analyzed and the evaluation of vertigo according to Silvoniemi's criteria was performed. After a 2-month therapy 4 patients (17.4%) out of the examined material showed a total lack of vertigo, 15 patients (65.2%) demonstrated a meaningful decrease in the vertigo intensity, also in the frequency of their occurrence in 14 cases (60.8%). Only 3 patients did not show any decrease in vertigo whereas in 1 patient a slight increase in the intensity was indicated. On the basis of a subjective evaluation of the vertigo increase according to the 5-stage Silvoniemi's scale it was proved that a mean point assessment claimed by the patients at the beginning of the therapy amounts to 3.0 points whereas after the therapy it was as follows: 1.43 pt after 2 weeks, 1.17 pt after 1 month and 1.13 pt after 2 months of kinesitherapy. It is extremely difficult to fully eliminate the symptoms of cervical vertigo (in the studied material in 4 cases--17.3%) because the causes of their occurrence, which are connected with excessive tension and degeneration in the cervical spine, cannot usually be eradicated. Additionally, as a diagnostic means, the videonystagmographic examination (VNG) accompanied by the positioning tests and the cervical rotation test facilitates precise and objective monitoring of the progress in treatment and rehabilitation of vertigo.

  17. A False Positive I-131 Metastatic Survey Caused by Radioactive Iodine Uptake by a Benign Thymic Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avneet K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid carcinoma is the most common endocrine malignancy in the United States with increasing incidence and diagnosis but stable mortality. Differentiated thyroid cancer rarely presents with distant metastases and is associated with a low risk of morbidity and mortality. Despite this, current protocols recommend remnant ablation with radioactive iodine and evaluation for local and distant metastasis in some patients with higher risk disease. There are several case reports of false positive results of metastatic surveys that are either normal physiologic variants or other pathological findings. Most false positive findings are associated with tissue that has physiologic increased uptake of I-131, such as breast tissue or lung tissue; pathological findings such as thymic cysts are also known to have increased uptake. Our case describes a rare finding of a thymic cyst found on a false positive I-131 metastatic survey. The patient was taken for surgical excision and the final pathology was a benign thymic cyst. Given that pulmonary metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer are rare, thymic cysts, though also rare, must be part of the differential diagnosis for false positive findings on an I-131 survey.

  18. Clinical use of Malay Version of Vertigo Symptom Scale (MWSS) in patients with peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainun, Zuraida; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi; Ismail, Zalina

    2012-08-01

    The Vertigo symptom scale (VSS) is a well established tool for the evaluation of vestibular disorders and the associated symptoms of autonomic arousal and somatosensation. By using a validated Malay version of vertigo symptom scale (MVVSS) questionnaire, the severity of the vertigo from patients' perspective can be determined and rated. Before MVVSS can be applied clinically among Malaysians, it was of interest to determine its clinical value in identifying vestibular disorders. Forty normal and 65 PVD subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. Normal subjects were recruited amongst Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) staff and students who had no history of ear and vestibular disorders. Mean total score of MVVSS in normal and PVD subjects were 13.9 +/- 11.1 and 30.1 +/- 20.9, respectively. When the total scores of normal and PVD group were compared, the Mann-Whitney U test showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups (p PVD [benign paroxymal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease, labyrinthitis and unknown] have different MVVSS results. However, analysis of variance (ANOVA) found no significant difference in term of outcomes of MVVSS among the different PVD pathologies. Using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) method, the sensitivity and specificity of MVVSS were 71% and 60%, respectively. MVVSS is able to discriminate clinically among the normal and PVD subjects. However, it is not a good indicator for differential diagnosis of PVD subtypes, at least in this study. Its sensitivity and specificity in clinical diagnosis are reasonably high. Perhaps a bigger sample size would be useful to further study the clinical usefulness of MVVSS.

  19. Vertigo is associated with advanced degenerative changes in patients with cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machaly, Shereen A; Senna, Mohammed K; Sadek, Ahmed G

    2011-12-01

    Since vascular risk factors that predispose to vertebrobasilar ischemia are common findings in elderly, cervical spondylosis-which is also common in such age group-as a cause of vertigo is sometimes considered as a myth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of cervical spondylosis on blood flow velocity of VAs during cervical rotation and to identify the possible association of vertigo with the decreased blood flow velocity through VAs during head rotation in these patients. The incidence of cervical spondylosis was estimated in patients with and without vertigo. Patients with vertigo proved to have spondylosis are further compared with patients having spondylosis but not complaining of vertigo and patients who neither have spondylosis nor complain of vertigo who served as controls. Plain cervical radiography was used to evaluate cervical degenerative changes using cervical degenerative index. Color duplex sonography was used to measure vertebral artery blood flow with the cervical spine in the neutral position then with 60° rotation and 30° extension to measure the opposite vertebral artery. A significantly higher prevalence of cervical spondylosis was found among patients complaining of vertigo than those in non-vertigo group (71.4% vs. 32.9%, respectively). Furthermore, among patients with cervical spondylosis, patients having vertigo showed significantly more evident degenerative changes (P = 0.003). Despite Doppler ultrasound examination with head in neutral position was similar in all groups; cervical spondylosis patients with vertigo had statistically significant lower blood flow parameters with contralateral head rotation in the left and right vertebral arteries than cervical spondylosis patients without vertigo and controls. The decreased vertebral artery blood flow that occurs with cervical rotation can be observed in patients with cervical spondylosis. In patients with high-grade cervical spondylosis with more extensive osteophyte

  20. Evaluating the morphological changes of intracranial arteries and whole-brain perfusion in undetermined isolated vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenxian; Feng, Youzhen; Lu, Weibiao; Xie, Xie; Xiong, Zhilin; Jing, Zhen; Cai, Xiangran; Huang, Li'an

    2016-11-15

    To determine the morphological changes of intracranial arteries and whole-brain perfusion in undetermined isolated vertigo (UIV) patients using 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). A total of 150 patients who underwent CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging were divided into UIV group and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) group. Sixty individuals with sex- and age-matched without vertigo and cerebral diseases served as the control. The morphological changes of intracranial arteries, perfusion parameters and vascular risk factors (VRFs) were analyzed, calculated and compared. In UIV patients, hypertension (HT), hyperlipidemia and number of VRFs≥3 occurred more commonly (P<0.0125, respectively). The incidence of vertebral artery dominance (VAD), vertebral artery stenosis (VAS) and basilar artery curvature (BAC) were significantly higher (P<0.0125, respectively). HT was an independent risk predictor of non-VAD (OR: 5.411, 95%CI: 1.401; 20.900, P=0.014). HT and VAD associated with BAC served as risk predictors (OR: 4.081, 95%CI: 1.056;15.775, P=0.041 and OR: 6.284, 95%CI: 1.848; 21.365, P=0.003, respectively). The absolute difference in relative values of CTP parameters from cerebellum and brainstem were significantly different (P<0.05), and hypoperfusion was found in the territories of the non-VAD side and the BAC cohort (P<0.05, respectively). On the basis of multiple VRFs, morphological changes of vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) and the unilateral hypoperfusion of the cerebellum and brainstem, that acts as a herald for IV occurrence, which should be paid cautious attention to UIV patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Referral and final diagnoses of patients assessed in an academic vertigo center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka eGeser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify under-diagnosed neuro-otological disorders and to evaluate whether under-diagnosing depends on the age of the patient.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of medical charts from 951 consecutive patients (685 under and 266 above the age of 65 years who entered diagnostic procedures at the Interdisciplinary Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Final diagnoses were compared to referral diagnoses.RESULTS: Relative to referral diagnoses, the proportion of patients finally diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV almost doubled both in younger (< 65 year from 12.7% to 25.1% and older patients (from 20.7% to 37.6%. Striking relative increases were found for the diagnoses multisensory dizziness in older patients (from 20.7% to 37.6% and vestibular migraine in younger patients (1.8% to 20.2%. In both age groups, the proportion of patients with undetermined diagnoses was reduced by about 60% (younger: 69.8% to 9.8%; older: 69.2% to 12.4% by the diagnostic procedures in the vertigo center. These changes were all significant (p < 0.05 in McNemar tests with continuity correction (2x2 tables: focused diagnosis vs. other diagnoses, referral vs. final.CONCLUSION: Significant changes of diagnoses can be expected by a specialized neuro-otological work-up. In particular, BPPV, multisensory dizziness, and vestibular migraine are under-diagnosed by referring physicians. This finding calls for better education of primary care takers in the field of neuro-otology.

  2. Referral and final diagnoses of patients assessed in an academic vertigo center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geser, Rebekka; Straumann, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    To identify under-diagnosed neuro-otological disorders and to evaluate whether under-diagnosing depends on the age of the patient. Retrospective analysis of medical charts from 951 consecutive patients (685 under and 266 above the age of 65 years) who entered diagnostic procedures at the Interdisciplinary Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Final diagnoses were compared to referral diagnoses. Relative to referral diagnoses, the proportion of patients finally diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) almost doubled both in younger (<65 year from 12.7 to 25.1%) and older patients (from 20.7 to 37.6%). Striking relative increases were found for the diagnoses multisensory dizziness in older patients (from 20.7 to 37.6%) and vestibular migraine in younger patients (1.8 to 20.2%). In both age groups, the proportion of patients with undetermined diagnoses was reduced by about 60% (younger: 69.8 to 9.8%; older: 69.2 to 12.4%) by the diagnostic procedures in the vertigo center. These changes were all significant (p < 0.05) in McNemar tests with continuity correction (2 × 2 tables: focused diagnosis vs. other diagnoses, referral vs. final). Significant changes of diagnoses can be expected by a specialized neuro-otological work-up. In particular, BPPV, multisensory dizziness, and vestibular migraine are under-diagnosed by referring physicians. This finding calls for better education of primary care takers in the field of neuro-otology.

  3. Tetra-ataxiometric Posturography in Patients with Migrainous Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Nedim; Atalay, Nilgun S; Degirmenci, Eylem; Sahin, Fusun; Bir, Levent Sinan

    2016-01-01

    measures vertical pressure fluctuations on 4 independent stable platforms, each placed beneath 2 heels and toe parts of the patient; inputs from these platforms are integrated and processed by a computer digitally. Four separate plates are used and perpendicular pressures of the anterior and posterior feet are measured. Pressure of each force plate is measured and data was analyzed by the software program. A very small, non-randomized, and controlled study with the inability to find an answer to the mechanism of involvement of the somatosensorial system and vestibular system in migrainous headaches. The distribution of patients with posturographical abnormalities in the migrainous vertigo group was significantly different than the control group. Distribution of the patients with posturographical abnormalities in the high frequencies of the head-right position was significantly different in the migrainous vertigo group than in the control group and distribution of the patients with posturographical abnormalities in high frequencies of the head-right position was significantly different in the migraine group than in the controls groups. The stability index of the migrainous vertigo group was significantly higher than in the control group when tested on in the neutral-head position with open eyes. In this first study of tetra-ataxiometric static posturography evaluating postural abnormalities in a well-defined population of patients with migrainous vertigo, the central part of the vestibular apparatus would be responsible of postural abnormalities in patients with migraine and migrainous vertigo.

  4. Vertigo and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maruska D' Aparecida; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are accepted by many authors as being responsible for balance disorders. Because of the importance of metabolic disorders in the field of labyrinthine dysfunction, we decided to assess the prevalence of carbohydrates, lipids and thyroid hormones disorders in our patients with vestibular diseases. The study evaluates the metabolic profile of 325 patients with vertigo who sought the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo in the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. The laboratory tests ordered according to the classical research protocol were: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, TSH, T3, T4 and fasting blood sugar level. The metabolic disorders found and the ones that were observed in the general population were compared. The high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the altered levels of thyroid hormones, the higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus were the most significant changes found in the group of study. The higher amount of metabolic disorders in patients with vertigo disease reinforces the hypothesis of its influence on the etiopathogenesis of cochleovestibular symptoms.

  5. Epley maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repositioning maneuvers; CRP; Benign positional vertigo - Epley; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - Epley; BPPV - Epley; BPV - Epley ... Orvidas L, et al. Clinical practice guideline: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Otolaryngol: Head Neck Surg . 2008;139(5 Suppl ...

  6. Epidemiology of vestibular vertigo: a neurotologic survey of the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, H K; von Brevern, M; Radtke, A; Lezius, F; Feldmann, M; Ziese, T; Lempert, T

    2005-09-27

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and incidence of vestibular vertigo in the general population and to describe its clinical characteristics and associated factors. The neurotologic survey had a two-stage general population sampling design: nationwide modified random digit dialing sampling for participation in the German National Telephone Health Interview Survey 2003 (response rate 52%) with screening of a random sample of 4,869 participants for moderate or severe dizziness or vertigo, followed by detailed neurotologic interviews developed through piloting and validation (n = 1,003, response rate 87%). Diagnostic criteria for vestibular vertigo were rotational vertigo, positional vertigo, or recurrent dizziness with nausea and oscillopsia or imbalance. Vestibular vertigo was detected by our interview with a specificity of 94% and a sensitivity of 84[corrected]% in a concurrent validation study using neurotology clinic diagnoses as an accepted standard (n = 61). The lifetime prevalence of vestibular vertigo was 7.4[corrected]%, the 1-year prevalence was 4.9[corrected]%, and the incidence was 1.4[corrected]%. In 80% of affected individuals, vertigo resulted in a medical consultation, interruption of daily activities, or sick leave. Female sex, age, lower educational level, and various comorbid conditions, including tinnitus, depression, and several cardiovascular diseases and risk factors, were associated with vestibular vertigo in the past year in univariate analysis. In multivariable analysis, only female sex, self-reported depression, tinnitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia had an independent effect on vestibular vertigo. Vestibular vertigo is common in the general population, affecting [corrected] 5% of adults in 1 year. The frequency and health care impact of vestibular symptoms at the population level have been underestimated.

  7. Patients' psychological well-being and resilient coping protect from secondary somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) 1 year after vestibular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschan, Regine; Best, Christoph; Beutel, Manfred E; Knebel, Achim; Wiltink, Jörg; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret

    2011-01-01

    Secondary somatoform dizziness and vertigo (SVD) is an underdiagnosed and handicapping psychosomatic disorder, leading to extensive utilization of health care and maladaptive coping. Few long-term follow-up studies have focused on the assessment of risk factors and little is known about protective factors. The aim of this 1-year follow-up study was to identify neurootological patients at risk for the development of secondary SVD with respect to individual psychopathological disposition, subjective well-being and resilient coping. In a prospective interdisciplinary study, we assessed mental disorders in n=59 patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders (n=15 benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, n=15 vestibular neuritis, n=8 Menière's disease, n=24 vestibular migraine) at baseline (T0) and 1 year after admission (T1). Psychosomatic examinations included the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS), and a psychometric test battery measuring resilience (RS), sense of coherence (SOC), and satisfaction with life (SWLS). Subjective well-being significantly predicted the development of secondary SVD: Patients with higher scores of RS, SOC, and SWLS at T0 were less likely to acquire secondary SVD at T1. Lifetime mental disorders correlated with a reduced subjective well-being at T0. Patients with mental comorbidity at T0 were generally more at risk for developing secondary SVD at T1. Patients' dispositional psychopathology and subjective well-being play a major predictive role for the long-term prognosis of dizziness and vertigo. To prevent secondary SVD, patients should be screened for risk and preventive factors, and offered psychotherapeutic treatment in case of insufficient coping capacity.

  8. Vertigo and stroke: a national database survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huon, Leh-Kiong; Wang, Ting-Chuan; Fang, Te-Yung; Chuang, Li-Ju; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the association between vertigo and stroke in Taiwan using the Bureau of National Health Insurance research database. Information on adult patients with an index vertigo attack in 2006 was retrieved from Bureau of National Health Insurance research database. All patients with specific diagnostic codes for vertigo were included. Occurrence of stroke during a 1-year follow-up period was identified. Risk factors for stroke were examined. Using χ test, t test, and a multilevel logistic regression model, patients with vertigo were categorized into stroke and nonstroke groups for comparative analyses. An age- and sex- matched control cohort was prepared for comparison. Patients with vertigo (n = 527,807) (mean age, 55.1 yr) accounted for 3.1% of the general Taiwanese adult population. The prevalence of stroke among vertigo patients of 0.5% (mean age, 67.8 yr) was slightly higher than that of the control group (0.3%; mean age, 72.3 yr; p vertigo had higher prevalence of comorbid conditions (p diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, or atrial fibrillation had a higher prevalence of stroke (p vertigo had higher chance to develop stroke than the control group. Some strokes may initially manifest as peripheral vertigo, and some central vertigo may eventually evolve into a stroke. Middle aged male, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation are risk factors for subsequent stroke in vertigo patients.

  9. Secondary syphilis presenting as vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.; Mehmood, T.; Khan, B.; Malik, N.; Malik, K.Z.; Sukhera, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic, systemic and sexually transmitted infectious disease affecting most of the organs in the body. A young African man presented with vertigo, unsteadiness of gait and a skin rash suggestive of secondary syphilis. Diagnosis was confirmed on serology and was treated with two shots of long-acting penicillin, following which his symptoms settled. (author)

  10. Vertigo, can it be redefined?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabani Kumar Choudhury

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives- Vertigo, a clinical symptom complex is not infrequent in our patients. Its diagnosis too is controversial. Majority of these cases run from hospital to clinics, some times to Otolaryngologists to get rid of this bizarre experience. Sometimes they get benefit but otherwise they experience a destitute life. Our aim was to treat them by Physical Therapy in the light of Cervical Spondylosis that is commonly associated with vertigo. Material & Methods- This is a prospective case study done in PMR department (OPD of a teaching institute over a period of 6 months time period. 20 OPD patients of both sexes (14 ladies and 6 gents with definite Cervical Spondylosis along with complain of vertigo or dizziness, pain at cervical spine were accounted for the study. Only extreme aged persons or patients with other major co-morbidity were excluded. These 20 patients were treated with conventional Physical Therapy for CS. Medications were prescribed as and when required. Results- After Physical Therapy, that included lifestyle modification, isometric cervical exercise, intermittent cervical traction, application of Therapeutic Ultrasound (UST to cervical region and proper posture care of cervical spine along with use of cervical orthosis (where needed, majority of the patients become symptom free. Conclusion- Physical Therapy may be considered as an alternative method of treatment of Vertigo patients, who are otherwise not responding satisfactorily to pharmaceutical agents.

  11. Betahistine for symptoms of vertigo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murdin, Louisa; Hussain, Kiran; Schilder, Anne G M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertigo is a symptom in which individuals experience a false sensation of movement. This type of dizziness is thought to originate in the inner ear labyrinth or its neural connections. It is a commonly experienced symptom and can cause significant problems with carrying out normal

  12. Neurophysiology: vertigo in MRI machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Dominik; Bockisch, Christopher J

    2011-10-11

    Subjects of brain-imaging studies often report experiencing vertigo while in MRI machines; a new study shows that the magnetic field stimulates the vestibular sensors in the inner ear by a Lorentz force. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictive Capability of an iPad-Based Medical Device (medx) for the Diagnosis of Vertigo and Dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Katharina; Feuerecker, Regina; Goldschagg, Nicolina; Strobl, Ralf; Brandt, Thomas; von Müller, Albrecht; Grill, Eva; Strupp, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Making the correct diagnosis of patients presenting with vertigo and dizziness in clinical practice is often challenging. In this study we examined the performance of the iPad based program me d x in the prediction of different clinical vertigo and dizziness diagnoses and as a diagnostic tool to distinguish between them. The data collection was done in the outpatient clinic of the German Center of Vertigo and Balance Disorders. The "gold standard diagnosis" was defined as the clinical diagnosis of the specialist during the visit of the patient based on standardized history and clinical examination. Another independent and blinded physician finalized each patient's case in the constellatory diagnostic system of me d x based on an algorithm using all available clinical information. These diagnoses were compared to the "gold standard" by retrospective review of the charts of the patients. The accuracy provided by me d x was defined as the number of correctly classified diagnoses. In addition, the probability of being test positive when a disease was present (sensitivity), of being test negative when a disease was absent (specificity), of having the disease when the test is positive (positive predictive value) and of not having the disease when the test is negative (negative predictive value) for the most common diagnoses were reported. Sixteen possible different vertigo and dizziness diagnoses could be provided by me d x. A total of 610 patients (mean age 58.1 ± 16.3 years, 51.2% female) were included. The accuracy for the most common diagnoses was between 82.1 and 96.6% with a sensitivity of 40 to 80.5% and a specificity of more than 80%. When analyzing the quality of me d x in a multiclass problem for the six most common clinical diagnoses, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were as follows: Bilateral vestibulopathy (81.6, 97.1, 71.1, and 97.5%), Menière's disease (77.8, 97.6, 87.0, and 95.3%), benign paroxysmal positional

  14. Predictive Capability of an iPad-Based Medical Device (medx for the Diagnosis of Vertigo and Dizziness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Feil

    2018-02-01

    (77.8, 97.6, 87.0, and 95.3%, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (61.7, 98.3, 86.6, and 93.4%, downbeat nystagmus syndrome (69.6, 97.7, 71.1, and 97.5%, vestibular migraine (34.7, 97.8, 76.1, and 88.3%, and phobic postural vertigo (80.5, 82.5, 52.5, and 94.6%.ConclusionThis study demonstrates that medx is a new and easy approach to screen for different diagnoses. With the high specificity and negative predictive value, the system helps to rule out differential diagnoses and can therefore also lead to a cost reduction in the health care system. However, the sensitivity was unexpectedly low, especially for vestibular migraine. All in all, this device can only be a complementary tool, in particular for non-experts in the field.

  15. Bedside diagnosis of vertigo: value of the history and neurological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen A

    2003-12-01

    Vertigo is caused by disturbance of the input or central processing of sensory signals from the vestibular apparatus that provide information regarding the position of the body in space. It is caused either by asymmetric disruption of sensory input from the vestibular organs or asymmetric integration of vestibular input into the central nervous system. Vertigo is readily differentiated from other causes of dizziness by a sensation of motion. A crucial aspect of the management of the emergency department patient with vertigo is the differentiation of vertigo associated with acute stroke syndromes from vertigo due to peripheral causes. Routine computerized axial tomography imaging is insensitive for posterior circulation strokes, so for emergency physicians, the history and neurological examination remain the most useful diagnostic tools. This article emphasizes the history and physical examination in the localization of the lesion in patients with vertigo and offers a rational basis for decisions regarding the need for special neurological imaging and consultation. It also emphasizes subtle findings that may prevent the erroneous diagnosis of peripheral vertigo in the presence of an acute stroke syndrome.

  16. [Therapeutic effect and mechanism of the surgical treatment for cervical vertigo with cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhuolin; Hu, Jianhua; Zhai, Jiliang; Tian, Ye; Qiu, Guixing; Weng, Xisheng; Wu, Gui; Zhu, Qiankun; Zhao, Lijuan

    2015-07-07

    To investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the surgical treatment for cervical vertigo with cervical spondylosis. Thirty-five patients in Department of Orthopaedics, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, who received surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis concomitant with cervical vertigo from 2004 to 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. The preoperative cervical curvature index (CCI), slip distance and intervertebral angle, as well as the pre-and-postoperative Cobb angle were measured. The pre-and-postoperative degree of vertigo was reported according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium standard. The therapeutic effect and mechanism for patients with different imaging features and thus underwent various surgical approaches were analyzed. The mean follow-up was 40.6 months. Cervical instability was found in 33 patients. 29 of 35 (82.9%) patients had a satisfied recovery from cervical vertigo. The difference in Cobb angle in pre- and postoperative neutral cervical X-ray images was positively associated with the improvement for the vertigo (Pearson's test, P spondylosis. Cervical sympathetic nerves may have played an important role in the cervical vertigo. Surgery may relieve the cervical vertigo accompanying the cervical spondylosis.

  17. Comparative study on cases of vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room and otorhinolaryngological clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Toshiya; Kawashima, Kayoko; Hashimoto, Seiko; Imai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    We recently studied the characteristics of vertigo and dizziness in 197 patients who first visited the emergency room (ER group) and in 288 patients who first visited the otorhinolaryngological clinic of Minoh City Hospital (ENT group) between January 1 and December 31 of 2009. The ER group can be regarded as representing the hyperacute phase and the ENT group as representing the acute to chronic phase. These two groups were completely distinct. We also subdivided these groups into the high risk subgroup (H subgroup) for cases with the underlying diseases of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and hyperlipidemia, and the normal subgroup (N subgroup).Comparison of the two groups showed that, in the ER group, a significantly larger numbers of patients had symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease, and a significantly larger number of patients had symptoms of unknown origin in the ENT group. Half of this group may be accounted for by patients with symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for BPPV and Meniere's disease in the ER group. In 8 out of 158 patients of the ER group and 1 out of 122 patients of the ENT group, cerebral lesions were not found on CT images but were found with MRI. Careful investigation is necessary in the patients with normal CT findings. Central vestibular lesions were found in 7 out of 197 patients (3.5%) of the ER group and 5 out of 288 patients (1.7%) of the ENT group. The incidence of central lesions tended to be higher in the ER group than in the ENT group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of central lesion among the H and N subgroups of both groups. Careful investigation of the central vestibular lesion is also necessary in the N subgroup. (author)

  18. Bodies in Vertigo: the language of liminalities

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Shelby Elise

    2014-01-01

    Starting with my own travel experiences, and with the help of poets, Elizabeth Bishop, Jorie Graham, and Emily Dickinson, I create a theory of displacement, called Vertigo. Vertigo is not only a sense of falling, but a sense of detachment from reality that I felt traversing through different cultures, languages, and worlds for the first time. Vertigo is a liminal, transformative space that allows an individual to experience the created nature of their own worldview and culture. This is also a...

  19. Psychological distress longitudinally mediates the effect of vertigo symptoms on vertigo-related handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Dinkel, Andreas; Schmid-Mühlbauer, Gabriele; Radziej, Katharina; Limburg, Karina; Pieh, Christoph; Lahmann, Claas

    2017-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms can lead to more or less vertigo-related handicap. This longitudinal study investigated whether depression, anxiety, and/or somatization mediate the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. N=111 patients with vertigo/dizziness provided complete data on the following measures: Vertigo symptoms at baseline, depression at 6-month follow-up, anxiety at 6-month follow-up, somatization at 6-month follow-up, and vertigo handicap at 12-month follow-up. Mediation analyses with bootstrapping were performed to investigate the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization in the relationship between vertigo symptoms and vertigo-related handicap. When the mediating role of anxiety, depression, and somatization was evaluated separately from each other in single mediation models, the effect vertigo symptoms at baseline exerted on vertigo-related handicap at 12-month follow-up was significantly mediated by depression at 6-month follow-up (phandicap at 12-month follow-up (phandicap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyoscine versus diazepam for the management of true vertigo in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kariman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was a double-blind clinical trial to compare the efficiency of hysocine and diazepam in vertigo treatment. Eligible patients (n=69 were randomly divided into 2 groups of 5 mg hyoscine and 10 mg diazepam. Severity of vertigo was measured in supine and sitting position, and while turning the head. Vertigo severity was assessed before, and 1 and 2 hours after administration of the drug. Treatment success rate of diazepam in relieving vertigo in different positions varied between 88.9 and 100%, while this rate was 31.2–73.5% in hyoscine treatment group (p<0.01. Prescription of diazepam led to complete relief of vertigo in 40–63% of the patients, while this rate was only 2.6–12.5% in hyoscine treatment group (p<0.001. It is likely that diazepam is a better option than hyoscine for management of true vertigo in patients presenting to the emergency department.

  1. Medial Cranial Fossa Meningioma Diagnosed as Mixed Anxiety Disorder with Dissociative Symptoms and Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Mehmet Ceylan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient’s vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma. Resection of meningioma resulted in full remission of the patient proving it to be responsible for the etiology of the psychiatric syndrome and vertigo. We suggest that brain imaging should be performed for patients with late-onset (>50 years psychiatric symptoms and those with treatment resistance. It is important to keep in mind always that medically unexplained symptoms may become explicable with detailed assessment and regular follow-up of the patient.

  2. Isolated vertigo and possibility of brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosarrezai, Arash; Toghae, Mansoureh; Majed, Masoud; Aloosh, Mehdi

    2012-08-01

    In cases of isolated vertigo, physicians are unable to definitely distinguish between central or peripheral vertigo by history and physical examination. Some central causes of isolated vertigo such as cerebellar stroke can be life-threatening and require intervention. Brain infarction can be detected shortly after the onset of clinical symptoms by using diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). We have conducted this study to perform DWI on isolated vertigo patients with a higher probability of brain infarction. We enrolled 55 consecutive patients with isolated vertigo who had at least one cardiovascular risk factor. A questionnaire that consisted of cardiovascular risk factors was completed and DWI performed for each patient. We analyzed the association of cardiovascular risk factors with infarction as identified by DWI. Using DWI, 5 (9.1%) patients had an acute ischemic stroke. Among cardiovascular risk factors, analysis showed a significant relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and infarction. Isolated vertigo may occur due to the occlusion of a small artery in the area of brain circulated by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. According to our results, DWI may be used in diabetic patients with isolated vertigo to locate a probable infarction.

  3. 25-year follow-up of HIV-positive patients with benign lymphoepithelial cysts of the parotid glands: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Waleed F; Young, Rebekah; Kabarriti, Rafi; Blakaj, Dukagjin M; Shourbaji, Rania A; Glanzman, Jonathan; Patel, Shyamal; Ohri, Nitin; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Beitler, Jonathan J; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K

    2013-11-01

    To report long-term outcomes for HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) for benign lymphoepithelial cysts (BLEC) of the parotid glands. In this single institution retrospective study of HIV-associated BLEC of the parotids, the medical records of 37 HIV-positive patients who were treated with RT between 1987-2012 were reviewed. Patients were stratified into two groups; group A consisted of 15 patients (40.5%) who received a total dose of ≤18Gy, with a median dose 10 Gy (range 8-18Gy), and group B consisted of 22 patients (59.5%) who received a total dose of 24 Gy. In addition to dosing information, additional patient data were collected, including demographics, HAART compliance, follow-up, and re-treatment status. The median age at the time of treatment was 41 (range=7-70) years. With a median follow-up of 35 (range=12-75) months for the entire cohort, the complete response (CR) and partial response (PR) rates were 35% and 8%, respectively. All but one of 15 patients in Group A (lower total dose) eventually experienced local failure with the re-emergence of parotid hypertrophy. Among the patients in group B (higher total dose of 24 Gy), 55%, 13%, and 32% experienced CR, PR, and LF, respectively. Median times to failure in groups A and B were 7 and 20 months, respectively (pHIV-seropositivity.

  4. Transcanal labyrinthectomy for intractable vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Basura, Gregory J; Zwolan, Teresa A; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Telian, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Document the use of transcanal labyrinthectomy to treat disabling attacks of vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation. A 46-year-old woman with severe-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to enlarged vestibular aqueducts underwent cochlear implantation for her right ear with a Nucleus Freedom device. The surgery was uneventful, and postoperative imaging confirmed that the electrode was positioned properly. She developed episodic vertigo 10 to 14 days after the implant surgery, which failed to improve with aggressive vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Plugging of the round window for possible perilymphatic fistula did not relieve her symptoms. Right transcanal labyrinthectomy supplemented by filling the vestibule with gentamicin-soaked Gelfoam and then a customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Comparison of vestibular symptoms and cochlear implant performance before and after transcanal labyrinthectomy. The patient had immediate relief of symptoms, and the function of the cochlear implant was not adversely affected. Transcanal labyrinthectomy may be an effective method to ablate the vestibular end organ after unilateral cochlear implantation. It can offer relief of disabling vertigo without adversely affecting the performance of the implant.

  5. Differential diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint that leads patients to visit physicians of various specialties. Diseases resulting in vestibular vertigo are very diverse and may be caused by lesion of both the central parts of the vestibular system and the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In many cases, its diagnosis can be made from complaints and a history of disease and special bedside tests requiring no sophisticated equipment. Management of vestibular vertigo should aim at treating the underlying disease; vestibular dilators as symptomatic therapy can be effective for several days. Vestibular exercises the efficiency of which can be enhanced by betahistine and other drugs accelerating vestibular compensation should be further needed. Data on the efficacy of betaver (betahistine in patients with vestibular vertigo are given.

  6. Cinemateca de Vertigo. El delirio de la mirada: Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock) Analisis de una secuencia

    OpenAIRE

    Castro de Paz, José Luis

    1992-01-01

    Castro De Paz, JL. (1992). Cinemateca de Vertigo. El delirio de la mirada: Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock) Analisis de una secuencia. Vértigo. Revista de cine. (2):43-48. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/42923. 43 48 2

  7. [Clinical Observation of the Proprioceptive Sensibility Reflexotherapy by Tendon Acupuncture at Trigger Points for Cervical Vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fen-Fen; Luo, Jun; Liu, Jiao; Fang, Wen-Yao; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Sheng; Mao, Yu-Lin; Yuan, Zhen; Wang, Kai

    2017-10-25

    To evaluate the efficacy of the proprioceptive sensibility reflexotherapy by tendon acupuncture needling at trigger points for patients with proprioceptive disorder of cervical vertigo. Seventy-nine patients with proprioceptive disorder of cervical vertigo were randomly assigned into a treatment group (42 cases) and a control group (37 cases). Patients in the treatment group received the proprioceptive sensibility reflexotherapy with tendon acupuncture at trigger points in the neck. And those in the control group were given traditional traction, massage and intermediate frequency electro therapy. All the treatment was given for 2 courses, once a day and 10 days as a course. The cervical vertigo symptom and function, the joint position error (JPE) and stability index (ST) before and after treatment were observed in the two groups and the effects were evaluated. The cervical vertigo symptom and function were improved, JPE and ST decreased after treatment in the two groups (all P sensibility reflexotherapy with tendon acupuncture at trigger points is effective for proprioceptive disorder of cervical vertigo.

  8. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Danieli B; Sosnay, Patrick R; Azen, Colleen; Young, Suzanne; Raraigh, Karen S; Keens, Thomas G; Kharrazi, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance. We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C); those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC); and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown). Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared. Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78) and 11% of Unknown (27/244) met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing. While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  9. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli B Salinas

    Full Text Available Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance.We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C; those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC; and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown. Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared.Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78 and 11% of Unknown (27/244 met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing.While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  10. Management of a Benign Phyllodes Tumor in a 13-Year-Old Girl with Trans-position of the Nipple Areola Complex and Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erginel, B; Celet Ozden, B; Yesil Onder, S; Yuksel, S; Gun Soysal, F; Celik, A; Salman, T

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor is a rare primary tumor of the breast. In children and adolescents, it is even rarer with only 20 cases, treatment of which vary in the literature. Herein we report the case of a 13-year-old female patient with a giant benign phyllodes tumor eroding the bottom of the breast skin and causing nipple retraction. We performed breast conservative surgery by mobilizing the areola, using skin flaps and inserting an implant. Breast malignancy, including phyllodes tumor (PT), is very rare in adolescents. PT, previously called cystosarcoma phylloides, consists of leaf-like fronds, from which the tumor gets its name (1, 2). Although PT is most often seen in the fourth decade of life, almost 20 cases have been reported in the adolescent period, most of which are benign. The histologic types are benign, borderline, and malignant, depending on the mitotic rate of the tumor (3, 4). © Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  11. Benign acute childhood myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajajee, Sarala; Ezhilarasi, S; Rajarajan, K

    2005-05-01

    To describe the clinical and laboratory features of benign acute childhood myositis. 40 children of BACM were seen during October 2001 to February 2002, 22 (52%) were male with mean age of 5.3 years. Duration of illness was 3.97 days. Preceding symptoms included fever, leg pain, vomiting and inability to walk. A provisional diagnosis of viral myositis was made in 26 (66%). Guillian Barre Syndrome was the most common referral diagnosis. 11 (27.5%) children had leucopenia with lymphocytic response and 16 (40%) had thrombocytopenia. CRP was negative in 32 (80%). CPK was markedly elevated (more than 1000 IU/l) in 18 (45%) and more than 500 IU/l in 11 (27.5%) remaining between 200 to 500 IU/l. Associated features were hepatitis (elevated SGOT & SGPT) in 28 (70%) and shock in 5 (12.5%). Serological test were indicative of dengue virus (Elisa PAN BIO) in 20 (50%) of which 8 (25%) were primary dengue and 12 (30%) were secondary dengue. The outcome of therapy mainly supportive were excellent. Benign acute myositis occurs often in association with viral infection. In the present study, Dengue virus was positive in 20 (50%) children. Benign acute myositis can be differentiated from more serious causes of walking difficulty by presence of calf and thigh muscle tenderness on stretching, normal power and deep tendon reflex and elevated CPK.

  12. Electronystagmography versus videonystagmography in diagnosis of vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Pepaś, Renata; Sułkowski, Wiesław J; Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Olszewski, Jurek

    2012-03-01

    Vertigo is a very common symptom mainly caused by the lesion of vestibular system (peripheral or central) and often accompanied by some work-related diseases and occupational intoxications. The aim of this study was to assess the value of electronystagmography (ENG) and videonystagmography (VNG) for diagnosing vertigo of various origin. The study included four groups, 25 subjects each, of patients suffering from vestibular disorders of peripheral, central and mixed origin versus healthy controls. All were examined by means of ENG and VNG, using the bithermal caloric test with 30°C and 44°C air irrigations of the ears. The findings (frequency of induced nystagmus FRQ, its slow phase velocity SPV, canal paresis CP, directional preponderance DP, vestibular excitability VE) were analysed and compared. In all patients with vertigo due to vestibular neuritis, barotrauma and kinetosis, significant CP, the important sign of peripheral site of vestibular lesion was identified both in ENG and VNG. None of the patients with central origin disorders showed CP in VNG; in the majority of cases DP was observed. However, in ENG we found CP in 5 patients with central origin disorders. There were no essential differences between ENG and VNG in measurements of FRQ and SPV except for higher values in VNG in controls and patients with mixed vertigo. The results suggest that the VNG should be recommended in preference as the valuable method to assess vertigo and to discriminate between the peripheral and the central vestibular lesions.

  13. La Mettrie's soul: vertigo, fever, massacre, and The Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Ian

    2009-01-01

    La Mettrie's materialist and monistic philosophy is that of a military doctor, knowing what dysentery did to his own mind, watching his regiment destroyed at Fontenoy, running French field hospitals in Flanders. He learned brain science in the injuries of his fellows. He knew pain and that man's main positive drive was sex. He despised the prudish hypocrisies of feeble materialists like Diderot and Voltaire. His brutal military life and his hedonism made him the most coherent monist against Cartesian dualism. His study of vertigo is sound clinical medicine, which well accords with one trend in today's medical practice.

  14. Ambiguous Authorities: Vertigo and the Auteur Figure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Licari-Guillaume

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines authorial performance in the context of DC’s Vertigo line. In the 1990s, Vertigo gained its reputation as an innovative and progressive imprint by promoting the work of British scriptwriters, who were hailed as true author figures, despite the inherently collaborative nature of the mainstream comics industry. In a manner reminiscent of “auteur theory”, writers such as Neil Gaiman, Warren Ellis or Grant Morrison developed attractive author personas which they consistently displayed through interviews, letter columns or social media, but also, more importantly, by inserting their avatars within the comics they scripted. Upon closer examination, however, it becomes clear that their work in fact simultaneously asserts and destabilizes writerly authority, in a manner that is consistent with Linda Hutcheon’s view of postmodernity. By multiplying author figures and playfully disseminating authority, Vertigo authors question their own authorial control over the text, asserting instead the crucial role played by the reader.

  15. Vertigo as a Predominant Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim F. Imran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that affects multiple organ systems. Neurological manifestations of sarcoidosis are less common and can include cranial neuropathies and intracranial lesions. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who presented with vertigo and uveitis. Extensive workup including brain imaging revealed enhancing focal lesions. A lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was initially treated with prednisone, which did not adequately control his symptoms, and then was switched to methotrexate with moderate symptomatic improvement. Our patient had an atypical presentation with vertigo as the predominant manifestation of sarcoidosis. Patients with neurosarcoidosis typically present with systemic involvement of sarcoidosis followed by neurologic involvement. Vertigo is rarely reported as an initial manifestation. This case highlights the importance of consideration of neurosarcoidosis as an entity even in patients that may not have a typical presentation or systemic involvement of disease.

  16. [Megadolichobasilar anomaly causing acute deafness with vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, M H; Radeloff, A; Bink, A; Gstöttner, W; Ziemann, U

    2008-01-01

    Megadolichobasilar anomaly, a dilatant arteriopathy of the basilar artery attributable to chronic arterial hypertension, can cause cranial nerve compression syndromes of the cerebellopontine angle or infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation. In this paper, we report on a patient with known megadolichobasilar anomaly and a partially thrombosed fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery, who presented with acute-onset vertigo and subsequent deafness due to thromboembolic occlusion of the labyrinthine artery. Because of the vascular origin of the patient's symptoms, his vertigo disappeared over time while the deafness persisted.

  17. Abnormality in cerebellar blood flow in solo vertigo patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahori, Takeshi; Nishijima, Michiharu; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system as a cause of vertigo and dizziness. We used Xe-CT to study cerebellar blood flow in 53 patients who ranged in age from 35 to 85 years. The patients were divided into two groups. One of them was the vertigo group that comprised 28 patients with rotatory sensation, and the other, the non-vertigo group of 25 patients with a sensation other than rotation. At the stage of severe symptoms, there was decreased cerebellar blood flow in all patients of both, the vertigo and the non-vertigo groups, and a decrease in the bilateral cerebellar hemisphere was observed in five patients and in a unilateral hemisphere in three patients of the vertigo group. By comparison, in the non-vertigo group, unilateral decrease of cerebellar blood flow was observed in only one patient, and a bilateral decrease in five. At the stage of severe symptoms, the mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 40.5±8.0 ml/100 g/min (n=16 sides) in the vertigo group and 45.3±9.5 ml/100 g/min (n=12 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the stage of moderate symptoms, blood flow image was normal in four of 14 vertigo patients and in seven of 12 non-vertigo patients. The mean regional blood flow was 47.8±8.6 ml/100 g/min (n=28 sides) in the vertigo group and 47.1±5.1 ml/100 g/min (n=24 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the asymptomatic stage, a high proportion of normal blood flow images (nine of 16 vertigo patients and 10 of 10 non-vertigo patients) was observed. The mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 51.6±10.7 ml/100 g/min (n=32 sides) in the vertigo group and 52.8±8.5 ml/100 g/min (n=20 sides) in the non-vertigo group. This study demonstrates that a unilateral or bilateral decrease in blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system may cause vertigo and dizziness. It also shows that Xe-CT of the cerebellum may be a valuable examination modality for the diagnosis and treatment of vertigo and dizziness. (author)

  18. Vertigo in neurological practice (common problems of diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kosivtsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with vertigo seek neurological advice. In spite of the availability of current examination techniques, a differential diagnosis of vertigo is not frequently made. The paper discusses the terminology and classification of vertigo and clinical methods for diagnosing central and peripheral vestibulopathies. It considers the common problems of management of patients with diseases of the central and peripheral vestibular systems, the use of piracetam and other drugs to stimulate rehabilitation.

  19. Prevalence and etiology of vertigo in adult rural population

    OpenAIRE

    Abrol, Raman; Nehru, Vikas I.; Venkatramana, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A survey on 10.000 adults between the age of 20 and 79 years out of a total population of 66.186 persons in rural settlements under the inrisduction of Union Territory of Chandigarh between June 1993 to June 1995 was conducted to find out the prevalence and various causes of vertigo. In general community, in rural population, we found that more people suffer from non-otologic vertigo rather than otologic vertigo. We found overall prevalence of vertigo in rural adult community to be 0.71%. Ver...

  20. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  1. The interpretation of static positional nystagmus in a balance clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Hanna; Hopkins, Matthew; Anderson, Rebecca; Patel, Vignapti; Rogers, Jennifer

    2017-12-01

    To review the current criteria for the interpretation of positional nystagmus (PN). Videonystagmography data on PN was collected for 90 patients presenting for balance testing with a history of vertigo or imbalance (excluding those diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). These were compared to normative data from 90 asymptomatic subjects. A literature review was carried out regarding threshold criteria for clinically significant PN. These were evaluated using the data collected. Clinic group: 90 patients; 37 male, 53 female. Age range 15-82 years. Normative group: Ninety subjects; 31 male, 59 female. Age range 21-79 years. PN was seen in 75.6% of the clinic group and in 50% of the normative group. The prevalence of nystagmus of slow phase velocity (SPV) > 3°/s was significantly higher in the clinic group than the normative group. The maximum SPV recorded in each position was greater from the clinic group than the normative group. This study supports the use of normative thresholds for SPV for both horizontal and vertical PN. A normative threshold of >3°/s for horizontal and >7°/s for vertical nystagmus is proposed.

  2. Vértigo en el niño Vertigo in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El vértigo en el niño es una patología poco frecuente, pero además ha sido subvalorada y poco citada en la literatura hasta la década de los 80. Definido como la sensación de movimiento del propio cuerpo o del ambiente circundante, es un síntoma que se origina por múltiples causas. En este artículo se describen los diferentes cuadros de vértigo en el niño y las características clínicas que permiten su identificación. Especial importancia tiene una historia clínica detallada y un examen otológico y neurológico completos para efectuar el diagnóstico. Destacan la otitis media y las variantes migrañosas, en especial el vértigo paroxístico benigno, como las causas más frecuentes de vértigo en la infancia. El adecuado enfrentamiento del niño con vértigo, que parte por la sospecha clínica en un paciente que puede no dar las claves anamnésticas por su corta edad, es fundamental para establecer el diagnóstico correcto y efectuar los tratamientos adecuados según la causa de vértigo en cada caso.Vertigo is uncommon in children, but it is usually underecognized and it has not been well referenced in the medical literature until the 1980s. It is defined as a subjective sensation of movement of the body or the surrounding, and it is a symptom that may have multiple causes. This paper reviews the different types of vertigo in children, emphasizing their clinical features that may be useful in establishing the diagnosis. Of particular relevance is an accurate clinical history and a complete otologic and neurologic examination. More common causes of pediatric vertigo are otitis media and migraine variants, particularly benign paroxysmal vertigo. An appropriate approach to the child with vertigo begins with the clinical suspicion, based on a detailed clinical history and examination, and specific tests. Diagnosis should be followed by adequate symptomatic treatment and management of the underlying specific causes.

  3. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Alsalman

    Full Text Available Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic

  4. Vertigo/dizziness as a Drugs’ adverse reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimirri, Serafina; Aiello, Rossana; Mazzitello, Carmela; Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Altomonte, Mariolina; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vertigo, dizziness, and nausea encompass a spectrum of balance-related symptoms caused by a variety of etiologies. Balance is affected by many systems: Proprioceptive pathways and visual, cerebellar, vestibulocochlear, and vascular / vasovagal systems. Vertigo is a subtype of dizziness, in which a subject, as a result to a dysfunction of the vestibular system, improperly experiments the perception of motion. The most useful clinical subdivision is to categorize vertigo into true vertigo and pseudovertigo, whereas from a pathophysiological point of view, vertigo can be classified into central, peripheral, and psychogenic. It is not easy to identify the cause of vertigo since the patients often are not able to precisely describe their symptoms. An impressive list of drugs may cause vertigo or dizziness. Materials and Methods: The aim of the present study was to analyze the data extracted from the reporting cards of the ADRs (adverse drug reactions), received at our Pharmacovigilance Regional Center (Calabria, Italy) in 2012. In particular, the data concerning the occurrence of vertigo and dizziness, after taking certain classes of drugs, have been considered. Results: Our results show that, among the side-effects of different classes of drugs such as anti-convulsants, anti-hypertensives, antibiotics, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, and anti-inflammatory, also vertigo or dizziness are included. Conclusions: Spontaneous reports of vertigo or dizziness, as side-effect of certain drugs, received at our Pharmacovigilance Center, represented the 5% of all reports in 2012. Considering the high incidence of such an ADR for several drugs’ classes, it can be speculated that under-reporting also affect vertigo and dizziness. Despite the fact that these ADRs might not represent a direct threaten for life, indirectly they can cause secondary damage to patients such as falls, fractures etc. Balance should be accurately monitored during drug use and particularly

  5. [Value of visual nystagmography in diagnosis of the patients with vertebrobasilar transient ischemic vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Zhou, Huifang

    2007-07-01

    To study the changes of visual nystagmography(VNG) in patients with vertebrobasilar transient ischemic vertigo(VBTIV), explore their clinical value in diagnosis of the patients with VBTIV. Thirty-eight patients who complained vertigo and imbalance with VBTIV were selected as experimental group for testing of visual nystagmography (VNG). Twenty normal persons were chosen as control group. The result was analyzed. In the experimental group, there was one case that had spontaneous nystagmus and 29 cases (76.3%) with positional nystagmus. The positional nystagmus intension in those patients was (4.08+/-3.18) degrees/s, which was much higher as compared with the control group( P VNG be used as important diagnostic test for patients with VBTIV and might be helpful for the location diagnosis of VBTIV.

  6. [Differential diagnosis and treatment of vertigo in hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, V A

    2005-01-01

    To study causes of vertigo in hypertensive patients and specify approaches to its treatment. Material and methods. Prevalence and causes of vertigo were analysed in 285 patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The examination included 24-h monitoring of arterial pressure (APM) and MR-tomography of the head. The majority of patients (78%) hospitalized with the diagnosis "hypertensive crisis" were diagnosed to have other diseases (headaches of tension, stroke, Meniere's syndrome and disease, etc.) the development of which was accompanied with hypertension and simulated a hypertensive crisis. Vertigo occurs in 20% hypertensive patients and is unrelated to elevated blood pressure. It is rather due to associated neurological, peripheral vestibular and other diseases. APM shows that vertigo occurs in hypotension after intake of hypotensive drugs. In hypertensive patients treatment of vertigo should not be directed only to management of elevated pressure but demands treatment of underlying disease. Vertigo plus mnestic disorders are effectively corrected with tanakan in a dose 120-160 mg/day. Vertigo in hypertensive patients is not caused by elevated pressure but related with concomitant neurological or peripheral vestibular diseases as well as hypotension. Hypertensive patients with vertigo need correction of the condition causing it.

  7. Probable Correlation between Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Vertigo in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Temporomandibular disorder (TMD covers a variety of clinical problems, and some epidemiologic studies have tried to indicate mechanisms of interaction and association between vertigo and TMD, but this topic still is controversial. Objective To assess the presence of vertigo in elderly patients associated with TMD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with the inclusion of elderly individuals who lived independently. TMD was assessed by dental evaluation and vertigo was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and relative risk. Results There was a significant association (p = 0.0256 between the TMD and vertigo (odds ratio = 2.3793. Conclusion These results highlighted the importance of identifying risk factors for vertigo that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential to prevent future episodes, as well as managing the process of rehabilitation of elderly patients in general.

  8. Pesquisa do nistagmo/vertigem de posição e avaliação eletronistagmográfica em um grupo de indivíduos portadores de diabetes Mellitus tipo I Search of the nystagmus/ positional vertigo and electronystagmographic evaluation in a group of diabetics Mellitus type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian P. Scherer

    2002-05-01

    search the nystagmus/ positional vertigo and electronystagmographic evaluation, and to identify possible alterations. Study design: Prospective clinical. Material and method: 12 Diabetics Type I, insulin dependents, between 12 and 27 years old, and members of Associação Riograndense de Apoio aos Diabéticos (ARAD. To observe the vestibular reactions, we did a specific interview, otoscopy, tympanometric, search of the Nystagmus/ Positional Vertigo and Electronystagmographic Evaluation in the selected sample. Results: We verified Periferic Irritable Vestibular Syndrome in 75% of the altered results. 62,5% in this group didn't present otoneurologyc symptom. Conclusions: We note that the effect of Diabetes Type I in the vestibular function may be taken into consideration like any other usual complications, since the same may occur in asymptomatic patients, and also because with the early etiologic diagnostic it is possible to help in the prevention of this disease's complications.

  9. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... The following organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ... Urology Care Foundation -- www. ...

  10. Prevalence and etiology of vertigo in adult rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, R; Nehru, V I; Venkatramana, Y

    2001-01-01

    A survey on 10.000 adults between the age of 20 and 79 years out of a total population of 66.186 persons in rural settlements under the inrisduction of Union Territory of Chandigarh between June 1993 to June 1995 was conducted to find out the prevalence and various causes of vertigo. In general community, in rural population, we found that more people suffer from non-otologic vertigo rather than otologic vertigo. We found overall prevalence of vertigo in rural adult community to be 0.71%. Vertigo secondary to cardiovascular disease was most common and prevalent in 0.32% of population. Neurologic disease accounted for vertigo in 0.14%, metabolic disease in 0.09% and otologic disease 0.08%. Miscellaneous disorders were present in remaining 0.08% of population studied. To the best of our knowledge this study represents the first population based survey of prevalence of various causes of vertigo in general community in adult rural population.

  11. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back ...

  12. Immunoprofile of benign and malignant fibrohistiocytic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Zarbo, R J; Tomich, C E; Lloyd, R V; Courtney, R M; Crissman, J D

    1987-05-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 26 malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFH) and 61 benign fibrohistiocytic proliferations (BFHP) were evaluated immunohistochemically. An avidinbiotin-peroxidase technique was used to determine immunoreactivity for alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, muramidase, HLA-DR, leucocyte common antigen, S-100 protein, vimentin, desmin, and keratin. MFHs were consistently positive for ACT and vimentin and inconsistently reactive for the other antigens. MFHs were negative for LCA suggesting a mesenchymal origin for these lesions. In the MFH histologic subtypes, antigen expression was not significantly different to be useful in their classification. Also no distinctive pattern emerged relative to immunoreactivity and tumor location. The benign lesions, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, dermatofibroma, and oral benign fibrous histiocytoma differed from the MFHs in that they were often LCA positive, suggesting origin from hematopoetic mononuclear-macrophages. The immunoprofiles of peripheral fibromas and "giant cell" fibromas were felt to be consistent with origin from mesenchymal cells. Several of the antigens studied could be used to differentiate the benign lesions studied from other benign neoplasms. The antigens were, however, of little value in separation of benign and malignant lesions.

  13. 'Cardiogenic vertigo'--true vertigo as the presenting manifestation of primary cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Toker, David E; Camargo, Carlos A

    2006-03-01

    A 90-year-old woman presented to a hospital emergency department with a brief loss of consciousness that was heralded by spinning vertigo lasting approximately 2 min. She had a long history of intermittent brief episodes of rotatory vertigo, presyncope, and non-vertiginous dizziness, occurring either with or without loss of consciousness. Although initially attributed to symptomatic carotid artery stenosis, these episodes persisted, despite surgical restoration of carotid artery blood flow 1 year after her first syncope. Her medical history was otherwise notable for hypertension, mild depression and a gradual decline in gait and balance function attributed to left hip arthritis and older age. Bedside history and examination, non-contrast head CT scan, electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiogram, and bedside cardiac telemetry. Sick sinus syndrome or severe reflex bradycardia with asystole causing recurrent, episodic vertigo, presyncope, non-vertiginous dizziness and syncope (Stokes-Adams attacks). Placement of a temporary pacing wire, followed by surgical implantation of a single-chamber ventricular (VVI) pacemaker.

  14. Prognostic parameters in benign astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, L; Gjerris, F; Klinken, L

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the prognosis of different types of benign astrocytomas and to ascertain whether patients with partially resected benign astrocytomas, or any subtype of these, would benefit from postoperative radiotherapy, we studied retrospectively material comprising 300 patients with benign astro...... time of patients with non-pilocytic supratentorial benign astrocytomas. The study emphasizes the necessity of a prospective combined multicenter analysis of the effect of radiation on benign astrocytomas....

  15. Prognostic parameters in benign astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, L; Gjerris, F; Klinken, L

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the prognosis of different types of benign astrocytomas and to ascertain whether patients with partially resected benign astrocytomas, or any subtype of these, would benefit from postoperative radiotherapy, we studied retrospectively material comprising 300 patients with benign...... time of patients with non-pilocytic supratentorial benign astrocytomas. The study emphasizes the necessity of a prospective combined multicenter analysis of the effect of radiation on benign astrocytomas....

  16. Differential diagnosis of vertigo and dizziness in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Yoshiyuki; Kitahara, Tadashi; Fukushima, Munehisa; Michiba, Takahiro; Imai, Ryusuke; Tomiyama, Youichirou; Nishiike, Suetaka; Inohara, Hidenori; Morita, Hisaki

    2014-02-01

    To establish a system of differential diagnosis for vertigo/dizziness at the Emergency Department (ED), careful history-taking of complications and examinations of nystagmus should be helpful and therefore prepared by ED staff. Vertigo/dizziness could come from various kinds of organs for equilibrium, sometimes resulting in an emergency due to the central origin. In the present study, we checked patients' background data at the ED in advance of a definitive diagnosis at the Department of Otolaryngology and examined the significance of the correlation between the data and the diagnosis. We studied a series of 120 patients with vertigo/dizziness, who visited the Departments of Emergency and Otolaryngology between April 2011 and March 2012. At the ED, we first checked patients' backgrounds and carried out neurologic and neuro-otologic examinations. At the Department of Otolaryngology, we finally diagnosed all the patients according to the criteria and classified the origins of vertigo/dizziness into central and non-central diseases. The ratio of patients with disease of central origin was 12.5% and that for non-central origin was 87.5%. The risk factors for cerebrovascular disease such as hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes were also the risk factors for central vertigo/dizziness by the chi-squared test. To predict a central origin for vertigo/dizziness, only gaze nystagmus was the significant factor by multivariate regression analysis.

  17. Central vertigo and dizziness: epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and common causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Mehmet

    2008-11-01

    Dizziness is a common complaint among patients seen by primary care physicians, neurologists, and otolaryngologists. The most common causes of dizziness are peripheral vestibular disorders, but central nervous system disorders must be excluded. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology of dizziness, differentiating between central and peripheral vertigo, and central causes of dizziness. Dizziness is among the most common complaints in medicine, affecting approximately 20% to 30% of persons in the general population. Dizziness is a general term for a sense of disequilibrium. Vertigo is a subtype of dizziness, defined as an illusion of movement caused by asymmetric involvement of the vestibular system. Central vestibular lesions affecting the pons, medulla, or cerebellum cause vertigo, nausea, vomiting, severe ataxia, multidirectional nystagmus that is not suppressed by optic fixation, and other neurologic signs. The other types of dizziness are dysequilibrium without vertigo, presyncope, and psychophysiologic dizziness, which is often associated with anxiety, depression, and panic disorder. Epidemiologic studies indicate that central causes are responsible for almost one-fourth of the dizziness experience by patients. The patient's history, neurologic examination, and imaging studies are usually the key to differentiation of peripheral and central causes of vertigo. The most common central causes of dizziness and vertigo are cerebrovascular disorders related to the vertebrobasilar circulation, migraine, multiple sclerosis, tumors of the posterior fossa, neurodegenerative disorders, some drugs, and psychiatric disorders.

  18. [Benign chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrie, A; Thurel, C

    1994-09-15

    Recent data indicate that 25 to 30% of the population in industrialized countries suffers from benign chronic pain. Among these patients, 50 to 75% are professionally incapable for varied lengths of time, from a few days to some weeks or months, or even definitively. The aetiology and clinical presentation of chronic benign pain are enormously varied because this definition includes such different pathologies as headache, pain of rheumatologic, postsurgical, organic, and post-zoster origin, lombalgia, radiculalgia, post-amputation pain, neuropathologic pain, causalgia, algoneurodystrophic pain, psychosomatic and idiopathic pain. Since these syndromes and causes of pain could not be discussed individually, they have been grouped according to their neurophysiology and pathophysiology.

  19. Benign Jaw Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, Anita; Villa, Alessandro; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    There are both odontogenic and nonodontogenic benign lesions in the maxilla and mandible. These lesions may have similar imaging features, and the key radiographic features are presented to help the clinician narrow the differential diagnosis and plan patient treatment. Both intraoral and panoramic radiographs and advanced imaging features are useful in assessing the benign lesions of the jaws. The location, margins, internal contents, and effects of the lesions on adjacent structures are important features in diagnosing the lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Benign bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilday, D.L.; Ash, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions

  1. Uraemia from Benign Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tance,' and the criteria for the recognition of malignant hypertension have become so well established that there is no dispute about the diagnosis when this condition ends in uraemia. By contrast, benign hypertension mani- fests itself mainly as cardiac or cerebrovascular disease,"" and although the occurrence of renal ...

  2. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  3. Benign gastric filling defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  4. CT application in diagnosing benign diseases of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Jingfang; Chen Qi; He Guoxiang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of CT for diagnosing benign diseases of breast. Methods: The breast CT scan and mammography were performed on 44 patients (78 focus). The accuracy of determining the position and nature of breast diseases was compared between the two mentioned diagnostic methods. All cases were confirmed as breast benign disease by pathology. Results: CT played a remarkable role in the diagnosis of breast fibroadenoma and cyst, and is superior to mammography in demonstrating deep breast lesion, multiple-focus and multiple-patterns benign diseases of breast. The accuracy of CT and mammography in determining the position and nature of benign diseases of breast were 85% and 54% (x 2 = 12.58, P 2 = 8.29, P < 0.01) respectively. Conclusion: CT has a higher accuracy than mammography in determining the position and nature of breast benign disease

  5. Are thiazides effective on hypertensive vertigo? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryaman, Esra; Gökcan, Gökçen; Parmaksız, Ergün; Acar, Nurhan Ozdemir; Ozlüoğlu, Levent Naci

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the symptoms of vertigo related to hypertension resulted from endolymphatic hydrops and the efficacy of the thiazides in the treatment. A total of 24 vertigo patients without peripheric or central vestibular pathologies or hyperlipidemia were included. The study group comprised 15 patients with hypertension, including nine with regulated non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM). The control group comprised nine patients without hypertension or DM. The patients in the study group received hydrochlorothiazide treatment. The European Evaluation of Vertigo Scale (EEVS) and Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ), puretone audiometry, tympanometry, electronystagmography (ENG) for nystagmus tests, oculomotor tests, and caloric test were carried out initially and at three weeks for both groups. The results of the study group were compared to those of the control group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the scores of EEVS and VHQ at three weeks in the study group, compared to the baseline scores (for both groups p≤0.01). Our study results showed that thiazides alleviated vertigo symptoms in hypertensive patients, as measured by qualitative methods (i.e. EEVS, VHQ), but not with quantitative measurements (i.e. ENG).

  6. Brain MR imaging finding in patients with central vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chun Keun; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, You Me; Cha, Min Jung; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Geun Ho; Rhee, Chung Koo; Park, Hyun Min

    1998-01-01

    To investigate brain lesions and their locations in patients with central vertigo, as seen on MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 85 patients with central type vertigo diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and vestibular function test(VFT), and analyzed lesions fand their locations. Those located along the known central vestibular pathway were included in our study. In 29 of 85 patients(34%), lesions considered to be associated with central vertigo were detected on MR imaging. These included infarction(18 patients), hemorrhage(5), tumor(2), cavernous angioma(1), cerebellopontine angle cyst(1), tuberous sclerosis(1) and olivopontocerebellar atrophy (1);they were located in the parietal lobe(6 patients), the lateral medulla(5), the pons(5), the middle cerebellar peduncle(4), the corona radiata(3), and the cerebellar vermis(3). Thirty-eight cases showed high signal intensity lesions in deep cerebral matter, the basal ganglia, and pons but these were considered to be unrelated to central vertigo. MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of patients with central vertigo.=20

  7. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous dimenhydrinate and intravenous piracetam in patients with vertigo: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Avcu, Nazire; Yaka, Elif; Yılmaz, Serkan; Pekdemir, Murat

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficacy of dimenhydrinate and piracetam in patients with vertigo. A blinded, parallel group, superiority, randomised clinical trial was carried out on patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with vertigo. Healthy adult patients presenting to the ED with undifferentiated vertigo were included in the study. The efficacy of intravenous dimenhydrinate (100 mg) and intravenous piracetam (2000 mg) for reducing the intensity of vertigo was compared in two randomised treatment groups using a 10-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The determination of NRS scores was performed at presentation and at the 30th minute of presentation, after the study drug was implemented, both in immobile and ambulatory positions. The primary outcome variable was reduction in vertigo intensity documented on the NRS at the 30th minute after medication administration, analysed by intention to treat. A total of 94 patients were included in the randomisation (n=47 in both groups). The baseline NRS scores were 7.55±2.00 in the dimenhydrinate group and 8.19±1.79 in the piracetam group. The changes from baseline for dimenhydrinate and piracetam were 2.92±3.11 and 3.75±3.40 (difference -0.83 (95% CI -2.23 to 0.57)) in the immobile position and were 2.04±3.07 and 2.72±2.91 (difference -0.68 (95% CI -2.03 to 0.67)) in the ambulatory position. Rescue medication need was similar in both treatment groups (p=0.330), and only one adverse reaction was reported. We found no evidence of a difference between dimenhydrinate and piracetam in relieving the symptoms of vertigo. Clinical Trials Registration ID: NCT01890538. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy in benign pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Rodrigo S; Cotta, Leonardo R; Neves, Marcelo F; Abelha, David L; Tavora, Jose E

    2006-01-01

    We report our experience with 43 retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy for benign kidney disease. All patients had a poor function from obstructive uropathology and renal atrophy. None of these patients had a previous lumbotomy. Retroperitoneoscopy was performed with 4 trocar port technique in a lateral position. The retroperitoneal space is created by using a Gaur's balloon made of sterile glove. The approach to vascular pedicle was done posteriorly and vessels were clipped by metal and Hem-o-lock (Weck Closure Systems, North Carolina, USA) clips. The sample was intact extracted in an Endo-Bag prolonging one trocar incision. Median operative time was 160 minutes and median blood loss was 200 mL. Four cases (9%) were converted to open surgery: one case due to bleeding and 3 cases due to technical difficulties regarding perirenal adherences. Most patients (39) checked out from the Hospital in day two. Four of them were left over 3 days due to wound complications. Retroperitoneoscopy offers a safe, effective and reproductive access to nephrectomy for benign pathologies.

  10. Benign pneumatosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenton, L.Z.; Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Background. In pediatrics, pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is usually due to necrotizing enterocolitis in premature newborns. Beyond infancy, PI is uncommon. ''Benign pneumatosis'' is PI in patients with few or no symptoms that resolves with conservative management. Objective. Our goal was to better characterize benign PI in children. Our investigation focused on identifying underlying risk factors, symptoms at time of diagnosis, management and outcome. Materials and methods. Available medical records and radiographs of children with pneumatosis intestinalis from 1990 to 1998 were reviewed for underlying conditions, symptoms at time of radiographs, management and outcome. Results. Thirty-seven children (mean age 4 years) were included. Thirty-two children had identifiable risk factors. Twenty -five children were immunocompromised by their underlying conditions or therapeutic regimen. Thirty-five children were managed conservatively with resolution of PI. Two patients, however, required surgery and one patient died. Conclusion. Benign pneumatosis does occur in children. The majority have underlying risk factors, most commonly related to immunosuppression. Clinical deterioration is the most useful indicator for surgical intervention. In most patients PI resolves with conservative management. (orig.)

  11. [Emergency care of vertigo patients: suggestions for efficient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Takei, Yasuhiko; Matsuda, Takeaki; Karaho, Takehiro; Morita, Masahiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    Some diseases in which persons show vertigo or dizziness may be life-threatening, regardless of symptom severity, and require careful attention. These include diseases of the inner ear, central nervous system, and cardiovascular manifestation. In May 2006, a group in charge of primary emergency consultation began work enabling physicians to treat vertigo patients more efficiently and safely, as detailed in this report. Of the 173 persons with vertigo hospitalized from January 2004 to March 2008, six had cerebrovascular manifestations clarified only after hospitalization, underscoring the importance of careful examination, especially of those 75 years of age older, having continuous headache, having severe trunk ataxia despite apparently mild eye nystagmus, or reporting a history of high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or ischemic heart disease.

  12. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  13. Benign fibroosseous lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Köseoğlu Seçgin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Benign fibroosseous lesions represent a group of lesions that share the same basic evolutive mechanism and are characterized by replacement of normal bone with a fibrous connective tissue that gradually undergoes mineralization. These lesions are presented by a variety of diseases including developmental, reactive-dysplastic processes and neoplasms. Depending on the nature and amount of calcified tissue, they can be observed as radiolucent, mixed or radiopaque. Their radiographic features could be well-defined or indistinguishable from the surrounding bone tissue. They can be asymptomatic as in osseous dysplasias and can be detected incidentally on radiographs, or they can lead to expansion in the affected bone as in ossifying fibroma. All fibroosseous lesions seen in the jaws and face are variations of the same histological pattern. Therefore, detailed clinical and radiographic evaluation in differential diagnosis is important. In this review, fibroosseous benign lesions are classified as osseous dysplasia, fibrous dysplasia and fibroosseous tumors; and radiographic features and differential diagnosis of these lesions are reviewed taking into account this classification.

  14. Benign cementoblastoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitapathi Revathi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Benign cementoblastoma is a rare odontogenic tumor of mesenchymal origin comprising only less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The radiographic features is very characteristic in which the tumor mass is attached to the root of the tooth. Histopathologically benign cementoblastoma and osteoblastoma are indistinguishable. Here, a case report of 28 year old patient with benign cementoblastoma is presented along with a brief review of literature.

  15. Radiation therapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.; Donaldson, S.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the evaluation and treatment of benign disease. The text begins with a chapter concerning standards of practice by an eminent malpractice lawyer, thereby clarifying the medical-legal implications of the radiation treatment of benign disease. The text then lists, in alphabetic order, those benign diseases which have been or are currently treated with radiotherapy for each disease entity. A feature is the survey of current radiation practice in the United States

  16. Migraine-associated vertigo and dizziness as presenting complaint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Migraine-associated vertigo (MV) remains a developing entity because accepted diagnostic criteria are unavailable. Patients present with debilitating dizziness without experiencing headache, and are often misdiagnosed as anxious. The condition is manageable in primary care without the need for ...

  17. SERUM LIPID PROFILE AS AN ETIOLOGY OF VERTIGO : A STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study of lipid profile was done in 60 patients of vertigo at E.L.M.C. Lucknow from 2011 to 2014. All components of serum cholesterol were analyzed. Serum cholesterol and hyperlipidemia as an etiology of the atherosclerosis of all blood vessel s also have a role in vestibulo - cochlear vessels. It was found that there were 34 females and 26 males and maximum number of patients (63.33% in the age group of 31 - 50years. Appreciable difference (p<0.05 in the mean value of total lipid, total cholester ol, triglycerides and phospholipids in the control and study group was found but difference was not significant in the mean value of HDL, LDL and VLDL cholesterol level. Four cases of diabetes and ten cases of hypertension of 60 vertigo cases were having m arked vertigo of longer duration. These findings were similar to Mehra Y.N. Thus we find that serum lipid studies are important in the patients of vertigo for the diagnosis and management

  18. Usefulness of MR angiography in cases of central vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Nobuya; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2002-07-01

    Syndromal vertigo is defined as a combination of vestibular function disturbance and cranial nerve or cerebral function disturbance. There is evidence that MR angiography (MRA), providing angiogram-like images of the intracranial and extracranial arterial flow, could replace invasive methods for diagnosing central vertigo. The purpose of this study was to provide simplified MRA criteria for identifying morbidity and to analyze the relation between imaging findings and clinical manifestations. Thirty-three individuals with symptoms of syndromal vertigo and vertebrobasilar territory disease were examined by equilibriometry, MR imaging (MRI) and MRA. Under MRA, vertebral artery (VA) stenosis was more common than VA occlusion (23 vs. nine cases, respectively). A basilar artery (BA) deviation was found in eight cases (24.2%). Twenty-five VA or BA abnormalities (75.8%) were found, and eight combined VA and BA abnormalities (24.2%) were found. We emphasize three points as follows. MRA is advantageous over conventional angiography for less invasive method. MRA can reveal abnormalities even in cases of 'solo-vertigo' with no observed neurologic abnormalities. In our series, abnormalities were confirmed by MRA even in cases with no concomitant such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, or diabetes mellitus, which are regarded as latent risk factors for stroke.

  19. A postmarketing study of flunarizine in migraine and vertigo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelhart, J.; de Bock, G.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Tromp, T.P.; Springer, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    This prospective, open multi-centre study on flunarizine focused on the risk/benefit ratio of the use of flunarizine in the prophylaxis of migraine and in the treatment of vertigo, due to disorder of the vestibular system. The assessment of risks focused on the incidence of new events of depression

  20. Otoneurologisk udredning ved akut opstået svimmelhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Ninn-Pedersen, Mirjana; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuronitis and Menière's disease cause most cases of acute vertigo. However, doctors must consider central neurological reasons to vertigo. If it is determined that a patient has oto-neurological vertigo, the next task is to determine whether the p...

  1. Otoneurologisk udredning ved akut opstået svimmelhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Ninn-Pedersen, Mirjana; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuronitis and Menière's disease cause most cases of acute vertigo. However, doctors must consider central neurological reasons to vertigo. If it is determined that a patient has oto-neurological vertigo, the next task is to determine whether...

  2. Dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your brain works to sort out the confusion. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This condition causes an intense and brief but ... up or experience a blow to the head. BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo. Infection. ...

  3. The prevalence and characteristics of metabolic syndrome in patients with vertigo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a condition that increases the risk of coronary artery disease and cerebral infarction. We determined the prevalence of MetS in vertigo patients and clinically investigated the association between MetS and vertigo. STUDY DESIGN: Case-control study. METHODS: The subjects were 333 patients, including 107 males and 226 females, who presented with vertigo as a primary symptom. MetS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation definition, which is based on waist circumference, blood serum levels, and blood pressure. RESULTS: MetS was detected in 53 (15.9% of 333 vertigo patients, including 24 males (22.4% and 29 females (12.8%; i.e., the frequency of MetS was significantly higher among the male patients than the female patients. The overall prevalence of MetS (15.9% among vertigo patients did not differ from that observed among general adults in previous Japanese surveillance studies; however, MetS was significantly more common among the vertigo patients in males than general adult males. The prevalence of MetS was also examined in five types of vertigo, Concomitant MetS was noted in many males with vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI and isolated vertigo of unknown etiology. CONCLUSION: It was suggested that MetS is involved in the development of vertigo in males. MetS might be a risk factor for vascular vertigo such as VBI in males. The high frequency of MetS among males with vertigo of unknown etiology suggested that the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome is involved in this type of isolated vertigo.

  4. The prevalence and characteristics of metabolic syndrome in patients with vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Shirota, Shiho; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a condition that increases the risk of coronary artery disease and cerebral infarction. We determined the prevalence of MetS in vertigo patients and clinically investigated the association between MetS and vertigo. Case-control study. The subjects were 333 patients, including 107 males and 226 females, who presented with vertigo as a primary symptom. MetS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation definition, which is based on waist circumference, blood serum levels, and blood pressure. MetS was detected in 53 (15.9%) of 333 vertigo patients, including 24 males (22.4%) and 29 females (12.8%); i.e., the frequency of MetS was significantly higher among the male patients than the female patients. The overall prevalence of MetS (15.9%) among vertigo patients did not differ from that observed among general adults in previous Japanese surveillance studies; however, MetS was significantly more common among the vertigo patients in males than general adult males. The prevalence of MetS was also examined in five types of vertigo, Concomitant MetS was noted in many males with vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) and isolated vertigo of unknown etiology. It was suggested that MetS is involved in the development of vertigo in males. MetS might be a risk factor for vascular vertigo such as VBI in males. The high frequency of MetS among males with vertigo of unknown etiology suggested that the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome is involved in this type of isolated vertigo.

  5. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Shirota, Shiho; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a condition that increases the risk of coronary artery disease and cerebral infarction. We determined the prevalence of MetS in vertigo patients and clinically investigated the association between MetS and vertigo. STUDY DESIGN: Case-control study. METHODS: The subjects were 333 patients, including 107 males and 226 females, who presented with vertigo as a primary symptom. MetS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation...

  6. Prevalence and clinical symptoms of migrainous vertigo in Germany - a population based study

    OpenAIRE

    Feldmann, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the epidemiology of migrainous vertigo (MV) in the general population by assessing the prevalence, clinical features, co morbid conditions, quality of life, and health care utilization. Methods: We screened a representative sample of the adult population in Germany (n=4,869) for moderate or severe dizziness/vertigo and followed up with validated neurotologic telephone interviews (n=1003). Diagnostic criteria for MV were as follows: 1. recurrent vestibular vertigo, 2....

  7. Nihilism: a benign denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2003-06-01

    Nihilism is the belief that all possible knowledge on a given topic has been amassed and codified. Ranging from benign denial to deliberate attempts at excommunication, nihilism is often encountered in the history of medicine. Eustachius, Columbus, and Sylvius strongly criticized Vesalius and defended the authority of Galen. Riolan fervently rejected Harvey's monumental work on the circulation of blood. Gross stated that no honest and sensible surgeon would ever sanction thyroidectomy. Sandstrom's discovery of the parathyroids was met with silence. Transplantation of parathyroids by Mandl was not appreciated when announced. Aristotle's dictum that the heart cannot withstand serious injury led to Paget's statement that cardiac surgery had reached the limits set by nature, which no new techniques could overcome. The first Billroth I operation was welcomed as, "Hopefully, also the last." Pancreatic surgery was opposed because the organ was of no clinical interest and was impossible for surgeons to reach. Pancreatic transplantation was rejected for many years, despite good results. When Blundell used blood transfusion for postpartum hemorrhage, critics averred that his next exploit would be radical removal of the spleen. Bassini stated that it could be risky to publish more about radical treatment of inguinal hernias. Carcinomas of the lower sigmoid and upper rectum were deemed untreatable because of their inaccessibility. Colostomy during pediatric surgery was rejected many times. Although it is difficult for the human mind to move from a familiar point of view, this propensity should not infect science, thereby impeding advancement.

  8. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  9. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hh

    2011-07-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  10. Benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Karstrup, Steen

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of ultrasonography (US)-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) on the volume of benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules and any nodule-related symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ILP was performed in 16 patients with normal thyroid function and a solid...... benign thyroid nodule. None of the patients had uptake on a radionuclide scan. Patients underwent one ILP session. A needle was positioned in the thyroid nodule with US guidance, and the laser fiber was placed in the lumen of the needle. Patients were treated for 287-1,200 seconds with an output power...... of 1-3 W. ILP was performed with continuous US guidance and terminated when the echogenic changes were stationary. Thyroid nodule volume and thyroid function were evaluated before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. During the same period, 15 untreated patients (control group) were followed up...

  11. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  12. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Greco; G. F. Macri; A. Gallo; M. Fusconi; A. De Virgilio; G. Pagliuca; C. Marinelli; M. de Vincentiis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a su...

  13. Sonographic examination of epiaortic vessels in patients with peripheral vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaggio, G; Gargano, R; Campisi, A; Cantisani, V; Ricci, P; Gallina, S; Midiri, M; Caruso, G

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the utility of echo-color-Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) of extracranial brain-supplying vessels in patients with peripheral vertigo of unknown origin. One-hundred-fifty-six patients (study group; 42 male and 114 female; mean age 61.86 ± 14.14) and 161 patients (control group; 80 male and 81 female; mean age 62.31 ± 13.69) were prospectively evaluated with CDU of extracranial brain-supplying vessels. Plaques in common and/or internal carotid artery (CA), arterial wall intima-media thickness (IMT) of common CA and peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistive index (RI) of vertebral arteries (VA) were evaluated. Parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (Mann-Whitney U-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) tests were applied. Logistic regression analysis was performed to provide odds ratio indicating the magnitude of risk of vertigo. Independent variables consisting of characteristics (age, sex), vascular risk factors (hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension) and CDU variables (IMT, plaque, PSV and RI of VA) were considered. Plaques were found in 31 (19.8%) patients of study group and in 43 (26.7%) patients of control group. IMT > 1 mm was found in 98 (62.8%) patients of study group and in 125 (77.6%) patients of control group.Statistical tests, applied to PSV and RI, showed no significant difference (p-value >0.05). At logistic regression analysis, vertigo was associated with age, sex, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension and IMT (p  .05). IMT is the only CDU variable significantly associated with vertigo, especially in the lower age-classes (35-45 and 45-55) of study group.

  14. SERUM LIPID PROFILE AS AN ETIOLOGY OF VERTIGO : A STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sami; Satveer Singh

    2015-01-01

    A prospective study of lipid profile was done in 60 patients of vertigo at E.L.M.C. Lucknow from 2011 to 2014. All components of serum cholesterol were analyzed. Serum cholesterol and hyperlipidemia as an etiology of the atherosclerosis of all blood vessel s also have a role in vestibulo - cochlear vessels. It was found that there were 34 females and 26 males and maximum number of patients (63.33%) in the age group of 31 - 50y...

  15. Metabolic disorders in vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, H; Doroszewska, G

    2001-01-01

    Vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss are common complaints among populations of industrial countries, especially in persons older than 40 years. Numerous agents are known to incite vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, among them hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we proposed to assess the occurrence of hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia in patients suffering from vertigo, tinnitus, or hearing loss of unknown origin. Results of various tests in 48 patients were compared to those in 31 control subjects. Assessments of body mass index, blood pressure, and laryngological, audiometric, and electronystagmographic parameters were performed in all study participants. An oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate insulin levels, and lipoprotein phenotyping served to determine cholesterol, triglyceride, and lipoprotein levels. Patients were found to be significantly more overweight (on the basis of body mass index) than were the control subjects. Hypertension was more common among patients than controls, but the difference was significant only between the men in the two groups. Disturbances of glucose metabolism were found in 27.1% of patients but in only 9.7% of controls. Diabetes mellitus was not present in any controls but was identified in four patients. Hyperinsulinemia was almost twice as common in patients as in controls. Only the occurrence of hyperlipoproteinemia seemed not to differ between patients and control subjects. We conclude that such disturbances of glucose metabolism as diabetes mellitus and hyperinsulinemia may be responsible for inner ear diseases, whereas the role of disturbances of lipid metabolism remains vague.

  16. Benign Breast Problems and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a needle. Another example is a simple fibroadenoma . Simple fibroadenomas usually shrink or go away on their own. ... Cyst: A sac or pouch filled with fluid. Fibroadenoma: A type of solid, benign breast mass. Hormone: ...

  17. Light cupula: the pathophysiological basis of persistent geotropic positional nystagmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takao; Matsuda, Kazunori; Takeda, Noriaki; Uno, Atsuhiko; Kitahara, Tadashi; Horii, Arata; Nishiike, Suetaka; Inohara, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Objective To clarify the pathophysiological basis of persistent geotropic positional nystagmus (PGN) in patients with the horizontal canal type of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (H-BPPV), the time constant (TC) of nystagmus and the relationship between its slow phase eye velocity (SPV) and the angle of head rotation in supine were defined. Methods Geotropic or apogeotropic positional nystagmus was recorded by video-oculography and analysed three-dimensionally. Results Geotropic positional nystagmuses in patients with H-BPPV were classified as transient geotropic positional nystagmus with a TC of ≤35 s or PGN with a TC of >35 s. Alternatively, the TC of persistent apogeotropic positional nystagmus (AN) in patients with H-BPPV was >35 s. The direction of the SPV of patients with PGN was opposite to that of patients with AN at each head position across the range of neutral head positions. The relationship between the SPV of patients with PGN and the angle of head rotation was linearly symmetrical against that of patients with AN with respect to a line drawn on the neutral head position. Conclusions Since its TC was >35 s, it is suggested that PGN is induced by cupula deviation in response to gravity at each head position. It is also suggested that the direction of cupula deviation in patients with PGN is opposite to that of patients with AN across the neutral head positional range with no nystagmus where the long axis of cupula is in alignment with the axis of gravity. Since the pathophysiological basis of AN is considered a heavy cupula, it is suggested that PGN is conversely induced by a light cupula. PMID:25586370

  18. Benign bone-forming tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Staebler, A.; Steinborn, M.; Woertler, K.

    2001-01-01

    Benign bone-forming tumors include osteomas, enostomas, osteoid osteomas, and osteoblastomas. These lesions are often characterized by typical imaging findings on radiographs, CT and MR imaging studies. Radiologic findings and additional clinical information allow for a specific diagnosis in most cases. This review article emphasizes the radiological patterns of benign boneforming tumors as well as their epidemiological, clinical, and pathological characteristics. In addition, minimally invasive interventional procedures for the therapy of osteoid osteoma are reviewed. (orig.) [de

  19. Benign osseous metaplasia of the breast: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Alyami

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign Osseous metaplasia of the breast is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Here we present a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump. Case presentation: 38-year-old previously well woman presented with a one-year history of bilateral breast pain and a left-sided breast lump. Ultrasound and mammography suggested calcified fibroadenoma. An ultrasound-guided true cut biopsy revealed fibrous tissue containing foci of adenosis in the presence of a myoepithelial cell layer. Excision biopsy was performed, and histopathological examination showed bone matrix deposition occupying most of the nodule with peripheral hyalinized tissue but no evidence of malignancy. A diagnosis of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast was made, and the patient recovered well without recurrence after lump excision. Discussion: Only a few cases of osseous metaplasia are reported in the literature. Most reported cases are malignant, such as in fibrosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, osteoid sarcoma, osteogenic sarcoma, and osteochondrosarcoma.Very few cases of osseous sarcoma are reported in benign lesions such as fibroadenoma, pleomorphic adenoma, benign mesenchymoma, phyllodes tumor, and amyloid tumor of the breast. Joshi et al. first reported a case of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as breast lump in an HIV-positive patient [18]. We, therefore, consider this case to be the second case report of benign osseous metaplasia of the breast presenting as a breast lump, but the patient had no chronic illness. Conclusion: A breast lump can be the first presentation of benign osseous metaplasia. Keywords: Benign osseous metaplasia, Breast lump, Case report

  20. Benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Suk Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasms of the lacrimal drainage system are uncommon, but potentially life-threatening and are often difficult to diagnose. Among primary lacrimal sac tumors, benign mixed tumors are extremely rare. Histologically, benign mixed tumors have been classified as a type of benign epithelial tumor. Here we report a case of benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac.

  1. Radical Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Benign Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kavanagh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple's procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple's procedure during a 15-year period (1987–2002 were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%. On