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Sample records for benign giant cell

  1. Lung metastasis of benign giant cell tumor: a case report

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    Bosi, Thiago Carneiro da Cunha; Andrade, Fernando Coelho Goulart de; Turtelli, Celso Montenegro; Ribeiro Junior, Helio Antonio [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: tccbosi@yahoo.com.br; Fatureto, Marcelo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Pathology

    2008-05-15

    Giant cell tumor is the sixth most frequent primary bone neoplasm, affecting long bone metaphysis, most frequently in young adults. On radiological images, this tumor appears as a lytic, well-defined, eccentric lesion. The authors report a case of benign giant cell tumor in a patient who presented with lung metastases five years after undergoing resection of the primary tumor. (author)

  2. Multinucleate Giant Cells in FNAC of Benign Breast Lesions: Its Significance

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    R, Kalyani; Murthy V, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleate giant cells are described in breast aspirates. However, due to its rarity very few cases have been described cytologically. Hence recognition and correct interpretation of their presence is difficult, yet crucial for accurate diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The prospective study of FNAC (fine needle aspirate cytology) of breast lumps was conducted for a period of six months. Direct smears were prepared from the material aspirated. In case of fluid aspirates, centrifuge done and cell sediment was used for making smears. Smears were alcohol fixed and stained with PAP/H&E or air dried smears were stained with Leishman stain. Further smears were subjected to immunocytochemistry using vimentin and CD34 markers to know the origin of multinucleate giant cells. Results: We have reported 11 cases of breast lesions, which showed multinucleate giant cells on FNAC. Out of the 11 cases, Cytologically six cases showed granuloma debris with relative proportion of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleate giant cells. Two cases were diagnosed as acute suppurative granulomatous mastitis. Two cases of fibroadenoma and one case of fat necrosis showed multinucleate giant cells. Immunocytochemistry showed vimentin positivity in both stromal and histiocytic type of multinucleate giant cells and in isolated histiocytes. CD34 was focally positive in histiocytic type of giant cells. Conclusion: An effort is made to distinguish between the stromal and histiocytic type giant cells in non-neoplastic breast lesions. Further molecular studies have to be done to know the exact histogenesis and role of these multinucleate giant cells in benign lesions. PMID:25653953

  3. A diagnostic dilemma in breast pathology – benign fibroadenoma with multinucleated stromal giant cells

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    Tobbia Igdam

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroadenomas are common benign breast tumours that display a characteristic pathological morphology, although several epithelial and stromal variations exist. A very rare histological finding is the presence of multinucleated giant cells throughout the stroma of a benign fibroadenoma. Cells of this type, which are more commonly found incidentally within the interlobular stroma of breast tissue, are benign and should not be mistaken for malignant cells on microscopic examination. Unfortunately a lack of awareness of this pathological entity can lead to diagnostic confusion amongst pathologists resulting in the multinucleate giant cells being mistaken for highly mitotic cells and consequently the fibroadenoma being mistaken for a malignant lesion. This may have serious implications for the subsequent management of the patient. The presence of this unusual cell type in the stroma does not alter the prognosis of otherwise benign lesion. We encountered two such cases at our institution in a six month period recently. We present their histories along with relevant radiological, microscopic and immunohistochemical features, followed by a discussion of this unusual pathological entity.

  4. A case of recurrent giant cell tumor of bone with malignant transformation and benign pulmonary metastases

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    Gray Robert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a locally destructive tumor that occurs predominantly in long bones of post-pubertal adolescents and young adults, where it occurs in the epiphysis. The majority are treated by aggressive curettage or resection. Vascular invasion outside the boundary of the tumor can be seen. Metastasis, with identical morphology to the primary tumor, occurs in a few percent of cases, usually to the lung. On occasion GCTs of bone undergo frank malignant transformation to undifferentiated sarcomas. Here we report a case of GCT of bone that at the time of recurrence was found to have undergone malignant transformation. Concurrent metastases were found in the lung, but these were non-transformed GCT.

  5. Giant Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in a Pakistani Patient

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    Zafaruddin Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Giant hyperplasia” of the prostate is a rare pathology of the prostate gland. We report one such case, in which a successful retropubic prostatectomy was performed on an elderly male patient in Pakistan. The weight of the resected prostate was 700 g, which is the eighth largest prostate with benign prostatic hyperplasia reported.

  6. Giant Cell Arteritis

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    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  7. Peripheral giant cell granuloma

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    Padam Narayan Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so-called "giant cell epulis" is the most common oral giant cell lesion. It normally presents as a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. This article reports a case of peripheral giant cell granuloma arising at the maxillary anterior region in a 22-year-old female patient. The lesion was completely excised to the periosteum level and there is no residual or recurrent swelling or bony defect apparent in the area of biopsy after a follow-up period of 6 months.

  8. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

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    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  9. A Rare Case Report on Suboccipital Region Benign Giant Osteoma

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    Bhattarai, Binod

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report a rare case of a giant suboccipital osteoma in a 55-year-old woman presenting primarily due to cosmetic issue. We discuss the management algorithm taken in the patient, highlighting excision of a potentially curable bony tumor only after ruling out its extension to the ear cavity, mastoid ear cells, transverse sinus, and the intracranial compartment. PMID:27051540

  10. Giant Cell Fibroma

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    Tahere Nosratzehi; Lale Maleki

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma is a fibrous tumor which represents about 2 to 5% of all oral fibrotic proliferations. Compared to traumatic fibroma, giant (traumatic fibroma or irritation fibroma) cell fibroma occurs at a younger age. In about 60% of the cases the lesion is diagnosed within the first three decades of life and is slightly more in women. 50% of the cases is observed in the gum and will appear as a nodule with a papillary surface [1]. The giant cell fibroma is treated by conservative excisi...

  11. The Giant Cell.

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    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  12. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

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    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  13. Giant benign nodular hidradenoma of the shoulder: A rare tumor in orthopedic practice

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    Singhal Vibhore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear cell hidradenoma is a rare dermal tumor, which is believed to originate from the apical portion of the sweat glands. The usual size reported is 5-30 mm. It is generally found in the head, face, and upper extremity regions. This lesion has not been reported to be large enough to impinge a joint range of motion. Hence, its description in the orthopedic literature is extremely rare. We present a giant benign nodular hidradenoma presenting as painful restriction of the right shoulder joint in a 35-year-old male.

  14. 良性骨巨细胞瘤周边生物学行为及SMAa微血管标记的意义%Benign Giant Cell of Bone:Marginal Biologic Behavior and Significan ce of SMAa Microvascular Marking

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    李松建; 王臻; 等

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To detect histopathology of margina l tumor lesions in benign giant cell tumor of bone(GCT)and to study smooth muscu ar actin-a(SMAa)expressions in microvasculature of GCT lesions.Materials and M ethods:8 macrosections containing the tumor and surrounding bone and soft tissue were obtained from April 1995 to March 1998 in our department.The specimens in c enter and margin of the tumors were evaluated respectively by means of HE staini ng and immunohistochemistry.Results:benign GCT is potential to destroy through t he cortical bone and to invade soft tissue.A large amount of neovasculature was in the margin of GCT lesion.Multinuclear giant cells,by invading the wall of mic rovasculature,led the tumor cells to enter the blood vessels.Conclusion:Benig n GCT is locally aggressive and potential to metastases.%的:检测良性骨巨细胞瘤(Giant Cell Tum or of Bone,GCT)周边组织病理学改变及瘤组织对微血管的侵袭。方法:收集1995~1998年 我科切除的8例良性GCT瘤段,对其病灶周边进行组织病理学及血管平滑肌肌动蛋白a(Smooth Muscular actin,SMAa)免疫组织化学研究。结果:组织学良性GCT可具有侵蚀皮质骨、松质 骨及周围软组织的能力,边界处有大量新生微血管密度形成,肿瘤中多核巨细胞可侵袭微静 脉,肿瘤细胞可由此进入血管。结论:良性GCT仍具有局部侵袭和潜在转移的能力。

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis.

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    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

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    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  17. Benign giant mediastinal schwannoma presenting as cardiac tamponade in a woman: a case report

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    Sekiya Mitsuaki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal schwannomas are typically benign and asymptomatic, and generally present no immediate risks. We encountered a rare case of a giant benign posterior mediastinal schwannoma, complicated by life-threatening cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We report the case of a 72-year-old Japanese woman, who presented with cardiogenic shock. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a posterior mediastinal mass 150 cm in diameter, with pericardial effusion. The cardiac tamponade was treated with prompt pericardial fluid drainage. A biopsy was taken from the mass, and after histological examination, it was diagnosed as a benign schwannoma, a well-encapsulated non-infiltrating tumor, originating from the intrathoracic vagus nerve. It was successfully excised, restoring normal cardiac function. Conclusion Our case suggests that giant mediastinal schwannomas, although generally benign and asymptomatic, should be excised upon discovery to prevent the development of life-threatening cardiopulmonary complications.

  18. PERIPHERAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA- A CASE REPORT

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    Ashutosh Agrawal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a benign inflammatory hyperplastictype of lesion of unknown etiology occurring in gingiva or alveolar ridge. It normally presentsas a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background ofmononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. A 75 years old male patientreported with a chief complaint of pain and swelling in lower right back region of mouth. Onintra-oral examination the swelling was red, firm and sessile with smooth surface texture. Theorthopantomogram (OPG revealed a well-demarcated radiolucency extending from distalaspect of mandibular canine to mesial aspect of mandibular first molar. The cone beamcomputed tomography also showed the features suggestive of soft tissue lesion causingcupping resorption of mandible. Excisional biopsy was performed under local anaesthesiaand tissue was examined histopathologically. The lesion was diagnosed as PGCG afterthorough clinical, radiologic and histopathologic examination.

  19. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

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    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  20. Annular Elastolytic Giant Cell Granuloma

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    Khandpur Sujay

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and histopathological features of annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma in a 42â€"year-old female patient are described. The condition presented as annular erythematous plaques over sun- exposed skin sparing the face. Histopathology revealed dense granulomatous infiltrate consisting of numerous giant cells and lymphohistiocytes without any palisading arrangement or necrobiosis. The features differentiating it from other similar granulomatous disorders are discussed.

  1. Giant cell reparative granuloma in soft tissue of foot: A case report

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    Park, Gyeong Min; Lee, Jihae; Kang, Mijin; Lee, Han Bee; Bae, Kyung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Hyun Jung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Giant cell reparative granuloma is a benign reactive process following intraosseous hemorrhage rather than a true tumor. This lesion most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible, followed by phalanges, hands, and feet. Local invasion of surrounding soft tissue is a typical feature of giant cell reparative granuloma in the bones of the upper and lower limbs. We present the rare case of giant cell reparative granuloma arising from soft tissue of the foot without erosion or engulfing of the adjacent bone.

  2. Giant Cell Fibroma of the Tongue: A Case Report

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    Farrokh Farhadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell fibroma of the tongue is a rare benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues in the oral cavity, very few of which have been reported. This benign neoplasm has a predilection for the gingiva and .usually occurs in women under 30. Since this tumor is clinically, and especially histopathologically, placed in the differential diagnosis list of benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors, its proper diagnosis is of great significance because widespread and unnecessary surgeries are avoided as a result. The aim of the present report is to present a case of the tumor in the tongue of a 65-year-old man. The fibroma is a benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues which is microscopically classified in differential diagnosis with other soft tissue tumors since its proper diagnosis prevents from extensive and unnecessary surgeries on the patient.

  3. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF GIANT CELL TUMOR OF PHALANX

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    Ramkumar Reddy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 13 year old girl presented with a painful and swollen left middle finger with no overlying skin abnormality. There was no history of past trauma. A radiograph showed a radiolucent lesion, within the middle phalanx, with surrounding cortical thinning. No new bone formation. Histological analysis reported benign cartilaginous lesion. With provisional diagnosis of Enchondroma, curettage and cortico - cancellous grafting was done. Over a 4 month duration, the graft absorbed and increase in swelling and brake in cortex. Suspecting a giant cell tumour of bone, amputation of finger through middle phalanx was done . Histology Specimen confirmed giant cell tumour. The patient had excellent hand function and has had no complications . BACKGROUND: Giant cell tumor commonly occurs in upper middle age group females at epiphyses of long bones. Occurrence in children and that of phalanges is a rare condition. Only 2% of all reported GCTs are found in the hand . [1

  4. Rare giant cell tumor involvement of the olecranon bone.

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    Yang, Chen; Gong, Yubao; Liu, Jianguo; Qi, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a relatively common benign bone lesion and is usually located in long bones, but involvement of the olecranon is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of solitary GCT of bone in the olecranon that was confirmed by preoperative needle biopsy and postoperative histological examination. The treatment included intralesional curettage, allogeneic bone grafting, and plating. At 26 months follow-up, the patient had no local recurrence.

  5. Rare giant cell tumor involvement of the olecranon bone

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    Chen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a relatively common benign bone lesion and is usually located in long bones, but involvement of the olecranon is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of solitary GCT of bone in the olecranon that was confirmed by preoperative needle biopsy and postoperative histological examination. The treatment included intralesional curettage, allogeneic bone grafting, and plating. At 26 months follow-up, the patient had no local recurrence.

  6. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

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    Tsuo, Y.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Menna, P. [National Agency for New Technologies Energy and Environment, Portici (Italy); Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V. [Intersolarcenter, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  7. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

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    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  8. Large mid-esophageal granular cell tumor: benign versus malignant

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    Prarthana Roselil Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumors are rare soft tissue neoplasms, among which only 2% are malignant, arising from nervous tissue. Here we present a case of a large esophageal granular cell tumor with benign histopathological features which metastasized to the liver, but showing on positron emission tomography-computerized tomography standardized uptake value suggestive of a benign lesion.

  9. Giant cell tumor of the temporal bone – a case report

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    Rao Saraswathi G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant cell tumor is a benign but locally aggressive bone neoplasm which uncommonly involves the skull. The petrous portion of the temporal bone forms a rare location for this tumor. Case presentation The authors report a case of a large giant cell tumor involving the petrous and squamous portions of the temporal bone in a 26 year old male patient. He presented with right side severe hearing loss and facial paresis. Radical excision of the tumor was achieved but facial palsy could not be avoided. Conclusion Radical excision of skull base giant cell tumor may be hazardous but if achieved is the optimal treatment and may be curative.

  10. Giant cell tumor of the humeral head treated by denosumab: Implication to shoulder surgeons

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    Ka Hei Leung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor is a benign bone tumor that is commonly encountered. The optimal treatment of a giant cell tumor which causes extensive bony destruction is controversial. Recent studies on the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand antagonist denosumab may offer a new treatment option for these patients. We presented a patient with giant cell tumor of the humeral head. He was initially treated with denosumab and subsequently with the operation. The shoulder joint was successfully salvaged. But there are potential difficulties that surgeons may face in patients treated with denosumab.

  11.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

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    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  12. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

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    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma.

  13. CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF THE MANDIBLE: A RARE PRESENTATION

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    Virendra SINGH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is an intra-osseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrosis tissue containing multiple foci of hemorrhage, multinucleated giant cells and trabecules of woven bone. This lesion accounts for less than 7% of all benign jaw tumours. Jaffe considered it as a locally reparative reaction of bone, which can be possibly due to either an inflammatory response, hemorrhage or local trauma. Females are affected more frequently than males. It occurs over a wide age range.It has been reported that this lesion is diagnosed during the first two decades of life in approximately 48% of cases, and 60% of cases are evident before the age of 30. It is considerably more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. Most lesions occur in the molar and premolar area, some of these extending up to the ascending ramus. The presence of giant cell granuloma in the mandibular body area, the entire ramus, condyle and coronoid represents a therapeutic challenge for the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The aim of this report is to describe an unusual presentation of central giant cell granuloma involving the mandibular body, ramus, condylar and coronoid processes, and to discuss the differentiated diagnosis, the radiographic presentation and the management of this lesion.

  14. Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

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    Noleto, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: wilsonnoleto@ig.com.br; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sampaio, Renato Kobler [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Irion, Klaus L. [Liverpool NHS Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Cardiothoracic Centre; Collares, Felipe Birchal [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating main radiological and epidemiological aspects of giant cell lesions (central giant cell granuloma and brown tumors of hyperparathyroidism). Materials and methods: The sample consisted of 26 giant cell lesions diagnosed in 22 patients divided into two groups, one of them including 17 patients who were not affected by hyperparathyroidism (group A) and another including five patients with such a disorder (group B). Results: Prevalence was higher in female patients (72.7%). Most frequently, lesions occurred more in the second decade of life (mean age, 27 years). The mandible arc was most frequently involved (61.5%). Radiographically, 57.7% of lesions were multilocular and 42.3% were unilocular with defined limits. All of the 26 lesions caused expansion of bone, 15.4% radicular resorption, 50% dental displacement, and 11.5% produced pain. In the mandible 18.7% of the lesions crossed the midline. Group A showed 66.7% of lesions in the mandible and group B showed an even distribution of lesions between arches. In group A 66.7% of lesions were multilocular, and 33.3% unilocular; in group B 62.5% were unilocular, and 37.5% multilocular. Conclusion: Giant cells lesions may present themselves with a wide spectrum, from small, slow-growing unilocular lesions to extensive multilocular lesions. They present features of benignity, though some lesions may demonstrate a locally aggressive behavior. (author)

  15. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the hallux following enchondroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, Khaled; Sellami, Tarak; Jlailia, Zied; Abid, Layla; Jenzri, Mourad; Bouaziz, Mouna; Zouar, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign intra osseous lytic lesion occurring especially in gnathis bone but also seen in feet and hands. It has similar clinical and radiological presentations than giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and hyperparathyroidism brown tumors but with specific histological findings We report a case of a GCRG of hallux phalanx in 18 years old patient appearing many years after enchondroma curettage and grafting. Radiographs showed a multiloculated osteolytic lesions involving whole phalanx with cortical thinning and without fluid-fluid levels in CT view. Expected to be an enchondroma recurrence, second biopsy confirmed diagnosis of GCRG with specific histological findings. Although if aetiopathogeny remains unknown, GCRG is reported to be a local non neoplasic reaction to an intraosseous hemorrhage. Our exceptional case claims that this tumor can appear in reaction to cellular disturbance primary or secondary. PMID:26985281

  16. Dilemma in the management of central giant cell granuloma of maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra B Metgudmath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion occasionally causing severe local destruction. Surgical excision is the main stay of treatment. As this lesion is unusual in clinical practice and is associated with dilemma in the treatment, we present here a case report with review of the literature concerning management.

  17. Giant Cell Tumor: Role of Conservative Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatolii Diedkov[1; Pavlo Kovalchuk[1; Marija Kukushkina[2; Sergey Bojchuk[1; Viktor Kostyuk[1

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor is aggressive bone tumor. Surgical treatment is considered to be the only effective method of treatment ofthese tumors. The problem of inoperable patients with giant cell tumors is a challenge. A total of 8 patients had giant cell bone tumorsof pelvis and sacrum. 3 patients were treated by bisphosphonates, radiation therapy and embolization of tumor-nutrient arteries. 5patients received denosumab. The efficiency was assessed according to clinical data and CT scan control. Median follow up is 28months. All 8 patients had reduction of pain intensity. Treatment with denosumab demonstrated more than 30% tumor regression. Allof the patients are in remission.

  18. Efficacy of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of locally advanced and/or metastatic tenosynovial giant cell tumor/pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassier, P.A.; Gelderblom, H.; Stacchiotti, S.; Thomas, D.; Maki, R.G.; Kroep, J.R.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Italiano, A.; Seddon, B.; Domont, J.; Bompas, E.; Wagner, A.J.; Blay, J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) (also known as diffuse-type giant cell tumor) and tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) are rare, usually benign neoplasms that affect the synovium and tendon sheaths in young adults. These tumors are driven by the overexpression of colony stimulat

  19. Giant Cell Fibroma in a Two-Year-Old Child

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    Anna Carolina Volpi Mello-Moura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant cell fibroma is a benign nonneoplastic fibrous tumor of the oral mucosa. It occurs in the first three decades of life in the mandibular gingiva, predominantly, showing predilection for females. This article reports a case of giant cell fibroma in a 2-year-old girl, which is an uncommon age for this lesion. The patient was brought for treatment at the Research and Clinical Center of Dental Trauma in Primary Teeth, where practice for the Discipline of Pediatric Dentistry (Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil takes place. During clinical examination, a tissue growth was detected on the lingual gingival mucosa of the lower right primary incisors teeth. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia and submitted to histological examination at the Oral Pathology Department of the Faculty of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. There was no recurrence after 20 months of monitoring. This instance reinforces the importance of oral care from the very first months of life in order to enable doctors to make precocious diagnosis and offer more appropriate treatments for oral diseases, as well as to promote more efficient oral health in the community.

  20. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  1. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  2. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  3. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

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    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  4. Indeterminate cell histiocytosis that presented clinically as benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimovic, Adele; Chernoff, Karen; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Schaffer, Julie V

    2014-12-16

    Indeterminate cell histiocytosis (ICH) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by immunophenotypic features of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. We describe a 12-month-old boy with a four-month history of asymptomatic, small, pink-tan papules on his face. Histopathologic evaluation showed a superficial, dermal infiltrate of histiocytes that was positive for S100, CD1a, CD68, and Factor XIIIa. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of the clinical presentation of benign cephalic histiocytosis with immunohistochemical findings of ICH. We review the classification of histiocytic disorders and the clinical and immunohistochemical features of both ICH and benign cephalic histiocytosis.

  5. Nonconventional papillary thyroid carcinomas with pleomorphic tumor giant cells: a diagnostic pitfall with anaplastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommell-Fontaine, Juliette; Borda, Angela; Ragage, Florence; Berger, Nicole; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam

    2010-06-01

    The presence of pleomorphic tumor giant cells in thyroid carcinomas of follicular cell origin is always worrisome for the pathologist as they first of all refer to anaplastic carcinoma, one of the most aggressive human malignancies. However, non-anaplastic pleomorphic giant cells are well described in other thyroid diseases, most often benign. In this paper, we describe four cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma displaying pleomorphic tumor giant cells with features that differ from those of anaplastic carcinoma. Pleomorphic giant cells were admixed with the underlying thyroid carcinoma and constituted from 5% to 25% of the tumor. Cytologically, they had an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with large and irregular nuclei. Compared to pleomorphic giant cells of anaplastic carcinoma, they reproduced the growth pattern of the underlying carcinoma, had a low mitotic index without necrosis or inflammation, and were reactive with thyroglobulin and thyroid-specific transcription factor-1 and strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratin AE1/AE3. After 16-84 months of follow-up, patients are relapse-free and still alive. These cases show that pleomorphic tumor giant cells arising in papillary thyroid carcinomas do not always represent dedifferentiation and progression to anaplastic carcinoma. Distinction among these processes is critical as their treatment and prognosis are very different.

  6. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-12-08

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  7. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golka Dariusz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  8. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor presenting as a parotid gland mass: Expanding the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions in salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT are rare benign soft tissue tumors affecting mostly young adults. The most common affected sites include the knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, and fingers. The temporomandibular joint is occasionally affected. Herein, we report a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian male who presented clinically with a parotid gland mass. The initial clinical and radiological work-up failed to reveal any involvement of the adjacent temporomandibular joint. Fine-needle aspiration revealed a cellular tumor composed of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells with fibrosis and hemosiderin deposition. This was subsequently found to be a TGCT arising from the temporomandibular joint. Giant cell-rich lesions are uncommon in salivary glands. Herein, we describe the cytomorphology and clinico-radiographic features of this tumor with emphasis on the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions presenting in salivary glands. Despite its rare occurrence, this entity should be considered when giant cells are prominent in specimens acquired from this location.

  9. Can p63 serve as a biomarker for giant cell tumor of bone? A Moroccan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammas Nawal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multinucleated giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone represent a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant lesions. Differential diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in instances of limited sampling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the P63 in the positive and differential diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone. Methods This study includes 48 giant cell-containing tumors and pseudotumors of bone. P63 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Data analysis was performed using Epi-info software and SPSS software package (version 17. Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed a P63 nuclear expression in all giant cell tumors of bone, in 50% of osteoid osteomas, 40% of aneurysmal bone cysts, 37.5% of osteoblastomas, 33.3% of chondromyxoide fibromas, 25% of non ossifiant fibromas and 8.3% of osteosarcomas. Only one case of chondroblastoma was included in this series and expressed p63. No P63 immunoreactivity was detected in any of the cases of central giant cell granulomas or langerhans cells histiocytosis. The sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV of P63 immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone were 100%. The specificity and positive predictive value (PPV were 74.42% and 59.26% respectively. Conclusions This study found not only that GCTOB expresses the P63 but it also shows that this protein may serve as a biomarker for the differential diagnosis between two morphologically similar lesions particularly in instances of limited sampling. Indeed, P63 expression seems to differentiate between giant cell tumor of bone and central giant cell granuloma since the latter does not express P63. Other benign and malignant giant cell-containing lesions express P63, decreasing its specificity as a diagnostic marker, but a strong staining was seen, except a case of chondroblastoma, only in giant cell tumor of bone. Clinical and radiological

  10. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy.

  11. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: a rare periungual location simulating myxoid cyst*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minotto, Renan; Rodrigues, Camila Britto; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Furian, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumor most frequent between the third and fifth decades of life. It can mimic and make differential diagnoses with several hand tumors. Definitive diagnosis and the treatment of choice are reached with complete resection and histopathological examination. Here we describe a case with clinical presentation similar to that of a myxoid cyst. PMID:28225971

  12. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  13. PERIPHERAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMAS OF ORAL CAVITY: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so - called “giant cell epulis” is the most common oral giant cell lesion. Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant - cell hyperplasia, osteoclastoma, or giant cell reparative granuloma. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen . This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. The aim in publishing this study is to present the clinical, histopathological features and treatment of peripheral giant cell granulomas of various sizes in different age groups in jaws

  14. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

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    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  15. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Benign signet ring cells in pseudomembranous colitis: A diagnostic trap

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    Sunitha Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old female patient was admitted with intractable diarrhea and abdominal distention following several courses of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Colonic biopsy revealed pseudomembranous colitis with foci of signet ring cell (SRC change. The SRCs possessed bland nuclei and were confined to the basement membranes of the crypts with no infiltration into the lamina propria. Benign SRCs in pseudomembranous colitis is an uncommon phenomenon. Awareness of this rare, but potential pitfall is of utmost importance to avoid a misdiagnosis of SRC carcinoma.

  17. Benign signet ring cells in pseudomembranous colitis: a diagnostic trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sunitha; Zayyani, Najah R

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old female patient was admitted with intractable diarrhea and abdominal distention following several courses of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Colonic biopsy revealed pseudomembranous colitis with foci of signet ring cell (SRC) change. The SRCs possessed bland nuclei and were confined to the basement membranes of the crypts with no infiltration into the lamina propria. Benign SRCs in pseudomembranous colitis is an uncommon phenomenon. Awareness of this rare, but potential pitfall is of utmost importance to avoid a misdiagnosis of SRC carcinoma.

  18. Lyme carditis mimicking giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krati Chauhan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Presenting an interesting case of a patient who complained of myalgias, fatigue, headache, jaw claudication and scalp tenderness. Patient’s physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory findings showed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, bilateral temporal artery biopsy results were negative and first degree atrioventricular block was seen on electrocardiogram. Serology for Borrelia burgdorferi was positive; patient was diagnosed with Lyme carditis and treated with doxycycline. Lyme is a tick-borne, multi-system disease and occasionally its presentation may mimic giant cell arteritis. On follow-up there was complete resolution of symptoms and electrocardiogram findings.

  19. Benign prostate hyperplasia and stem cells: a new therapeutic opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notara, Maria; Ahmed, Aamir

    2012-12-01

    Most men over 50 experience some lower urinary tract symptoms of nocturia, poor stream, urgency and frequency for urination, due to hyperplastic enlargement of the prostate (benign prostate hyperplasia, BPH). BPH is thought to be a disease with multiple aetiologies including hormone signalling, disruption of proliferation and apoptosis dynamics and chronic inflammation with changes in the morphology and phenotype of the prostate stroma. It has been proposed, recently, that stromal stem cells in prostate may be caused by the development of BPH. This review focuses on this putative role of stromal stem or stem-like cells in the development of BPH and assesses the potential of targeting the stem cells for the treatment of BPH.

  20. Giant cell myocarditis : a fatal cause of dyspnea in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, PL; van Rossem, M; Valentijn, RM; Beijer, GJP

    2001-01-01

    The clinical course of a pregnant patient, who presented with progressive dyspnea and heart failure is described. Despite intensive care and resuscitative efforts to mother and child, both expired. The autopsy revealed giant cell myocarditis in the mother. Giant cell myocarditis can affect pregnant

  1. Giant Merkel Cell Carcinoma Involving the Face

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    Savaş Yaylı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive, malignant cutaneous tumor. It usually appears on the sun-exposed areas such as the head and neck in the elderly. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with the complaints of a big mass on her face. She described that the mass on her left cheek rapidly grew in three months. Her family and own medical history was unremarkable for skin cancers. On physical examination, there were no pathological findings except for a palpable submandibular lymphadenopathy. Dermatological examination revealed a giant tumoral lesion 9x9 cm in diameter, containing crusted and ulcerated areas on her left cheek. Histopathological examination of the specimen obtained from the lesion showed a neoplastic infiltration consisting small, atypic cells with big, round, hyperchromatic nucleus, narrow cytoplasms, and prominent nucleoulus in some areas, showing high mitotic activity. The neoplasm, which had apoptotic bodies and necrobiosis, also invaded the full thickness of the skin, and the epidermis was very thin. In immunochemistry, CK20 was strongly positive, S100 was focally positive, and EMA was positive, while synaptophysin, chromogranin, vimentin, CD3, CD20, as well as CD45, and CD99 were all negative. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having Merkel cell carcinoma. On the systemic screening for metastases, nodular lesions in the lungs compatible with metastases were detected on computed tomography. By the consultations with plastic and reconstructive surgeons and oncologists, she was accepted as inoperable and etoposide monotherapy was administered. In this report, we aimed to underline the importance of early diagnosis while presenting a case of giant Merkel cell carcinoma which shows an aggressive progression with lung metastases.

  2. A Review and Report of Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a 4-Year-Old Child

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    Afsaneh Nekouei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a common benign and reactive gingival epulis in oral cavity. It is often difficult to make a clinical diagnosis; thereby definitive diagnosis depends on histopathologic features. We report a case of a 4-year-old Caucasian boy presenting with a five-month history a 20 × 15 × 12 mm pedunculated, lobular soft tissue mass of the left anterior maxilla gingiva which was misdiagnosed and maltreated before his referral. An excisional biopsy of the lesion followed by histopathologic examination of the biopsy specimen revealed distinctive features of peripheral giant cell granuloma. Early detection and excision of this hyperplastic nodule especially in children are important to minimize potential dentoalveolar complications.

  3. File list: His.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Histone Placenta Trophoblast giant cel...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.20.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Histone Placenta Trophoblast giant cel...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Histone Placenta Trophoblast giant cel...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.50.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells mm9 Histone Placenta Trophoblast giant cel...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.05.AllAg.Trophoblast_giant_cells.bed ...

  7. Excess mortality in giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgård, C; Sloth, H; Keiding, Niels

    1991-01-01

    A 13-year departmental sample of 34 patients with definite (biopsy-verified) giant cell arteritis (GCA) was reviewed. The mortality of this material was compared to sex-, age- and time-specific death rates in the Danish population. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.8 (95% confidence...... with respect to SMR, sex distribution or age. In the group of patients with department-diagnosed GCA (definite + probable = 180 patients), the 95% confidence interval for the SMR of the women included 1.0. In all other subgroups there was a significant excess mortality. Excess mortality has been found in two...... of seven previous studies on survival in GCA. The prevailing opinion that steroid-treated GCA does not affect the life expectancy of patients is probably not correct....

  8. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31, followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21, distal end of radius(n=14,upper end of fibula (n=9,proximal end of femur(n=5, upper end of the humerus(n=3, iliac bone(n=2,phalanx (n=2 and spine(n=1. The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4 and metatarsal(n=1. Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases . Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice . The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction.

  9. Doppler ultrasound and giant cell arteritis

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    Ana Marina Suelves

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ana Marina Suelves1, Enrique España-Gregori1,2, Jose Tembl3, Stephanie Rohrweck1, Jose Maria Millán4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,4,51Service of Ophthalmology, La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain; 2Department of Optics, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 3Service of Neurology, La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain; 4CIBERER, Ciber de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 5Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, SpainObjective: To evaluate the utility of ultrasound in aiding the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA, in monitoring the response to corticotherapy, and in detecting early relapses.Methods: A pilot study, prospective, included 10 patients with suspected GCA. All patients underwent ultrasound examination of both temporal arteries before temporal artery biopsy (TAB, 3 weeks after starting treatment, and 3 months after diagnosis. For this study, the histological findings alone were used to define if patients were suffering from GCA. The findings on ultrasound were compared with the results of biopsy. The best place to perform TAB was observed by ultrasound.Results: All patients with positive biopsy were detected with ultrasound. No false positives were observed on ultrasound. The results presented give a sensibility, specificity, and positive predictive value of 100% for the use of ultrasound in the diagnosis of GCA. Two relapses were detected early by ultrasound during the follow-up.Conclusions: This pilot study suggests that eco-doppler may be a useful tool in diagnosis and clinic follow-up in patients with suspected GCA.Keywords: giant cell arteritis, ultrasound, temporal artery biopsy, optic nerve

  10. Differentially expressed genes in giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babeto, Erica; Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Peitl Junior, Paulo; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; de Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; de Freitas Calmon, Marília; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Rahal, Paula

    2011-04-01

    Giant cells tumors of bone (GCTB) are benign in nature but cause osteolytic destruction with a number of particular characteristics. These tumors can have uncertain biological behavior often contain a significant proportion of highly multinucleated cells, and may show aggressive behavior. We have studied differential gene expression in GCTB that may give a better understanding of their physiopathology, and might be helpful in prognosis and treatment. Rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) was used to identify and measure novel genes that appear to be differentially expressed, including KTN1, NEB, ROCK1, and ZAK using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in the samples of GCTBs compared to normal bone tissue. Normal bone was used in the methodology RaSH for comparison with the GCTB in identification of differentially expressed genes. Functional annotation indicated that these genes are involved in cellular processes related to their tumor phenotype. The differential expression of KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK was independently confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the KTN1 and ROCK1 genes were increased in samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and ZAK had reduced expression. Since ZAK have CpG islands in their promoter region and low expression in tumor tissue, their methylation pattern was analyzed by MSP-PCR. The genes identified KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK may be responsible for loss of cellular homeostasis in GCTB since they are responsible for various functions related to tumorigenesis such as cell migration, cytoskeletal organization, apoptosis, and cell cycle control and thus may contribute at some stage in the process of formation and development of GCTB.

  11. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S

    2016-03-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures.

  12. Aneurysmal bone cyst: Rarity in mandible and its ambiguity with Central giant cell granuloma

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    Anagha Shete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon lesion which has been found in most bones of the skeleton, although the majority occur in the long bones and in the spine. It was first described as a distinct clinical entity by Jaffe and Lichenstein in 1942 to describe the -characteristic "blow-out" of the bone seen in the radiographs of the lesion. In the past, the lesion has been classified as an atypical giant cell tumor or benign bone cyst. We report a case of an aneurysmal bone cyst in an 18-year-old patient who reported with the chief complaint of swelling on the right side of the face since 4 months. It was non-tender, non-fluctuant, and hard in consistency. Radiographic examination revealed a large, expansile, multilocular lesion suggestive of benign odontogenic tumor. Complete enucleation was carried out and the final histopathologic diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst was given.

  13. Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelifa-Hamdani, Elhem; Touati-Serraj, Monia; Perriard, Jacqueline; Chavaz, Pierre; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Kaya, Gürkan

    2008-10-01

    Giant cell lichenoid dermatitis is a recently described pathological entity, which can be seen as an unusual lichenoid drug eruption, a manifestation of sarcoidosis or within herpes zoster scars. Histopathological findings include focal vacuolar alteration of the basal layer with cytoid bodies, dermal and intraepidermal multinucleated giant cells and a mixed chronic inflammatory infiltrate with a lichenoid pattern consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and plasma cells. Here, we report a giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a 41-year-old male patient who developed, 3 days after intravenous treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for erysipelas of the left leg, a clinical picture suggesting a baboon syndrome characterized by an erythematous and pruritic eruption on the axillary, inguinal and popliteal areas and the anterior side of elbows. This is the first reported case of giant cell lichenoid dermatitis in a patient with baboon syndrome.

  14. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis

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    Jennifer L. Beams

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

  15. [Rare complication in a patient with giant cell arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, S; Gonzalez, S Olivera; Amores, B; Arriaga, B Amores; Torralba, M A; Cabeza, M A Torralba; Pérez Calvo, J I; Calvo, J I Pérez

    2010-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis) is a chronic vasculitis that usually affects older people. Although this is a systemic disease, it most often affects the cranial arteries. The most frequent complication of this disorder is visual loss. We report the case of a patient who suffered several rare complications, including tongue necrosis, as a result of being diagnosed with giant cell arteritis following the start of treatment.

  16. YKL-40 in giant cells and macrophages from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J S; Baslund, B; Garbarsch, C

    1999-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate whether macrophages and giant cells of patients with GCA produce YKL-40, and whether serum YKL-40 concentrations are elevated in these patients. METHODS: Serum YKL-40 was determined by radioimmunoassay in 19 patients with GCA and 8 patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) who......-matched controls (median 118 microg/liter), and the serum level of YKL-40 decreased to normal levels during prednisolone treatment (-38% after 1 month; PPMR had normal serum YKL-40 levels (median 158 microg/liter) and had no changes in the serum YKL-40 levels during prednisolone...

  17. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  18. SURGICAL TREATMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION FOR CENTRAL GIANT CELL GRANULOMA OF MANDIBLE - case report and literature review.

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    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG is a benign aggressive destructive osteolytic lesion of osteoclastic origin. The central giant cell granuloma is often found in the mandible, anterior to the first molars. It most commonly occurs in patients under the age of 30, with a clear female prevalencePurpose: To present a case of CGCG of the lower jaw in Department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery, University Hospital "St. Anna". Although en bloc resection provides the lowest recurrence rate, only a few single case reports describe the use of this technique followed by reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts.Material and methods: The medical history of a 28 years patient with a large central giant cell granuloma in the mandible. Biopsy specimen taken from the lesion showed CGCG followed by curettage with peripheral ostectomy with preservation of the continuity of the mandible.Result: At the 1-year clinical and radiological follow up there was no sign of recurrence. Conclusion: After complete healing of the graft, prosthetic rehabilitation with implants will be perfomed. This allows the best functional and aesthetic results.

  19. Epidemiological study on giant cell tumor recurrence at the Brazilian National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics

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    Roberto Clayton Lima Oliveira Júnior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Giant cell tumors are benign bone neoplasms that are relatively rare in adults and their biological behavior is still unpredictable. The incidence of local recurrence has presented variation between 0% and 65% in studies conducted worldwide, but few data are available on this complication in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Information on 155 patients with confirmed histological diagnoses of giant cell tumor who were treated in our institution's orthopedic oncology service between January 2000 and July 2014 was gathered. Demographic characteristics were evaluated and compared between patients who presented local recurrence during the clinical follow-up. RESULTS: Local recurrence was observed in 26 patients (16.7%, of whom 22 were female (84.6%. The most common site of local recurrence was the distal femur (38.4%. Eleven patients presented early recurrence, while 15 cases were diagnosed after 15 months, representing 42.3% and 57.7%, respectively. Metastases were identified in five patients (3.2%. CONCLUSION: Tumor-related factors did not show any increased incidence of local recurrence of giant cell tumors. Surgical treatment with an intralesional margin is a valid option for treating local recurrences and does not show any difference in disease-free survival in relation to other types of procedures. Clinical treatment is reserved for cases of unresectable tumors or when surgical treatment is impossible.

  20. Two Cases of Sarcoma Arising in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Treated with Denosumab

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    Cory Julian Broehm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is a generally benign, but often locally aggressive, neoplasm of bone, with a propensity for recurrence. Sarcomatous transformation is rare and typically occurs with a history of recurrences and radiation treatment. Denosumab, an inhibitor of the RANK ligand involved in bone resorption in GCT, is increasingly used in treatment of recurrent or unresectable giant cell tumor of bone. We report two cases of sarcomatous transformation of GCT to osteosarcoma in patients receiving denosumab. One was a 59-year-old male with a 12-year history of GCT and multiple recurrences taking denosumab for 2.5 years. The second case was in a 56-year-old male with a seven-year history of GCT taking denosumab for six months. Review of the literature shows one case report of malignant transformation of GCT in a patient being treated with denosumab. As the use of denosumab for treatment of GCT will likely increase, larger, controlled studies are needed to ascertain whether denosumab may play a role in malignant transformation of giant cell tumor of bone.

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of estrogen and progesterone receptors in peripheral and central giant cell granuloma of the jaws

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    Razavi SM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Giant cell granuloma is a relatively common benign proliferative lesion of the oral cavity. This lesion has a marked gender predilection with more prevalence in females and tendency to rapid growth and recurrence during pregnancy. The aim of this study was the evaluation of specific receptors of sex hormones in giant cell granuloma. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, twenty five cases of formalin fixed paraffin embedded giant cell granulomas were retrieved from the oral pathology archive of dental school Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Also twenty five normal oral mucosa biopsies resected during different surgical procedures were prepared as control group. Cases were immunohistochemically stained for estrogen and progesterone receptors using the biotin-streptavidine method. Data were analyzed by SPSS package. Results: Staining for ER/PR markers were negative for the mononuclear stromal cells and multinucleated giant cells in all cases. The epithelial cells and connective tissue stromal cells of the control group were also negative for these receptors. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, immunostaining for ER/PR was negative in all cases. These findings suggest that in most cases development and growth of this lesion is not directly related to these hormones. However further studies with more sensitive techniques are recommended.

  2. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: A review of 123 cases

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    Niloofar Shadman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral giant cell granuloma is one of the reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity, which originates from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical characteristics of peripheral gi-ant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population. Methods: A series of 123 consecutive confirmed cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma after biopsy were evaluated. Age, sex, anatomic location, consistency, etiologic factor, pain and bleeding history, color, surface texture, and pedicle situation were recorded and were analyzed by chi-square test and values were considered to be significant if P < 0.05. Results: Age ranged from 6 to 75 years (mean 33 years. Women affected more than men (M/F 1:1.1. Peripheral giant cell granuloma was seen in the mandible more than in the maxilla and in the anterior region more than in the posterior region. In most cases, lesions were pink, pedunculated and had non-ulcerated surface. In less than half of the cases, there was no history of bleeding and also pain was rarely reported. Calculus was the most common etiologic factor. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the clinical features of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population are almost similar to those reported by other investigators.

  3. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis in childhood: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Sultan; Akçan, Ramazan; Heybet, Eyup Ruşen; Cavlak, Mehmet; Pehlivan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is a rare entity of unknown origin, which causes sudden death in more than half of the affected patients. It is rarely seen in childhood, and might result in death due to heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is mostly diagnosed at autopsy incidentally. Here we present a rare case of childhood idiopathic giant cell myocarditis. A 10-year old boy found dead in his bed in the morning. Interview with family members revealed death the boy was in good health conditions apart from being overweight. At autopsy, external examination was completely normal. Internal examination revealed normal findings; the heart was 297g and macroscopically normal. No traces of any toxic agents detected in complete toxicological analyses. Areas characterized with granulomatous lesions, lymphocytes, histiocytes, and multinucleated giant cells were observed in myocardium at histopathological examination. No necrosis was observed in granulomatous areas. Tuberculosis was negative in the PCR assays. There were no signs indicative of fungal infection, and clinical status of the case was not compatible with the sarcoidosis. In this respect death was attributed to idiopathic giant cell myocarditis.

  4. Giant cell temporal arteritis associated with overlying basal cell carcinoma: co-incidence or connection?

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    Salem Alowami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries manifesting as temporal arteritis and/or polymyalgia rheumatica. The histological assessment of temporal artery biopsies is frequently encountered in anatomical pathology and has important diagnostic consequences in patients clinically suspected of having giant cell arteritis. We present an intriguing case of giant cell arteritis associated with a Basal cell carcinoma and discuss the ongoing controversy pertaining to the association of giant cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica with malignancy.

  5. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the occipital bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Briz, A.; Ricoy, J.R.; Martinez-Tello, F.J. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Lobato, R.D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Ramos, A.; Millan, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Departamento de Anatomia Patologica, Avda. de Andalucia s/n, Madrid 28041 (Spain)

    2003-03-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a non-neoplastic fibrous lesion with unevenly distributed multinucleated giant cells, areas of osseous metaplasia and hemorrhage. The small bones of the hands and feet are the most common sites, followed by the vertebral bodies and craniofacial bones. In the craniofacial bones GCRG has been reported in the temporal bone, in the frontal bone and paranasal sinus. However, to the best of our knowledge no case has been reported in the occipital bone. We report on the imaging findings and pathological features of a GCRG of the occipital bone and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity in this particular location, especially with giant cell tumor because of the therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  6. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

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    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  7. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock

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    Rose Tompkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis.

  8. Differential Expression of ADAM23, CDKN2A (P16), MMP14 and VIM Associated with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Babeto, Erica [UNESP; Candido, Natalia Maria [UNESP; Franco, Fernanda Craveiro [UNESP; Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires de Campos; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; Cordeiro,José Antônio; Calmon, Marilia de Freitas [UNESP; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Though benign, giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) can become aggressive and can exhibit a high mitotic rate, necrosis and rarely vascular invasion and metastasis. GCTB has unique histologic characteristics, a high rate of multinucleated cells, a variable and unpredictable growth potential and uncertain biological behavior. In this study, we sought to identify genes differentially expressed in GCTB, thus building a molecular profile of this tumor. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase ch...

  9. Mechanical characterization of benign and malignant urothelial cells from voided urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei-Baghini, Ehsan; Zheng, Yi; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Geddie, William B.; Sun, Yu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates whether mechanical differences exist between benign and malignant urothelial cells in voided urine. The Young's modulus of individual cells was measured using the micropipette aspiration technique. Malignant urothelial cells showed significantly lower Young's modulus values compared to benign urothelial cells. The results indicate that Young's modulus as a biomechanical marker could possibly provide additional information to conventional urinary cytology. We hope that these preliminary results could evoke attention to mechanical characterization of urine cells and spark interest in the development of biomechanical approaches to enhance non-invasive urothelial carcinoma detection.

  10. [Visual hallucinations and giant cell arteritis: the Charles Bonnet syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, J; Morell-Dubois, S; Koch, E; Launay, D; Maillard-Lefebvre, H; Buchdahl, A-L; Hachulla, E; Rouland, J-F; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2011-12-01

    In patients with visual hallucinations, diagnostic strategy is unclearly codified. In patients known to have giant cell arteritis, the main diagnostic assumption is disease relapse. Indeed, this should lead to rapid corticosteroid therapy. However, the Charles Bonnet syndrome, that is a poorly known etiology of visual hallucinations usually observed in elderly people, should be part of the differential diagnosis. We report a 87-year-old woman, with a 2-year history of giant cell arteritis who was admitted with an acute onset of visual hallucinations and who met all the criteria for Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  11. Giant cell hepatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia after chickenpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Maşallah; Özgenç, Funda; Berk, Ömer; Gökçe, Demir; Kavakli, Kaan; Yilmaz, Funda; Şen, Sait; Yağci, Raşit Vural

    2010-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia with giant cell hepatitis is a distinct entity in children. It is usually fatal with progressive liver disease. Immunosuppressive treatment with conventional drugs offers some response; however, it is usually only temporary. Alternative therapeutic options with monoclonals have been reported with promising remission of the disease. We report a case with autoimmune hemolytic anemia+giant cell hepatitis after varicella infection. She was resistant to standard immunosuppressive combinations, and rescue therapy with rituximab was used. Remission was not achieved with the drug and the child died with septic complication.

  12. Breast carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Lauridsen, M C; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2001-01-01

    Primary carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a very rare tumour of the female breast. The clinical course, histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 61 cases of invasive duct carcinoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (OMGCs) are reviewed and a new...... in the literature have shown that 86% of patients with these tumours are still alive after 5 years. Histologically, these tumours are invasive ductal carcinomas with OMGCs next to the neoplastic glands and within their lumen. Signs of recent and past haemorrhage are ubiquitously present in the highly vascularized...

  13. IL-4 induces the formation of multinucleated giant cells and expression of β5 integrin in central giant cell lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghbali, Amirala; Rafieyan, Sona; Mohamed-Khosroshahi, Leila; Baradaran, Behzad; Shanehbandi, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    Background It is now well established that IL-4 has a central role in the development of monocytes to multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) by inducing the expression of integrins on the surface of monocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of IL-4 in induction of β5 integrin expression in the peripheral blood samples of patients with giant cell granuloma. Material and Methods Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood samples of patients with central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and healthy controls using human Monocyte Isolation Kit II. Isolated monocytes were then cultured in the absence or presence of IL-4 (10 and 20 ng/mL), and following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, Real-time PCR was performed to determine the level of β5 integrin expression. The formation of CGCGs and morphological analyses were done under light microscopy. For confirmation of CGCGs, immunocytochemistry technique was also carried out by anti-RANK (receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand) antibody. Results In both patient and control groups, β5 levels were significantly enhanced by increasing the IL-4 dose from 10 to 20 ng/mL. In addition, these differences were significant between patient and control groups without IL-4 treatment. On the other hand, the number of cells which expressed RANK and therefore the number of giant cells were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison to controls, as assessed by immunohistochemistry evaluations. Conclusions In this study, we showed an elevation in the expression levels of β5 integrin when stimulated by IL-4. It is strongly indicated that this integrin acts as an important mediator during macrophage to macrophage fusion and development of giant cells. Key words:β5 integrin, giant cell, Il-4, monocyte, rank. PMID:27918730

  14. P-cadherin as myoepithelial cell marker for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions

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    Yachika Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: P-cadherin is cell-cell adhesion glycoprotein which can be used as a myoepithelial cell (MEC marker in the breast lesions. MEC layer is retained in most benign lesions and loss of this outer layer is hallmark of infiltrating carcinomas in the breast. Aim: To evaluate the expression of P-cadherin as MEC marker in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was done using P-cadherin-specific antibody on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded sections of 25 benign and 15 malignant breast lumps. Results: All 25 cases of benign breast lesions showed positive P-cadherin immunostaining, while only 4 out of 15 cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma showed positive immunostaining for P-cadherin. In the case of benign lesions, staining index varied from 4 to 6 or 7 to 9, while in case of malignant lesions, 11 cases showed staining index from 1 to 3. Only 4 out of 15 malignant cases had staining index from 4 to 6. None of them showed index from 7 to 9. Conclusions: P-cadherin as a MEC marker can be used in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions.

  15. Congenital segmental lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis complex with associated subependymal giant cell astrocytomas treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Giulia; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Janis, Sara; Vercellino, Nadia; Rossi, Andrea; Consales, Alessandro; Raso, Alessandro; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic, multisystemic disorder characterized by circumscribed benign lesions (hamartomas) in several organs, including brain. This is the result of defects in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes, encoding the hamartin-tuberin complex that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Specific inhibitors of this pathway have been shown to reduce the volume of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Congenital lymphedema is rarely seen in association with tuberous sclerosis, with only a few reported cases. Although this association can be coincidental, the dysgenetic lymphatic system can represent a hamartia as a consequence of gene mutation. We describe a child with congenital lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis and associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma who experienced lymphangitis under treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Because our patient did not show worsening of lymphedema, congenital lymphedema does not seem to be a contraindication for this therapy.

  16. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath restricting joint movement in the thumb: A case study and review of literature

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    Muzaffer Durmus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are the second most common type of subcutaneous benign tumors found in the hand. These tumors are slow growing soft tissue mases that develop over a long period of time and can occur at any age. Although such lesions are usually painless, there is a possibility of recurrence of the tumor. Patients should seek postoperative management in order to prevent any possibility of recurrence. In view of the current literature, we present a case involving a patient suffering from a multifocal giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath that restricted movement of the interphalangeal joints of the thumb. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 16-19

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  13. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  14. Granulomatous giant cell submandibular sialadenitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Écija, Alejandro; Estepa, José Carlos; Mendoza, Francisco Javier

    2012-11-01

    A 4-month-old dog was presented with a progressive swelling of the submandibular area. The history, course, cytological, and sialographic findings were consistent with an aseptic pyogranulomatous sialadenitis with concurrent duct blockage. This rare entity, responsive to medical treatment, appears to be similar to the granulomatous giant cell sialadenitis of humans.

  15. Vessel involvement in giant cell arteritis : an imaging approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Pieter W; Sandovici, Maria; Slart, Riemer H.; Glaudemans, Andor W; Rutgers, Abraham; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Vasculitis is classified based on the size of the involved vessels. The two major forms are small vessel vasculitis (SVV) and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Main forms of LVV are Takayasu Arteritis (TA), Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA), Isolated Aortitis (IA) and Chronic Periaortitis (PC). This manuscrip

  16. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda;

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a detailed mechanism-based model of a tripartite synapse consisting of P- and R-neurons together with a giant glial cell in the ganglia of the medical leech (Hirudo medicinalis), which is a useful object for experimental studies in situ. We describe the two main pathways of th...

  17. A case report of peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Jung, Yeon Hwa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan(Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-15

    The authors experienced one case of peripheral giant cell granuloma occurred at the gingiva of right maxillary molar in a 12-year-old male patient. The lesion showed amorphous calcification within soft tissue mass which made difficult to differentiate this lesion from peripheral ossifying fibroma and peripheral odontogenic fibroma clinically and radiographically. The final diagnosis was made histologically.

  18. Delayed Diagnosis: Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of Scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı,

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common form of skin cancer, the scalp lesions of BCC have been rarely reported. Giant BCC is defined as a tumor larger than 5 cm in diameter and only 0.5-1 % of all BCCs achieve this size. We report a case of giant BCC on the scalp that was treated with topical coticosteroids and antifungal shampoo for five years. BCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in erythematous plaque type lesions resistant to therapy with long duration localized on the scalp.

  19. Giant cell tumour in the foot of a skeletally immature girl: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2009-08-01

    We present a case of delayed diagnosis of a benign giant cell tumour (GCT) of the third metatarsal in a skeletally immature girl. The patient underwent en bloc excision of the tumour. The tumour had replaced the third metatarsal and had infiltrated the surrounding soft tissue and the second and fourth metatarsal bases. Deep, lateral and medial margins were all involved. A high index of suspicion is needed when evaluating any tumours of the foot, because the compact structure of the foot may delay diagnosis. Early detection is important for avoiding amputation, as the hindfoot and midfoot are classified as one compartment and radical resection is impossible to achieve. Tumours grow faster in the foot than in other bones. GCT in this location and age-group are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a destructive bony lesion in skeletally immature patients.

  20. Giant cell arteritis: a multicenter observational study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe demographic features, disease manifestations and therapy in patients with giant cell arteritis from referral centers in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed on 45 giant cell arteritis patients from three university hospitals in Brazil. Diagnoses were based on the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for giant cell arteritis or temporal artery biopsy findings. RESULTS: Most patients were Caucasian, and females were slightly more predominant. The frequencies of disease manifestations were as follows: temporal headache in 82.2%, neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations in 68.9%, jaw claudication in 48.9%, systemic symptoms in 44.4%, polymyalgia rheumatica in 35.6% and extra-cranial vessel involvement in 17.8% of cases. Aortic aneurysms were observed in 6.6% of patients. A comparison between patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis and those without temporal artery biopsies did not yield significant differences in disease manifestations. All patients were treated with oral prednisone, and intravenous methylprednisolone was administered to nearly half of the patients. Methotrexate was the most commonly used immunosuppressive agent, and low-dose aspirin was prescribed to the majority of patients. Relapses occurred in 28.9% of patients, and aspirin had a protective effect against relapses. Females had higher prevalences of polymyalgia rheumatica, systemic manifestations and jaw claudication, while permanent visual loss was more prevalent in men. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the clinical features of Brazilian giant cell arteritis patients were similar to those found in other studies, except for the high prevalence of neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and permanent blindness in the Brazilian patients. Aspirin had a protective effect on relapses.

  1. Phenotypic alterations in myoepithelial cells associated with benign sclerosing lesions of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilson, Justin B; Schnitt, Stuart J; Collins, Laura C

    2010-06-01

    Myoepithelial cells surrounding spaces involved by ductal carcinoma in situ show phenotypic differences from normal myoepithelial cells. Myoepithelial cells are also present around entrapped glandular spaces in benign sclerosing lesions of the breast, but the immunophenotype of these myoepithelial cells has not been characterized. We evaluated myoepithelial cell immunophenotype in 48 benign sclerosing lesions using antibodies to 7 myoepithelial cell markers (smooth muscle actin, calponin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, p63, CD10, cytokeratin 5/6, and p75). Staining intensity of the myoepithelial cells surrounding entrapped glands was compared with that of myoepithelial cells surrounding normal ducts and lobules on the same section. When compared with normal breast ducts and lobules on the same slide, myoepithelial cells associated with benign sclerosing lesions showed reduced expression of cytokeratin 5/6 in 31.8% of cases, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain in 20.9%, CD10 in 15.2%, p63 in 9.3%, and calponin in 6.4%. In 15.9% of cases, myoepithelial cells surrounding entrapped glands showed complete absence of staining for cytokeratin 5/6. None of the cases showed reduced myoepithelial cell expression of smooth muscle actin or p75. The proportion of radial scars/complex sclerosing lesions and sclerosing adenosis with reduced expression was significantly different for CD10 (26.9% and 0% respectively; P=0.01) and p63 (17.4% and 0% respectively; P=0.05). We conclude that myoepithelial cells associated with benign sclerosing lesions of the breast may show immunophenotypic differences from normal myoepithelial cells. This needs to be taken into consideration when selecting myoepithelial markers to help distinguish benign sclerosing lesions from invasive breast cancer.

  2. Giant notochordal hamartoma of intraosseous origin: a newly reported benign entity to be distinguished from chordoma. Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirra, J.M. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Pathology, Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brien, E.W. [Dept. of Musculoskeletal Tumors, Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Two cases are reported of a newly described intraosseous entity of vertebral bodies deemed ''giant notochordal hamartoma of intraosseous origin''. This entity is commonly mistaken for chordoma and must be distinguished from it as the consequences of misinterpretation may be serious. The clinical, radiological and histologic criteria that can be used to distinguish these two entities are emphasized. Included is a proposed pathogenesis for this lesion, its probable notochordal origin, and a review of other probable cases. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign soft tissue neoplasms in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eric A; Fenton, Michael E; Salesky, Joel S; Murphey, Mark D

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews a spectrum of benign soft tissue tumors found in adults. Rather than presenting a complete review, the focus of this article is on benign tumors for which the diagnosis may be confidently made or strongly suggested on the basis of imaging. Diagnoses presented include nodular fasciitis, superficial and deep fibromatosis, elastofibroma, lipomatous lesions, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, Morton neuroma, hemangioma, and myxoma.

  4. Mysteries of TGF-β paradox in benign and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung eLee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β regulates a wide range of biological functions including embryonic development, wound healing, organogenesis, immune modulation, and cancer progression. Interestingly, TGF-β is known to inhibit cell growth in benign cells but promote progression in cancer cells, a phenomenon known as TGF-β paradox. To date, the mechanism of this paradox still remains as a scientific mystery. In this review, we present our experience, alone with the literature, in an attempt to offer answers to this mystery. First, we observed that, upon TGF-β engagement, there is a differential activation of Erk between benign and cancer cells. Since activated Erk is a major mediator in tumor progression and metastasis, a differentially activated Erk represents the answer to this mystery. Second, we identified a key player, PP2A-B56α, which is differentially recruited by the activated type I TGF-β receptor (TBRI in benign and tumor cells, resulting in differential Erk activation. Finally, TGF-β stimulation leads to a suppressed TBRs in tumor cells but not in benign cells. This differentially suppressed TBRs triggers differential recruitment of PP2A-B56α and, thus, differential activation of Erk. The above three events offer the explanation to the mysteries

  5. Mysteries of TGF-β Paradox in Benign and Malignant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Nengwang; Lee, Chung

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β regulates a wide range of biological functions including embryonic development, wound healing, organogenesis, immune modulation, and cancer progression. Interestingly, TGF-β is known to inhibit cell growth in benign cells but promote progression in cancer cells; this phenomenon is known as TGF-β paradox. To date, the mechanism of this paradox still remains a scientific mystery. In this review, we present our experience, along with the literature, in an attempt to answer this mystery. First, we observed that, on TGF-β engagement, there is a differential activation of Erk between benign and cancer cells. Since activated Erk is a major mediator in tumor progression and metastasis, a differentially activated Erk represents the answer to this mystery. Second, we identified a key player, PP2A-B56α, which is differentially recruited by the activated type I TGF-β receptor (TBRI) in benign and tumor cells, resulting in differential Erk activation. Finally, TGF-β stimulation leads to suppressed TBRs in tumor cells but not in benign cells. This differentially suppressed TBRs triggers differential recruitment of PP2A-B56α and, thus, differential activation of Erk. The above three events explain the mysteries of TGF-β paradox. Understanding the mechanism of TGF-β paradox will help us to predict indolent from aggressive cancers and develop novel anti-cancer strategies.

  6. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma of conjunctiva: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabi Konar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma is a condition characterized histologically by damaged elastic fibers associated with preponderance of giant cells along with absence of necrobiosis, lipid, mucin, and pallisading granuloma. It usually occurs on sun-damaged skin and hence the previous name actinic granuloma. A similar process occurs on the conjunctiva. Over the past three decades only four cases of conjunctival actinic granuloma have been documented. All the previous patients were females with lesions in nasal or temporal bulbar conjunctiva varying 2-3 mm in size. We report a male patient aged 70 years presenting with a 14 mm × 7 mm fleshy mass on right lower bulbar conjunctiva. Clinical differential diagnoses were lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma in situ and amyloidosis. Surgical excision followed by histopathology confirmed it to be a case of actinic granuloma. This is the first case of isolated conjunctival actinic granuloma of such a large size reported from India.

  7. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  8. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: Spectrum of radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S. (Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States) Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is the second most common tumor of the hand. It can also occur in larger joints. Radiologic features include a soft-tissue mass with or without osseous erosion. Less commonly, it can cause periostitis or permeative osseous invasion; it may rarely calcify. The entire imaging spectrum of this lesion is presented, with emphasis on atypical appearances which can mimic other lesions. (orig.).

  9. Giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita, Joao Paulo, E-mail: jpauloejulieta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Matushita, Julieta S.; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem Dr. Matsushita, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matushita, Cristina S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Simoes, Luiz Antonio Monteiro; Carvalho Neto, Lizando Franco de

    2013-06-15

    The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus in a 54-year-old male patient. This tumor location is rare, and this is the third case reported in the literature with radiographic documentation and histopathological confirmation. The patient underwent surgery, with curettage of frontal sinus and placement of a prosthesis. He died because a voluntary abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids. (author)

  10. Leiomyosarcoma of the skin with osteoclast-like giant cells: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Deba P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Osteoclast-like giant cells have been noted in various malignant tumors, such as, carcinomas of pancreas and liver and leiomyosarcomas of non-cutaneous locations, such as, uterus and rectum. We were unable to find any reported case of a leiomyosarcoma of the skin where osteoclast-like giant cells were present in the tumor. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with a cutaneous leiomyosarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells arising from the subcutaneous artery of the leg. The nature of the giant cells is discussed in light of the findings from the immunostaining as well as survey of the literature. Conclusion A rare case of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is reported. The giant cells in the tumor appear to be reactive histiocytic cells.

  11. Benign ocular manifestations of sickle cell Anemia in Arabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-salem Mahmoud

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete ophthalmic examination was carried out for each of 54 adult patients with various forms of sickle cell disease. Mild and infrequent signs in the anterior and posterior segments were found, but there were no cases of proliferative sickle cell retinopathy detected. These findings were compared with the reported findings in the black Americans of African origin with the same disease. The probable explanations were the high prevalence of fetal haemoglobin in Arab sicklers, the rarity of sickle cell disease among the Arabs and the possible existence of a different gene.

  12. Painful scoliosis due to superposed giant cell bone tumor and aneurysmal bone cyst in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togral, Guray; Arikan, Murat; Hasturk, Askin E; Gungor, Safak

    2014-07-01

    Giant cell bone tumors are the most common precursor lesions of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) developing secondarily. In giant cell bone tumors containing an explicit ABC component, the observation of the solid component of the giant cell bone tumor plays a critical role in the separation of the primary ABC. In general, ABC cases together with giant cell tumors in the bone are diagnosed histopathologically. The combination of giant cell bone tumor with superposed ABC and that of painful scoliosis with backache is rarely seen in children. In this case study, we discussed the diagnosis and the treatment of a giant cell tumor and superposed an ABC present in the fifth lumbar spine in a pediatric patient admitted to our clinic with a complaint of acute scoliotic back pain.

  13. Giant Cell Fibroma in Children: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Nikitakis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell fibroma is a type of fibrous tumour of the oral mucosa which rarely affects children under the age of 10. The purpose of this paper was to contribute two clinically and histologically documented cases of giant cell fibroma in the free gingiva of a 7 and 6 year old boys. Methods: Both nodules were presented in the mandibular anterior region. In the differential diagnosis several fibrous hyperplastic lesions were considered such as traumatic fibroma, papilloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, giant cell fibroma and odontogenic hamartoma. Results: The lesions were removed and the histological examination revealed fibrocollagenous connective tissue with the presence of stellate giant cells which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. Conclusions: Dentists should be aware of the existence of giant cell fibroma in children, which must be included in the differential diagnosis of nodular lesions of the gingiva and adequately diagnosed and treated by removal and histopathological examination.

  14. A Case of Giant Cell Hepatitis Recurring after Liver Transplantation and Treated with Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Hassoun

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation for giant cell hepatitis with cirrhosis and in whom giant cell hepatitis recurred twice after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. He was treated with ribavirin with an excellent result. The literature on this subject is reviewed. This observation clearly confirms the efficacy of ribavirin for the treatment of giant cell hepatitis, thus providing evidence for its viral origin.

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Nesher

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2–3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be “isolated” or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of “isolated” PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, “hidden” GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2–3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: 2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Gideon; Breuer, Gabriel S

    2016-10-31

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are both more common among people of North European decent than among Mediterranean people. Women are 2-3 times more commonly affected. Giant cell arteritis and PMR are extremely rare before age 50 years. Polymyalgia rheumatica may be "isolated" or associated with GCA. There is increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in temporal arteries of PMR patients, without overt histological evidence of arteritis. One-third of "isolated" PMR patients have vascular uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, suggesting clinically unrecognized, "hidden" GCA. Typical manifestations of GCA are headache, tenderness over temporal arteries, jaw claudication, PMR, acute vision loss, and low-grade fever. Bilateral aching of the shoulders with morning stiffness is typical for PMR. In both conditions sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are elevated, and anemia and thrombocytosis may occur. Color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries may aid in GCA diagnosis. Temporal artery biopsy showing vasculitis, often with giant cells, confirms GCA diagnosis. In cases with negative biopsy one must rely on the clinical presentation and laboratory abnormalities. The diagnosis of PMR is made primarily on clinical grounds. Other conditions that may mimic GCA or PMR must be excluded. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for both conditions. Prompt treatment is crucial in GCA, to prevent irreversible complications of acute vision loss and stroke. Addition of low-dose aspirin may further prevent these complications. The average duration of treatment is 2-3 years, but some patients require a prolonged course of treatment, and some may develop disease-related or treatment-related complications. No steroid-sparing agent has been proven to be widely effective thus far, but some promising therapeutic agents are currently being studied.

  17. [Giant cell arteritis: guidelines of the University Hospital of Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetsou, S; Michel, P; Ribi, C; Hirt, L; Kawasaki, A; Hugli, O; De Leval, L; Bart, P-A; Waeber, G; Meuli, R; Raffoul, W; So, A; Du Pasquier, R

    2015-02-11

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a subacute/chronic vasculitis and represents the most common form of systemic vasculitis in people over the age of 50 years. The absence of clear and specific diagnostic criteria with the highly variable clinical presentation is a diagnostic challenge requesting a multidisciplinary approach. Yet, GCA is an emergency and the treatment must be initiated very rapidly due to the risk of blindness. This article presents a review of GCA as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic institutional guidelines of the University Hospital of Lausanne.

  18. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  19. Oncological and functional results following operation for giant cell tumour of bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhong Wei; Eugene T.H. Ek; Lipeng Yu; Guoyong Yin

    2008-01-01

    Objective:Giant cell tumours(GCT) represent one of the most common benign turnouts of bone. However, despite its benign nature they are aggressive lesions that have a tendency to recur. This study aims to report experience with the treatment of GCTs, and reviews the relationship between surgical management and clinical outcome. Methods:A retrospective review was performed with 70 patients (32 males and 38 females) who presented to our institution between 1991 and 2001 with GCT of bone. An evaluation of the oncological and functional results was conducted and patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment method; Group Ⅰ:(46 patients) intralesional curettage and adjuvant therapy and packing with filling materials. Group Ⅱ:(18 patients) en-bloc resection and arthrodesis or reconstruction. Group Ⅲ:(6 patients) amputation. Results:The mean follow-up period was 10 years (range, 5-15 years). The overall rate of local recurrence was 14%, 22% in Group Ⅰ, and only 4% in Group Ⅱ and Group Ⅲ According to the Musculoskeletal Tumour Society(MSTS) score for functional outcome, the mean overall score for Group Ⅰ was 27.9 (out of 30), 15.9 for Group Ⅱ. Of note, the 9 patients within Group Ⅱ who received endoprosthetic reconstruction, the mean overall MSTS functional score was 25.5. Conclusion:Intralesional curettage with adjuvant therapies and filling agents is often associated with a relatively high recurrence rate, however joint function is well preserved. Patients with more extensive, biologically aggressive, and/or recurrent tumours are best treated with en-bloc resection.

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  4. Histological Regression of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Following RANK Ligand Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Dietrich MD, PhD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung metastases are a rare complication of giant cell tumors of bone. We herein describe an interesting case of histological regression and size reduction of lung metastases originating from a primary giant cell tumor of bone in response to the RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab.

  5. Benign Pigmented Dermal Basal Cell Tumor in a Namibian Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja K. Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3.5-year-old wild born cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, living in a large enclosure on a private Namibian farm, developed a large exophytic nodular neoplasm in its skin at the height of the left shoulder blade. We describe the clinical appearance, the surgical removal, and histological examination of the tumor, which was diagnosed as a moderately pigmented benign basal cell tumor. A three-year follow-up showed no evidence of recurrence after the surgery. Although neoplasia is reported in nondomestic felids, only very few concern cheetahs. So far, no case of basal cell tumor was described in this species.

  6. Periaortic lymph node involvement by metastatic angiosarcoma and benign sinus mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotalo, P A; Jabit, M; Wenckebach, G F

    2001-05-01

    Hyperplastic mesothelial cells involving lymph node sinuses have only been recently described. Most nodal mesothelial cells are thought to originate from mesothelial surfaces disrupted by serosal effusions. Dislodged mesothelial cells likely gain access to submesothelial lymphatics via mesothelial stomata and disseminate to draining lymph nodes. Unusual lymph node architectural patterns result when benign sinus mesothelial cells occur concurrently with a neoplastic nodal process. We describe a young man who developed diffuse metastases from a primary cardiac angiosarcoma. His periaortic lymph nodes contained metastatic angiosarcoma and hyperplastic mesothelial cells with a sinus distribution. The patient had a clinical history of progressive haemoperitoneum, exacerbated by thrombocytopaenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Massive haemoperitoneum of 5000 ml was confirmed at autopsy. This is the first report to suggest that multiple episodes of intraperitoneal haemorrhage and ascites may both act in the same manner to cause dislodgment and dissemination of mesothelial cells to draining lymph node sinuses.

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  15. [Giant-cell bone tumors of the spine: report of two cases and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekrine, T; Tawfiq, N; Bourhaleb, Z; Benchakroun, N; Jouhadi, H; Sahraoui, S; Benider, A

    2009-09-01

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) are relatively rare neoplasms, most often benign. They are characterized by their local aggression. We report two observations of GCT, the spine in a 51-year-old woman and a 14-year-old boy. They were revealed by spinal pain and cord compression for the second observation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed osteolysis of the body and vertebral arch of L5 for the first and a process affecting the vertebral body and medullary canal of T6-T7 with spinal cord compression for the second case. The diagnosis was confirmed by histological examination in two cases. An external radiation at a dose of 45 Gy on L4, L5 and the sacrum was made in the first case and the dose of 40 Gy on the vertebrae of T4 to T9 and an additional 6 Gy on T5-T8 in the second case. The patients are alive without progress with five years and 18 months follow-up, respectively. Radiation could be proposed as a standard treatment for patients with incomplete excision or where surgery would induces functional deficits.

  16. Aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to a giant cell tumor of the patella: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    YU, XIAOLONG; GUO, RUNSHENG; FAN, CONGLIANG; LIU, HUCHENG; ZHANG, BIN; NIE, TAO; TU, YI; DAI, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The patella is an unusual location for primary and metastatic bone tumors to develop. The most frequently encountered primary osteolytic lesions at the patella include giant cell tumors of the bone (GCT), chondroblastoma and aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC). However, the presentation of an ABC originating secondary to a GCT at the patella is rare. The present study describes such a case in a 46-year-old female. The differential diagnosis of the condition was extensive. The patient underwent curettage and the addition of bone cement to fill the defect. Pathological analysis of the resected tissue demonstrated that the lesion was consistent with an ABC forming secondary to a GCT. A 3-month follow-up was completed subsequent to the surgery, with a computed tomography scan demonstrating no evidence of recurrence. However, frequent and continuous observations of the patient following diagnosis are planned in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the surgical treatment. To the best of our knowledge, the present study describes the third reported case in the literature of this rare, double synchronous, benign tumor located at the patella. PMID:26893764

  17. Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

  18. Acute Paraparesis Caused by a Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Chun Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is a benign but locally aggressive skeletal neoplasm of young adults. GCT located in the spine is relatively rare and may need a combination of surgical and adjunctive therapies. Here we present a patient who had intermittent thoracic back pain for two weeks and experienced an acute episode of decreased muscle power of both lower limbs. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging examinations of the thoracic spine revealed that the patient had severe spinal canal compression caused by pathological fracture due to a tumor within the seventh thoracic vertebra. She underwent an emergent surgical intervention for total removal of the tumor and spinal reconstruction with autologous rib grafts and instruments. Postoperatively, the patient made an uneventful recovery of muscle power of bilateral lower limbs. She subsequently received adjuvant radiotherapy. In a follow-up period of 36 months, the patient had no clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence. Even though spinal location for GCT is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with osteolytic lesions or pathological fractures of the vertebra, especially in young female patients sustaining no trauma who had a clinical history of persistent low back pain.

  19. Nonepiphyseal Giant Cell Tumor of the Rib: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippocrates Moschouris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 32-year-old female patient with a giant cell tumor originating in the middle part of the left 10th rib is presented. On X-rays and CT, the tumor caused a well-defined osteolysis with nonsclerotic borders. On MRI, it exhibited intermediate signal intensity on T1 sequences and central high signal and peripheral intermediate signal on T2 sequences. On contrast-enhanced MR images both central and peripheral-periosteal enhancement was noted. Thanks to its small size ( cm, the lesion was easily resected en bloc with a part of the affected rib. The patient is free of recurrence for 3 years after the operation.

  20. Giant cell tumor complicating Paget disease of long bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoch, Benjamin [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Hermann, George [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Klein, Michael J. [University of Alabama School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Abdelwahab, Ibrahim F. [Coney Island Hospital affiliated with CUNY Downstate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Springfield, Dempsey [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a rare complication of Paget disease of bone. It usually occurs in the skull or pelvic bones of patients with long-standing polyostotic disease. This report describes a 62-year-old patient who presented with monostotic Paget disease of the distal femur complicated by GCT. He had a 2-year history of discomfort and pain in his left knee. Conventional plain films and MRI demonstrated the characteristic bone changes of Paget disease and an associated lytic lesion involving the epiphyseal and metaphyseal regions of the distal femur. A diagnostic curettage showed the characteristic histopathologic features of Paget disease and GCT. There was no evidence of malignancy. The clinicopathologic features of this rare lesion are described and correlated with a review of the literature. (orig.)

  1. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the sphenoid bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aralasmak, A; Aygun, N; Westra, W H; Yousem, D M

    2006-09-01

    We present 2 patients with giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the sphenoid bone. The first patient is an 8-year-old boy with involvement of the greater wing, and the second is a 53- year-old man with a lateral pterygoid plate mass. Both patients presented with rapid expansion of lytic bone lesions, which had solid and cystic components and lacked matrix calcification. Biopsies were indeterminate for definitive diagnoses. The radiologic appearance, location, and incidence of the lesions, and the patient's age and medical history are helpful aids in narrowing the differential diagnosis of sphenoid bone lesions. However, the imaging and, occasionally, even the histologic findings may not suggest the specific diagnosis of GCRG, which must be added into the differential diagnosis of rapidly enlarging cystic bone lesions of the sphenoid bone.

  2. Clinical and CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant and oncology patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarville, M.B.; Goodin, Geoffrey S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Whittle, Sarah B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Chin-Shang; Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hale, Gregory A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States); Kaufman, Robert A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Pneumatosis intestinalis in children is associated with a wide variety of underlying conditions and often has a benign course. The CT features of this condition have not been systematically investigated. Defining benign pneumatosis intestinalis as pneumatosis intestinalis that resolved with medical management alone, we sought to: (1) determine whether the incidence of benign pneumatosis intestinalis had increased at our pediatric cancer hospital; (2) characterize CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis; and (3) determine the relationship between imaging features and clinical course of benign pneumatosis intestinalis in this cohort. Radiology reports from November 1994 to December 2006 were searched for ''pneumatosis intestinalis,'' ''free intraperitoneal air,'' and ''portal venous air or gas.'' Corresponding imaging was reviewed by two radiologists who confirmed pneumatosis intestinalis and recorded the presence of extraluminal free air, degree of intramural gaseous distension, number of involved bowel segments, and time to pneumatosis resolution. The search revealed 12 boys and 4 girls with pneumatosis intestinalis; 11 were hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The annual incidences of benign pneumatosis have not changed at our institution. Increases in intramural distension marginally correlated with the number of bowel segments involved (P=0.08). Three patients had free air and longer times to resolution of pneumatosis (P=0.03). Male children may be at increased risk of benign pneumatosis intestinalis. The incidence of benign pneumatosis at our institution is proportional to the number of hematopoietic stem cell transplants. The degree of intramural distension may correlate with the number of bowel segments involved. Patients with free air have a longer time to resolution of benign pneumatosis. (orig.)

  3. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia: unusual lung disorder and an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Jinghong; Huang Mei; Cao Min; Miao Liyun; Xiao Yonglong; Shi Yi; Meng Fanqing

    2014-01-01

    Background Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) was a rare form of pneumoconiosis,associated with exposure to hard metals,which had been reported mostly as isolated case reports.We described eight cases of GIP diagnosed in our hospital during the past seven years,with particular reference to new findings.Methods Eight patients with GIP confirmed by biopsy in the Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital affiliated to Medical School of Nanjing University from 2005 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed.For each patient,the occupy histories and medical records were thoroughly reviewed and clinic data were extracted.Two radiologists,without knowledge of any of the clinical and functional findings,independently reviewed the HRCT scans of all patients.Follow-up data were collected.Results Among the eight patients,seven had a history of exposure to hard metal dusts,one denied an exposure history.The most common manifestations were cough and dyspnea.One patient initiated with pneumothorax and another pleural effusion,both of which were uncommon to GIP.The main pathologic appearances were the presence of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in the alveolar space.The clinical symptoms and radiographic abnormalities were obviously improved after cessation of exposure and receiving corticosteroid treatments,recurrences were observed in two patients when they resumed work.In spite of exposure cessation and corticosteroid treatment,one patient developed pulmonary fibrosis at seven years follow-up.Conclusions Awareness of the patients' occupational history often provided clues to the diagnosis of GIP.Histopathologic examinations were necessary to establish the right diagnosis.Exposure cessation was of benefit to most patients; however,pulmonary fibrosis was possible in spite of exposure cessation and corticosteroid treatment.Better ways should be found out to improve the outcome and quality of life.

  4. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  5. A rare case of giant cell fibroma in a pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Rajesh Patankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous hyperplastic lesions are frequently encountered in the oral cavity. Although clinically similar, these lesions show variations histologically. Giant cell fibroma (GCF is one such nonneoplastic fibrous lesion with a characteristic histopathological feature of stellate-shaped multinuclear or mononuclear fibroblasts known as giant cell fibroblasts. In the recent years, more and more GCF cases have been reported in pediatric patients. This case report describes a papillary soft tissue growth in the lower right posterior region of the mandible in a 5-year-old child with a review on giant cell fibroblasts.

  6. Evolution of microscopic colitis to giant cell colitis without significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis or thickened collagen plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petris, Giovanni; Chen, Longwen

    2015-05-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an umbrella term that encompasses lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC). Several histological variants of these 2 entities exist; among them is the uncommon giant cell colitis (GCC), in which histiocytic giant cells (GCs) are present in background of CC or LC. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman complaining of watery diarrhea for several years that was diagnosed with CC. At follow-up, she developed giant cell colitis (GCC). Nine years later, a colectomy revealed a form of microscopic colitis in which significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis and collagen plate thickening have disappeared while GCs persisted with diffuse mononuclear cells inflammation of the lamina propria. Thinning of the collagen plate in association with GCs has been described previously. The case contributes the possibility of further evolution of MC into a pure giant cell colitis in which the prototypical manifestations of MC have all but disappeared.

  7. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  8. Primary de novo malignant giant cell tumor of kidney: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torkian Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoclast-like giant cell tumors are usually observed in osseous tissue or as tumors of tendon sheath, characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear stromal cells. It has been reported in various extraosseous sites including breast, skin, soft tissue, salivary glands, lung, pancreas, female genital tract, thyroid, larynx and heart. However, extraosseus occurrence of such giant cell tumors in the kidney is extremely rare and is usually found in combination with a conventional malignancy. De-novo primary malignant giant cell tumors of the kidney are unusual lesions and to our knowledge this is the second such case. Case Presentation We report a rare case of extraosseous primary denovo malignant giant cell tumor of the renal parenchyma in a 39-year-old Caucasian female to determine the histogenesis of this neoplasm with a detailed literature review. Conclusion Primary denovo malignant giant cell tumor of the kidney is extremely rare. The cellular origin of this tumor is favored to be a pluripotential mesenchymal stromal cell of the mononuclear/phagocytic cellular lineage. Awareness of this neoplasm is important in the pathological interpretation of unusual findings at either fine needle aspiration or frozen section of solid renal masses.

  9. Photoinduced Giant Dielectric Constant in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Perez, Emilio J; Sanchez, Rafael S; Badia, Laura; Garcia-Belmonte, Germá; Kang, Yong Soo; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan

    2014-07-03

    Organic-inorganic lead trihalide perovskites have emerged as an outstanding photovoltaic material that demonstrated a high 17.9% conversion efficiency of sunlight to electricity in a short time. We have found a giant dielectric constant (GDC) phenomenon in these materials consisting on a low frequency dielectric constant in the dark of the order of ε0 = 1000. We also found an unprecedented behavior in which ε0 further increases under illumination or by charge injection at applied bias. We observe that ε0 increases nearly linearly with the illumination intensity up to an additional factor 1000 under 1 sun. Measurement of a variety of samples of different morphologies, compositions, and different types of contacts shows that the GDC is an intrinsic property of MAPbX3 (MA = CH3NH3(+)). We hypothesize that the large dielectric response is induced by structural fluctuations. Photoinduced carriers modify the local unit cell equilibrium and change the polarizability, assisted by the freedom of rotation of MA. The study opens a way for the understanding of a key aspect of the photovoltaic operation of high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  10. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for giant cell tumor of distal radius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia Kabul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumor (GCT of the distal radius poses problems for reconstruction after resection. Several reconstructive procedures like vascularized and non-vascularized fibular graft, osteo-articular allograft, ceramic prosthesis and megaprosthesis are in use for substitution of the defect in the distal radius following resection. Most authors advocate wrist arthrodesis following resection of distal radius and non vascularized fibular graft. Here we have analyzed the results of aggressive benign GCTs of the distal radius treated by resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized fibular graft. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four cases of giant cell tumor of the distal radius (mean age 32 years, mean follow-up 6.6 years treated by en-bloc resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized ipsilateral fibular graft with a minimum followup of two years have been included in this retrospective study. Nineteen cases were of Campanacci grade III and five were of Grade II recurrence. The mean resected length of the radius was 9.5 (8-12 cm. Routine radiographs and clinical assessments regarding pain, instability, recurrence, hand grip strength and functional status were done at regular intervals and functional results were assessed using (musculoskeletal tumor society MSTS-87 scoring. Results: Early radiological union at host-graft junction was achieved at mean 12.5 weeks, (range 12-14 weeks and solid incorporation with callus formation was observed in mean 29 weeks (range 28-32 weeks in all the cases. Satisfactory range of motion (mean 63%, range 52-78% of the wrist was achieved in 18 cases. Grip strength compared to the contralateral hand was found to be 67% (range 58-74%. Functional results were excellent in six cases (25%, good in 14 cases (58.3% and four (16.7% cases had fair results. Soft tissue recurrence was seen in one patient. The most commonly encountered complication was fibulo

  11. Identification of genes differentially expressed between benign and osteopontin transformed rat mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudland Philip S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopontin is a secreted, integrin-binding and phosphorylated acidic glycoprotein which has an important role in tumor progression. Findings In this study, we have utilized suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH to evaluate OPN regulated gene expression, using the Rama 37 benign non-invasive rat mammary cell line and a subclone, Rama 37-OPN. Rama 37-OPN was produced by stably transfecting Rama 37 with an OPN expression vector and it demonstrates increased malignant properties in vitro. Sequence and expression array analysis of the respective cDNA libraries of over 1600 subtracted cDNA fragments revealed 982 ESTs, 45 novel sequences and 659 known genes. The known up-regulated genes in the Rama 37-OPN library code for proteins with a variety of functions including those involved in metabolism, cell adhesion and migration, signal transduction and in apoptosis. Four of the most differentially expressed genes between the benign and in vitro malignant rat mammary cell lines are tumor protein translationally controlled I (TPTI, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and RAN GTPase (RAN. The largest difference (ca 10,000 fold between the less aggressively (MCF-7, ZR-75 and more aggressively malignant (MDA MB 231, MDA MB 435S human breast cancer cell lines is that due to RAN, the next is that due to osteopontin itself. Conclusion The results suggest that enhanced properties associated with the malignant state in vitro induced by osteopontin may be due to, in part, overexpression of RAN GTPase and these biological results are the subject of a subsequent publication 1.

  12. Central giant cell granuloma of the mandibular condyle: Case-report

    OpenAIRE

    Munzenmayer,J; Tapia, P.; Zeballos,J; Martínez, A.; Compan,Á; Urra, A.; Spencer,ML

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 19-year-old female patient with a central giant cell granuloma in the left mandibular condyle, treated with en bloc resection and reconstruction with fibula graft. This occurrence is considered very unusual.

  13. Transfusion rate and prevalence of unexpected red blood cell alloantibodies in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoestesen, Lisbeth M; Rasmussen, Kjeld L; Lauszus, Finn F;

    2011-01-01

    To determine transfusion rates, risk factors for transfusion and the prevalence of unexpected red blood cell alloantibodies in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign disease. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the necessity of the pretransfusion testing for red blood cell alloantibodies....

  14. Detection of the Epstein-Barr Virus and DNA-Topoisomerase II-α in Recurrent and Nonrecurrent Giant Cell Lesion of the Jawbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Zyada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II- correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II- using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II- in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs. Student t-test showed that mean Topo II- labelling index (LI in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (. Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II- LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II- LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II- LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  15. Gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Mak, Isabella; Power, Patricia; Cunningham, Melissa; Cunnigham, Melissa; Turcotte, Robert; Ghert, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The neoplastic stem-like stromal cell of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) survives for multiple passages in primary culture with a stable phenotype, and exhibits multipotent characteristics. The pathophysiology of this tumor has been studied through the primary culture of these cells. However, successful gene transfer of these cells has not been reported to date. In this short report, we describe the development of the first reported technique that results in efficient gene transfection in primary stem-like cells of GCT.

  16. Multinucleated Giant Cancer Cells Produced in Response to Ionizing Radiation Retain Viability and Replicate Their Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2017-01-01

    Loss of wild-type p53 function is widely accepted to be permissive for the development of multinucleated giant cells. However, whether therapy-induced multinucleation is associated with cancer cell death or survival remains controversial. Herein, we demonstrate that exposure of p53-deficient or p21WAF1 (p21)-deficient solid tumor-derived cell lines to ionizing radiation (between 2 and 8 Gy) results in the development of multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent to the culture dish for long times post-irradiation. Somewhat surprisingly, single-cell observations revealed that virtually all multinucleated giant cells that remain adherent for the duration of the experiments (up to three weeks post-irradiation) retain viability and metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and the majority (>60%) exhibit DNA synthesis. We further report that treatment of multinucleated giant cells with pharmacological activators of apoptosis (e.g., sodium salicylate) triggers their demise. Our observations reinforce the notion that radiation-induced multinucleation may reflect a survival mechanism for p53/p21-deficient cancer cells. With respect to evaluating radiosensitivity, our observations underscore the importance of single-cell experimental approaches (e.g., single-cell MTT) as the creation of viable multinucleated giant cells complicates the interpretation of the experimental data obtained by commonly-used multi-well plate colorimetric assays. PMID:28208747

  17. GIANT CELL-RICH LESIONS OF BONE AND JOINTS: A ONE YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Sri Nithisa H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Giant cell-rich lesions constitute a group of biologically and morphologically diverse bone and joint tumours. The common feature is presence of numerous multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells. However, they differ from each other by in terms of clinical and radiographic features and in many cases by their distinct morphological features. METHODS All the bone and joint specimens with giant cell-rich lesions received in the period of one year were studied along with clinical and radiological data available. Gross and microscopic findings were noted. RESULTS In a period of one year, 10 cases of giant cell-rich lesions of bone and joints have been studied, which were and correlated with clinical and radiological findings. Five were lesions from bone and two were from joints, which are chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma, osteoclastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, pigmented villonodular synovitis, giant cell lesion of tendon sheath, and tendinous xanthoma. CONCLUSION In the present study, variety of giant cell lesions of bone and joints are studied. Of which, the mean age in young patients being 20 years and in elderly patients being 50 years. The common site being lower end of femur.

  18. Optimal management of giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica

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    Charlton R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodger CharltonCollege of Medicine, Swansea University, Wales, UKAbstract: Giant cell arteritis (GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR are clinical diagnoses without "gold standard" serological or histological tests, excluding temporal artery biopsy for GCA. Further, other conditions may mimic GCA and PMR. Treatment with 10–20 mg of prednisolone daily is suggested for PMR or 40–60 mg daily for GCA when temporal arteritis is suspected. This ocular involvement of GCA should be treated as a medical emergency to prevent possible blindness and steroids should be commenced immediately. There are no absolute guidelines as to the dose or duration of administration; the therapeutics of treating this condition and the rate of reduction of prednisolone should be adjusted depending on the individual's response and with consideration of the multiple risks of high-dose and long-term glucocorticoids. Optimal management may need to consider the role of low-dose aspirin in reducing complications. Clinicians should also be aware of studies that indicate an increased incidence of large-artery complications with GCA. This clinical area requires further research through future development of radiological imaging to aid the diagnosis and produce a clearer consensus relating to diagnosis and treatment.Keywords: arteritis, visual loss, blindness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, stiffness, pain, aspirin, disability, glucocorticoids

  19. Design of the Tocilizumab in Giant Cell Arteritis Trial

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    Sebastian H. Unizony

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview. The GiACTA trial is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study designed to test the ability of tocilizumab (TCZ, an interleukin (IL-6 receptor antagonist, to maintain disease remission in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA. Design. Approximately 100 centers will enroll 250 patients with active disease. The trial consists of a 52-week blinded treatment phase followed by 104 weeks of open-label extension. Patients will be randomized into one of four groups. Group A (TCZ 162 mg weekly plus a 6-month prednisone-taper; group B (TCZ 162 mg every other week plus a 6-month prednisone-taper; group C (placebo plus a 6-month prednisone-taper; and group D (placebo plus a 12-month prednisone taper. We hypothesize that patients assigned to TCZ in addition to a 6-month prednisone course are more likely to achieve the primary efficacy endpoint of sustained remission (SR at 52 weeks compared with those assigned to a 6-month prednisone course alone, thus potentially minimizing the long-term adverse effects of corticosteroids. Conclusion. GiACTA will test the hypothesis that interference with IL-6 signaling exerts a beneficial effect on patients with GCA. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of the trial and address major issues related to its development.

  20. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  1. Gene expression disparity in giant cell tumor of bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua PAN; Shuhua YANG; Deming XIAO; Yong DAI; Lili REN

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the differential gene expression of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) by gene chip technology. Total RNA of 8 fresh GCTB specimens (Jaffe Ⅰ:6 cases, Ⅱ: 1 case, Ⅲ: 1 case; Campanacci Ⅰ:6 cases, Ⅱ:1 case, Ⅲ:1 case; Enneking Staging G0T1-2M0, 5 cases, G1T1-2M0: 2 cases, G1T2M0: 1 case) and 4 normal bony callus specimens (the control group) were extracted and purified to get mRNA and then reverse transcribed to complementary DNA, respectively. Microarray screening with a set of 8064 human cDNA genes was conducted to analyze the difference among the samples and the control. The hybridization signals were scanned. The gene expression disparity between the GCTB samples and normal bony callus was significantly different (P<0.01), and the disparity of over 5-fold was found in 47 genes in the GCTB specimens, with 25 genes up-regulated and 22 down-regulated including the extracellular matrix and transforming-related genes, oncogene and its homolog genes, cytokine and its receptor genes. Specific gene spectrum associated with GCTB can be identified by cDNA microarray, which will be the foundation of progressive etiology elucidation, diagnosis and treatment of GCTB.

  2. 5{alpha}-reductase expression by prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.; Masters, J.R.W. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)]|[Pfizer Central Research, Kent (United Kingdom); Ballard, S.A.; Worman, N. [Pfizer Central Research, Sandwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    5{alpha}-Reductase (5{alpha}R) activity in two human prostate cancer cell lines was compared to that in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue and COS cells transfected with and expressing the human genes for 5{alpha}-reductase type 1 (5{alpha}R1) and type 2 (5{alpha}R2). Comparisons were based on pH profiles and sensitivities to selective inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase. In the cancer lines, activity was greatest over the pH range 7-8, compared to a sharp peak of activity between pH 5-5.5 in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2. Finasteride and SKF105,657 were potent inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2, but weak inhibitors in the cancer lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. In contrast, LTK1 17,026 was a more potent inhibitor of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in the prostate cancer cell lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. These data indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines express 5{alpha}-reductase activity similar to that in COS cells transfected with 5{alpha}R1, but different from that in BPH tissue. This may be a consequence of in vitro culture. Alternatively, it may reflect a change occurring as a result of neoplastic transformation, in which case it will be important to select appropriate inhibitors in the clinic. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Giant oral lipoma: a rare entity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, José Burgos; Ferreira, Gustavo Zanna; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are very common benign slow-growing soft tissue neoplasms composed of mature adipose tissue mostly diagnosed in the fifth decade of life. These tumors rarely present in the oral cavity, representing less than approximately 5% of all benign mouth tumors. They are usually less than 2cm in size and etiology remains unclear. We report a young male patient presenting with a giant lipoma in the buccal mucosa. Histopathology revealed a large area of mature fat cells consistent with conventional lipoma and an area of the mucosal lining of the lesion suggestive of morsicatio buccarum. In the present article, we emphasize the clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of the disease.

  4. The foreign body giant cell cannot resorb bone, but dissolves hydroxyapatite like osteoclasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. ten Harkel; T. Schoenmaker; D.I. Picavet; N.L. Davison; T.J. de Vries; V. Everts

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important

  5. Linking genomic reorganization to tumor initiation via the giant cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, N; Mercado-Uribe, I; Tao, F; Han, Z; Pathak, S; Multani, A S; Kuang, J; Yao, J; Bast, R C; Sood, A K; Hung, M-C; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying our recent paradoxical finding that mitotically incapacitated and genomically unstable polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are capable of tumor initiation, we labeled ovarian cancer cells with α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, histone-2B fused to red fluorescent protein and FUCCI (fluorescent ubiquitination cell cycle indicator), and tracked the spatial and time-dependent change in spindle and chromosomal dynamics of PGCCs using live-cell fluorescence time-lapse recording. We found that single-dose (500 nm) treatment with paclitaxel paradoxically initiated endoreplication to form PGCCs after massive cell death. The resulting PGCCs continued self-renewal via endoreplication and further divided by nuclear budding or fragmentation; the small daughter nuclei then acquired cytoplasm, split off from the giant mother cells and acquired competency in mitosis. FUCCI showed that PGCCs divided via truncated endoreplication cell cycle (endocycle or endomitosis). Confocal microscopy showed that PGCCs had pronounced nuclear fragmentation and lacked expression of key mitotic proteins. PGCC-derived daughter cells were capable of long-term proliferation and acquired numerous new genome/chromosome alterations demonstrated by spectral karyotyping. These data prompt us to conceptualize a giant cell cycle composed of four distinct but overlapping phases, initiation, self-renewal, termination and stability. The giant cell cycle may represent a fundamental cellular mechanism to initiate genomic reorganization to generate new tumor-initiating cells in response to chemotherapy-induced stress and contributes to disease relapse. PMID:27991913

  6. Differential gene expression in stromal cells of human giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelling, M; Delling, G; Kaiser, E

    2004-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) offers a unique model for the hematopoietic-stromal cell interaction in human bone marrow. Evidence has been presented that GCT stromal cells (GCTSCs) promote accumulation, size and activity of the giant cells. Although GCTSCs are considered the neoplastic component of GCT, little is known about their genetic basis and, to date, a tumor-specific gene expression pattern has not been characterized. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as the origin of the GCT neoplastic stromal cell. Using state of the art array technology, expression profiling was applied to enriched stromal cell populations from five different GCTs and two primary MSCs as controls. Of the 29 differentially expressed genes found, 25 showed an increased expression. Differential mRNA expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 10 selected genes, supporting the validity of cDNA arrays as a tool to identify tumor-related genes in GCTSCs. Increased expression of two oncogenes, JUN and NME2, was substantiated at the protein level, utilizing immunohistochemical evaluation of GCT sections and Western-blot analysis. Increased phosphorylation of JUN Ser-63 was also found.

  7. Giant Cell Fibroma of Tongue: Understanding the Nature of an Unusual Histopathological Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjari Ghate Sonalika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell fibroma (GCF is a rare case with unique histopathology. It belongs to the broad category of fibrous hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity. It is often mistaken with fibroma and papilloma due to its clinical resemblance. Only its peculiar histopathological features help us to distinguish it from them. The origin of the giant cell is still controversial. Data available is very sparse to predict the exact behavior. Hence, we report a case of GCF of tongue in a 19-year-old male. Special emphasis is given to understand the basic process of development of the lesion, nature of giant cells, and also the need for formation of these peculiar cells. Briefly, the differential diagnosis for GCF is tabulated.

  8. Differential expression of filamin B splice variants in giant cell tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Joseph Chi-Ching; Lau, Carol Po-Ying; Cheung, Alex Chun; Wong, Kwok-chuen; Huang, Lin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; KUMTA, SHEKHAR MADHUKAR

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is the most commonly reported non-malignant bone tumor in Hong Kong. This kind of tumor usually affects people aged 20–40 years. Also, it is well known for recurrence locally, especially when the tumor cannot be removed completely. Filamins are actin-binding proteins which contain three family members, filamin A, B and C. They are the products of three different genes, FLNA, FLNB and FLNC, which can generate various transcript variants in different cell types. I...

  9. Imaging findings of common benign renal tumors in the era of small renal masses: Differential diagnosis from small renal cell carcinoma: Current status and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sung Min; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The prevalence of small renal masses (SRM) has risen, paralleling the increased usage of cross-sectional imaging. A large proportion of these SRMs are not malignant, and do not require invasive treatment such as nephrectomy. Therefore, differentation between early renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and benign SRM is critical to achieve proper management. This article reviews the radiological features of benign SRMs, with focus on two of the most common benign entities, angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma, in terms of their common imaging findings and differential features from RCC. Furthermore, the role of percutaneous biopsy is discussed as imaging is yet imperfect, therefore necessitating biopsy in certain circumstances to confirm the benignity of SRMs.

  10. Giant cell tumor of the greater wing of the sphenoid: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaz, Andrés Coca; Llorente Pendás, José L; Rodrigo Tapia, Juan P; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We report a very unusual presentation of giant cell tumor probably originated on the greater wing of the sphenoid and show a review about the knowledge and the treatment of the lesion in this rare localization. We treated a 48-year-old man with a giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa. He presented with a right-side hearing loss and facial pain. The tumor was resected by means of a subtemporal-preauricular approach, and after 12 months of follow-up, the patient is free of recurrence. Giant cell tumors of the skull base are an extremely rare neoplasm, and there is not much information on the literature about the treatment and the prognostic. Wide resection ought to be made, and at the follow-up, the clinician must try to diagnose not only local recurrence but also the possibility of distant metastases to the lung.

  11. The value of recognizing suspect diagnoses in the triple diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotru Mrinalini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is the most frequently over-diagnosed neoplasm in orthopedic pathology because giant cells are a common component of many neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions of bone. Triple diagnosis, requiring substantial individual and collective inputs by orthopedic surgeons, radiologists and pathologists, is the preferred method for the workup of patients with suspected bone neoplasms. At each stage in triple diagnosis, deviations from the typical must be regarded as clues to alternate diagnoses: the greater the deviation, the more a diagnosis of GCT must be considered suspect. A suspect diagnosis must trigger renewed analysis of the available data and a diligent search to exclude alternate diagnoses.

  12. SOME ASPECTS OF DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF GIANT-CELL TUMOUR, OSTEOCYSTOMA AND OSTEOSARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Pavlenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of timeliness and correctness of diagnostics of bone tumours, as well as therapeutic decision deserve the most careful consideration. The present research concerns the detection of criteria of differential diagnostics of giant-cell tumours, osteocystoma and osteosarcoma (according to the literary data. According to the literature the study of clinical and radiologic diagnostics, allowed to work out differential and diagnostic tables of signs and algorithms of diagnostics of giant-cell tumours, osteocystoma and osteosarcoma. It enabled to detect a therapeutic and diagnostic approach to patients with bone tumours.

  13. Circulating Prostate Cells Found in Men with Benign Prostate Disease Are P504S Negative: Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developments in immunological and quantitative real-time PCR-based analysis have enabled the detection, enumeration, and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs. It is assumed that the detection of CTCs is associated with cancer, based on the finding that CTCs can be detected in all major cancer and not in healthy subjects or those with benign disease. Methods and Patients. Consecutive men, with suspicion of prostate cancer, had blood samples taken before prostate biopsy; mononuclear cells were obtained using differential gel centrifugation and CPCs detecting using anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent further classification with anti-P504S. Results. 329 men underwent prostate biopsy; of these men 83 underwent a second biopsy and 44 a third one. Of those with a biopsy negative for cancer, 19/226 (8.4% had CPCs PSA (+ P504S (− detected at first biopsy, 6/74 (8.1% at second biopsy, and 5/33 (15.2% at third biopsy. Men with cancer-positive biopsies did not have PSA (+ P504S (− CPCs detected. These benign cells were associated with chronic prostatitis. Conclusions. Patients with chronic prostatitis may have circulating prostate cells detected in blood, which do not express the enzyme P504S and should be thought of as benign in nature.

  14. Monocyte/macrophage and T-cell infiltrates in peritoneum of patients with ovarian cancer or benign pelvic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Qing

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that tumor-free peritoneum of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC exhibited enhanced expression of several inflammatory response genes compared to peritoneum of benign disease. Here, we examined peritoneal inflammatory cell patterns to determine their concordance with selected enhanced genes. Methods Expression patterns of selected inflammatory genes were mined from our previously published data base. Bilateral pelvic peritoneal and subjacent stromal specimens were obtained from 20 women with EOC and 7 women with benign pelvic conditions. Sections were first stained by indirect immunoperoxidase and numbers of monocytes/macrophages (MO/MA, T cells, B cells, and NK cells counted. Proportions of CD68+ cells and CD3+ cells that coexpressed MO/MA differentiation factors (CD163, CCR1, CXCR8, VCAM1, and phosphorylated cytosolic phospholipase A2 [pcPLA2], which had demonstrated expression in EOC peritoneal samples, were determined by multicolor immunofluorescence. Results MO/MA were present on both sides of the pelvic peritoneum in EOC patients, with infiltration of the subjacent stroma and mesothelium. CD68+ MO/MA, the most commonly represented population, and CD3+ T cells were present more often in EOC than in benign pelvic tumors. NK cells, B cells, and granulocytes were rare. CXCL8 (IL-8 and the chemokine receptor CCR1 were coexpressed more frequently on MO/MA than on CD3+ cells contrasting with CD68+/CD163+ cells that coexpressed CXCL8 less often. An important activated enzyme in the eicosanoid pathway, pcPLA2, was highly expressed on both CD68+ and CD163+ cells. The adherence molecule Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM1 was expressed on CD31+ endothelial cells and on a proportion of CD68+ MO/MA but rarely on CD3+ cells. Conclusion The pelvic peritoneum in EOC exhibits a general pattern of chronic inflammation, represented primarily by differentiated MO/MA, and distinct from that in benign

  15. Heterogeneous vesicles in mucous epithelial cells of posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus

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    H. Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultrastructural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E. Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC; ii electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC; and iii mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC.

  16. Use of Myoepithelial Cell Markers in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign, In situ, and Invasive Lesions of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corben, Adriana D; Lerwill, Melinda F

    2009-06-01

    Immunohistochemical markers for myoepithelial cells are commonly used to distinguish invasive from noninvasive lesions in the breast. The approach takes advantage of the fact that conventional invasive carcinomas lack surrounding myoepithelial cells, whereas nearly all benign lesions and in situ carcinomas retain their myoepithelial cell layer. Although conceptually straightforward, the interpretation of myoepithelial cell markers can be complicated by misleading patterns of reactivity (such as stromal or tumor cell staining) or lack of reactivity (due to reduced numbers of myoepithelial cells or variable antigenicity). In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used myoepithelial cell markers, their general utility in distinguishing invasive from noninvasive processes, and pitfalls in their interpretation. We also examine whether the detection of myoepithelial cells is helpful in the evaluation of papillary lesions, another common application. Myoepithelial cell markers can be diagnostically useful in the distinction of many benign, in situ, and invasive lesions, but they must be interpreted in conjunction with careful morphologic analysis.

  17. Biological effect of human serum collected before and after oral intake of Pygeum africanum on various benign prostate cell cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stéphane Larré; Philippe Camparo; Eva Comperat; Delphine Boulbés; Mohammed Haddoum; Sylvain Baulande; Pascal Soularue; Pierre Costa; Olivier Cussenot

    2012-01-01

    Pygeum africanum (Tadenan) is a popular phytotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia.The active compounds of the drug have not been identified,and determining the plasma concentration of the drug is,therefore,not possible.Because there are conflicting results on the efficacy of this drug,we aimed to investigate its effect on prostate cell growth in vitro using human serum collected before and after Pygeum africanum intake.We used primary and organotypic cultures of human prostatic stromal myofibroblast cell line WPMY and prostatic epithelial cell line PNT2.We also used fresh benign prostatic tissue.The serum of a treated man induced decreases in the proliferation of primary cells,organotypic cells and WPMY cells but not PNT2 cells.We also analysed the effect of treated serum on the gene expression profile of WPMY cells.The transcriptome analysis revealed an upregulation of genes involved in multiple tumour suppression pathways and a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and oxidative-stress pathways.The oral intake of Pygeum africanum resulted in serum levels of active substances that were sufficient to inhibit the proliferation of cultured myofibroblasts prostatic cells.This inhibition was associated with changes in the transcriptome.

  18. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  19. The central giant cells granuloma of the mandible: a report of two cases and areview of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Tenore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The central giant cells granuloma (CGCG is a benign intraosseous lesion of the jaws. CGCG is found predominantly in childrenand young adults, most commonly in the anterior portion of the mandible. Although many theories have been proposed to explain theaetiology and pathogenesis of CGCG, its true nature is still unknown. In this study, two cases of CGCG are presented.The first case is about a 7-year-old patient with a lesion of the mandible and the ectopic displacement of teeth n° 3.2 and n° 7.4.The second case is about a 68-year-old man with a recidivant lesion of the mandible, that produced an external root resorption of3.3, in the same site of a previously excised CGCG. In both cases a surgical excision of the lesion was performed and a histologicaldiagnosis of CGCG was made. The clinical and radiographic 4-years follow-up in the first case and a 2-years follow-up in the secondcase did not reveal any recurrence of the lesion. So we may conclude that early and precise diagnosis of CGCG allows conservativemanagement without risks for the adjacent teeth or bone.

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporal Bone with Direct Invasion into the Middle Ear and Skull Base: A Case Report

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    Takashi Iizuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT is classified as a benign bone tumor, and it is frequently identified at the epiphysis of long bones and relatively rare in the temporal bone. For orthopedists expert at recognizing bone and soft tissue tumors, the diagnosis of GCT is relatively easy; however, since head and neck surgeons experience few cases of GCT, it may be difficult to diagnose when it occurs in the temporal bone. A 32-year-old man complained of left hearing loss, aural fullness, and tinnitus. Examination of the ear revealed a bulging tumor. Audiologic examination demonstrated conductive hearing loss of the left ear. Computer tomograph of the temporal bone showed a soft-tissue-density specification indicating bone destruction at the left temporal bone. The tumor invaded the skull base. Imaging examinations using magnetic resonance imaging revealed a nonhomogenous isosignal intensity area on T1 at the left temporal bone. After intravenous gadolinium, the mass showed unequal enhancement. This patient subsequently underwent surgery to remove the lesion using transmastoid and middle fossa approach. Pathological examinations from specimens of the tumor revealed characteristic of GCT. No clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence was detected for 4 years.

  1. Tuberous sclerosis complex complicated with extraventricular cystic giant cell astrocytoma: case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu-zhu; DAI Jian-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is one of the most commonly identified neurocutaneous disorders with a prevalence of 1/6000 to 1/9000 in general population1,2 In the patients with TSC, 10%-15% have subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) .3

  2. Temporal artery biopsy is not required in all cases of suspected giant cell arteritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-07-01

    Temporal artery biopsy (TAB) is performed during the diagnostic workup for giant cell arteritis (GCA), a vasculitis with the potential to cause irreversible blindness or stroke. However, treatment is often started on clinical grounds, and TAB result frequently does not influence patient management. The aim of this study was to assess the need for TAB in cases of suspected GCA.

  3. Case Report of Undifferentiated Endometrial Sarcoma in Association with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells

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    Svetoslav Bardarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical, gross and microscopic features of undifferentiated uterine stromal sarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells. A case of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma is already described in association with osteoclast-like giant cells; however, the current case differs in that the tumor was a high grade and did not show any evidence of smooth muscle or epithelioid differentiation and was shown to be strongly positive for CD10 and focally for WT-1 and Inhibin supporting an endometrial stromal origin. The associated osteoclast-like giant cells were abundant, evenly distributed within the tumor and showed strong positivity for CD68. Interestingly, rare (less than 2% giant cells also showed weak cytoplasmic positivity for b-hCG. The tumor infiltrated deep into the myometrium and had marked lymphovascular invasion. Although the regional lymph nodes and peritoneal washings were negative, the lesion showed a highly aggressive clinical course. Despite treatment, the tumor disseminated within the abdominal cavity and lungs and ultimately led to the patient's demise within 9 months of the diagnosis.

  4. Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinoma of the intestine. An immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Teglbjaerg, P S

    1989-01-01

    Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinomas have been described in the lungs, thyroid, pancreas, and gallbladder. Two pleomorphic carcinomas of the small bowel and two of the large bowel are presented. On light microscopic study, the carcinomas were solid, without squamous or glandular differentiation...

  5. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome with central giant cell granuloma. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Kivanç; Orhan, Kaan; Demir, Pinar; Karabulut, Bariş; Can-Karabulut, Deniz C

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes a clinical case of both giant cell granuloma and Kartagener syndrome in a 15-year-old male patient, with emphasis on the radiographic aspects of this extremely unusual pathology. To our knowledge, the presence of these 2 rare clinical conditions in the same patient has not been previously reported.

  6. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive...... DISCLOSURE(S): The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article....

  7. Preferential accumulation of T helper cells but not cytotoxic T cells characterizes benign subclinical rejection of human liver allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Anna K; Schlue, Jerome; Noyan, Fatih; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Lehner, Frank; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Klempnauer, Juergen; Manns, Michael P; Taubert, Richard; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2016-07-01

    Subclinical rejection (SCR) is a common event in protocol biopsies after liver transplantation (LT). So far the interpretation of the underlying histological changes and clinical significance is limited. Previous studies were restricted to SCR manifestations within the first weeks after transplantation with limited follow-up. We analyzed clinical data from our prospective protocol biopsy program and found late SCR (at least 3 months after transplantation) to be a common event (41/94 patients). SCR manifested much later than acute cellular rejection (ACR). In the second year after transplantation, the SCR incidence in protocol biopsies reached a plateau of approximately 25% and remained at this level until the latest observed manifestations more than 5 years after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 32 months after SCR, no acute or chronic rejection, relevant graft fibrosis, graft loss, or liver-related death occurred even without specific therapy for SCR. Immunophenotyping of liver biopsies during SCR showed that similar to ACR, the composition of intrahepatic T cells depended on the severity of histological rejection. However, SCR showed a different pattern of infiltrating T cells with a stronger accumulation of CD4(+) cells, an increasing CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio, and an increasing CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cell (Treg)/CD8(+) ratio, which was not seen in ACR. These intrahepatic T cell patterns were not reflected in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, late SCR after LT has a good clinical prognosis, and it seems safe to leave it untreated. This benign clinical course compared to ACR is associated with intrahepatic T cell infiltration patterns showing less cytotoxic T cells and more CD4(+) FOXP3(+) Tregs. Liver Transplantation 22 943-955 2016 AASLD.

  8. Osteoclastic Giant Cell Rich Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Alemán-Meza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and represents the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Histologically 85 to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma is an unusual histological variant of which only 4 cases have been reported. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 6-month history of irregular vaginal bleeding. Examination revealed a 2.7 cm polypoid mass in the anterior lip of the uterine cervix. The patient underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Microscopically the tumor was composed of infiltrative nests of poorly differentiated nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Interspersed in between these tumor cells were numerous osteoclastic giant cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm devoid of nuclear atypia, hyperchromatism, or mitotic activity. Immunohistochemistry was performed; CK and P63 were strongly positive in the squamous component and negative in the osteoclastic giant cells, while CD68 and Vimentin were strongly positive in the giant cell population and negative in the squamous component. The patient received chemo- and radiotherapy for recurrent disease identified 3 months later on a follow-up CT scan; 7 months after the surgical procedure the patient is clinically and radiologically disease-free.

  9. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  10. Expression of CD 68, CD 45 and human leukocyte antigen-DR in central and peripheral giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor of long bones, and tuberculous granuloma: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: CD 68 and CD 45 expression was found in central giant cell granuloma, peripheral giant cell granuloma and GCT, suggesting the origin from mononuclear phagocyte system and considering their clinical behavior of osteoclast type. High expressivity of HLA-DR in tuberculous granulomas which is an essential factor for presentation of the microbial antigen to CD 4 helper cells thus reassuring the fact that they are up-regulated in response to infection.

  11. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  12. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and image analytic parameters characterizing the stromal component in primary and recurrent giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Charu Chandra; Safaya, Rajni; Kawatra Madan, Neha; Khan, Shah Alam; Iyer, Venkateswaran K

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign locally aggressive tumor whose biological behavior is unpredictable. Currently, there are no definitive clinical, histological, biochemical, or immunological parameters that can predict its behavior. This study was undertaken to examine whether delineation of reactive and neoplastic stromal component of GCT can help in this regard. 55 cases of GCT (30 primary, 25 recurrent) were subjected to histopathological grading, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Spindling of stroma was more frequent in recurrent GCT with 64% cases having more than 50% spindled stroma (p group (24.75% and 7.7%, respectively). A single numerical parameter encompassing stromal cell population and its proliferation was derived as ratio of PCNA/CD68 and PCNA/α1-ACT. Both ratios were higher in recurrent (0.81 ± 0.38; 1.58 ± 1.50) than in primary GCT (0.58 ± 0.62; 0.34 ± 0.29) (p = 0.002; 0.01). On image analysis, parameters significantly different between the two groups were nuclear area and nuclear integrated optical density. It was thus concluded that recurrent GCT shows higher grade, increased mitosis, more spindling, fewer reactive components, and higher proliferation than primary GCT. Delineation of reactive component (α1-ACT positive) and proliferating component (PCNA positive cells) using immunohistochemistry with calculation of the PCNA/ACT ratio delivers more information than image analysis.

  13. The Important Morphological Parameters Used to Differentiate Benign/Malignant Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülkü KÜÇÜK

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasia of the breast. Tumors are classified according to the histological criteria as benign, borderline, malignant groups. Criteria used to discriminate benign/malignant cases are stromal cytological atypia, stromal hypercellularity, mitotic rate, stromal overgrowth, and tumor margins. We designed this study retrospectively to see the validity of these criteria for our case group and investigate whether we could add any new criteria.Material and Method: We included 22 cases diagnosed as phyllodes tumor from our archives. Pathology records were used for age, tumor site, macroscopic size. The Hematoxylin-Eosin stained slides were reviewed according to the defined criteria. Additionally leaf like growth pattern, stromal hyalinization, calcification, stromal giant cells, stromal neutrophil leukocyte, and mononuclear lymphocytic infiltrate were recorded qualitatively (present/absent and numerically (mild, moderate, severe. We examined the differences between benign and malignant groups with the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests.Results: The previously defined criteria were statistically significant but stromal giant cells, stromal hyalinization, calcification, stromal neutrophil and mononuclear lymphocytic infiltrate intensity were not statistically significant in determining the benign-borderlinemalignant cases.Conclusion: Stromal hypercellularity, moderate/severe stromal cytological atypia, increased mitotic rate, stromal overgrowth and infiltrative tumor margins were observed in malignant phyllodes tumors. Malignant cases were also older and tumor size was bigger than benign ones.

  14. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  15. Effects of Kangquan Recipe(康泉方) on Sex Steroids and Cell Proliferation in Rats with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄源鹏; 杜建; 洪振丰; 陈治卿; 吴锦发; 赵锦燕

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of Kangquan Recipe(康泉方,KQR)on sex steroids and cell proliferation in an experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH)model in rats.Methods:Seventy-two SD rats were randomly divided into six groups:the normal group,the model group,the finasteride group,and the low-, middle-,and high-dose KQR groups,12 in each group.Except those in the normal group,the rats were injected with testosterone after castration for the establishment of BPH model and then given respectively w...

  16. Rare Giant Granular Cell Ameloblastoma: A Case Report and an Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Hunasgi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim is to present a case of rare giant granular cell ameloblastoma and to review the pertinent literature highlighting the molecular aspects of its pathogenesis by analyzing the expression of CD-68, Bcl-2, and β-catenin. Methods. H and E stained sections showed large odontogenic islands showing peripheral ameloblast-like cells and central stellate reticulum-like cells with extensive granular cell transformation surrounded by fibrous stroma. Polyclonal rabbit anti-CD 68, anti-Bcl2, and anti-β-catenin were stained immunohistochemically. Results. CD-68 showed a moderate to strong staining intensity in granular cells. Moderate staining of Bcl-2 was expressed by the peripheral columnar cells of tumor islands and negative in the granular cells. Expression of β-catenin was generally weak, except for only the focal areas that showed a moderate staining intensity and weak in peripheral cells. Conclusion. The present case of giant granular cell ameloblastoma is a rare entity. Development of monstrous size is indicative of ameloblastomas persistent growth. Granular cell transformation in ameloblastomas probably occurs as a consequence of extensive molecular changes. Immunohistochemical studies help us to know the pathogenesis of this granular cell ameloblastoma. Therefore, an effort has been made here to study the expression of Bcl-2, CD-68, and β-catenin.

  17. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  18. Silencing of the UCHL1 gene in giant cell tumors of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenberg, Jörg; Lehner, Burkhard; Witte, Daniela

    2010-10-15

    Giant cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors consisting of multinucleated giant cells, fibroblast-like stromal cells and mononuclear histiocytes. The stromal cells have been identified as the neoplastic cell population, which promotes the recruitment of histiocytes and the formation of giant cells. Strong evidence exists that these cells develop from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in GCT tumorigenesis. The aim of our study was the identification of cancer-related genes differentially expressed in GCTs compared to MSCs in order to identify possible targets for aberrant promoter methylation, which may contribute to MSC transformation and GCT development. Gene expression of 440 cancer-related genes was analyzed by DNA microarrays in GCT stromal cells and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) isolated from the same patient (n = 3) to avoid interindividual variations. Differential expression was identified for 14 genes, which could be confirmed by quantitative PCR in further 21 GCT and 10 BMSC samples. The most pronounced difference in gene expression was detected for UCHL1, an important regulator of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed a strong methylation of the CpG island covering the UCHL1 promoter in GCT stromal cells, whereas methylation was completely absent in BMSCs. UCHL1 expression in stromal cells could be restored by the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-dC. These data demonstrate that the UCHL1 gene is inactivated in GCTs but not in MSCs, suggesting a possible role of UCHL1 in MSC transformation and GCT development.

  19. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  20. Giant cell carcinoma of endometrium: A rare case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell carcinoma of uterus is an aggressive form of endometrial carcinoma. It can be confused on histopathology with other giant cell containing lesions including trophoblastic tumors, certain primary sarcomas, and malignant mixed müllerian tumors. Due to the paucity of cases of this rare subtype, the prognostic parameters are difficult to assess. We describe here one such case in a 60-year-old female who presented with postmenopausal bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 13th case being reported in world literature. We intend to describe this case due to its rarity, failure to recognize this tumor as a subtype, and lack of definition and guidelines in the literature for accurate classification.

  1. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex: considerations for surgical or pharmacotherapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheless, James W; Klimo, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene that can result in the growth of hamartomas in multiple organ systems. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are slow-growing brain tumors associated primarily with tuberous sclerosis complex. They are usually located in the ventricles, often near the foramen of Monro, where they can cause an obstruction if they grow too large, leading to increased intracranial pressure. Surgery to remove a tumor has been the mainstay of treatment but can be associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Not all tumors and/or patients are suitable for surgery. The recent development of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors that target the pathway affected by TSC1/TSC2 mutations offers a novel pharmacotherapeutic option for these patients. We review the timing and use of surgery versus pharmacotherapy for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex.

  2. THE CASE OF THE GIANT-CELL ARTERITIS MANIFESTED AS DORSOLATERAL MEDULLARY INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Akimov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a giant-cell arteritis is presented. First clinical signs of the disease were fewer and development of infarction in the basin of the left vertebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed its prolonged diminution. Laboratory results were remarkable for the high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increase of C-reactive protein (CRP concentration. Physical examination revealed acrotism in temporal arteries. Diagnosis was proven by biopsy results which included giant multinucleate cells. Authors discuss problems of diagnosis of the disease, the role of radiological methods (angio-ultrasonography, magnetic resonance and computed tomography aided angiography, positron-emission tomography and the necessity to pay particular attention to the elderly patients with high rate of erythrocyte sedimentation and the increased CRP concentration.

  3. Primary Giant Cell Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of the Kidney with Staghorn Calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFH as primary renal tumours are rare, with less than 50 cases described in the literature. We report a case of primary renal MFH of giant cell type in a 56-year-old man, who presented with bilateral dull flank pain, intermittent gross haematuria and body weight loss (6 kg in 3 months. Intravenous urography, computerized tomography (CT and magnetic resonance image (MRI showed right ureteral stones with mild hydronephrosis, and a solid mass at the lower pole of the left kidney associated with staghorn calculi, as well as tumour thrombi in the left renal vein and inferior vena cava. Left radical nephrectomy and evacuation of tumour thrombi from the left renal vein and inferior vena cava were performed. Histopathologic examination revealed malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH of giant cell type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of primary renal MFH associated with staghorn calculi.

  4. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  5. Giant epithelial malignancies (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma: A series of 20 tumors from a single center

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    Uwe Wollina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC, basal cell carcinoma (BCC, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC are the most common. Giant NMSCs have occasionally reported in the medical literature with particular problems related to diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze patients, treatment, and outcome with giant BCC/SCC. Materials and Methods: We analyzed our files between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, of an academic teaching hospital in the dermatology department. Patients were analyzed according to demographic factors, clinical presentation, histopathology, treatment, and outcome. American Society of Anesthesiology physical status system was used to assess the fitness of patients before surgery. Results: The frequency of giant NMSC was estimated as 0.4% for both tumor entities. 80% of giant BCC patients were female and 100% of giant SCC patients were male. The mean age was 81.5 ± 8.5 years for BCC and 79.5 ± 11.4 years for SCC. The major anatomical site was the scalp. Four of 10 BCCs were classified metatypic (basosquamous. Perineural infiltration was seen in 5 NMSCs. Seventy percent of patients had an ASA score ≥3. Surgery was performed in general anaesthesia in 5 (BCC and 6 (SCC patients, respectively. All other patients were operated in local or tumescence anesthesia. Blood transfusions were necessary in five patients. The primary treatment was delayed Mohs technique. Defect closure was realized with rotational flaps in most cases. Neoadjuvant chemoimmune therapy and adjuvant combined cetuximab/radiotherapy have been performed in three patients. We observed three deaths, all unrelated to NMSC. 75% of patients achieved complete remission. Conclusions: Giant NMSC is uncommon but not rare. These tumors are high-risk subtypes. Treatment needs an interdisciplinary approach.

  6. Giant vesicles "colonies": a model for primitive cell communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Paolo; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-09

    Current research on the origin of life typically focuses on the self-organisation of molecular components in individual cell-like compartments, thereby bringing about the emergence of self-sustaining minimal cells. This is justified by the fact that single cells are the minimal forms of life. No attempts have been made to investigate the cooperative mechanisms that could derive from the assembly of individual compartments. Here we present a novel experimental approach based on vesicles "colonies" as a model of primitive cell communities. Experiments show that several advantages could have favoured primitive cell colonies when compared with isolated primitive cells. In fact there are two novel unexpected features typical of vesicle colonies, namely solute capture and vesicle fusion, which can be seen as the basic physicochemical mechanisms at the origin of life.

  7. Giant oral tumor in a child with malnutrition and sickle cell trait: Anesthetic challenges

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    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric oral tumors have always been challenging for the even most skilled anesthesiologists. The conventional method of awake intubation is not realistic in this age group. The management is to chart out a plan to intubate the child post induction. We describe successful management of a case of giant of ossifying fibroma in a child with sickle cell trait where non-conventional innovate approach helped us to secure the airway pre-operatively and avoid possible medical complications.

  8. Giant cell tumors of lower end of the radius : Problems and solutions

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    Dhammi I

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumors of bone are aggressive, potentially malignant lesions. Juxtaarticular giant cell tumours of lower end radius are common and present a special problem of reconstruction after tumor excision. Out of the various reconstructive procedures described, use of nonvascularised fibular autograft has been widely used with satisfactory functional results. Methods: Sixteen patients with a mean age of 20.2 years, with either Campanacci grade II or III histologically proven giant cell tumours of lower end radius were treated with wide excision and reconstruction with ipsilateral nonvascularised proximal fibular autograft. Host graft junction was fixed with intramedullary nail in 12 cases and DCP in last 4 cases. Wrist ligament reconstruction and fixation of the head of fibula with carpal bones using K-wires and primary cancellous iliac crest grafting at graft host junction with DCP was done in last 2 cases. Results: The follow up ranges from 2 - 5 years (mean 3.5 years. At last follow up, the average combined range of motion was 110° with range varying from 60-125°. The average grip strength was 39% in comparison to the contralateral side (range 21-88%. The average union time was 8 months (range 4-12 months. Sound union occurred in 5 months, where DCPs were used. There were 5 nonunions, one resorption of graft, 10 wrist subluxations (2 painful, one recurrence, 3 superficial infections, one wound dehiscence and one amputation. There was no case of graft fracture, metastasis, death or significant donor site morbidity. A total of 10 secondary procedures were required. Conclusions: Enbloc resection of giant cell tumours of lower end radius is a widely accepted method. Reconstruction with nonvascularised fibular graft, internal fixation with DCP with primary corticocancellous bone grafting with transfixation of the fibular head and wrist ligament reconstruction minimizes the problem and gives satisfactory functional results.

  9. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management.

  10. Congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a brain tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). It usually grows in a second decade of life, but may develop in the first months of life. The aim of this work was to establish the incidence, clinical features, and outcome of congenital SEGA in TSC patients. Methods Cohort of 452 TSC patients was reviewed to identify cases with growing or hydrocephalus producing SEGAs in the first 3 months of life. Clinical presentation, siz...

  11. Giant cell myocarditis, a rare form of myocarditis; Riesenzellmyokarditis - eine seltene Form der Myokarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerkurth, O.; Zellweger, M.J.; Bremerich, J.

    2008-07-15

    Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and - in spite of immunosuppressive therapy - still usually lethal form of myocarditis. It must be verified by biopsy. MR of the heart is capable of 1. providing a non-invasive way of detecting mycardial necrosis; identify ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes and provide a diagnosis of suspected myocarditis; identify affected myocardial regions for biopsy planning; 4. assess the success of the therapy by means of regular course control. (orig.)

  12. Sickle cell disease in Saudi Arabia: the phenotype in adults with the Arab-Indian haplotype is not benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Alabdulaali, Mohammed K; Griffin, Paula J; Alsuliman, Ahmed M; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Sebastiani, Paola; Albuali, Waleed H; Al-Ali, Amein K; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) in Saudi patients from the Eastern Province is associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) HBB (β-globin gene) haplotype. The phenotype of AI SCD in children was described as benign and was attributed to their high fetal haemoglobin (HbF). We conducted a hospital-based study to assess the pattern of SCD complications in adults. A total of 104 patients with average age of 27 years were enrolled. Ninety-six per cent of these patients reported history of painful crisis; 47% had at least one episode of acute chest syndrome, however, only 15% had two or more episodes; symptomatic osteonecrosis was reported in 18%; priapism in 17%; overt stroke in 6%; none had leg ulcers. The majority of patients had persistent splenomegaly and 66% had gallstones. Half of the patients co-inherited α-thalassaemia and about one-third had glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Higher HbF correlated with higher rate of splenic sequestration but not with other phenotypes. The phenotype of adult patients with AI SCD is not benign despite their relatively high HbF level. This is probably due to the continued decline in HbF level in adults and the heterocellular and variable distribution of HbF amongst F-cells.

  13. Benign phyllodes tumor of the breast recurring as a malignant phyllodes tumor and spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Kristen E; Tafe, Laura J; de Abreu, Francine B; Peterson, Jason D; Wells, Wendy A; Barth, Richard J; Marotti, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    We report a unique case of a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with a benign phyllodes tumor (PT), which recurred twice in the same location over a 7-year period: first as a malignant PT and then as a malignant PT with coexisting spindle cell metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC). The MBC was differentiated from the malignant PT by expression of cytokeratins (CKs) AE1/AE3, CK MNF-116, CK 5/6, and p63. Somatic mutation analysis using a next-generation sequencing platform revealed a shared mutation in F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7, a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a ubiquitin ligase-associated protein, in the original benign PT and the first recurrent malignant PT. Chromosomal microarray analysis showed shared genetic gains and losses between the malignant PT and MBC. This case highlights the utility of immunohistochemistry to differentiate malignant PT from spindle cell MBC, describes a novel mutation in PT, and demonstrates a biologic relationship between these 2 entities.

  14. Withania coagulans Extract Induces Cell Apoptosis and Inhibits COX-2 Expression in a Rat Model of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

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    Sarbishegi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Phytotherapy is a popular treatment option in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, with many different herbal products being used for the treatment of this condition. Withania coagulans (WC is an herbal medicine that has shown anti-tumoral, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. Objectives This study examined the effect of Withania coagulans extract (WCE on prostatic cell apoptosis and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH in rats. Methods Forty Wistar rats were equally divided into five groups: control, sham, BPH, BPH + WCE, and BPH + CLX (celecoxib as a positive control group. The induction of BPH was achieved via the subcutaneous injection of 3 mg/kg of testosterone propionate (TP daily for 28 days. The animals received WCE, celecoxib, or distilled water by oral gavage accompanied by the TP injection. After four weeks, the prostate glands of the rats were weighed to measure the prostatic index (PI. The ventral lobes of the prostates were dissected and processed with paraffin blocks in order to study the number of mast cells. A TUNEL analysis was performed to evaluate the cell apoptosis, while the expression of COX-2 was examined using immunohistochemistry. Results BPH was obvious in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and the administration of WCE markedly decreased the PI and the number of mast cells (P < 0.001 in the BPH rats. Additionally, the WCE treatment induced prostatic cell apoptosis when compared to the BPH group. Furthermore, following the WCE treatment, the expression of COX-2 in the prostatic tissues was significantly decreased when compared to the BPH groups. Conclusions According to the results of this study, WCE was effective in the treatment of BPH in rats. It may therefore have beneficial effects in the treatment of patients with BPH.

  15. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis: cutaneous T cell lymphoma, peripheral T cell lymphoma, and premalignant and benign cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelickson, B D; Peters, M S; Muller, S A; Thibodeau, S N; Lust, J A; Quam, L M; Pittelkow, M R

    1991-11-01

    T-cell receptor gene rearrangement analysis is a useful technique to detect clonality and determine lineage of lymphoid neoplasms. We examined 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, peripheral T cell lymphoma, potentially malignant lymphoproliferative disorders including pre-Sézary syndrome, large plaque parapsoriasis, lymphomatoid papulosis and follicular mucinosis, and various benign inflammatory infiltrates. A clonal rearrangement was detected in skin samples in 20 of 24 patients with mycosis fungoides and in peripheral blood samples in 19 of 21 patients with Sézary syndrome. A clonal population was also detected in seven of eight cases classified as peripheral T cell lymphoma. The potentially malignant dermatoses tended to have clonal rearrangement, with the exception of large plaque parapsoriasis, and further follow-up is needed to correlate clonality with the disease course. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular genetics as an adjunct to morphology in the examination of patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disease.

  16. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  17. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour.

  18. Evidence of Ambiguous Differentiation and mTOR Pathway Dysregulation in Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

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    Brad D BARROWS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The exact cell of origin of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma is debated but most currently consider the tumor in the astrocytic category. Mutations and subsequent biallelic inactivation of TSC1 encoding hamartin, or TSC2 encoding tuberin appear to be the underlying genetic aberrations. Inactivation leads to loss of proteins that inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR disrupting tightly regulated cell functions.Material and Method: We analyzed the expression of tuberin and hamartin along with an array of neuroepithelial markers in 9 subependymal giant cell astrocytomas. In addition, RPS6 and 4EBP1 regulatory proteins that are downstream in the mTOR pathway were also evaluated.Results: While hamartin and tuberin expression levels were relatively decreased compared to control tissue, this was not of particular practical use to detect the mutated gene since low levels of positivity could be detected throughout the central nervous system. As expected, the levels of RPS6 and 4EBP1 were increased, further confirming the activation of the mTOR pathway. GFAP was positive in 5 cases, while Synaptophysin positivity was found in all tumors. CD34 (a marker often observed in well differentiated glio-neuronal tumors, Olig2 (a nuclear marker present in most gliomas, IDH1 and IDH2 were entirely negative in all tumor cells. Ki67 (MIB-1 showed a low proliferation rate ranging from 2% to 8%.Conclusion: Staining with neuroepithelial markers supports the suggestion of ambiguous differentiation. Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas do not appear to have the typical expression profiles of astrocytic tumors, under which they have been classified.

  19. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in patients without hard metal exposure: analysis of 3 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoor, Andras; Roden, Anja C; Colby, Thomas V; Roggli, Victor L; Elrefaei, Mohamed; Alvarez, Francisco; Erasmus, David B; Mallea, Jorge M; Murray, David L; Keller, Cesar A

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell interstitial pneumonia is a rare lung disease and is considered pathognomonic for hard metal lung disease, although some cases with no apparent hard metal (tungsten carbide cobalt) exposure have been reported. We aimed to explore the association between giant cell interstitial pneumonia and hard metal exposure. Surgical pathology files from 2001 to 2004 were searched for explanted lungs with the histopathologic diagnosis of giant cell interstitial pneumonia, and we reviewed the associated clinical histories. Mass spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and human leukocyte antigen typing data were evaluated. Of the 455 lung transplants, 3 met the histologic criteria for giant cell interstitial pneumonia. Patient 1 was a 36-year-old firefighter, patient 2 was a 58-year-old welder, and patient 3 was a 45-year-old environmental inspector. None reported exposure to hard metal or cobalt dust. Patients 1 and 2 received double lung transplants; patient 3 received a left single-lung transplant. Histologically, giant cell interstitial pneumonia presented as chronic interstitial pneumonia with fibrosis, alveolar macrophage accumulation, and multinucleated giant cells of both alveolar macrophage and type 2 cell origin. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis revealed no cobalt or tungsten particles in samples from the explanted lungs. None of the samples had detectable tungsten levels, and only patient 2 had elevated cobalt levels. The lack of appropriate inhalation history and negative analytical findings in the tissue from 2 of the 3 patients suggests that giant cell interstitial pneumonia is not limited to individuals with hard metal exposure, and other environmental factors may elicit the same histologic reaction.

  20. Fine needle aspiration diagnosis of bilateral dysgerminoma with syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells

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    Chakrabarti Indranil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysgerminoma accounts for only 1-3% of ovarian cancers and about 30-40% of all ovarian germ cell malignant tumors. Literature states that about 2% of nonpregnant patients with dysgerminomas present with elevated serum or urine levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. Here, we report a 34 year-old multiparous woman presenting with an abdominal lump, ascites, and abdominal pain with elevated urinary and serum hCG levels. An abdominal ultrasound showed bilateral ovarian mass. An ultrasound-guided, transabdominal fine needle aspiration revealed dysgerminoma with syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells. Bilateral oophorectomy was done and the diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology.

  1. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia with giant cell arteritis and pulmonary mucormycosis

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    Ryan A. Denu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is characterized by a low CD4+ lymphocyte count in the absence of HIV or other underlying etiologies. We report a case of a 57-year old man with ICL and giant cell arteritis (GCA who developed pulmonary mucormycosis, which, to our knowledge, is the first report of these occurring in a patient with ICL. Abnormally low total lymphocyte or CD4+ cell counts occurring in patients with autoimmune disorders should alert clinicians to the possibility of ICL. Immunosuppressive treatment should be used with caution in this context.

  2. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

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    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  3. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath composed largely of epithelioid histiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a relatively uncommon lesion. GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. A 73-year-old man presented with a mass of right thumb, and resection of the mass was performed. Grossly, the mass was encapsulated and yellowish, and measured 1.5 x 2 x 2 cm. Microscopically, the mass was composed of cellular and hypocellular zones. The former was composed of spindle cells and osteoclast-like giant cells, while the latter of epithelioid clear histiocytes. The area of the former was 20%, and the latter 80%. Pigment was seen in the former elements. Mitotic figures were seen in 3/per 30 high power fields (HPFs) in the former element and 2/per 30 HPFs in the latter element. Histochemically, the pigment was hemosiderin positive with Prussian blue staining. Immunohistochemically, both the elements were negative for cytokeratin (CK) CE1/3, CK CAM5.2, CEA, HMB45, alpha-smooth muscle antigen, p53, CD10, TTF-1, and CDX2. Both the elements were positive for CD68 and Ki-67 (cellular element 30% and hypocellular element 20%). The histiocytes of the hypocellular element and osteoclast-like giant cell of the cellular element were positive for CD45. S100-protein positive Langerhans cells and CD45-positive lymphocytes were scattered. The pathological diagnosis was GCTTS. In the author's experience, GCTTS composed largely epithelioid histiocytes are very rare. In the literature, the author could not find such cases. Thus, the author reports herein this case.

  4. Diagnostic Efficacy of Radiology in the Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumour of Bone

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    Afia Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumour (GCT is an aggressive and potentially malignant lesion. Microscopic feature reveals osteoclast like giant cells in a mononuclear stromal cells background. The mononuclear stromal cell is interpreted as neoplastic. Objective: As radiological diagnosis is non invasive and cost effective in comparison to histopathological diagnosis, considering the patients’ compliance, the aim of the study was to observe the diagnostic efficacy of radiology in diagnosis of GCT. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Delta Hopital Ltd., Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to December 2012. A total of 30 study subjects were enrolled in the study irrespective of age and sex. Biopsy material and relevant data of clinically suspected cases of GCT along with radiology report were sent from National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Histopathological diagnosis was made by expert pathologists. Results: Mean (±SD age of the study subjects was 29.20 (±7.34 years with highest number of patients were observed in 3rd decade and female was predominant (60% with a male female ratio of 1:1.5. Common site of GCT was around knee (50%. Among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 25 (83.3% cases were radiologically diagnosed as GCT, 2 (6.7% diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia, 1 (3.3% as chondroblastoma, 1 (3.3% as simple bone cyst and 1 (3.3% as aneurysmal bone cyst. However among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 28 (93.3% patients were histopathologically diagnosed as Giant cell lesion and rest 2 (6.7% patients diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of radiological diagnosis of GCT were found to be 92.6%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 40.0% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiology can be effectively used as a screening tool in diagnosing GCT.

  5. Giant Benign Senile Pyometra in Bicornuate Uterus

    OpenAIRE

    José Luís Lobato Miguélez; María Victoria San Roman Sigler; Miguel López Valverde

    2014-01-01

    Pyometra is an accumulation of pus in the endometrial cavity. It occurs when there is a stenosed cervical os as a result of malignant growths in the uterus or cervix, surgery or radiation therapy and senile atrophy. We present the case of an 84-year-old female patient referred to the Emergency Service of the Basurto University Hospital in Bilbao, Spain by the doctor of the nursing home where she is institutionalized because of a two-week history of continued fever without apparent cause. She ...

  6. Giant Benign Senile Pyometra in Bicornuate Uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Lobato Miguélez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyometra is an accumulation of pus in the endometrial cavity. It occurs when there is a stenosed cervical os as a result of malignant growths in the uterus or cervix, surgery or radiation therapy and senile atrophy. We present the case of an 84-year-old female patient referred to the Emergency Service of the Basurto University Hospital in Bilbao, Spain by the doctor of the nursing home where she is institutionalized because of a two-week history of continued fever without apparent cause. She was diagnosed with urinary tract infection and treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate. Based on the imaging tests, a pyometra in bicornuate uterus was diagnosed. She underwent drainage of the pyometra via the vaginal route, under general anesthesia, after mechanical dilation of the cervical canal. Treatment with ertapenen was prescribed. Progression was satisfactory. Given the rarity of this case, we decided to present it.

  7. MULTICENTRIC GIANT CELL TUMOR OF IPSILATERAL ACETABULUM AND FEMORAL HEAD WITH PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURE OF FEMORAL NECK: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor is extremely rare; here we are presenting a case of pathological neck femur fracture in case of multicentric giant cell tumor involving ipsilateral acetabulum along with femoral head and neck. CASE PRESENTATION: 24 years old male presented with pain in groin region and inability to walk after he fell down while walking. He had pain in left groin on weight bearing for last six months. Radiological examination shows pathological trans - cervical femoral neck fracture with sub - articular lytic lesion in femoral head and neck suggestive of Giant cell tumor. MRI has been done to define the extent of involvement and to rule out soft tissue infiltration. Fine needle aspiration cytology which was done through anterior route was inconclusive. After review of literature, patient has been planned for excisional biopsy and un - cemented total hip arthroplasty. Intra - operatively, frozen section confirms the giant cell tumor and surprisingly acetabulum was found to be involved which was curetted and hydrogen - peroxide treated. Post - operatively, patient was pain - free with good range of movements at hip. CONCLUSION: Giant cell tumor involving femoral head and neck with pathological fracture though uncommon, but may present as multicentric with acetabular involvement.

  8. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

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    Orozco Javier I

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion.

  9. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

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    Varun Sharma Tandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (GCT is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and giant cell hepatitis: Report of three infants

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    Şule Ünal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell hepatitis associated with direct Coombs’ test-positive hemolytic anemia is a rare condition of childhood and the pathogenesis remains unclear. An autoimmune activation and loss of self-tolerance in these patients may be the underlying pathology related to the response of some of the patients to immunosuppressive treatment. Herein, we report the clinical presentation and course of three consecutive patients with this rare condition. We conclude that serum ferritin at diagnosis may be used for prediction of the outcome.

  11. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

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    Pauline Joy F. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect.

  12. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive...... DISCLOSURE(S): The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article....... with antibodies for the AT(2) receptor was similar in the patients with GCA and in controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that AT(1) receptors play a role in the development of GCA. Inhibition of the angiotensin system may thus provide a noncorticosteroid alternative for the treatment of GCA. FINANCIAL...

  13. Successful treatment of generalized elastolytic giant cell granuloma with psoralen-ultraviolet A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Lidia; García-Gavín, Juan; Allegue, Francisco; Ortiz-Rey, José Antonio; Zulaica, Ander

    2012-10-01

    Elastolytic giant cell granuloma (EGCG) is an infrequent granulomatous skin disorder with variable response to different therapeutic regimens. Information on the benefit of phototherapy is very scarce as this therapy has seldom been tried in the affected patients. We present the results achieved in two female patients after undergoing psoralen-ultraviolet A (PUVA). Two 54-year-old otherwise healthy female patients received a course of PUVA after trying other alternatives. Complete clearance was achieved in the two patients with excellent tolerance and no adverse effects. We consider PUVA is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective treatment for patients with EGCG.

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  15. Imaging appearance of giant cell tumour of the spine above the sacrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L S; Wu, W J; Zhang, Z K; Gao, F; Latif, M

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of the spine is rarely encountered in daily clinical practice. Most of the tumours occur at the sacrum instead of at the spine above the sacrum, which has been reported to account for 1.3–9.3% of all spine GCTs. This article is a review of our radiological experience of the diagnosis of spine GCT above the sacrum based on 34 patients at a single institution. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight the imaging findings of GCT and to provide clues that may distinguish it from other, more common neoplasms. PMID:25923147

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis in a 12-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab A. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is rare in children. The kidneys are generally spared. We present a case of GCA in a 12-year-old girl with severe headache and tender scalp especially over the right temporal area. The right superficial temporal artery was cord like and nodular and the pulsations were barely felt. Several small tender nodular swellings were felt in the occipital area. She had been previously diagnosed as a case of nephrotic syndrome due to underlying membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. This report is aimed at drawing attention to this rare form of vasculitis in children aiming at decreasing its morbidities.

  17. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Ortega, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease but its molecular mechanism remains unknown. Using human tissue samples from 16 patients diagnosed with BPH, we performed an ultrastructural study to clarify the mechanism and the role of glandular cells in this pathology. We have made a description of all the changes that suffers the prostatic epithelium. We have shown that the glandular architecture presents many non-physiological forms such as papillae and papillary fronds. Basal c...

  18. Osteoclast-like giant cell tumors of the pancreas and liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juergen Bauditz; Birgit Rudolph; Wolfram Wermke

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclast-like giant cell tumors (OGCT) are rare abdominal tumors, which mainly occur in the pancreas.The neoplasms are composed of two distinct cell populations and frequently show an inhomogenous appearance with cystic structures. However, due to the rarity of these tumors, only very limited clinical data are available, Imaging features and sonographic appearance have hardly been characterized. Here we report on two cases of osteoclast-like giant cell tumors, one located within the pancreas, the other within the liver,in which OGCTs are extremely rare. Both patients were investigated by contrast sonography, which demonstrated a complex, partly cystic and strongly vascularized tumor within the head of the pancreas in the first patient and a large, hypervascularized neoplasm with calcifications within the liver in the second patient. The liver OGCT responded well to a combination of carboplatin,etoposide and paclitaxel. With a combination of surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation and chemotherapy,the patient's survival is currently more than 15 mo,making him the longest survivor with an OGCT of the liver to date.

  19. Long segmental hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal with giant diverticulum formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liyan; Qiu, Tian; Song, Ying; Shan, Ling; Liu, Xiuyun; Guo, Lei; Ying, Jianming; Zou, Shuangmei; Shi, Susheng; Polydorides, Alexandros D; Zhao, Xinming; Lu, Ning; Lin, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) usually form a well-circumscribed mass. In contrast, diffuse interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) hyperplasia along the Auerbach plexus without a discrete mass may occur in patients with germline mutations in the NF1, c-KIT or PDGFRA genes. However, sporadic, diffuse ICC hyperplasia without c-KIT or PDGFRA mutations has not been reported. We describe herein one such case, forming a giant diverticulum. A 63-year-old woman with no features of Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) presented with increasing abdominal pain for more than 30 years. A large, diverticulum-like mass in the ileum was resected. Microscopically, a diffuse proliferation of bland spindle cells was seen extending for 12 cm, replacing the muscularis propria and lined by intact mucosa. The spindle cells were CD117+/CD34+/DOG1+/SMA+/Desmin-/S100-. Mutation analyses did not reveal any mutations in c-KIT or PDGFRA. The lesion had two silent mutations in the NF1 gene. It is rare of the diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia showing diffuse longitudinal microscopic growth completely replacing the muscularis propria, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes, but without solid components and no c-KIT or PDGFRA gene mutations. This peculiar form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia may be related to intestinal dysmotility in this ileal segment and giant diverticulum formation.

  20. Benign positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). It is caused by a problem in the inner ear. ...

  1. Differential Expression of ADAM23, CDKN2A (P16), MMP14 and VIM Associated with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Babeto, Erica; Candido, Natalia Maria; Franco, Fernanda Craveiro; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Though benign, giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) can become aggressive and can exhibit a high mitotic rate, necrosis and rarely vascular invasion and metastasis. GCTB has unique histologic characteristics, a high rate of multinucleated cells, a variable and unpredictable growth potential and uncertain biological behavior. In this study, we sought to identify genes differentially expressed in GCTB, thus building a molecular profile of this tumor. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), immunohistochemistry and analyses of methylation to identify genes that are putatively associated with GCTB. The expression of the ADAM23 and CDKN2A genes was decreased in GCTB samples compared to normal bone tissue, measured by qPCR. Additionally, a high hypermethylation frequency of the promoter regions of ADAM23 and CDKN2A in GCTB was observed. The expression of the MAP2K3, MMP14, TIMP2 and VIM genes was significantly higher in GCTB than in normal bone tissue, a fact that was confirmed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The set of genes identified here furthers our understanding of the molecular basis of GCTB.

  2. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  3. Giant cell tumor of bone: current review of morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi P. Georgiev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of bone accounts for about 5% of all primary bone tumors in adults and is still one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumors of bone. This largely results from the lack of uniform clinical, radiographic, histological or morphological aspects that allow prediction of recurrence. Classified by the World Health Organization as “an aggressive, potentially malignant lesion”, the giant cell tumor of bone could give lung metastases, could undergo malignant degeneration or could have multicentric localization. It usually develops in long bones but can also occur in unusual locations. The common presenting symptom is increasing pain at the tumor site. Standard treatment ranges from curettage to wide resection, with reports of varying oncological and functional results. The recurrence rate is high during the first 2-3 years after surgery regardless of pre-operative tumor stage. Herein, we discuss the morphological, clinical, radiological, and therapeutic characteristics of this pathologic entity as well as its differential diagnosis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 475-485

  4. Vitamin A metabolism in benign and malignant melanocytic skin cells: importance of lecithin/retinol acyltransferase and RPE65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Philipp M; Luo, Chonglin; Owen, Robert W; Hofmann, Claudia; Freudenberger, Muriel; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2012-02-01

    Disturbance in vitamin A metabolism seems to be an important attribute of cancer cells. Retinoids, particularly retinoic acid, have critical regulatory functions and appear to modulate tumor development and progression. The key step of vitamin A metabolism is the esterification of all-trans retinol, catalyzed by lecithin/retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). In this work, we show that malignant melanoma cells are able to esterify all-trans retinol and subsequently isomerize all-trans retinyl esters (RE) into 11-cis retinol, whereas their benign counterparts-melanocytes are not able to catalyze these reactions. Besides, melanoma cell lines express lecithin/retinol acyltranseferase both at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, melanocytes do not express this enzyme at the protein level, but mRNA of lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase could still be present at mRNA level. RPE65 is expressed in both melanocytic counterparts, and could be involved in the subsequent isomerization of RE produced by lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase to 11-cis retinol. Cellular retinol-binding protein 2 does not appear to be involved in the regulation of all-trans retinol esterification in these cells. Expression of LRAT and RPE65 can be modulated by retinoids. We propose that the post-transcriptional regulation of lecithin/retinol acyltransefrase could be involved in the differential expression of this enzyme. Besides, activities of LRAT and RPE65 may be important for removal of all-trans retinal which is the substrate for retinoic acid production in skin cells. Consequently, the decreasing cellular amount of retinoic acid and its precursor molecules could result in a change of gene regulation.

  5. Distinguishing benign from malignant mesothelial cells in effusions by Glut-1, EMA, and Desmin expression: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Michael; Florence, Roxanne R; Pantanowitz, Liron; Visintainer, Paul F; Cibas, Edmund S; Otis, Christopher N

    2013-02-01

    Distinguishing malignant mesothelioma (MM) from reactive mesothelial hyperplasia (RM) may be difficult in effusions. This study tested the hypothesis that immunocytochemistry (IC) in effusion cell blocks (CB) can distinguish MM from RM and that the results may be applied to individual specimens. External validation of a risk score (RS) model associating sensitivity and specificity was applied to an external set of MM and RM specimens from a separate institution. Forty three effusion cytology CBs of 25 confirmed malignant mesotheliomas were compared to CBs of 23 benign mesothelial effusions without inflammation and 13 reactive mesothelial proliferations associated with inflammation. Glut-1, EMA, and Desmin expression were evaluated by immunocytochemistry on CBs. Each antibody was compared using ROC values, where the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.90, 0.82, and 0.84 for Glut-1, EMA, and Desmin, respectively. Logistic regression (LR) analysis was applied to a combination of Glut-1 and EMA. A combined ROC curve was modeled for Glut-1 and EMA (AUC = 0.93). A RS = 2 × (Glut-1%) + 1 × (EMA%) was created from this ROC curve. When applied to an external set of MM and RM, the RS resulted in an ROC with AUC = 0.91. In conclusion, a RS derived from a LR of Glut-1 and EMA IC greatly improves the distinction between MM from RM cells in individual effusions. The study illustrates principles of evidence-based pathology concerning internal and external test performance in the differential diagnosis of MM versus RM.

  6. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohori, N.P.; Sciurba, F.C.; Owens, G.R.; Hodgson, M.J.; Yousem, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure. 25 references.

  7. The giant protein Ebh is a determinant of Staphylococcus aureus cell size and complement resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alice G; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus USA300, the clonal type associated with epidemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, displays the giant protein Ebh on its surface. Mutations that disrupt the ebh reading frame increase the volume of staphylococcal cells and alter the cross wall, a membrane-enclosed peptidoglycan synthesis and assembly compartment. S. aureus ebh variants display increased sensitivity to oxacillin (methicillin) as well as susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Mutations in ebh are associated with reduced survival of mutant staphylococci in blood and diminished virulence in mice. We propose that Ebh, following its secretion into the cross wall, contributes to the characteristic cell growth and envelope assembly pathways of S. aureus, thereby enabling complement resistance and the pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections.

  8. EEVD motif of heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to bacterial uptake by trophoblast giant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Suk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of abortion-inducing pathogens by trophoblast giant (TG cells is a key event in infectious abortion. However, little is known about phagocytic functions of TG cells against the pathogens. Here we show that heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70 contributes to bacterial uptake by TG cells and the EEVD motif of Hsc70 plays an important role in this. Methods Brucella abortus and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the bacterial antigen in this study. Recombinant proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains were constructed and confirmation of the binding capacity to Hsc70 was assessed by ELISA. The recombinant TPR proteins were used for investigation of the effect of TPR proteins on bacterial uptake by TG cells and on pregnancy in mice. Results The monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial uptake by TG cells reacted with the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Bacterial TPR proteins bound to the C-terminal of Hsc70 through its EEVD motif and this binding inhibited bacterial uptake by TG cells. Infectious abortion was also prevented by blocking the EEVD motif of Hsc70. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that surface located Hsc70 on TG cells mediates the uptake of pathogenic bacteria and proteins containing the TPR domain inhibit the function of Hsc70 by binding to its EEVD motif. These molecules may be useful in the development of methods for preventing infectious abortion.

  9. Langhans giant cells from M. tuberculosis-induced human granulomas cannot mediate mycobacterial uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, G; Poquet, Y; Salek-Peyron, P; Puissegur, M-P; Botanch, C; Bon, H; Levillain, F; Duteyrat, J-L; Emile, J-F; Altare, F

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis is characterized by a tight interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) and host cells within granulomas. These cellular aggregates restrain M. tb spreading but do not kill all bacilli, which persist for years. A more detailed investigation of the interaction between M. tb and granuloma cells is needed to improve our understanding of this persistence and to explain the physiopathology of tuberculosis. In the present study, a recently developed in vitro human model of tuberculous granulomas has been used to analyse the modulation of granuloma cell differentiation by M. tb, in comparison to poorly virulent mycobacteria, which do not persist. It is reported that whilst all mycobacteria species induce granuloma formation, only M. tb triggers the differentiation of granuloma macrophages into very large multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) that are unable to mediate any bacterial uptake. This loss of function is not due to cell quiescence, as MGCs still display NADPH oxidase activity, but it correlates with decreased expression of phagocytosis receptors. This phenomenon is specific for the virulent species of M. tuberculosis complex, as poorly virulent species only induce the formation of small multinucleated cells (MCs) with conserved mycobacterial uptake ability, which never reach the MGC differentiation stage. The phenotype of MGCs thus strongly resembles mature dendritic cells with a loss of microbial uptake ability, despite conserved antigen presentation. In M. tb-induced granulomas, MGCs thus seem to be devoted to the destruction of bacilli that have been ingested in previous differentiation stages, ie in macrophages and MCs.

  10. Lethal (2) giant larvae: an indispensable regulator of cell polarity and cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Miao, Yi; Xu, Kedong; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Cell polarity is one of the most basic properties of all normal cells and is essential for regulating numerous biological processes. Loss of polarity is considered a hallmark for cancer. Multiple polarity proteins are implicated in maintenance of cell polarity. Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl) is one of polarity proteins that plays an important role in regulating cell polarity, asymmetric division as well as tumorigenesis. Lgl proteins in different species have similar structures and conserved functions. Lgl acts as an indispensable regulator of cell biological function, including cell polarity and asymmetric division, through interplaying with other polarity proteins, regulating exocytosis, mediating cytoskeleton and being involved in signaling pathways. Furthermore, Lgl plays a role of a tumor suppressor, and the aberrant expression of Hugl, a human homologue of Lgl, contributes to multiple cancers. However, the exact functions of Lgl and the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. In this review, we will give an overview of the Lgl functions in cell polarity and cancer development, discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these functions, and raise our conclusion of previous studies and points of view about the future studies.

  11. Tumor de células gigantes costal ocupando todo o hemitórax Giant cell tumor of the rib occupying the entire hemithorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Zuínglio de Biasi Cordeiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma paciente de 28 anos de idade portadora de tumor de células gigantes originário da costela. O tumor de grandes dimensões (25 × 17 cm ocupava todo o hemitórax e causava atelectasia do pulmão esquerdo. Tratava-se de uma neoplasia mesenquimal benigna, a qual raramente acomete as costelas. Foi realizada toracotomia com ressecção em bloco da parede torácica e do tumor. O objetivo deste artigo é enfatizar que, apesar da grande dimensão do tumor, ele pôde ser completamente ressecado, e o pulmão foi reabilitado.The authors report the case of a 28-year-old female patient with a giant cell tumor originating from the rib. The tumor, measuring 25 × 17 cm, occupied the entire hemithorax and caused atelectasis of the left lung. This tumor was a benign mesenchymal neoplasm, which rarely affects the ribs. A thoracotomy involving en bloc resection of the chest wall and tumor was performed. Despite the large dimensions of the tumor, complete resection was possible, and lung function was restored.

  12. Curettage of benign bone tumors and tumor like lesions: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zile Singh Kundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Curettage is one of the most common treatment options for benign lytic bone tumors and tumor like lesions. The resultant defect is usually filled. We report our outcome curettage of benign bone tumors and tumor like lesions without filling the cavity. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied 42 patients (28 males and 14 females with benign bone tumors who had undergone curettage without grafting or filling of the defect by any other bone graft substitute. The age of the patients ranged from 14 to 66 years. The most common histological diagnosis was that of giant cell tumor followed by simple bone cyst, aneurysamal bone cyst, enchondroma, fibrous dysplasia, chondromyxoid fibroma, and chondroblastoma and giant cell reparative granuloma. Of the 15 giant cell tumors, 4 were radiographic grade 1 lesions, 8 were grade 2 and 3 grade 3. The mean maximum diameter of the cysts was 5.1 (range 1.1-9 cm cm and the mean volume of the lesions was 34.89 cm 3 (range 0.94-194.52 cm 3 . The plain radiographs of the part before and after curettage were reviewed to establish the size of the initial defect and the rate of reconstitution, filling and remodeling of the bone defect. Patients were reviewed every 3 monthly for a minimum period of 2 years. Results: Most of the bone defects completely reconstituted to a normal appearance while the rest filled partially. Two patients had preoperative and three had postoperative fractures. All the fractures healed uneventfully. Local recurrence occurred in three patients with giant cell tumor who were then reoperated. All other patients had unrestricted activities of daily living after surgery. The rate of bone reconstitution, risk of subsequent fracture or the incidence of complications was related to the size of the cyst/tumor at diagnosis. The benign cystic bone lesions with volume greater than approximately 70 cm 3 were found to have higher incidence of complications. Conclusion: This study

  13. Acute seronegative hepatitis C manifesting itself as adult giant cell hepatitis--a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryczka, Wiesław; Walewska-Zielecka, Bozena; Dutkiewicz, Ewa

    2003-08-01

    Adult giant cell hepatitis (AGCH) is a rare event and only about 100 cases have been reported within the last 20 years. The AGCH has been observed in association with viral infection, drug reactions or autoimmune disorders but in many cases its etiology remains unclear. AGCH manifests clinically as severe form of hepatitis histologically characterized by diffuse giant cell transformation of hepatocytes. We report the case of a 39-yr-old man with acute community-acquired hepatitis without previous pathology of the liver. Laboratory data revealed slight hypergammaglobulinemia and high titer of anti-smooth-muscle antibody with negative serology of hepatotropic viruses and absence of other known causes of hepatitis. Preliminary diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was established, additionally confirmed by excellent clinical and biochemical improvement during corticosteroid treatment. A liver biopsy showed the typical findings of panlobular syncytial giant cell hepatitis and positive HCV-RNA both in serum and liver. The above verified the diagnosis of acute type C hepatitis manifested histologically as adult giant cell hepatitis. After three months of treatment we withdrew corticosteroids as spontaneous clearance of HCV occurred and the lack of autoantibodies in serum as well as significant improvement of liver histology was ascertained. Within 30 months of the follow-up we have not observed biochemical and immunological abnormalities and control liver biopsy has shown no signs of hepatitis.

  14. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  15. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a nickel metal hydride battery worker: a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hou-rong; CAO Min; MENG Fan-qing; WEI Jing-yi; HOU Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) is a very rare chronic interstitial pneumonia caused by exposure to metal compounds such as cobalt or tungsten carbide. Although GIP was included in an original framework for the histologic classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias by Liebow and Carrington in 1969,1 GIP is currently considered a form of pneumoconiosis.

  16. Giant Cell Tumor of Rib Arising Anteriorly as a Large Inframammary Mass: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sharma

    2012-01-01

    posteriorly. The rarity of this tumor poses diagnostic and therapeutic problems for physicians, especially when it is located in the anterior arc of the rib in close proximity to the breasts in female patients. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 32-year-old Asian female with a giant cell tumor of her anterior rib, presenting as a large inframammary mass. Computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the 7th rib anteriorly with marginal sclerosis, cortical destruction, and a soft tissue mass. She was treated with surgical resection, and the defect was reconstructed primarily. The surgical specimen measured 28.0 × 24.0 cm. The microscopic examination showed a large number of multinucleate giant cells scattered over the parenchyma. Patient recovered uneventfully and continues to be recurrence-free six years after surgical resection. Conclusion. We report the largest known case of giant cell tumor arising from the anterior aspect of a rib. We recommend including giant cell tumor in the differential diagnosis of chest wall masses especially in female patients, regardless of the size on clinical examination.

  17. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  18. Surgical treatment of multifocal giant cell tumor of carpal bones with preservation of wrist function: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Yih-Wen; Yang, Shan-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Jen

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of multifocal giant cell tumor of bone involving the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and scaphoid with soft tissue extension. Following intralesional resection, an autogenous corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft was used to fill the resultant defect and preserve carpal height and radiocarpal motion. Successful union with no recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up.

  19. Metacarpal resection with a contoured iliac bone graft and silicone rubber implant for metacarpal giant cell tumor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, S B; Khuri, S M

    1985-03-01

    A definitive surgical procedure for a giant cell tumor that combines metacarpal resection with an iliac bone graft and arthroplasty with a silicone rubber implant is proposed for the elderly patient. The results were encouraging in one patient who had a cosmetically and functionally acceptable hand and no evidence of recurrence.

  20. Serial right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy in rapid-onset severe heart failure due to giant cell myocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, Paul L.; Brugemann, Johan; Diercks, Gilles F.; Suurmeijer, Albert; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2006-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a serious condition that warrants immediate diagnosis and treatment. It often presents as rapidly progressive heart failure and/or malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Here, we describe a 34-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis who presented with GCM 2 weeks after re

  1. Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands: a series of 13 neoplasms in 12 cases, including mammary-type juvenile fibroadenoma, fibroadenoma with lactation changes, and neurofibromatosis-associated pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J; Thompson, Jane; Agaimy, Abbas; Magro, Gaetano; Bisceglia, Michele; Vazmitel, Marina; Kacerovska, Denisa; Kutzner, Heinz; Mukensnabl, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a series of 13 fibroepithelial neoplasms involving anogenital mammary-like glands, all occurring in 12 female patients, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 51 years (mean, 38 y; median, 42 y). All women presented with a solitary asymptomatic nodule in the vulva (n=8), perineum (n=2), or near the anus (n=2) ranging in size from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Microscopically, 8 lesions were classified as fibroadenoma, and 5, including 1 recurrent tumor, as phyllodes tumor, of which 1 was benign and 4 low-grade malignant. In addition to conventional findings, we describe several hitherto unreported features including juvenile fibroadenoma-like proliferation, fibroadenoma with lactation change, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells in a patient with neurofibromatosis, type 1 all constituting potential diagnostic pitfalls, which are best averted by using the same approach to diagnosis as for their analogous mammary counterparts.

  2. UreA and cagA genes of Helicobacter pylori in Egyptian patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and benign laryngeal polyps: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ghada; Nabiel, Yasmin; Ali, Omima; El-Nady, Ghada; Musaad, Ahmed; El-Sharkawy, Asser

    2016-10-01

    This work aims to estimate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori ureA gene and evaluate cagA gene-positive strains in both patients of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and those with benign laryngeal polyps. This study included 49 patients confirmed pathologically to have LSCC and 15 patients with benign laryngeal polyps over a period from June 2013 to March 2015. Samples of laryngeal tissue were collected during direct laryngoscope under general anesthesia to be pathologically evaluated followed by analysis for H. pylori detection. Each laryngeal tissue sample was divided into three parts; one for bacteriological examination, the second for pathological examination and the third for PCR to detect both ureA and cagA genes. Out of 49 LSCC samples, 31 (64.6 %) was positive for ureA by PCR. Out of them, 29 samples (93.5 %) were cagA positive. Only three cases (20 %) of the benign laryngeal polyp were ureA positive by PCR and one of them was cagA positive by PCR. By the bacteriological culture, only eight samples (25.8 %) gave growth. All of them were ureA positive and only seven of them were cagA positive. There was a significant association between presence of H. pylori and LSCC as compared to benign laryngeal polyp which may contribute in the pathogenesis of laryngeal carcinoma. These results should be confirmed by further studies over larger number of cases.

  3. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Renty, Christelle; DePamphilis, Melvin L; Ullah, Zakir

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  4. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle de Renty

    Full Text Available Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  5. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus among Patients Diagnosed with Giant Cell Arteritis or Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Ahlström, Magnus G; Lindhardsen, Jesper;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with organ- or life-threatening vasculitis receive high cumulative glucocorticoid (GC) doses during their disease course. GC have diabetogenic effects, but the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) related to vasculitis therapy is not well characterized. We assessed the DM risk among...... patients diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA) or granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), i.e., patients with relatively common forms of systemic vasculitis. METHODS: We used Danish healthcare registries to identify 1682 patients diagnosed with GCA and 342 patients diagnosed with GPA from 1997 to 2015...... and to obtain information regarding medication exposures. Each patient with vasculitis was matched with 9 population controls. Date of new-onset DM was defined as date of first claimed prescription for an antidiabetic drug. We used Cox regression analyses to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRR) for DM...

  6. Giant Cell Arteritis: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed with the Use of MRI Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Shambhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in western countries in individuals over the age of 50. It is typically characterised by the granulomatous involvement of large and medium sized blood vessels branching of the aorta with particular tendencies for involving the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. Generally the diagnosis is straightforward when characteristic symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or other ischemic complications are present. Atypical presentations of GCA without “overt” cranial ischemic manifestations have become increasingly recognised but we report for the first time a case of GCA presenting as mild upper abdominal pain and generalized weakness in the context of hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of vasculitis that was subsequently diagnosed by MRI scanning. This case adds to the literature and emphasises the importance of MRI in the evaluation of GCA patients without “classic” cranial ischemic symptoms.

  7. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadey, David Y A; Kamath, Ashwin A; Leuthardt, Eric C; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor occurring almost exclusively in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although open resection remains the standard therapy, complication rates remain high. To minimize morbidity, less invasive approaches, such as endoscope-assisted resection, radiosurgery, and chemotherapy with mTOR pathway inhibitors, are also used to treat these lesions. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a relatively new modality that is increasingly used to treat a variety of intracranial lesions. In this report, the authors describe two pediatric cases of SEGA that were treated with LITT. In both patients the lesion responded well to this treatment modality, with tumor shrinkage observed on follow-up MRI. These cases highlight the potential of LITT to serve as a viable minimally invasive therapeutic approach to the management of SEGAs in the pediatric population.

  8. Subtotal tongue necrosis in delayed diagnosed giant-cell arteritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebl, Matthias Oliver; Hugl, Beate; Posch, Lydia; Tzankov, Alexandar; Weber, Florian; Perkmann, Reinhold; Fraedrich, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis of large- and medium-sized vessels, mainly affecting elderly patients. Headache, vision impairment, jaw claudication, and scalp tenderness are common symptoms. However, diagnosis can be difficult because GCA can affect almost every vascular pathway and lead to a variety of possible manifestations. We report the case of a belated diagnosed GCA, resulting in nearly complete necrosis of the mobile part of the tongue, visual impairment, and neurologic as well as intestinal ischemic symptoms. Aggressive immunosuppressive treatment resolved the symptoms, but the patient remained severely morbid because of bilateral necrosis of the mobile part of the tongue. In any case of unclear ischemic symptoms in an elderly patient, one must keep GCA in mind as the possible culprit disease.

  9. Giant Cell Fibroma of the Buccal Mucosa with Laser Excision: Report of Unusual Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Somayyeh; Azimi, Somayyeh; Bigom Taheri, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    Giant Cell Fibroma (GCF) was described as a new entity of fibrous hyperplastic soft tissue. It seems that stimulus from an unexplained origin can have a role in its etiology. Histopathologically GCF is consisted of multinucleated fibroblasts that have oval shape nuclei within the eosinophilic cytoplasm. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is very rare. Here we report a case of relatively large GCF in a 54-year-old man. Gingiva is the common location of GCF. As in our case, it may be mistaken as irritation fibroma especially if it is on the buccal mucosa, the most common location for fibroma. Correct diagnosis is based on biopsy and clinical examination to see surface texture roughness. To minimize bleeding because of its large size an excisional biopsy with Diod laser was performed under local anesthesia for this patient. PMID:26351504

  10. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira C Saito

    Full Text Available Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  11. MRI in giant cell (temporal) arteritis; Magnetresonanztomografie der Arteriitis temporalis Horton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, T.A.; Uhl, M.; Frydrychowicz, A.; Langer, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik; Markl, M. [Uniklinik Freiburg (Germany). Roentgendiagnostik - Medizinische Physik

    2007-07-15

    Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is a diagnostic challenge. Blindness is a dreaded complication, especially if high-dose steroid treatment is delayed. With an optimized MR protocol, noninvasive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis is facilitated. Submillimeter in-plane resolution makes it possible to distinguish healthy segments from inflamed segments. The lumen and arterial wall can be depicted in high detail. Post-contrast high-resolution MRI visualizes the superficial cranial arteries bilaterally and simultaneously, allowing assessment of the cranial involvement pattern. In combination with MR angiography of the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the extracranial involvement pattern can be demonstrated in a single comprehensive MR examination assessing the cranial, cervical and thoracic vasculature. Good diagnostic image quality can be achieved at 1.5 Tesla and at 3 Tesla. However, due to higher signal-to-noise ratios, image quality seems to be superior at 3 Tesla. Over the course of successful long-term treatment, MR signs of mural inflammation decrease significantly and eventually vanish entirely. In contrast to color-coded Duplex sonography, which is a comparatively cost-efficient imaging modality, acquisition of high-resolution MRI is almost independent of the investigator's expertise. Compared to positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which is a very sensitive whole-body screening tool for detecting extracranial involvement of large vessel vasculitis, MRI allows visualization and assessment of both the superficial cranial arteries in high detail and the extracranial large artery involvement in the same investigation. (orig.)

  12. Aspectos radiológicos e epidemiológicos do granuloma central de células gigantes Radiological and epidemiological aspects of central giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson Noleto

    2007-06-01

    including 17 patients who were not affected by hyperparathyroidism (group A and another including five patients with such a disorder (group B. RESULTS: Prevalence was higher in female patients (72.7%. Most frequently, lesions occurred more in the second decade of life (mean age, 27 years. The mandible arc was most frequently involved (61.5%. Radiographically, 57.7% of lesions were multilocular and 42.3% were unilocular with defined limits. All of the 26 lesions caused expansion of bone, 15.4% radicular resorption, 50% dental displacement, and 11.5% produced pain. In the mandible 18.7% of the lesions crossed the midline. Group A showed 66.7% of lesions in the mandible and group B showed an even distribution of lesions between arches. In group A 66.7% of lesions were multilocular, and 33.3% unilocular; in group B 62.5% were unilocular, and 37.5% multilocular. CONCLUSION: Giant cells lesions may present themselves with a wide spectrum, from small, slow-growing unilocular lesions to extensive multilocular lesions. They present features of benignity, though some lesions may demonstrate a locally aggressive behavior.

  13. Selective Amplification of the Genome Surrounding Key Placental Genes in Trophoblast Giant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Baker, Julie C

    2016-01-25

    While most cells maintain a diploid state, polyploid cells exist in many organisms and are particularly prevalent within the mammalian placenta [1], where they can generate more than 900 copies of the genome [2]. Polyploidy is thought to be an efficient method of increasing the content of the genome by avoiding the costly and slow process of cytokinesis [1, 3, 4]. Polyploidy can also affect gene regulation by amplifying a subset of genomic regions required for specific cellular function [1, 3, 4]. This mechanism is found in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where polyploid ovarian follicle cells amplify genomic regions containing chorion genes, which facilitate secretion of eggshell proteins [5]. Here, we report that genomic amplification also occurs in mammals at selective regions of the genome in parietal trophoblast giant cells (p-TGCs) of the mouse placenta. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) of mouse p-TGCs, we identified five amplified regions, each containing a gene family known to be involved in mammalian placentation: the prolactins (two clusters), serpins, cathepsins, and the natural killer (NK)/C-type lectin (CLEC) complex [6-12]. We report here the first description of amplification at selective genomic regions in mammals and present evidence that this is an important mode of genome regulation in placental TGCs.

  14. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  15. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng-Sheng [Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Ding, Xiao-Yi, E-mail: dingxiaoyi1965@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yuan, Fei, E-mail: yuanfeirj@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Du, Lian-Jun; Lu, Yong [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Wei-Bin [Department of Orthopedics, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells masquerading as pleomorphic sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC with osteoclast-like giant cells (OLGCs is a rare entity known to occur in skin, breast, lung, and pharynx. Only a single case of SCC containing OLGC in larynx has been reported so far. We report a case of a 65-year-old male patient presenting with sudden onset respiratory distress, who was subjected to biopsy, which was reported as undifferentiated sarcoma which was endorsed on laryngectomy specimen, however, sections from cervical lymph nodes revealed deposits of SCC. Extensive resectioning revealed a single focus showing origin of poorly differentiated carcinoma from the overlying squamous epithelium. Hence in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, a thorough sectioning and careful search for SCC including immunohistochemical markers should be done to exclude the possibility of a poorly differentiated epithelial malignancy.

  17. AP-1 as a Regulator of MMP-13 in the Stromal Cell of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella W. Y. Mak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13 has been shown to be an important protease in inflammatory and neoplastic conditions of the skeletal system. In particular, the stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT express very high levels of MMP-13 in response to the cytokine-rich environment of the tumor. We have previously shown that MMP-13 expression in these cells is regulated, at least in part, by the RUNX2 transcription factor. In the current study, we identify the expression of the c-Fos and c-Jun elements of the AP-1 transcription factor in these cells by protein screening assays and real-time PCR. We then used siRNA gene knockdown to determine that these elements, in particular c-Jun, are upstream regulators of MMP-13 expression and activity in GCT stromal cells. We conclude that there was no synergy found between RUNX2 and AP-1 in the regulation of the MMP13 expression and that these transcription factors may be independently regulated in these cells.

  18. Radical pancreaticoduodenectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2008-01-01

    Whipple\\'s procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple\\'s procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple\\'s procedure during a 15-year period (1987-2002) were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%). One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30-75). The major presenting features included jaundice (five), pain (two), gastric outlet obstruction (one), and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one). Investigations included ultrasound (eight), computerised tomography (eight), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology), and endoscopic ultrasound (two). The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two), chronic pancreatitis (two), choledochal cyst (one), inflammatory pseudotumour (one), cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one), duodenal angiodysplasia (one), and granular cell neoplasm (one). There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one), anastomotic leak (one), liver abscess (one), and myocardial infarction (one). All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple\\'s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) may reduce the need for Whipple\\'s operation

  19. Expression of Beta-Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Genes in Renal Cell Cancer and Benign Renal Disease Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜永光; 曾甫清; 肖传国; 刘俊敏

    2003-01-01

    To study the expression of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) genes in renal cellcarcinomas (RCC) and benign renal disease tissues, nested reverse transcription-polymerase chainreaction (RT-PCR) and restriction endonuclease analysis were employed to detect the expression ofβhCG genes in 44 cases of RCC tissues and 24 cases of benign renal disease tissues. It was foundthat 52% RCC samples revealed positive for βhCG mRNA expression. Positive rate in advancedstage and poorly differentiated RCC was higher, but there was no significant difference. The posi-tive rate of βhCG mRNA expression was 54% in 24 cases of benign renal tissues, including 3 casesout of 6 polycystic kidneys, 7 cases out of 13 renal atrophies, 2 cases out of 2 oncocytomas and 1case out of 2 pyonephrotic kidneys. β7 was most frequently transcribed subtype gene independent onthe histology. These findings suggested βhCG gene transcription is not only involved in RCC but al-so in benign renal diseases.

  20. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ten Harkel

    Full Text Available Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP. However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones--cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII, chloride channel 7 (CIC7, and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase, in contrast the matrix degrading

  1. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  2. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  3. Proliferative, reparative, and reactive benign bone lesions that may be confused diagnostically with true osseous neoplasms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wick, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic problems attending intraosseous and parosteal pseudoneoplastic lesions can be radiographic, or histological, or both. Proliferations in this category may contain cellular fibro-osseous or chondro-osseous tissues that are difficult to separate microscopically from those seen in various true neoplasms of the bones. This review considers the clinicopathologic features of fibrous dysplasia, benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jawbones, osteofibrous dysplasia, metaphyseal fibrous defect, giant-cell reparative granuloma, "brown tumor" of hyperparathyroidism, synovial chondrometaplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, tumefactive chronic osteomyelitis, proliferative Paget disease, and polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease of bone.

  4. Benign bone tumors and tumor-like lesions: value of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675, Munich (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews the role of CT and MR imaging in the diagnosis of benign bone tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone with with regard to differential diagnosis, the assessment of tumor-related complications, and the detection of postoperative recurrence. Indications for cross-sectional imaging of specific lesions, including osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, enchondroma, osteochondroma, intraosseous lipoma, hemangioma, giant cell tumor, aneurysmal bone cyst, simple bone cyst, and eosinophilic granuloma, are discussed, and advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging modalities are illustrated on the basis of pathologically confirmed cases. (orig.)

  5. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  6. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato; Cristhiane Almeida Leite; Brunna Haddad Anhesini; Jéssica Marques Gomes da Silva Aguilera; Álvaro Henrique Borges

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or ...

  7. Mutation Analysis of H3F3A and H3F3B as a Diagnostic Tool for Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and Chondroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleven, Arjen H G; Höcker, Saskia; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge; Szuhai, Karoly; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-11-01

    Specific H3F3A driver mutations and IDH2 mutations were recently described in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) and H3F3B driver mutations in chondroblastoma; these may be helpful as a diagnostic tool for giant cell-containing tumors of the bone. Using Sanger sequencing, we determined the frequency of H3F3A, H3F3B, IDH1, and IDH2 mutations in GCTBs (n=60), chondroblastomas (n=12), and other giant cell-containing tumors (n=24), including aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, and telangiectatic osteosarcoma. To find an easy applicable marker for H3F3A mutation status, H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX expression were correlated with H3F3A mutations. In total, 69% of all GCTBs harbored an H3F3A (G34W/V) mutation compared with 0% of all other giant cell-containing tumors (Pchondroblastomas showed an H3F3B (K36M) mutation compared with 0% of other giant cell-containing tumors (Pchondroblastoma from other giant cell-containing tumors. Although H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX immunohistochemistry cannot be used as surrogate markers for H3F3A mutation status, mutations in H3F3A are associated with increased H3K36 trimethylation, suggesting that methylation at this residue may play a role in the etiology of the disease.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with a unilateral giant ovarian fibroma in a Japanese 6-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimbo, Takahiro; Masumoto, Kouji; Urita, Yasuhisa; Takayasu, Hajime; Shinkai, Toko; Uesugi, Toru; Gotoh, Chikashi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sasaki, Takato; Oto, Tatsuyuki; Fukushima, Takashi; Noguchi, Emiko; Nakano, Yoshiro

    2014-05-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is characterized by basal cell carcinoma, skeletal abnormalities, benign tumors including ovarian fibroma, and various other phenotypic expressions. Ovarian fibromas in NBCCS before puberty are very rare. We report a 6-year-old prepubescent girl with NBCCS showing skeletal abnormalities, medulloblastoma, and ovarian fibromas. The patient was referred to our hospital owing to abdominal distension. On admission, a huge elastic hard tumor was palpable and computed tomography showed a huge tumor of the left ovary. We performed a left salpingo-oophorectomy and diagnosed the tumor as a benign fibroma. Further examination of the computed tomography images showed skeletal abnormalities. In addition, the patient had a history of medulloblastoma at the age of 4 years. Therefore, we diagnosed NBCCS. A genetic examination indicated a novel 1 bp deletion in exon 18 (c.3055delG). Sequence analysis of exon 18 using DNA from the ovarian tumor revealed a mutant allele (c.3055delG) dominant to the wild-type allele, thus suggesting loss of heterozygosity in the PTCH1 gene, which is known to be associated with NBCCS. Conclusion On the basis of our experience, physicians treating pediatric ovarian tumors should be aware that such huge benign ovarian tumors may be a phenotype of NBCCS, as shown in our patient. In addition, genetic examination focusing on the PTCH1 gene might be important for diagnosis of NBCCS in pediatric patients.

  9. The Thromboembolic Risk in Giant Cell Arteritis: A Critical Review of the Literature

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    A. Guida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the aorta and its main vessels. Cardiovascular risk, both for arterial and venous thromboembolism, is increased in these patients, but the role of thromboprophylaxis is still debated. It should be suspected in elderly patients suffering from sudden onset severe headaches, jaw claudication, and visual disease. Early diagnosis is necessary because prognosis depends on the timeliness of treatment: this kind of arteritis can be complicated by vision loss and cerebrovascular strokes. Corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of the pharmacological treatment of GCA. Aspirin seems to be effective in cardiovascular prevention, while the use of anticoagulant therapy is controversial. Association with other rheumatological disease, particularly with polymyalgia rheumatica is well known, while possible association with antiphospholipid syndrome is not established. Large future trials may provide information about the optimal therapy. Other approaches with new drugs, such as TNF-alpha blockades, Il-6 and IL-1 blockade agents, need to be tested in larger trials.

  10. Giant cell arteritis mimicking infiltrative leptomeningeal disease of the optic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, Michael D; Ratchford, John N; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Probasco, John C

    2015-04-09

    A 67-year-old man presented with several days of progressive, painless left eye vision loss. He reported mild jaw claudication but denied headache, scalp tenderness or constitutional symptoms. Examination revealed palpable temporal arteries, blurring of the left optic disc, and 20/100 vision in the left eye with mild relative afferent pupillary defect. Inflammatory markers were sent, and methylprednisolone was initiated for presumptive giant cell arteritis (GCA). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was normal, however, and C reactive protein was only mildly elevated, prompting further investigation. Orbital MRI revealed nodular enhancement of the optic nerve sheaths bilaterally from optic nerve head to chiasm, raising concern for an infiltrative leptomeningeal process such as sarcoidosis or lymphoma. Methylprednisolone was temporarily stopped while a broad work up for inflammatory and neoplastic causes was pursued. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ultimately revealed hypermetabolism in the temporal, ophthalmic and occipital arteries suggesting GCA, which was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. Steroids were restarted, and the patient's vision stabilised.

  11. Lower extremity vasculitis in giant cell arteritis: important differential diagnosis in patients with lower limb claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Martin; Hsu, Eric; Scheffel, Hans; Haneder, Stefan; Rümenapf, Gerhard; Amendt, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Most patients with peripheral arterial disease suffer from arteriosclerosis, the prevalence of which increases with age. In some of these patients, however, the ischemic symptoms are not caused by stenotic arteriosclerosis, but by large vessel giant cell arteritis (LV-GCA), a disease also predominantly affecting patients of the older generation. Identifying large vessel vasculitis is a challenge for all physicians caring for patients with peripheral artery disease. The results of invasive treatment such as bypass surgery and angioplasty of inflammatory vascular lesions differ fundamentally from those of patients with atherosclerosis. Duplex ultrasound is a widely available diagnostic method for examining patients with lower limb claudication and pathological ankle-/toe- brachial index or pulse volume recording with or without exercise. Knowledge of characteristic sonographic findings suspicious about large vessel vasculitis is essential for a differential diagnosis of vasculitis versus atherosclerosis. In addition to clinical and laboratory findings, further imaging techniques, e.g. contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or a combination of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) can provide information on further vessel involvement and inflammatory activity. The present study focuses on diagnostic imaging of LV-GCA in patients presenting with claudication, illustrated by a series of cases.

  12. Giant cell arteritis. Part III. New trends in its treatment (role of genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a well-known vasculitis sensitive to glucocorticoid (GC immuno-suppression. However, during long-term treatment there may be many adverse reactions that remain a serious problem so far. Since GCA encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical subtypes, ranging from severe visual loss and neurological deficits to isolated systemic signs, its treatment must be adjusted specially to each case. The literature contains contradicting recommendations for the therapy for GCA. The paper considers different treatment options for GCA, including that with neuro-ophthalmic and neurological complications, as well as the evidence for their possible adjuvant therapies. Although there is no randomized controlled clinical trial in GCA with ocular and neurological complications, the data available in the literature suggest that these patients are recommended to be admitted for high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, monitoring, and prevention of GC-induced complications. It is expedient to use aspirin in these cases. The evidence supporting the use of methotrexate, as well as genetically engineered agents (GEAs, infliximab, etanercept as steroid-sparing agents is discussed. Cases of using individual GEAs (adalimumab, tocilizumab and rituximab as an alternative to GC monotherapy are described. It is concluded that there is a need for extended clinical trials evaluating the most effective and safe GC-sparing drugs.

  13. A chondroblastoma versus a giant cell tumor: emphasis on the MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jee Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Na Ra; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    To assess the MR imaging features in differentiating a chondroblastoma (CB) from a giant cell tumor (GCT), with an emphasis on the accompanying peritumoral bone marrow edema. MR imaging findings in 20 patients with CB were compared with the imaging features of 22 patients with GCT. The location of the lesion, signal intensity, adjacent cortical change, degree of accompanying bone marrow edema, synovitis in the adjacent joint and cystic change were analyzed. The findings of CB and GCT were examined statistically with use of Fisher's exact test. The incidence ratios of MR imaging findings were as follows (CB:GCT). Metaphyseal dominant involvement (2:21), partial cortical disruption (2:14), extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor (14:0) and synovitis in the adjacent joint (11:2) were statistically different in incidence between CB and GCT ({rho} < 0.01). The inhomogeneous signal intensity (17:17) and cystic change (10:15) were not different in incidence between a CB and GCT. The presence of metaphyseal dominant involvement and cortical disruption favors a diagnosis of a GCT rather than a CB. In contrast, extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor and synovitis in the adjacent joint are highly indicative of a CB.

  14. Giant Cell Tumor Of The Long Bones: Results With Combination Of Cryosurgery, Curettage, And Cementation

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    Mortazavi S.M.J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study we evaluated the treatment of giant cell tumor (GCT of long bones using cryosurgery combined with curettage and polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA cementing. Material and methods: From January 1999 to December 2004, twenty patients (mean age at the time of surgery 29.2 years; 13 females and 7 males; were included in the study. Cortical disruption were presented in 7 patients; 4 with soft tissue extension, but none of them had intra-articular extension of tumor, 3 patients presented with pathologic fracture of distal femoral lesions. These tumors were located in distal femur in 6 patients, proximal tibia in 7, distal radius in 3, proximal femur in 2, and each of proximal humerus and distal ulna in one patient. In each case diagnostic biopsy was done and surgical procedure performed including curettage, power burr of the wall, cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen and finally filling the space with PMMA cementing. The mean follow-up was 34 months (7 to 61 . Results: During follow-up, we observed one recurrence of GCT of proximal tibia. Secondary Aneurysmal bone cyst was reported at the site of one primary distal femoral lesion, without any finding in favor of a recurrence. Neurapraxia of the proneal nerve was occurred in one patient with proximal tibia tumor improved after 8 months. Conclusion: Cryosurgery combined with power burr and PMMA cementing in the treatment of GCT could be an effective approach in tumor eradication. This method obviates the need for extensive resections and reconstructive procedure.

  15. Giant cell arteritis or tension-type headache?: A differential diagnostic dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Saeed, Usman; Khan, Osama A.; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M.; Paul, Dion

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) or Temporal arteritis (TA) is an autoimmune disease and the most common type of vasculitis in the elderly. It causes inflammation of the medium and large arteries in the upper part of the body. GCA is an under-recognized cause of  head aches in the elderly, especially when it presents itself with atypical features, resulting in delayed or incorrect diagnosis. Since GCA is a treatable condition, an accurate diagnosis is crucial to prevent the most serious complication of CGA, permanent vision loss. The diagnosis can be further complicated as GCA may present with features of other painful neurological conditions. The present case is an 81-year-old woman diagnosed with GCA, who initially presented with features similar to tension-type headache. Due to overlapping features of these conditions, the diagnosis of GCA was delayed, resulting in irreversible vision loss. Although previous research highlights diagnostic dilemmas featuring GCA and other disease states, this case is exclusive in describing a unique dilemma where tension-type headache mimics GCA. PMID:25288850

  16. Giant cell arteritis or tension-type headache?: A differential diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA or Temporal arteritis (TA is an autoimmune disease and the most common type of vasculitis in the elderly. It causes inflammation of the medium and large arteries in the upper part of the body. GCA is an under-recognized cause of  head aches in the elderly, especially when it presents itself with atypical features, resulting in delayed or incorrect diagnosis. Since GCA is a treatable condition, an accurate diagnosis is crucial to prevent the most serious complication of CGA, permanent vision loss. The diagnosis can be further complicated as GCA may present with features of other painful neurological conditions. The present case is an 81-year-old woman diagnosed with GCA, who initially presented with features similar to tension-type headache. Due to overlapping features of these conditions, the diagnosis of GCA was delayed, resulting in irreversible vision loss. Although previous research highlights diagnostic dilemmas featuring GCA and other disease states, this case is exclusive in describing a unique dilemma where tension-type headache mimics GCA.

  17. Giant cell myocarditis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spence N

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. First described by Saltykow in 1905 (1, Giant cell myocarditis (GCM is a rare but highly lethal disease. Until the 1980s the diagnosis of GCM was determined at autopsy (2. It often affects young patients (mean age of 42.6 + 12.7 years, and appears to occur in men and women equally. The occurrence of GCM in minority patients has not been previously described (3. The most common presenting symptom is heart failure (75%, though ventricular tachycardia (14%, chest pain with ECG findings of acute myocardial infarction (6% and complete heart block (5% may also occur. Treatment often involves an immunosuppressive regimen as a bridge to heart transplantation. The prevalence of GCM is known primarily from autopsy studies (i.e., 0.051% in India, 0.007% in England, and 0.023% in Japan (4-6. In the largest GCM observational study yet published, the rate of death or cardiac transplantation was 89 percent, with a median ...

  18. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  19. Metastases of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Thyroid Gland with Synchronous Benign and Malignant Follicular Cell-Derived Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zamarrón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC is the most common origin for metastasis in the thyroid. A 51-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for a subcarinal lesion. Ten years before, the patient had undergone a nephrectomy for CCRCC. Whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed elevated values in the thyroid gland, while the mediastinum was normal. An endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the mediastinal mass was consistent with CCRCC, and this was confirmed after resection. The thyroidectomy specimen also revealed lymphocytic thyroiditis, nodular hyperplasia, one follicular adenoma, two papillary microcarcinomas, and six foci of metastatic CCRCC involving both thyroid lobes. Curiously two of the six metastatic foci were located inside two adenomatoid nodules (tumor-in-tumor. The metastatic cells were positive for cytokeratins, CD10, epidermal growth factor receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. No BRAF gene mutations were found in any of the primary and metastatic lesions. The patient was treated with sunitinib and finally died due to CCRCC distant metastases 6 years after the thyroidectomy. In CCRCC patients, a particularly prolonged survival rate may be achieved with the appropriate therapy, in contrast to the ominous prognosis typically found in patients with thyroid metastases from other origins.

  20. Clinical outcome of en-block resection and reconstruction with nonvascularized fibular autograft for the treatment of giant cell tumor of distal radius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Taraz-Jamshidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although giant cell tumor (GCT is considered to be a primary benign bone tumor, its aggressive behavior makes its diagnosis and treatment, difficult and challenging. This is especially true in distal radius where GCT appears to be more aggressive and difficult to control locally. We report our clinical outcome of en-block resection and reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft in 15 patients with distal radius GCT. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 15 patients with GCT (Grade 2 and 3 of distal radius who were treated with en-block resection and non-vascularized fibular autograft. Five of 15 were recurrent GCT treated initially with extended curettage; local adjuvant therapy and filling the cavity with cement or bone graft. We followed the patients for mean 7.2 years post operation (range: 4-11 years. Patients were evaluated post operation with clinical examination, plain radiography of distal radius and chest X-ray and/or computed tomography scan. Furthermore pain, function, range of motion and grip strength of the affected limb were evaluated and mMayo wrist score was assessed. Results: A total of 11 patients were women and 4 were men. Mean age of patients was 29 years (range: 19-48. We had no lung metastasis and bony recurrence occurred in one patient (6.6%. Nearly 53.3% of patients had excellent or good functional wrist score, 80% of the patients were free of pain or had only occasional pain and 80% of patients returned to work. Mean range of motion of the wrist was 77° of flexion-extension and mean grip strength was 70% of the normal hand. Conclusion: En-block resection of distal radius GCT and reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft is an effective technique for treatment in local control of the tumor and preserving function of the limb.

  1. Thermodynamic considerations of acrylic cement implant at the site of giant cell tumors of the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, E C; Nelson, C; Neff, J R

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of the thermodynamic aspects of a relatively new treatment method for giant cell tumors of the bone is presented in this paper. The advantages of implanting methylmethacrylate acrylic bone cement into a curetted tumor site are briefly discussed and placed in perspective relative to more prevalent surgical treatments. As the bone cement self-heats while curing, the possibility of heat necrosis in the bone exists. However, the damage due to heat may be beneficial in reducing the rate of tumor recurrence. A thermodynamic consideration of the treatment situation appears to be warranted. After a general introduction and a brief literature review, the theoretical thermodynamic equations are developed. Once the basic equations for the heat transfer from the cement or the bone are derived, there is then a discussion of the various characteristics of bone and methylmethacrylate crucial to the analysis, such as, thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat generation parameters. Finally, in order to reduce the theory to a form which may be used practically, the equations derived are written in terms of finite-difference equations, which approximate them numerically. Different equations are written for each type of heat transfer condition encountered in the cement-bone system as spacial variances in material and geometry occur. The equations derived may be used to model the system allowing one to predict the time-dependent temperature distribution in bone during the curing of acrylic cement. Using computer techniques to reduce the equations obtained from this analysis, and knowing the temperature at which adjacent cells die, a zone of necrosis may be mapped surrounding the acrylic impact.

  2. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

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    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  3. Ocular pulse amplitude as a diagnostic adjunct in giant cell arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, P B; Bachmann, L M; Thiel, M A; Landau, K; Kaufmann, C

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop an algorithm based on the ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) to predict the probability of a positive temporal artery biopsy (TAB) result in the acute phase of suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods Unilateral TAB was performed and ipsilateral OPA measurements were taken by Dynamic Contour Tonometry. Among the clinical signs and laboratory findings tested in univariate analyses, OPA, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and thrombocyte count showed a strong association with a positive TAB result. Algorithm parameters were categorized into three groups (OPA >3.5, 2.5–3.5, and 60 mm/h; thrombocyte count 500'000/μl). Score values (0, 1, and 2) were attributed to each group, resulting in a total score range from 0 to 6. A univariate logistic regression analysis using the GCA diagnosis as the dependent and the total score as the independent variate was fitted and probability estimates were calculated. Results Thirty-one patients with suspected GCA undergoing TAB during an eighteen-month observation period were enrolled. Twenty patients showed histologically proven GCA. Four patients had score values ≤2, fourteen between 3 and 4, and thirteen of ≥5. The corresponding estimated probabilities of GCA were95%. Conclusion The present study confirms previous findings of reduced OPA levels, elevated ESR, and elevated thrombocyte counts in GCA. It indicates that a sum score based on OPA, ESR, and thrombocyte count can be helpful in predicting TAB results, especially at the upper and the lower end of the sum score range. PMID:26088675

  4. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high.

  5. MicroRNA expression profiles in metastatic and non-metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosakhani, Neda; Pazzaglia, Laura; Benassi, Maria Serena; Borze, Ioana; Quattrini, Irene; Picci, Piero; Knuutila, Sakari

    2013-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a skeletal neoplasm, a locally aggressive tumor that occasionally metastasizes to the lungs. To identify novel biomarkers associated with GCTB progression and metastasis, we performed a miRNA microarray on ten primary tumors of GCTB, of which five developed lung metastases and the rest remained metastasis-free. Between metastatic and non-metastatic GCTB, 12 miRNAs were differentially expressed (such as miR-136, miR-513a-5p, miR-494, miR-224, and miR-542-5p). A decreased level of miR-136 in metastatic versus non-metastatic GCTB was significantly confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (p=0.04). To identify potential target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs, we used three target prediction databases. Then, to functionally validate the potential target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, we re-analyzed our previous gene expression data from the same ten patients. Eight genes such as NFIB, TNC, and FLRT2 were inversely expressed relative to their predicted miRNA regulators. NFIB expression correlated in metastatic GCTB with no or low expression of miR-136, and this gene was selected for further verification with qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Verification of NFIB mRNA and protein by qRT-PCR showed elevated expression levels in metastatic GCTBs. Further, the protein expression level of NFIB was tested in an independent validation cohort of 74 primary archival GCTB specimens. In the primary tumors that developed metastases compared to the disease-free group, NFIB protein was moderately to strongly expressed at a higher frequency. Thus, in GCTB, miR-136 and NFIB may serve as prognostic makers.

  6. Giant Fibroadenoma of Breast in an Adolescent Girl

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    Nithya Thuruthiyath

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl presented with a 15 × 15 cm, rapidly enlarging mass in left breast. Fine-needle aspiration cytology showed a benign proliferative breast lesion. Total excision of the mass was done preserving nipple and areola. Histopathology features were suggestive of giant fibroadenoma with benign phyllodes.

  7. Rapidly Evolving Giant Dermatofibroma

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    K. J. Lang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma, also known as “fibrous histiocytoma”, is a benign dermal or subcutaneous poorly circumscribed proliferation of spindle-shaped fibroblasts and macrophages in the dermis. Although it is commonly present as a brownish nodule the legs of females, it may also arise on the upper extremities, trunk, and rarely on the head. The exact pathogenesis is unclear. However, it is widely believed that the originating insult to the dermis is a folliculitis, an arthropod bite, or an unspecified initial inflammatory condition. Giant dermatofibromas of greater than 5 cm in diameter are rare, with only 22 cases reported in the literature. We present a case of a rapidly evolving pedunculated mass in the groin of a male patient. Histological examination confirmed this to be a giant dermatofibroma. Though this specimen cannot is not confirmed as such, the cellular subtype is sometimes present as a larger lesion with anecdotal reports of local recurrence and distant metastases. The clinical and radiological features which were somewhat suspicious of malignancy are considered in the context of the definitive pathological diagnosis of a benign lesion.

  8. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  9. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  10. Ultrastructural cytochemical and ultrastructural morphological differences between human multinucleated giant cells elicited by wear particles from hip prostheses and artificial ligaments at the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazawa, Ukei; Hanaoka, Hideya; Morioka, Hideo; Morii, Takeshi; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the ultrastructural cytochemical features of multinucleated and mononuclear cells in periprosthetic tissues associated with bone resorption (osteolysis) and those in tissues adjoining failed artificial ligaments having no relation to bone resorption. Clinical specimens of granulation tissue of each type, respectively numbering 4 and 3, were stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) reactions and examined by light and electron microscopy. Both periprosthetic granulation tissues and those adjoining artificial ligaments contained TRAP-positive multinucleated and mononuclear cells. Near joint prostheses, multinucleated cells, including some giant cells, showed TRAP activity and cytoplasmic features resembling osteoclasts, while others had features consistent with foreign-body giant cells, and still others showed degenerative changes. Near artificial ligaments, TRAP-positive multinucleated cells lacked osteoclastic features. At both sites, TRAP-positive multinucleated cells had phagocytised wear particles. TRAP-positive mononuclear cells at both sites also showed phagocytic cytoplasmic features, but not osteoclastic cytoplasmic features. Human mononuclear phagocytes and multinucleated giant cells induced by wear particles possess TRAP activity. Those multinucleated giant cells at sites of osteolysis developed osteoclastic cytoplasmic features and have a phagocytic function.

  11. Undifferentiated (Anaplastic Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells Showing Various Degree of Pancreas Duct Involvement. A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Maksymov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Undifferentiated (anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells is exceedingly rare. The prognosis of undifferentiated carcinoma is worse than that of poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas; however, undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells might have a more favorable prognosis. Case report We report the case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells, showing an intraductal growth pattern with various degree of pancreas duct involvement in the different areas. As a result, we were able to demonstrate the entire spectrum of changes, ranging from the early, minimal intraluminal growth to the partial or complete occlusion of the branches of the main pancreatic duct, and finally invasion and formation of the large necrotic/degenerated cysts. Conclusions Our findings support the epithelial origin of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells. In early stages, the affected pancreatic duct epithelium was intermingled with nonepithelial component and had an immunoprofile distinctive from the epithelial lining of the uninvolved (normal pancreatic ducts. Distinctive immunoprofile (CK 5/6, p63 and p53 positive of the epithelial component and p63 and p53 positivity of the nonepithelial component should be explained and further investigated in the similar cases. Our findings support prior assertions that undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells may develop from carcinoma in situ within the main pancreatic duct or its branches

  12. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) BPPV is the most common vestibular disorder. Benign ... al. Diagnosis and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). CMAJ. 2003 169(7):681-693. Nuti D, ...

  13. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil); Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi [Instituto Avanços em Medicina (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de, E-mail: marcos.menezes@hc.fm.usp.br [Sírio Libânes Hospital, Radiology and Imaged Guided Intervention Service (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  14. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Burke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate.

  15. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... The following organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ... Urology Care Foundation -- www. ...

  16. Epigenetic silencing of genes and microRNAs within the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 region at human chromosome 14.32 in giant cell tumor of bone

    OpenAIRE

    Lehner, Burkhard; Kunz, Pierre; Saehr, Heiner; Fellenberg, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing evidence exists that the neoplastic stromal cell population (GCTSC) within giant cell tumors (GCT) originates from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). In a previous study we identified a microRNA signature that differentiates between these cell types. Five differentially expressed microRNAs are located within the Dlk1-Dio3 region on chromosome 14. Aberrant regulation within this region is known to influence cell growth, differentiation and the development of cancer. The aim of th...

  17. Reconstructive procedures for segmental resection of bone in giant cell tumors around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Segmental resection of bone in Giant Cell Tumor (GCT around the knee, in indicated cases, leaves a gap which requires a complex reconstructive procedure. The present study analyzes various reconstructive procedures in terms of morbidity and various complications encountered. Materials and Methods: Thirteen cases (M-six and F-seven; lower end femur-six and upper end tibia -seven of GCT around the knee, radiologically either Campanacci Grade II, Grade II with pathological fracture or Grade III were included. Mean age was 25.6 years (range 19-30 years. Resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail ( n=5, resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail ( n=3 and resection arthrodesis with intercalary fibular autograft and simultaneous limb lengthening ( n=5 were the procedure performed. Results: Shortening was the major problem following resection arthrodesis with telescoping (shortening over intramedullary nail. Only two patients agreed for subsequent limb lengthening. The rest continued to walk with shortening. Infection was the major problem in all cases of resection arthrodesis with an intercalary allograft threaded over a long intramedullary nail and required multiple drainage procedures. Fusion was achieved after two years in two patients. In the third patient the allograft sequestrated. The patient underwent sequestrectomy, telescoping of fragments and ilizarov fixator application with subsequent limb lengthening. The patient was finally given an ischial weight relieving orthosis, 54 months after the index procedure. After resection arthrodesis with intercalary autograft and simultaneous lengthening the resultant gap (~15cm was partially bridged by intercalary nonvascularized dual fibular strut graft (6-7cm and additional corticocancellous bone graft from ipsilateral patella. Simultaneous limb lengthening with a distal tibial corticotomy was performed on an

  18. Etiopatogenia de la arteritis de células gigantes Etiopathogenesis of giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Casas

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available La arteritis de células gigantes es una vasculitis que afecta a arterias de diámetro medio y ancho, preferentemente aquellas del arco aórtico con distribución extracraneal, pero también la aorta y otras de sus ramas mayores. Se caracteriza por la presencia de infiltrados inflamatorios mononucleares en la proximidad de la lámina elástica interna constituidos por linfocitos y macrófagos, que en aproximadamente algo más del 50% de los casos contienen células gigantes multinucleadas. La morbilidad asociada a esta enfermedad se relaciona con fenómenos de isquemia distales a la estenosis luminal de las arterias inflamadas y en menor medida con la formación de aneurismas por el debilitamiento de la pared arterial. De etiología desconocida, su patogenia es inmune a través de la migración y localización de células T productoras de γ-INF en la capa adventicia de las arterias inflamadas, suponiéndose que éste es el lugar del estímulo inmune por un antígeno aún no identificado. El reclutamiento y activación de macrófagos por esta citocina constituye uno de los puntos más importantes de su patogenia. La destrucción por éstos del tejido elástico arterial es un fenómeno relevante, así como la producción de otros factores promotores de neoangiogénesis y proliferación de la neoíntima, responsable a través de la obliteración de la luz, de las manifestaciones isquémicas de la enfermedad. El proceso se acompaña de una importante repercusión sistémica caracterizada por una fuerte reacción de fase aguda y síntomas generales de enfermedad poco específicos. Por otra parte, un importante porcentaje de los pacientes presentan un cuadro de polimialgia reumática, entidad en histórica y controvertida relación con esta arteritis. En los últimos años se han producido importantes aportaciones al conocimiento de los mecanismos inmunes implicados en su patogenia.Giant cell arteritis is a vasculitis of large and medium size

  19. 17Beta-estradiol at low concentrations acts through distinct pathways in normal versus benign prostatic hyperplasia-derived prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Irwin I; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Victoria; Kozlowski, James M; Zhang, Ju; Lee, Chung

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differential responses to low concentrations of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in primary stromal cell cultures derived from either normal organ donors or benign prostatic hyperplasia or hypertrophy (BPH) specimens. Furthermore, we sought to identify the potential mechanism of E2 action in these cell types, through either a genomic or nongenomic mechanism. We initially treated stromal cells derived from five normal prostates or five BPH specimens with low concentrations of E2 (0.001-1.0 nM) and analyzed their growth response. To determine whether genomic or nongenomic pathways were involved, we performed studies using specific estrogen receptor antagonists to confirm transcriptional activity or MAPK inhibitors to confirm the involvement of rapid signaling. Results of these studies revealed a fundamental difference in the mechanism of the response to E2. In normal cells, we found that a nongenomic, rapid E2 signaling pathway is predominantly involved, mediated by G protein-coupled receptor-30 and the subsequent activation of ERK1/2. In BPH-derived prostate stromal cells, a genomic pathway is predominantly involved because the addition of ICI 182780 was sufficient to abrogate any estrogenic effects. In conclusion, prostate stromal cells respond to far lower concentrations of E2 than previously recognized or examined, and this response is mediated through two distinct mechanisms, depending on its origin. This may provide the basis for new insights into the causes of, and possible treatments for, BPH.

  20. RARE BENIGN EYELID TUMOR IN CHILDREN (EPITHELIOMA OF MALHERBE, PILOMATRIXOMA, OR TRICHELEMMOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ryabtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe clinical manifestations of rare eyelid tumor (epithelioma Malherbe and to improve differential diagnosis of benign eyelid tumors in children. Patients and methods. We observed 8 children aged 3,5‑8 years (sex ratio was 1:1. In all cases, examination, palpation, surgical excision of the tumor with histological examination were performed. Results. Trichilemmoma, or pilomatricoma, was suggested from clinical manifestations. Epithelioma Malherbe was diagnosed by histology only. Microscopically, the tumor is surrounded by a capsule which includes two cell types. Peripheral basophilic cells are small cells with poor cytoplasm, indistinct borders, and deeply basophilic nucleus. Central shadow cells have a distinct border and a central unstained area. Islands of small basaloid epithelial cells with squamous cell focuses and cornification are embedded in the stroma. Epithelial lesions are often necrotized. Epithelial mass is surrounded by granulations with giant cells. Osseous trabeculae are often adjacent to necrotic lesions. Further follow-up revealed no complications or recurrences. Conclusions. Our observations and literature data suggest that epithelioma Malherbe is occured in 1.3 % of benign eyelid tumors in childern. Tumor growth is slow and non-invasive. 

  1. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  2. CoCl2, a mimic of hypoxia, induces formation of polyploid giant cells with stem characteristics in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Lopez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs, while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47 and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer.

  3. 埃兹蛋白在骨巨细胞瘤中的表达及意义%Expression of Ezrin and its significance in giant-cell tumor of bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚骏; 李平生; 胡海波; 林伟龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect the expression of Ezrin in giant-cell tumor of bone,and to investigate its cilincal significance. Methods 60 cases of biopsy which had been confirmed as bone giant-cell tumors in our hospital from January 2008 to December 2013 were set as observation group;tumor tissues from 8 cases of reactive new bone in nonmalignant bone diseases,12 cases of osteoid osteoma and 11 cases of osteoblastoma in the corresponding period were set as control group. Protein and gene levels of Ezrin were tested with Western blotting method and real-time PCR detection,simultaneously proceeded the corresponding analysis combined with the clinical data of patients;60 cases of bone giant-cell tumor patients accepted tumor resection and pros-thesis replacement,2 courses of preoperative chemotherapy;mitochondria morphological changes of tumor tissue and Ezrin protein and genetic changes were observed before and after chemotherapy. Results In the giant-cell tumors of bone,the Ezrin protein mainly located in the cytoplasm,and its expression positive rate was much higher than that in reactive new bone of nonmalignant bone diseases(19. 7% ),osteoid osteoma(21. 2% )and osteoblastoma(20. 7% );the difference was statistically significant(χ2 = 4. 18,P = 0. 024),but no statistical difference in the Ezrin expression among the groups of osteosarcoma,osteoid osteoma and osteblastoma(χ2 =6. 18,P = 0. 087). In the giant-cell tumors of bone tissue after chemotherapy,mitochondria pyknosis and the phenomenon of liquid cavitation was less than that before the treatment,and Ezrin protein expression decreased and gene levels reduced[(23. 99 ± 1. 49)vs(20. 11 ± 1. 11),t = 5. 03,P = 0. 018)]. Conclusion The expression of Ezrin in giant-cell tumor of bone is much higher than other benign bone tumor,and it could be a biological marker for differentiating benign and malignant bone tumor. Early intervention in Ezrin may be helpful for reatment of giant-cell tumor of bone.%目的:检测埃兹

  4. Dendritic Cells and T Lymphocytes in the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. ten Berge (Bregje)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe history of sarcoidosis begins in 1899 when the Norwegian dermatologist Ceasar Boeck described nodular skin lesions characterized by epitheloid cells and a few giant cells as multiple benign sarcoid of the skin. Now, many years later, a lot more is known about sarcoidosis. The definit

  5. A Giant-Cell Lesion with Cellular Cannibalism in the Mandible: Case Report and Review of Brown Tumors in Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Lorenzo; Cimetti, Laura; Annoni, Matteo; Anselmi, Diego; Tettamanti, Lucia; Tagliabue, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    A small radiolucent area in the mandible was discovered in a 58-year-old woman with no oral complaints. The patient's history included only hypertension. The lesion was considered as an inflammatory cyst and was enucleated. Three months later, a CT revealed the presence of a cyst-like lesion in the mandible with thin expanded buccal cortical plate, localized erosion, and a polylobate appearance on the lingual aspect of the cortical plate. The histological diagnosis of the lesion was central giant-cell granuloma (CGCG). The lesion was thoroughly enucleated. Nevertheless, another X-ray carried out six months later revealed multiple bilateral osteolytic areas throughout the jaw. In addition, widespread cortical plate erosion was observed, as well as signs of root resorption and periodontal enlargement. There was no sign of neurological involvement, although the nerves appeared to be dislocated. After full blood chemistry analysis and detailed collection of radiographs, the final diagnosis was brown tumors in primary hyperparathyroidism. This case report demonstrates how dental clinicians may be the first-line specialists who identify a complex systemic disease before other clinicians. Finally, it highlights the role of cellular cannibalism in predicting the clinical aggressiveness of brown tumors as well as in other giant-cell lesions.

  6. Imaging in a case of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in foot: A case report with re-view of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Patnaik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Large sized Giant cell tumors (GCT of the tendon sheaths of the foot are rare. We present a case with a large tumor over the dor-sum of foot which was diagnosed and studied by plain radiog-raphy, Ultrasound, CT and MRI scans. It was histologically con-firmed on biopsy. When the size of the tumor (like Giant cell tu-mor is too large and spread over multiple bones of the foot MRI is the imaging modality of choice to precisely define the anatomy to help in taking surgical decisions.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the metatarsal bone: case report and review of the literature; Tumor de celulas gigantes do metatarso: relato de caso e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites Filho, Paulo R.; Escuissato, Dante L. [Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia]. E-mail: danteluiz@onda.com.br; Urban, Linei A.B.D. [DAPI - Diagnostico Avancado por Imagem, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Gasparetto, Taisa P. Davaus [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Sakamoto, Danielle; Ioshii, Sergio [Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Anatomia Patologica; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2007-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare neoplasm and account for 5% of all primary bone tumors. It is common in the knee and wrist, but rare in the small bones of the foot. The authors report a 32-year old male patient presented with a four-month history of right foot pain. Plain radiographs showed an expansive lytic lesion involving the first right metatarsal bone. Computed tomography scan demonstrated a radiolucent lesion with well-defined borders. Biopsy was performed and the histological diagnostic was giant cell tumor. The authors emphasize the correlation between the imaging and histological findings. (author)

  8. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and persistent hyperamylasemia as a presentation of pancreatic osteoclastic giant cell tumor: an unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rampurwala, Murtuza; Rai, Mridula; Golioto, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of the pancreas are rare neoplasms divided into three forms: osteoclastic, pleomorphic, and mixed. We report an unusual case of a 62-year-old male presenting with recurrent acute pancreatitis and found to have a mass in the head of the pancreas on routine imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a main pancreatic duct stricture, with brush cytology revealing the diagnosis of osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas. Whipple's procedure was successfully performed for resection of this tumor. and IAP.

  9. Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    We review the interior structure and evolution of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and giant exoplanets with particular emphasis on constraining their global composition. Compared to the first edition of this review, we provide a new discussion of the atmospheric compositions of the solar system giant planets, we discuss the discovery of oscillations of Jupiter and Saturn, the significant improvements in our understanding of the behavior of material at high pressures and the consequences for interior and evolution models. We place the giant planets in our Solar System in context with the trends seen for exoplanets.

  10. Heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to Brucella invasion into trophoblast giant cells that cause infectious abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuoka Hidefumi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell tropism of Brucella abortus, a causative agent of brucellosis and facultative intracellular pathogen, in the placenta is thought to be a key event of infectious abortion, although the molecular mechanism for this is largely unknown. There is a higher degree of bacterial colonization in the placenta than in other organs and many bacteria are detected in trophoblast giant (TG cells in the placenta. In the present study, we investigated mechanism of B. abortus invasion into TG cells. Results We observed internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in cultured TG cells. A monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial internalization was isolated and this reacted with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70. Depletion and over expression of Hsc70 in TG cells inhibited and promoted bacterial internalization, respectively. IFN-γ receptor was expressed in TG cells and IFN-γ treatment enhanced the uptake of bacteria by TG cells. Administering the anti-Hsc70 antibody to pregnant mice served to prevent infectious abortion. Conclusion B. abortus infection of TG cells in placenta is mediated by Hsc70, and that such infection leads to infectious abortion.

  11. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  12. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  13. Granuloma gigantocelular central del maxilar inferior: Presentación de un caso pediátrico Giant cell granuloma of the lower jaw: Description of a pediatric case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Grees

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El granuloma gigantocelular central (GGCC, es una lesión tumoral o seudotumoral, infrecuente de los huesos de la cabeza y cuello, que afecta más frecuentemente los maxilares. Su etiología y patogenia son poco conocidas, sus características histológicas son benignas y su comportamiento biológico puede ser agresivo localmente. Presentamos el caso de un niño de 6 años con esta afección y realizamos una revisión de la entidad y sus diagnósticos diferenciales con otras lesiones de los maxilares.Giant Cell Granuloma (GCG is an uncommon condition affecting the bones of the head and neck. The ethiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. The histlogic characteristics of GCG are benign, but its biologic behavior could locally aggressive. We describe the case of a 6 year-old boy with GCG and performed a review of the entity ant their differential diagnosis with other lesions of the maxillary bones.

  14. GIANT LIPOMA OF THE SPERMATIC CORD: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma is a common soft tissue benign tumor. Lipomas of the spermatic cord are rare. We present here a case of giant lipoma of the spermatic cord presented as an irreducible inguinal hernia and its surgical management. The giant lipoma was completely excised and removed in toto. Giant lipoma of the spermatic cord is a large, irreducible, complete, sac-less and indirect fatty inguinal hernia. So, to avoid medico-legal consequences, giant lipoma of the spermatic cord should also be considered as hernias. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(2.000: 170-171

  15. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation. Tumor de celulas gigantes localizado en la columna dorsal: presentacion radiologica poco frecuente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Echeverria, M.A.; Parra Blanco, J.A.; Pagola Serrano, M.A.; Mellado Santos, J.M.; Bueno Lopez, J.; Gonzalez Tutor, A. (Hospital Marques Valdecilla. Santander (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  16. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Carmona, F.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castaneda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jose; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; Francisca Gonzalez-Escribano, M.; Ortiz-Fernandez, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narvaez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, Jose A.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schoenau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Oyvind; Molberg, Oyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip a

  17. Clinicopathological Features of a Series of 27 Cases of Post-Denosumab Treated Giant Cell Tumors of Bones: A Single Institutional Experience at a Tertiary Cancer Referral Centre, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhi, Bharat; Verma, Vivek; Gulia, Ashish; Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Desai, Subhash; Juvekar, Shashikant L; Bajpai, Jyoti; Puri, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is mostly a benign tumor, but associated with recurrences and metastasis. Lately, denosumab is being utilized in the treatment of certain GCTBs. Twenty-seven tumors, analyzed in the present study, occurred in 16 males and 11 females (M: F = 1.45:1), in the age-range of 16 to 47 years (mean = 29.5, median = 29). Most tumors were identified in the tibia(6) and femur(6), followed by the humerus(3), radius(3), pelvis(3), fibula(3), sacrum(1), metacarpal(1) and metatarsal(1) bones. There were 18(66.6 %) primary and 9(33.3 %) recurrent tumors. Exact tumor size (19 cases) varied from 3.7 to 15 cm (mean = 7.8, median = 6.4). Eight of the 19 tumors (42.1 %) had size more than or equal to 8 cm. On histopathologic examination of post-denosumab treated specimens, more than half cases (15)(55.5 %) revealed complete absence of osteoclast-like giant cells (OCLGs) and 12 cases revealed residual OCLGCs. In addition, there was replacement by fibro-osseous tissue, including reactive woven bone or osteoid in most cases, followed by variable amount of spindle cells, hyalinisation, fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. Post-treatment follow-up (25 cases, 92.5 %), over 7-27 months duration (median = 18), revealed 20 cases continuously disease-free. Five patients developed recurrences at 9, 12, 13, 14 and 18 months, respectively. Out of these, who underwent repeat surgical intervention, 4 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and a single patient, planned for a second surgery, is alive-with-disease. Denosumab was mostly offered to patients with large sized, borderline salvageable tumors, in order to decrease the morbidity of index surgical procedure, that led to disappearance of OCLGCs in most cases. Post-denosumab treated GCT cases appear as low grade osteosarcomas on histopathologic examination, but lack the clinical behaviour of an osteosarcoma, therefore may be

  18. Differentiation of benign and malignant skeletal lesions with quantitative diffusion weighted MRI at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani, E-mail: sahlawa1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology & Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD 21287 (United States); Khandheria, Paras, E-mail: pkhandh1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology & Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD 21287 (United States); Subhawong, Ty K., E-mail: TSubhawong@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiology (R-109), University of Miami Leonard M. Miller Miami, FL 33101 (United States); Fayad, Laura M., E-mail: lfayad1@jhmi.edu [The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology & Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD 21287 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • DWI may have predictive value for the characterization of bone lesions. • Benign lesions have higher minimum, and mean ADC values than malignancies. • Minimum ADC has the highest accuracy in discerning benign from malignant lesion. • Minimum ADC of 0.9 × 10. • All ADC measurements were made with high inter-observer concordance. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the accuracy of quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping for characterizing bone lesions as benign or malignant. Methods: At 3 T, 31 subjects with intramedullary lesions imaged by DWI (b-values 50, 400, 800 s/mm{sup 2}) were included. ADC values (minimum, mean, maximum) were recorded by three observers independently. Interobserver variability and differences between ADC values in benign and malignant lesions were assessed (unpaired t-test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis). Results: Of 31 lesions, 18 were benign (osteoblastic (n = 1), chondroid (n = 6), cysts (n = 4), hemangiomatosis (n = 1), fibrous (n = 3), eosinophilic granuloma (n = 1), giant cell tumor (n = 1), osteomyelitis (n = 1)) and 13 were malignant (primary (n = 5), metastases (n = 8)). Overall, there were higher minimum (1.27 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs 0.68 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.001), mean (1.68 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs 1.13 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.001), and maximum (2.09 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs 1. 7 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 0.03). ADC values in benign lesions compared with those in malignancies. ROC analysis revealed areas under the curve for minimum, mean, and maximum ADC values of 0.91, 0.85, and 0.71, respectively. ADC measurements were made with high inter-observer concordance (ρ = 0.83–0.96). Conclusion: Quantitative ADC maps may have predictive value for the characterization of bone lesions. Benign lesions generally have higher minimum, mean, and maximum ADC values than malignancies, with the

  19. Lethal giant larvae 1 tumour suppressor activity is not conserved in models of mammalian T and B cell leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin D Hawkins

    Full Text Available In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1⁻/⁻ mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...

  1. Limb Preservation in Recurrent Giant Cell Tumour of Distal End of Radius with Fibular Graft Fracture: Role of Ulnocarpal Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narinder

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of distal radius are locally aggressive tumors with a high rate of recurrence. Though surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, reconstruction remains a challenge in cases of recurrence. Recurrences of GCT in autogenous fibular grafts have been rarely reported and pathological fractures through such grafts are even rarer. Ulnocarpal arthrodesis has never been described as a limb preservation procedure in such a recurrent lesion in distal radius with pathological fracture through a well incorporated fibular graft. A case of pathological fracture in a well incorporated autogenous non-vascularized fibular bone graft in recurrent GCT of distal radius and its successful management with ulnocarpal arthrodesis is reported. In such a scenario where other reconstructive options like allograft or prosthetic reconstructions are not likely to succeed, ulnocarpal arthrodesis may be considered as a salvage procedure.

  2. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  3. Increased tissue leptin hormone level and mast cell count in skin tags: A possible role of adipoimmune in the growth of benign skin growths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Safoury Omar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags (ST are common tumors. They mainly consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Decrease in endocrine, hormone level and other factors are thought to play a role in the evolution of ST. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that acts as a major regulatory hormone for food intake and energy homeostasis. Leptin deficiency or resistance can result in profound obesity and diabetes in humans. A role of mast cell in the pathogenesis of ST is well recognized. Aims: To investigate the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of ST and to clarify whether there is a correlation between mast cell count and leptin level in ST. Methods: Forty-five skin biopsies were taken from 15 patients with ST. From each patient, a biopsy of a large ST (length >4 mm, a small ST (length <2 mm and a normal skin biopsy (as a control were taken. The samples were processed for leptin level. Skin biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue-uranyl nitrate metachromatic method for mast cell count was used. Results: There was a significant increased level of leptin in the ST compared to the normal skin. It was highly significant in small ST than in big ST (P = 0.0001 and it was highly significant in small and big ST compared to controls, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively. There was a significant increase in mast cell count in the ST, which did not correlate with the increased levels of leptin. Conclusion: This is the first report to demonstrate that tissue leptin may play a role in the pathogenesis of ST. The significant increase in the levels of leptin and mast cell count in ST may indicate a possible role of adipoimmune in the benign skin growths.

  4. Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa Varma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous histiocytomas (FHs are mesenchymal tumors that may be benign or malignant. Ocular involvement by FHs is infrequent and primarily limited to the orbit. Rarely, FHs can also involve the conjunctiva and perilimbal area. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with lid, conjunctival, and neck FHs. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology.

  5. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate gets bigger, it may press on the urethra and cause the flow of urine to be slower and less forceful. "Benign" means the enlargement isn't caused by cancer or infection. "Hyperplasia" means enlargement. SymptomsWhat are the ...

  6. Nanoencapsulated anti-CK2 small molecule drug or siRNA specifically targets malignant cancer but not benign cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembley, Janeen H; Unger, Gretchen M; Korman, Vicci L; Tobolt, Diane K; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Kren, Betsy T; Ahmed, Khalil

    2012-02-01

    CK2, a pleiotropic Ser/Thr kinase, is an important target for cancer therapy. We tested our novel tenfibgen-based nanocapsule for delivery of the inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) and an siRNA directed against both CK2α and α' catalytic subunits to prostate cancer cells. We present data on the TBG nanocapsule itself and on CK2 inhibition or downregulation in treated cells, including effects on Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65. By direct comparison of two CK2-directed cargos, our data provide proof that the TBG encapsulation design for delivery of drugs specifically to cancer cells has strong potential for small molecule- and nucleic acid-based cancer therapy.

  7. Giant insulinoma in a 15-year-old man: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasin Vasikasin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We report the youngest case of a giant insulinoma. Despite the size of the tumor, the pathological report confirmed the benign characteristics. However, long-term follow-up is still essential to detect recurrence in the future.

  8. A pre-pubertal girl with giant juvenile fibroadenoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Through this case we want to emphasize that these giant benign neoplasms should be suspected in any pre-pubertal girl with breast lump and should always be treated with breast conserving surgery.

  9. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, P.N.; Sjoegren, U.K.; Krey, G.; Sundqvist, G. (Dental Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe x-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  10. Giant lens, a gene involved in cell determination and axon guidance in the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, D; Brunner, A; Wiersdorff, V; Pflugfelder, G O; Heisenberg, M; Schneuwly, S

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila gene giant lens (gil) affect ommatidial development, photoreceptor axon guidance and optic lobe development. We have cloned the gene using an enhancer trap line. Molecular analysis of gil suggests that it encodes a secreted protein with an epidermal-growth-factor-like motif. We have generated mutations at the gil locus by imprecise excision of the enhancer trap P-element. In the absence of gil, additional photoreceptors develop at the expense of pigment cells, suggesting an involvement of gil in cell determination during eye development. In addition, gil mutants show drastic effects on photoreceptor axon guidance and optic lobe development. In wildtype flies, photoreceptor axons grow from the eye disc through the optic stalk into the larval brain hemisphere, where retinal innervation is required for the normal development of the lamina and distal medulla. The projection pattern of these axons in the developing lamina and medulla is highly regular and reproducible. In gil, photoreceptor axons enter the larval brain but fail to establish proper connections in the lamina or medulla. We propose that gil encodes a new type of signalling molecule involved in the process of axon pathfinding and cell determination in the visual system of Drosophila. Images PMID:1628618

  11. Electron microscopy and computational studies of Ebh, a giant cell-wall-associated protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Sou; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Isao; Takei, Toshiaki; Yu, Jian; Kuroda, Makoto; Yao, Min; Ohta, Toshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-11-14

    Ebh, a giant protein found in staphylococci, contains several domains, including a large central region with 52 imperfect repeats of a domain composed of 126 amino acids. We used electron microscopy to observe the rod-like structure of a partial Ebh protein containing 10 repeating units. This is the first report of the direct observation of an Ebh structure containing a large number of repeating units, although structures containing one, two, or four repeating units have been reported. The observed structure of the partial Ebh protein was distorted and had a length of ca. 520A and a width of ca. 21A. The observed structures were consistent with those deduced from crystal structure analysis, suggesting that the Ebh domains are connected to form a rod-like structure. The crystal structure data revealed distorted, string-like features in the simulated structure of the whole-length Ebh protein. Superposition of fragments of the simulated whole-length structure of the Ebh protein onto each electron micrograph showed a high level of correlation between the observed and calculated structures. These results suggest that Ebh is composed of highly flexible filate molecules. The highly repetitive structure and the associated unique structural flexibility of Ebh support the proposed function of this protein, i.e. binding to sugars in the cell wall. This binding might result in intra-cell-wall cross-linking that contributes to the rigidity of bacterial cells.

  12. Metachronous multicentric giant-cell tumor of the bone in the lower limb. Case report and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Marc-Antoine; Handra-Luca, Adriana; Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Catonné, Yves; Saillant, Gérard

    2004-07-01

    Multicentric giant-cell tumors of the bone (GCTs) are rare. Little is known about the mechanisms by which these tumors spread and how 1% of GCT turn out to be multicentric. We report the case of a 19-year-old woman with metachronous multiple and recurrent GCTs that were unusual in their pattern of progression along the right lower limb over a 23-year period. Histology showed no evidence of malignant transformation. The treatment was repeated curettage and packing with cement. This did not permit a wide surgical margin, but avoided amputation and preserved full limb function. We tested the proliferation index marker Ki-67 in the tumor specimens. Ki-67 expression was limited to the mononuclear cell component of the tumors. The proliferation index was similar in each new tumor and higher in recurrences for each location. In this case, proliferation was initially low in the new tumor location, despite the time difference and independent from the initial clone evolution. Proliferation index increased in recurrent GCTs after marginal margin resection.

  13. Giant Accessory Right-Sided Suprarenal Spleen in Thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An accessory spleen is defined as ectopic splenic tissue that develops due to failure of fusion of cells during embryonic development as they migrate from the midline to the left upper quadrant. While benign, complications may arise which include trauma, torsion, or infarction of the ectopic tissue. Additionally, patients who have had a splenectomy secondary to treatment for previous pathology such as a haematological malignancy or idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura may experience persistent symptoms due to the accessory splenic tissue. The presence of an accessory spleen is therefore of significant diagnostic and therapeutic importance. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this case is the second and largest reported case of a giant right suprarenal accessory spleen and highlights the difficulty in differentiation of these masses from malignant adrenal tumours.

  14. A CYTOLOGICALLY DIAGNOSED CASE OF GIANT FIBROADENOMA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metta Raja Gopal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumors which occur most frequently in child bearing age with 68% occurrence in adolescents. Giant fibroadenomas are uncommon variants of fibroadenomas usually presenting in adolescents characterized by massive and rapid enlargement of bre ast tissue which may be quite alarming to the young girls. We present a case of giant fibroadenoma diagnosed by FNAC in the 14 yr adolescent who presented with large unilateral left breast enlargement which grew rapidly over a period of 10 months.

  15. Research progress of the relationship between age and prognosis of giant cell tumors of the spine%年龄与脊柱骨巨细胞瘤预后关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇鸣; 韦峰; 刘忠军

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumors ( GCT ) are benign but locally aggressive with a relatively high recurrence rate. Some previous literatures about GCT reported that the postoperative recurrence rate varied in different age groups of patients and indicated that age might be an important factor affecting the biological behaviour and prognosis of GCT. However, the previous studies mainly focused on the cases of GCT of the whole body, and the relationship between age and prognosis of GCT of the spine was not clearly illustrated. GCT of the spine are relatively rare. So far, there has been no large series of cases documented. The existing small series of cases report about GCT of the spine at home and abroad were reviewed in this article and the effects of age on the prognosis of GCT of the spine were analyzed, including the postoperative recurrence rate, iconography, pathology and micro cytokines. According to the existing literatures, the recurrence rate in young patients is relatively low. Tumors in young patients are less likely to invade more than one vertebral level or to involve both the anterior and posterior structures of the vertebral body. Histologically, cellular atypia and mitosis are less common in spindle-like stromal cells of youth patients. As to the cytokines, the ratios of serum ligand of receptor activator of NF-κB ( RANKL ) and osteoprotegerin ( OPG ) are lower in young patients. It is indicated that age appears to be associated with the recurrence rate of GCT of the spine. Young patients tend to have a better prognosis. However, larger series of cases report are needed to demonstrate this conclusion in the future.

  16. The Role of 3 Tesla Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign versus Malignant Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Flavio Barchetti; Nicola Pranno; Guglielmo Giraldi; Alessandro Sartori; Silvia Gigli; Giovanni Barchetti; Luigi Lo Mele; Luigi Tonino Marsella

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to validate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 Tesla in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant laterocervical lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods. Before undergoing surgery, 80 patients, with biopsy proven HNSCC, underwent a magnetic resonance exam. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Spe) of conventional criteria and DWI in detecting laterocervical lymph node metas...

  17. Giant Uterine Fibromyoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahiluma Santana Pedraza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The uterus is the common site for multiple benign and malignant conditions. Giant uterine fibromyoma is a benign tumor of low incidence. Its management poses a challenge for the surgical team because of the volume of the surgical specimen and the variations in the distribution of intra-abdominal organs caused by uterine growth. A case of a 43-year-old patient with a history of bronchial asthma and hypertension who presented with enlargement of the abdomen and vaginal bleeding is reported. The patient was attended by the General Surgery Department of the María Genoveva Guerrero Ramos Comprehensive Diagnostic Center in the Libertador Municipality, Capital District, Venezuela. Total abdominal hysterectomy and complementary appendectomy were performed. The histopathological study showed a giant uterine fibromyoma. Postoperative progress was satisfactory. It was decided to present the case due to its rarity.

  18. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers.

  19. A case of giant prostatic hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Wang; Paul Davis; Kevin McMillan

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common conditions experienced by aging males and a frequent cause of bladder outlet obstruction and macroscopic haematuria. Giant prostatic hyperplasia (GPH) is an extremely rare form of prostatic hyperplasia. We present a case of a patient with GPH of 800 mL. To our knowledge, this is the fourth largest prostatic hyperplasia ever reported in the literature.

  20. Giant Myoepithelioma of the Soft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oktay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoepitheliomas are benign salivary gland tumors and account for less than 1% of all salivary gland tumors. They are usually located in the parotid gland. The soft palate is very rare affected site. The differential diagnosis of myoepitheliomas should include reactive and neoplastic lesions. The treatment of myoepitheliomas is complete removal of the tumor. Herein, we report a case with giant myoepithelioma of the soft palate, reviewing the related literature.

  1. A case of giant prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is one of the most common conditions experienced by aging males and a frequent cause of bladder outlet obstruction and macroscopic haematuria. Giant prostatic hyperplasia (GPH is an extremely rare form of prostatic hyperplasia. We present a case of a patient with GPH of 800 mL. To our knowledge, this is the fourth largest prostatic hyperplasia ever reported in the literature.

  2. MicroRNAs as Predictive and Prognostic Biomarkers inHuman Neoplasia: With Specific Focus on Colorectal Cancer, Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, and Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Mosakhani, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Recently, discovery of microRNA has provided new insights into cancer research, revealing the role of miRNAs in various biological processes, and evidence shows that their deregulation in many cancers has prognostic and predictive significance. Although specific miRNAs have been discovered in the malignancies studied in this thesis: colorectal cancer (CRC), giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), very little still is known about t...

  3. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  4. Benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, F; Caputo, R; Ermacora, E; Gianni, E

    1986-09-01

    Benign cephalic histiocytosis is a self-healing non-X, nonlipid cutaneous histiocytosis of children, characterized by a papular eruption on the head. Mucous membranes and viscera are always spared. In the 13 cases reported herein, the children were otherwise in good general health. The disease appeared during the first three years of life, and spontaneous regression was complete by the age of nine years in the four cases healed to date. The histiocytic infiltrate was localized in the upper and middle dermis and contained no lipids at any stage of evolution. All the histiocytes contained coated vesicles, and 5% to 30% also contained comma-shaped bodies in their cytoplasm.

  5. Mieloma múltiple y arteritis de células gigantes sin amiloidosis Simultaneous multiple myeloma and giant cell arteritis without systemic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara C. Finn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La amiloidosis sistémica primaria y el mieloma múltiple con amiloidosis primaria se han presentado con características clínicas e histopatológicas que simulan una arteritis de células gigantes. Hasta el momento la asociación se basaba en el rol antigénico del depósito de amiloide sobre las arterias, desencadenando la respuesta inmune que finaliza con una arteritis. Presentamos el primer caso en la literatura de un paciente con mieloma múltiple y arteritis de células gigantes sin amiloidosis sistémica, sugiriendo una relación patogénica entre estas dos entidades. En el caso de nuestro paciente se descartó la presencia de amiloide en la pared arterial, por lo que proponemos que el estímulo para el desarrollo de la arteritis podría ser una excesiva producción de interleuquina 6 fabricada por las células mielomatosas.Primary systemic amyloidosis with clinical and histopathologic features of giant cell arteritis has already been described. The association of multiple myeloma (with primary amyloidosis and giant cell arteritis is also known. We present the first case in the literature of a patient with multiple myeloma and giant cell arteritis without systemic amyloidosis, suggesting a pathogenic relationship between the two diseases.

  6. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or medical history, but the habit of picking his teeth and “poking” the gingiva. The oral lesion consisted of an asymptomatic, rounded, pink colored, smooth surface, soft tissue injury with fibrous consistency and approximated size of 1.5 cm located in the attached gingiva between the upper left permanent lateral incisor and the primary canine of the same side. Excisional biopsy was performed through curettage and removal of the periosteum, periodontal ligament, and curettage of the involved teeth with vestibular access. The histopathological analysis led to the diagnosis of PGCG. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the PGCG resulted in a more conservative surgery and a reduced risk for tooth and bone loss and recurrence of the lesion. After four years of control, patient had no relapse of the lesion and good gingival and osseous health.

  7. Venous Thromboembolism and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Alberto Lo Gullo

    Full Text Available To investigate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE and cerebrovascular events in a community-based incidence cohort of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA compared to the general population.A population-based inception cohort of patients with incident GCA between January 1, 1950 and December 31, 2009 in Olmsted County, Minnesota and a cohort of non-GCA subjects from the same population were assembled and followed until December 31, 2013. Confirmed VTE and cerebrovascular events were identified through direct medical record review.The study population included 244 patients with GCA with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 76.2 ± 8.2 years (79% women and an average length of follow-up of 10.2 ± 6.8 years. Compared to non-GCA subjects of similar age and sex, patients diagnosed with GCA had a higher incidence (% of amaurosis fugax (cumulative incidence ± SE: 2.1 ± 0.9 versus 0, respectively; p = 0.014 but similar rates of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and VTE. Among patients with GCA, neither baseline characteristics nor laboratory parameters at diagnosis reliably predicted risk of VTE or cerebrovascular events.In this population-based study, the incidence of VTE, stroke and TIA was similar in patients with GCA compared to non-GCA subjects.

  8. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child Associated with Ectopic Eruption and Traumatic Habit with Control of Four Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Cristhiane Almeida; Anhesini, Brunna Haddad; Aguilera, Jéssica Marques Gomes da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a nonneoplastic lesion that may affect any region of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa of edentulous and toothed areas, preferentially in the mandible and rarely occurring in children. This report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of a PGCG diagnosed in the maxilla of a 9-year-old boy associated with a tooth erupting improperly and a traumatic habit. The patient did not present anything noteworthy on extraoral physical examination or medical history, but the habit of picking his teeth and “poking” the gingiva. The oral lesion consisted of an asymptomatic, rounded, pink colored, smooth surface, soft tissue injury with fibrous consistency and approximated size of 1.5 cm located in the attached gingiva between the upper left permanent lateral incisor and the primary canine of the same side. Excisional biopsy was performed through curettage and removal of the periosteum, periodontal ligament, and curettage of the involved teeth with vestibular access. The histopathological analysis led to the diagnosis of PGCG. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of the PGCG resulted in a more conservative surgery and a reduced risk for tooth and bone loss and recurrence of the lesion. After four years of control, patient had no relapse of the lesion and good gingival and osseous health. PMID:27999690

  9. Features and treatment of recurrent giant cell tumor of limbs%肢体骨巨细胞瘤复发特征与治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦永中; 刘沛

    2001-01-01

    目的总结肢体骨巨细胞瘤复发特征及治疗措施。方法随访复发性肢体骨巨细胞瘤30例,对其临床表现、影像学特征、病理及治疗方法进行回顾性分析。结果复发病例大多为病灶刮除术后,3年内复发占73.33%。其中有症状者26例,以局部疼痛、肿胀为主;无症状者4例。影像学主要表现为局部植骨吸收,出现不规则密度减低区,病变范围扩大。组织学检查27例复发后仍呈良性,3例恶变。复发后治疗:早期病例行再次病灶清除植骨术17例,其中再复发3例;行瘤段切除关节置换4例、关节融合术3例、截肢术6例,均未再复发。结论定期随访可以早期发现病灶;早期病例可采用彻底的病灶清除加植骨术,晚期病例可采用瘤段切除人工关节置换或截肢等手术。%Objective To summarize the features and treatment of recurrent giant cell tumor(GCT) of limbs. Methods Clinical, radiological, pathological data and treatment of 30 cases of recurrent GCT of limb were analyzed. Results Most of the recurrent cases of GCT of limbs were 3 years after operation of curettage. 26 cases had clinical symptoms such as pain,swelling, 4 cases had no symptom. Most of the X-ray pictures showed that the bony graft was absorbed, the irregular low-density area formed, and the area of tumor enlarged. 27 cases showed benign and 3 cases malignant pathological change. 17 cases in all 30 cases were treated by the operation of curettage and bone grafting. Excision of bone tumor and artificial joint replacement in 4 cases, arthrodesis in 3 cases, amputation in 6 cases. Conclusion The regular follow-up must be conducted after first operation of GCT. Curettage of bone tumor and bone grafting can be considered for the early recurrent case. Excision of bone tumor and artificial joint replacemant or amputation will be performed in patients of late stage.

  10. Giant lipoma of posterior neck with bleeding decubitus ulcer: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Varma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours. They are found relatively rarely on the posterior part of the neck. Bleeding pressure ulcer in this giant tumour is a rare presentation. Surgical interventions in these tumours are very challenging because, sometimes, extension to the spinal cord and malignant change may occur, especially in old age. Knowledge of the anatomy and meticulous surgical techniques are needed for such giant lipomas.

  11. Baby STEPS: a giant leap for cell therapy in neonatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlongan, Cesar V; Weiss, Michael D

    2011-07-01

    We advance Baby STEPS or Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm in Stroke as a guide in facilitating the critical evaluation in the laboratory of the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for neonatal encephalopathy. The need to carefully consider the clinical relevance of the animal models in mimicking human neonatal brain injury, selection of the optimal stem cell donor, and the application of functional outcome assays in small and large animal models serve as the foundation for preclinical work and beginning to understand the mechanism of this cellular therapy. The preclinical studies will aid our formulation of a rigorous human clinical trial that encompasses not only efficacy testing but also monitoring of safety indices and demonstration of mechanisms of action. This schema forms the basis of Baby STEPS. Our goal is to resonate the urgent call to enhance the successful translation of cell therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  12. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  13. Giant renal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by rupture of renal angiomyolipoma following pregnancy: Endovascular treatment and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkay S Idilman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal angiomyolipoma is a hamartomatous, benign tumor composed of blood vessels, fatty tissue and smooth muscle cells, and is often detected incidentally. It can also be associated with the tuberous-sclerosis complex (TSC. Pregnancy and use of oral contraceptives are known to be associated with an increased risk of tumoral rupture and bleeding. Herein, we report a unique case of renal angiomyolipoma associated with TSC who presented with hypovolemic shock as a result of spontaneous rupture of a giant renal pseudoaneurysm, immediately after pregnancy. Emergency endovascular treatment was successful with sparing of most of the affected kidney as demonstrated by follow-up computed tomography imaging.

  14. Giant Uterine Leiomyoma. A Case Report

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    Luis Noel Marrero Quiala

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant uterine fibromyoma is a benign condition which has a very low incidence. Its management poses a challenge for the surgical team due to the volume of the surgical specimen and the variations in the distribution of the intra-abdominal organs caused by the uterine growth. The case of a 29-year-old patient misdiagnosed with giant hepatomegaly at admission is presented. Her symptoms included hard abdomen and feeling of heaviness. Successful completion of the interview, physical examination and imaging studies led to the correct diagnosis of giant uterine fibromyoma. Surgical treatment was applied. A total abdominal hysterectomy was performed with satisfactory results. This case is presented to the medical community for teaching purposes and due to its rarity.

  15. Urokinase receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) is expressed in connection with malignant as well as benign lesions of the human breast and occurs in specific populations of stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnack Nielsen, Boye; Rank, Fritz; Engelholm, Lars H;

    2002-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor (uPAR) are key components in the plasminogen activation system, serving to promote specific events of extracellular matrix degradation in connection with tissue remodeling and cancer invasion. We recently described a new uPAR-ass...... lesions. Whereas the normal breast tissue was uPARAP-negative, all benign lesions and ductal carcinoma in situ lesions showed immunoreactivity in fibroblast-like cells and myoepithelial cells associated with the lesion. In invasive carcinoma, uPARAP immunoreactivity was limited to tumor...

  16. MR imaging of benign soft-tissue masses of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llauger, J; Palmer, J; Monill, J M; Franquet, T; Bagué, S; Rosón, N

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 75% of all biopsy-proved soft-tissue masses of the foot and ankle are benign tumors or nontumoral lesions representing a variety of histologic types. In some cases, it may be difficult if not impossible to identify the lesion; however, careful analysis of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings and correlation of these findings with the patient's clinical history can usually suggest a more specific diagnosis, particularly in the most common benign tumors of the foot (e.g., fibromatosis, cavernous hemangioma) and in nonneoplastic soft-tissue lesions such as Morton neuroma, ganglion cyst, and plantar fasciitis. In addition, a specific diagnosis can almost always be made in patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) or giant cell tumor (GCT) of the tendon sheath. The MR imaging appearance of PVNS consists of multiple synovial lesions with low or intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted and gradient-echo images. GCTs of the tendon sheath usually have areas of low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images due to the paramagnetic effect of hemosiderin. Awareness and understanding of the underlying pathologic findings in lesions of the foot and ankle aid in MR imaging interpretation.

  17. Imaging of benign and malignant soft tissue masses of the foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Rechl, Hans [Department of Orthopedics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The foot is a relatively uncommon site of neoplastic and non-neoplastic soft tissue tumors. Although it contains a relatively small amount of somatic soft tissue elements, the foot is considerably rich in tendons, fasciae, retinaculae, and synovium. Corresponding to this distribution of soft tissue elements, some soft tissue lesions, such as giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, fibromatosis, and synovial sarcoma, are commonly seen in this location. Vascular tumors represent common soft tissue masses of the foot as well. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice in the assessment of soft tissue tumors. The presence of a suspected lesion can be confirmed and tumor margins can be defined accurately. In general, MRI does not provide histologic specificity, but considering some MR features may often help in correctly distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. In addition, characteristic features of the most common benign tumors (i.e., fibromatosis, cavernous hemangioma) and reactive processes of the foot (ganglion cyst, Morton's neuroma) often suggest a specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic guidelines and treatment of benign bone tumors; Diagnostisch-therapeutisches Vorgehen bei gutartigen Knochentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominkus, M.; Krepler, P.; Schwameis, E.; Kotz, R. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Orthopaedische Klinik

    2001-07-01

    The indications of surgical treatment of benigne bone tumours are strongly related to the clinical behaviour, the patient's complaints and the activity in Tc-bone scan. Some lesions - like the nonossifying fibroma - that can safely be diagnosed by conventional X-rays may not be treated surgically - as long as the patients are free of pain, and there is no risk of pathologic fracture. In case of clinically relevant lesions, activity in Tc-bone scan, or a risk of fracture, biopsy and curettage combined with autologous or homologous bone grafting is indicated. Some aggressive tumors, like the giant cell tumor, have to be treated more aggressively by curettage with adjuvant measures (Phenole) or by marginal excision. (orig.) [German] Die Indikation zur operativen Sanierung benigner Knochentumoren richtet sich nach ihrem klinischen Verhalten, dem Beschwerdebild des Patienten, und der Aktivitaet im Knochenscan. Generell koennen klinisch stumme Laesionen wie das NOF beobachtet werden, waehrend Laesionen die entweder klinische Beschwerden verursachen, im Knochenscan speichern, oder aufgrund ihrer Ausdehnung eine Frakturgefahr darstellen, entsprechend den angegebenen Richtlinien abgeklaert und behandelt werden sollen. (orig.)

  19. Differential expression of the metastasis suppressor KAI1 in decidual cells and trophoblast giant cells at the feto-maternal interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Bon Koo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of trophoblasts into maternal uterine tissue is essentialfor establishing mature feto-maternal circulation. The trophoblastinvasion associated with placentation is similar to tumorinvasion. In this study, we investigated the role of KAI1, ananti-metastasis factor, at the maternal-fetal interface duringplacentation. Mouse embryos were obtained from gestationaldays 5.5 (E5.5 to E13.5. Immunohistochemical analysis revealedthat KAI1 was expressed on decidual cells around the trackmade when a fertilized ovum invaded the endometrium, at daysE5.5 and E7.5, and on trophoblast giant cells, along the centralmaternal artery of the placenta at E9.5. KAI1 in trophoblast giantcells was increased at E11.5, and then decreased at E13.5.Furthermore, KAI1 was upregulated during the forskolinmediatedtrophoblastic differentiation of BeWo cells. Collectively,these results indicate that KAI1 is differentially expressedin decidual cells and trophoblasts at the maternal-fetal interface,suggesting that KAI1 prevents trophoblast invasion duringplacentation. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(10: 507-512

  20. Serum markers associated with disease activity in giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Rutgers, Abraham; Horst, Gerda; Bijzet, Johan; Arends, Suzanne; Roffel, Mirjam P.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare multiple serum markers for their ability to detect active disease in patients with GCA and in those with PMR. Methods. Twenty-six markers related to immune cells that may be involved in GCA and PMR were determined by ELISA and multiplex assay in the serum of 24 newly diagnosed,

  1. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a common clinical disorder characterized by brief recurrent spells of vertigo often brought about by certain head position changes as may occur with looking up, turning over in bed, or straightening up after bending over. It is important to understand BPPV not only because it may avert expensive and often unnecessary testing, but also because treatment is rapid, easy, and effective in >90% of cases. The diagnosis of BPPV can be made based on the history and examination. Patients usually report episodes of spinning evoked by certain movements, such as lying back or getting out of bed, turning in bed, looking up, or straightening after bending over. At present, the generally accepted recurrence rate of BPPV after successful treatment is 40%-50% at 5 years of average follow-up. There does appear to be a subset of individuals prone to multiple recurrences.

  2. Inoperable metastatic giant basal cell trunk carcinoma: radiotherapy can be useful; Carcinome basocellulaire geant du tronc metastatique inoperable: la radiotherapie peut etre utile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, A.; Durando, X.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Barthelemy, I. [CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors evoke some characteristics of the basal cell carcinoma (slow evolution, local morbidity) and report and discuss the case of a giant basal cell trunk carcinoma, associated with several symptoms (pain, bleeding, anaemia), already metastatic at the moment of diagnosis, and locally treated by irradiation. Due to its size and expansion, this carcinoma was considered as inoperable. An external radiotherapy has been performed and resulted in a significant clinical tumour reduction. But the metastatic risk is high in such cases. Radiotherapy is then a therapeutic option for a local treatment with a durable efficiency. Short communication

  3. The Role of 3 Tesla Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign versus Malignant Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranno, Nicola; Sartori, Alessandro; Gigli, Silvia; Lo Mele, Luigi; Marsella, Luigi Tonino

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to validate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 Tesla in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant laterocervical lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods. Before undergoing surgery, 80 patients, with biopsy proven HNSCC, underwent a magnetic resonance exam. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Spe) of conventional criteria and DWI in detecting laterocervical lymph node metastases were calculated. Histological results from neck dissection were used as standard of reference. Results. In the 239 histologically proven metastatic lymphadenopathies, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was 0.903 × 10−3 mm2/sec. In the 412 pathologically confirmed benign lymph nodes, an average ADC value of 1.650 × 10−3 mm2/sec was found. For differentiating between benign versus metastatic lymph nodes, DWI showed Se of 97% and Spe of 93%, whereas morphological criteria displayed Se of 61% and Spe of 98%. DWI showed an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.964, while morphological criteria displayed an AUC of 0.715. Conclusions. In a DWI negative neck for malignant lymph nodes, the planned dissection could be converted to a wait-and-scan policy, whereas DWI positive neck would support the decision to perform a neck dissection. PMID:25003115

  4. The Role of 3 Tesla Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign versus Malignant Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Barchetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to validate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI at 3 Tesla in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant laterocervical lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Materials and Methods. Before undergoing surgery, 80 patients, with biopsy proven HNSCC, underwent a magnetic resonance exam. Sensitivity (Se and specificity (Spe of conventional criteria and DWI in detecting laterocervical lymph node metastases were calculated. Histological results from neck dissection were used as standard of reference. Results. In the 239 histologically proven metastatic lymphadenopathies, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value was 0.903 × 10−3 mm2/sec. In the 412 pathologically confirmed benign lymph nodes, an average ADC value of 1.650 × 10−3 mm2/sec was found. For differentiating between benign versus metastatic lymph nodes, DWI showed Se of 97% and Spe of 93%, whereas morphological criteria displayed Se of 61% and Spe of 98%. DWI showed an area under the ROC curve (AUC of 0.964, while morphological criteria displayed an AUC of 0.715. Conclusions. In a DWI negative neck for malignant lymph nodes, the planned dissection could be converted to a wait-and-scan policy, whereas DWI positive neck would support the decision to perform a neck dissection.

  5. Giant photocurrent enhancement by transition metal doping in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Pimachev, Artem K.; Yost, Andrew J.; Poudyal, Uma; Maloney, Scott; Wang, Wenyong; Chien, TeYu; Dahnovsky, Yuri; Tang, Jinke

    2016-09-01

    A huge enhancement in the incident photon-to-current efficiency of PbS quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells by manganese doping is observed. In the presence of Mn dopants with relatively small concentration (4 at. %), the photoelectric current increases by an average of 300% (up to 700%). This effect cannot be explained by the light absorption mechanism because both the experimental and theoretical absorption spectra demonstrate several times decreases in the absorption coefficient. To explain such dramatic increase in the photocurrent we propose the electron tunneling mechanism from the LUMO of the QD excited state to the Zn2SnO4 (ZTO) semiconductor photoanode. This change is due to the presence of the Mn instead of Pb atom at the QD/ZTO interface. The ab initio calculations confirm this mechanism. This work proposes an alternative route for a significant improvement of the efficiency for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  6. CD8+ T cells promote proliferation of benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cells under low androgen level via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Shuai; Liu, Jie; Cui, Yun; Fan, Yu; Lv, Tianjing; Liu, Libo; Li, Jun; He, Qun; Han, Wenke; Yu, Wei; Sun, Yin; Jin, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies by our group have shown that low intra-prostatic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced BPH epithelial cells (BECs) to recruit CD8+ T cells. However, the influence of the recruited CD8+ T cells on BECs under a low androgen level is still unknown. Here, we found CD8+ T cells have the capacity to promote proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition. Mechanism dissection revealed that interaction between CD8+ T cells and BECs through secretion of CCL5 might promote the phosphorylation of STAT5 and a higher expression of CCND1 in BECs. Suppressed CCL5/STAT5 signals via CCL5 neutralizing antibody or STAT5 inhibitor Pimozide led to reverse CD8+ T cell-enhanced BECs proliferation. IHC analysis from Finasteride treated patients showed PCNA expression in BECs was highly correlated to the level of CD8+ T cell infiltration and the expression of CCL5. Consequently, our data indicated infiltrating CD8+ T cells could promote the proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling. The increased secretion of CCL5 from the CD8+ T cells/BECs interaction might help BECs survive in a low DHT environment. Targeting these signals may provide a new potential therapeutic approach to better treat BPH patients who failed the therapy of 5α-reductase inhibitors. PMID:28216616

  7. Giant Cell Tumor Developing in Paget’s Disease of Bone: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Puri, Ajay; Shah, Sanket; Rekhi, Bharat; Gulia, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a disease of elderly characterized by disorganized bone remodeling. Development of secondary neoplasm in PDB is a known but rare phenomenon. Development of giant cell tumor in PDB (GCT-PDB) is extremely rare, and little is known about its etiopathogenesis and management. We present a case report of such a development with a review of the literature and the role of various new modalities of treatment available in the management of this rare condition. Case Report: A 40-year-old gentleman presented with back pain and on evaluation was diagnosed as a case of polyostotic PDB. He was treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D supplements. After an asymptomatic period of 3-year, he presented with a gluteal mass involving ilium and sacrum which was confirmed as GCT on biopsy. Serial angioembolization was attempted but mass progressed, so surgery performed with excision and curettage of the lesion. He presented with a local recurrence 2 years later with a large soft tissue component. He was started on denosumab, RANKL inhibitor, with the aim to downstage the lesion. The patient showed a good response after 6 doses with reduction in soft tissue mass followed by which he underwent surgery with partial T-1 internal hemipelvectomy and curettage of sacrum. Currently, the patient is asymptomatic at a follow-up of 15 months. Conclusion: GCT-PDB is a rare phenomenon occurring mainly in polyostotic PDB and is associated with more severe manifestations of the disease. The management is challenging and requires multimodality management. Pharmacological agents include use of bisphosphonates and RANK ligand inhibitor - denosumab. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment for GCT, other modalities of treatment such as RANK ligand inhibitors (denosumab), selective arterial embolization, or radiation therapy has to be used for inoperable cases or where surgery would be functionally too morbid, especially in cases

  8. Radiotherapy for marginally resected, unresectable or recurrent giant cell tumor of the bone: a rare cancer network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Miller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of radiotherapy for local control of marginally resected, unresectable, and recurrent giant cell tumors of bone (GCToB has not been well defined. The number of patients affected by this rare disease is low. We present a series of 58 patients with biopsy proven GCToB who were treated with radiation therapy. A retrospective review of the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of GCToB was conducted in participating institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Eligibility criteria consisted of the use of radiotherapy for marginally resected, unresectable, and recurrent GCToB. Fifty-eight patients with biopsy proven GCToB were analyzed from 9 participating North American and European institutions. Forty-five patients had a primary tumor and 13 patients had a recurrent tumor. Median radiation dose was 50 Gy in a median of 25 fractions. Indication for radiation therapy was marginal resection in 33 patients, unresectable tumor in 13 patients, recurrence in 9 patients and palliation in 2 patients. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm. A significant proportion of the tumors involved critical structures. Median follow- up was 8.0 years. Five year local control was 85% . Of the 7 local failures, 3 were treated successfully with salvage surgery. All patients who received palliation achieved symptom relief. Five year overall survival was 94%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. This study reports a large published experience in the treatment of GCToB with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy can provide excellent local control for incompletely resected, unresectable or recurrent GCToB with acceptable morbidity.

  9. Long-Term Survival of a Patient with Giant Cell Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    E. Naydenov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common glial tumor of the central nervous system. Overall survival is less than a year in most of the cases in spite of multimodal treatment approaches. A 45-year-old female with histologically confirmed giant cell GBM was treated at our institution. Subtotal excision of the lesion situated in the right precentral area was performed during the initial stay in August 2005. The patient improved after the procedure with no hypertension and additional neurological deficit. Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide was performed. The patient was symptom-free for 35 months after initial surgery. From July 2008 the patient developed partial motor seizures in the left side of the body and progressive hemiparesis. Local tumor progression was demonstrated on the neuroimaging studies. In December 2008, a second operative intervention was performed with subtotal excision of the tumor. Forty-five months after the initial diagnosis the patient is still alive with moderate neurological deficit. Microarray analysis of the tumor found the following numeric chromosomal aberrations: monosomy 8, 10, 13, 22, and trisomy 21, as well as amplifications in 4q34.1, 4q28.2, 6q16.3, 7q36.1, 7p21.3, and deletions in 1q42.12, 1q32.2, 1q25.2, 1p33, 2q37.2, 18q22.3, 19p13.2, Xq28, and Xq27.3. GBMs seem to be a heterogeneous group of glial tumors with different clinical course and therapeutic response. Microarray analysis is a useful method to establish a number of possible molecular predictors.

  10. Leflunomide as a Corticosteroid-Sparing Agent in Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica: A Case Series

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    Andreas P. Diamantopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Giant cell arteritis (GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR affect individuals older than 50 years of age and corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. The aim of our study was to explore the role of leflunomide as a corticosteroid-sparing agent in GCA and PMR patients. Methods. Patients with difficult-to-treat GCA and PMR were retrospectively identified in the period from 2010 to 2013. The doses of corticosteroids and CRP values were noted before, after three months, and at the end of the treatment with leflunomide (for patients continuing treatment, censoring date was January 1, 2013. Results. Twenty-three patients were identified (12 with PMR and 11 with GCA. A reduction of 6 mg/dL (CI 95% –10.9–34.2, P=0.05 in CRP and 3.7 mg (CI 95% 0.5–7.0, P=0.03 in prednisolone dose was observed in the PMR group. In GCA patients, the reduction was 12.4 mg/dL (CI 95% 0.7–25.5, P=0.06 in CRP and 6.6 mg (CI 95% 2.8–10.3, P<0.01 in prednisolone dose. Conclusion. Leflunomide seems to be effective as a corticosteroid-sparing agent in patients with difficult-to-treat GCA and PMR. Randomized controlled trials are warranted in order to confirm the usefulness of leflunomide in the therapy of GCA/PMR.

  11. MRI displays involvement of the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in patients with giant cell arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klink, Thorsten [Inselspital - University Medical Center Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Geiger, Julia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); University Children' s Hospital Zuerich, Division of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Vaith, Peter; Glaser, Cornelia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Freiburg (Germany); Ness, Thomas [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Ophthalmology, Freiburg (Germany); Duwendag, Dirk [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Ophthalmology, Kiel (Germany); Both, Marcus [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess deep temporal artery and temporalis muscle involvement in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Ninety-nine patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superficial temporal artery biopsy (TAB) were included in this study. Patients with positive TAB (n = 61) were defined as GCA patients, those with negative TAB (n = 38) as the GCA-negative reference group. Contrast-enhanced T1w-images were acquired utilizing 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Two radiologists assessed the images. Mural contrast-hyperenhancement and wall thickening of the deep temporal artery and hyperenhancement of the muscle were defined as inflammation. MRI results were correlated with jaw claudication in 70 patients. The two observers found temporalis muscle involvement in 19.7 % (n = 12) and 21.3 % (n = 13) of GCA patients. It occurred bilaterally in 100 %. Specificities were 92/97 % and sensitivities were 20/21 %. Deep temporal artery involvement was found in 34.4 % (n = 21) and 49.2 % (n = 30) and occurred bilaterally in 80/90.5 %. Specificities were 84/95 % and sensitivities were 34/49 %. Both structures were affected simultaneously in 18/21.3 %. Jaw claudication correlated moderately with inflammation of the temporalis muscle (r = 0.31; p < 0.05) and the deep temporal artery (r = 0.38; p = 0.01). MRI visualizes changes in the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in GCA. Moderate correlation of clinical symptoms with MRI results was observed. circle Approximately 20 % of GCA patients presented with temporalis muscle inflammation. (orig.)

  12. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

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    Laura-Nanna Lohkamp

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09. BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001. IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized.

  13. Color Doppler imaging features in patients presenting central retinal artery occlusion with and without giant cell arteritis

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    Catalin Jianu Dragos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central retinal artery obstruction (CRAO represents an abrupt diminution of blood flow through the CRA that is severe enough to cause ischemia of the inner retina with permanent unilateral visual loss. We presented the role of color Doppler imaging (CDI of orbital vessels and of extracranial duplex sonography (EDS in the etiological diagnosis of CRAO in two patients with clinical suspicion of unilateral CRAO. Case report. Patients were examined following the protocol which included CDI of orbital vessels and EDS. Both patients had no emboli visible on ophthalmoscopy. The B-scan ultrasound evaluation of the first patient found a small round, moderately reflective echo within the right optic nerve, 1.5 mm behind the optic disc (emboli of cholesterol. CDI of retrobulbar vessels revealed the normal right ophthalmic artery (OA hemodynamic parameters, but the first patient had no arterial flow signal on CDI at the distance of 1.5 mm behind the right optic disc. In contrast, the left eye had the normal aspect on CDI of retrobulbar vessels. The right internal carotid artery EDS identified a severe stenosis at its origin as CRA’s emboli source. The second patient had characteristic CDI findings for giant cell arteritis (GCA with eye involvement: severe diminished blood flow velocities, especially end-diastolic velocities, in both CRAs. Less abnormalities were observed in the posterior ciliary arteries, and in the ophthalmic arteries. The second patient had no systemic symptoms or signs of GCA. Conclusion. In the presented cases, the ultrasound investigation enabled prompt differentiation between central retinal artery occlusion of embolic mechanism and CRAO caused by GCA.

  14. A massive neglected giant basal cell carcinoma in a schizophrenic patient treated successfully with vismodegib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Lei, Ulrikke

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule vismodegib is a great treatment alternative to patients challenged, e.g. psychiatric disorders, suffering from severe basal cell carcinoma of the skin in which surgery or other treatment modalities is not possible because of patient's wish or condition. We present a case of a 73-year-old schizophrenic patient with a 15-year history of a neglected tumour located at the forehead and scalp, admitted to hospital in a state of inanition because of tumour expansion to the meninges and severe anaemia caused by bleeding, treated successfully with vismodegib.

  15. Characteristics of benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Xia Li; Shi-Feng Yu; Kai-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathological characteristics and carcinogenesis mechanism of benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa (BLOM).METHODS: The expressions of Ki-67, CD34 and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemical SP staining in 64 paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Of them, 9 were from BLOM with dysplasia, 15 from BLOM without dysplasia,15 from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), 15 from oral precancerosis, and 10 from normal tissues. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis of tissue samples were also analyzed.RESULTS: The expression of Ki-67 in BLOM with dysplasia,oral precancerosis and OSCC was significantly higher than in BLOM without dysplasia and normal mucosa. The microvascular density (MVD) in BLOM with and without dysplasia, oral precancerosis, and OSCC was significantly higher than in normal mucosa. Apoptosis in BLOM and oral precancerosis was significantly higher than in OSCC and normal mucosa.CONCLUSION: Benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa has potentialities of cancerization.

  16. How benign is benign tertian malaria?

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    Archna Sharma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to determine the incidence of variouscomplications of Plasmodium vivax malaria based on review of case records.Methods: The case records of all confirmed cases of malaria over the period of one year (September2005–August 2006 were studied. Complete blood count, peripheral blood findings, liver and kidneyfunctions were reviewed. The results of rapid diagnostic test for malaria (OptiMAL test, DiamedAG, Switzerland were correlated with the peripheral blood smear findings in the patients in whomit was requested. All abnormal results like a positive direct Coomb’s test were noted. Findingswere clinically correlated.Results: There were 265 confirmed cases by peripheral blood examination. Of these 221 were dueto Plasmodium vivax and 41 due to P. falciparum. Two cases had mixed infection and in one casethe species could not be identified as it showed only malarial pigment. The peak incidence ofmalaria was seen in September 2005 and August 2006. The complications in P. vivax werethrombocytopenia, biochemical evidence of hepatic dysfunction, renal damage, positive DCT anddeath due to ARDS. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 213 patients with counts 3 mg/dl with normal liver enzymes. Liver enzymeswere elevated in 60 patients with seven patients showing liver enzymes level, three times the normal.Renal dysfunction was seen in 17 patients with serum creatinine ranging from 1.3–10.65 mg/dl.One patient went into acute renal failure following quinine therapy and showed red cell fragmentsin the peripheral blood. In two children DCT was positive with the peripheral smear showing RBCagglutinates around the parasitised RBC. There were three maternal deaths at about 32 weeksgestation due to ARDS. The peripheral blood smear in these patients showed WBC agglutinates.Conclusion: This paper is presented to highlight that P. vivax malaria though considered to be abenign entity can also have a severe and complicated course

  17. Der benigne paroxysmale Lagerungsschwindel

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    Wiest G

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Der benigne paroxysmale Lagerungsschwindel (BPPV ist eine häufige Störung des peripheren Vestibularorgans, welche bei allen Patienten mit lageabhängigem Schwindel suspiziert werden sollte. Obwohl kurzzeitige Drehschwindelattacken als pathognomonisches Symptom gelten, weisen viele Patienten auch unsystematisierten Schwankschwindel auf, was die Diagnosestellung oft erschwert. Auslöser des BPPV sind Klziumkarbonatkristalle (Otokonien, welche sich aus der Otolithenmatrix des Utriculus lösen und in einen der drei Bogengänge gelangen. Die Diagnosestellung erfolgt mit spezifischen Provokations- bzw. Lagerungstests, um den entsprechenden Lagerungsschwindel und Nystagmus zu induzieren. Die von Semont und Epley entwickelten Befreiungsmanöver zielen darauf ab, die in den Bogengängen lokalisierten Partikel in den Utriculus zu repositionieren, wo sie keinen Drehschwindel mehr auslösen. Zur Unterscheidung des BPPV von einem zentralen Lageschwindel bzw. Nystagmus können neben der Latenz auch der Verlauf und die Dauer des Lagerungsnystagmus beitragen, von entscheidender Bedeutung in der Differentialdiagnose ist allerdings die Schlagrichtung des induzierten Nystagmus.

  18. Nihilism: a benign denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2003-06-01

    Nihilism is the belief that all possible knowledge on a given topic has been amassed and codified. Ranging from benign denial to deliberate attempts at excommunication, nihilism is often encountered in the history of medicine. Eustachius, Columbus, and Sylvius strongly criticized Vesalius and defended the authority of Galen. Riolan fervently rejected Harvey's monumental work on the circulation of blood. Gross stated that no honest and sensible surgeon would ever sanction thyroidectomy. Sandstrom's discovery of the parathyroids was met with silence. Transplantation of parathyroids by Mandl was not appreciated when announced. Aristotle's dictum that the heart cannot withstand serious injury led to Paget's statement that cardiac surgery had reached the limits set by nature, which no new techniques could overcome. The first Billroth I operation was welcomed as, "Hopefully, also the last." Pancreatic surgery was opposed because the organ was of no clinical interest and was impossible for surgeons to reach. Pancreatic transplantation was rejected for many years, despite good results. When Blundell used blood transfusion for postpartum hemorrhage, critics averred that his next exploit would be radical removal of the spleen. Bassini stated that it could be risky to publish more about radical treatment of inguinal hernias. Carcinomas of the lower sigmoid and upper rectum were deemed untreatable because of their inaccessibility. Colostomy during pediatric surgery was rejected many times. Although it is difficult for the human mind to move from a familiar point of view, this propensity should not infect science, thereby impeding advancement.

  19. Benign anatomical mistakes: incidentaloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, J E

    2002-11-01

    The concept of the "incidentaloma," a totally asymptomatic nonfunctional tumor that is clinically and biochemically silent and discovered "incidentally" in a totally asymptomatic patient, is a by-product of the evolving diagnostic techniques of the last three decades. Various authors have used the concept for "incidental" findings during diagnostic workup for symptoms unrelated to adrenal disease, or for "incidental" adrenal tumors unrelated to symptoms that could potentially be of adrenal origin. "Incidentaloma" has been used to encompass a wide and heterogeneous spectrum of pathologic entities including adrenocortical and medullary tumors, benign or malignant lesions, hormonally active or inactive lesions, metastases, infections, granulomas, infiltrations, cysts and pseudocysts, hemorrhages, and pseudoadrenal masses. The term "incidentaloma" does not indicate whether the mass is functional, or malignant, or adrenocortical in origin. "Incidentaloma" has also appeared in the literature in reference to other endocrine organs such as pituitary, thyroid, and parathyroids, as well as the liver or kidney. We question the scientific justification for this neologism and suggest that it should be abolished. Questionable lesions should be clearly and simply described as "incidentally found."

  20. Intracellular pH of giant salivary gland cells of the leech Haementeria ghilianii: regulation and effects on secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, W A; Munsch, T; Berry, M S

    1994-04-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane potential (Em) of giant salivary gland cells of the leech, Haementeria ghilianii, were measured with double-barrelled, neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. Em was -51 +/- 11.2 mV and pHi was 6.98 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- S.D., N = 41) in Hepes-buffered saline (nominally HCO3(-)-free; extracellular pH, pHe = 7.4). pHi was independent of Em. 3. Amiloride (2 mmol l-1) had no effect on resting pHi or on pHi recovery from an acid load (induced by the NH4+ pre-pulse technique). Removal of external Na+ produced a progressive acidification which was blocked by amiloride, and the drug also slowed the recovery of pHi on reintroduction of Na+. The results indicate the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ exchanger whose access to amiloride is competitively blocked by Na+. 4. In certain smaller cells of the gland, which probably form a separate population, removal of external Na+ did not affect pHi, and recovery from an acid load was blocked by amiloride. There may, therefore, be two types of Na+/H+ exchanger, differing in reversibility and sensitivity to amiloride. 5. Recovery of pHi from NH4(+)-induced acid loading was not affected by bicarbonate-buffered saline (2% CO2; 11 mmol l-1 HCO3-) or by addition of the anion-exchange blocker SITS (10(-4) mol l-1). This suggests that there is no significant contribution of a HCO3(-)-dependent transport mechanism to pHi regulation in the gland cells. 6. Removal of external Cl- slowly reduced pHi and there was a transient increase (overshoot) in pHi when Cl- was reintroduced. These effects of Cl- are probably explained by changes in the Na+ gradient. Intracellular Na+ and Cl- activities were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes. 7. Acidification with NH4+ was difficult, probably because of the cells' poor permeability to this ion. Attempts to introduce NH4+ via the Na+ pump or Na+/Cl- transporter were not successful. The H+/K+ ionophore nigericin (1 microgram ml-1), however, produced

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath in wrist%腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤诊治体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆斌; 薛花; 崔庆元; 何仿

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤的诊断方法及手术治疗体会.方法:2002年9月至2009年10月对8例术前MRI初步诊断为腕部腱鞘巨细胞瘤的患者进行手术治疗,其中男5例,女3例;年龄16~65岁,平均41岁;痛程10~72个月,平均31个月.结果:所有患者术后病理均证实为腱鞘巨细胞瘤,随访时间5~48个月,平均34.2个月.1例复发,3例正中神经损伤症状术后明显缓解.所有患者术后腕关节功能得到明显改善.结论:腱鞘巨细胞瘤的MRI表现特点有助于术前的鉴别诊断,术中彻底切除肿块有助于预防肿瘤复发.%Objective: To investigate diagnostic methods and surgical effect for the treatment of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath in wrist. Methods:From September 2002 to October 2009,8 patients with preoperative diagnosis as giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath based on MRI were treated surgically. There were 5 males and 3 females,ranging in age from 16 to 65 years,with an average of 41 years. The disease course ranged from 10 to 72 months with an average of 31 months. Results:The diagnosis of all the patients was confirmed as giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath by postoperative pathology. All the patients were followed up,and the during ranged from 5 to 48 months (averaged,34.2 months). One patient recurred and 3 patients got obvious relief of symptoms of median nerve injury. All the patients had significant improvement in wrist function after surgery. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI is helpful for differential diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendinous sheath. Thorough removal of tumor is very important in prevention of recurrence.

  2. Benign Breast Problems and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a needle. Another example is a simple fibroadenoma . Simple fibroadenomas usually shrink or go away on their own. ... Cyst: A sac or pouch filled with fluid. Fibroadenoma: A type of solid, benign breast mass. Hormone: ...

  3. Localized Giant Cell Tumors of the Flexor Tendon Sheath of the Finger: An Analysis of Twenty Five Patients

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    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate localized giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS with Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging findings and to review the epidemiological features of the disease. We also evaluated the literature regarding GCTTS and performed an analysis of the available information. Material and Method: We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 25 histologically proven cases of GCTTS of the finger during the period between 2012-2014. In addition, a retrospective analysis of the patients’ records was carried out, and age, gender, site and size of lesion, recurrence, and MRI findings were reviewed. Results: The patients were predominantly female (n = 16 and had a mean age of 51.9 ± 12.8 years. Nine patients were male with a mean age of 45.1 ± 13.4 years. The size of the tumors ranged from 6 mm to 30 mm, with a mean size of 15.3±6.8 mm. Tumors were present on the right hand in 15 patients and on the left hand in 10 patients. Among women, 11 tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were found on the left. In men, 4 of the tumors were located on the right hand and 5 were on the left. The most frequent digit on which tumors were found was the index finger, accounting for 40% of cases (n=10. The most frequent location was the index finger for both women (n=6 and men (n=4. All of the lesions were described as well-circumscribed, encapsulated, lobulated, or multilobulated solitary masses with MR imaging. Signal intensity on T1 weighted images (WI was equal to that of skeletal muscle in 23 cases. In two cases, signal intensity was slightly higher. On T2WIs, the signal intensities tended to be between those of skeletal muscle and fat in all of the cases. All of the lesions showed mild to moderate contrast enhancement when compared with precontrast images. There was no statistically significant differences between male and female patients in terms of age, tumor side, involved digit, and highest tumor size

  4. Laparoscopy for benign disease: robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, Mark A

    2003-12-01

    Currently available robotic surgical systems appear to be particularly suited for use in benign diseases of the gastrointestinal system. Minimally invasive operations for foregut conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and achalasia, require excellent visibility and precise tissue dissection. Benign lower gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and diverticulitis, also can be approached using robotic assistance. Disadvantages include expense and the loss of tactile feedback. Early clinical results are promising.

  5. First histologically confirmed case of a classic chordoma arising in a precursor benign notochordal lesion: differential diagnosis of benign and malignant notochordal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takehiko [Department of Anatomic and Diagnostic Pathology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Yamato, Minoru [Department of Radiology, International Catholic Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Saotome, Koichi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The first histologically confirmed case of a classic chordoma arising in a precursor benign notochordal lesion is presented and the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant notochordal lesions is discussed. A 57-year-old man presented with a classic chordoma in the coccyx. The resected specimen demonstrated a small intraosseous benign notochordal lesion in the coccyx, which was adjacent to the classic chordoma. Also seen were two separate, similar benign lesions in the sacrum. The classic chordoma consisted of multiple lobules that were separated by thin fibrous septa and that showed cords or strands of atypical physaliphorous cells set within an abundant myxoid matrix. In contrast, the benign lesions consisted of intraosseous sheets of bland physaliphorous cells without any extracellular matrix. The affected bone trabeculae showed sclerotic reactions. It was concluded that benign and malignant notochordal lesions can be distinguished microscopically. (orig.)

  6. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  7. A giant solid cystic inferior fourth ventricle subependymoma – Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Subependymomas are a rare subtype of ependymomas, slow growing WHO grade I tumors that develop either intracranial from the subependymal glial precursor cells layer of the ventricles or intramedullary. These tumors originate in the undifferentiated Subependymal layer of cells that can become either ependymocytes or astrocytes. Most of the subependymomas are located inside the fourth ventricle (50-60%. We reviewed the case of a 40 years old woman with a giant solid cystic fourth ventricle ependymoma. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor through a subociipital transvermian approach. We discussed the characteristics of these benign tumors and reviewed the literature on this subject and concluded that total resection is the treatment of choice for symptomatic Subependymomas localized in posterior fossa.

  8. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  9. Paciente con complicación poco frecuente de arteritis de células gigantes Rare complication in a patient with giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Olivera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La arteritis de células gigantes (arteritis de la arteria temporal es una vasculitis crónica que afecta mayoritariamente a personas de edad avanzada. Aunque se trata de una enfermedad sistémica, se afectan sobre todo las arterias craneales. La complicación más frecuente de esta patología es la pérdida visual. Presentamos el caso clínico de una paciente que padeció varias complicaciones, entre ellas una necrosis lingual, a raíz de serle diagnosticada una arteritis de células gigantes tras iniciar el tratamiento de la misma.Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis is a chronic vasculitis that usually affects older people. Although this is a systemic disease, it most often affects the cranial arteries. The most frequent complication of this disorder is visual loss. We report the case of a patient who suffered several rare complications, including tongue necrosis, as a result of being diagnosed with giant cell arteritis following the start of treatment.

  10. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacoangeli M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Iacoangeli,1 Alessandro Di Rienzo,1 Massimo Re,2 Lorenzo Alvaro,1 Niccolò Nocchi,1 Maurizio Gladi,1 Maurizio De Nicola,3 Massimo Scerrati11Department of Neurosurgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 2Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Section, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Giant cell tumors (GCTs are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches. The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury.Keywords: clival giant cell tumor, endoscopic endonasal approach, internal carotid artery injury, minimally invasive surgery

  11. Benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Suk Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasms of the lacrimal drainage system are uncommon, but potentially life-threatening and are often difficult to diagnose. Among primary lacrimal sac tumors, benign mixed tumors are extremely rare. Histologically, benign mixed tumors have been classified as a type of benign epithelial tumor. Here we report a case of benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac.

  12. 浅谈卵巢良性卵泡膜细胞瘤与卵巢纤维瘤的鉴别诊断%Differential Diagnosis of Benign Ovarian Theca Cell Tumors and Ovarian Fibroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大鹏

    2013-01-01

      Objective To investigate the differential diagnosis of benign ovarian follicular the membrane cell tumors and ovarian fibroma. Methods A retrospective analysis of our hospital from 2001 to 2012, the pathological diagnosis of 37 cases of ovarian theca cell tumors and ovarian fibroma, generally light microscope, special staining and immunohistochemistry method, differential diagnosis, and track postoperative prognosis further identification. Conclusion Benign ovarian theca cell tumors and ovarian fibroma in general and light microscope is not easy to identify, and the prognosis is similar to (theca cell tumor associated with cell proliferation activity should be alert), only through the fat staining and immunohistochemistry to accurately both tumors phase identification.%  目的探讨卵巢良性卵泡膜细胞瘤与卵巢纤维瘤的鉴别诊断。方法回顾分析了本院自2001年至2012年间,病理诊断为卵巢卵泡膜细胞瘤和卵巢纤维瘤各37例,用大体、光镜下、特殊染色及免疫组化的方法进行鉴别诊断,并对术后患者进行跟踪,在预后方面进一步鉴别。结论良性卵巢卵泡膜细胞瘤与卵巢纤维瘤在大体和光镜下并不容易鉴别,而且预后相似(卵泡膜细胞瘤伴细胞增生活跃者应警惕),只有通过脂肪染色和免疫组化才能较准确将这两种肿瘤相鉴别。

  13. Histiocytic sarcoma that mimics benign histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau-Garsaud, A M; Vergier, B; Beylot-Barry, M; Nastasel-Menini, F; Dubus, P; de Mascarel, A; Eghbali, H; Beylot, C

    1996-06-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a histiocytic sarcoma of a very uncommon origin, as it had developed for several years like a benign cutaneous histiocytosis resembling generalized eruptive histiocytoma before becoming acute, with nodal and massive pulmonary involvement. Despite various chemotherapies, the patient died within 8 months. Skin biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation in the dermis and node biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation with a sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical analysis, performed on paraffin-embedded sections, demonstrated strong labeling of tumoral cells for CD68 and moderate labeling for CD3 and CD4. CD30 labeling was negative. S-100 protein was positive on a Langerhans' cell reactive subpopulation. Electron microscopy confirmed the histiocytic nature of malignant cells and showed cytoplasmic inclusions such as regularly laminated bodies, dense bodies and pleomorphic inclusions. No Birbeck granules were seen. A gene rearrangement study of T-cell receptor gamma and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes showed a germline configuration. Histiocytic sarcoma is an extremely rare true histiocytic malignancy, the existence of which has been recently debated since it has often been mistaken in the past for large cell lymphomas. Such a deceptive onset as benign cutaneous histiocytosis has not been described in the literature to our knowledge.

  14. Critical surgical techniques for giant cell tumor of sacrum%骶骨骨巨细胞瘤的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国东; 蔡郑东; 付东; 陈楷; 李健; 胡硕; 孙伟; 孙梦熊

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨骶骨骨巨细胞瘤外科切除边界与局部复发率及骶神经保留节段与神经功能的关系.方法 对1996年8月至2008年8月行肿瘤切除的48例骶骨骨巨细胞瘤患者进行回顾性分析,男20例,女28例;年龄19~74岁,平均34.7岁.肿瘤累及S1~S5 4例,S1~S4 7例,S1~S3 15例,S1,2 12例,S2~S5 8例,S3~S5 2例.采用单纯后路29例,前后联合入路19例.整块切除2例,边缘切除12例,边缘切除加刮除25例,刮除9例.术后定期随访,观察局部复发情况与骶神经功能.结果 41例随访18~115个月,平均43.5个月.术中出血量550~12000 ml,平均3560 ml.1例发生良性肺转移,2例发生肉瘤变后死亡.15例肿瘤原位复发,其中整块切除复发率0(0/2)、边缘切除18.2%(2/11)、边缘切除加刮除40.9%(9/22)、单纯刮除66.7%(4/6).边缘切除局部复发率低于单纯刮除,差异有统计学意义.保留双侧S3神经根者大小便功能障碍发生率7.4%(2/27),保留单侧S3神经根者33.3%(4/12),差异有统计学意义.结论 外科切除边界与骶骨骨巨细胞瘤局部复发率相关,在注意保留骶神经根的前提下应以边缘切除为目标;保留双侧S3神经根可使绝大部分患者的括约肌功能得以恢复.%Objective To discuss the relations between optimal surgical margin and local recurrence and the impact of preserving segment of sacral nerve root on neural functions based on the clinical and pathological features of giant cell tumor(GCT).Methods From August 1996 to August 2008,48 patients with sacral GCT undergoing tumor resection were respectively analyzed,including 20 males and 28 females with an average of 34.7 years(range,19-74).The tumors were located in S1-S5 in 4 patients,S1-S4 in 7,S1-S3 in 15,S1,2 in 12,S2-S5 in 8,and S3-S5 in 2.Surgical methods included single posterior approach in 29 cases,combined anterior-posterior approach in 19.The surgical margins adopted were en-bloc in 2 patients,marginal in 15,marginal and

  15. Giant Basal Cell Carcinomas Arising on the Bilateral Forearms of a Patient: A Case Report and Review of Nonsurgical Treatment Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shangraw

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant basal cell carcinomas (GBCCs are large basal cell carcinomas (BCCs; <5 cm with a greater propensity to invade and metastasize than standard BCCs. The presence of 2 GBCCs in a single individual is rare. We present the case of a 71-year-old Caucasian male with bilateral GBCCs on the dorsal forearms, measuring 130 cm2 and 24 cm2, respectively, that developed over a 21-year period. Over this period, the patient treated the tumors with herbal remedies. Histologic evaluation showed a conventional nodular BCC for both tumors. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T4N0M0 stage for the larger lesion. Surgical excision and grafting and reconstruction were offered, but he declined. This case highlights a shared belief in holistic treatments and rejection of Western medical interventions that are common among many patients with GBCC. Studies reporting nonsurgical treatments for GBCCs, including radiotherapy, vismodegib, topical imiquimod, and acitretin are reviewed.

  16. Giant Breast Cyst. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Magaly González González del Pino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in women is among the top three causes of death in the world and in our country it is, according to the latest statistics, in the first place. We report the case of a woman aged 94, who died at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguia Lima General University Hospital of Cienfuegos, with a diagnosis of breast malignancy with metastases. The autopsy, was conducted on November 7, 2009 and it confirmed the presence of giant benign cyst, from which this report was prepared.

  17. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  18. Design of environmentally benign processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Martin; Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid method for design of environmentally benign processes. The hybrid method integrates mathematical modelling with heuristic approaches to solving the optimisation problems related to separation process synthesis and solvent design and selection. A structured method...... of solution, which employs thermodynamic insights to reduce the complexity and size of the mathematical problem by eliminating redundant alternatives, has been developed for the hybrid method. Separation process synthesis and design problems related to the removal of a chemical species from process streams...... mixture and the second example involves the determination of environmentally benign substitute solvents for removal of a chemical species from wastewater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma Complicating Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, V A

    2015-01-01

    Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM) is a rare peritoneal pathology typically affecting women in reproductive age. Though MBM is considered benign, these lesions are prone to recurrence and their growth could be modulated by the presence of oestrogen receptors. Acute presentation of MBM is still very rare in pregnancy and management options are not established. We describe a case of MBM presenting in early pregnancy with acute pain. This was successfully treated with surgical resection. Pregnancy continued uneventfully to term and no evidence of recurrent MBM was found at Caesarean section.

  20. Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tamhankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM is a rare peritoneal pathology typically affecting women in reproductive age. Though MBM is considered benign, these lesions are prone to recurrence and their growth could be modulated by the presence of oestrogen receptors. Acute presentation of MBM is still very rare in pregnancy and management options are not established. We describe a case of MBM presenting in early pregnancy with acute pain. This was successfully treated with surgical resection. Pregnancy continued uneventfully to term and no evidence of recurrent MBM was found at Caesarean section.

  1. Successful treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma with topical imiquimod 5% cream with long term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chun-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the topical Imiquimod 5% cream offers a noninvasive, nonsurgical, and an effective option for the treatment of primary small (5 cm BCC with topical Imiquimod 5% cream are rare. We present our experience in the treatment of two giant tumors (6 × 8 cm 2 , 5.2 × 4.2 cm 2 of BCC on the face with Imiquimod 5% cream, 2 to 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Both the tumors were cured with clinical and pathological evidence, one with 6-year follow-up and the other with 3.5-year follow-up.

  2. Gastropericardial fistula complicating benign gastric ulcer: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simice, P.; Zwirewich, C.V. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2000-08-01

    Pneumopericardium is a rare radiologic finding and is most commonly associated with esophageal ulceration or trauma. Benign ulcers of the distal esophagus are the most frequent source of non-traumatic perforation into the pericardial sac. Other etiologies include fistula formation from diseased subdiaphragmatic hollow viscera or subphrenic abscess, recent cardiac surgery, an extension of pneumomediastinum into the pericardium sac, and primary septic pericarditis from gasforming organisms. Pneumopericardium caused by the penetration of a benign gastric ulcer is a recognized but rare phenomenon. Intrathoracic gastric perforations are more commonly associated with pneumomediastium. Risk factors associated with an increased risk of penetration of gastric ulcers into the pericardium include the presence of a giant ulcer in the gastric fundus, an ulcer within a hiatus hernia, a history of hiatus hernia repair, concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Scar tissue formation at the site of previous hiatal surgery may result in the adherence of the gastric fundus or lower esophagus to the pericardium and produce a pathway for benign ulcers to erode into the pericardium.

  3. Is "Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes” Always Benign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SAEED

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Saeed M, Azam M, Shabbir N, Qamar ShA. Is "Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes" Always Benign? Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3: 39-45.AbstractObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of associated behavioral problems and prognosis with Benign Childhood Epilepsy with CentroTemporal Spikes (BCECTS.Descriptive, Cross Sectional study that was conducted from October 2009 to April 2013 in the Department of Pediatric Neurology, the Children’s Hospital Taif, KSA.Material & MethodsThis study was conducted after approval from the Ethics Committee of the Children’s Hospital Taif, Saudi Arabia. Thirty-two patients from the age of 3 to 10 years old were recruited from the pediatric neurology clinic over a period of 4 years. All the patients were selected based on history, EEGs, and neuropsychological and neurological examinations.EEGs were performed for all the patients while in awake and sleep states. Those who had centrotemporal discharges were included in the study. All the patients also underwent a brain MRI. Only two patients had mild cortical atrophy but developmentally they were normal.ResultsIn our study, prevalence of BRE is 32/430 (7.44%. Among the 32 cases, 24 were male and eight were female. Six cases out of 32 indicated a family history of BRE. Twenty-eight cases had unilateral right sided centrotemporal discharges and four had bilateral discharges.ConclusionIt is possible that for BECTS, a high number of seizures might play an important role in the development of mild cognitive impairment and/or behavior disturbances.ReferencesBradley WG, Daroff RB, Fenichel JM, Jahrovic J. Neurology of clinical practice. 5th Ed. 2009: pp. 1953-1990.Berg AT, Berkovic SF, Brodie MJ, Buchhalter J, Cross H, Van Emde Boas M, et al: Revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies: Report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology, 2005–2009. Epilepsia. 2010

  4. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  5. Giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a previously asymptomatic man presenting with gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Carneiro, Ariê; Tristão, Rodrigo Alves; Sakuramoto, Paulo Kouiti; Youssef, Jorg Daoud Merched; Lopes Neto, Antonio Correa; Santiago, Lucila Heloísa Simardi; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Giant prostatic hyperplasia is a rare condition characterized by very high volume benign prostatic enlargement (>500g). Few cases have been reported so far and most of them are associated with severe lower urinary symptoms. We report the first case of asymptomatic giant prostatic hyperplasia in an elderly man who had a 720g prostate adenoma, sudden gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock. The patient was successfully treated with open transvesical prostatectomy and had an uneventful postoperative recovery.

  6. Reconstruction by bone transport after resection of benign tumors of tibia: A retrospective study of 38 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzunov, Dmitry Y; Balaev, Pavel I; Subramanyam, Koushik N

    2015-01-01

    Background: The commonly used reconstructive options after post resection defects in bone tumors like megaprosthesis, autograft, allograft, bone graft substitutes and recycled bone have their own demerits on a long term. Bone transport that regenerates patient's own bone is a less explored option of reconstruction after resection of benign bone tumors and reports on this are limited. This technique is very much relevant in tibia where Ilizarov fixator is surgeon and patient friendly. We report our experience. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective series of resection and bone transport in 38 patients with benign tumor of tibia. There were 14 males and 24 females with mean age of 23.40 years (range 9–40 years). Lesion was located in proximal third tibia in 27, middle third in two and distal third in nine patients. The diagnosis was giant cell tumor in 32, chondroblastoma in three, chondromyxoid fibroma, enchondroma and desmoplasic fibroma in one patient each. The resection was intercalary in 28 and transarticular in 10 patients. Osteosynthesis was monofocal in three, bifocal in 31 and polyfocal in four cases. Results: Mean followup was 7.22 years (range 1.5–15 years). Mean resection length was 10.21 cm (range 3–22 cm). The mean duration of external fixator was 308.03 days (range 89–677 days) and mean external fixator index was 36.14 days/cm (range 16.84–97.43 days/cm). Twelve patients had difficulties in the form of 11 problems and five obstacles that were successfully managed. None of the patients had local recurrence of tumor or any long term complication. Mean Musculo-skeletal Tumour Society score at final followup was 27.18 (90.60%). Conclusions: Bone transport is an excellent option after resection of benign tumors of tibia with good local control and functional outcome, despite minor difficulties that need timely management. PMID:26538757

  7. No evidence of parvovirus B19, Chlamydia pneumoniae or human herpes virus infection in temporal artery biopsies in patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tarp, B; Obel, N;

    2002-01-01

    conditions. DNA was extracted from frozen biopsies and PCR was used to amplify genes from Chlamydia pneumoniae, parvovirus B19 and each of the eight human herpes viruses: herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus and human herpes viruses HHV-6, -7 and -8......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that infective agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of giant cell arteritis (GCA), in particular Chlamydia pneumoniae and parvovirus B19. We investigated temporal arteries from patients with GCA for these infections as well as human herpes viruses...... using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). METHODS: Thirty temporal artery biopsies from 30 patients suspected of having GCA within a period of 1 yr were examined. Thirteen patients had classical GCA, two had biopsy-negative GCA, 10 patients had polymyalgia rheumatica and five patients had other...

  8. Endoscopic endonasal approach for the treatment of a large clival giant cell tumor complicated by an intraoperative internal carotid artery rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Re, Massimo; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Nocchi, Niccolò; Gladi, Maurizio; De Nicola, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are primary bone neoplasms that rarely involve the skull base. These lesions are usually locally aggressive and require complete removal, including the surrounding apparently healthy bone, to provide the best chance of cure. GCTs, as well as other lesions located in the clivus, can nowadays be treated by a minimally invasive fully endoscopic extended endonasal approach. This approach ensures a more direct route to the craniovertebral junction than other possible approaches (transfacial, extended lateral, and posterolateral approaches). The case reported is a clival GCT operated on by an extended endonasal approach that provides another contribution on how to address one of the most feared complications attributed to this approach: a massive bleed due to an internal carotid artery injury.

  9. Giant-cell fibroblastoma and dermato fibro sarcoma protuberans: the same tumoral spectrum? Report of two cases of association in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinier, P; Scheiner, C; Bardot, J; Vasse, D; Rimareix, F; Faissal, T; Magalon, G

    2000-12-01

    We describe two cases of giant-cell fibroblastoma (GCF) with dermato fibro sarcoma protuberans (DFSP) component, occurring in two children in a chest wall localization. One case recurred 1 year later. The two patients were tumor-free 12 and 8 years later. GCF is a rare mesenchymal cutaneous and subcutaneous tumor reported mostly in the first two decades of life. Dermato fibro sarcoma protuberans, occurring preferentially in adults, is a rare skin tumor with a pronounced tendency to local recurrence. Some cases of association of recurrence of GFC under the form of DFSP have been reported, raising the question of a continuum between the two tumors. The treatment of choice of the two tumors is a wide local excision.

  10. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  11. Reconstruction of the distal radio-ulnar joint with a prosthesis of the distal ulna in the treatment of a recurrent giant cell tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrych, Daniel; Zyluk, Andrzej; Walaszek, Ireneusz; Bohatryrewicz, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    We present a case of 35-year old left-handed woman with recurrent giant-cell tumour affecting 1/4 of the distal part of the left ulna, with associated ulnar nerve involvement. After resection of the tumour and 1 cm of the ulnar nerve, the distal ulna was reconstructed with an individually designed and matched prosthesis, followed by ulnar nerve reconstruction. At 12 months follow-up the patients was free of pain, had excellent recovery of ulnar nerve function, satisfactory wrist range of motion and moderately impaired function of the left hand (DASH score 42). She returned to her original work in the office. We believe that restoration of the anatomy of the distal forearm after en block resection of the distal ulna is desirable in young, active patients, and that the prosthesis we used provides a good anatomical framework for the recovery of the function of the wrist.

  12. Perianal Giant Condyloma Acuminatum: A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rare giant condyloma acuminatum (CA) reported by this paper is an interesting unusual case in China. Giant CA is a tumor that primarily affects the genital and perianal areas. Its feature is the high rate of local recurrence and transformation into squamous cell carcinoma. Making choice of wide surgical excision and using interferon as antiviral and immunoenhancement for CA after operation, we obtain satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  13. Giant Pumpkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David; Alexeev, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we investigate the growth of pumpkins from 1 to 1000 pounds in weight. Time-lapse photography is used to document the growth of pumpkins. Data is presented on the relation between the pumpkins' weights and aspect ratios (height divided by width). We observe pumpkins tend to become squashed (up to 50%) as they increase in size. The lattice-spring method is used to numerically estimate the elasto-plastic forces resisting deformation of the pumpkin. Using levels of plasticity consistent with that of plant cell growth, we find pumpkins shapes consistent with those observed.

  14. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radioiodbehandling af benign thyreoideasygdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogh Rasmussen, Aa.; Jarloev, A.E.; Faber, J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of benigh thyroid disease in Denmark. A questionnaire was distributed to all departments in Denmark which administer radioiodine in the treatment of benign thyroid disease (n=20). Radioiodine is used for patients with toxic nodular goitre and for patients with relapse of toxic diffuse goitre. Four departments did not use radioiodine for volume reduction in non-toxic goitre. Patient information's included very different recommendations regarding cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. Radioiodine is widely used in the treatment of benign thyroid disease. We recommend a national standardization of the cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. (au)

  15. ENDOSCOPIC RESECTION OF GIANT ETHMOIDAL OSTEOMA WITH INTRAORBITAL EXTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : Osteomas are slow growing benign tumors of the paranasal sinuses. Most of them are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiographs. Sometimes they may grow to produce symptoms like cosmetic deformity, proptosis, epiphora and visual disturbances. A case of giant ethmoid osteoma with intra orbital extension in 30 year old female that was managed endoscopically is discussed. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic approach along with intra nasal drill is a safe and effective technique in management of osteoma of nose and paranasal sinus.

  16. A Case of Giant Uterine Lipoleiomyoma Simulating Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Erbil Karaman; Numan Çim; Gülay Bulut; Gülhan Elçi; Esra Andıç; Mustafa Tekin; Ali Kolusarı

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign pathology in women and lipoleiomyoma is an extremely rare and specific type of leiomyoma. Here, we report an unusual case of giant pedunculated subserous lipoleiomyoma misdiagnosed preoperatively as leiomyosarcoma. Case. A 45-year-old woman admitted to our gynecology outpatient clinic for complaints of abdominal distention, tiredness, and pelvic pain for the last 6 months. Sonography and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showe...

  17. Enucleation of a Giant Hemangioma of Liver: Old School Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpagavel ChandraBose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are the most frequent benign hepatic tumours and are usually found in patients aged between 40 and 60 years, more frequently in women. In 30–35% of patients, the lesions are multiple. If the lesions are larger than 4–10 cm, they are coined as “giant” hemangioma. Here, we present a case of giant hemangioma treated with enucleation of the lesion and the advantages of the procedure.

  18. Recurrent giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ser Yee Lee; Weng Hoong Chan; Ranjiv Sivanandan; Dennis Teck Hock Lim; Wai Keong Wong

    2009-01-01

    Giant fibrovascular polyps of the esophagus and hypopharynx are rare benign esophageal tumors. They arise most commonly in the upper esophagus and may, rarely, originate in the hypopharynx. They can vary significantly in size. Even though they are benign, they may be lethal due to either bleeding or, rarely, asphyxiation if a large polyp is regurgitated. Patients commonly present with dysphagia or hematemesis. The polyps may not be well visualized on endoscopy and imaging plays a vital role in aiding diagnosis as well as providing important information for preoperative planning, such as the location of the pedicle, the vascularity of the polyp and the tissue elements of the mass. They can also be recurrent in rare cases, especially if the resection margins of the base are involved. We review the recent literature and report a case of a 61-year-old man with a recurrent giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp with illustrative contrast barium swallow, CT and intra-operative images, who required several surgeries via a combination of endoscopic, trans-oral, trans-cervical, trans-thoracic and trans-abdominal approaches.

  19. Expression of TRPC6 in benign and malignant human prostate tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Yue; Yong Wang; Jian-Ying Xiao; Ping Wang; Chang-Shan Ren

    2009-01-01

    ancer cell lines. In summary, TRPC6 is detected in benign and malignant human prostate tissues and prostate cancer cell lines and is associated with the histological grade, Gleason score and extraprostatic extension of prostate cancer.

  20. An Adolescent Girl with Giant Fibroadenoma – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdousee Ishrat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Though fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the breast and is more common under the age of 30, giant fibroadenoma is rare representing less than 4% of all fibroadenomas. A 12 years old girl presented with rapidly enlarging well-circumscribed firm, non-tender mass in right breast for 2 months which was painless and with no history of trauma, nipple discharge, fever, anorexia, weight loss or axillary lymphadenopathy. There was no family history of neoplasms. Clinically, the lump was about 12 × 12 cm and not fixed to skin or underlying structures with the absence of nipple retraction or discharge. There was no axillary lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a benign proliferative breast disease. Total excision of mass was done preserving nipple and areola having weight of 535 gm with histopathological features suggestive of giant fibroadenoma. Giant fibroadenoma is a benign breast disease that may mimic rare malignant lesion. So, breast and nipple conserving surgery should always be performed irrespective of size of tumor as in this case.

  1. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Saha

    2008-06-01

    Nanodielectrics is an emerging area of research because of its potential application in energy storage and transducers. One-dimensional metallic nanostructures with localized electronic wave functions show giant dielectric constant. Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal nanowires, which shows giant permittivity is also discussed.

  2. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinyama, Catherine N. [Princess Elizabeth Hospital, Le Vauquiedor, St. Martin' s Guernsey, Channel Islands (United Kingdom); Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  3. Giant choledochal calculosis: Surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Bektas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gallstone disease is one of the most common surgical pathologies. Choledocholithiasis may occur in some of these cases and require surgical intervention. Although there are relatively non-invasive procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, this technique is usually unsuccessful in patients with stones larger than 10 mm. In our case, we aimed to report a giant choledochal stone (15 cm × 4.5 cm, which is rare in surgical practice and our treatment with open surgery. Case Report: The patient was a 59-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP had showed a hydropic gallbladder with an excessively dilated CBD and a 110 mm × 41 mm stone. In the operation, an excessively dilated CBD was seen and after choledochotomy and a very large calculus that filled CBD completely. Choledochotomy incision was carried forward and a T-tube choledochostomy with choledochoduodenostomy (CD was performed. The patient was discharged without any complications on postoperative 8 th day. Conclusion: Benign gallstone disease is a multifactorial process, with risk factors such as obesity, hemolytic diseases, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. Risk factors for choledocholithiasis are similar to those for gallstone disease. MRCP is a non-invasive technique in detecting choledocholithiasis. The gold standard intervention for CBD stones is ERCP. Stones in CBD may reach very considerable dimensions without causing serious symptoms. The most common symptom is jaundice. During preoperative radiological examination, giant stones may be interfered with malignancies. Surgeons should obey conventional algorithms in diagnosis and open surgery must be kept in mind in earlier stages without being too insistent on endoscopic interventions.

  4. Benign chondroblastoma - malignant radiological appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Treugut, H.; Mueller, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    The very rare benign chondroblastoma occasionally invades soft tissues and may grow beyond the epiphysis into the metaphysis. In the present case such a tumour did not show the typical radiological appearances, but presented malignant features both on plain films and on the angiogram. The importance of biopsy of tumours which cannot be identified with certainty must be stressed before radical surgery is carried out.

  5. Giant xanthogranuloma of the pelvis with S1 origin: Complete removal with only posterior approach, technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Nicola; Landi, Alessandro; Mancarella, Cristina; Rocco, Pierluigi; Pietrantonio, Andrea; Galati, Gaspare; Bolognese, Antonio; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-01-16

    Xanthogranulomas (XG) are benign proliferative disorder of histiocytes, a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Whose etiology is unknown. The nature of these lesions is controversial and could be either reactive or neoplastic; the presence of monoclonal cells does, however, favor the second hypothesis. Xanthogranuloma is frequently found in young adults and children (under 20 years old), mainly in the skin. In about 5%-10% of all Juvenile XG (JXG) cases xanthogranuloma are extracutaneous. Within this group, the site most frequently involved is the eye. Other involved organs are heart, liver, adrenals, oropharynx, lung, spleen, central nervous system and subcutaneous tissue, although involvement of the spine is uncommon. Isolated lesions involving the sacral region are extremely rare. To date, this is the first reported case of a giant JXG arising from S1 with extension into the pelvic region in an adult spine.

  6. Endoscopic resection of a giant fibrovascular polyp of the oesophagus with the assistance of ultrasonic shears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Niyati; Hall, Andrew; Weir, Justin; Mace, Alasdair

    2016-01-14

    Giant fibrovascular polyps of the oesophagus are rare benign tumours originating from the upper oesophagus. A 58-year-old woman presented with a 6-week history of a sore throat, odynophagia and progressive dysphagia, managing only a soft diet. CT of the neck and thorax, and barium swallow, both demonstrated a giant fibrovascular polyp measuring approximately 7 cm in length arising from the proximal oesophagus. The patient underwent endoscopic resection of the polyp with the assistance of ultrasonic shears. We present the case of a giant fibrovascular polyp and describe our novel technique for successful endoscopic resection using ultrasonic shears.

  7. [Local excision of giant rectal polypoid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimitan, Andrea; Burza, Antonio; Basile, Ursula; Saputo, Serena; Mingazzini, Pietro; Stipa, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Local excision is the best therapeutic option for giant adenomas of the rectum. Parks technique for lower rectal lesions and the T.E.M. technique for lesions localised in the middle and upper rectum offer exceptionally good exposure, allowing radical excision in the case of early low-risk T1 adenocarcinomas (well or moderately differentiated [G1/2] without lymphovascular invasion [L0]). From July 1987 to March 2006, 224 patients were treated by local excision for rectal lesions in our department. In 48 patients (21.4%) a large sessile benign lesion was diagnosed preoperatively. In 3 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of severe dysplasia (Tis) final pathology showed adenoma and for this reason they were included in our study group. A total of 51 patients with giant preoperative benign lesions were treated by local excision (Parks technique, T.E.M. or both). Twenty-five (49%) patients had a definitive diagnosis of adenocarcinoma: in situ (pTis) in 22 patients (88%), pT1 in 2 patients (8%) and pT2 in 1 patient (4%). In 26 patients (51%) the diagnosis was adenoma. The overall local recurrence rate was 9.8% (5/51); the recurrence rate was 7.6% (2/26) for adenomas and 12% (3/25) for carcinomas. The median hospital stay was 7 days (range 3-39). There was no operative mortality. Giant sessile polypoid lesions localized in the middle and upper rectum are best treated with T.E.M., while Parks technique is a good option in lower rectal tumours. These techniques, if correctly indicated and well performed, offer great advantages in terms of safety and radicality. In our experience the operative mortality was nil and the morbidity and recurrence rates were low.

  8. Epidemiology and management of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M.C. Verhamme (Katia)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBenign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common non-cancerous form of cell growth in men and usually begins with the formation of microscopic nodules in younger men. As BPH progresses, overgrowth occurs in the central area of the prostate, called the transition zone, which wraps ar

  9. Giant aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible with unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote-Moreno, Ana; Acero, Julio; García-Recuero, Ignacio; Ruiz, Julián; Serrano, Rosario; de Paz, Víctor

    2009-03-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are rare benign lesions of bone tissue, infrequent in craneofacial skeleton with regard to other structures like long bones or the spine. They are composed of sinusoidal and vascular spaces blood-filled and surrounded by fibrous tissue septa. We present a case of a 29-year-old Caucasian male with a big swelling in the left mandible associated to pain and rapid growth. He referred previous extraction of the left inferior third molar. On the X-ray study, an expansive multilocular and high vascularized bony lesion within the mandibular angle was observed. It produced expansion and destruction of lingual and buccal cortex. An incisional biopsy was performed showing a fibrous tissue with blood-filled spaces lesion suggestive of an aneurysmal bone cyst. After selective embolization of the tumour, surgical resection was done with curettage and immediate reconstruction of the defect with an anterior iliac crest graft. Aneurysmal bone cysts are non-neoplastic but locally aggressive tumours with occasional rapid growth that may be differentiated from other multilocular process like ameloblastoma, ossifying fibroma, epithelial cyst, giant cell granuloma and sarcomas. Treatment of choice consists on conservative surgical excision of the mass with curettage or enucleation. When resection creates a big defect, primary surgical reconstruction is recommended.

  10. Primary mediastinal leiomyma mimicking a giant mediastinal cyst: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yeong Uk; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, You Sung; Kim, Han Seong [Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Primary mediastinal leiomyoma is an extremely rare benign tumor of smooth muscle. Most common radiographic appearance is a well circumscribed heterogeneous solid mass. We reported a case of giant cyst-like lesion at the middle mediastinum, which was pathologically confirmed as a primary mediastinal leiomyoma.

  11. Factors Affecting the Recurrence of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone After Surgery: A Clinicopathological Study of 80 Cases from a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-dong Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This aim of the present study was to identify specific markers determining the recurrence of the giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB. Methods: This study involved the clinicopathological analysis of 80 cases. All of the clinical features, pathological fracture, Campanacci grade, histological features and surgical methods were reviewed. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of Ki-67, CD147, mutant p53 and p63 in GCTB. Comparisons between different groups were performed using the Chi-square test. The risk factors affecting recurrence were analyzed using a binary logistic model. Kaplan-Meier analysis was employed for the survival analysis between the groups. Cell proliferation assays, migration and invasion assays were used to detect the function of CD147 on GCTB in vitro. Results: The univariate analysis showed that Ki-67 and CD147 expression, pathological fracture, Campanacci grade and surgical method were associated with recurrence. The multivariate analysis revealed that CD147 expression, Campanacci grade and surgical method were the factors affecting GCTB recurrence. In addition, the Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that these factors affected tumor-free survival time. In vitro study revealed that the CD147 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA technique dramatically reduced the proliferation, migration and invasion of GCTB. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CD147 may serve as an adequate marker for GCTB recurrence. Campanacci grade is a risk factor for GCTB recurrence, which is also affected by the surgical method used.

  12. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of Giant Unit Cell Intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, Ho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary intermetallics R117Co52+δSn112+γ (R = Y, La, Pr, Nd, and Ho have been prepared by arc-melting followed by annealing at 800 °C. All the compounds belong to the Tb117Fe52Ge112 structure type (space group Fm 3 ¯ m characterized by a complex giant cubic unit cell with a ~ 30 Å. The single-crystal structure determination of Y- and La-containing compounds reveals a significant structural disorder. A comparison of these and earlier reported crystal structures of R117Co52+δSn112+γ suggests that more extensive disorder occurs for structures that contain larger lanthanide atoms. This observation can be explained by the need to maintain optimal bonding interactions as the size of the unit cell increases. Y117Co56Sn115 exhibits weak paramagnetism due to the Co sublattice and does not show magnetic ordering in the 1.8–300 K range. Ho117Co55Sn108 shows ferromagnetic ordering at 10.6 K. Both Pr117Co54Sn112 and Nd117Co54Sn111 exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering at 17 K and 24.7 K, respectively, followed by a spin reorientation transition at lower temperature.

  13. Distinct H3F3A and H3F3B driver mutations define chondroblastoma and giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick S; Presneau, Nadège; Scheipl, Susanne; Pillay, Nischalan; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Cooke, Susanna L; Gundem, Gunes; Davies, Helen; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Martin, Sancha; McLaren, Stuart; Goody, Victoria; Goodie, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Butler, Adam; Teague, Jon W; Halai, Dina; Khatri, Bhavisha; Myklebost, Ola; Baumhoer, Daniel; Jundt, Gernot; Hamoudi, Rifat; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2013-12-01

    It is recognized that some mutated cancer genes contribute to the development of many cancer types, whereas others are cancer type specific. For genes that are mutated in multiple cancer classes, mutations are usually similar in the different affected cancer types. Here, however, we report exquisite tumor type specificity for different histone H3.3 driver alterations. In 73 of 77 cases of chondroblastoma (95%), we found p.Lys36Met alterations predominantly encoded in H3F3B, which is one of two genes for histone H3.3. In contrast, in 92% (49/53) of giant cell tumors of bone, we found histone H3.3 alterations exclusively in H3F3A, leading to p.Gly34Trp or, in one case, p.Gly34Leu alterations. The mutations were restricted to the stromal cell population and were not detected in osteoclasts or their precursors. In the context of previously reported H3F3A mutations encoding p.Lys27Met and p.Gly34Arg or p.Gly34Val alterations in childhood brain tumors, a remarkable picture of tumor type specificity for histone H3.3 driver alterations emerges, indicating that histone H3.3 residues, mutations and genes have distinct functions.

  14. The surgical treatment of the giant cell tumor around the knee joint%膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏郁; 胡扬华; 王旭; 刘寿坤; 王体惠

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical and imaging characteristics,the corresponding operation method and clinical effect of the giant cell tumor around the knee joint,and discuss the selection of surgical options of the lesion. Methods 23 patients with giant cell tumor around the knee joint were retrospectively analyzed,10 distal femur cases and 12 proximal tibia cases and 1 case of proximal fibula tumor combined with tibia metastasis were included in the study. Surgical method was chosen according to the clinical and imaging characteristics of the pathological changes: 9 cases removal of the segmental tumor and joint prosthesis replacement;Extensively curettage and inactivation of the tumor cavity for 13 cases, then filled the cavity with bone graft or cement and using fixation (9 cases of bone graft, 4 cases of cement), amputation in 1 case. Results All cases were followed up for 8 ~ 50 months. Tumor recurred in 3 cases postoperation. 1 case recurred in the group of resection of tumor segment and tumor prosthesis replacement. 2 cases recurred in the group of extended tumor curettage and bone repair of the devitalized tumor cavity. The limb functional score of the two groups were 80% and 95% respectively. Conclusions A reasonable treatment based on the clinical and imaging characteristics of giant cell tumor should be chosen in order to obtain a good local control and limb functions.%目的:探讨膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤的临床和影像学特点、手术方式的选择及临床疗效,讨论该病变可接受的外科治疗方式。方法23例膝关节周围骨巨细胞瘤患者(股骨远端10例,胫骨近端12例,腓骨近端复发并胫骨转移1例)根据病变的临床、影像学特点选择不同手术方式:9例行瘤段切除肿瘤假体置换术;13例行肿瘤扩大刮除瘤腔灭活骨修复和内固定术(植骨 9例,骨水泥填充4例),1例行截肢术。结果患者均获得随访,时间8~50个月。术后 3例复发,

  15. Giant hepatocellular adenoma; case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitella, F.A.; Coutinho, A.M.N.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatocellular adenoma is a benign hepatic tumor identified mainly in women during fertility age, with estimated incidence of 4/1000 inhabitants. It is usually unique, well circumscribed, with or without a capsule, size varying from 1 to 30 cm, with possible central areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Case Report: A 37-year-old female patient presenting with no comorbities, use of hormonal birth control pills for 18 years, a condition of reduction in the consistency of feces, increase in number of daily defecations, abdominal cramps, and a stuffed sensation after meals for two years. A palpable abdominal mass extending from the right hypochondriac to the right iliac fossa was noticed four months ago. A computerized tomography (CT) showed an extensive hepatic mass on the right which was considered, within the diagnostic hypotheses, hepatic adenomatosis, without ruling out secondary lesions. A hepatic scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-DISIDA showed an extensive exophytic area from segment V to the right iliac fossa with arterialized blood flow and hepatocytic activity, as well as a hepatic nodule in segment VII with hepatocytic activity consistent with the hepatic adenomas hypothesis. The biopsy confirmed the hepatic adenoma diagnosis and the patient was submitted to a partial hepatectomy and cholecystectomy with good clinical evolution. Conclusion: Nuclear Medicine may supplement the assessment of hepatic nodules, including giant masses, thus suggesting new hypotheses and direction to therapeutic conduct. (author)

  16. A male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyama Yasumasa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a rare male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 59-year-old Japanese man with diabetes visited our hospital, complaining of fullness in the upper abdomen. A laboratory analysis revealed anemia (Hemoglobin; 9.7 g/dl and elevated C-reactive protein (3.01 mg/dl. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 274 U/ml and Carcinoembryonic antigen was 29.6 ng/ml. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a 14-cm cystic mass in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen that appeared to originate from the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy/total gastrectomy/cholecystectomy. The mass consisted of a multilocular cystic lesion. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium, including mucinous epithelium. Sarcomatous mononuclear cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells were found in the stroma. Ovarian-type stroma was not seen. We made a diagnosis of osteoclast-like giant cell tumor originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. All surgical margins were negative, however, two peripancreatic lymph nodes were positive. The patient recovered uneventfully. Two months after the operation, multiple metastases occurred in the liver. He died 4 months after the operation.

  17. Surgical treatment of giant cell tumors of long bone combined with inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia%插入式微波天线阵列诱导高温治疗长骨骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇; 范清宇; 马保安; 张明华; 沈万安

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the surgical treatment methods of giant cell tumors (GCT) of long bone in conjunction with inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia.METHODS:46 patients, included the surgical procedures,the oncology results,the functions of the limbs and the complications were analyzed.RESULTS:Follow up 3.5 to 9 years (mean 5.5 years).All patients were evaluated according to oncological and orthopaedic criteria.Two tumors were recurred.Orthopaedic function were perfect in 44 patients and were fair in 2.Infection was found in 2 patients.CONCLUSION:The surgical procedure to treat the giant cell tumors of long bone by inserted microwave antennas induced hyperthermia is a definitive surgical method which is safe and confident.

  18. Functional outcome of en bloc resection of a giant cell tumour of the distal radius and arthrodesis of the wrist and distal ulna using an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulna bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Zhong, J; Li, D; Sun, C; Zhao, H; Gao, Y

    2016-08-25

    Giant cell tumour of the distal radius is a locally aggressive lesion. In this study, we performed a wrist arthrodesis reconstruction with an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulnar bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure for a giant cell tumour of the distal radius. From January 2007 to September 2013, we followed eight patients for a mean duration of 36 months. One patient developed a recurrence and was treated by amputation; the other seven patients achieved radiological union in about 8 months. There was no wrist instability, deformation or dislocation; the mean range of motion of the forearm achieved 75° of supination and 70° of pronation. The patients could recover reasonable grip strength. This new operative procedure can excise the tumour with a low rate of recurrence, fewer functional deficits and fewer complications than reported for other procedures.

  19. Improved specificity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for lymph node staging of non-small cell lung cancer considering calcified lymph node as benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong Young; Seo, Young Soon; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Na, Kook Joo; Choi, Chan; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Yun Hyun; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) in lymph node staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) considering calcification and histologic types as well as FDG uptake. Fifty-three patients (38 men, 15 women; mean age, 62 years) with NSCLC underwent surgical resection (tumor resection and lymph node dissection) after PET/CT. After surgery, we compared PET/CT results with the biopsy results, and analyzed lymph node metastases, based on histologic types. PET diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was determined by maximum SUV (maxSUV) > 3.0, and PET/CT diagnosis was determined by maxSUV > 3.0 without lymph node calcification. By PET diagnosis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of overall lymph node staging were 45% (13 of 29), 91% (228 of 252), and 86% (241 of 281). Specificity was 91% in both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, while sensitivity was 71% in squamous cell carcinoma and 36% in adenocarcinoma. When we excluded calcified lymph node with maxSUV > 3.0 from metastasis by PET/CT diagnosis, specificity improved to 98% in squamous cell carcinoma and 97% in adenocarcinoma. The degree of improvement was not dependent on histologic types. PET/CT improved specificity of lymph node staging by reducing false positive lymph node regardless of histologic types of NSCLC.

  20. Quantum Giant Magnons

    CERN Document Server

    Zarembo, K

    2008-01-01

    The giant magnons are classical solitons of the O(N) sigma-model, which play an important role in the AdS/CFT correspondence. We study quantum giant magnons first at large N and then exactly using Bethe Ansatz, where giant magnons can be interpreted as holes in the Fermi sea. We also identify a solvable limit of Bethe Ansatz in which it describes a weakly-interacting Bose gas at zero temperature. The examples include the O(N) model at large N, weakly interacting non-linear Schrodinger model, and nearly isotropic XXZ spin chain in the magnetic field.

  1. Dynamos of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Busse, F H; 10.1017/S1743921307000920

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity variations. The importance of the constraint on the Ohmic dissipation provided by the planetary luminosity is emphasized. Planetary dynamos are likely to be of an oscillatory type, although these oscillations may not be evident from the exterior of the planets.

  2. Benign Papules and Nodules of Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Gürel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the more common benign oral papules and nodules of oral mucosa with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include mucocele, traumatic fibroma, epulis, pyogenic granuloma, oral papilloma, oral warts, lymphangioma, hemangioma, lipoma, oral nevi and some soft tissue benign tumors. These benign lesions must be separated clinically and histologically from precancerous and malign neoplastic lesions. Accurate clinico-pathological diagnosis is mandatory to insure appropriate therapy.

  3. Autograft-prosthesis composite for aggressive giant cell tumor of bone around knee%自体骨复合旋转铰链膝关节治疗骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuchun Yu; Ming Xu; Zhihou Fu; Songfeng Xu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the research was to study the clinical feasibility of autograft-prosthesis composite for aggressive giant cell tumor of bone around knee. Methods: Seven patients (5 males and 2 females, the mean age of 30.5 years old) with giant cell tumor of bone around knee underwent tumor resection and reconstructed with autograft-prosthesis composites since January 2006. Five lesions located at the distal femur and 2 at the proximal tibia. There were 3 patients with primary tumor and 4 with recurrent. Three patients with pathological fracture and all patients were of Campanacci Ⅲ. Results:All patients were done follow-up from 12 to 36 months. No recurrence, metastasis, and prosthesis loosening were found. The mean healing time between autograft and host bone was 5 months. The mean motion range of affected knee were 90° (70°-110°). Conclusion: Our data documented the clinical feasibility of autograft-prosthesis composite for giant cell tumor of bone around knee which should be performed tumor resection and reconstructed with prosthesis. The long-term outcomes remain to be further proven.

  4. Third cranial nerve palsy (ptosis, diplopia accompanied by orbital swelling: case report of unusual clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis associated with polymyalgia rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prassede Bravi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionGiant cell arteritis (GCA is the most common systemic vasculitis in older individuals, characterized by granulomatosus inflammation of the wall of large and medium-sized arteries. The wide spectrum of arterial sites involved leads to ischemia of different organs resulting in a wide range of clinical signs and symptoms. Temporal artery is commonly involved (temporal arteritis. Unusual patterns of presentation, such as extraocular motility disorders and orbital swelling, may be early and transient manifestations of GCA and precede the permanent visual loss due to ischemic optic neuropathy.Case reportWe describe a patient with uncommon manifestations of GCA consisting of transient recurrent diplopia, ptosis, orbital swelling together with more typical clinical features of the disease such as musculoskeletal manifestations (polymyalgia rheumatica and facial pain: all signs and symptoms promptly resolved under corticosteroid therapy without relapse.Conclusions A high level of suspicion of GCA in individuals over the age of 50 years is needed to prevent the development of severe complications. Clinicians should be aware of uncommon manifestations of the disease such as head–neck swelling and ophthalmoplegia: management guidelines have stated that prompt administration of adequate dose of corticosteroids as soon as ocular manifestations of GCA are noted may almost totally prevent blindness.

  5. Tumor de células gigantes de bainha de tendão no LCA Tendon sheath giant cells tumor in ACL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um relato de caso de tumor de células gigantes de bainha do ligamento cruzado anterior, uma localização extremamente rara para esse tipo de lesão. O paciente do sexo feminino apresentava dor no joelho, sem relato de trauma anterior. Foi submetido ao exame clínico, ao estudo radiográfico e de ressonância magnética da região. Feita a hipótese diagnóstica de TGC de Bainha, o paciente foi então tratado com ressecção artroscópica do tumor. O diagnóstico foi confirmado com exame anátomo-patológico. O paciente evoluiu bem, com melhora dos sintomas referidos no pré-operatório.The author presents a case report of Tumor Giant Cells (TGC localized on the anterior cruciate ligament sheath, an extremely rare site for this kind of lesion. A 37 y-o female patient presented with knee pain, with no history of previous trauma. She underwent clinical examination, X-ray study and magnetic resonance of the region. The diagnostic hypothesis of Sheath TGC was provided, and the patient was treated with tumor arthroscopy resection. Diagnosis was confirmed by anatomicopathological examination. By the end point assessment, none of the pre-operative symptoms were reported.

  6. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Philipp; Markl, Michael; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Vaith, Peter; Bürk, Jonas; Langer, Mathias; Geiger, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries' inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries' inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ=0.89 for 12-channel and κ=0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ=0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ=0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (pcoil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  7. Giant distal humeral geode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, M.M. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kennedy, J.; Hynes, D. [Department of Orthopaedics, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Murray, J.G.; O' Connell, D. [Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2000-03-30

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  8. Seismology of Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick; Schmider, Francois-Xavier; Guillot, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Seismology applied to giant planets could drastically change our understanding of their deep interiors, as it has happened with the Earth, the Sun, and many main-sequence and evolved stars. The study of giant planets' composition is important for understanding both the mechanisms enabling their formation and the origins of planetary systems, in particular our own. Unfortunately, its determination is complicated by the fact that their interior is thought not to be homogeneous, so that spectroscopic determinations of atmospheric abundances are probably not representative of the planet as a whole. Instead, the determination of their composition and structure must rely on indirect measurements and interior models. Giant planets are mostly fluid and convective, which makes their seismology much closer to that of solar-like stars than that of terrestrial planets. Hence, helioseismology techniques naturally transfer to giant planets. In addition, two alternative methods can be used: photometry of the solar light ref...

  9. Cell wall glycoproteins at interaction sites between parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its host Pelargonium zonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striberny, Bernd; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The process of host plant penetration by parasitic dodder (genus Cuscuta) is accompanied by molecular and structural changes at the host/parasite interface. Recently, changes in pectin methyl esterification levels in the host cell walls abutting parasitic cells in established infection sites were reported. In addition to that, we show here that the composition of cell wall glycoproteins in Cuscuta-infected Pelargonium zonale undergoes substantial changes. While several arabinogalactan protein epitopes exhibit decreased abundances in the vicinity of the Cuscuta reflexa haustorium, extensins tend to increase in the infected areas.

  10. Giant magnetostrictive materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU JingHua; JIANG ChengBao; XU HuiBin

    2012-01-01

    Giant magnetostrictive materials are a kind of functional materials developed since 1970s,known as their large magnetostrain and high energy density.In this paper,an introduction of magnetosttiction and the history of magnetostrictive materials are described firstly.Then we review the recent developments of both rare earth and non-rare earth magnetostrictive materials.Finally,the tendency of developing new giant magnetostrictive materials is presented.

  11. Red giant seismology: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The CoRoT and Kepler missions provide us with thousands of red-giant light curves that allow a very precise asteroseismic study of these objects. Before CoRoT and Kepler, the red-giant oscillation patterns remained obscure. Now, these spectra are much more clear and unveil many crucial interior structure properties. For thousands of red giants, we can derive from seismic data precise estimates of the stellar mass and radius, the evolutionary status of the giants (with a clear difference between clump and RGB stars, the internal differential rotation, the mass loss, the distance of the stars... Analyzing this amount of information is made easy by the identification of the largely homologous red-giant oscillation patterns. For the first time, both pressure and mixed mode oscillation patterns can be precisely depicted. The mixed-mode analysis allows us, for instance, to probe directly the stellar core. Fine details completing the red-giant oscillation pattern then provide further information on the interior structure, including differential rotation.

  12. Benign communicating hydrocephalus in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, B.; Holland, I.

    1981-03-01

    A review was performed of the computed tomograms (CTs) of 500 children which had been reported as showing widening of the supratentorial subarachnoid spaces with normal cerebral substance. On the basis of this a radiological diagnosis of cerebral atrophy had been made in all but five, who were said to have mengalencephaly. From these, the children with large or abnormally enlarging heads, but normal or only slightly enlarged ventricles, were selected; there were 40 such cases (8%). The clinical condition either improved or remained stable over a period of 2 years; in the majority the scan abnormality regressed (22.5%) or remained static (67.5%). In three cases there was slight progression of the CT changes before stabilisation, but only one case developed classical communicating hydrocephalus necessitating a shunt procedure. This condition is a generally benign and mild form of communicating hydrocephalus, for which an aetiological factor was apparent in about two-thirds of the cases studied.

  13. Benign paroxysmal torticollis in infancy

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    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Benign paroxysmal torticollis (BPT is an episodic functional disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by the periods of torticollic posturing of the head, that occurs in the early months of life in healthy children. Case report. We reported two patients with BPT. In the first patient the symptoms were observed at the age of day 20, and disappeared at the age of 3 years. There were 10 episodes, of which 2 were followed by vomiting, pallor, irritability and the abnormal trunk posture. In the second patient, a 12-month-old girl, BPT started from day 15. She had 4 episodes followed by vomiting in the first year. Both girls had the normal psychomotor development. All diagnostical tests were normal. Conclusion. The recognition of BPT, as well as its clinical course may help to avoid not only unnecessary tests and the treatment, but also the anxiety of the parents.

  14. Benign fibroxanthoma of the mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Zouloumis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histiocytomas constitute a large group of tumors, the classification of which created a lot of confusion in the past. For this reason, various attempts were carried out during the last years so that a widely accepted classification system could be defined. Fibroxanthomas, according to contemporary data, are classified into benign histiocytomas and they are mostly located at the skin of extremities. They are rarely localized in the area of the head and neck, where they are found commonly in soft tissue. Fibroxanthomas located at the bones of oral and maxillofacial region are extremely rare. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of a fibroxanthoma located at the mandible as well as to analyze the histological findings of the lesion on which the diagnosis and differential diagnosis were based.

  15. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira E Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination.

  16. Environmentally benign and efficient Ag2S-ZnO nanowires as photoanodes for solar cells: comparison with CdS-ZnO nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Yong, Kijung

    2013-02-04

    In this work, we develop a low-temperature, facile solution reaction route for the fabrication of quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) containing Ag(2)S-ZnO nanowires (NWs), simultaneously ensuring low manufacturing costs and environmental safety. For comparison, a CdS-ZnO NW photoanode was also prepared using the layer-by-layer growth method. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed type-II band alignments for the band structures of both photoanodes which facilitate electron transfer/collection. Compared to CdS-ZnO QDSSCs, Ag(2)S-ZnO QDSSCs exhibit a considerably higher short-circuit current density (J(sc)) and a strongly enhanced light-harvesting efficiency, but lower open-circuit voltages (V(oc)), resulting in almost the same power-conversion efficiency of 1.2 %. Through this work, we demonstrate Ag(2)S as an efficient quantum-dot-sensitizing material that has the potential to replace Cd-based sensitizers for eco-friendly applications.

  17. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200–400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  18. Escisión de un fibroma de células gigantes con láser de diodo: Informe de un caso Excision of a giant cell fibroma with Diodo's Laser: Report of case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Ardila Medina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo informa un caso de un fibroma gigantocelular localizado en tejido gingival y mucosa oral. Microscópicamente, la lesión se caracterizó por proliferación de fibras colágenas y fibroblastos gigantes, que se disponían en forma densa e irregular. Además, la superficie de la lesión estaba revestida por epitelio con cambios de hiperqueratosis. Se realizó escisión del fibroma con láser de diodo.This article reports a case of giant cell fibroma located in the gingival tissue and oral mucosa. Microscopically, the lesion was characterized by proliferation of collagen fibers and giant fibroblast, irregular and densely arranged. Beside, the surface was covered by epithelium with hiperqueratosis changes. The excision was done with Diodo's Laser.

  19. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensen, E. van; Leeuwen, R.B. van; Zaag-Loonen, H.J. van der; Masius-Olthof, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. AIM: To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal

  20. Giant omental lipoblastoma and CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Miyano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of giant omental lipoblastoma in a 13-month-old boy, which was treated successfully by total excision. Tumor cells were positive for S100, CD34 and CD56. This is the first report of lipoblastoma expressing CD56, a fact that could be used to differentiate lipoblastoma from liposarcoma.