WorldWideScience

Sample records for belowground competition effects

  1. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  2. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    OpenAIRE

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenho...

  3. Belowground competition among invading detritivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Han; Szlavecz, Katalin; Filley, Timothy; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Bernard, Michael J; Pitz, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    The factors regulating soil animal communities are poorly understood. Current theory favors niche complementarity and facilitation over competition as the primary forms of non-trophic interspecific interaction in soil fauna; however, competition has frequently been suggested as an important community-structuring factor in earthworms, ecosystem engineers that influence belowground processes. To date, direct evidence of competition in earthworms is lacking due to the difficulty inherent in identifying a limiting resource for saprophagous animals. In the present study, we offer the first direct evidence of interspecific competition for food in this dominant soil detritivore group by combining field observations with laboratory mesocosm experiments using 13C and 15N double-enriched leaf litter to track consumption patterns. In our experiments, the Asian invasive species Amynthas hilgendorfi was a dominant competitor for leaf litter against two European species currently invading the temperate deciduous forests in North America. This competitive advantage may account for recent invasion success of A. hilgendorfi in forests with established populations of European species, and we hypothesize that specific phenological differences play an important role in determining the outcome of the belowground competition. In contrast, Eisenoides lonnbergi, a common native species in the Eastern United States, occupied a unique trophic position with limited interactions with other species, which may contribute to its persistence in habitats dominated by invasive species. Furthermore, our results supported neither the hypothesis that facilitation occurs between species of different functional groups nor the hypothesis that species in the same group exhibit functional equivalency in C and N translocation in the soil. We propose that species identity is a more powerful approach to understand earthworm invasion and its impacts on belowground processes. PMID:27008785

  4. Interactive effects of above- and belowground herbivory and plant competition on plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Jingying; Raaijmakers, Ciska; Kostenko, Olga; Kos, Martine; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Competition and herbivory are two major factors that can influence plant growth and plant defence. Although these two factors are often studied separately, they do not operate independently. We examined how aboveground herbivory by beet armyworm larvae (Spodoptera exigua) and belowground herbivory b

  5. Belowground Competition Directs Spatial Patterns of Seedling Growth in Boreal Pine Forests in Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petter Axelsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground competition is often argued to be the main process determining patterns of natural forest regeneration. However, the theory of multiple resource limitation suggests that seedling performance also depends on belowground competition and, thus, that their relative influence is of fundamental importance. Two approaches were used to address the relative importance of above- and below-ground competition on regeneration in a nutrient-poor pine (Pinus sylvestris boreal forest. Firstly, seedling establishment beneath trees stem-girdled 12 years ago show that a substantial proportion of the seedlings were established within two years after girdling, which corresponds to a time when nutrient uptake by tree roots was severely reduced without disrupting water transport to the tree canopy, which consequently was maintained. The establishment during these two years also corresponds to abundances high enough for normal stand replacement. Secondly, surveys of regeneration within forest gaps showed that surrounding forests depressed seedlings, so that satisfactory growth occurred only more than 5 m from forest edges and that higher solar radiation in south facing edges was not enough to mediate these effects. We conclude that disruption of belowground competitive interactions mediates regeneration and, thus, that belowground competition has a strong limiting influence on seedling establishment in these forests.

  6. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  7. Effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on elm seedlings growth in Horqin Sandy Land%地上竞争与地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐毅; 蒋德明; 陈卓; 押田敏雄

    2011-01-01

    榆树疏林草原对科尔沁沙地植被恢复和景观保护有着重要意义.本文采用双因素两水平控制试验,从幼苗生物量、地下/地上生物量、茎高、根茎比、叶片数等方面,研究了草-树地上、地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响.结果表明:对于1年生榆树幼苗,单株平均生物量表现为无竞争>地上竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;地下/地上生物量表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;幼苗高度表现为地上竞争>无竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;根茎比表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;叶片数表现为地上竞争>无竞争>地下竞争>全竞争.地下竞争对1年生榆树幼苗生长影响显著,而地上竞争对榆树幼苗生长无显著影响.地上竞争与地下竞争对2年生榆树幼苗生长的影响均不显著.科尔沁沙地草本植物对榆树幼苗生长的影响主要通过地下竞争的方式实现,但地下竞争并没有改变榆树幼苗的资源分配方式.随榆树幼苗龄级的增长,草本植物竞争作用的影响逐渐减弱.%Elm sparse woodland steppe plays an important role in vegetation restoration and landscape protection in Horqin Sandy Land. In this paper, a two-factor and two-level field experiment was conducted to explore the effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on the growth of elm seedlings in the Sandy Land. Five aspects were considered, I. E. , seedling biomass, belowground biomass/aboveground biomass, stem height, ratio of root to stem, and leaf number. For the one-year-old elm seedlings, their biomass showed a trend of no competition > aboveground competition > full competition > belowground competition, belowground biomass / aboveground biomass showed a trend of belowground competition > full competition > no competition > aboveground competition, stem height showed a trend of aboveground competition > no competition

  8. The relative importance of above- versus belowground competition for tree growth during early succession of a tropical moist forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breugel, Michiel van; van Breugel, Paulo; Jansen, Patrick A.;

    2012-01-01

    Competition between neighboring plants plays a major role in the population dynamics of tree species in the early phases of humid tropical forest succession. We evaluated the relative importance of above-versus below-ground competition during the first years of old-field succession on soil with low...... Trichospermum mexicanum, two pioneer species that dominate the secondary forests in the study region, varied with the abundance and size of neighboring trees in 1-2 year old secondary vegetation. We found that local neighborhood basal area varied 10-fold (3 to 30 cm(2) m(-2)) and explained most of the variation...

  9. Performance of Planted Herbaceous Species in Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) Plantations: Overstory Effects of Competition and Needlefall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagley, C.M.

    2001-07-03

    Research to determine the separate effects of above-ground and below-ground competition and needlefall of over-story pines on under-story plant performance. Periodic monitoring of over-story crown closure, soil water content, temperature, and nutrients were conducted. Results indicate competition for light had a more determental effect on performance of herbaceous species in longleaf pine plantations than that resulting from competition for below-ground resources.

  10. Effects of canopy tree species on belowground biogeochemistry in a lowland wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrienne B.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical rain forests are known for their high biological diversity, but the effects of plant diversity on important ecosystem processes in this biome remain unclear. Interspecies differences in both the demand for nutrients and in foliar and litter nutrient concentrations could drive variations in both the pool sizes and fluxes of important belowground resources, yet our understanding of the effects and importance of aboveground heterogeneity on belowground biogeochemistry is poor, especially in the species-rich forests of the wet tropics. To investigate the effects of individual tree species on belowground biogeochemical processes, we used both field and laboratory studies to examine how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycles vary under nine different canopy tree species – including three legume and six non-legume species – that vary in foliar nutrient concentrations in a wet tropical forest in southwestern Costa Rica. We found significant differences in belowground C, N and P cycling under different canopy tree species: total C, N and P pools in standing litter varied by species, as did total soil and microbial C and N pools. Rates of soil extracellular acid phosphatase activity also varied significantly among species and functional groups, with higher rates of phosphatase activity under legumes. In addition, across all tree species, phosphatase activity was significantly positively correlated with litter N/P ratios, suggesting a tight coupling between relative N and P inputs and resource allocation to P acquisition. Overall, our results suggest the importance of aboveground plant community composition in promoting belowground biogeochemical heterogeneity at relatively small spatial scales.

  11. Effects of above- and belowground herbivory on growth, pollination, and reproduction in cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Nicholas A; Adler, Lynn S; Bernardo, Holly L

    2011-02-01

    Plants experience unique challenges due to simultaneous life in two spheres, above- and belowground. Interactions with other organisms on one side of the soil surface may have impacts that extend across this boundary. Although our understanding of plant-herbivore interactions is derived largely from studies of leaf herbivory, belowground root herbivores may affect plant fitness directly or by altering interactions with other organisms, such as pollinators. In this study, we investigated the effects of leaf herbivory, root herbivory, and pollination on plant growth, subsequent leaf herbivory, flower production, pollinator attraction, and reproduction in cucumber (Cucumis sativus). We manipulated leaf and root herbivory with striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) adults and larvae, respectively, and manipulated pollination with supplemental pollen. Both enhanced leaf and root herbivory reduced plant growth, and leaf herbivory reduced subsequent leaf damage. Plants with enhanced root herbivory produced 35% fewer female flowers, while leaf herbivory had no effect on flower production. While leaf herbivory reduced the time that honey bees spent probing flowers by 29%, probing times on root-damaged plants were over twice as long as those on control plants. Root herbivory increased pollen limitation for seed production in spite of increased honey bee preference for plants with root damage. Leaf damage and hand-pollination treatments had no effect on fruit production, but plants with enhanced root damage produced 38% fewer fruits that were 25% lighter than those on control plants. Despite the positive effect of belowground damage on honey bee visitation, root herbivory had a stronger negative effect on plant reproduction than leaf herbivory. These results demonstrate that the often-overlooked effects of belowground herbivores may have profound effects on plant performance. PMID:20859750

  12. Above and belowground controls on litter decomposition in semiarid ecosystems: effects of solar radiation, water availability and litter quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, A. T.; Araujo, P. I.; Leva, P. E.; Ballare, C. L.

    2008-12-01

    The integrated controls on soil organic matter formation in arid and semiarid ecosystems are not well understood and appear to stem from a number of interacting controls affecting above- and belowground carbon turnover. While solar radiation has recently been shown to have an important direct effect on carbon loss in semiarid ecosystems as a result of photochemical mineralization of aboveground plant material, the mechanistic basis for photodegradative losses is poorly understood. In addition, there are large potential differences in major controls on above- and belowground decomposition in low rainfall ecosystems. We report on a mesocosm and field study designed to examine the relative importance of different wavelengths of solar radiation, water availability, position of senescent material above- and belowground and the importance of carbon litter quality in determining rates of abiotic and biotic decomposition. In a factorial experiment of mesocosms, we incubated leaf and root litter simultaneously above- and belowground and manipulated water availability with large and small pulses. Significant interactions between position-litter type and position-pulse sizes demonstrated interactive controls on organic mass loss. Aboveground decomposition showed no response to pulse size or litter type, as roots and leaves decomposed equally rapidly under all circumstances. In contrast, belowground decomposition was significantly altered by litter type and water pulses, with roots decomposing significantly slower and small water pulses reducing belowground decomposition. In the field site, using plastic filters which attenuated different wavelengths of natural solar radiation, we found a highly significant effect of radiation exclusion on mass loss and demonstrated that both UV-A and short-wave visible light can have important impacts on photodegradative carbon losses. The combination of position and litter quality effects on litter decomposition appear to be critical for the

  13. Nitrogen Addition Altered the Effect of Belowground C Allocation on Soil Respiration in a Subtropical Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongxin; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Zhang, Fangyue

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil play an important role in soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. However, the variation in the soil respiration (Rs) and response of microbial community to the combined changes in belowground C and N inputs in forest ecosystems are not yet fully understood. Stem girdling and N addition were performed in this study to evaluate the effects of C supply and N availability on Rs and soil microbial community in a subtropical forest. The trees were girdled on 1 July 2012. Rs was monitored from July 2012 to November 2013, and soil microbial community composition was also examined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) 1 year after girdling. Results showed that Rs decreased by 40.5% with girdling alone, but N addition only did not change Rs. Interestingly, Rs decreased by 62.7% under the girdling with N addition treatment. The reducing effect of girdling and N addition on Rs differed between dormant and growing seasons. Girdling alone reduced Rs by 33.9% in the dormant season and 54.8% in the growing season compared with the control. By contrast, girdling with N addition decreased Rs by 59.5% in the dormant season and 65.4% in the growing season. Girdling and N addition significantly decreased the total and bacterial PLFAs. Moreover, the effect of N addition was greater than girdling. Both girdling and N addition treatments separated the microbial groups on the basis of the first principal component through principal component analysis compared with control. This indicated that girdling and N addition changed the soil microbial community composition. However, the effect of girdling with N addition treatment separated the microbial groups on the basis of the second principal component compared to N addition treatment, which suggested N addition altered the effect of girdling on soil microbial community composition. These results suggest that the increase in soil N availability by N deposition alters the effect of

  14. Effects of Manipulated Above- and Belowground Organic Matter Input on Soil Respiration in a Chinese Pine Plantation

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Fan; Jinsong Wang; Bo Zhao; Lianhai Wu; Chunyu Zhang; Xiuhai Zhao; Gadow, Klaus V.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT), only litter removal (LR), control (CK), only root trenching (RT) and litter a...

  15. Nitrogen mediates above-ground effects of ozone but not below-ground effects in a rhizomatous sedge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.L.M., E-mail: lj@ceh.ac.u [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, LL57 2UW Wales (United Kingdom); Hodges, G. [AMEC, Earth and Environmental UK Ltd, Unit 1, Trinity Place, Thames St, Weybridge, Surrey KT13 8JB (United Kingdom); Mills, G. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, LL57 2UW Wales (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Ozone and atmospheric nitrogen are co-occurring pollutants with adverse effects on natural grassland vegetation. Plants of the rhizomatous sedge Carex arenaria were exposed to four ozone regimes representing increasing background concentrations (background-peak): 10-30, 35-55, 60-80 and 85-105 ppb ozone at two nitrogen levels: 12 and 100 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Ozone increased the number and proportion of senesced leaves, but not overall leaf number. There was a clear nitrogen x ozone interaction with high nitrogen reducing proportional senescence in each treatment and increasing the ozone dose (AOT40) at which enhanced senescence occurred. Ozone reduced total biomass due to significant effects on root biomass. There were no interactive effects on shoot:root ratio. Rhizome tissue N content was increased by both nitrogen and ozone. Results suggest that nitrogen mediates above-ground impacts of ozone but not impacts on below-ground resource translocation. This may lead to complex interactive effects between the two pollutants on natural vegetation. - Nitrogen alters threshold of ozone-induced senescence, but not below-ground resource allocation.

  16. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

    2011-04-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

  17. Competition Effects of Supermarket Services

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanno, Alessandro; Lopez, Rigoberto A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of in-store services on retail food prices, supermarket competition, and demand using fluid milk as a case study. It is shown that higher-service supermarkets charge higher milk prices essentially because of an increase in market power due to differentiation of service offering. Results show that different types of services impact milk prices differently, that upscale food-retailers face stronger competition in newer services, and that service competition re...

  18. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive re

  19. The Effects of Tax Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan TALPOŞ

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Tax competition between governments is a research topic of growing importance in the context of globalization. This subject is particularly important for the European Union, characterized by a high degree of economic integration, single currency and free movement of goods, services, persons and capital. In this paper we define the concept of tax competition and we provide a review of the literature to highlight its potential effects.

  20. The Effects of Tax Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan TALPOŞ; Alexandru O. CRÂŞNEAC

    2010-01-01

    Tax competition between governments is a research topic of growing importance in the context of globalization. This subject is particularly important for the European Union, characterized by a high degree of economic integration, single currency and free movement of goods, services, persons and capital. In this paper we define the concept of tax competition and we provide a review of the literature to highlight its potential effects.

  1. Effects of elevated pO3 on carbon cycle between above and belowground organs of trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ping; Rennenberg Heinz; Matyssek Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Translocation of carbohydrate from leaves to roots via phloem and reallocation from roots to leaves via xylem regulate the allocation of carbon (C) between above and belowground organs of trees. To quantitatively analyze effects of elevated ozone concentrations pO3 on the internal cycle of C, juvenile beech and spruce were grown in phytotrons and exposed to ambient and elevated pO3 (i.e. twice-ambient O3 levels, restricted to < 150 ppb) for two growing seasons. The translocation of C in the phloem and xylem was quantitatively studied by investigating the phloem/xylem-loading of sugars, the differentiation of stem conductive tissue and the hourly water flow through the stem. Results in the present study shown, elevated pO3 significantly decreased C translocation from shoot to roots in beech by reducing both sugar concentration in the phloem and conductive phloem area. Elevated pO3 also significantly decreased C reallocation from the roots to the shoot in beech by reducing both of sugar concentration in the xylem and transpiration rate. The adverse effects of elevated pO3 on C translocation in the phloem and xylem, however, were small in spruce.Contrasting to beech, spruce is less sensitive to elevated pO3, regarding to phloem differentiation and sugar concentrations in the phloem and xylem.

  2. Dynamic belowground ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W. F.; Santantonio, D.; McGinty, D.

    1979-01-01

    Roots comprise the primary interface between plant and soil for uptake of water and nutrients. Much is known about the biochemistry, cell physiology and membrane physics associated with these important processes. In this paper we discuss the role of the belowground ecosystem, especially the autotrophic root component, in the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Beyond recognizing roles of anchoring terrestrial plants and uptake of water and nutrients, this component of the forest has been largely neglected in an ecosystem context. In order to focus discussion on the properties of the belowground ecosystem, we use the term rhizosphere to include roots, mycorrhizae, microbes, and rhizophagus invertebrates.

  3. Belowground biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardgett, R.D.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that the immense diversity of microorganisms and animals that live belowground contributes significantly to shaping aboveground biodiversity and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Our understanding of how this belowground biodiversity is distributed, and how it regulates

  4. Above- and below-ground herbivory effects on below-ground plant–fungus interactions and plant–soil feedback responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Martens, H.; Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Kostenko, O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Feeding by insect herbivores can affect plant growth and the concentration of defense compounds in plant tissues. Since plants provide resources for soil organisms, herbivory can also influence the composition of the soil community via its effects on the plant. Soil organisms, in turn, are i

  5. Effects of manipulated above- and belowground organic matter input on soil respiration in a Chinese pine plantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fan

    Full Text Available Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT, only litter removal (LR, control (CK, only root trenching (RT and litter addition (LA. We found that either aboveground litter removal or root trenching decreased soil respiration. On average, soil respiration rate was significantly decreased in the LRRT treatment, by about 38.93% ± 2.01% compared to the control. Soil respiration rate in the LR treatment was 30.65% ± 1.87% and in the RT treatment 17.65% ± 1.95% lower than in the control. Litter addition significantly increased soil respiration rate by about 25.82% ± 2.44% compared to the control. Soil temperature and soil moisture were the main factors affecting seasonal variation in soil respiration. Up to the 59.7% to 82.9% seasonal variation in soil respiration is explained by integrating soil temperature and soil moisture within each of the various organic matter treatments. The temperature sensitivity parameter, Q10, was higher in the RT (2.72 and LA (3.19 treatments relative to the control (2.51, but lower in the LRRT (1.52 and LR treatments (1.36. Our data suggest that manipulation of soil organic matter input can not only alter soil CO2 efflux, but also have profound effect on the temperature sensitivity of organic carbon decomposition in a temperate pine forest.

  6. Effects of manipulated above- and belowground organic matter input on soil respiration in a Chinese pine plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juan; Wang, Jinsong; Zhao, Bo; Wu, Lianhai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Xiuhai; Gadow, Klaus V

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT), only litter removal (LR), control (CK), only root trenching (RT) and litter addition (LA). We found that either aboveground litter removal or root trenching decreased soil respiration. On average, soil respiration rate was significantly decreased in the LRRT treatment, by about 38.93% ± 2.01% compared to the control. Soil respiration rate in the LR treatment was 30.65% ± 1.87% and in the RT treatment 17.65% ± 1.95% lower than in the control. Litter addition significantly increased soil respiration rate by about 25.82% ± 2.44% compared to the control. Soil temperature and soil moisture were the main factors affecting seasonal variation in soil respiration. Up to the 59.7% to 82.9% seasonal variation in soil respiration is explained by integrating soil temperature and soil moisture within each of the various organic matter treatments. The temperature sensitivity parameter, Q10, was higher in the RT (2.72) and LA (3.19) treatments relative to the control (2.51), but lower in the LRRT (1.52) and LR treatments (1.36). Our data suggest that manipulation of soil organic matter input can not only alter soil CO2 efflux, but also have profound effect on the temperature sensitivity of organic carbon decomposition in a temperate pine forest. PMID:25970791

  7. Effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on aboveground-belowground systems: a case study with plants, their mutualistic bacteria and root / shoot herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael William Ryalls

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between above- and belowground herbivores have been prominent in the field of aboveground-belowground ecology from the outset, although little is known about how climate change affects these organisms when they share the same plant. Additionally, the interactive effects of multiple factors associated with climate change such as elevated temperature (eT and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2 are untested. We investigated how eT and eCO2 affected larval development of the lucerne weevil (Sitona discoideus and colonisation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, on three cultivars of a common host plant, lucerne (Medicago sativa. Sitona discoideus larvae feed on root nodules housing N2-fixing rhizobial bacteria, allowing us to test the effects of eT and eCO2 on three trophic levels. Moreover, we assessed the influence of these factors on plant growth. eT increased plant growth rate initially (6, 8 and 10 weeks after sowing, with cultivar ‘Sequel’ achieving the greatest height. Inoculation with aphids, however, reduced plant growth at week 14. eT severely reduced root nodulation by 43%, whereas eCO2 promoted nodulation by 56%, but only at ambient temperatures. Weevil presence increased net root biomass and nodulation, by 31 and 45%, respectively, showing an overcompensatory plant growth response. Effects of eT and eCO2 on root nodulation were mirrored by weevil larval development; eT and eCO2 reduced and increased larval development, respectively. Contrary to expectations, aphid colonisation was unaffected by eT or eCO2, but there was a near-significant 10% reduction in colonisation rates on plants with weevils present belowground. The contrasting effects of eT and eCO2 on weevils potentially occurred through changes in root nodulation patterns.

  8. Exploring the Competitive Effects of Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Medina, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Central to the debate over school choice has been the question of how public schools respond to market-based competition. Many choice advocates suggest that competition can spur public schools to become more effective and efficient, but the evidence regarding the effect of competition from charters is comparably sparse and mixed. This article…

  9. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Ma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR and net N mineralization rate (NMR. Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  10. Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.

    2000-01-01

    Competition has been modelled in the literature in a number of ways.What do these different parametrizations of competition have in common?For instance, it turns out that it is not always the case that a rise in competition reduces price cost margins, industry wide profits or concentration.All parametrizations of competition, considered here, have two features in common.First, the reallocation effect: a rise in competition raises the profits of a firm relative to the profits of a less efficie...

  11. Species-specific defence responses facilitate conspecifics and inhibit heterospecifics in above–belowground herbivore interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Xiao, Li; Yang, Xuefang; Ding, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Conspecific and heterospecific aboveground and belowground herbivores often occur together in nature and their interactions may determine community structure. Here we show how aboveground adults and belowground larvae of the tallow tree specialist beetle Bikasha collaris and multiple heterospecific aboveground species interact to determine herbivore performance. Conspecific aboveground adults facilitate belowground larvae, but other aboveground damage inhibits larvae or has no effect. Belowgr...

  12. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W.H. van der Putten,; R.D. Bardgett; P.C. de Ruiter;

    2009-01-01

    from an empirical perspective and in specific ecological settings or contexts. Belowground interactions operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Due to the relatively low mobility and high survival of organisms in the soil, plants have longer lasting legacy effects belowground than aboveground...... and environmental settings, we explore where and how they can be supported by theoretical approaches to develop testable predictions and to generalise empirical results. We review four key areas where a combined aboveground-belowground approach offers perspectives for enhancing ecological...

  13. The Unintended Effects of Private School Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Calmar; Serritzlew, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We examine whether competition from private schools improves public school performance and expenditure. It is difficult methodologically to isolate the effect of competition, but we use new measures of competition in both the public and the private school sector and a data set comprising detailed...... background information on more than 35,000 public school students in the Danish voucher system. This design provides a relatively firm support for the conclusion that competition does not improve achievement of public school students but that it increases public expenditure per student. Finally, we argue...

  14. When CO2 kills: effects of magmatic CO2 flux on belowground biota at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, J.; Waldrop, M. P.; Mangan, M.

    2011-12-01

    The biomass, composition, and activity of the soil microbial community is tightly linked to the composition of the aboveground plant community. Microorganisms in aerobic surface soils, both free-living and plant-associated are largely structured by the availability of growth limiting carbon (C) substrates derived from plant inputs. When C availability declines following a catastrophic event such as the death of large swaths of trees, the number and composition of microorganisms in soil would be expected to decline and/or shift to unique microorganisms that have better survival strategies under starvation conditions. High concentrations of volcanic cold CO2 emanating from Mammoth Mountain near Horseshoe Lake on the southwestern edge of Long Valley Caldera, CA has resulted in a large kill zone of tree species, and associated soil microbial species. In July 2010, we assessed belowground microbial community structure in response to disturbance of the plant community along a gradient of soil CO2 concentrations grading from 80% (no plant life). We employed a microbial community fingerprinting technique (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to determine changes in overall community composition for three broad functional groups: fungi, bacteria, and archaea. To evaluate changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal associates along the CO2 gradient, we harvested root tips from lodgepole pine seedlings collected in unaffected forest as well as at the leading edge of colonization into the kill zone. We also measured soil C fractions (dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C, and non-extractable C) at 10 and 30 cm depth, as well as NH4+. Not surprisingly, our results indicate a precipitous decline in soil C, and microbial C with increasing soil CO2; phospholipid fatty acid analysis in conjunction with community fingerprinting indicate both a loss of fungal diversity as well as a dramatic decrease in biomass as one proceeds further into the kill zone. This observation was

  15. PLACEBO EFFECTS IN COMPETITIVE SPORT: QUALITATIVE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Beedie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the placebo effect in sports performance. The possibility that the placebo effect is a more common phenomenon than the quantity of published research would suggest is briefly addressed. It is suggested that the placebo control design often used in sports performance research masks any placebo effects and thus presents a false picture of the mechanisms underlying performance-enhancing interventions in the real world. An electronic survey was sent to 48 competitive, international and professional athletes. Questions related to the placebo effect in competitive sport. Thirty responses were received. Data indicate that the majority (97% of respondents believe that the placebo effect can exert an influence on sports performance, and that a significant number (73% have experienced what they defined as a placebo effect. Inductive content analysis reveals that these experiences fall into several categories such as explicit placebo effects, inadvertent false beliefs, ritual and reverse placebo effects. Furthermore, 10 respondents (33% offer explanations as to the nature of the placebo effect. Again, inductive content analysis reveals that these explanations fall into several categories including deliberate changes in competitive strategy, belief/expectancy, faith in a third party, and marketing. Overall, responses support previous experimental research and anecdotal reports that have found a relationship between belief and sports performance. It is suggested that further research be structured to not simply control for the placebo effect, but to elucidate it

  16. Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

    2002-01-01

    Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,…

  17. EFFECTIVE INCENTIVES AND CHICKPEA COMPETITIVENESS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Krishna D.; Kyle, Steven C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper attempts to measure the impact of government intervention in product and factor markets on chickpea competitiveness in India. This is done by estimating the nominal (NPC), effective (EPC) and effective subsidy (ESC) protection coefficients for chickpea and its main competing crops -wheat and mustard. Further, the Net Economic Benefit (NEB) in the production of these three crops is estimated to indicate where comparative advantage and production efficiency in production lie. In addi...

  18. Competitive Aggression without Interaction: Effects of Competitive versus Cooperative Instructions on Aggressive Behavior in Video Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Craig A.; Morrow, Melissa

    1995-01-01

    Extended and tested Deutsch's theory of competition effects. Predicted that people view competitive situations as inherently more aggressive than cooperative ones. Predicted that leading people to think of an aggressive situation in competitive terms would increase aggressive behavior. Increase of kill ratio occurred in absence of changes in…

  19. Brand effect versus competitiveness in hypernetworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Li; Suo, Qi

    2015-02-01

    A few of evolving models in hypernetworks have been proposed based on uniform growth. In order to better depict the growth mechanism and competitive aspect of real hypernetworks, we propose a model in term of the non-uniform growth. Besides hyperdegrees, the other two important factors are introduced to underlie preferential attachment. One dimension is the brand effect and the other is the competitiveness. Our model can accurately describe the evolution of real hypernetworks. The paper analyzes the model and calculates the stationary average hyperdegree distribution of the hypernetwork by using Poisson process theory and a continuous technique. We also address the limit in which this model has a condensation. The theoretical analyses agree with numerical simulations. Our model is universal, in that the standard preferential attachment, the fitness model in complex networks and scale-free model in hypernetworks can all be seen as degenerate cases of the model.

  20. Above- and below-ground herbivory effects on below- ground plant-fungus interactions and plant-soil feedback responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Martens, H.; Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Kostenko, O.

    2013-01-01

    1.Feeding by insect herbivores can affect plant growth and the concentration of defense compounds in plant tissues. Since plants provide resources for soil organisms, herbivory can also influence the composition of the soil community via its effects on the plant. Soil organisms, in turn, are importa

  1. Facilitation and inhibition: changes in plant nitrogen and secondary metabolites mediate interactions between above-ground and below-ground herbivores

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Yang, Xuefang; Wheeler, Gregory S.; Ding, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    To date, it remains unclear how herbivore-induced changes in plant primary and secondary metabolites impact above-ground and below-ground herbivore interactions. Here, we report effects of above-ground (adult) and below-ground (larval) feeding by Bikasha collaris on nitrogen and secondary chemicals in shoots and roots of Triadica sebifera to explain reciprocal above-ground and below-ground insect interactions. Plants increased root tannins with below-ground herbivory, but above-ground herbivo...

  2. Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2000-01-01

    Competition has been modelled in the literature in a number of ways.What do these different parametrizations of competition have in common?For instance, it turns out that it is not always the case that a rise in competition reduces price cost margins, industry wide profits or concentration.All param

  3. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on fatty acid molecular and isotope composition of above- and belowground tree biomass and forest soil fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griepentrog, Marco; Eglinton, Timothy I; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W I; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-derived organic matter (OM) in soils are still under debate and it is not clear how N deposition affects soil OM dynamics. Here, we studied the effects of 4 years of elevated (13C-depleted) CO2 and N deposition in forest ecosystems established in open-top chambers on composition and turnover of fatty acids (FAs) in plants and soils. FAs served as biomarkers for plant- and microbial-derived OM in soil density fractions. We analyzed above- and belowground plant biomass of beech and spruce trees as well as soil density fractions for the total organic C and FA molecular and isotope (δ13C) composition. FAs did not accumulate relative to total organic C in fine mineral fractions, showing that FAs are not effectively stabilized by association with soil minerals. The δ13C values of FAs in plant biomass increased under high N deposition. However, the N effect was only apparent under elevated CO2 suggesting a N limitation of the system. In soil fractions, only isotope compositions of short-chain FAs (C16+18) were affected. Fractions of 'new' (experimental-derived) FAs were calculated using isotope depletion in elevated CO2 plots and decreased from free light to fine mineral fractions. 'New' FAs were higher in short-chain compared to long-chain FAs (C20-30), indicating a faster turnover of short-chain compared to long-chain FAs. Increased N deposition did not significantly affect the quantity of 'new' FAs in soil fractions, but showed a tendency of increased amounts of 'old' (pre-experimental) C suggesting that decomposition of 'old' C is retarded by high N inputs. PMID:24953725

  4. Low-cost carriers fare competition effect

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona Benitez, R.B.; Lodewijks, G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects that low-cost carriers (LCC’s) produce when entering new routes operated only by full-service carriers (FSC’s) and routes operated by low-cost carriers in competition with full-service carriers. A mathematical model has been developed to determine what routes should be operated by a low-cost carrier with better possibilities to subsist. The proposed model in this paper was set up by analyzing The United States domestic air transport market 2005 year database fr...

  5. Plasticity in above- and belowground resource acquisition traits in response to single and multiple environmental factors in three tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Bellingham, Peter J; Lyver, Philip O'B; Bonner, Karen I; Wardle, David A

    2013-04-01

    Functional trait plasticity is a major component of plant adjustment to environmental stresses. Here, we explore how multiple local environmental gradients in resources required by plants (light, water, and nutrients) and soil disturbance together influence the direction and amplitude of intraspecific changes in leaf and fine root traits that facilitate capture of these resources. We measured population-level analogous above- and belowground traits related to resource acquisition, i.e. "specific leaf area"-"specific root length" (SLA-SRL), and leaf and root N, P, and dry matter content (DMC), on three dominant understory tree species with contrasting carbon and nutrient economics across 15 plots in a temperate forest influenced by burrowing seabirds. We observed similar responses of the three species to the same single environmental influences, but partially species-specific responses to combinations of influences. The strength of intraspecific above- and belowground trait responses appeared unrelated to species resource acquisition strategy. Finally, most analogous leaf and root traits (SLA vs. SRL, and leaf versus root P and DMC) were controlled by contrasting environmental influences. The decoupled responses of above- and belowground traits to these multiple environmental factors together with partially species-specific adjustments suggest complex responses of plant communities to environmental changes, and potentially contrasting feedbacks of plant traits with ecosystem properties. We demonstrate that despite the growing evidence for broadly consistent resource-acquisition strategies at the whole plant level among species, plants also show partially decoupled, finely tuned strategies between above- and belowground parts at the intraspecific level in response to their environment. This decoupling within species suggests a need for many species-centred ecological theories on how plants respond to their environments (e.g. competitive/stress-tolerant/ruderal and

  6. Measuring the economic effects of competition law enforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Don, H.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Sinderen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Together with a move from a rules-based legal approach to a more economic approach in competition cases, the economic effects of competition law enforcement have received increasing attention. Measuring these effects is important for external accountability of the Competition Authority, for quality

  7. Competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕思思

    2007-01-01

    <正> The term competition reminds me of asoul-stirring fight between a mother monkeyand a crocodile,The crocodile caught her babywhen the baby was drinking water in a pool,Inthe end,the mother got her baby,but herbaby’s body only,She lost her child forever,just for a mouthful of water.Such is competition,cruel and merciless,But if we see the other side of the coin,we’ll

  8. Belowground legacies of Pinus contorta invasion and removal result in multiple mechanisms of invasional meltdown

    OpenAIRE

    Dickie, Ian A.; St John, Mark G.; Yeates, Gregor W.; Morse, Chris W.; Bonner, Karen I; Orwin, Kate; Peltzer, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant invasions can change soil biota and nutrients in ways that drive subsequent plant communities, particularly when co-invading with belowground mutualists such as ectomycorrhizal fungi. These effects can persist following removal of the invasive plant and, combined with effects of removal per se, influence subsequent plant communities and ecosystem functioning. We used field observations and a soil bioassay with multiple plant species to determine the belowground effects and post-removal ...

  9. Belowground plant biomass allocation in tundra ecosystems and its relationship with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Heijmans, Monique M. P. D.; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; Maximov, Trofim C.; Berendse, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Climate warming is known to increase the aboveground productivity of tundra ecosystems. Recently, belowground biomass is receiving more attention, but the effects of climate warming on belowground productivity remain unclear. Enhanced understanding of the belowground component of the tundra is important in the context of climate warming, since most carbon is sequestered belowground in these ecosystems. In this study we synthesized published tundra belowground biomass data from 36 field studies spanning a mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from ‑20 °C to 0 °C across the tundra biome, and determined the relationships between different plant biomass pools and MAT. Our results show that the plant community biomass–temperature relationships are significantly different between above and belowground. Aboveground biomass clearly increased with MAT, whereas total belowground biomass and fine root biomass did not show a significant increase over the broad MAT gradient. Our results suggest that biomass allocation of tundra vegetation shifts towards aboveground in warmer conditions, which could impact on the carbon cycling in tundra ecosystems through altered litter input and distribution in the soil, as well as possible changes in root turnover.

  10. Identifying qualitative effects of different grazing types on below-ground communities and function in a long-term field experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Catriona A.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wright, Denis J.;

    2015-01-01

    on some soil functions involved in carbon cycling, microbial diversity, structure and functional composition. Both rabbit and invertebrate grazing impacted soil functions and microbial community structure. All functional community measures (functions, biogeochemical cycling genes, network association......Herbivory is an important modulator of plant biodiversity and productivity in grasslands, but our understanding of herbivore-induced changes on below-ground processes and communities is limited. Using a long-term (17 years) experimental site, we evaluated impacts of rabbit and invertebrate grazers...... between different taxa) were more strongly affected by invertebrate grazers than rabbits. Furthermore, our results suggest that exclusion of invertebrate grazers decreases both microbial biomass and abundance of genes associated with key biogeochemical cycles, and could thus have long-term consequences...

  11. Above- and belowground herbivory jointly impact defense and seed dispersal traits in Taraxacum officinale

    OpenAIRE

    de la Pena, Eduardo; Bonte, Dries

    2014-01-01

    Plants are able to cope with herbivores by inducing defensive traits or growth responses that allow them to reduce or avoid the impact of herbivores. Since above- and belowground herbivores differ substantially in life-history traits, for example feeding types, and their spatial distribution, it is likely that they induce different responses in plants. Moreover, strong interactive effects on defense and plant growth are expected when above- and belowground herbivores are jointly present. The ...

  12. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from April 11 to 20. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers with a value of 50 € each to win. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  13. Interactions between above- and belowground organisms modified in climate change experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsbak, Karen; Scherber, Christoph; Gladbach, David;

    2012-01-01

    a multifactor, field-scale climate change experiment and independently manipulate atmospheric CO2 concentration, air and soil temperature and drought in all combinations since 2005. We show that changes in these factors modify the interaction between above- and belowground organisms.We use an insect herbivore......Climate change has been shown to affect ecosystem process rates and community composition, with direct and indirect effects on belowground food webs. In particular, altered rates of herbivory under future climate4 can be expected to influence above–belowground interactions. Here, we use...... to experimentally increase aboveground herbivory in grass phytometers exposed to all eight combinations of climate change factors for three years. Aboveground herbivory increased the abundance of belowground protozoans, microbial growth and microbial nitrogen availability. Increased CO2 modified these links through...

  14. Impact of interspecific competition and drought on the allocation of new assimilates in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, R; Siegwolf, R; Zavadlav, S; Arend, M; Schaub, M; Galiano, L; Haeni, M; Kayler, Z E; Gessler, A

    2016-09-01

    In trees, the interplay between reduced carbon assimilation and the inability to transport carbohydrates to the sites of demand under drought might be one of the mechanisms leading to carbon starvation. However, we largely lack knowledge on how drought effects on new assimilate allocation differ between species with different drought sensitivities and how these effects are modified by interspecific competition. We assessed the fate of (13) C labelled assimilates in above- and belowground plant organs and in root/rhizosphere respired CO2 in saplings of drought-tolerant Norway maple (Acer platanoides) and drought-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica) exposed to moderate drought, either in mono- or mixed culture. While drought reduced stomatal conductance and photosynthesis rates in both species, both maintained assimilate transport belowground. Beech even allocated more new assimilate to the roots under moderate drought compared to non-limited water supply conditions, and this pattern was even more pronounced under interspecific competition. Even though maple was a superior competitor compared to beech under non-limited soil water conditions, as indicated by the changes in above- and belowground biomass of both species in the interspecific competition treatments, we can state that beech was still able to efficiently allocate new assimilate belowground under combined drought and interspecific competition. This might be seen as a strategy to maintain root osmotic potential and to prioritise root functioning. Our results thus show that beech tolerates moderate drought stress plus competition without losing its ability to supply belowground tissues. It remains to be explored in future work if this strategy is also valid during long-term drought exposure. PMID:27061772

  15. The Effect of International Competition on Union and Nonunion Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, David A.; Stewart, James B.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the impact of international competition on union and nonunion wages found that international competition was a significant determinant and that the net negative effect of a given import share of union and nonunion wages decreased sharply in absolute magnitude as the percentage of organized workers increased. (Author)

  16. Agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance

    OpenAIRE

    Páger, Balázs; Komlósi, Éva

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to elaborate the role of agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance. Our research contributes to the understanding of the relationship that exists between a country's urban system characterized by spatial agglomeration (concentration) or deglomeration (deconcentration) processes, and its competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance, respectively. Urbanization economies refer to considerable cost savings generated through the locating...

  17. Competition effects in charged particle induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute cross sections have been measured for 14 reactions: 54Cr(p,γ)55Mn for 0.83 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 3.61 MeV, 54Cr(pn,)54Mn for 2.23 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 3.61 MeV, 51V(p,γ)52Cr for 0.93 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 4.47 MeV, 51V(p,n)51Cr for 1.58 MeV 68Zn(p,γ)69Ga for 1.67 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 4.97 MeV, 68Zn(p,n)68Ga for 3.77 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 5.03 MeV, 68Zn(p,γ)65Cu for 3.36 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 5.48 MeV, 48Ca(p,γ)49Sc for 0.58 MeV less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 2.67 MeV, 48Ca(p,n,)48Sc for 0.96 less than or equal to E/sub p/ less than or equal to 2.67 MeV, 37Cl(α,γ)41K for 2.90 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 5.23 MeV, 62Ni(α,γ)66Zn for 5.07 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 8.64 MeV, 62Ni(α,n)65Zn for 6.95 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 8.76 MeV, 64Ni(α,γ)68Zn for 4.50 MeV less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 7.45 MeV, and 64Ni(α,n)67Zn for 5.29 less than or equal to E/sub α/ less than or equal to 7.44 MeV. Substantial drops in cross section were observed above the neutron thresholds for all the radiative capture reactions except 48Ca(p,γ). In the 48Ca(p,γ)and 68Zn(p,α) reactions significant though smaller neutron competition effects were observed. These cross sections were compared with cross sections calculated with global Hauser-Feshbach models. Criteria for isospin indexing, width fluctuation corrections, and black nuclues strength functions were established

  18. Indirect Effects of Environmental Change in Resource Competition Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Adler, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic environmental change can affect species directly by altering physiological rates or indirectly by changing competitive outcomes. The unknown strength of competition-mediated indirect effects makes it difficult to predict species abundances in the face of ongoing environmental change. Theory developed with phenomenological competition models shows that indirect effects are weak when coexistence is strongly stabilized, but these models lack a mechanistic link between environmental change and species performance. To extend existing theory, we examined the relationship between coexistence and indirect effects in mechanistic resource competition models. We defined environmental change as a change in resource supply points and quantified the resulting competition-mediated indirect effects on species abundances. We found that the magnitude of indirect effects increases in proportion to niche overlap. However, indirect effects also depend on differences in how competitors respond to the change in resource supply, an insight hidden in nonmechanistic models. Our analysis demonstrates the value of using niche overlap to predict the strength of indirect effects and clarifies the types of indirect effects that global change can have on competing species. PMID:26655983

  19. The Effects of Imbalanced Competition on Demonstration Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman, Amir; Ofir, Chezy

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of competition on product demonstration decisions. Pre-purchase product demonstration enables marketers to differentiate products that are ex-post differentiated but are judged according to perceived fit, rather than actual fit, due to pre-purchase consumer uncertainty. Imbalanced competition accompanied by fit uncertainty motivates the follower to offer demonstrations to avoid a price war. This paper explores the conditions that lead the leader to retaliate. In...

  20. Competition between triplet superconductivity and Kondo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kondo effect strongly depends on spin and orbital degrees of freedom of Cooper pairs. We focus on the Kondo effect in a px + ipy-wave superconductor with a full energy gap. The numerical renormalization study shows that the ground state is always a spin doublet for a Simp=1/2 local spin and that it is always a spin singlet for Simp=1. The latter is due to uniaxial spin anisotropy of the Cooper pair. We also compare these results with a case of the dx2-y2 + idxy-wave superconductivity having the same energy-gap structure. (author)

  1. Competitive energy markets. The effective route to improving the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Market forces, operating in an increasingly competitive energy market, are a preferred route to achieving environmental and energy efficiency benefits, than those which can be achieved through a managed approach adopted by many governments. It is shown, through examples, how electricity is a catalyst for change at several levels in business, the community and the general economy. Experience in the United Kingdom indicates that free market forces and inter-energy competition not only help improve the regional and therefore national economy, but they offer a very effective way of introducing improvements in energy efficiency and the environment. Governments should establish the framework for competition and regulation but not attempt to manage an industry, which is invariably done more effectively by those who run them. (author)

  2. Comparing the effects of mutualism and competition on industrial districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Christopher J. K.; Penn, Alexandra S.; Hoyle, Rebecca B.

    2014-12-01

    Industrial districts are made up of numerous firms or industries interacting in myriad ways. We create and study a model of trade and service interactions in an industrial district, and then extend it to investigate the effect of both positive (mutualistic) and negative (competitive) non-trade interactions on the behaviour of two different types of industrial district-Marshallian and hub-and-spoke. In particular we study whether the structure of the district, or the positioning of the relationships, makes a difference to the outcome for the district as a whole. We find that both these aspects make a difference. For instance, in both Marshallian and hub-and-spoke districts a competitive relationship between firms that are directly linked by trade has a stronger effect than competition between firms that are not. On the other hand in a Marshallian district it is possible to make the district more 'egalitarian' by adding a mutualistic relationship between suppliers or between intermediary firms, but this effect is not seen in hub-and-spoke districts. We highlight for further investigation a hypothesis suggested by our results that the effects of mutualism on an industrial district are more pronounced than those of competition.

  3. Competition between magnetic order and Kondo effect in cerium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a mean-field analysis of the competition between magnetic order and Kondo effect in a Kondo-lattice model usually employed to discuss properties of certain cerium compounds. A phase diagram is obtained showing an antiferromagnetic phase and a Kondo-compensated regime, in agreement with the Doniach diagram. A general discussion of the mean-field approach is also presented

  4. Safety in numbers? The effect of network competition on cybersecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gideon, Carolyn; Hogendorn, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    Economic incentives for security investment in elements of the Internet is of increasing concern. This paper contains an exploration of the incentives for Internet service providers (ISP)s to invest in security. The analysis focuses on the spillover effects of ISP security investments to other ISPs, which may be serving a different market or competing in the same market. The findings show that the nature of these spillover effects can change the effect competition in the ISP market has on inc...

  5. Bertrand competition in markets with network effects and switching costs

    OpenAIRE

    Suleymanova, Irina; Wey, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We analyze market dynamics under Bertrand duopoly competition in industries with network effects and consumer switching costs. Consumers form installed bases, repeatedly buy the products, and differ with respect to their switching costs. Depending on the ratio of switching costs to network effects, our model generates convergence to monopoly as well as market sharing as equilibrium outcomes. Convergence can be monotone or alternating in both scenarios. A critical mass effect, where consumers ...

  6. Soil organisms shape the competition between grassland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabais, Alexander C W; Eisenhauer, Nico; König, Stephan; Renker, Carsten; Buscot, François; Scheu, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Decomposers and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) both determine plant nutrition; however, little is known about their interactive effects on plant communities. We set up a greenhouse experiment to study effects of plant competition (one- and two-species treatments), Collembola (Heteromurus nitidus and Protaphorura armata), and AMF (Glomus intraradices) on the performance (above- and belowground productivity and nutrient uptake) of three grassland plant species (Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense, and Plantago lanceolata) belonging to three dominant plant functional groups (grasses, legumes, and herbs). Generally, L. perenne benefited from being released from intraspecific competition in the presence of T. pratense and P. lanceolata. However, the presence of AMF increased the competitive strength of P. lanceolata and T. pratense against L. perenne and also modified the effects of Collembola on plant productivity. The colonization of roots by AMF was reduced in treatments with two plant species suggesting that plant infection by AMF was modified by interspecific plant interactions. Collembola did not affect total colonization of roots by AMF, but increased the number of mycorrhizal vesicles in P. lanceolata. AMF and Collembola both enhanced the amount of N and P in plant shoot tissue, but impacts of Collembola were less pronounced in the presence of AMF. Overall, the results suggest that, by differentially affecting the nutrient acquisition and performance of plant species, AMF and Collembola interactively modify plant competition and shape the composition of grassland plant communities. The results suggest that mechanisms shaping plant community composition can only be understood when complex belowground interactions are considered. PMID:22678109

  7. Organizational Effectiveness: Social Capital and Competitive Advantage Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vini Wiratno Putri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at developing the model of organizational effectiveness in university through social capital and competitive advantage. The populations of this study are the head of study programs and the structural officials in some Universities in Semarang. In this case, We used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM in AMOS 21.0 program as the analysis tool. The result of the study and model analysis showed that even though the social capital had significant positive influenced to the competitive advantage in the university, the improvement of social capital and competitive advantage at university could not improve the university organizational effectiveness. Then, between two factors which influenced the competitive advantage (internal social capital and external social capital, it is obtained that external social capital got the dominant influenced factor to competitive advantage. The managerial implication suggested the policies should focus on improving the quality of cooperative relationships with external parties in the university. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah membangun model efektifitas organisasi pada perguruan tinggi melalui modal sosial dan keunggulan bersaing. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah ketua program studi maupun pejabat struktural pada perguruan tinggi di Semarang. Alat analisis data yang digunakan adalah Structural Equation Modelling (SEM pada program AMOS 21.0.Hasil pengujian dan analisis model menunjukkan bahwa pada meskipun modal sosial memiliki pengaruh positif signifikan terhadap keunggulan berasingn pada perguruan tinggi namun peningkatan modal sosial dan keunggulan kompetitif pada perguruan tinggi belum mampu meningkatkan efektifitas organidsasi perguruan tinggi tersebut. Selanjutnya diantara kedua faktor yang mempengaruhi keunggulan bersaing (internal social capitaldan external social capital, didapatkan bahwa external social capital merupakan faktor yang paling dominan pengaruhnya terhadap keunggulan

  8. The effect of swimming on oral health status: competitive versus non-competitive athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ercole, Simonetta; Tieri, Marco; Martinelli, Diego; Tripodi, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    Young swimmers are particularly susceptible to the onset of oral diseases. Objective To evaluate the oral health status in young competitive and non-competitive swimmers, involving an assessment of salivary cariogenic bacteria and secretory IgA (S-IgA) concentration. Material and Methods Before training sessions (T1), 54 competitive and 69 non-competitive swimmers had the following parameters assessed: decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT), Plaque Index (PlI), and Gingival Index (GI). At T1 and after training sessions (T2), stimulated saliva was collected and microbiological and immunological analyses were performed. Results Competitive swimmers trained 2.02±0.09 hours 5 times a week, while non-competitive swimmers trained 2.03±0.18 hours a week. A total of 14.7% of competitive swimmers suffered dental trauma related to sports. Only 11.76% of the competitive swimmers took a daily dose of fluoride, against 32.65% of non-competitive swimmers (p=0.029). Neither group followed an established diet or presented statistically significant differences in terms of nutritional supplement drink and chocolate intake. There were statistically significant differences in terms of oral hygiene. No significant difference in clinical indexes (DMFT, PlI, and GI) was present. S. mutans was harbored by 18.6% of competitive and the 32.2% of non-competitive swimmers. S. sobrinus was detected in 22.03% of competitive and 91.6% of non-competitive swimmers (poral infection. PMID:27119757

  9. Effects of confidence and anxiety on flow state in competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Confidence and anxiety are important variables that underlie the experience of flow in sport. Specifically, research has indicated that confidence displays a positive relationship and anxiety a negative relationship with flow. The aim of this study was to assess potential direct and indirect effects of confidence and anxiety dimensions on flow state in tennis competition. A sample of 59 junior tennis players completed measures of Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2d and Flow State Scale-2. Following predictive analysis, results showed significant positive correlations between confidence (intensity and direction) and anxiety symptoms (only directional perceptions) with flow state. Standard multiple regression analysis indicated confidence as the only significant predictor of flow. The results confirmed a protective function of confidence against debilitating anxiety interpretations, but there were no significant interaction effects between confidence and anxiety on flow state. PMID:24050472

  10. Diffusion of two brands in competition: Cross-brand effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laciana, C. E.; Gual, G.; Kalmus, D.; Oteiza-Aguirre, N.; Rovere, S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We study the equilibrium points of a system of equations corresponding to a Bass based model that describes the diffusion of two brands in competition. To increase the understanding of the effects of the cross-brand parameters, we perform a sensitivity analysis. Finally, we show a comparison with an agent-based model inspired in the Potts model. Conclusions include that both models give the same diffusion curves only when the cross coefficients are not null.

  11. Price Competition and Product Differentiation when Goods have Network Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our approach is to develop a model which captures horizontal product differentiation under environmental awareness, product innovation under network effects, and price competition whereby environmentally friendly products are costlier to produce. As an example, we refer to automobile producers, offering cars with a gasoline powered engine and one with a natural gas powered engine. The network of petrol stations provide the complementary good. The fulfilled expectation equilib...

  12. Optimal Forest Conservation: Competitiveness Versus Green Image Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Koskela, Erkki; Ollikainen, Markku

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical framework to study the behavioral and welfare effects of forest conservation, which leads to a binding harvesting constraint for landowners. The economy is modeled as a three-stage game by the interaction of the government’s conservation policy, with consequent adjustments in domestic timber market, and in output determination in a Cournot rivalry with the foreign forest industry. More specifically, we study how forest industry’s competitiveness constrains fo...

  13. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  14. Disentangling direct and indirect effects of water table drawdown on above and belowground plant litter decomposition: Consequences for accumulation of organic matter in boreal peatlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Strakova, Petra; PenttilÀ, Timo; Laine, Jukka; Laiho, Raija

    2012-01-01

    Pristine peatlands are carbon (C) accumulating wetland ecosystems sustained by a high water table (WT) and consequent anoxia that slows down decomposition. Persistent WT drawdown as a response to climate and/or land-use change affects decomposition either directly through environmental factors such as increased oxygenation, or indirectly through changes in plant community composition. This study attempts to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of WT drawdown by measuring the relative i...

  15. The effect of fertilization on the below-ground diversity and community composition of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shannon H A; Berch, Shannon M; Berbee, Mary L

    2009-04-01

    Fertilization typically reduces ectomycorrhizal diversity shortly after its application but less is known about its longer-term influence on fungal species. Long-term effects are important in forests where fertilizer is rarely applied. We compared fungal species composition in western hemlock control plots with plots last fertilized 7 years ago with nitrogen (N) or nitrogen plus phosphorus (N + P). The N + P fertilization had a significant lingering effect, increasing the tree size and foliar P content of the western hemlocks. From ectomycorrhizal roots of 24-year-old trees from northern Vancouver Island, Canada, we identified fungi from 12 samples per treatment, by amplifying, cloning, and sequencing fungal ribosomal DNA fragments, placing sequences with 97% or more identity in the same operational taxonomic unit (OTU). Diversity was high across treatments; we detected 77 fungal OTUs, 52 from ectomycorrhizal genera, among 922 clone sequences. The five most frequent OTUs were similar in abundance across treatments. Only 19 OTUs matched any of the 197 previously reported ectomycorrhizal species of western hemlock. Species composition but not diversity in nitrogen plus phosphorus plots differed significantly from control or nitrogen plots. Two Cortinarius OTUs were indicator species for nitrogen plus phosphorus plots and presence of Cortinarius cinnamomeus was correlated with control or nitrogen plots. After 7 years, fertilization history had made no detectable difference in ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity, but long-lasting changes in environment resulting from fertilization had a lingering effect on fungal ectomycorrhizal species composition. PMID:19139932

  16. UK's climate change levy: cost effectiveness, competitiveness and environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper intends to examine the cost effectiveness of UK's climate change levy (CCL), its implications on competitiveness of firms and the environmental impact. The paper briefly describes the levy and analyses it under the cannons of a good taxation policy. The economic implications of the levy are discussed with theoretical and empirical perspectives. Change in net exports, investment patterns and productivity and inclusion of compliance cost forms the basis for analysing the effect on competitiveness. It discusses the options available to firms to safeguard their competitiveness if it is adversely affected by the CCL. A description of the current scenario of the levy since its inception is also presented. The paper argues the need for a comprehensive policy involving the use of standards, emission trading as well as energy taxes to achieve emission and energy-use reductions. A focal point of this paper is to elucidate the pros and cons of the CCL (energy tax) with respect to an emission trading scheme

  17. The prerequisites for effective competition in restructured wholesale electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, R.; Auer, H. [Energy Economics Group, Institute of Power Systems and Energy Economics, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27-29/373-2, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-05-15

    This paper argues that effective competition in reformed wholesale electricity markets can only be achieved if the following six prerequisites are met: (1) separation of the grid from generation and supply; (2) wholesale price deregulation; (3) sufficient transmission capacity for a competitive market and non-discriminating grid access; (4) excess generation capacity developed by a large number of competing generators; (5) an equilibrium relationship between short-term spot markets and the long-term financial instruments that marketers use to manage spot-market price volatility; (6) an essentially hands-off government policy that encompasses reduced oversight and privatization. The absence of any one of the first five conditions may result in an oligopoly or monopoly market whose economic performance does not meet the efficiency standards of a competently managed regulated electrical utility. (author)

  18. The prerequisites for effective competition in restructured wholesale electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper argues that effective competition in reformed wholesale electricity markets can only be achieved if the following six prerequisites are met: (1) separation of the grid from generation and supply; (2) wholesale price deregulation; (3) sufficient transmission capacity for a competitive market and non-discriminating grid access; (4) excess generation capacity developed by a large number of competing generators; (5) an equilibrium relationship between short-term spot markets and the long-term financial instruments that marketers use to manage spot-market price volatility; (6) an essentially hands-off government policy that encompasses reduced oversight and privatization. The absence of any one of the first five conditions may result in an oligopoly or monopoly market whose economic performance does not meet the efficiency standards of a competently managed regulated electrical utility. (author)

  19. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  20. Modelling inter- and intra-specific competition effects in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    Accounting for competition effects is an essential step in building any stand growth simulator. However, accurate modelling of competition effects depends upon a clear understanding of quantitative relationships of various aspects of stand dynamics, including distributional parameters and spatial statistics. This study addressed four aspects of competition effects: 1) competition effects on distributional parameter dynamics of tree size variables; 2) inter-specific (loblolly pine ...

  1. The Competitive and Welfare Effects of New Product Introduction: The Case of Crystal Pepsi

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of new products is an important method of competition in many markets. Towards understanding its impact on competition and welfare, this paper estimates the effects of Crystal Pepsi being introduced by PepsiCo. Estimating a structural model of the soft drink market, the competitive effect is decomposed into two parts: the effect on the prices of existing products from increased competition, and the effect of having additional product variety. I find that firms’ profit and con...

  2. Carryover effects drive competitive dominance in spatially structured environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, Benjamin G; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2016-06-21

    Understanding how changes to the quality of habitat patches affect the distribution of species across the whole landscape is critical in our human-dominated world and changing climate. Although patterns of species' abundances across a landscape are clearly influenced by dispersal among habitats and local species interactions, little is known about how the identity and origin of dispersers affect these patterns. Because traits of individuals are altered by experiences in their natal habitat, differences in the natal habitat of dispersers can carry over when individuals disperse to new habitats and alter their fitness and interactions with other species. We manipulated the presence or absence of such carried-over natal habitat effects for up to eight generations to examine their influence on two interacting species across multiple dispersal rates and different habitat compositions. We found that experimentally accounting for the natal habitat of dispersers significantly influenced competitive outcomes at all spatial scales and increased total community biomass within a landscape. However, the direction and magnitude of the impact of natal habitat effects was dependent upon landscape type and dispersal rate. Interestingly, effects of natal habitats increased the difference between species performance across the landscape, suggesting that natal habitat effects could alter competitive interactions to promote spatial coexistence. Given that heterogeneity in habitat quality is ubiquitous in nature, natal habitat effects are likely important drivers of spatial community structure and could promote variation in species performance, which may help facilitate spatial coexistence. The results have important implications for conservation and invasive species management. PMID:27298356

  3. Effects of intraspecific larval competition on adult longevity in the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    OpenAIRE

    Reiskind, M.H.; Lounibos, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Larval competition is common in container-breeding mosquitoes. The impact of competition on larval growth has been thoroughly examined and findings that larval competition can lead to density-dependent effects on adult body size have been documented. The effects of larval competition on adult longevity have been less well explored. The effects of intraspecific larval densities on the longevity of adults maintained under relatively harsh environmental conditions were tested in the laboratory b...

  4. The Effect of Competitive Balance on the Demand for International Cricket

    OpenAIRE

    Sacheti, Abhinav

    2006-01-01

    The issue of competitive balance and its effect on the attendance demand for sport has been covered extensively for many professional sports, but there is very little coverage of the effect of competitive balance on demand for international cricket, particularly in terms of long run competitive balance. This dissertation uses economic analysis to investigate the effect of long run competitive balance on attendance demand for international cricket, using attendance data for Test and one-day in...

  5. Effect on persistence of intra-specific competition in competition models

    OpenAIRE

    Frederic Mazenc; Claude Lobry

    2007-01-01

    An ecological model describing the competition for a single substrate of an arbitrary number of species is considered. The mortality rates of the species are not supposed to have all the same value and the growth function of the substrate is not supposed to be linear or decreasing. Intra-specific competition is taken into account. Under additional technical assumptions, we establish that the model admits a globally asymptotically stable positive equilibrium point. This ensures persistence of ...

  6. Peer Effects, Social Networks, and Intergroup Competition in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Takao; Shu, Pian

    novel evidence on the interplay between social networks (urban resident group and rural migrant group) and peer effects. Specifically, we find that a worker puts in more effort when she is working with more able outgroup teammates but not when working with more able ingroup teammates, pointing to...... intergroup competition as a powerful source of the peer effects. Such peer effects across the social network, combined with the presence of incentive to outperform teammates at this firm, are largely consistent with recent experimental evidence on the important role that group identities play in facilitating......Using weekly data for defect rates (proportion of defective output) for all weavers in a Chinese textile firm during a 12 months (April 2003 - March 2004) period, we provide some of the first rigorous evidence on the presence and nature of peer effects in the manufacturing workplace. First, a...

  7. Effects of Phenibut and Citrocard on Non-Competitive and Competitive Behavior during Provoked Aggression in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagmetova, V V; Krivitskaya, A N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2015-05-01

    Anti-aggressive effects of phenibut (25 mg/kg) and its structural analogue citrocard (50 mg/kg) were revealed in rats under condition of provoked intraspecific aggression. These substances significantly decreased manifestations of aggression in animals: they increased the latency of attacks and reduced their number. Anti-aggressive effects of citrocard were more pronounced than effects of phenibut under conditions of non-competitive aggression induced by fear of inescapable painful exposure or under conditions of competitive aggression reflecting the ability of animals to reveal adaptive social communicative skills in aversive situation. PMID:26033589

  8. Effect of Heterogeneity in Initial Geographic Distribution on Opinions’ Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Balankin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Spin dynamics on networks allows us to understand how a global consensus emerges out of individual opinions. Here, we are interested in the effect of heterogeneity in the initial geographic distribution of a competing opinion on the competitiveness of its own opinion. Accordingly, in this work, we studied the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the majority rule dynamics using a three-state spin model, in which one state is neutral. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on square lattices divided into square blocks (cells. Accordingly, one competing opinion was distributed uniformly among cells, whereas the spatial distribution of the rival opinion was varied from the uniform to heterogeneous, with the median-to-mean ratio in the range from 1 to 0. When the size of discussion group is odd, the uncommitted agents disappear completely after  3.30 ± 0.05 update cycles, and then the system evolves in a two-state regime with complementary spatial distributions of two competing opinions. Even so, the initial heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of one of the competing opinions causes a decrease of this opinion competitiveness. That is, the opinion with initially heterogeneous spatial distribution has less probability to win, than the opinion with the initially uniform spatial distribution, even when the initial concentrations of both opinions are equal. We found that although the time to consensus , the opinion’s recession rate is determined during the first 3.3 update cycles. On the other hand, we found that the initial heterogeneity of the opinion spatial distribution assists the formation of quasi-stable regions, in which this opinion is dominant. The results of Monte Carlo simulations are discussed with regard to the electoral competition of political parties.

  9. Effect on persistence of intra-specific competition in competition models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Mazenc

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An ecological model describing the competition for a single substrate of an arbitrary number of species is considered. The mortality rates of the species are not supposed to have all the same value and the growth function of the substrate is not supposed to be linear or decreasing. Intra-specific competition is taken into account. Under additional technical assumptions, we establish that the model admits a globally asymptotically stable positive equilibrium point. This ensures persistence of the species. Our proof relies on a Lyapunov function.

  10. Belowground consequences of vegetation change and their treatment in models

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, R.B.; Schenk, H J; Jobbagy, E G; Canadell, J.; Colello, G D; Dickinson, R E; Dunne, T.; Field, C.B.; Friedlingstein, P.; Heimann, M.; Hibbard, K.; Kicklighter, D W; A. Kleidon; R. P. Neilson; Parton, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    The extent and consequences of global land-cover and land-use change are increasingly apparent. One consequence not so apparent is the altered structure of plants belowground. This paper examines such belowground changes, emphasizing the interaction of altered root distributions with other factors and their treatment in models. Shifts of woody and herbaceous vegetation with deforestation, afforestation, and woody plant encroachment typically alter the depth and distribution of plant rests, in...

  11. Entry time effects and follow-on drug competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Sermet, Catherine; Pichetti, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms have been criticized for concentrating efforts of R&D on the so-called me-too or follow-on drugs. There have been many comments for and against the dissemination of these incremental innovations but few papers have broached the subject from an econometric point of view, possibly because identification of me-too or follow-on drugs is not so obvious. This paper focuses on the impact of entry order on follow-on drug competition in the French market between the years 2001 and 2007. More precisely, this study examines the effects on market share of first entrants in the follow-on drug market and how this possible competitive advantage changes over time. First results are coherent with theoretical microeconomic issues concerning the importance of being first. We find evidence that first movers in the follow-on drug market have the ability to capture and maintain greater market share for a long period of time. The hierarchical market position of follow-on drugs does not seem to be affected by generic drug emergence. From a dynamic perspective, our analysis shows that market share is positively correlated with the ability of follow-on drugs to set prices higher than the average follow-on drug prices in a specific therapeutic class, which means that market power remains considerably important for first movers. Moreover, we found that the optimum level of innovation to maximize market share is the highest one. PMID:25501258

  12. Competition effects in the dynamics of tumor cords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalerandi, M.; Sansone, B. Capogrosso; Benati, C.; Condat, C. A.

    2002-05-01

    A general feature of cancer growth is the cellular competition for available nutrients. This is also the case for tumor cords, neoplasms forming cylindrical structures around blood vessels. Experimental data show that, in their avascular phase, cords grow up to a limit radius of about 100 μm, reaching a quasi-steady-state characterized by a necrotized area separating the tumor from the surrounding healthy tissue. Here we use a set of rules to formulate a model that describes how the dynamics of cord growth is controlled by the competition of tumor cells among themselves and with healthy cells for the acquisition of essential nutrients. The model takes into account the mechanical effects resulting from the interaction between the multiplying cancer cells and the surrounding tissue. We explore the influence of the relevant parameters on the tumor growth and on its final state. The model is also applied to investigate cord deformation in a region containing multiple nutrient sources and to predict the further complex growth of the tumor.

  13. A Modeling Approach to Simulate Effects of Intercropping and Interspecific Competition in Arable Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Heike Knörzer; Simone Graeff-Hönninger; Bettina U. Müller; Hans-Peter Piepho; Wilhelm Claupein

    2010-01-01

    Interspecific competition between species influences their individual growth and performance. Neighborhood effects become especially important in intercropping systems, and modeling approaches could be a useful tool to simulate plant growth under different environmental conditions to help identify appropriate combinations of different crops while managing competition. This study gives an overview of different competition models and their underlying modeling approaches. To model intercropping ...

  14. Competitive Intelligence in Malaysia Pharmaceutical Industry : Effectiveness of Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi, Hooi Min

    2004-01-01

    Competitive Intelligence is increasingly being considered an important, if not mandatory, piece of every business’ overall strategy and functioning, including tactical and strategic planning. The level of Competitive Intelligence activities differ by industries, and at different stage of product life cycle. It is closely linked to Knowledge Management – another major field on the way company handling information. Competitive Intelligence has often been related to industrial espionage where so...

  15. Belowground induction by delia radicum or phytohormones affect aboveground herbivore communities on field-grown broccoli

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre, S.P.; Dugravot, S.; Hervé, M. R.; Hassan, H M; Dam, N.M. van; Cortesero, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Induced plant defence in response to phytophagous insects is a well described phenomenon. However, so far little is known about the effect of induced plant responses on subsequently colonizing herbivores in the field. Broccoli plants were induced in the belowground compartment using (i) infestation by the root-herbivore Delia radicum, (ii) root application of jasmonic acid (JA) or (iii) root application of salicylic acid (SA). The abundance of D. radicum and six aboveground herbivores display...

  16. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    OpenAIRE

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Lukasz L Stelinski; Duncan, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through fol...

  17. Signal signature of aboveground-induced resistance upon belowground herbivory in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Erb, Matthias; Flors, Victor; Karlen, Danielle; De Lange, Elvira S.; Planchamp, Chantal; D’Alessandro, Marco; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Ton, Jurriaan

    2012-01-01

    Plants activate local and systemic defence mechanisms upon exposure to stress. This innate immune response is partially regulated by plant hormones, and involves the accumulation of defensive metabolites. Although local defence reactions to herbivores are well studied, less is known about the impact of root herbivory on shoot defence. Here, we examined the effects of belowground infestation by the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera on aboveground resistance in maize. Belowgr...

  18. Competitiveness through innovation for the Romanian Economy. IP activity and its effect on competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Drumea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to study the way that the efforts put into increasing one of the most significant competitiveness pillars (innovation) and results (especially Patent, Marks and Designs production and application) correlate for the Romanian economy in the last decade. We will then use as effort indicators the R&D expenses and the Innovation costs, as reported by the National Institute of Statistics and as result indicators we use the number and provenience of Intellectual Property (IP) activit...

  19. The effects of individual and team competitions on performance, emotions, and effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Andrew; Kavussanu, Maria; McIntyre, David; Ring, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    It is well documented that competition can affect performance and emotion in sport. However, our understanding of the comparative effects of individual and team competitions on performance and emotion is limited. We also know little about emotion-based mechanisms underlying the effects of different types of competition on performance. To address these issues, 64 participants completed a handgrip endurance task during time-trial, one-on-one, two-on-two, and four-on-four competitions while self-report and possible corroborative physiological measures of enjoyment, anxiety, and effort were assessed. Results indicated that performance, enjoyment, anxiety, and effort increased from individual to team competitions. The observed increases in performance were mediated by increased enjoyment and effort. Our findings illustrate differential effects of individual and team competitions on performance and emotion. Moreover, they indicate that both enjoyment-based and anxiety-based mechanisms can explain changes in performance among different types of individual and team competition. PMID:23535972

  20. Release from belowground enemies and shifts in root traits as interrelated drivers of alien plant invasion success: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the interrelated mechanisms driving plant invasions, such as the interplay between enemy release and resource-acquisition traits, is biased by an aboveground perspective. To address this bias, I hypothesize that plant release from belowground enemies (especially fungal pathogens) will give invasive plant species a fitness advantage in the alien range, via shifts in root traits (e.g., increased specific root length and branching intensity) that increase resource uptake and competitive ability compared to native species in the alien range, and compared to plants of the invader in its native range. Such root-trait changes could be ecological or evolutionary in nature. I explain how shifts in root traits could occur as a consequence of enemy release and contribute to invasion success of alien plants, and how they could be interrelated with other potential belowground drivers of invasion success (allelopathy, mutualist enhancement). Finally, I outline the approaches that could be taken to test whether belowground enemy release results in increased competitive ability and nutrient uptake by invasive alien plants, via changes in root traits in the alien range. PMID:26668717

  1. Genetic Variation of the Host Plant Species Matters for Interactions with Above- and Belowground Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kafle

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants are challenged by both above- and belowground herbivores which may indirectly interact with each other via herbivore-induced changes in plant traits; however, little is known about how genetic variation of the host plant shapes such interactions. We used two genotypes (M4 and E9 of Solanum dulcamara (Solanaceae with or without previous experience of aboveground herbivory by Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae to quantify its effects on subsequent root herbivory by Agriotes spp. (Elateridae. In the genotype M4, due to the aboveground herbivory, shoot and root biomass was significantly decreased, roots had a lower C/N ratio and contained significantly higher levels of proteins, while the genotype E9 was not affected. However, aboveground herbivory had no effects on weight gain or mortality of the belowground herbivores. Root herbivory by Agriotes increased the nitrogen concentration in the roots of M4 plants leading to a higher weight gain of conspecific larvae. Also, in feeding bioassays, Agriotes larvae tended to prefer roots of M4 over E9, irrespective of the aboveground herbivore treatment. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR documented differences in metabolic profiles of the two plant genotypes and of the roots of M4 plants after aboveground herbivory. Together, these results demonstrate that previous aboveground herbivory can have genotype-specific effects on quantitative and qualitative root traits. This may have consequences for belowground interactions, although generalist root herbivores might not be affected when the root biomass offered is still sufficient for growth and survival.

  2. Belowground legacies of Pinus contorta invasion and removal result in multiple mechanisms of invasional meltdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Ian A; St John, Mark G; Yeates, Gregor W; Morse, Chris W; Bonner, Karen I; Orwin, Kate; Peltzer, Duane A

    2014-01-01

    Plant invasions can change soil biota and nutrients in ways that drive subsequent plant communities, particularly when co-invading with belowground mutualists such as ectomycorrhizal fungi. These effects can persist following removal of the invasive plant and, combined with effects of removal per se, influence subsequent plant communities and ecosystem functioning. We used field observations and a soil bioassay with multiple plant species to determine the belowground effects and post-removal legacy caused by invasion of the non-native tree Pinus contorta into a native plant community. Pinus facilitated ectomycorrhizal infection of the co-occurring invasive tree, Pseudotsuga menziesii, but not conspecific Pinus (which always had ectomycorrhizas) nor the native pioneer Kunzea ericoides (which never had ectomycorrhizas). Pinus also caused a major shift in soil nutrient cycling as indicated by increased bacterial dominance, NO3-N (17-fold increase) and available phosphorus (3.2-fold increase) in soils, which in turn promoted increased growth of graminoids. These results parallel field observations, where Pinus removal is associated with invasion by non-native grasses and herbs, and suggest that legacies of Pinus on soil nutrient cycling thus indirectly promote invasion of other non-native plant species. Our findings demonstrate that multi-trophic belowground legacies are an important but hitherto largely unconsidered factor in plant community reassembly following invasive plant removal. PMID:25228312

  3. Belowground legacies of Pinus contorta invasion and removal result in multiple mechanisms of invasional meltdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Ian A.; St John, Mark G.; Yeates, Gregor W.; Morse, Chris W.; Bonner, Karen I.; Orwin, Kate; Peltzer, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant invasions can change soil biota and nutrients in ways that drive subsequent plant communities, particularly when co-invading with belowground mutualists such as ectomycorrhizal fungi. These effects can persist following removal of the invasive plant and, combined with effects of removal per se, influence subsequent plant communities and ecosystem functioning. We used field observations and a soil bioassay with multiple plant species to determine the belowground effects and post-removal legacy caused by invasion of the non-native tree Pinus contorta into a native plant community. Pinus facilitated ectomycorrhizal infection of the co-occurring invasive tree, Pseudotsuga menziesii, but not conspecific Pinus (which always had ectomycorrhizas) nor the native pioneer Kunzea ericoides (which never had ectomycorrhizas). Pinus also caused a major shift in soil nutrient cycling as indicated by increased bacterial dominance, NO3-N (17-fold increase) and available phosphorus (3.2-fold increase) in soils, which in turn promoted increased growth of graminoids. These results parallel field observations, where Pinus removal is associated with invasion by non-native grasses and herbs, and suggest that legacies of Pinus on soil nutrient cycling thus indirectly promote invasion of other non-native plant species. Our findings demonstrate that multi-trophic belowground legacies are an important but hitherto largely unconsidered factor in plant community reassembly following invasive plant removal. PMID:25228312

  4. The effective strategic leadership in the global competitive environment

    OpenAIRE

    Miceski, Trajko

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on strategic leadership and its importance as a potential source of competitive advantage in today's era of globalization. Strategic leadership can be defined as ability to: influence without coercion, prediction, vision, maintaining flexibility, anticipation of positive change, mobilizing and effectuation of human resources and many other activities that allow the company to the forefront in the global competitive environment.

  5. Pitching effects of buoyancy during four competitive swimming strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Raymond C Z; Cleary, Paul W; Harrison, Simon M; Mason, Bruce R; Pease, David L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pitching effects of buoyancy during all competitive swimming strokes--freestyle, backstroke, butterfly, and breaststroke. Laser body scans of national-level athletes and synchronized multiangle swimming footage were used in a novel markerless motion capture process to produce three-dimensional biomechanical models of the swimming athletes. The deforming surface meshes were then used to calculate swimmer center-of-mass (CoM) positions, center-of-buoyancy (CoB) positions, pitch buoyancy torques, and sagittal plane moments of inertia (MoI) throughout each stroke cycle. In all cases the mean buoyancy torque tended to raise the legs and lower the head; however, during part of the butterfly stroke the instantaneous buoyancy torque had the opposite effect. The swimming strokes that use opposing arm and leg strokes (freestyle and backstroke) had smaller variations in CoM positions, CoB positions, and buoyancy torques. Strokes with synchronized left-right arm and leg movement (butterfly and breaststroke) had larger variations in buoyancy torques, which impacts the swimmer's ability to maintain a horizontal body pitch for these strokes. The methodology outlined in this paper enables the rotational effects of buoyancy to be better understood by swimmers, allowing better control of streamlined horizontal body positioning during swimming to improve performance. PMID:24979812

  6. The Effectiveness of Trade Shows in Global Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONIDA KELLEZI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trade shows industry has experienced a rapid growth during the last years. They are considered as a vital communication technique especially for those companies that operate in international markets and that aim to reach specific audiences. Making them an integral part of the marketing communication strategy enables companies in: developing customer relationships; offering possibilities for sales and sales promotion; undertaking and maintaining good international business relations; monitoring international competition as well as minimizing entry barriers in new markets. During the last years, many Albanian companies that operate in foreign businesses have started to engage in trade shows. Face to face meetings with their potential customers and direct competitors are among the most important reasons for investing in this marketing tool. Even though the literature regarding trade shows effectiveness is increasing constantly, research on its effectiveness is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to study the effectiveness of trade shows as a marketing communication tool. More specifically, it is focused in studying the usage of trade shows by Albanian companies when competing on international markets.

  7. Competitiveness through innovation for the Romanian Economy. IP activity and its effect on competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina DRUMEA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the way that the efforts put into increasing one of the most significant competitiveness pillars (innovation and results (especially Patent, Marks and Designs production and application correlate for the Romanian economy in the last decade. We will then use as effort indicators the R&D expenses and the Innovation costs, as reported by the National Institute of Statistics and as result indicators we use the number and provenience of Intellectual Property (IP activity registered with World Intellectual Property Organization, as well as GDP.

  8. Competitive Effects of 2+ and 3+ Cations on DNA Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tongu, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Zinchenko, A A; Chen, N; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    By using single-DNA observation with fluorescence microscopy, we observed the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA with 166 kbp). It was found that divalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. These experimental observations are inconsistent with the well-established Debye-Huckel scheme regarding the shielding effect of counter ions, which is given as the additivity of contributions of cations with different valences. We interpreted the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counter ions before and after the folding transition of DNA. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we considered the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly-charged polyelectrolyte, double-st...

  9. Estimation of Below-Ground Biomass in Natural and Replanted Mangroves in Gazi Bay, Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of belowground biomass in woody ecosystems is important because of it's relevance to nutrient turnover and the potential store in carbon. Most studies om mangroves biomass have concentrated on standing biomass with very little on belowground biomass; this is particularly true for he eastern African region. The present study was conducted at Gaza Bay in Southern Coast of Kenya. The main objective was to determine belowground biomass mangroves in natural and replanted plantations of Rhizophora mucronata, Avicennia marina and Sonneratia alba. The study in addition investigated horizontal and vertical root distribution. Sampling was carried out in 10m * 10m plots where cores (65 cm length and 15.6 cm diameter) were made at the present root base, between and away from the stem as far as the roots from individual stem could possibly extend based on the sampled tree canopy diameter. In R. mucronata belowground biomass from different stands ranged between 4.9 to 3.7 t ha-1, S. alba 50.8 to 87.3 t ha-1and A. marina 28.7 to 47.6 t ha-1. R mucronata showed a clear effect of age with the amount of biomass increasing with age. Vertical root distribution showed high root densities in the top 20 cm layer decreasing gradually with depth in all species under study. Fine root (<5 mm) density ranged between 20 to 52.8% of the total live root biomass among all species. The information generated is useful in complimenting previous studies on above-ground biomass in Gazi bay and therefore contribute to determination of the potential amount of carbon sequestered by mangroves total biomass within the entire Gazi bay hence improving on forest management

  10. Responses of belowground carbon allocation dynamics to extended shading in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Michael; Lattanzi, Fernando A.; Hasibeder, Roland; Wild, Birgit; Koranda, Marianne; Danese, Valentina; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Schmitt, Michael; Siegwolf, Rolf; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. Using in situ 13CO2 pulse labeling, we studied the effects of one week of shading on the transfer of recent photoassimilates between sugars and starch of above- and belowground plant organs and to soil microbial communities of a mountain meadow. C allocation to roots and microbial communities was rapid. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots, but not roots, and affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots, but not roots: recent C was slowly incorporated into root starch irrespective of the shading treatment. Shading reduced leaf respiration more strongly than root respiration. It caused no reduction in the amount of 13C incorporated into fungi and gram-negative bacteria, but increased its residence time. These findings suggest that, under interrupted C supply, belowground C allocation (as reflected by the amount of tracer allocated to root starch, soil microbial communities and belowground respiration) was maintained at the expense of aboveground C status, and that C source strength may affect the turnover of recent plant-derived C in soil microbial communities. (Reference: Bahn et al. 2013. New Phytologist 198:116-126)

  11. Belowground rhizomes in paleosols: The hidden half of an Early Devonian vascular plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jinzhuang; Deng, Zhenzhen; Huang, Pu; Huang, Kangjun; Benton, Michael J; Cui, Ying; Wang, Deming; Liu, Jianbo; Shen, Bing; Basinger, James F; Hao, Shougang

    2016-08-23

    The colonization of terrestrial environments by rooted vascular plants had far-reaching impacts on the Earth system. However, the belowground structures of early vascular plants are rarely documented, and thus the plant-soil interactions in early terrestrial ecosystems are poorly understood. Here we report the earliest rooted paleosols (fossil soils) in Asia from Early Devonian deposits of Yunnan, China. Plant traces are extensive within the soil and occur as complex network-like structures, which are interpreted as representing long-lived, belowground rhizomes of the basal lycopsid Drepanophycus The rhizomes produced large clones and helped the plant survive frequent sediment burial in well-drained soils within a seasonal wet-dry climate zone. Rhizome networks contributed to the accumulation and pedogenesis of floodplain sediments and increased the soil stabilizing effects of early plants. Predating the appearance of trees with deep roots in the Middle Devonian, plant rhizomes have long functioned in the belowground soil ecosystem. This study presents strong, direct evidence for plant-soil interactions at an early stage of vascular plant radiation. Soil stabilization by complex rhizome systems was apparently widespread, and contributed to landscape modification at an earlier time than had been appreciated. PMID:27503883

  12. The Effect of Advanced Management Accounting Practices on the Competitive Strategies and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Yücel; Kayhan Ahmetoğulları

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on a sample of 300 managers from the production industry of West Marmara Region. The goal of this study is to examine the interaction among advanced management accounting practices, competitive strategies and company performance. As a result of study, it is found that advanced accounting management practices have a positive effect on the company performance and competitive strategies. In addition, competitive strategies have an effect on the company performance positively....

  13. Assessing the Effectiveness of Competition Law Enforcement Policy in Relation to Cartels

    OpenAIRE

    Priit Mändmaa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high fines for cartel infringements it is claimed that the current competition law enforcement lacks deterrent effect for the avoidance of cartel infringements and is procedurally fragile. This article analyses the current competition law enforcement policy in relation to cartels. More specifically, the article assesses the effectiveness of the policy in deterring the formation of cartels and pursuing the goals of competition law by analysing the theory of deterrence, case law, pr...

  14. Interactions between above- and belowground biota: importance for small-scale vegetation mosaics in a grassland ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomqvist, M.M.; Olff, H.; Blaauw, M.B.; Bongers, T.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Grasslands are often characterised by small-scale mosaics in plant community composition that contribute to their diversity. Although above- and belowground biota can both cause such mosaics, few studies have addressed their interacting effects. We studied multi-trophic interactions between abovegro

  15. The Economic Effect of Competition in the Air Transportation Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The air transportation industry has been described as a highly-competitive, regulated oligopoly or as a price-regulated cartel with blocked entry, resulting in excessive service and low load factors. The current structure of the industry has been strongly influenced by the hypotheses that increased levels of competition are desirable per se, and that more competing carriers can be economically supported in larger markets, in longer haul markets, with lower unit costs, and with higher fare levels. An elementary application of competition/game theory casts doubt on the validity of these hypotheses, but rather emphasizes the critical importance of the short-term non-variable costs in determining economic levels of competition.

  16. A study on the effect of internet on competitiveness and customer loyalty in insurance industry based on Porter competitive forces

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Ghazavi; Mahmood Reza Cheraghali

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effect of internet in insurance industry in Iran. The proposed study designs a questionnaire, distributes it among some experts and analyzes them based on some statistical test. The survey is conducted within insurance firms located in one of provinces of Iran. The results of the study confirm that internet influences competition among providers, bargaining power of customers as well as suppliers, significantly. In addition, internet...

  17. The Effect of Regulated Competition on Pharmaceutical Advertising and Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Guy David; Sara Markowitz

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical advertising and promotion are distinct in that the firm’s decisions are highly interconnected with issues surrounding consumer safety. Expenditure decisions must balance profitable demand expansions with potential regulatory actions, and depend on the nature of competition (monopoly versus oligopoly). We develop a model of the firm’s choice of expenditures under different competitive scenarios with consideration of possible regulatory action. We test the model’s predictions wit...

  18. Biochemical Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation in a Simulated Competition of Short Terrestrial Duathlon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Bill

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biochemical effects of carbohydrate supplementation in a simulated competition of short terrestrial duathlon. Ten duathletes participated in a simulated competition of short terrestrial duathlon 30 minutes after the ingestion of a 6% (30 g/500 ml maltodextrin solution (MALT or a placebo (PLA. This solution was also ingested every 15 minutes during the competition (12 g/200 ml; and immediately after the competition (18 g/300 ml. Samples of blood were collected at 3 time points: 1 at rest 1 hour before the beginning of the competition; 2 during the competition (approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes after the 1st collection; 3 immediately after the competition. Blood was analyzed for blood glucose, lactate, insulin and cortisol. Significant differences were observed in relation to blood glucose levels between MALT and PLA in the post-competition phase. There was also a significant difference in the lactate levels observed between MALT and PLA during the competition phase. Similarly, a significant difference in the cortisol concentrations during and after the competition phases (MALT and PLA were observed. We conclude that maltodextrin supplementation appears to be beneficial during short terrestrial duathlon competition as evidenced by biochemical markers.

  19. Behaviourally mediated indirect effects : interference competition increases predation mortality in foraging redshanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderman, J; Lind, J; Cresswell, W

    2006-01-01

    The effect of competition for a limiting resource on the population dynamics of competitors is usually assumed to operate directly through starvation, yet may also affect survival indirectly through behaviourally mediated effects that affect risk of predation. Thus, competition can affect more than

  20. 75 FR 24969 - China's Agricultural Trade: Competitive Conditions and Effects on U.S. Exports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... COMMISSION China's Agricultural Trade: Competitive Conditions and Effects on U.S. Exports AGENCY: United.... International Trade Commission (Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-518, China's Agricultural Trade... on the conditions of competition in China's agricultural market and trade and their effect on...

  1. A study on the effect of internet on competitiveness and customer loyalty in insurance industry based on Porter competitive forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Ghazavi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effect of internet in insurance industry in Iran. The proposed study designs a questionnaire, distributes it among some experts and analyzes them based on some statistical test. The survey is conducted within insurance firms located in one of provinces of Iran. The results of the study confirm that internet influences competition among providers, bargaining power of customers as well as suppliers, significantly. In addition, internet has meaningful impacts on starting a business, the threat of substitutes, customer satisfaction, perceived image as well as perceived quality. The results of this survey emphasizes on the relative importance of internet for building a better competitive insurance industry.

  2. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fichtner

    Full Text Available The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading and belowground competition (crowding among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services.

  3. Competitive Capabilities of Thai Logistics Industry: Effects on Corporate Image and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Apicha Boonpattarakan

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate competitive capabilities of firms operating in the logistics industry. Theobjective of the research was to study the effects of strategic elements associated with competitive capabilitieson corporate image, profitability, and growth. Key strategic elements for building competitive capabilities wereproposed to consist of service quality, marketing capabilities, and management capabilities. The results suggestthat the firms’ first priority level in buil...

  4. Competitive Balance Measures in Sports Leagues: The Effects of Variation in Season Length

    OpenAIRE

    P. Dorian Owen; Nicholas King

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate measurement of competitive balance is a cornerstone of the economic analysis of professional sports leagues. We examine the distributional properties of the ratio of standard deviations (RSD) of points percentages, the most widely used measure of competitive balance in the sports economics literature, in comparison with other standard-deviation-based measures. Simulation methods are used to evaluate the effects of changes in season length on the distributions of competitive balanc...

  5. Effects of combination of leaf resources on competition in container mosquito larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiskind, M H; Zarrabi, A A; Lounibos, L P

    2012-08-01

    Resource diversity is critical to fitness in many insect species, and may determine the coexistence of competitive species and the function of ecosystems. Plant material provides the nutritional base for numerous aquatic systems, yet the consequences of diversity of plant material have not been studied in aquatic container systems important for the production of mosquitoes. To address how diversity in leaf detritus affects container-inhabiting mosquitoes, we examined how leaf species affect competition between two container inhabiting mosquito larvae, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, that co-occur in many parts of the world. We tested the hypotheses that leaf species changes the outcome of intra- and interspecific competition between these mosquito species, and that combinations of leaf species affect competition in a manner not predictable based upon the response to each leaf species alone (i.e. the response to leaf combinations is non-additive). We find support for our first hypothesis that leaf species can affect competition, evidence that, in general, leaf combination alters competitive interactions, and no support that leaf combination impacts interspecific competition differently than intraspecific competition. We conclude that combinations of leaves increase mosquito production non-additively such that combinations of leaves act synergistically, in general, and result in higher total yield of adult mosquitoes in most cases, although certain leaf combinations for A. albopictus are antagonistic. We also conclude that leaf diversity does not have a different effect on interspecific competition between A. aegypti and A. albopictus, relative to intraspecific competition for each mosquito. PMID:22314102

  6. Competition effects of mergers. An event study of the German electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the competition effects of the entry of Vattenfall into the German electricity market. While the competition authorities supported the entry by approving Vattenfall's acquisition of three regional utilities, other market participants raised concerns over the emergence of an upcoming oligopoly in the German market for power generation. We contrast the efficiency hypothesis postulating pro-competitive effects of mergers with the market power hypothesis postulating anti-competitive effects. For the analysis of the two opposing hypotheses, we use an event study approach to the stock prices of Vattenfall's competitors in the German market. While we find no empirical evidence for increased market power in the German electricity market due to Vattenfall's mergers, there is some indication for efficiency increases. We therefore cannot oppose the view of the competition authorities predicting an overall positive effect for consumers as a result of Vattenfall's entry into the German electricity market. (author)

  7. Competition effects of mergers: An event study of the German electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the competition effects of the entry of Vattenfall into the German electricity market. While the competition authorities supported the entry by approving Vattenfall's acquisition of three regional utilities, other market participants raised concerns over the emergence of an upcoming oligopoly in the German market for power generation. We contrast the efficiency hypothesis postulating pro-competitive effects of mergers with the market power hypothesis postulating anti-competitive effects. For the analysis of the two opposing hypotheses, we use an event study approach to the stock prices of Vattenfall's competitors in the German market. While we find no empirical evidence for increased market power in the German electricity market due to Vattenfall's mergers, there is some indication for efficiency increases. We therefore cannot oppose the view of the competition authorities predicting an overall positive effect for consumers as a result of Vattenfall's entry into the German electricity market.

  8. Competition effects of mergers: An event study of the German electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.keller@uni-oldenburg.d [Department of Economics, University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the competition effects of the entry of Vattenfall into the German electricity market. While the competition authorities supported the entry by approving Vattenfall's acquisition of three regional utilities, other market participants raised concerns over the emergence of an upcoming oligopoly in the German market for power generation. We contrast the efficiency hypothesis postulating pro-competitive effects of mergers with the market power hypothesis postulating anti-competitive effects. For the analysis of the two opposing hypotheses, we use an event study approach to the stock prices of Vattenfall's competitors in the German market. While we find no empirical evidence for increased market power in the German electricity market due to Vattenfall's mergers, there is some indication for efficiency increases. We therefore cannot oppose the view of the competition authorities predicting an overall positive effect for consumers as a result of Vattenfall's entry into the German electricity market.

  9. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground–belowground ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; de Ruiter, P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  10. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  11. The effects of training volume and competition on the salivary cortisol concentrations of Olympic weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, Blair T; Heke, Taati; Keogh, Justin W L

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of training volume and competition on the salivary cortisol (Sal-C) concentrations of Olympic weightlifters. Male (n = 5) and female (n = 4) Olympic weightlifters provided saliva samples across a 5-week experimental = period. The first aim was to assess the weekly effects of high (≥ 200 sets) and low (≤ 100 sets) training volume on Sal-C. The second aim was to compare Sal-C concentrations and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) performance during 2 simulated and 2 actual competitions. Performance was assessed using the snatch, clean and jerk, and the Olympic total lift. Data from each competition setting were pooled before analysis. There were no significant weekly changes in Sal-C levels (p > 0.05). The actual competitions produced higher (128-130%) Sal-C concentrations (p clean and jerk, and the Olympic total, than the simulated competitions (p < 0.05). Individual Sal-C concentrations before the simulated competitions were positively correlated to all of the 1RM lifts (r = 0.48-0.49, p < 0.05). In conclusion, actual competitions produced greater Sal-C responses than simulated competitions, and this appeared to benefit the 1RM performance of Olympic weightlifters. Individuals with higher Sal-C concentrations also tended to exhibit superior 1RM lifts during the simulated competitions. Given these findings, greater emphasis should be placed upon the monitoring of C to establish normative values, training standards and to assist with performance prediction. PMID:21116196

  12. The importance of aboveground–belowground interactions on the evolution and maintenance of variation in plant defense traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geem, Moniek; Gols, Rieta; van Dam, Nicole M.; van der Putten, Wim H.; Fortuna, Taiadjana; Harvey, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades a growing body of empirical research has shown that many ecological processes are mediated by a complex array of indirect interactions occurring between rhizosphere-inhabiting organisms and those found on aboveground plant parts. Aboveground–belowground studies have thus far focused on elucidating processes and underlying mechanisms that mediate the behavior and performance of invertebrates in opposite ecosystem compartments. Less is known about genetic variation in plant traits such as defense as that may be driven by above- and belowground trophic interactions. For instance, although our understanding of genetic variation in aboveground plant traits and its effects on community-level interactions is well developed, little is known about the importance of aboveground–belowground interactions in driving this variation. Plant traits may have evolved in response to selection pressures from above- and below-ground interactions from antagonists and mutualists. Here, we discuss gaps in our understanding of genetic variation in plant-related traits as they relate to aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions. When metabolic resources are limiting, multiple attacks by antagonists in both domains may lead to trade-offs. In nature, these trade-offs may critically depend upon their effects on plant fitness. Natural enemies of herbivores may also influence selection for different traits via top–down control. At larger scales these interactions may generate evolutionary “hotspots” where the expression of various plant traits is the result of strong reciprocal selection via direct and indirect interactions. The role of abiotic factors in driving genetic variation in plant traits is also discussed. PMID:24348484

  13. Study on effects of environmental regulation on competitiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Man Ok; Lim, Hyun Jeong [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    For Korea, the claim that the enhancement of environmental regulation is worsening the international competitiveness of the business is dominant. However, it is too early to reestablish a relationship between environmental regulation and competitiveness with the above new aspect. In fact, the economic development, which is brought a quantitative growth, and the maintenance of environmental quality, which is brought a qualitative growth, are very important on decision making in economic and social policy. In this study, it represents the results of existing positive studies on the relationship between the enhancement of environmental regulation, trade and productivity. Moreover, the objective of this study is on applying it based on the data of Korea. 86 refs., 13 figs., 35 tabs.

  14. Competitive energy markets. The effective route to improving the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how market forces, operating in an increasingly competitive energy market, are a preferred route to achieving environmental and energy efficiency benefits than those which can be achieved through a managed approach adopted by many governments. It shows, through UK examples such as shifting to electricity in several industrial processes, how electricity is a catalyst for change at several levels in business, the community and the general economy

  15. Effects of Noise in Symmetric Two-Species Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, José M. G.; Solé, Ricard V.

    1998-05-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between noise and periodic modulations in a classical Lotka-Volterra model of two-species competition. We have found that the consideration of noise changes drastically the behavior of the system and leads to new situations which have no counterpart in the deterministic case. Among others, noise is responsible for temporal oscillations, spatial patterns, and the enhancement of the response of the system via stochastic resonance.

  16. Electronic Health Information Exchange, Competition, and Network Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Desai

    2014-01-01

    As in most industries, in health care, information is a competitive asset, and we expect that health care providers may have incentive to protect their information from competitors. This study aims to understand how this incentive to protect information may be a barrier to the development of a health information network. Health information networks are designed to facilitate electronic information sharing across health care providers. The electronic exchange of health information is widely co...

  17. Crossing Mountains: The Effect of Competition on the Laffer Curve

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Miguel de Oliveira Cruz Pinto de Abreu; Elísio Fernando Moreira Brandão; Samuel Cruz Alves Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Regarding states and state-like entities as producers and taxation as a price, this paper connects the thoroughly studied impacts of the market structures in microeconomics to the controversial Laffer curve, suggesting that the outcome of the “taxation market” depends also on competition. By studying the determinants for Property Tax revenue for the 308 Portuguese municipalities, a general model that successfully explains tax revenue is developed. Evidence is found for the existence of a two-...

  18. Effects of competition on video-task performance in monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of competition on performance of a video-formatted task were examined in a series of experiments. Two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to manipulate a joystick to shoot at moving targets on a computer screen. The task was made competitive by requiring both animals to shoot at the same target and by rewarding only the animal that hit the target first each trial. The competitive task produced a significant and robust speed-accuracy trade-off in performance. The monkeys hit the target in significantly less time on contested than on uncontested trials. However, they required significantly more shots to hit the target on contested trials in relation to uncontested trials. This effect was unchanged when various schedules of reinforcement were introduced in the uncontested trials. This supports the influence of competition qua competition on performance, a point further bolstered by other findings of behavioral contrast presented here.

  19. Does school competition matter? : Effects of a large-scale school choice reform on student performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlin, Åsa

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a general school choice reform on student performance is studied in a Swedish institutional setting. A rich set of individual level data allows estimation of a value added specification, mitigating problems with omission of relevant variables. Increased school competition is shown to have statistically significant positive effects on student performance in mathematics, but no significant effects in English and Swedish. Interacting school competition with student characteristics,...

  20. Issues and prospects of belowground ecology with special reference to global climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jinsheng; WANG Zhengquan; FANG Jingyun

    2004-01-01

    The theory of ecology is based on over 100 a of research and investigation, all centered on aboveground patterns and processes. However, as contemporary ecologists are increasingly acknowledging, belowground structures, functions, and processes are some of the most poorly understood areas in ecology. This lack of understanding of belowground ecological processes seriously restricts the advance of global change research. The interdisciplinary field of belowground ecology began to flourish in the 1990s, along with the expansion of global change research, and quickly gained momentum. Belowground ecology aims to investigate belowground structures, functions, and processes, as well as their relationships with corresponding aboveground features, emphasizing the responses of belowground systems under global change conditions. Key research areas include root ecology,belowground animals, and soil microorganisms. This review summarizes and analyzes the relationships between aboveand belowground ecosystems, root ecology, root biogeography, belowground biodiversity, as well as research areas with particular challenges and progress. This commentary emphasizes certain theoretical issues concerning the responses of belowground processes to global change, and concludes that belowground ecology is a critical research priority in the 21st century.

  1. THE IMPACT OF MACROECONOMIC FACTORS ON COMPETITION POLICY EFFECTIVENESS WITHIN EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoi Ionut

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, more and more countries have enacted competition laws, understanding the importance of this process in providing a normal functioning of the economy. Analyzing competition policy effectiveness is important not only because of the recent extent of the phenomenon, but also because of the impact of competition policy effectiveness on economic development and, in the current economic climate, on the economic recovery process. For this reason, quantitative evaluation for competition policy effectiveness became very useful as data handling and understanding the whole phenomenon are easier this way and an international perspective is provided. This was made possible by various international institutions that have created a system of aggregated indicators for the evaluation of competition law enforcement and competition advocacy (perceived effectiveness. The purpose of our research is to identify the macroeconomic factors that influence the effectiveness of competition law implementation within the European Union Member States. We have tasted the influence of 13 macroeconomic, using panel data methodology and data from the last four years. We obtained ß coefficients statistically significant only for 11 of them. The results are consistent with prior analyzed studies and economic logic: positive influence from market division, intensity of local competition, ethical behavior of firms, strength of auditing and reporting standards, efficiency of legal framework in settling disputes, protection of minority shareholders’ interests, public trust of politicians, economic dimension and market size and negative influence from corruption level and diversion of public funds. Based on the achieved results we can perform an analysis of principal components leading to causal space reduction with minimal information loss and without informational redundancy, creating the premises for building a model that explains competition policy

  2. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of aquatic macroinvertebrates to carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Parra, Gema; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    The Ecological Risk Assessment of pesticides and other potentially toxic chemicals is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments. In the field, however, contaminant effects are ubiquitously co-occurring with ecological interactions such as species competition and predation, which might influence the sensitivity of the individuals exposed to toxicants. The present experimental study investigated how intra- and interspecific competition influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms to a pesticide. For this, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the mortality and growth of the snail Bithynia tentaculata and the crustacean Gammarus pulex under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for a food resource. Interspecific competition was created by adding individuals of Radix peregra and Asellus aquaticus, respectively. The interaction of competition and carbendazim exposure significantly influenced B. tentaculata growth, however, combined effects on survival and immobility were considered transient and were less easily demonstrated. Positive influence of competition on G. pulex survival was observed under low-medium carbendazim concentrations and under medium-high density pressures, being partly related to cannibalistic and predation compensatory mechanisms, enhanced under food limiting conditions. This study shows that intra- and interspecific competition pressure may influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms in a more complex way (positive, non-significant and negative effects were observed) than just increasing the sensitivity of the studied species, as has generally been hypothesized. PMID:26024811

  3. The Effect of Advanced Management Accounting Practices on the Competitive Strategies and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Yücel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on a sample of 300 managers from the production industry of West Marmara Region. The goal of this study is to examine the interaction among advanced management accounting practices, competitive strategies and company performance. As a result of study, it is found that advanced accounting management practices have a positive effect on the company performance and competitive strategies. In addition, competitive strategies have an effect on the company performance positively. Furthermore, there is a positive and significant relation between long-term strategy based on management accounting practices and non-financial company performance and between activity based on management accounting practices and financial performance.

  4. Effect of mode–mode competition on atom–atom entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system consisting of two atoms interacting with a two-mode vacuum is considered, where each atom is resonant with the two cavity modes through two different competing transitions. The effect of mode–mode competition on the atom–atom entanglement is investigated. We find that the entanglement between the two atoms can be induced by the mode–mode competition. For the initial atomic state |Ψ(0)}, whether the atoms are initially separated or entangled, a large or even maximal entanglement between them can be obtained periodically by introducing the mode–mode competition. For the initial atomic state |Φ(0)}, the strong mode–mode competition can prevent the two atoms entangled initially from suffering entanglement sudden death; besides, it makes them in a more stable and longer-lived entanglement than in the non-competition case. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  5. Belowground carbon trade among tall forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf; Koerner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Just imagine one tree could hand over large quantities of carbon to another tree. How would that change our thinking about carbon relations of forests, the single biggest biological C reservoir on earth? If such a tree-to-tree C shuttle would exist, it required a demand-supply gradient and a pipeline. Here we show that exactly this unthinkable does occur in overlapping root spheres of tall trees in a mixed temperate forest. Using canopy scale stable carbon isotope labelling applied from a construction crane, we demonstrate that carbon assimilated by spruce is traded over to neighbouring beech, larch, and pine in amounts so large that fine roots almost equilibrate the carbon source signature. The isotope mixing ratio indicated that the interspecific transfer accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon, which is ca. 280 kg ha-1 a-1. This is the first forest scale evidence of a large flux of carbon among mature trees from evolutionary distant taxa. Carbon transfer most likely occurred through common ectomycorrhiza networks, which also exhibited the labelled carbon signal. These observations indicate that while competition for resources (e.g. light, water, nutrients) is often considered the dominant tree-tree interaction in a forest, trees actually interact in more complex pathways including a massive carbon exchange.

  6. Effect of competitional stress on salivary dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol in female handballists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Farzanegi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hormonal responses to competitions and their relationships have been extensively examined in male athletes, but there are few studies in women. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of competition stress on salivary dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA and cortisol in female handballists. Materials and Method: Ten female handballists of Islamic Azad University (Sari Branch (age 21.5±2.5 years participated in this study. Salivary samples were collected 30 min and 5 min before competition, between two half times and immediately after four competitions. The salivary DHEA and cortisol concentrations were measured by ELISA method. Results: The results of one-way ANOVA with repeated measures have shown a significant (p=0.001 increases for DHEA concentration after four competitions, however, cortisol and DHEA/cortisol ratio did not show any changes after four competition (p>0.05. Conclusion: These results indicate that salivary DHEA is more sensitive to competition situations than cortisol concentration. We suggested that androgens maybe more affected by competition

  7. Competitive effects of Basel II on U.S. bank credit card lending

    OpenAIRE

    William W. Lang; Loretta J. Mester; Todd A. Vermilyea

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyze the potential competitive effects of the proposed Basel II capital regulations on U.S. bank credit card lending. They find that bank issuers operating under Basel II will face higher regulatory capital minimums than Basel I banks, with differences due to the way the two regulations treat reserves and gain-on-sale of securitized assets. During periods of normal economic conditions, this is not likely to have a competitive effect; however, during periods of substantial stres...

  8. Interactive Effect of Herbivory and Competition on the Invasive Plant Mikania micrantha

    OpenAIRE

    Junmin Li; Tao Xiao; Qiong Zhang; Ming Dong

    2013-01-01

    A considerable number of host-specific biological control agents fail to control invasive plants in the field, and exploring the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is important and helpful for the management of invasive plants. Herbivory and competition are two of the most common biotic stressors encountered by invasive plants in their recipient communities. We predicted that the antagonistic interactive effect between herbivory and competition would weaken the effect of herbivory on invasi...

  9. The regulated firm: Effects of regulation on competence development and sustainable competitive advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Frohwein, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) is a central tenet in strategic management theory. The effect of regulation on sustaining competitive advantages is widely neglected in literature. The impact on competence development and SCA of the firm can be significant, if regulatory requirements and regulatory prohibitions as types of specific industry regulation are considered. In arguing that resource-based theory can be modeled analogous to complex system theory, the effect of regulation on com...

  10. Contrasting above- and belowground sensitivity of three Great Plains grasslands to altered rainfall regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kevin R; von Fischer, Joseph C; Muscha, Jennifer M; Petersen, Mark K; Knapp, Alan K

    2015-01-01

    Intensification of the global hydrological cycle with atmospheric warming is expected to increase interannual variation in precipitation amount and the frequency of extreme precipitation events. Although studies in grasslands have shown sensitivity of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) to both precipitation amount and event size, we lack equivalent knowledge for responses of belowground net primary productivity (BNPP) and NPP. We conducted a 2-year experiment in three US Great Plains grasslands--the C4-dominated shortgrass prairie (SGP; low ANPP) and tallgrass prairie (TGP; high ANPP), and the C3-dominated northern mixed grass prairie (NMP; intermediate ANPP)--to test three predictions: (i) both ANPP and BNPP responses to increased precipitation amount would vary inversely with mean annual precipitation (MAP) and site productivity; (ii) increased numbers of extreme rainfall events during high-rainfall years would affect high and low MAP sites differently; and (iii) responses belowground would mirror those aboveground. We increased growing season precipitation by as much as 50% by augmenting natural rainfall via (i) many (11-13) small or (ii) fewer (3-5) large watering events, with the latter coinciding with naturally occurring large storms. Both ANPP and BNPP increased with water addition in the two C4 grasslands, with greater ANPP sensitivity in TGP, but greater BNPP and NPP sensitivity in SGP. ANPP and BNPP did not respond to any rainfall manipulations in the C3 -dominated NMP. Consistent with previous studies, fewer larger (extreme) rainfall events increased ANPP relative to many small events in SGP, but event size had no effect in TGP. Neither system responded consistently above- and belowground to event size; consequently, total NPP was insensitive to event size. The diversity of responses observed in these three grassland types underscores the challenge of predicting responses relevant to C cycling to forecast changes in precipitation regimes even

  11. Competitive outcome of Daphnia-Simocephalus experimental microcosms: salinity versus priority effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Loureiro

    Full Text Available Competition is a major driving force in freshwaters, especially given the cyclic nature and dynamics of pelagic food webs. Competition is especially important in the initial species assortment during colonization and re-colonization events, which depends strongly on the environmental context. Subtle changes, such as saline intrusion, may disrupt competitive relationships and, thus, influence community composition. Bearing this in mind, our objective was to assess whether low salinity levels (using NaCl as a proxy alter the competitive outcome (measured as the rate of population biomass increase of Daphnia-Simocephalus experimental microcosms, taking into account interactions with priority effects (sequential species arrival order. With this approach, we aimed to experimentally demonstrate a putative mechanism of differential species sorting in brackish environments or in freshwaters facing secondary salinization. Experiments considered three salinity levels, regarding NaCl added (0.00, 0.75 and 1.50 g L(-1, crossed with three competition scenarios (no priority, priority of Daphnia over Simocephalus, and vice-versa. At lower NaCl concentrations (0.00 and 0.75 g L(-1, Daphnia was a significantly superior competitor, irrespective of the species inoculation order, suggesting negligible priority effects. However, the strong decrease in Daphnia population growth at 1.50 g L(-1 alleviated the competitive pressure on Simocephalus, causing an inversion of the competitive outcome in favour of Simocephalus. The intensity of this inversion depended on the competition scenario. This salinity-mediated disruption of the competitive outcome demonstrates that subtle environmental changes produce indirect effects in key ecological mechanisms, thus altering community composition, which may lead to serious implications in terms of ecosystem functioning (e.g. lake regime shifts due to reduced grazing and biodiversity.

  12. The effect of counter-trading on competition in electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Justin [IVM, VU University Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, Bert, E-mail: bwillems@tilburguniversity.ed [CentER and TILEC, Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153 Room K308, NL-5000 LE Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    In a competitive electricity market, nodal pricing is the most efficient way to manage congestion. Counter-trading is inefficient as it gives the wrong long term signals for entry and exit of power plants. However, in a non-competitive market, additional entry will improve the competitiveness of the market, and will increase social benefit by reducing price-cost margins. This paper studies whether the potential pro-competitive entry effects could make counter-trading more efficient than nodal pricing. We find that this is unlikely to be the case, and expect counter-trading to have a negative effect on overall welfare. The potential benefits of additional competition (more competitive prices and lower production cost) do not outweigh the distortions (additional investment cost for the entrant, and socialization of the congestion cost to final consumers). - Research highlights: {yields} 'Counter-trading' and 'nodal pricing' manage congestion in electric grids. {yields} Nodal pricing gives superior locational prices. {yields} Counter-trading induces extra investments in regions with a production surplus. {yields} Extra investments improve competition, but are expected to be socially inefficient.

  13. The effect of counter-trading on competition in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a competitive electricity market, nodal pricing is the most efficient way to manage congestion. Counter-trading is inefficient as it gives the wrong long term signals for entry and exit of power plants. However, in a non-competitive market, additional entry will improve the competitiveness of the market, and will increase social benefit by reducing price-cost margins. This paper studies whether the potential pro-competitive entry effects could make counter-trading more efficient than nodal pricing. We find that this is unlikely to be the case, and expect counter-trading to have a negative effect on overall welfare. The potential benefits of additional competition (more competitive prices and lower production cost) do not outweigh the distortions (additional investment cost for the entrant, and socialization of the congestion cost to final consumers). - Research highlights: → 'Counter-trading' and 'nodal pricing' manage congestion in electric grids. → Nodal pricing gives superior locational prices. → Counter-trading induces extra investments in regions with a production surplus. → Extra investments improve competition, but are expected to be socially inefficient.

  14. Outsourcing CIS to achieve a cost-effective competitive edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to survive in a competitive electricity market is a function of the ability of a service provider to deliver superior levels of customer service and develop new and innovative products and services. More and more, the foundation of these new services and products is the customer information system which has the capability to provide vast amounts of usage data and billing information; access to this data enables service providers to introduce new and innovative services and implement targeted marketing initiatives. Recent trend by progressive electricity providers appears to be to outsource specific information technology functions such as customer information systems (CIS) as a way to minimize capital investment, take advantage of leading edge technologies and leverage the expertise of niche service providers. Advantages of outsourcing, and factors important in the selection of an outsourcing partner are discussed

  15. The Effects of Environmental Factors on the Growth and Competition of Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; WANG; Jiazhang; CHEN; Shunlong; MENG

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the effect of environmental factors on the algae growth and competition,the author summarized overseas and domestic related researches in recent years.Most of the researches are about the influence of single factor on growth of algae.However,there is insufficient investment on the interaction of different factors and the competition between algae growth.This paper briefly introduced the classification of algae and the role they played in ecological system and focused on the influence which included temperature,illumination,nitrogen,phosphorus and pH on the growth and competition of algal.In the end,the author proposed key questions which were still needed to be studied in order to know more about the relationship between environment effects and growth and competition of algae.Therefore,people could better improve the community structure of algae and water ecological environment,and improve water primary productivity.

  16. Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species

    OpenAIRE

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Durant, Joël M.; Fowler, Mike S.; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Jonzén, Niclas; Chan, Kung-Sik; Liu, Hai; De Laet, Jenny; SHELDON, BEN C.; Visser, Marcel E; André A Dhondt

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have profound ecological effects, yet shifts in competitive abilities among species are rarely studied in this context. Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tits (Parus major) compete for food and roosting sites, yet coexist across much of their range. Climate change might thus change the competitive relationships and coexistence between these two species. Analysing four of the highest-quality, long-term datasets available on these species across Europe, we ...

  17. Individually-psychological discrepancies of the qualified athletes and their effect on productivity of competitive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolkunova I.V.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Extreme effect of competitive conditions calls in sportsmen a condition nervously - a mental pressure. Sportsmen do not test these pressure (or pressure in much smaller degree during training exercises. Research is guided on study of individual psychological properties of the personality of sportsmen from 18 till 32 years (specialization track and field athletics leaps. The interrelation of sports outcomes of main competitions of a season with separate parameters of properties of the personality of sportsmen is exhibited.

  18. Effectiveness of Training and Development on Employees’ Performance and Organisation Competitiveness in the Nigerian Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Falola, H.O.; Osibanjo, A.O.; Ojo, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    Training and development is indispensable strategic tool for enhancing employee performance and organizations keep increasing training budget on yearly basis with believe that it will earn them competitive edge. The main objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of training and development on employees’ performance and organisation competitive advantage in the Nigerian banking industry. Descriptive research method was adopted for this study using two hundred and twenty three val...

  19. The allelopathic effects of Festuca paniculata depend on competition in subalpine grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Viard-Crétat, F.; Baptist, F.; Secher-Fromell, H.; Gallet, C.

    2012-01-01

    Allelopathy is recognized as an important process in plant-plant interactions, but how it affects plant communities growing in competitive conditions has not been assessed. This article investigates whether the allelopathic effect of Festuca paniculata is modified by competition between target plants in subalpine grasslands. We hypothesized that plants growing in mixed stands will be more affected by allelochemicals than the same species in monoculture. At Lautaret pass (Northern French Alps)...

  20. Effect of dispersal and nutrient availability on the competitive ability of toxin-producing yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wloch-Salamon, Dominika M; Gerla, Daan; Hoekstra, Rolf F.; de Visser, J. Arjan G.M.

    2008-01-01

    The ecological role of interference competition through toxin production is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear under what conditions the benefits of toxic killing outweigh the metabolic costs involved. A killer advantage has been suggested to rely on local competitive interactions where the benefits of killing accrue to the toxin producer preferentially, but this notion has little empirical support. In addition, contrasting predictions exist about the effect of resource abundan...

  1. The fungal endophyte Chaetomium globosum negatively affects both above- and belowground herbivores in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqing; Starr, James L; Krumm, Janice L; Sword, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Mutualistic plant-endophyte symbioses can benefit plants by increasing host fitness through reductions in herbivory. The fungus, Chaetomium globosum strain TAMU 520, was previously isolated as an endophyte from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and can be re-inoculated to systemically colonize cotton plants via seed treatment. We evaluated the potential impacts of the endophyte in cotton on plant parasitic nematodes belowground, along with piercing-sucking and chewing insects aboveground. Endophytic C. globosum inhibited root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) infection and reduced female reproduction belowground. To confirm the endophytic effect of C. globosum on root-knot nematode, a contact fungicide was applied to remove soil-borne and epiphytic C. globosum Consistent inhibition of nematode activity was observed post-fungicide treatment, with positive C. globosum colonization confirmed within plant tissues. Aboveground, endophytic C. globosum also negatively affected the fecundity of both cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii) and beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua). Faster development rates and smaller head capsule of beet armyworm larvae were observed when fed Chaetomium-colonized plants. However, no larval weight difference was found between Chaetomium-colonized and control plants. No consistent effect on plant performance was found across experiments. Our findings illustrate how a single facultative fungal endophyte can increase plant systemic resistance against a range of invertebrate herbivores in a major crop. PMID:27451418

  2. How Does School Choice Improve Student Achievement? Estimating School-level Competitive Effects and Student-level Peer Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jinnai, Yusuke; 陣内, 悠介

    2016-01-01

    Although school choice programs have played a key role in public education reform in the United States for years, the impact of competition between schools on student achievement remains unclear. This study examines the effects of introducing charter schools on students at neighboring traditional public schools. Unlike prior work, which estimates the effects of charter schools as a whole, I present that such impact consists of school-level competitive eff ects and student-level peer effects. ...

  3. Temporal priority effects on competition are not consistent among intermountain grassland species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Li, Hongli; Ma, Yongqing; Callaway, Ragan M.

    2016-08-01

    Previous work indicates that priority effects exist, but mechanisms are not well understood. So we explored shifts in competitive outcomes and intensities as a potential general mechanism. In a standard greenhouse experiment the temporal priority effects of the target species Pseudoroegneria spicata and its competitive responses to five receptor species, i.e., Bromus ciliatus, Bromus marginatus, Coreopsis tinctoria, Senecio atratus, and Solidago canadensis were evaluated. P. spicata adults with a high root: shoot ratio had a significant inhibitory priority effect on B. ciliatus, B. marginatus, and C. tinctoria. Compared with the target species, under later and simultaneous sowing, B. ciliatus, B. marginatus, C. tinctoria, and S. atratus exhibited an increasing trend in terms of competition. However, S. canadensis did not display priority effects. In addition, the gram per gram competitive effect of P. spicata depended on the receptor species in the following order: B. marginatus > B. ciliatus > C. tinctoria > S. atratus. There were positive relationships between the relative interaction indices and the root: shoot ratios in B. ciliatus, B. marginatus, and C. tinctoria, thereby suggesting that the early germination or emergence of P. spicata may reduce the root: shoot ratios of these receptors. The results of this study indicate that priority effects occurred in early colonizers with high root: shoot ratios and greater competitive capacities.

  4. The effects of greening the supplier and innovation on environmental performance and competitive advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unine van den Berg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Companies in South Africa should realise the important influence of greening their suppliers and of innovation to achieve environmental goals and competitive advantages. In order to prove this, a questionnaire survey was conducted with 75 companies from 11 industries in the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality region, South Africa. A confirmatory factor analysis was done, followed by bivariate correlations to determine the strength of association between the latent constructs. Correlations between greening the supplier, innovation, environmental performance and competitive advantages were done. The research found that a green innovative process had a significant effect on environmental performance. Green managerial innovation further had a significant correlation with competitive advantage. The primary result of the study indicated that all the constructs positively related to each other, meaning that greening suppliers, by means of green innovation, leads to an enhanced environmental performance and to competitive advantages.

  5. Effect of playing violent video games cooperatively or competitively on subsequent cooperative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewoldsen, David R; Eno, Cassie A; Okdie, Bradley M; Velez, John A; Guadagno, Rosanna E; DeCoster, Jamie

    2012-05-01

    Research on video games has yielded consistent findings that violent video games increase aggression and decrease prosocial behavior. However, these studies typically examined single-player games. Of interest is the effect of cooperative play in a violent video game on subsequent cooperative or competitive behavior. Participants played Halo II (a first-person shooter game) cooperatively or competitively and then completed a modified prisoner's dilemma task to assess competitive and cooperative behavior. Compared with the competitive play conditions, players in the cooperative condition engaged in more tit-for-tat behaviors-a pattern of behavior that typically precedes cooperative behavior. The social context of game play influenced subsequent behavior more than the content of the game that was played. PMID:22489544

  6. Impacts of farming practice within organic farming systems on below-ground ecology and ecosystem function

    OpenAIRE

    Stockdale, E A; Phillips, L; Watson, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    Maintaining ecosystem function is a key issue for sustainable farming systems which contribute broadly to global ecosystem health. A focus simply on the diversity of belowground organisms is not sufficient and there is a need to consider the contribution of below-ground biological processes to the maintenance and enhancement of soil function and ecosystem services. A critical literature review on the impacts of land management practices on below-ground ecology and function shows that farm man...

  7. Above- and belowground biomass in relation to envi- ronmental factors in temperate grasslands, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Above- and belowground biomasses of grasslands are important parameters for characterizing re- gional and global carbon cycles in grassland ecosystems. Compared with the relatively detailed in- formation for aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) is poorly reported at the re- gional scales. The present study, based on a total of 113 sampling sites in temperate grassland of the Inner Mongolia, investigated regional distribution patterns of AGB, BGB, vertical distribution of roots, and their relationships with environmental factors. AGB and BGB increased from the southwest to the northeast of the study region. The largest biomass occurred in meadow steppe, with mean AGB and BGB of 196.7 and 1385.2 g/m2, respectively; while the lowest biomass occurred in desert steppe, with an AGB of 56.6 g/m2 and a BGB of 301.0 g/m2. In addition, about 47% of root biomass was distributed in the top 10 cm soil. Further statistical analysis indicated that precipitation was the primary determinant factor in shaping these distribution patterns. Vertical distribution of roots was significantly affected by precipitation, while the effects of soil texture and grassland types were weak.

  8. Competition between the Thermal Gradient and the Bimorph Effect in Locally Heated MEMS Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of thermal gradient effects in inhomogeneously heated MEMS/NEMS. The actuation perturbations caused by thermal gradients have been studied through static optothermal actuation experiments of a bi-material polymer based cantilever and supported by finite element...... modeling. As a result, bidirectional bending has been experimentally observed and interpreted as the competition between bimorph and thermal gradient effects. The competition has illustrated the importance of including the thermal gradient effect in the behavior analysis of bimorph driven MEMS/NEMS devices....

  9. Competition effects of mergers. An event study of the German electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Andreas [Department of Economics, University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the competition effects of the entry of Vattenfall into the German electricity market. While the competition authorities supported the entry by approving Vattenfall's acquisition of three regional utilities, other market participants raised concerns over the emergence of an upcoming oligopoly in the German market for power generation. We contrast the efficiency hypothesis postulating pro-competitive effects of mergers with the market power hypothesis postulating anti-competitive effects. For the analysis of the two opposing hypotheses, we use an event study approach to the stock prices of Vattenfall's competitors in the German market. While we find no empirical evidence for increased market power in the German electricity market due to Vattenfall's mergers, there is some indication for efficiency increases. We therefore cannot oppose the view of the competition authorities predicting an overall positive effect for consumers as a result of Vattenfall's entry into the German electricity market. (author)

  10. Effect of 10 Week Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Competition and Training Performance in Elite Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise M. Burke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some laboratory-based studies show an ergogenic effect with beta-alanine supplementation, there is a lack of field-based research in training and competition settings. Elite/Sub-elite swimmers (n = 23 males and 18 females, age = 21.7 ± 2.8 years; mean ± SD were supplemented with either beta-alanine (4 weeks loading phase of 4.8 g/day and 3.2 g/day thereafter or placebo for 10 weeks. Competition performance times were log-transformed, then evaluated before (National Championships and after (international or national selection meet supplementation. Swimmers also completed three standardized training sets at baseline, 4 and 10 weeks of supplementation. Capillary blood was analyzed for pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentration in both competition and training. There was an unclear effect (0.4%; ±0.8%, mean, ±90% confidence limits of beta-alanine on competition performance compared to placebo with no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. While there was a transient improvement on training performance after 4 weeks with beta-alanine (−1.3%; ±1.0%, there was an unclear effect at ten weeks (−0.2%; ±1.5% and no meaningful changes in blood chemistry. Beta-alanine supplementation appears to have minimal effect on swimming performance in non-laboratory controlled real-world training and competition settings.

  11. Effects of intraspecific competition on the life cycle of the stonefly, Nemurella pictetii (Plecoptera: Nemouridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwick Peter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable variation of life cycle duration in given insect species has been frequently recorded. Splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle lengths may occur, sometimes even between siblings from the same batch. Larval populations of the stonefly Nemurella pictetii in central Europe regularly split into a very fast developing and a normal univoltine cohort, leading to partial multivoltinism. The causes for such variation remain unknown but presumably act on the larval stage in which most of the life cycle is spent. We therefore studied possible effects of intraspecific competition on growth and development of larvae in the laboratory. Results Intraspecific competition had important influence on growth and development of the larvae. High larval densities led to reduced growth and retarded development through interference, not through exploitative competition. All specimens were negatively affected by frequent encounters and the resulting disturbance. There were no dominant individuals able to grow and develop faster than the rest, at the expense of the others. Conclusion Differences in life cycle length of Nemurella pictetii may result from different larval densities in different microhabitats and resultant different degrees of interference competition. Although competition alone probably does not cause splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle duration differences in size and development caused by other factors are certainly enhanced by intraspecific competition.

  12. The Effects of Corporate Reputation on the Competitiveness of Malaysian Telecommunication Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainudin Hj Awang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The competition for customers among telecommunication firms in Malaysia is fierce. The competition among them is not only limited to new customers but also to the respective customer base. In this fiercely competitive environment, existing customers are frequently exposed to offers and counter offers from the competing firms. At the same time various persuasive messages being made to encourage customers to switch their service provider. Perhaps the corporate reputation of a firm could provide certain competitive edge which could ensure the growth and survival of a firm into the future amid the highly competitive environment. This study attempts to assess the influence of corporate reputation of the firms on their competitive advantage in the market from the customers’ perspective. The study sampled 600 individual customers who have been using the mobile service at a minimum of three years. The selected respondents have been experiencing the service provided by more than one telecommunication operators. The data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM in AMOS 6.0. The study found that the direct impact of firms’ corporate reputation on their competitive advantage in the market is not significant at ? = 0.05. Instead, the corporate reputation has an indirect impact on competitive advantage through perceived value and perceived quality of the service. In other words, the firms should communicate their favorable corporate reputation effectively to the market so that the customers’ perception level towards their products and service would arise. In other words, the firm’s corporate reputation could only help the marketability of its products or services if it could trigger the positive perception of quality and value of products or services in the mind of their potential customers. The findings provide important implications to the telecommunication operators in their effort

  13. Effects of Competitive and Cooperative Learning Strategies on Academic Performance of Nigerian Students in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, E. B.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the cooperative and competitive learning on academic performance of students in mathematics in order to find out which one of them is the more effective learning strategy. The sample of the study was 400 Senior Secondary Schools III, Mathematics students made up of 240 boys and 160 girls randomly selected…

  14. The interaction between dispersal, the Allee effect and scramble competition affects population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.; Wertheim, B.; Hemerik, L.; Schneider, P.; Powell, J.

    2002-01-01

    Many organisms experience an Allee effect: their populations do not grow optimally at low densities. In addition, individuals compete with one another at high densities. The Allee effect and competition thus create a lower and an upper bound to local population size. Local populations can, however,

  15. The interaction between dispersal, the Allee effect and scramble competition affects population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R; Wertheim, B; Hemerik, L; Schneider, P; Powell, J

    2002-01-01

    Many organisms experience an Allee effect: their populations do not grow optimally at low densities. In addition, individuals compete with one another at high densities. The Allee effect and competition thus create a lower and an upper bound to local population size. Local populations can, however.

  16. Detrimental effects of highly efficient interference competition: invasive Argentine ants outcompete native ants at toxic baits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; Bennett, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    The Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is an invasive species that disrupts the balance of natural ecosystems by displacing indigenous ant species throughout its introduced range. Previous studies that examined the mechanisms by which Argentine ants attain ecological dominance showed that superior interference and exploitation competition are key to the successful displacement of native ant species. The objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that effective interference competition by Argentine ants may also be detrimental to the survival of Argentine ant colonies where Argentine ants and native ants compete at toxic baits used to slow the spread of Argentine ants. To study this hypothesis, we examined the competitive interactions between Argentine ants and native odorous house ants, Tapinoma sessile, in the presence and absence of toxic baits. Results showed that Argentine ants aggressively outcompete T. sessile from toxic baits through efficient interference competition and monopolize bait resources. This has severe negative consequences for the survival of Argentine ants as colonies succumb to the toxic effects of the bait. In turn, T. sessile avoid areas occupied by Argentine ants, give up baits, and consequently suffer minimal mortality. Our results provide experimental evidence that highly efficient interference competition may have negative consequences for Argentine ants in areas where toxic baits are used and may provide a basis for designing innovative management programs for Argentine ants. Such programs would have the double benefit of selectively eliminating the invasive species while simultaneously protecting native ants from the toxic effects of baits. PMID:18559180

  17. Incorporating network effects in a competitive electricity industry. An Australian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of an electricity network in a competitive electricity industry is reviewed, the nation's experience with transmission pricing is discussed, and a 'Nodal Auction Model' for incorporating network effects in a competitive electricity industry is proposed. The model uses a computer-based auction procedure to address both the spatial issues associated with an electricity network and the temporal issues associated with operation scheduling. The objective is to provide a market framework that addresses both network effects and operation scheduling in a coordinated implementation of spot pricing theory. 12 refs

  18. Effects of inbreeding and genetic modification on Aedes aegypti larval competition and adult energy reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kormaksson Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic modification of mosquitoes offers a promising strategy for the prevention and control of mosquito-borne diseases. For such a strategy to be effective, it is critically important that engineered strains are competitive enough to serve their intended function in population replacement or reduction of wild mosquitoes in nature. Thus far, fitness evaluations of genetically modified strains have not addressed the effects of competition among the aquatic stages and its consequences for adult fitness. We therefore tested the competitive success of combinations of wild, inbred and transgenic (created in the inbred background immature stages of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in the presence of optimal and sub-optimal larval diets. Results The wild strain of Ae. aegypti demonstrated greater performance (based on a composite index of survival, development rate and size than the inbred strain, which in turn demonstrated greater performance than the genetically modified strain. Moreover, increasing competition through lowering the amount of diet available per larva affected fitness disproportionately: transgenic larvae had a reduced index of performance (95-119% compared to inbred (50-88% and wild type larvae (38-54%. In terms of teneral energy reserves (glycogen, lipid and sugar, adult wild type mosquitoes had more reserves directly available for flight, dispersal and basic metabolic functions than transgenic and inbred mosquitoes. Conclusions Our study provides a detailed assessment of inter- and intra-strain competition across aquatic stages of wild type, inbred, and transgenic mosquitoes and the impact of these conditions on adult energy reserves. Although it is not clear what competitive level is adequate for success of transgenic strains in nature, strong gene drive mechanisms are likely to be necessary in order to overcome competitive disadvantages in the larval stage that carryover to affect adult fitness.

  19. Competitive strategy in turbulent healthcare markets: an analysis of financially effective teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, J

    1998-01-01

    As the healthcare marketplace, characterized by declining revenues and heavy price competition, continues to evolve toward managed care, teaching hospitals are being forced to act more like traditional industrial organizations. Profit-oriented behavior, including emphases on market strategies and competitive advantage, is now a necessity if these hospitals are going to survive the transition to managed care. To help teaching hospitals evaluate strategic options that maximize financial effectiveness, this study examined the financial and operating data for 100 major U.S. teaching hospitals to determine relationships among competitive strategy, market environment, and financial return on invested capital. Results should help major hospitals formulate more effective strategies to combat environmental turbulence. PMID:10338929

  20. Assessing the Effectiveness of Competition Law Enforcement Policy in Relation to Cartels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priit Mändmaa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the high fines for cartel infringements it is claimed that the current competition law enforcement lacks deterrent effect for the avoidance of cartel infringements and is procedurally fragile. This article analyses the current competition law enforcement policy in relation to cartels. More specifically, the article assesses the effectiveness of the policy in deterring the formation of cartels and pursuing the goals of competition law by analysing the theory of deterrence, case law, procedural norms, imposed fines and academic literature. The main conclusions are that wrong targets are aimed at under the deterrence principle, the proceedings are of a criminal law nature and require a separation of powers, and that the current level of fines does not pose a threat on the economy and continually fail to deter price-fixing.

  1. Co-evolution of the brand effect and competitiveness in evolving networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle that ‘the brand effect is attractive’ underlies the preferential attachment. Here we show that the brand effect is just one dimension of attractiveness. Another dimension is competitiveness. We firstly introduce a general framework that allows us to investigate the competitive aspect of real networks, instead of simply preferring popular nodes. Our model accurately describes the evolution of social and technological networks. The phenomenon that more competitive nodes become richer can help us to understand the evolution of many competitive systems in nature and society. In general, the paper provides an explicit analytical expression of degree distributions of the network. In particular, the model yields a nontrivial time evolution of nodes' properties and the scale-free behavior with exponents depending on the microscopic parameters characterizing the competition rules. Secondly, through theoretical analyses and numerical simulations, we reveal that our model has not only the universality for the homogeneous weighted network, but also the character for the heterogeneous weighted network. Thirdly, we also develop a model based on the profit-driven mechanism. It can better describe the observed phenomenon in enterprise cooperation networks. We show that the standard preferential attachment, the growing random graph, the initial attractiveness model, the fitness model, and weighted networks can all be seen as degenerate cases of our model. (general)

  2. Advertising Effectiveness, Digital Video Recorders, and Product Market Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Bikram Ghosh; Axel Stock

    2010-01-01

    With increasing fragmentation of media markets and recent advances in technology, loss of advertising effectiveness has been a great concern for marketers. For consumers, the digital video recorder (DVR) offers the possibility to fast-forward through live programming. Whereas the DVR thus benefits consumers by reducing nuisance from commercials, industry observers believe that it may diminish advertisers' profits by rendering commercials ineffective. We use a model of informative advertising ...

  3. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects in novel versus familiar environments in two Drosophila species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi

    2004-08-01

    Models of competitor coevolution, especially the genetic feedback hypothesis, suggest that a negative correlation between intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects may be important in sustaining competitor coexistence, and can give rise to oscillatory dynamics with repeated reversals of competitive superiority. I reanalyzed previously published census data from an experiment in which populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans underwent competitive coevolution in one familiar and two novel environments, to specifically look for any evidence of a negative relationship between intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth rates, and for any indication of short period cycling in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects. While there was considerable variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects over generations, among both populations and environments, there was no clear evidence supporting the genetic feedback hypothesis. Intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth rates were strongly positively correlated in novel environments, and uncorrelated in the familiar environment. Data from the familiar environment indicated that indices of competition of populations of the initially superior competitor, D. melanogaster, might be showing some cyclic behaviour, but I argue that this is likely to be transient, and not suggestive of sustained oscillatory dynamics predicted by the genetic feedback model. I discuss the results in the context of the importance of the genetic architecture of intraspecific and interspecific competitive abilities in determining the coevolutionary trajectory of competitive interactions.

  4. Belowground neighbor perception in Arabidopsis thaliana studied by transcriptome analysis: roots of Hieracium pilosella cause biotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christoph; Bauer, Sibylle; Müller, Benedikt; Bartelheimer, Maik

    2013-01-01

    Root-root interactions are much more sophisticated than previously thought, yet the mechanisms of belowground neighbor perception remain largely obscure. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses allow detailed insight into plant reactions to environmental cues. A root interaction trial was set up to explore both morphological and whole genome transcriptional responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence or absence of an inferior competitor, Hieracium pilosella. Neighbor perception was indicated by Arabidopsis roots predominantly growing away from the neighbor (segregation), while solitary plants placed more roots toward the middle of the pot. Total biomass remained unaffected. Database comparisons in transcriptome analysis revealed considerable similarity between Arabidopsis root reactions to neighbors and reactions to pathogens. Detailed analyses of the functional category "biotic stress" using MapMan tools found the sub-category "pathogenesis-related proteins" highly significantly induced. A comparison to a study on intraspecific competition brought forward a core of genes consistently involved in reactions to neighbor roots. We conclude that beyond resource depletion roots perceive neighboring roots or their associated microorganisms by a relatively uniform mechanism that involves the strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins. In an ecological context the findings reveal that belowground neighbor detection may occur independently of resource depletion, allowing for a time advantage for the root to prepare for potential interactions. PMID:23967000

  5. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  6. Tidal Influences on Belowground Methane Dynamics in a Mesohaline Coastal Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. C.; Tripathee, R.; Pal, D.; Schafer, K. V.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of tidal hydrology on belowground distributions and atmospheric fluxes of methane (CH4) remain poorly understood. The greenhouse gas balance of coastal wetland systems is a topic of increasing importance due to mounting proposals for coastal wetland preservation and/or restoration for carbon sequestration purposes, so it is essential that the effects of tides on methane dynamics be more fully understood. Here we describe a set of porewater measurements intended to clarify the influence of tides on belowground CH4 dynamics and their consequent effects on atmospheric emissions. Monthly measurements were conducted for one year in a marsh with mixed Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis vegetation and in an adjacent intertidal mud flat. The site is located in the Hackensack Meadowlands in northern New Jersey and is mesohaline, with a range of salinities from 4 - 8 ppt. Measurements indicate major differences in the spatial and temporal dynamics of belowground CH4 between the low marsh and mud flat sediments, though both are characterized by very high dissolved CH4 concentrations of >1,000 μM in summer months. A particularly important distinction is that mud flat porewaters remain saturated with dissolved CH4 into early winter, while low marsh porewarers never reach CH4 saturation and rapidly fall off to negligible concentrations in the autumn months. We attribute this long-term CH4 storage to differences in low-tide water table depths between the mud flat and low marsh, as well as the ventilating effects of macrophytes in the low marsh. We hypothesize that CH4-enriched gas bubbles are produced in mud flat sediments in summer, and then slowly dissolve over the fall and early winter months to maintain near-saturation concentrations in porewater. Static flux chamber measurements conducted at the same site, and discussed in detail in a separate submission, confirm the importance of mud flat CH4 storage in contributing to significant CH4 emissions

  7. On a competitive system under chemotactic effects with non-local terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study a system of partial differential equations describing the evolution of a population under chemotactic effects with non-local reaction terms. We consider an external application of chemoattractant in the system and study the cases of one and two populations in competition. By introducing global competitive/cooperative factors in terms of the total mass of the populations, we obtain, for a range of parameters, that any solution with positive and bounded initial data converges to a spatially homogeneous state with positive components. The proofs rely on the maximum principle for spatially homogeneous sub- and super-solutions. (paper)

  8. The Effect of Intra- and Interspecific Competition on Coexistence in Multispecies Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, György; J Michalska-Smith, Matthew; Allesina, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    For two competing species, intraspecific competition must exceed interspecific competition for coexistence. To generalize this well-known criterion to multiple competing species, one must take into account both the distribution of interaction strengths and community structure. Here we derive a multispecies generalization of the two-species rule in the context of symmetric Lotka-Volterra competition and obtain explicit stability conditions for random competitive communities. We then explore the influence of community structure on coexistence. Results show that both the most and least stabilized cases have striking global structures, with a nested pattern emerging in both cases. The distribution of intraspecific coefficients leading to the most and least stabilized communities also follows a predictable pattern that can be justified analytically. In addition, we show that the size of the parameter space allowing for feasible communities always increases with the strength of intraspecific effects in a characteristic way that is independent of the interspecific interaction structure. We conclude by discussing possible extensions of our results to nonsymmetric competition. PMID:27322128

  9. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: Influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Lucile

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. Methods We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala, to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Results Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host, larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Conclusions Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood.

  10. Effects of clonal fragmentation on intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous floating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Xu, Y-S; Dong, B-C; Xue, W; Yu, F-H

    2014-11-01

    Disturbance is common and can fragment clones of plants. Clonal fragmentation may affect the density and growth of ramets so that it could alter intraspecific competition. To test this hypothesis, we grew one (low density), five (medium density) or nine (high density) parent ramets of the floating invasive plant Pistia stratiotes in buckets, and newly produced offspring ramets were either severed (with fragmentation) or remained connected to parent ramets (no fragmentation). Increasing density reduced biomass of the whole clone (i.e. parent ramet plus its offspring ramets), showing intense intraspecific competition. Fragmentation decreased biomass of offspring ramets, but increased biomass of parent ramets and the whole clone, suggesting significant resource translocation from parent to offspring ramets when clones were not fragmented. There was no interaction effect of density x fragmentation on biomass of the whole clone, and fragmentation did not affect competition intensity index. We conclude that clonal fragmentation does not alter intraspecific competition between clones of P. stratiotes, but increases biomass production of the whole clone. Thus, fragmentation may contribute to its interspecific competitive ability and invasiveness, and intentional fragmentation should not be recommended as a measure to stop the rapid growth of this invasive species. PMID:24661501

  11. Real Effective Exchange Rate of Rouble and Competitiveness of Russian Agrarian Producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Maitah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of development projects were launched in Russia to support agro-producers, emphasizing increasing potential and perspective significance of Agrarian sector in the Russian economy. In light of this, it becomes interesting to investigate the position of agro-producers both in comparison to producers from other domestic sectors and relatively to its main foreign competitors. An analysis of the recent dynamics (from 2000 to 2014 of the real effective exchange rate of Russian rouble serves in the present study as an indicator of price competitiveness, which determines relative position of domestic producers in external markets. The actual competitive state of Russian agro-producers is analyzed by the means of revealed comparative advantage indices proposed by Balassa, Vollrath and Lafay. The calculations have shown that the entire analyzed period can be generally characterized as the period of significant real appreciation of the Russian rouble and the reason behind this is the difference in inflation rates in Russia and its main foreign trade partners. This predetermined the relatively low price competitiveness of agro-producers, which was mostly confirmed by calculated values of Balassa Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA index, Vollrath Revealed Competitiveness index (VRC and Lafay Trade Specialization index (LFI. The short-term real depreciations of the rouble did not have any expected substantially positive impacts on their competitive position.

  12. Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Durant, Joel M.; Fowler, Mike S.; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Jonzen, Niclas; Chan, Kung-Sik; Liu, Hai; De Laet, Jenny; Sheldon, Ben C.; Visser, Marcel E.; Dhondt, Andre A.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have profound ecological effects, yet shifts in competitive abilities among species are rarely studied in this context. Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tits (Parus major) compete for food and roosting sites, yet coexist across much of their range. Climate chan

  13. Fictional citizens and real effects: accountability to citizens in competitive and monopolistic markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.J.; Schillemans, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the influence of market conditions – (semi) competitive versus monopolistic markets –on (the effects of) citizen accountability on public sector organisations. Empirical material from case studies in education, healthcare, social security and land registry in the Netherlands is

  14. Effects of inbreeding and genetic modification on Aedes aegypti larval competition and adult energy reserves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Kormaksson, M.; Harrington, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Genetic modification of mosquitoes offers a promising strategy for the prevention and control of mosquito-borne diseases. For such a strategy to be effective, it is critically important that engineered strains are competitive enough to serve their intended function in population replace

  15. The Effects of Information Technology Applications on Collaborating Capability in Achieving Organisational Competitive Advantages in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Lew Sook Ling; Ong Puay Tee; Uchenna Cyril Eze

    2013-01-01

    Emerging and developing countries, particularly in Asia, have seen relatively strong economic growth. Withright information technology (IT) adoption, the strong growth would provide a great advantage in improving thepotential of the growth of companies. This paper highlights information technology (IT) applications havemoderating effects towards collaborating capability-organisational competitive advantage relationship based onempirical justifications of 295 Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC) Ma...

  16. STRATEGIC APPROACHES WITH EFFECTS ON COMPETITIVENESS AND PROFITABILITY OF TEXTILE MARKET IN IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamir Hadi Abod AL-GENABI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the results of the research aimed at understanding the effects of the market strategies the textile organizations follow to increase profitability, considering that this sector is a pillar of the national economy. In this respect, 7 hypotheses are stated and verified. This research is an attempt to know how to face competition in this industry.

  17. Root pruning reduces root competition in living mulch cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Båth, B.; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    In intercropping systems with a cash crop and a living mulch intercrop, competition between the cash crop and the intercrop (the living mulch) often reduces the yield of the cash crop. This project investigated (1) the influence of root pruning of living mulches on aboveground biomass of white cabbage. Below-ground growth and competition were examined by measuring (2) root distribution in minirhizotrons and (3) uptake of 15N placed at different soil depths. Two field experiments were carried ...

  18. Estimating the Effect of Competition on Trait Evolution Using Maximum Likelihood Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Jonathan; Clavel, Julien; Manceau, Marc; Morlon, Hélène

    2016-07-01

    Many classical ecological and evolutionary theoretical frameworks posit that competition between species is an important selective force. For example, in adaptive radiations, resource competition between evolving lineages plays a role in driving phenotypic diversification and exploration of novel ecological space. Nevertheless, current models of trait evolution fit to phylogenies and comparative data sets are not designed to incorporate the effect of competition. The most advanced models in this direction are diversity-dependent models where evolutionary rates depend on lineage diversity. However, these models still treat changes in traits in one branch as independent of the value of traits on other branches, thus ignoring the effect of species similarity on trait evolution. Here, we consider a model where the evolutionary dynamics of traits involved in interspecific interactions are influenced by species similarity in trait values and where we can specify which lineages are in sympatry. We develop a maximum likelihood based approach to fit this model to combined phylogenetic and phenotypic data. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the approach accurately estimates the simulated parameter values across a broad range of parameter space. Additionally, we develop tools for specifying the biogeographic context in which trait evolution occurs. In order to compare models, we also apply these biogeographic methods to specify which lineages interact sympatrically for two diversity-dependent models. Finally, we fit these various models to morphological data from a classical adaptive radiation (Greater Antillean Anolis lizards). We show that models that account for competition and geography perform better than other models. The matching competition model is an important new tool for studying the influence of interspecific interactions, in particular competition, on phenotypic evolution. More generally, it constitutes a step toward a better integration of interspecific

  19. Plant competitive interactions and invasiveness: searching for the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and origin on competition intensity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 5 (2011), s. 655-667. ISSN 0003-0147 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0132 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : competitive equivalence * invasive plants * phylogenetic similarity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.725, year: 2011

  20. Effect of Black Economic Empowerment on profit and competitiveness of firms in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert P.J. Kleynhans

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The key obstacle hindering optimal profitability levels and competitiveness in firms in South Africa is the application of labour legislation policies and tools aimed at narrowing the income gap between different racial groups and resolving inequality amongst a diverse workforce.Research purpose: This article determined whether the implementation of a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE policy by companies has a positive effect on their growth in terms of profits and competitiveness.Motivation for the study: This study determined whether the implementation of BEE could be profitable for companies.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative study was undertaken in order to find empirical evidence supporting the relation between high BEE Scores, profitability and competitiveness. The empirical investigation utilised regression analysis, correlations and other methods, based on data between January 2009 and December 2011. The BEE Scorecard was used to obtain BEE scores of the top 50 BEE companies. Thereafter, the top 50 companies’ financial information was gathered from the Johannesburg Securities Exchange.Main findings: The implementation of BEE within companies has a positive effect on profitability, turnover and investment. Numerous factors have, however, been hindering,while other factors enhanced the success of BEE.Practical/managerial implications: The findings encourage mangers to engage in BEE as it may facilitate higher profits and indicates where labour legislation could be improved.Contribution/value-add: Value was added through new research determining the effects of BEE and labour legislation on profitability and competitiveness of firms on a micro-level.

  1. Effects of Agricultural Pollutants on Competition Between Filter-Feeding Caddis Flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D. A.; Watzin, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    The effects of agricultural pollutants on competition between lotic macroinvertebrates are largely unstudied. We investigated how agricultural pollution affects competition between larvae of two caddis flies, Hydropsyche spp. and Brachycentrus appalachia. Month-long laboratory experiments were conducted in recirculating stream microcosms at two levels of Hydropsyche abundance: low density (80 Hydropsyche and 40 Brachycentrus per tank) and high density (300 Hydropsyche and 40 Brachycentrus). Experimental factors tested were agricultural pollutant addition (cow manure compost and sand) versus control tanks and taxon combination (Hydropsyche only, Brachycentrus only, and both taxa). In high-density experiments, mortality and drift of Hydropsyche were higher in agricultural tanks than in controls and more Brachycentrus drifted in tanks with Hydropsyche present. In low-density experiments, mortality of Brachycentrus was higher in tanks with Hydropsyche present. In both high and low-density experiments,Brachycentrus had lower mean condition (as measured by body-length residuals) in the presence ofHydropsyche, although these differences were only statistically significant in the high-density experiment. No difference in condition was observed for Hydropsyche at either density. Our results provide evidence of both competition between Hydropsyche and Brachycentrus and direct effects of pollutant addition, but the pollution effects did not alter the competitive interactions between the two species.

  2. Biomass explains the intensity of facilitative – not competitive – interactions: three intraspecific tests with annuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tielbörger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to discern the role of plant size in resource competition, the circumstances under which size-dependent plant-plant interactions occur are still unclear. The traditional assumption is that competition intensifies with increasing neighbour size. However, recent studies suggest that the size (biomass dependence of competitive interactions is strongest at very low biomass levels and becomes negligible after a certain threshold neighbour biomass has been reached. We searched for the generality of such patterns for three common annual plant species in Israel. We monitored target and neighbour biomass along their entire lifecycle using an even-aged, intraspecific and intrapopulation competition screenhouse experiment under water-limited conditions. For all focal species, neighbour presence had a net negative effect on vegetative biomass at harvest. However, this was not explained by increasing neighbour biomass over time, as a consistent pattern of size-dependent facilitative, rather than competitive, interactions was observed at all life stages. We explain these observations in terms of co-occurring aboveground facilitation and dominant belowground competition for water. Since our findings are the first of their kind and contradict theoretical predictions of biomass dependence of net negative interactions, we advocate further experiments addressing size dependence in interactions among plants. In particular, theoretical models addressing size dependence of positive interactions must be developed.

  3. Quantifying above- and belowground biomass carbon loss with forest conversion in tropical lowlands of Sumatra (Indonesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowska, Martyna M; Leuschner, Christoph; Triadiati, Triadiati; Meriem, Selis; Hertel, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    Natural forests in South-East Asia have been extensively converted into other land-use systems in the past decades and still show high deforestation rates. Historically, lowland forests have been converted into rubber forests, but more recently, the dominant conversion is into oil palm plantations. While it is expected that the large-scale conversion has strong effects on the carbon cycle, detailed studies quantifying carbon pools and total net primary production (NPPtotal ) in above- and belowground tree biomass in land-use systems replacing rainforest (incl. oil palm plantations) are rare so far. We measured above- and belowground carbon pools in tree biomass together with NPPtotal in natural old-growth forests, 'jungle rubber' agroforests under natural tree cover, and rubber and oil palm monocultures in Sumatra. In total, 32 stands (eight plot replicates per land-use system) were studied in two different regions. Total tree biomass in the natural forest (mean: 384 Mg ha(-1) ) was more than two times higher than in jungle rubber stands (147 Mg ha(-1) ) and >four times higher than in monoculture rubber and oil palm plantations (78 and 50 Mg ha(-1) ). NPPtotal was higher in the natural forest (24 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) than in the rubber systems (20 and 15 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ), but was highest in the oil palm system (33 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) due to very high fruit production (15-20 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ). NPPtotal was dominated in all systems by aboveground production, but belowground productivity was significantly higher in the natural forest and jungle rubber than in plantations. We conclude that conversion of natural lowland forest into different agricultural systems leads to a strong reduction not only in the biomass carbon pool (up to 166 Mg C ha(-1) ) but also in carbon sequestration as carbon residence time (i.e. biomass-C:NPP-C) was 3-10 times higher in the natural forest than in rubber and oil palm plantations. PMID:25980371

  4. Factors affecting athletes’ motor behavior after the observation of scenes of cooperation and competition in competitive sport: the effect of sport attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eDe Stefani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAim: This study delineated how observing sports scenes of cooperation or competition modulated an action of interaction, in expert athletes, depending on their specific sport attitude. Method: In a kinematic study, athletes were divided into two groups depending on their attitude towards teammates (cooperative or competitive. Participants observed sport scenes of cooperation and competition (basketball, soccer, water polo, volleyball, and rugby and then they reached for, picked up, and placed an object on the hand of a conspecific (giving action. Mixed-design ANOVAs were carried out on the mean values of grasping-reaching parameters. Results: Data showed that the type of scene observed as well as the athletes’ attitude affected reach-to-grasp actions to give. In particular, the cooperative athletes were speeded during reach-to-grasp movements when they observed scenes of cooperation compared to when they observed scenes of competition. Discussion: Participants were speeded when executing a giving action after observing actions of cooperation. This occurred only when they had a cooperative attitude. A match between attitude and intended action seems to be a necessary prerequisite for observing an effect of the observed type of scene on the performed action. It is possible that the observation of scenes of competition activated motor strategies which interfered with the strategies adopted by the cooperative participants to execute a cooperative (giving sequence.

  5. Effects of competition and facilitation on species assemblage in two types of tropical cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wenxing; Zang, Runguo; Ding, Yi; Huang, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Competition and facilitation between tree individuals are two kinds of non-random processes influencing the structure and functioning of forest communities, but how these two plant-plant interactions change along gradient of resources or environments remains very much a matter of debate. We developed a null model to test the size-distance regression, and assessed the effects of competition and facilitation (including interspecific interactions, intraspecific interactions and overall species interactions) on each adult tree species assemblage [diameter at breast height (dbh) ≥5 cm] across two types of tropical cloud forest with different environmental and resource regimes. The null model test revealed that 17% to 27% tree species had positive dbh-distance correlations while 11% to 19% tree species showed negative dbh-distance correlations within these two forest types, indicating that both competition and facilitation processes existed during the community assembly. The importance of competition for heterospecific species, and the intensity of competition for both heterospecific and overall species increased from high to low resources for all the shared species spanning the two forests. The importance of facilitation for conspecific and overall species, as well as that the intensity of facilitation for both heterospecific and conspecific species increased with increasing low air temperature stress for all the shared species spanning the two forests. Our results show that both competition and facilitation processes simultaneously affect parts of species assemblage in the tropical cloud forests. Moreover, the fact that nearly 50% species assemblage is not detected with our approaches suggest that tree species in these tropical forest systems are assembled with multiple ecological processes, and that there is a need to explore the processes other than the two biotic interactions in further researches. PMID:23565209

  6. Effects of competition and facilitation on species assemblage in two types of tropical cloud forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxing Long

    Full Text Available Competition and facilitation between tree individuals are two kinds of non-random processes influencing the structure and functioning of forest communities, but how these two plant-plant interactions change along gradient of resources or environments remains very much a matter of debate. We developed a null model to test the size-distance regression, and assessed the effects of competition and facilitation (including interspecific interactions, intraspecific interactions and overall species interactions on each adult tree species assemblage [diameter at breast height (dbh ≥5 cm] across two types of tropical cloud forest with different environmental and resource regimes. The null model test revealed that 17% to 27% tree species had positive dbh-distance correlations while 11% to 19% tree species showed negative dbh-distance correlations within these two forest types, indicating that both competition and facilitation processes existed during the community assembly. The importance of competition for heterospecific species, and the intensity of competition for both heterospecific and overall species increased from high to low resources for all the shared species spanning the two forests. The importance of facilitation for conspecific and overall species, as well as that the intensity of facilitation for both heterospecific and conspecific species increased with increasing low air temperature stress for all the shared species spanning the two forests. Our results show that both competition and facilitation processes simultaneously affect parts of species assemblage in the tropical cloud forests. Moreover, the fact that nearly 50% species assemblage is not detected with our approaches suggest that tree species in these tropical forest systems are assembled with multiple ecological processes, and that there is a need to explore the processes other than the two biotic interactions in further researches.

  7. Effects of competitive interactions of different life forms submersed plants on biomass allocation in shallow lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiu-feng

    2010-01-01

    Plant competition has been recognized as one of the most important factors influencing the structure and function of lake ecosystems.Competition from plants of dissimilar growth form may have profound effects on shallow lakes.An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of competitive interactions of submersed plants with dissimilar growth forms on the biomass allocations.Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans were selected and were planted in a single-species monoculture and a mixed-species pattern.Results showed that the growth of Ⅴ.natans was significantly affected by the H.verticillata and caused a sharp reduction of biomass,but the root:shoot ratio of Ⅴ.natans was not affected significantly and there was a minimal increase in mixture: while for H.verticillata,the biomass and the root:shoot ratio were not significantly changed by the competitive interactions of Ⅴ.natans,there was minimal increase qf biomass and minimal decrease of the root:shoot ratio.These results may indicate that the phant which candevelop a dense mat or canopy at the water surface would be a stronger competitor relative to the plant that dependsmore on light availability near the sediment.

  8. Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenseth, Nils Chr; Durant, Joël M; Fowler, Mike S; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Jonzén, Niclas; Chan, Kung-Sik; Liu, Hai; De Laet, Jenny; Sheldon, Ben C; Visser, Marcel E; Dhondt, André A

    2015-05-22

    Climate change is expected to have profound ecological effects, yet shifts in competitive abilities among species are rarely studied in this context. Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tits (Parus major) compete for food and roosting sites, yet coexist across much of their range. Climate change might thus change the competitive relationships and coexistence between these two species. Analysing four of the highest-quality, long-term datasets available on these species across Europe, we extend the textbook example of coexistence between competing species to include the dynamic effects of long-term climate variation. Using threshold time-series statistical modelling, we demonstrate that long-term climate variation affects species demography through different influences on density-dependent and density-independent processes. The competitive interaction between blue tits and great tits has shifted in one of the studied sites, creating conditions that alter the relative equilibrium densities between the two species, potentially disrupting long-term coexistence. Our analyses show that long-term climate change can, but does not always, generate local differences in the equilibrium conditions of spatially structured species assemblages. We demonstrate how long-term data can be used to better understand whether (and how), for instance, climate change might change the relationships between coexisting species. However, the studied populations are rather robust against competitive exclusion. PMID:25904659

  9. Quality Competition and a Demand Spillover Effect: A Case of Product Differentiated Duopoly

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyoshi Toshimitsu

    2012-01-01

    Employing the price-quality competition model in a horizontally differentiated products market, we analyze how a demand spillover effect associated with upgrading the quality level of a product affects the strategic relationship between firms and the property of a subgame perfect Nash equilibrium. In particular, we show that the strategic relationship depends on the degree of a demand spillover effect. Then, we consider the cases of second-best policy and cooperative quality choice. Furthermo...

  10. The role of effective personnel management in enhancing the competitiveness of dairy systems: theory, practice, benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana Grydkina; Liliya Pechnikova

    2013-01-01

    At the present stage of development of the economy as an effective personnel management is of particular relevance in enhancing the competitiveness of dairy complexes. The main purpose of human resource management in the industry is molokoproizvodyaschey timely decisions that determine the human resources and the amount required to meet production goals, the selection of competent and motivated staff, the ability to retain them, organizing them effectively, improve worker training, social dev...

  11. The role of effective personnel management in enhancing the competitiveness of dairy systems: theory, practice, benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Grydkina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present stage of development of the economy as an effective personnel management is of particular relevance in enhancing the competitiveness of dairy complexes. The main purpose of human resource management in the industry is molokoproizvodyaschey timely decisions that determine the human resources and the amount required to meet production goals, the selection of competent and motivated staff, the ability to retain them, organizing them effectively, improve worker training, social development.

  12. Leaching from cementitious waste forms in belowground vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification and/or stabilization with cementitious materials prior to burial is one option for disposal of liquid hazardous and radioactive wastes. A common design for disposal of cementitious waste forms is to pour the material into large belowground vaults. The leaching performance of partially degraded monolithic vaults is examined quantitatively for facilities located in humid to semiarid climates. Development of perched water on the vault roof leading to fracture flow through the structure is predicted for a wide range of climate and design conditions. Leaching controlled by diffusion in matrix blocks out to fractures is examined parametrically in relation to water flux rate and crack spacing. Depending upon the parameters examined, release rate may be controlled by water flux rate or diffusion. Under some circumstances, contaminant release rates and exit concentrations are predicted to be inversely related. In this situation, minimization of release does not result in the lowest predicted groundwater concentrations below the vault

  13. Weed-crop competition effects on growth and yield of sugarcane planted using two methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of planting techniques and weed-crop competition periods on yield potential of spring planted sugarcane variety HSF-240 was studied at the Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan. The experiment was laid out in RCBD with a split-plot arrangement, with four replications and net plot size of 3.6m x 10m. In the experiment, two planting techniques viz., 60 cm apart rows in flat sowing technique and 120 cm apart rows in trench sowing technique were randomized in main plots. Seven weed-crop competition periods viz., Zero (weed free), weed-crop competition for 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 days after sowing (DAS) and weedy check (full season weed-crop competition) were randomized in sub-plots. Sugarcane sown by trench method exhibited more leaf area index (LAI), average crop growth rate (ACGR) and yield contributing attributes. Trench sowing by yielding 72.22 and 75.08 t ha/sup -1/ stripped cane yields, significantly showed superiority over the flat sowing, which gave 64.13 and 66.04 t ha/sup -1/ stripped cane yields in 2005-06 and 2006- 07, respectively. Generally, there was an increase in weed population and biomass but decrease in leaf area index, crop growth rate and yield components with an increase in weed-crop competition period. A decrease of 10.06, 17.90, 22.42, 28.65, 37.64 and 56.89% in stripped cane yield was observed for weed-crop competition periods of 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 DAS and weedy check as compared with zero competition in 2005-06, respectively. In 2006-07, the respective decrease in stripped cane yield was 9.84, 18.76, 22.92, 27.98, 38.75, and 54.98%. Trench sowing at 1.2 m row spacing proved better sowing technique and 45 DAS was the critical period of weed-crop competition. (author)

  14. Securitization, Competition and Monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, J-H; Breton, R.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the impact of loan securitization on competition in the loan market. Using a dynamic loan market competition model where borrowers face both exogenous and endogenous costs to switch between banks, we uncover a competition softening effect of securitization that allows banks to extract rents in the primary loan market. By reducing monitoring incentives, securitization mitigates winner’s curse effects in future stages of competition thereby decreasing ex ante competition for initial ...

  15. Effect of Larval Competition on Extrinsic Incubation Period and Vectorial Capacity of Aedes albopictus for Dengue Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bara, Jeffrey; Rapti, Zoi; Cáceres, Carla E.; Muturi, Ephantus J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing awareness that larval competition can influence adult mosquito life history traits including susceptibility to pathogens, the net effect of larval competition on human risk of exposure to mosquito-borne pathogens remains poorly understood. We examined how intraspecific larval competition affects dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) extrinsic incubation period and vectorial capacity of its natural vector Aedes albopictus. Adult Ae. albopictus from low and high-larval density conditions ...

  16. Social behaviors as determined by different arrangements of social consequences: diffusion of responsibility effects with competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Bernard

    2003-06-01

    According to a recently proposed synthesis, social loafing, social facilitation, and deindividuation can be viewed as different ways of arranging social consequences (B. Guerin, 1999). The effects of such arrangements have been measured in past research as productive output (social loafing and social facilitation) or as antinormative behaviors (deindividuation), but all 3 effects are manipulable by changing individual identifiability, evaluation, social identity, task difficulty, and presence in a group. The synthesis also predicted that these same variables would apply to other measures and other arrangements of social consequences. To this end, in the present 2 experiments, the author varied the arrangements for consequence diffusion in a competition situation by varying small and large competing groups and measured productive output and antinormative behaviors simultaneously. The 2 experiments showed social-consequence effects in competition situations with college students, giving further support for the social-consequence synthesis and the idea that the verbal naming of phenomena in social psychology is arbitrary. PMID:12846515

  17. Density and relative frequency effects on competitive interactions and resource use in pea–barley intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Andersen, H.K.; Jørnsgaard, B.;

    2006-01-01

    . Intercropped pea did not increase its reliance on atmospheric nitrogen fixation compared to the pea sole crop. With respect to soil nitrogen uptake there were no effect of plant density but a strong effect of the relative frequency of pea in the intercrop, the greater the proportion the lower the uptake...... expected proportions sown; however, at high density the suppression of barley strongly increased the proportion of pea in the final grain yield. Weed infestation levels decreased as density was raised and the suppressing effect of density was clearly stronger the greater the frequency of pea in the crop...... competitiveness towards weeds or specific grain yield composition are wanted. Keywords: Competition dynamics; Grain quality; Hordeum vulgare; Intercropping; Nitrogen use; Organic farming; Pisum sativum; Weeds; Yield Abbreviations: IC, mixed intercropping; LER, land equivalent ratio; N, nitrogen; REIc, relative...

  18. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Cseresnyés

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L. was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956 were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches.

  19. Effect of Larval Competition on Extrinsic Incubation Period and Vectorial Capacity of Aedes albopictus for Dengue Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Bara

    Full Text Available Despite the growing awareness that larval competition can influence adult mosquito life history traits including susceptibility to pathogens, the net effect of larval competition on human risk of exposure to mosquito-borne pathogens remains poorly understood. We examined how intraspecific larval competition affects dengue-2 virus (DENV-2 extrinsic incubation period and vectorial capacity of its natural vector Aedes albopictus. Adult Ae. albopictus from low and high-larval density conditions were orally challenged with DENV-2 and then assayed for virus infection and dissemination rates following a 6, 9, or 12-day incubation period using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. We then modeled the effect of larval competition on vectorial capacity using parameter estimates obtained from peer-reviewed field and laboratory studies. Larval competition resulted in significantly longer development times, lower emergence rates, and smaller adults, but did not significantly affect the extrinsic incubation period of DENV-2 in Ae. albopictus. Our vectorial capacity models suggest that the effect of larval competition on adult mosquito longevity likely has a greater influence on vectorial capacity relative to any competition-induced changes in vector competence. Furthermore, we found that large increases in the viral dissemination rate may be necessary to compensate for small competition-induced reductions in daily survivorship. Our results indicate that mosquito populations that experience stress from larval competition are likely to have a reduced vectorial capacity, even when susceptibility to pathogens is enhanced.

  20. Effect of Larval Competition on Extrinsic Incubation Period and Vectorial Capacity of Aedes albopictus for Dengue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Jeffrey; Rapti, Zoi; Cáceres, Carla E; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing awareness that larval competition can influence adult mosquito life history traits including susceptibility to pathogens, the net effect of larval competition on human risk of exposure to mosquito-borne pathogens remains poorly understood. We examined how intraspecific larval competition affects dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) extrinsic incubation period and vectorial capacity of its natural vector Aedes albopictus. Adult Ae. albopictus from low and high-larval density conditions were orally challenged with DENV-2 and then assayed for virus infection and dissemination rates following a 6, 9, or 12-day incubation period using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. We then modeled the effect of larval competition on vectorial capacity using parameter estimates obtained from peer-reviewed field and laboratory studies. Larval competition resulted in significantly longer development times, lower emergence rates, and smaller adults, but did not significantly affect the extrinsic incubation period of DENV-2 in Ae. albopictus. Our vectorial capacity models suggest that the effect of larval competition on adult mosquito longevity likely has a greater influence on vectorial capacity relative to any competition-induced changes in vector competence. Furthermore, we found that large increases in the viral dissemination rate may be necessary to compensate for small competition-induced reductions in daily survivorship. Our results indicate that mosquito populations that experience stress from larval competition are likely to have a reduced vectorial capacity, even when susceptibility to pathogens is enhanced. PMID:25951173

  1. An exploitation-competition system with negative effect of prey on its predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers an exploitation-competition system in which exploitation is the dominant interaction when the prey is at low density, while competition is dominant when the prey is at high density due to its negative effect on the predator. The two-species system is characterized by differential equations, which are the combination of Lotka-Volterra competitive and predator-prey models. Global dynamics of the model demonstrate some basic properties of exploitation-competition systems: (i) When the growth rate of prey is extremely small, the prey cannot promote the growth of predator. (ii) When the growth rate is small, an obligate predator can survive by preying on the prey, while a facultative predator can approach a high density by the predation. (iii) When the growth rate is intermediate, the predator can approach the maximal density by an intermediate predation. (iv) When the growth rate is large, the predator can persist only if it has a large density and its predation on the prey is big. (v) Intermediate predation is beneficial to the predator under certain parameter range, while over- or under-predation is not good. Extremely big/small predation would lead to extinction of species. Numerical simulations confirm and extend our results. PMID:25707917

  2. The effect of competition on heart rate during kart driving: A field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakoshi Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the act of competing, which can create a kind of mental stress, and participation in motor sports, which induces physical stress from intense g-forces, are known to increase heart rate dramatically. However, little is known about the specific effect of competition on heart rate during motor sports, particularly during four-wheel car driving. The goal of this preliminary study, therefore, was to investigate whether competition increases heart rate under such situations. Findings The participants drove an entry-level formula kart during two competitive races and during solo driving against the clock while heart rate and g-forces were measured. Analyses showed that heart rate values during the races (168.8 beats/min were significantly higher than those during solo driving (140.9 beats/min and rest (75.1 beats/min. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that competition heightens heart rate during four-wheel car driving. Kart drivers should be concerned about maintaining good health and developing physical strength.

  3. ASSEMBLED PRODUCTS: THE KEY TO MORE EFFECTIVE COMPETITION AND ANTITRUST OVERSIGHT IN HEALTH CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2016-01-01

    This Article argues that recent calls for antitrust enforcement to protect health insurers from hospital and physician consolidation are incomplete. The principal obstacle to effective competition in health care is not that one or the other party has too much bargaining power, but that they have been buying and selling the wrong things. Vigorous antitrust enforcement will benefit health care consumers only if it accounts for the competitive distortions caused by the sector's long history of government regulation. Because of regulation, what pass for products in health care are typically small process steps and isolated components that can be assigned a billing code, even if they do little to help patients. Instead of further entrenching weakly competitive parties engaged in artificial commerce, antitrust enforcers and regulators should work together to promote the sale of fully assembled products and services that can be warranted to consumers for performance and safety. As better products emerge through innovation and market entry, competition may finally succeed at lowering medical costs, increasing access to treatment, and improving quality of care. PMID:27062731

  4. Multiple infestation by seed predators: the effect of loculate fruits on intraspecific insect larval competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, José M.; Delgado, Juan A.; López, Francisco; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fungairiño, Sara G.

    2001-06-01

    Many morphological features of fruits are important factors affecting predispersal seed predation by insects. This paper analyses the predispersal seed predation process of a major predator (a Noctuidae lepidopteran larvae) in loculate fruits of a bushy perennial plant, Cistus ladanifer. The main aim of the study is to assess the potential effect of internal valvae (which partition groups of seeds) in the intraspecific competition between larvae in multiple-infested fruits. Our results show that larvae do not reject already infested fruits, but they avoid the proximity of other larvae within the fruit, keeping an average minimum distance of one locule. In multiple-infested fruits, larval mortality increases and the proportion of seeds consumed by each larvae decreases. In those situations in which valvae keep apart larvae within a fruit, these only suffer the cost of exploitation competition with a low acquisition of resources. However, when all valvae between them are pierced by the larvae, competition switches to an interference component and larval mortality increases markedly. The existence of valvae within a fruit allows larvae to diminish the cost of intraspecific competition, obtaining high life expectancies (70%), even in triple-infested fruits.

  5. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-28

    We propose that individuals use anger strategically in interactions. We first show that in some environments angering people makes them more effective in competitions, whereas in others, anger makes them less effective. We then show that individuals anticipate these effects and strategically use the option to anger their opponents. In particular, they are more likely to anger their opponents when anger negatively affects the opponents' performances. This finding suggests people understand the effects of emotions on behavior and exploit them to their advantage. PMID:24474756

  6. Grassland management affects belowground carbon allocation in mountain grasslands and its resistance and resilience to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlowsky, Stefan; Augusti, Angela; Ingrisch, Johannes; Hasibeder, Roland; Bahn, Michael; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    leaves and followed by a stable phase. In microbial biomass, tracer dynamics generally reflect the root 13C enrichment and consequently show a more pronounced effect of drought in meadow treatments. Nevertheless, at the second labelling, 13C incorporation in leaves as well as 13C allocation to roots fully recovered to control level, in both, abandoned and meadow treatments. Accordingly, we assume that the C transfer to soil microbial biomass also should have been restored at that time (analyses in progress). Furthermore, the 13C analysis of individual microbial biomarker lipids will give us a more detailed view on the molecular mechanisms underpinning resistance and resilience of mountain grasslands. Additionally, we also analysed the 13C composition of CO2 respired by roots, to study how much and how fast newly assimilated C is respired at the root level. Our results show, that already 24 hours after labelling the canopy, newly formed C has been translocated and respired at the root level. We don't have enough data to show a difference in drought resistance between the two different land uses. However, preliminary results from labelling the rewetted plots indicate that the flux of newly formed CO2 from roots, both in abandoned and meadow treatments, recovers completely from drought with non-significant difference among the land use treatments (in accordance with bulk phytomass analyses). Moreover, data on the compound specific 13C composition in above- and below-ground biomass will highlight the relationship between C allocation in grassland species and the C respired by roots as CO2 as well as the C transferred to the microbial community in the rhizosphere.

  7. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale. PMID:27375630

  8. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale. PMID:27375630

  9. Effect of CO2 enrichment on competition between Skeletonema costatum and Heterosigma akashiwo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You; Ju, Qing; Yu, Qingyun; Tang, Xuexi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effect of CO2 enrichment and initial inoculum density on competition between Skeletonema costatum and Heterosigma akashiwo, two common algae seen in algal blooms. The initial inoculum density (0.2×104, 0.4×104, 0.8×104 cells/ml) had a significant effect on population growth and competition between H. akashiwo and S. costatum. The time required for population growth to reach the exponential growth phase and stationary phase decreased significantly as the initial density increased. When the two species were cultured together, S. costatum tended to outcompete H. akashiwo, especially when present at higher initial ratios. CO2 enrichment (5 000 μl/L CO2) increased the maximum population density and carrying capacity of H. akashiwo but decreased these measures for S. costatum. Thus, CO2 enrichment favored the growth of H. akashiwo over S. costatum.

  10. The effect of competition on the neutral intraspecific diversity of invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, L; Hosono, Y; Bonnefon, O; Boivin, T

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the effect of interspecific competition on the dynamics of neutral genetic diversity in a range-expanding population. The spread of an invasive species in an environment already hosting a resident competitor is described by a traveling wave solution with minimal speed, u(t,x) = U(x - c ∗ t), of a diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model. The description of the dynamics of neutral genetic fractions in this wave is based on a decomposition of the wave into several components, as proposed by Roques et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(23):8828-8833, 2012). Our analytical results reveal that the wave can be either the pulled type, corresponding to strong erosion of the diversity, or the pushed type, corresponding to maintenance of the initial diversity. The pulled/pushed nature of the wave depends on the linear or nonlinear nature of the speed c *. Our results show that, for sufficiently strong competition, the speed is nonlinear, and therefore all of the genetic diversity in the invasive population is maintained. Conversely, in the absence of competition, or when competition is mild, the speed is linear, which means that only the furthest forward fraction in the initial invasive population eventually remains in the colonization front. Our numerical results also show that the sufficient conditions of Lewis et al. (J Math Biol 45(3):219-233, 2002) and Huang (J Dyn Differ Equ 22(2):285-297, 2010) for the linearity of the speed c * can still be improved, and they show that nonlinear speeds occur across a wide region of the parameter space, providing a counterpoint to recent analytical results suggesting that nonlinear speeds only occur in certain limiting cases. PMID:25193551

  11. Spillover and Competitive Effects of Advertising in the Carbonated Soft Drink Market

    OpenAIRE

    Rigoberto A. Lopez; Yizao Liu; Chen Zhu

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the spillover effects of television advertising on brand-level consumer demand for carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) and the competition consequences for manufacturers’ and private label CSDs. Using a random coefficients logit model (BLP) with household purchasing and advertising viewing data from five U.S. cities, we find that although brand advertising is important in increasing demand as previous work confirms, company advertising spillovers are nearly as important. Not sur...

  12. Cross-diffusional effect in a telegraph reaction diffusion Lotka-Volterra two competitive system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdusalam, H.A E-mail: hosny@operamail.com; Fahmy, E.S

    2003-10-01

    It is known now that, telegraph equation is more suitable than ordinary diffusion equation in modelling reaction diffusion in several branches of sciences. Telegraph reaction diffusion Lotka-Volterra two competitive system is considered. We observed that this system can give rise to diffusive instability only in the presence of cross-diffusion. Local and global stability analysis in the cross-diffusional effect are studied by considering suitable Lyapunov functional.

  13. Pro-competitive effects and harmful trade liberalization in multi-country world

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Bykadorov; Andrea Ellero; Stefania Funari; Sergey Kokovin; Pavel Molchanov

    2015-01-01

    We study a multi-country trade model with two types of countries (big and small ones). The model generalizes the case of two countries analyzed in [3] and wonder whether there could be harm from trade. Monopolistic competition, iceberg type trade costs and variable elasticity of substitution (VES) are among the model assumptions. The effects of trade liberalization on price, production and welfare are analyzed, in cases of free trade and autarky.

  14. Oil Price Effects on Land Use Competition – An Empirical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Diermeier, Matthias; Schmidt, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of food commodities for biofuel production has substantial impact on prices and quantities of these and other food commodities. It is therefore likely that this trend also intensifies the competition for arable land. However, evidence for this hypothesis is generated by calibrated models while empirical evidence is rare. In this paper we analyze the effects of crude oil price and prices of input factors for biofuel production on prices, areas and quantities of selected food...

  15. Competition of Brazil nut effect, buoyancy, and inelasticity induced segregation in a granular mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Brito López, Ricardo; Soto, R.

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently reported that a granular mixture in which grains differ in their restitution coefficients presents segregation: the more inelastic particles sink to the bottom. When other segregation mechanisms as buoyancy and the Brazil nut effect are present, the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with them. First, a detailed analysis, based on numerical simulations of two dimensional systems, of the competition between buoyancy and the inelasticity induced segregation is pre...

  16. Investigating the Sensitivity of Equilibrium Profits to Advertising Dynamics and Competitive Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep K. Chintagunta

    1993-01-01

    The author investigates the validity of the "flat maximum principle"---the insensitivity of a firm's profits to changes in its optimal advertising level---in a duopolistic market in which advertising by the two firms has carryover effects. Two alternative competitive scenarios are examined (i) in which total industry sales are allowed to vary over time, and (ii) where firms are engaged in market share rivalry. For (i), the open-loop Nash equilibrium advertising strategies for the firms are de...

  17. Effects of intraspecific competition on size variation and reproductive allocation in a clonal plant

    OpenAIRE

    van Kleunen, Mark; Fischer, Markus; Schmid, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Clonal plants grow in diameter rather than height, and therefore competition among genets is likely to be symmetric and to result in smaller variation in size of genets than in non-clonal plants. Moreover, clonal plants can reproduce both sexually and vegetatively. We studied the effects of density on the size of rosettes and of clones, variation in the size of rosettes and of clones, and allocation to sexual and vegetative reproduction in the clonal herb Ranunculus reptans. We grew plants fr...

  18. The Performance Effects of Congruence Between Product Competitive Strategies and Purchasing Management Design

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith David; Yuhchang Hwang; Buck K. W. Pei; J. Hal Reneau

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine a performance contingency effect between product competitive strategy and organization design using an archival approach. Specifically, this study examines a sample of 194 firms from 20 industries based on the data collected by Center for Advanced Purchasing Studies (CAPS) in its benchmarking surveys between 1989-1994 and links the benchmarking data to the COMPUSTAT (Standard & Poor's) financial data of these firms. The results of the study reveal a c...

  19. Effects of sodium valproate and carbamazepine on food competition aggression in pigeons

    OpenAIRE

    C. Fachinelli; Ahumada, M.; J.M. Fachinellizz; M. Torrecilla; E.L. Rodríguez-Echandía

    2007-01-01

    Valproate and carbamazepine (CAR) have been proposed as adjunct alternatives for the control of aggression in psychiatric patients, although no definite conclusions have been reached. We examined the effects of these drugs on food competition offensive aggression and other behaviors in high- and low-aggression food-restricted pigeons. These were divided into pairs containing previously ranked high-aggression (N = 10 pairs) and low-aggression females (N = 10 pairs). In Experiment 1, a pigeon i...

  20. Effect of multiple-source entry on price competition after patent expiration in the pharmaceutical industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Suh***, D.C.; Manning, W G; Schondelmeyer, S; Hadsall, R S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of multiple-source drug entry on price competition after patent expiration in the pharmaceutical industry. DATA SOURCES: Originators and their multiple-source drugs selected from the 35 chemical entities whose patents expired from 1984 through 1987. Data were obtained from various primary and secondary sources for the patents' expiration dates, sales volume and units sold, and characteristics of drugs in the sample markets. STUDY DESIGN: The study was designed...

  1. Competition between direct interaction and Kondo effect: Renormalization-group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Via the Wilson renormalization-group approach, the effect of the competition between direct interaction (JL) and Kondo coupling is studied, in the magnetic susceptibility of a model with two different magnetic impurities. For the ferromagnetic interaction (JL > 0) between the localized impurities, we find a magnetic ground state and a divergent susceptibility at low temperatures. For (JL < 0), two different Kondo temperatures and a non-magnetic ground state are distinguished. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig

  2. Ionization competition effects on population distribution and radiative opacity of mixture plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongjun; Gao, Cheng; Tian, Qinyun [Department of Physics, College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); Zeng, Jiaolong, E-mail: jlzeng@nudt.edu.cn; Yuan, Jianmin [Department of Physics, College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Ionization competition arising from the electronic shell structures of various atomic species in the mixture plasmas was investigated, taking SiO{sub 2} as an example. Using a detailed-level-accounting approximation, we studied the competition effects on the charge state population distribution and spectrally resolved and Planck and Rosseland mean radiative opacities of mixture plasmas. A set of coupled equations for ionization equilibria that include all components of the mixture plasmas are solved to determine the population distributions. For a given plasma density, competition effects are found at three distinct temperature ranges, corresponding to the ionization of M-, L-, and K-shell electrons of Si. Taking the effects into account, the spectrally resolved and Planck and Rosseland mean opacities are systematically investigated over a wide range of plasma densities and temperatures. For a given mass density, the Rosseland mean decreases monotonically with plasma temperature, whereas Planck mean does not. Although the overall trend is a decrease, the Planck mean increases over a finite intermediate temperature regime. A comparison with the available experimental and theoretical results is made.

  3. Ionization competition effects on population distribution and radiative opacity of mixture plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization competition arising from the electronic shell structures of various atomic species in the mixture plasmas was investigated, taking SiO2 as an example. Using a detailed-level-accounting approximation, we studied the competition effects on the charge state population distribution and spectrally resolved and Planck and Rosseland mean radiative opacities of mixture plasmas. A set of coupled equations for ionization equilibria that include all components of the mixture plasmas are solved to determine the population distributions. For a given plasma density, competition effects are found at three distinct temperature ranges, corresponding to the ionization of M-, L-, and K-shell electrons of Si. Taking the effects into account, the spectrally resolved and Planck and Rosseland mean opacities are systematically investigated over a wide range of plasma densities and temperatures. For a given mass density, the Rosseland mean decreases monotonically with plasma temperature, whereas Planck mean does not. Although the overall trend is a decrease, the Planck mean increases over a finite intermediate temperature regime. A comparison with the available experimental and theoretical results is made

  4. Effects of soil organic matter and nitrogen supply on competition between Fectuca ovina and Deschampsia flexuosa during inland dune succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, van J.E.M.; Wilms, Y.J.C.; Berendse, F.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the prediction that the successional replacement of plant species during succession on inland sand dunes results from the effects of an increase in nitrogen mineralization on competitive interactions. The growth and competitive strength of Festuca ovina and Deschampsia flexuosa on soil sub

  5. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield

    OpenAIRE

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I.; Ong, Chin K.; Deans, J. Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-01-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing below-ground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. This study investigates its effects on growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (HB & K), Casuarina equisetifolia (L), Grevillea robusta (A. Cunn. ex R. Br), Maesopsis eminii (Engl.), and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most spec...

  6. Competitive displacement between two invasive whiteflies: insecticide application and host plant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Di-Bing; Liu, Yin-Quan; Qin, Li; Xu, Jing; Li, Fang-Fang; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    The cryptic species Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), formerly referred to as 'B biotype', of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex entered China in the mid 1990s, and the Mediterranean (MED) cryptic species, formerly referred to as 'Q biotype', of the same whitefly complex entered China around 2003. Field surveys in China after 2003 indicate that in many regions MED has been replacing the earlier invader MEAM1. The factors underlying this displacement are unclear. We conducted laboratory experiments and field sampling to examine the effects of insecticide application on the competitive interactions between MEAM1 and MED. In the laboratory, on cotton, a plant showing similar levels of suitability to both whitefly species, MEAM1 displaced MED in five generations when initial populations of the two species were equal and no insecticide was applied. In contrast, MED displaced MEAM1 in seven and two generations, respectively, when 12.5 and 50.0 mg l⁻¹ imidacloprid was applied to the plants via soil drench. Field sampling indicated that in a single season MED displaced MEAM1 on crops heavily sprayed with neonicotinoid insecticides but the relative abundance of the two species changed little on crops without insecticide spray. We also examined the effects of host plants on the competitive interactions between the two species in the laboratory. When cohorts with equal abundance of MEAM1 and MED were set up on different host plants, MEAM1 displaced MED on cabbage and tomato in five and seven generations, respectively, but MED displaced MEAM1 on pepper in two generations. As field populations of MED have lower susceptibility than those of MEAM1 to nearly all commonly used insecticides including imidacloprid, insecticide application seems to have played a major role in shifting the species competitive interaction effects in favour of MED in the field across China. Host plants may also shape competition between the two species depending on the relative levels of plant

  7. Effects of competition on great and blue tit reproduction: intensity and importance in relation to habitat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, André A

    2010-01-01

    1. In studies on the effect of competition in plant communities two terms are used to describe its effects: the absolute reduction in growth of an individual as a consequence of the presence of another one is called intensity, while the relative impact of competition on an individual as a proportion of the impact of the whole environment is called importance. One school of thought is that the role of competition remains constant across productivity gradients, while the other is that it decreases with increasing severity. J.B. Grace (1991. A clarification of the debate between grime and tilman. Functional Ecology, 5, 583-587.) suggested that the apparent contradiction might be solved if we acknowledge that the two schools are discussing different aspects of competition: the intensity of competition might remain constant while its importance declines with increasing severity. 2. There are no studies that compare intensity and importance of competition in bird populations between areas that differ in quality or productivity and hence it is not possible to make predictions how intensity or importance of competition would vary between them. 3. I compared variation in intensity and importance of competition of three demographic variables between five plots that differ strongly in quality for great Parus major L. and blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus (L.). 4. Both intensity and importance of competition are larger in great than in blue tit populations meaning that the effect of competition on demographic variables is stronger in great than in blue tits and that the contribution of competition to variation in these variables is relatively higher in great than in blue tits. 5. Intensity of competition is higher in low quality than in high quality plots for both species, a result not expected from studies in plant communities. 6. Importance of competition varies strongly between plots. It is larger in oak-dominated plots than in mixed deciduous plots. 7. In birds breeding density

  8. The importance of aboveground-belowground interactions on the evolution and maintenance of variation in plant defence traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek evan Geem

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades a growing body of empirical research has shown that many ecological processes are mediated by a complex array of indirect interactions occurring between rhizosphere-inhabiting organisms and those found on aboveground plant parts. Aboveground - belowground studies have thus far focused on elucidating processes and underlying mechanisms that mediate the behavior and performance of invertebrates in opposite compartments. Less is known about genetic variation in plant traits as this applies to an above- belowground framework. For instance, although the field of genetic variation in aboveground plant traits on community-level interactions is well developed, most studies have ignored genetic variation in plant traits – such as defence - that may have evolved in response to pressures from the combined effects of above- and below ground interactions from antagonists and mutualists. Here, we discuss gaps in our understanding of genetic variation in plant- and consumer-related traits as they relate to aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions. When metabolic resources are limiting, then multiple attack by antagonists in both domains may lead to trade-offs in where these resources are optimally invested. In nature, these trade-offs may critically depend upon their effects on plant fitness. Natural enemies of herbivores may also influence selection for different traits via top-down control. At larger scales these interactions may generate evolutionary ‘hotspots’ where the expression of various plant traits is the result of strong reciprocal selection via direct and indirect interactions. The role of abiotic factors in driving genetic variation in plant traits is also discussed.

  9. National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanchao Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study. Methods: Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated. Results: The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%, updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%, strengthened faculty development (84.0%, improved educational resources (82.1%, and benefited all students (53.4%. Conclusions: The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

  10. UK's climate change levy: cost effectiveness, competitiveness and environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Adarsh [Hull Univ., School of Economic Studies, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    This paper intends to examine the cost effectiveness of UK's climate change levy (CCL), its implications on competitiveness of firms and the environmental impact. The paper briefly describes the levy and analyses it under the canons of a good taxation policy. The economic implications of the levy are discussed with theoretical and empirical perspectives. Change in net exports, investment patterns and productivity and inclusion of compliance cost forms the basis for analysing the effect on competitiveness. It discusses the options available to firms to safeguard their competitiveness if it is adversely affected by the CCL. A description of the current scenario of the levy since its inception is also presented. The paper argues the need for a comprehensive policy involving the use of standards, emission trading as well as energy taxes to achieve emission and energy-use reductions. A focal point of this paper is to elucidate the pros and cons of the CCL (energy tax) with respect to an emission trading scheme. (Author)

  11. Welfare and competition effects of electricity interconnection between Ireland and Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaguzzi Valeri, Laura [Economic and Social Research Institute, Whitaker Square, Sir John Roberson' s Quay, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the effects of additional interconnection on welfare and competition in the Irish electricity market. I simulate the wholesale electricity markets of the island of Ireland and Great Britain for 2005. I find that in order for the two markets to be integrated in 2005, additional interconnection would have to be large. The amount of interconnection decreases for high costs of carbon, since this causes the markets to become more similar. This suggests that in the absence of strategic behavior of firms, most of the gains from trade derive not from differences in size between countries, but from technology differences and are strongly influenced by fuel and carbon costs. Social welfare increases with interconnection, although at a decreasing rate. As the amount of interconnection increases, there are also positive effects on competition in Ireland, the less competitive of the two markets. Finally, it is unlikely that private investors will pay for the optimal amount of interconnection since their returns are significantly smaller than the total social benefit of interconnection. (author)

  12. The effect of public intervention on global competitiveness and foreign direct investment: The case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşkun Karaca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, competitive power has become an important indicator of success in international area. In order to become an important actor in global level, it is possible for the countries to use their political apparatus and to increase the number of the industries with high added value in the market via directive policies. Accordingly, foreign direct investments, which have high technology and innovation qualification, are encouraged by the countries to invest in their territory. In this study; it is tried to measure the effects of the public interference, carried out in 28 countries between 1996 and 2011, on foreign direct investments and competitive power of the countries by using panel data analysis. The results of the study showed that educational level and research development capacity encourages foreign direct investment inputs, on the contrary high levels of tax rate prevents these investments. Besides, some findings have been reached which indicates that present foreign direct investments operating in the country has a positive effect on competitive power.

  13. Effects of Competition and Cooperation Interaction between Agents on Networks in Presence of a "Market Capacity"

    CERN Document Server

    Sonubi, A; Stefani, S; Ausloos, M

    2016-01-01

    A network effect is introduced taking into account competition, cooperation and mixed-type interaction amongst agents along a generalized Verhulst-Lotka-Volterra model. It is also argued that the presence of a market capacity enforces an indubious limit on the agent's size growth. The state stability of triadic agents, i.e., the most basic network plaquette, is investigated analytically for possible scenarios, through a fixed point analysis. It is discovered that: (i) \\market" demand is only satisfied for full competition when one agent monopolizes the market; (ii) growth of agent size is encouraged in full cooperation; (iii) collaboration amongst agents to compete against one single agent may result in the disappearance of this single agent out of the market, and (iv) cooperating with two rivals may become a growth strategy for an intelligent agent.

  14. Seating Arrangement, Group Composition and Competition-driven Interaction: Effects on Students' Performance in Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We probe the effect of seating arrangement, group composition and group-based competition on students' performance in Physics using a teaching technique adopted from Mazur's peer instruction method. Ninety eight lectures, involving 2339 students, were conducted across nine learning institutions from February 2006 to June 2009. All the lectures were interspersed with student interaction opportunities (SIO), in which students work in groups to discuss and answer concept tests. Two individual assessments were administered before and after the SIO. The ratio of the post-assessment score to the pre-assessment score and the Hake factor were calculated to establish the improvement in student performance. Using actual assessment results and neural network (NN) modeling, an optimal seating arrangement for a class was determined based on student seating location. The NN model also provided a quantifiable method for sectioning students. Lastly, the study revealed that competition-driven interactions increase within-group cooperation and lead to higher improvement on the students' performance.

  15. The effect of weak disorder on the phase competition in unconventional superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the phase competition between magnetism and superconductivity for iron pnictides in the presence of weak disorder. The competition of these two ordered states has been studied in detail by Fernandes and Schmalian (2010), who came to the conclusion that in the case of unconventional s+- pairing, the superconducting and antiferromagnetic phase may coexist microscopically but are near to a parameter regime of mutual exclusion. Correspondingly, the multicritical point in the phase diagram is close to the transition from from a tetracritical to a bicritical point. Close to the multicritical point, the free energy of the system can be expanded simultaneously in terms of magnetic and superconducting order parameters and the coefficients can be determined microscopically. We include the effect of impurity scattering in the model and investigate its influence on the phase diagram of iron pnictides.

  16. Effects of stress on defensive aggression and dominance in a water competition test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucion, A; Vogel, W H

    1994-01-01

    Water-deprived rats in a pair competing for a single source of water quickly establish a firm relationship during which one rat drinks consistently more (dominant) than the other (submissive) animal. This relationship is formed during the first competition and is very stable during subsequent tests. Exposure of dominant rats to a severe (18 hrs immobilization), but not a mild (2 hrs immobilization), stressor reduced markedly aggressive behavior and inverted transiently the dominant submissive relationship of the pairs. Exposure of submissive rats to the severe stressor resulted in only minor reductions of aggressive behavior in these animals. Prestress anxiety predicted stress effects in the dominant animals in that high-anxious animals lost more dominant behavior and weight during stress as compared with low-anxious rats. Thus, severe stress can transiently reduce dominant but not submissive behavior during water competition and high-anxious rats are more prone to lose their aggressive behavior. PMID:7696138

  17. Competition effect of some metal ions on the complexation of strontium with humic acid. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of radioactive strontium with humic acid present in water streams is of main importance to learn about the fate of strontium in case of accidental release. In this work, formation of Sr-humate precipitate was studied radiometrically and colorimetric at different PH's. The investigations indicated that formation of the precipitated complex increases with increasing strontium concentration till saturation. The competition effect of other cations in solution such as Ca, Mg, Ba, and Ni was investigated. The humate complexes of these cations were studied colorimetric, and the competition behaviour was investigated using the radiotracer of strontium. The results indicated that presence of Ba, Mg and Ni decreases the Sr-humate complex, while increasing Ca concentration enhances precipitation of Sr with humic acid. 10 figs

  18. Effects of five years of frequent N additions, with or without acidity, on the growth and below-ground dynamics of a young Sitka spruce stand growing on an acid peat: implications for sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Sheppard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A field manipulation study was established to demonstrate effects of simulated wet N and S deposition on a young (planted 1986 stand of Sitka spruce growing on a predominantly organic soil in an area of low (8–10 kg N ha-1 yr-1 background N deposition in the Scottish borders. From 1996, treatments (six were applied to the canopies of ten-tree plots in each of four blocks. N was provided as NH4NO3, either with H2SO4 (pH 2.5 at 48 or 96 kg N ha-1 yr-1 inputs or without, at 48 kg N ha-1 yr-1 along with wet (rain water and dry controls (scaffolding and a S treatment (Na2SO4. Positive responses (+ >20% over 5 years with respect to stem area increment were measured in response to N inputs, irrespective of whether acid was included. The positive response to N was not dose related and was achieved against falling base cation concentrations in the foliage, particularly with respect to K. The results suggest young trees are able to buffer the low nutrient levels and produce new growth when there is sufficient N. Inputs of 96 kg N ha-1 yr-1, in addition to ambient N inputs, on this site exceeded tree demand resulting in elevated foliar N, N2O losses and measurable soil water N. These excessive N inputs did not reduce stem area growth. Keywords: acid, canopy application, nitrogen, acid organic soil, simulated wet deposition, soil water, sulphur, young Sitka spruce

  19. Effects of sodium valproate and carbamazepine on food competition aggression in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fachinelli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Valproate and carbamazepine (CAR have been proposed as adjunct alternatives for the control of aggression in psychiatric patients, although no definite conclusions have been reached. We examined the effects of these drugs on food competition offensive aggression and other behaviors in high- and low-aggression food-restricted pigeons. These were divided into pairs containing previously ranked high-aggression (N = 10 pairs and low-aggression females (N = 10 pairs. In Experiment 1, a pigeon in each pair of high- and low-aggression subjects was treated daily with an oral dose of sodium valproate (50 mg kg-1 mL saline-1 for 15 days. The other animal received the vehicle. On days 1, 7, and 15, food competition trials (10 min were performed 60 min after treatment. In Experiment 2, one pigeon in each pair was treated daily with an oral dose of CAR (20 mg kg-1 mL saline-1 for 15 days. Each pair was submitted to a food competition trial on days 1, 7, and 15 of treatment. Valproate (15 days of treatment selectively decreased the time spent in offensive aggression (control: 102.7 ± 9.3 vs valproate: 32.7 ± 9.2 s; P < 0.001, ANOVA-2-TAU of high-aggression pigeons. This was also the case for 7 and 15 days of CAR treatment (control: 131.5 ± 8.9 vs CAR: 60.4 ± 5.3, P < 0.01, and control: 122.7 ± 7.1 vs CAR: 39.1 ± 5.2; P < 0.001, ANOVA-2-TAU, respectively. Thus, the two anticonvulsive drugs have a similar effect on food competition aggression in pigeons.

  20. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Anne C. S.; Ellen Macdonald, S.; Sylvie A Quideau

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and f...

  1. Below-ground herbivory in natural communities: a review emphasizing fossorial animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    Roots, bulbs, corms, and other below-ground organs are almost universally present in communities containing vascular plants. A large and taxonomically diverse group of herbivores uses these below-ground plant parts as its sole or primary source of food. Important within this group are plant-parasitic nematodes and several fossorial taxa that affect plants through their soil-disturbing activities as well as by consuming plant tissue. The fossorial taxa are probably best exemplified by fossorial rodents, which are distributed on all continents except Australia. All other fossorial herbivores are insects. The impact of below-groud herbivory on individual plant fitness will depend upon the extent to which, and under what circumstances, the consumption of plant tissue disrupts one or more of the six functions of below-ground plant parts. Below-ground herbivory is probably more often chronic than acute. Indirect evidence suggests that plants have responded evolutionarily to herbivory by enhancing the functional capacities of below-ground organs, thus developing a degree of tolerance, and by producing compounds that serve as feeding deterrents. Many plant species respond to the removal of root tissues by increasing the growth rate of the remaining roots and initiating new roots. Soil movement and mixing by fossorial rodents infleuce the environment of other below-ground herbivores as well as that of plants and plant propagules. The relationships among the various groups of below-ground herbivores, and between below-ground herbivores and plants, are at best poorly known, yet they appear to have major roles in determining the structure and regulating the functioning of natural communities.

  2. Uncertainty in below-ground carbon biomass for major land covers in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Jia Qi; Ziegler, Alan D.; Edward L Webb; Ryan, Casey M.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to difficulties associated with measuring root biomass accurately in space and time, below-ground root biomass is often calculated indirectly from above-ground biomass measurements via general allometric equations. Of concern is that general equations may not provide accurate site-specific calculations for accurate carbon stock assessments. This review comparing more than 100 root-related studies conducted in SE Asia shows highly variable and uncertain below-ground woody carbon (BGC) bi...

  3. Water availability and the competitive effect of a columnar cactus on its nurse plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Martínez, Arturo; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Sánchez-Colón, Salvador

    1998-02-01

    A field study was conducted in a semi-arid tropical ecosystem in Mexico to test whether competition for soil water is the causal mechanism underlying the negative effect of the columnar cactus Neobuxbaumia tetetzo on its nurse plant Mimosa luisana and to examine how this relationship varies over time. The effect of irrigation was evaluated by recording the production of leaves, modules (i.e. internodes with an axillary bud), inflorescences and fruits in shrubs growing either isolated or associated with juvenile or adult columnar cacti. 4 001 of water, in five doses of 801 each every 15 d, were added to the treatment plants; no water other than rainfall was added to control plants. Additionally, to evaluate how the effect of the columnar cacti on the shrubs may vary among years we made a comparison of the production of plant structures between 2 years of contrasting rainfall. The irrigation treatment increased the production of modules, inflorescences and fruits, but not of leaves. Shrub response to watering was also dependent on class of association: those associated with juvenile cacti showed a higher response to irrigation than any other treatment. Our results show that water addition increases the production of structures and partially reduces the negative effect of the cactus on nurse shrub, thus supporting the hypothesis of competition for water. The negative effect of the cacti on their nurse plants was present during both years of observations, but the intensity of the negative effect varies from relatively wet to dry years. The results are discussed in relation to how temporal changes in resource availability affect the results of competitive interactions and the importance of this mechanism in the structure and dynamics of this dryland community.

  4. Globalization and the effects of national versus international competition on the labour market. Theory and evidence from Belgian firm level data

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbussche, Hylke; Konings, Joep

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we first develop a simple theoretical framework which shows that important differences exist between national and international competition and their effect on national labour markets. National competition refers to a reduction of monopoly power in the product market through improved market contestability and market access, which is the responsibility of competition authorities. International competition refers to a reduction in product market competition as a result of trade li...

  5. Effects of random motility on microbial growth and competition in a flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballyk, M.; Dung, L.; Jones, D.A.; Smith, H.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1998-11-01

    The authors investigate the effects of random motility on the ability of a microbial population to survive in pure culture and to be a good competitor for scarce nutrient in mixed culture in a flow reactor model consisting of a nonlinear parabolic system of partial differential equations. For pure culture (*a single population), a sharp condition is derived which distinguishes between the two outcomes: (1) washout of the population from the reactor or (2) persistence of the population and the existence of a unique single-population steady state. The simulations suggest that this steady state is globally attracting. For the case of two populations competing for scarce nutrient, they obtain sufficient conditions for the uniform persistence of the two populations, for the existence of a coexistence steady state, and for the ability of one population to competitively exclude a rival. Extensive simulations are reported which suggest that (1) all solutions approach some steady state solution, (2) all possible outcomes exhibited by the classical competitive Lotka-Volterra ODE model can occur in the model, and (3) the outcome of competition between two bacterial strains can depend rather subtly on their respective random motility coefficients.

  6. -selection, -selection, effectiveness, and tolerance in competition: density-dependent selection revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi; N. G. Prasad; Mallikarjun Shakarad

    2001-08-01

    In the Drosophila literature, selection for faster development and selection for adapting to high density are often confounded, leading, for example, to the expectation that selection for faster development should also lead to higher competitive ability. At the same time, results from experimental studies on evolution at high density do not agree with many of the predictions from classical density-dependent selection theory. We put together a number of theoretical and empirical results from the literature, and some new experimental results on Drosophila populations successfully subjected to selection for faster development, to argue for a broader interpretation of density-dependent selection. We show that incorporating notions of -selection, and the division of competitive ability into effectiveness and tolerance components, into the concept of density-dependent selection yields a formulation that allows for a better understanding of the empirical results. We also use this broader formulation to predict that selection for faster development in Drosophila should, in fact, lead to the correlated evolution of decreased competitive ability, even though it does lead to the evolution of greater efficiency and higher population growth rates at high density when in monotypic culture.

  7. [Effects of nutritional condition on the competitive parameters of Prorocentrum donghaiense and Skeletonema costatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Ge, Wei; Chai, Chao; Wang, Jin-Ye; Zhao, Xiu-Fen

    2012-05-01

    By the methods of pure culture and mixed culture in laboratory, this paper studied the effects of different substrate nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on the population growth and interspecific competitive parameters of two kinds of microalgae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiens. With the increasing concentrations of substrate nitrogen and phosphorus, the maximum biomass of the two kinds of microalgae increased, and their specific growth rate was higher in pure culture than in mixed culture. In mixed culture, S. costatum was dominant at the beginning, while P. donghaiense became dominant later. The time period when this change happened was related to the nutritional conditions, and the inflection point for S. costatum and P. donghaiense was about 0-2.6 and 0.5-4.9 d, respectively. Under the test nutritional conditions, the competitive parameter of P. donghaiense to S. costatum (beta) was higher than that of S. costatum to P. donghaiense (alpha). When the substrate nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations were 128 micromol N x L(-1) and 32 micromol P x L(-1), the competitive capability of P. donghaiense was 3.8 times of that of S. costatum, presenting the most obvious difference. PMID:22919854

  8. Weed Competition and its Effects on Pwani Hybrid 1 Maize Grain Yields in Coastal Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed competition is a serious constraint to maize production in coastal Kenya. A trial to asses the effects of weed competition on performance of maize was planted at Regional Research Centre-Mtwapa and Msabaha Research Sub-centre-Malindi in 1992. Pwani hybrid 1 maize was used in the trials. Weeding was done at weekly intervals from germination up to the sixth week in an additive weed removal system and plots maintained weed free afterwards. A weedy and a weed free plot were used as checks. Data on plant counts plant heights, weed biomass, weed identification and maize grain yield at 15 % MC were all recorded. There was a significant difference between weed and weedy free plots for grain yield, plant height and weed biomass for both sites. A 53% maize grain yield reduction due to weed competition was recorded. A 3% grain yield reduction equivalent to 1.03 bags for every week's delay in weeding after the first to weeks was realised for both sites. There was a corresponding grain yield loss as delay in weeding increased

  9. Effectiveness of Training and Development on Employees’ Performance and Organisation Competitiveness in the Nigerian Banking Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falola, H.O.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Training and development is indispensable strategic tool for enhancing employee performance and organizations keep increasing training budget on yearly basis with believe that it will earn them competitive edge. The main objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of training and development on employees’ performance and organisation competitive advantage in the Nigerian banking industry. Descriptive research method was adopted for this study using two hundred and twenty three valid questionnaires which were completed by selected banks in Lagos State, South-West Nigeria using simple random sampling technique. The data collected were carefully analyzed using descriptive statistics to represent the raw data in a meaningful manner. The results show that strong relationship exists between training and development, employees’ performance and competitive advantage. Summary of the findings indicates that there is strong relationship between the tested dependent variable and independent construct. However, bank management should not relent in their quest to train their staff to develop new ideas that will keep improving and retaining employee performance.

  10. Effects of an accelerated liberalization. Consequences of accelerated liberalization for the competitiveness of Dutch energy companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the conclusions of the Dutch Energy Report, published at the end of 1999, was that it would be feasible to speed up the pace of liberalization in the Netherlands. This conclusion will lead to the liberalization of the retail customers in 2004 and the market for renewable energy in 2001. This will be an incentive to more competition and put a greater pressure on energy companies to concentrate in order to benefit from economies of scale. Less preparation time implies also that there will be less layers of isolation against cost leaders and hence a more intense (price-based) competition. The central question in this report is whether and to what extent the effects of policy, in particular the accelerated liberalization, affect the strategic behavior and competitiveness of the Dutch Regional Electricity Companies (RECs). To address this question four face-to-face interviews have been held with experts from the four major RECs. In these interviews the experts gave their opinion about the Dutch policy regarding the accelerated liberalization and the rate and extent of the privatization. Subsequently, their perspective on the impact of the policy on their competitiveness and their analysis of the Dutch energy market was recorded. After that, the experts exposed their outlook on the future energy market and the ambition and most likely direction of their companies. The data collection was complemented with numerous relevant public interviews of experts derived from various newspapers and energy magazines. The data thus collected were analyzed by means of a theoretical framework consisting of the insights of Porter, Prahalad and Hamel and at a more detailed level marketing theories regarding positioning and branding. This resulted in an overview of the current market position of the Dutch RECs and an outlook for the years to come. 27 refs

  11. Competitive strategies of soft corals (Coelenterata: Octocorallia): Allelopathic effects on selected scleractinian corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, P. W.; Coll, J. C.; La Barre, S.; Willis, B.

    1983-09-01

    A striking retardation of grwoth was observed in the scleractinian coral Pavona cactus (Coelenterata: Scleractinia) growing in the vicinity of the soft coral Sinularia flexibilis (Coelenterata: Alcyonacea). More extensive field observations of naturally occurring interactions between soft corals and scleractinian corals suggested that members of the former group can be the more effective competitors for space on hard substrate. To test this hypothesis, colonies of three soft corals, Lobophytum pauciflorum, Sinularia pavida, and Xenia sp. aff. danae, were relocated next to stands of two hard corals, Pavona cactus and Porites andrewsi (=Porites cylindrica), and compared with undisturbed control areas. In areas where soft corals and scleractinian corals were in direct contact, significantly high levels of local mortality in the latter occurred in three of the six interaction pairs. One soft coral, L. pauciflorum, also caused extensive and significant mortality in Porites andrewsi in a non-contact situation. The scleractinian corals had no effect on the soft corals considered here. These results indicate that soft corals can effectively compete for space against hard corals. Furthermore, it is inferred that toxic exudates from the soft coral might be responsible for causing localized mortality in hard corals, since extensive mortality occurred in certain cases in the absence of contact. Competitive abilities of soft corals in interactions with hard corals varied in a species-specific manner. Susceptibility of hard corals to competitive mechanisms utilized by soft corals, particularly allelopathic ones, likewise varied species-specifically. It is commonly believed that the adaptive value of toxic compounds in soft corals stems from their effectiveness as a chemical defence mechanism in predator-prey interactions. This study has demonstrated their further role as allelopathic agents in interspecific competitive interactions.

  12. Aboveground and belowground responses to nutrient additions and herbivore exclusion in Arctic tundra ecosystems in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. C.; Gough, L.; Simpson, R.; Johnson, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    declines in top predators. The models revealed shifts in the activities within and between the fungal and bacterial energy pathways, with the treatments inducing a bottleneck in activity at the microbe-microbivore trophic levels within both pathways. Our results confirm the complex nature of aboveground and belowground linkages and interactions in defining ecosystem structure and function. Drivers that enhance plant production and altered plant community structure had direct and indirect effects on the structure and activity within the belowground foodweb, the nature of which can help inform the mechanisms behind C dynamics in response to climate change in the Arctic.

  13. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  14. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Priault

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objectives of our study were to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak.

  15. The effect of competition between two spatially separated markets - An investigation of two interlinked Bak-Sneppen models

    OpenAIRE

    Damgaard, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of competition in a market consisting of interlinked economic agents. In particular, the effect of increased competition from the surrounding markets is demonstrated. The presented work is an extension of the Bak-Sneppen model (Bak and Sneppen 1993). Here are two Bak-Sneppen models interlinked such that if the lowest fitness value of one market exceeds the fitness values of the other market minus transportation cost, all cells lower than this band will recei...

  16. Regulation of mergers by the UK competition authorities: the effects on shareholder value and management motivations for mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Malcolm F.

    2007-01-01

    The UK competition authorities are responsible for regulating company mergers that were originally considered to have adverse effects that were “against the public interest”, or presently that could result in a “substantial lessening of competition”. The research in this thesis examines wider economic side effects of this regulatory policy that fall outside the remit of the competition authorities. Data on 63 merger cases that were subject to the merger regulatory process by th...

  17. Belowground Biomass Sampling to Estimate Fine Root Mass across NEON Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. J.; Meier, C. L.; Abercrombie, H.; Everhart, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Production of belowground biomass is an important and relatively uncharacterized component of the net primary productivity (NPP) of ecosystems. Fine root productivity makes up a significant portion of total belowground production because fine roots turn over rapidly, and therefore contribute disproportionately to annual estimates of belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). One of the major goals of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is to quantify above- and below-ground NPP at 60 sites within 20 different eco-climactic regions. NEON's Terrestrial Observation System will carry out belowground biomass sampling throughout the life of the observatory to estimate fine root production. However, belowground biomass sampling during NEON operations will be constrained to a maximum depth of 50cm. This limited depth range leaves the question of what proportion of total fine root mass is being collected and how to optimally characterize belowground biomass given sampling depth limitations. During the construction period, NEON is characterizing fine root biomass distribution at depth down to 2m at each site, as well as physical and chemical properties in each soil horizon. Each sampling unit is a pit (2m deep and approximately 1.5m wide), dug in the site's dominant vegetation type where fine root biomass sampling will also occur during Operations. To sample fine root biomass in each pit, soil samples of a known volume are taken from three vertical profiles down the face of the pit. Samples are then wet sieved to extract fine root mass, and roots are dried at 65°C for 48 hours and then weighed. The soil pit data are used to estimate the proportion of total fine root biomass from each site as a function of depth. Non-linear curves are fitted to the data to calculate total fine root mass at depth and to provide estimates of the proportion of the total fine root mass that is sampled at each site during NEON's 30 year operational sampling. The belowground

  18. Effects of shading on relative competitive advantage of three species of Sphagnum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Z. Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available (1 Sphagnum is an important genus of bryophytes holding 10–15 % of the terrestrial carbon stock. With climate change a drier surface may increase the abundance of vascular plants on peatlands, so shading of Sphagnum may increase. Here we describe growth cabinet experiments to reveal the effects of shading on interactions among mixtures of three species: S. capillifolium, S. palustre (hummock species, and S. fallax (a hollow species. We measured the six traits: growth in length, growth as increase in dry mass, side-shoot production, nitrogen and carbon proportion of the capitulum dry mass, and C:N ratio in the capitulum. (2 Shading had no effect on biomass production or side-shoot production but increased height increment in all three species. It also increased the C and N proportions of total dry mass but decreased C:N ratio in the capitula. (3 Neighbours of a different species reduced biomass and side-shoot production in the two hummock species but had no effect on the hollow species. (4 All three species showed interaction between shading and neighbour in two or more plant traits. S. fallax showed competitive advantage over S. palustre in no-shading treatments and over S. capillifolium in moderate shading treatments. In addition, under deep shading, S. fallax showed a competitive advantage over both hummock species. A clear competitive hierarchy S. fallax>S. capillifolium>S. palustre emerged which was consistent with the hierarchy of side-shoot production. (5 The results suggest that all the species appear to tolerate deep shade (for a few months at least. In a shaded environment, especially under deeply shaded conditions, S. fallax retains its dominance in hollow habitats (if water availability is guaranteed by virtue of its advantage in side-shoot production. (6 If shading increases then the abundance of different Sphagnum species is likely to change.

  19. Electricity supply. The effects of competitive power purchases are not yet certain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most electricity in the United States is produced by utilities that own and operate facilities for the generation, transmission, and distribution of power. Utilities traditionally have operated as regulated monopolists, each within an established geographic area. In return, utilities have an obligation to provide reliable electricity to all consumers in their territory at a reasonable price. Many utility companies also participate in power pools, under which they may purchase electricity from one another to meet requirements. Utilities are allowed to earn a return on plants they own and operate, while the costs of purchased electricity are passed directly to consumers. To encourage the development of alternative energy resources, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, as amended, (PURPA) required utilities to purchase power offered by qualifying facilities at a price not exceeding the utilities' avoided cost of generating it or purchasing it from another source. In part to help state regulators and utilities determine utilities' avoided costs and to help sort through a flood of bids, competitive bidding, which allows market forces to help determine prices, has emerged as a means of purchasing power from nonutility generators. Because several years are often required to construct generating sources, utilities have little operating experience with competitively purchased electricity. Thus, the effects of competitive power purchases on the long-term reliability of electric service - which is affected by the reliability of all sources and transmission and distribution facilities are not yet certain and difficult to assess. Among the three utilities reviewed, only at Central Maine Power have sources of competitively purchased power entered service, and they have operated reliably. However, each utility reviewed has accepted bids that were subsequently withdrawn, for financial or other reasons, prior to scheduled service dates. When selecting nonutility

  20. Effects of small spatial variation of the reproduction rate in a two species competition model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Hetzer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Of concern is the effect of a small spatially inhomogeneous perturbation of the reproduction rate of the first species in a two-species Lotka-Volterra competition-diffusion problem with spatially homogeneous reaction terms. Apart from this perturbation and the diffusion rates, the two species are assumed to be identical. Our main result shows that the first species can always invade, whereas the second species can only invade under certain conditions which yield uniform persistence of both species. The proof relies on comparison techniques and properties of the principal eigenvalue of reaction-diffusion equations.

  1. The Effect of Serial Culture and Storage on the Protective Potential of a Competitive Exclusion Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida WAF

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The competitive exclusion method (EC was used to protect day-old birds against colonisation of the intestinal tract by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE. The culture prepared in nutrient broth incubated at 37ºC/24 h inhibited SE growth in the caecal contents. The beneficial effect was also observed after serial passage of the feces culture for up to 14 times. The material obtained after 12 serial sub-cultures after storage for 28 days at 4-6ºC also kept its action on SE.

  2. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on high intensity, intermittent exercise performance in competitive squash players

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, LM; Barrington, JP; Jeukendrup, AE

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of oral creatine supplementation on high intensity, intermittent exercise performance in competitive squash players. Nine squash players (mean ± SEM V˙O2max = 61.9 ± 2.1ml · kg-1 · min-1; body mass = 73 ± 3 kg) performed an on-court “ghosting” routine that involved 10 sets of 2 repetitions of simulated positional play, each set interspersed with 30 s passive recovery. A double blind, crossover design was utilised whereby experimental and ...

  3. Effects of combined linear and nonlinear periodic training on physical fitness and competition times in finswimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Kyung-Hun; Suk, Min-Hwa; Kang, Shin-Woo; Shin, Yun-A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined linear and nonlinear periodic training on physical fitness and competition times in finswimmers. The linear resistance training model (6 days/week) and nonlinear underwater training (4 days/week) were applied to 12 finswimmers (age, 16.08± 1.44 yr; career, 3.78± 1.90 yr) for 12 weeks. Body composition measures included weight, body mass index (BMI), percent fat, and fat-free mass. Physical fitness measures included trunk flex...

  4. Welfare Effects of Tariff Peak Conversion: The Case of Monopolistic Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Jørgensen, Jan Guldager

    dispersion in initial tariffs (tariff peaks) and gaps between bound and applied tariff rates. This paper presents a general equilibrium model with monopolistic competition to examine the welfare effects of different formulas in a process of improving market access. Products with initially high and low...... tariffs are analyzed. It is established that reduction in the trade restriction using three formulas proposed in the literature i) a proportional cut, ii) the Swiss formula and iii) a compression formula leads to non-trivial impacts on the welfare....

  5. Home Versus Away Competition: Effect on Psychophysiological Variables in Elite Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Brian; Morgan, Kevin A; Baker, Julien S; Cardinale, Marco; Davies, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of game venue and starting status on precompetitive psychophysiological measures in elite rugby union. Saliva samples were taken from players (starting XV, n = 15, and nonstarters, n = 9) on a control day and 90 min before 4 games played consecutively at home and away venues against local rivals and league leaders. Precompetition psychological states were assessed using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2. The squad recorded 2 wins (home) and 2 losses (away) over the study period. Calculated effect sizes (ESs) showed higher pregame cortisol- (C) and testosterone- (T) difference values before all games than on a baseline control day (ES 0.7-1.5). Similar findings were observed for cognitive and somatic anxiety. Small between-venues C differences were observed in starting XV players (ES 0.2-0.25). Conversely, lower home T- (ES 0.95) and higher away C- (ES 0.6) difference values were observed in nonstarters. Lower T-difference values were apparent in nonstarters (vs starting XV) before home games, providing evidence of a between-groups effect (ES 0.92). Findings show an anticipatory rise in psychophysiological variables before competition. Knowledge of starting status appears a moderating factor in the magnitude of player endocrine response between home and away games. PMID:25946022

  6. Optimizing methyl-eugenol aromatherapy to maximize posttreatment effects to enhance mating competitiveness of male Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ihsan ul; Vreysen, Marc J B; Cacéres, Carlos; Shelly, Todd E; Hendrichs, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Methyl-eugenol (ME) (1,2-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenyl)benzene), a natural phytochemical, did enhance male Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae) mating competitiveness 3 d after ingestion. Enhanced male mating competitiveness can significantly increase the effectiveness of the sterile insect technique (SIT). ME application to mass reared sterile flies by feeding is infeasible. ME application by aromatherapy however, would be a very practical way of ME application in fly emergence and release facilities. This approach was shown to enhance mating competitiveness of B. carambolae 3 d posttreatment (DPT). Despite this added benefit, every additional day of delaying release will reduce sterile fly quality and will add cost to SIT application. The present study was planned to assess the effects of ME-aromatherapy on male B. carambolae mating competitiveness 1DPT and 2DPT. ME aromatherapy 1DPT or 2DPT did enhance mating competitiveness of B. carambolae males whereas ME feeding 1DPT and 2DPT did not. Male mating competitiveness was enhanced by the ME aromatherapy irrespective if they received 1DPT, 2DPT or 3DPT. ME aromatherapy, being a viable approach for its application, did enhance mating competitiveness of male B. carambolae 1 d posttreatment as ME feeding did 3 d after ingestion. PMID:24935641

  7. Effects of regulation and economic environment on the electricity industry's competitiveness: A study based on OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a competitiveness index for the electricity industry based on efficiency, stability, and growth factors identified from previous studies subject to data accessibility. These are then weighted appropriately through the application of the analytical hierarchy process. This index is an alternative tool to capture the diverse characteristics of the electricity industry in order to analyze performance after deregulation. Using the competitiveness index, we analyze the effect of regulation change in specific economic environments represented by the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share, for example. According to the results, deregulation generally increases competitiveness, but the effect depends on the economic environment and the type of regulation. Deregulating entry and vertical integration to increase competitiveness is more effective in countries where the level of economic development, energy intensity, and manufacturing share are low. The manner in which the privatization effect is related to the economic environment is, however, unclear. - Highlights: • This study proposes a competitiveness index for the electricity industry. • It examines the effects of electricity industry deregulation in OECD countries. • It suggests an economic environment in which deregulation can contribute to competitiveness

  8. Can We Predict the Winner in a Market with Network Effects? Competition in Cryptocurrency Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Gandal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how network effects affect competition in the nascent cryptocurrency market. We do so by examining early dynamics of exchange rates among different cryptocurrencies. While Bitcoin essentially dominates this market, our data suggest no evidence of a winner-take-all effect early in the market. Indeed, for a relatively long period, a few other cryptocurrencies competing with Bitcoin (the early industry leader appreciated much more quickly than Bitcoin. The data in this period are consistent with the use of cryptocurrencies as financial assets (popularized by Bitcoin, and not consistent with winner-take-all dynamics. Toward the end of our sample, however, things change dramatically. Bitcoin appreciates against the USD, while other currencies depreciate against the USD. The data in this period are consistent with strong network effects and winner-take-all dynamics. This trend continues at the time of writing.

  9. DEREGULATION, LIBERALIZATION AND CONSOLIDATION OF THE MEXICAN BANKING SYSTEM: EFFECTS ON COMPETITION

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Solís; Joaquín Maudos Villarroya

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the evolution of competition in the Mexican banking system in the period 1993-2005, a period of deregulation, liberalization and consolidation of the sector. For this purpose we use two indicators of competition from the theory of industrial organization (the Lerner index and the Panzar and Rosse´s H-statistic). The empirical evidence does not permit us to reject the existence of monopolistic competition. The Lerner index shows a decrease in competitive rivalry in the depo...

  10. The Effects of Enhancing Competitiveness on FDI Inflows in CEE Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Oana Cristina POPOVICI; Adrian Cantemir CĂLIN

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify how an increase in competitiveness could improve FDI in ten Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries. For assessing competitiveness, we employ the variables used by World Economic Forum in designing the Global Competitiveness Index and find that half of the analyzed countries could see the most important increases in FDI/capita if making institutions more competitive, four other countries should accelerate on improving innovation and infrastructu...

  11. Understanding the joint effects of Cognitive Distance and Competition on Pioneering Innovations through the Dynamics between Suppliers and Competitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Salomo, Søren

    2010-01-01

    the individual effects of cognitive distance and competition on innovation but also try to understand their joint effects in a coherent way based on a resource-based view and through the product life cycle as a link of cognitive distance and competition. Competition is multidimensional and innovation......The relationships between cognitive distance, competition and innovation have drawn great attention from economists and management researchers. First, with regard to cognitive distance and innovation, it is suggested that a moderate level of cognitive distance between firms is associated with an...... optimal innovation performance, because a too small cognitive distance provides the focal innovating firm with too little novelty value, while a too large cognitive distance makes it difficult for firms to learn and collaborate with each other. Second, the empirical evidence for the relationship between...

  12. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    students are allowed to use any method they like, are coached by teachers, and are encouraged to ask for help from experts at research centres or universities. Finally, they must prepare a 12-minute presentation. A tournament consists of different contests. In each contest, three teams are involved: the reporting team is challenged by an opponent team to present a task. This presentation is then criticized by the opponent, pointing out merits and possible weak parts. The discussion between the two representatives of the teams is a central element of a contest. The third team acts as reviewer, giving final comments on the performances of the contesting teams. At the end, a jury grades the performances of all three teams. Then, the different roles of the teams rotate, and the students also rotate roles within the teams. The competition started in the former Soviet Union in 1988 and became international for the first time in 1994 when it was organized in Groningen, The Netherlands. In the 2008 tournament in Trogir, Croatia, teams from 24 countries participated [5]. Since this tournament is younger and less known, the national pre-selections are not as well established and numerous as for the Olympiad. Also, the training is different: in addition to developing experimental skills and physical understanding of the problems, the students must organize their performances, share work and responsibilities, and must train in the techniques of presentation and debate (in English). The winner of the tournament in Croatia was the team from Germany. Their presentation in the finals was an experimental and theoretical investigation into the Kaye effect. The students wrote up their presentation, and it is reproduced here as the second paper in this special section. Again, different in spirit and aim is 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics' [6]. This competition started in 1991 in Poland and encourages students to take their first steps in physics research. Students of 20 years old or

  13. Performance effects of acute β-alanine induced paresthesia in competitive cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    β-alanine is a common ingredient in supplements consumed by athletes. Indeed, athletes may believe that the β-alanine induced paresthesia, experienced shortly after ingestion, is associated with its ergogenic effect despite no scientific mechanism supporting this notion. The present study examined changes in cycling performance under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. Eight competitive cyclists (VO2max = 61.8 ± 4.2 mL·kg·min(-1)) performed three practices, one baseline and four experimental trials. The experimental trials comprised a 1-km cycling time trial under four conditions with varying information (i.e., athlete informed β-alanine or placebo) and supplement content (athlete received β-alanine or placebo) delivered to the cyclist: informed β-alanine/received β-alanine, informed placebo/received β-alanine, informed β-alanine/received placebo and informed placebo/received placebo. Questionnaires were undertaken exploring the cyclists' experience of the effects of the experimental conditions. A possibly likely increase in mean power was associated with conditions in which β-alanine was administered (±95% CL: 2.2% ± 4.0%), but these results were inconclusive for performance enhancement (p = 0.32, effect size = 0.18, smallest worthwhile change = 56% beneficial). A possibly harmful effect was observed when cyclists were correctly informed that they had ingested a placebo (-1.0% ± 1.9%). Questionnaire data suggested that β-alanine ingestion resulted in evident sensory side effects and six cyclists reported placebo effects. Acute ingestion of β-alanine is not associated with improved 1-km TT performance in competitive cyclists. These findings are in contrast to the athlete's "belief" as cyclists reported improved energy and the ability to sustain a higher power output under conditions of β-alanine induced paresthesia. PMID:25636080

  14. Strategizing for Intense Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, William; Bourgeois, Ernest J., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Examines trend toward more aggressive student recruiting strategies by colleges and universities, applying a model that assesses five competitive forces-cause and effect of competition, the expanding marketplace, substitute products, buyer power, and supplier power, and examines various strategies for dealing with these competitive forces, such as…

  15. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  16. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  17. The price effects of enhancing services sector competition in a large open economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.D. Cavelaars

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper studies the price e?ects of shocks to the degree of competition. It is motivated by initiatives to enhance competition in services in the European Union. The paper shows that a higher degree of competition in the nontradable goods sector may have adverse implications for inter

  18. The effect of substrate competition on the metabolism of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheira, Mónica; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-11-01

    The type of carbon source present in the wastewater is one factor that affects the competition between polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) and therefore, the efficiency of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process. This study investigated the impact of the carbon source composition on the anaerobic and aerobic kinetics of PAOs and the EBPR performance of an 85% PAO enrichment. When both acetate (HAc) and propionate (HPr) were present, propionate was depleted more quickly, with a constant uptake rate of 0.18 ± 0.02 C-mol/(C-mol biomass·h), while the acetate uptake rate decreased with an increase in propionate concentration, due to the substrate competition between acetate and propionate. The metabolic model for PAOs was modified to incorporate the anaerobic substrate competition effect. The aerobic rates for phosphorus (P) uptake, glycogen production and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) degradation were within the same range for all tests, indicating that these rates are essentially independent of the acetate and propionate concentration, simplifying the calibration procedure for metabolic models. The metabolic model applied to describe the anaerobic and aerobic activity agreed well with the experimental data of HAc, HPr, P, PHA and biomass growth. The low glycogen consumption observed suggest that some reducing equivalents were generated anaerobically through the TCA cycle. The results of this work suggest that the propionate uptake kinetics by PAOs can provide them an advantage over GAOs in EBPR systems, even when the propionate fraction of the influent is relatively low. PMID:25051162

  19. Simulation and Visualisation of Functional Landscapes: Effects of the Water Resource Competition Between Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent Le Chevalier; Marc Jaeger; Xing Mei; Paul-Henry Cournède

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation ecosystem simulation and visualisation are challenging topics involving multidisciplinary aspects. In this paper, we present a new generic frame for the simulation of natural phenomena through manageable and interacting models. It focuses on the functional growth of large vegetal ecosystems, showing coherence for scales ranging from the individual plant to communities and with a particular attention to the effects of water resource competition between plants. The proposed approach is based on a model of plant growth in interaction with the environmental conditions. These are deduced from the climatic data (light, temperature, rainfall) and a model of soil hydrological budget. A set of layers is used to store the water resources and to build the interfaces between the environmental data and landscape components: temperature, rain, light, altitude, lakes, plant positions, biomass, cycles, etc. At the plant level, the simulation is performed for each individual by a structural-functional growth model, interacting with the plant's environment. Temperature is spatialised, changing according to altitude, and thus locally controls plant growth speed. The competition for water is based on a soil hydrological model taking into account rainfalls, water runoff, absorption, diffusion, percolation in soil. So far, the incoming light radiation is not studied in detail and is supposed constant. However, competition for light between plants is directly taken into account in the plant growth model. In our implementation, we propose a simple architecture for such a simulator and a simulation scheme to synchronise the water resource updating (on a temporal basis) and the plant growth cycles (determined by the sum of daily temperatures). The visualisation techniques are based on sets of layers, allowing both morphological and functional landscape views and providing interesting tools for ecosystem management. The implementation of the proposed frame leads to encouraging

  20. Effects of lexical competition on immediate memory span for spoken words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Winston D; Pisoni, David B

    2003-08-01

    Current theories and models of the structural organization of verbal short-term memory are primarily based on evidence obtained from manipulations of features inherent in the short-term traces of the presented stimuli, such as phonological similarity. In the present study, we investigated whether properties of the stimuli that are not inherent in the short-term traces of spoken words would affect performance in an immediate memory span task. We studied the lexical neighbourhood properties of the stimulus items, which are based on the structure and organization of words in the mental lexicon. The experiments manipulated lexical competition by varying the phonological neighbourhood structure (i.e., neighbourhood density and neighbourhood frequency) of the words on a test list while controlling for word frequency and intra-set phonological similarity (family size). Immediate memory span for spoken words was measured under repeated and nonrepeated sampling procedures. The results demonstrated that lexical competition only emerged when a nonrepeated sampling procedure was used and the participants had to access new words from their lexicons. These findings were not dependent on individual differences in short-term memory capacity. Additional results showed that the lexical competition effects did not interact with proactive interference. Analyses of error patterns indicated that item-type errors, but not positional errors, were influenced by the lexical attributes of the stimulus items. These results complement and extend previous findings that have argued for separate contributions of long-term knowledge and short-term memory rehearsal processes in immediate verbal serial recall tasks. PMID:12881165

  1. It's in the Game: The effect of Competition and Cooperation on Anti-Social Behavior in Online Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, David Parsons

    2016-01-01

    Video games have been criticized for the amount of violence present in them and how this violence could affect aggression and anti-social behavior. Much of the literature on video games effects has focused primarily on the content of video games, but recent studies show that competition in video games could be a major influence on aggression. While competing against other players has been shown to increase aggression, there is less research on whether the mere presence of a competitive enviro...

  2. Intraspecific competition in the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria: Effect of rearing density and gender on larval life history

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Gibbs; Lace, Lesley A.; Jones, Martin J.; Allen J. Moore

    2004-01-01

    In insects, the outcome of intraspecific competition for food during development depends primarily upon larval density and larval sex, but effects will also depend on the particular trait under consideration and the species under study. Experimental manipulations of larval densities of a Madeiran population of the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria confirmed that intraspecific competition affected growth. As densities increased P. aegeria adults were smaller and larval development period...

  3. Effects of Intraspecific Competition and Host-Parasitoid Developmental Timing on Foraging Behaviour of a Parasitoid Wasp

    OpenAIRE

    Couchoux, Christelle; van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2013-01-01

    In a context where hosts are distributed in patches and susceptible to parasitism for a limited time, female parasitoids foraging for hosts might experience intraspecific competition. We investigated the effects of host and parasitoid developmental stage and intraspecific competition among foraging females on host-searching behaviour in the parasitoid wasp Hyposoter horticola. We found that H. horticola females have a pre-reproductive adult stage during which their eggs are not mature yet and...

  4. EFFECTS OF HIGHER EDUCATION ON GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS: REVIEWS IN RELATION WITH EUROPEAN COUNTRIES AND THE MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HILAL YILDIRIR KESER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is investigate the effects of higher education on global competitiveness One of the most widely accepted definition of global competitiveness is in the form of " efficiency level encompassing all of the institutions that will ensure sustainable growth in a country, policies and factors of production". Therefore the competitiveness of a country depends on the factors such as; The level of development of R & D activities and productivity, performance of various sectors, the country's trade surplus, producing goods hosting high-tech in their nature, availability of expert and skilled labor force. But one of the main points in the realization of these factors is the quality of the higher education. Higher education has an important role in the formation of qualified labour. And the qualified labour carries the competitiveness firstly of the sector and then of the country up to higher ranks by increasing the performance and productivity of the companies. The study will be discussed in the following way: firstly the context of the global competitiveness will be mentioned, secondly, the role and importance of higher education will be put forth by explaining the basic determinants of competitivenes particularly within the World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index. Finally, assessments will be made in relation with the situation of higher education in global competitiveness in European countries and Middle Eastern countries.

  5. Effect of a Karate Competition on Urinary Excretion of Proteins with High Molecular Weight (Glomerular proteinuria in Young Male Karatekas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Kohanpour

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a karate competition on the urinary excretion of proteins with high molecular weight and urinary creatinine to protein ratio in young male karate as. Ten young male karate as with the age range of 25±2.63 years, height of 175.7±5.15 cm and weight of 71.5±8.61 kg voluntarily took part in this study and participated in a karate competition. Before and 20 min after the competition, the urinary sample was collected and the levels of albumin, total protein, creatinine and urinary creatinine to protein ratio were measured and calculated. To investigate the changes of urinary proteins caused by competition, the student’s t-test for dependent groups was used. Glomerular proteinuria increased after the competition; however, it was only significant for albumin and creatinine (p = 0.009 and p = 0.018, respectively. Although total protein increased after the competition, it was not statistically significant (p = 0.184 and the creatinine to protein ratio did not make any significant changes (p = 0.532. Creatinine to protein ratio was less than 0.1 for the samples before and after the competition; therefore, proteinuria had a physiological range which was very far from nephritic and pathological proteinuria ranges; thus, it was not harmful.

  6. Quantifying below-ground nitrogen of legumes: Optimizing procedures for 15N shoot-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying below-ground nitrogen (N) of legumes is fundamental to understanding their effects on soil mineral N fertility and on the N economies of following or companion crops in legume-based rotations. Methodologies based on 15N-labelling of whole plants with subsequent measurement of 15N in recovered plant parts and in the root-zone soil have proved promising. We report four glasshouse experiments with objectives to develop appropriate protocols for in situ 15N labelling of four pulses, faba bean (Vicia faba), chickpea (Cicer arietinum), mung bean (Vigna radiata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Treatments included 15N-urea concentration, feeding technique, leaflet/petiole position, and frequency of feeding. Nitrogen-15-labelling via the leaf-flap was best for faba bean, mung and pigeon pea, whilst petiole feeding was best for chickpea, in all cases using 0.2-mL volumes of 0.5% urea (98 atom% 15N excess). The implications of uneven enrichment of the nodulated roots because of effects of the 15N-depleted nodules when calculating root-derived N in soil are discussed. (author)

  7. The Effects of Enhancing Competitiveness on FDI Inflows in CEE Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Cristina POPOVICI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to identify how an increase in competitiveness could improve FDI in ten Central and Eastern European (CEE countries. For assessing competitiveness, we employ the variables used by World Economic Forum in designing the Global Competitiveness Index and find that half of the analyzed countries could see the most important increases in FDI/capita if making institutions more competitive, four other countries should accelerate on improving innovation and infrastructure while another country should work on labour market efficiency. We also calculate the potential increase in FDI/capita due to similar changes in different competitiveness variables.

  8. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna populations to the fungicide carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Rico, Andreu; van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The ecological risk assessment of pesticides is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments and does not take into account ecological interactions such as competition or predation. Intraspecific and interspecific competition are expected to result in additional stress and might increase the sensitivity of aquatic populations to pesticide contamination. To test this hypothesis, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the population dynamics of the micro-crustacean Daphnia magna under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for an algal food resource, using the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as competing species. The experiments were performed in glass jars with three different carbendazim concentrations (i.e., 50, 100 and 150 µg/L), and had a duration of 25 days, with a 4-day pre-treatment period in which competition was allowed to take place and a 21-day exposure period. The endpoints evaluated were D. magna total population abundance and population structure. Results of these experiments show that competition stress on its own had a significant influence on shaping D. magna population's structure, however, a different response was observed in the intraspecific and interspecific competition experiments. The use of a 4-day pre-treatment period in the intraspecific experiment already led to an absence of interactive effects due to the quick abundance confluence between the different intraspecific treatments, thus not allowing the observation of interactive effects between competition and carbendazim stress. Results of the interspecific competition experiment showed that rotifers were quickly outcompeted by D. magna and that D. magna even profited from the rotifer presence through exploitative competition, which alleviated the original stress caused by the algal resource limitation. These experiments suggest that competition interactions play an important role in defining population

  9. Availability and temporal heterogeneity of water supply affect the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore and consequently plant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tsunoda

    Full Text Available We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowground herbivorous insect, Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae. The larva was confined in different vertical distributions to top feeding zone (top treatment, middle feeding zone (middle treatment, or bottom feeding zone (bottom treatment; alternatively no larva was introduced (control treatment or larval movement was not confined (free treatment. Three-way interaction between water volume, heterogeneity, and the herbivore significantly affected plant biomass. With a large water volume, plant biomass was lower in free treatment than in control treatment regardless of heterogeneity. Plant biomass in free treatment was as low as in top treatment. With a small water volume and in free treatment, plant biomass was low (similar to that under top treatment under homogeneous water conditions but high under heterogeneous ones (similar to that under middle or bottom treatment. Therefore, there was little effect of belowground herbivory on plant growth under heterogeneous water conditions. In other watering regimes, herbivores would be distributed in the shallow soil and reduced root biomass. Herbivore mortality was high with homogeneous application of a large volume or heterogeneous application of a small water volume. Under the large water volume, plant biomass was high in pots in which the herbivore had died. Thus, the combinations of water volume and heterogeneity affected plant growth via the change of a belowground herbivore.

  10. Belowground plant development measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: exploiting the potential for non-invasive trait quantification using sugar beet as a proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eMetzner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both structural and functional properties of belowground plant organs are critical for the development and yield of plants but, compared to the shoot, much more difficult to observe due to soil opacity. Many processes concerning the belowground plant performance are not fully understood, in particular spatial and temporal dynamics and their interrelation with environmental factors. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI as a noninvasive method to evaluate which traits can be measured when a complex plant organ is monitored in-vivo while growing in the soil. We chose sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris as a model system. The beet consists mainly of root tissues, is rather complex regarding tissue structure and responses to environmental factors, and thereby a good object to test the applicability of MRI for 3D phenotyping approaches. Over a time period of up to 3 months, traits such as beet morphology or anatomy were followed in the soil and the effect of differently sized pots on beet fresh weight calculated from MRI data was studied. There was a clear positive correlation between the pot size and the increase in fresh weight of a sugar beet over time. Since knowledge of the development of internal beet structures with several concentric cambia, vascular and parenchyma rings is still limited, we consecutively acquired 3D volumetric images on individual plants using the MRI contrast parameter T2 to map the development of rings at the tissue level. This demonstrates that MRI provides versatile protocols to non-invasively measure plant traits in the soil. It opens new avenues to investigate belowground plant performance under adverse environmental conditions such as drought, nutrient shortage or soil compaction to seek for traits of belowground organs making plants more resilient to stress.

  11. Effects of competition on the sleep patterns of elite rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David A; Jones, Rhys M; Kilduff, Liam P; Cook, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    No published research has assessed sleep patterns of elite rugby union players following match-play. The present study examined sleep patterns of professional rugby union players, prior and post-match-play, to assess the influence of competition. Twenty-eight male rugby union players (24.4 ± 2.9 years, 103.9 ± 12.2 kg) competed in one of four competitive home matches. Player's sleep behaviours were monitored continuously using an Actiwatch® from two days before the match, until three days post-match. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences across the time points measured for time to bed (F = 26.425, η(2)  = 0.495, p night before the match (p night sleep. Furthermore, time asleep significantly decreased post-match (p nights pre-match. Across all time points, sleep latency and efficiency for most players were considered abnormal compared to that expected in normal populations. The results demonstrate that sleep that is deprived post-match may have detrimental effects on the recovery process. PMID:26255667

  12. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on high intensity, intermittent exercise performance in competitive squash players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, L M; Barrington, J P; Jeukendrup, A E

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of oral creatine supplementation on high intensity, intermittent exercise performance in competitive squash players. Nine squash players (mean +/- SEM VO2max = 61.9 +/- 2.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); body mass = 73 +/- 3 kg) performed an on-court "ghosting" routine that involved 10 sets of 2 repetitions of simulated positional play, each set interspersed with 30 s passive recovery. A double blind, crossover design was utilised whereby experimental and control groups supplemented 4 times daily for 5 d with 0.075 g x kg(-1) body mass of creatine monohydrate and maltodextrine, respectively, and a 4 wk washout period separated the crossover of treatments. The experimental group improved mean set sprint time by 3.2 +/- 0.8% over and above the changes noted for the control group (P = 0.004 and 95% Cl = 1.4 to 5.1%). Sets 2 to 10 were completed in a significantly shorter time following creatine supplementation compared to the placebo condition (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these data support existing evidence that creatine supplementation improves high intensity, intermittent exercise performance. In addition, the present study provides new evidence that oral creatine supplementation improves exercise performance in competitive squash players. PMID:11719888

  13. Effects of within-colony competition on body size asymmetries and reproductive skew in a social spider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinsted, Lena; Bilde, Trine

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive partitioning is a key component of social organization in groups of cooperative organisms. In colonies of permanently social spiders of the genus Stegodyphus less than half of the females reproduce, while all females, including nonreproducers, perform suicidal allo-maternal care. Some...... theoretical models suggest that reproductive skew is a result of contest competition within colonies, leading to size hierarchies where only the largest females become reproducers. We investigated the effect of competition on within-group body size variation over six months in S. dumicola, by manipulating...... food level and colony size. We found no evidence that competition leads to increased size asymmetry within colonies, suggesting that contest competition may not be the proximate explanation for reproductive skew. Within-colony body size variation was high already in the juvenile stage, and did not...

  14. Rate of gene transfer from mitochondria to nucleus: effects of cytoplasmic inheritance system and intensity of intracellular competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Atsushi

    2005-11-01

    Endosymbiotic theory states that mitochondria originated as bacterial intracellular symbionts, the size of the mitochondrial genome gradually reducing over a long period owing to, among other things, gene transfer from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Such gene transfer was observed in more genes in animals than in plants, implying a higher transfer rate of animals. The evolution of gene transfer may have been affected by an intensity of intracellular competition among organelle strains and the organelle inheritance system of the organism concerned. This article reveals a relationship between those factors and the gene transfer rate from organelle to nuclear genomes, using a mathematical model. Mutant mitochondria that lose a certain gene by deletion are considered to replicate more rapidly than normal ones, resulting in an advantage in intracellular competition. If the competition is intense, heteroplasmic individuals possessing both types of mitochondria change to homoplasmic individuals including mutant mitochondria only, with high probability. According to the mathematical model, it was revealed that the rate of gene transfer from mitochondria to the nucleus can be affected by three factors, the intensity of intracellular competition, the probability of paternal organelle transmission, and the effective population size. The gene transfer rate tends to increase with decreasing intracellular competition, increasing paternal organelle transmission, and decreasing effective population size. Intense intracellular competition tends to suppress gene transfer because it is likely to exclude mutant mitochondria that lose the essential gene due to the production of lethal individuals. PMID:16079242

  15. Effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209 on inter-specific competition between two species of marine bloom-forming microalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Zhang

    Full Text Available Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209, a new kind of persistent organic pollutants, was selected to investigate its influence on population growth and inter-specific competition between two species of marine bloom-forming microalgae, Heterosigma akashiwo and Karenia mikimotoi. (1BDE-209 showed acute toxic effects on both microalgae and H. akashiwo was more sensitive from view of 96 h-EC50 and the ultrastructure variation. (2The microalgal population growth patterns in mono-culture were density-dependent and the growth of both species in the normal co-culture was significantly depressed by competition (P<0.05 with different initial biomass ratios. BDE-209 exposure significantly changed the growth. (3 Lotka-Volterra competition model was used to simulate the interaction between the microalgae. BDE-209 exposure broke the competitive balance to make competition gradually shift in favor of H. akashiwo. Results suggested BDE-209 did have toxic effects on either microalgal growth or the inter-specific competition, which was quite different from previous reports. Further exploration of the mechanism is needed.

  16. Effect of Gamma Irradiation And Some Plant Oils on Mating Competitiveness of Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller)(Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of gamma radiation and plant oils on mating competitiveness of Phthorimaea operculella. When full grown pupae were irradiated with two sub-sterilizing doses and sterilizing dose (650 Gy) separately or combined with LC50 of 2% conc. Menth pepirita or Pelargonium graveolens. The fecundity and fertility were decreased by increasing the radiation dose. When males of Ph. operculella (Zeller) were sub-sterilized with gamma irradiation (150 or 200 Gy) or sterilized by 650 Gy and caged with non-irradiated pairs of adults at ratios of 1:1:1 and 5:1:1 (I male : U male : U female), the calculated degree of competitiveness showed that males irradiated with the lowest dose (150 Gy and 150 Gy + 2% conc. of M. pepirita or P. graveolens) were more competitive than males irradiated with the highest dose (650Gy). However, increasing the ratio of irradiated males with 650 Gy + 2% conc. M. pepirita to 10 increased the competitiveness value (CV), and the irradiated males were full competitive. The CV was more high among the irradiated males with 200 Gy while males were full competitive when irradiated and treated with 200 Gy + 2% conc. P. graveolens. The irradiated males with 150 Gy separately or combined with plant oil could be used in an effective sterile male release program at the ratio 1:1 (I male:N male) after suppression the field population with LC50 2% of plant oils M. pepirita or P. graveolens

  17. Evidence that acidification-induced declines in plant diversity and productivity are mediated by changes in below-ground communities and soil properties in a semi-arid steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dima; Lan, Zhichun; Bai, Xue; Grace, James B.; Bai, Yongfei

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic acid deposition–induced soil acidification is one of the major threats to biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services. Few studies, however, have explored in detail how above-ground changes in plant species richness and productivity resulting from soil acidification are mediated by effects on below-ground biota and soil properties.

  18. Modelling of Cs sorption in natural mixed-clays and the effects of ion competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cs adsorption on natural clayrocks in saline marsh waters was studied. • Competitive ions effects on Cs sorption must be evaluated and quantified. • A model for Cs sorption accounting for rock and water chemistry was used. • The principal contribution to Cs sorption is given by the mineral illite. - Abstract: Cs migration in the environment is mainly controlled by sorption onto mineral surfaces, in particular on clay minerals. With the objective of designing a geochemical reactive barrier to treat 137Cs accidental pollution in an industrial waste repository, different natural clayrocks were studied to analyse their capacity to retain Cs. The simple semi-empiric Kd-approach for experimental data analysis, is unsatisfactory to describe the variability of sorption upon chemical changes. Indeed, due to the high salinity of the site, the effects of competitive ions must be evaluated and quantified. Thus, the development of sorption models, capable of reproducing experimental data obtained under conditions representative of the contaminated site, and applicable to reactive transport studies, is needed. In this study, a model for Cs sorption, which takes into account the main mineralogy of the sorbent, the composition of the natural water (and ion competition) was successfully applied to interpret the non-linear Cs sorption under natural conditions. The selectivity coefficients of Cs with respect to the most important cations present in the site water (Na, K, NH4, Ca) were derived by means of experiments in single clay minerals and synthetic mono-component solutions. Then, these parameters were tested in systems of increasing complexity. Considering the mineralogical composition of raw materials, it was shown that the principal contribution to Cs sorption is given by the mineral illite, while smectite starts to be relevant only at very high Cs loadings. Kaolinite, even in concentrations around 10 wt% of the clayey fraction, played only a minor role

  19. INTRACEREBROVENTRICULAR APPLICATION OF COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NMDA ANTAGONISTS INDUCE SIMILAR EFFECTS UPON RAT HIPPOCAMPAL ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM AND LOCAL CEREBRAL GLUCOSE-UTILIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM; WIEDERHOLD, KH; PALACIOS, JM

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have used electrophysiological and metabolic markers to investigate the effects of competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists in rats after central or peripheral administration. The non-competitive antagonist, MK-801, induced dose-dependent suppression of rat hippocampal EEG e

  20. Plant species distribution along environmental gradient: do belowground interactions with fungi matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc ePellissier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of plants along environmental gradients is constrained by abiotic and biotic factors. Cumulative evidence attests of the impact of abiotic factors on plant distributions, but only few studies discuss the role of belowground communities. Soil fungi, in particular, are thought to play an important role in how plant species assemble locally into communities. We first review existing evidence, and then test the effect of the number of soil fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs on plant species distributions using a recently collected dataset of plant and metagenomic information on soil fungi in the Western Swiss Alps. Using species distribution models, we investigated whether the distribution of individual plant species is correlated to the number of OTUs of two important soil fungal classes known to interact with plants: the Glomeromycetes, that are obligatory symbionts of plants, and the Agaricomycetes, that may be facultative plant symbionts, pathogens, or wood decayers. We show that including the fungal richness information in the models of plant species distributions improves predictive accuracy. Number of fungal OTUs is especially correlated to the distribution of high elevation plant species. We suggest that high elevation soil show greater variation in fungal assemblages that may in turn impact plant turnover among communities. We finally discuss how to move beyond correlative analyses, through the design of field experiments manipulating plant and fungal communities along environmental gradients.

  1. Above- and belowground interactions drive habitat segregation between two cryptic species of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizano, Camila; Mangan, Scott A; Herre, Edward Allen; Eom, Ahn-Heum; Dalling, James W

    2011-01-01

    In the lowlands of central Panama, the Neotropical pioneer tree Trema micrantha (sensu lato) exists as two cryptic species: "landslide" Trema is restricted to landslides and road embankments, while "gap" Trema occurs mostly in treefall gaps. In this study, we explored the relative contributions of biotic interactions and physical factors to habitat segregation in T. micrantha. Field surveys showed that soils from landslides were significantly richer in available phosphorus and harbored distinct arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities compared to gap soils. Greenhouse experiments designed to determine the effect of these abiotic and biotic differences showed that: (1) both landslide and gap species performed better in sterilized soil from their own habitat, (2) the availability of phosphorus and nitrogen was limiting in gap and landslide soils, respectively, (3) a standardized AMF inoculum increased performance of both species, but primarily on gap soils, and (4) landslide and gap species performed better when sterilized soils were inoculated with the microbial inoculum from their own habitat. A field experiment confirmed that survival and growth of each species was highest in its corresponding habitat. This experiment also showed that browsing damage significantly decreased survival of gap Trema on landslides. We conclude that belowground interactions with soil microbes and aboveground interactions with herbivores contribute in fundamental ways to processes that may promote and reinforce adaptive speciation. PMID:21560675

  2. Photomorphogenic effects of UV-B radiation on plants: consequences for light competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of field and labotatory studies were conducted to explore the nature of photomorphogenic effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 280–320 nm) on plant morphology and to evaluate the ecological consequences of these alterations in morphology for interspecific competition. Under laboratory conditions, seedlings of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) exhibited appreciable (ca. 50%) and rapid (< 3h) inhibition in hypocotyl elongation in response to UV-B exposure. In cucumber, this inhibition was reversible, occurred without any associated changes in dry matter production and was caused by UV-B incident on the cotyledons and not the stem or growing tip. Inhibition of stem elongation in etiolated tomato seedlings occurred at least 3 h prior to the onset of accumulation of UV-absorbing pigments and monochromatic UV supplied against a background of visible radiation revealed maximum effectiveness in inhibition around 300 nm. Collectively, these findings suggest that a specific, but yet unidentified, UV-B photoreceptor is involved in mediating certain morphological responses to UV-B. For mixtures of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and wild oat (Avena fatua L.), a common weedy competitor, supplemental UV-B irradiation in the field differentially altered shoot morphology which resulted in changes in canopy structure, light interception and calculated stand photosynthesis. It is argued that, because of its asymmetrical nature, competition for light can potentially amplify the effects of UV-B on shoot morphology and may, therefore, be an important mechanism by which changes in the solar UV-B spectrum associated with stratospheric ozone reduction could alter the composition and character of terrestrial vegetation

  3. Effect of interspecific competition on trait variation in Phaeobacter inhibens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Carla; Thomas, Torsten; Steinberg, Peter; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Egan, Suhelen

    2016-05-01

    Interspecific competition between bacteria shapes community dynamics, causing evolutionary changes that affect life history traits. Here, we studied the role of interspecific competition on the generation of trait diversity using a two-species model system of marine, surface-associated bacteria. Bacterial biofilms of Phaeobacter inhibens were established alone or in competition with Pseudoalteromonas tunicata and phenotypic traits of dispersal cells were assessed during biofilm development. P. inhibens dispersal isolates from competition biofilms displayed less phenotypic variation, were superior competitors, were less susceptible to predation, and reached higher planktonic biomass than isolates from noncompetition biofilms. Moreover, the maintenance of competitive ability exhibited by individual dispersal isolates from competition biofilms did not result in an obvious reduction (measured as a negative trait correlation) in other traits, but was rather positively correlated with planktonic growth. However, where negative correlations between traits were found, they were exhibited by individuals derived from noncompetitive biofilms, whose populations also had a higher degree of trait variation than those from biofilms experiencing competition. Our observations indicate that interspecific competition during biofilm formation is important for maintaining both competitive ability and affects variation in ecologically relevant traits. Given that most bacteria in biofilms exist in diverse, multispecies communities, an understanding of how bacteria respond to biotic factors such as interspecific competition is critical for understanding the dynamics of bacterial populations in both ecological and evolutionary time. PMID:26914307

  4. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; Anderson, L. O.; Alvarez, E.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Patiño, S.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva, J. A., Jr.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-12-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  5. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms. PMID:27197388

  6. The Stroop effect at 80: The competition between stimulus control and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, David A

    2016-01-01

    For more than 80 years, researchers have examined the interference between automatic processing of stimuli, such as the meaning of color words, on performance of a controlled-processing task such as naming the color in which words are printed. The Stroop effect and its many variations provide an ideal test platform for examining the competition between stimulus control and cognitive control of attention, as reflected in behavior. The two experiments reported here show that rhesus monkeys, like human adults, show interference from incongruous stimulus conditions in a number-Stroop task, and that the monkeys may be particularly susceptible to influence from response strength and less able, relative to human adults, of using executive attention to minimize this interference. PMID:26781048

  7. Interactive effects of competition and predator cues on immune responses of leopard frogs at metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Maya L; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Reinert, Laura K; Hempel, John; Bier, Mark E; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-02-01

    Recent hypotheses suggest that immunosuppression, resulting from altered environmental conditions, may contribute to the increased incidence of amphibian disease around the world. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in amphibian skin are an important innate immune defense against fungal, viral and bacterial pathogens. Their release is tightly coupled with release of the stress hormone noradrenaline (norepinephrine). During metamorphosis, AMPs may constitute the primary immune response in the skin of some species because acquired immune functions are temporarily suppressed in order to prevent autoimmunity against new adult antigens. Suppression of AMPs during this transitional stage may impact disease rates. We exposed leopard frog tadpoles (Lithobates pipiens) to a factorial combination of competitor and caged-predator environments and measured their development, growth and production of hydrophobic skin peptides after metamorphosis. In the absence of predator cues, or if the exposure to predator cues was late in ontogeny, competition caused more than a 250% increase in mass-standardized hydrophobic skin peptides. Predator cues caused a decrease in mass-standardized hydrophobic skin peptides when the exposure was late in ontogeny under low competition, but otherwise had no effect. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the skin peptides showed that they include six AMPs in the brevinin and temporin families and at least three of these peptides are previously uncharacterized. Both of these peptide families have previously been shown to inhibit harmful microbes including Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the fungal pathogen associated with global amphibian declines. Our study shows that amphibians may be able to adjust their skin peptide defenses in response to stressors that are experienced early in ontogeny and that these effects extend through an important life-history transition. PMID:24115058

  8. The Effect of Competitive Rivalry on Internal Communication in Private Healthcare Organizations: Evidence from Istanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Gültekin Altuntas; Fatih Semerciöz; Aral Noyan

    2014-01-01

    Both competitive rivalry and internal communication play a crucial role for a business to position itself in a favourable manner in order to succeed particularly in a hostile environment. While numerous studies present the importance of competitive rivalry and of communication, even internal communication separately, little is known about the specific linkage of how competitive rivalry affects communication in the literature. Within the framework of internal communication, this st...

  9. Are NBA Policies that Promote Long-Term Competitive Balance Effective? What is the Price?

    OpenAIRE

    Corral Cuervo, Julio Florentino del; García Unanue, Jorge Fernando; Herencia Quintanar, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines competitive balance in the most prominent basketball league in the world: the NBA. Two types of graphs are used. First, long-term competitive balance is studied based on actual positions achieved by the teams on the Regu-lar Season. On the other hand, the competitive balance levels for each season are analyzed using sport betting odds data and through the use of two alternative strategies. In the first approach, density functions for the number of victories for al...

  10. Interactive effects of interspecific competition and microhabitat on early post-settlement survival in a coral reef fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, M. C.; Srinivasan, M.; Almany, G. R.; Jones, G. P.

    2009-03-01

    Microhabitat type and the competition for microhabitats can each influence patterns of abundance and mortality in coral reef fish communities; however, the effect of microhabitat on the intensity and outcome of competition is not well understood. In Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, surveys were used to quantify microhabitat use and selectivity in two live-coral specialist damselfishes (Pomacentridae), Chrysiptera parasema, and Dascyllus melanurus. A patch reef experiment was then conducted to test how intra- and interspecific competition interacts with two types of microhabitat to influence survival of recently settled C. parasema. Surveys demonstrated that C. parasema and D. melanurus recruits utilized similar coral microhabitats; 72% of C. parasema and 85% of D. melanurus used corymbose and bottlebrush growth forms of Acropora. One microhabitat type, Pocillopora sp. coral, was commonly used by D. melanurus but rarely by C. parasema. The patch reef experiment revealed that both microhabitat and interspecific competition influence abundance of recently settled C. parasema. Microhabitat had the strongest influence on survival of C. parasema. In the absence of interspecific competitors, ~85% of C. parasema survived for 5 days after transplantation to high-complexity bottlebrush Acropora reefs when compared to only 25% survival of Pocillopora reefs. In both microhabitats, interspecific competition with D. melanurus, but not intraspecific competition, significantly decreased the survival of C. parasema. Taken together, these results suggest that the observed distribution of C. parasema results from specialized microhabitat requirements and competition for space in those microhabitats. This study demonstrates that interspecific competition and microhabitat type can interact to influence early post-settlement survival in coral reef fishes, though, whether and how these factors influence survival will depend on the behavioural attributes and strength of habitat associations

  11. Competitiveness effects of environmental tax reforms (COMETR). Final report to the European Commission, DG Research and DG TAXUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skou Andersen, M.; Speck, S. (Univ. of Aarhus, National Environmental Research Institute, Dept. of Policy Analysis (Denmark)); Barker, T.; Junankar, S.; Pollitt, H. (Cambridge Econometrics (United Kingdom)); Fitz Gerald, J.; Scott, S. (Economic and Social Research Institute (Ireland)); Jilkova, J. (Univ. of Economics Prague, Institute for Economic and Environmental Policy (Czech Republic)); Salmons, R.; Ekins, P. (Policy Studies Institute (United Kingdom)); Christie, E.; Michael Landesmann, M. (Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (Austria))

    2007-12-15

    COMETR provides an ex-post assessment of experiences and competitiveness impacts of using carbon-energy taxes as an instrument of an Environmental Tax Reform (ETR), which shifts the tax burden and helps reduce the carbon emissions that cause global warming. COMETR: reviews the experience in ETR in seven EU Member States (Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Finland, Slovenia, Sweden and UK); analyses world market conditions for a set of energy-intensive sectors, as a framework for considering competitiveness effects; analyses the effects of ETR on sector-specific energy usage and carbon emissions in Member States with carbon-energy taxes introduced on industry; presents a macroeconomic analysis of the competitiveness effects of ETR for individual Member States as well as for the EU as a whole; provides ex-post figures for environmental decoupling and assesses carbon leakage; reviews mitigation and compensation mechanisms for energy-intensive industries. (au)

  12. Building an effective competitive intelligence system for health care service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festervand, T A; Lumpkin, J R

    1990-01-01

    With the increasing competitiveness of the health care marketplace, the need for information by service providers has increased concomitantly. In response to this need, strategic and competitive intelligence systems have emerged as a vital source of information. This article establishes a basis for the development and operation of a competitive intelligence system. Initially, strategic and competitive intelligence systems are conceptualized, then followed by a discussion of the areas which are candidates for inclusion in the intelligence system. The remainder of the article focuses on system development and operation. Attention also is directed toward information utilization and integration. PMID:10106847

  13. Audience effects in the Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana–prudent male mate choice in response to perceived sperm competition risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kronmarck Claudia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidirectional interactions in social networks can have a profound effect on mate choice behavior; e.g., Poecilia mexicana males show weaker expression of mating preferences when being observed by a rival. This may be an adaptation to reduce sperm competition risk, which arises because commonly preferred female phenotypes will receive attention also from surrounding males, and/or because other males can copy the focal male's mate choice. Do P. mexicana males indeed respond to perceived sperm competition risk? We gave males a choice between two females and repeated the tests under one of the following conditions: (1 an empty transparent cylinder was presented (control; (2 another ("audience" male inside the cylinder observed the focal male throughout the 2nd part, or (3 the audience male was presented only before the tests, but could not eavesdrop during the actual choice tests (non-specific sperm competition risk treatments; (4 the focal male could see a rival male interact sexually with the previously preferred, or (5 with the non-preferred female before the 2nd part of the tests (specific sperm competition risk treatments. Results The strength of individual male preferences declined slightly also during the control treatment (1. However, this decrease was more than two-fold stronger in audience treatment (2, i.e., with non-specific sperm competition risk including the possibility for visual eavesdropping by the audience male. No audience effect was found in treatments (3 and (5, but a weak effect was also observed when the focal male had seen the previously preferred female sexually interact with a rival male (treatment 4; specific sperm competition risk. Conclusion When comparing the two 'non-specific sperm competition risk' treatments, a very strong effect was found only when the audience male could actually observe the focal male during mate choice [treatment (2]. This suggests that focal males indeed attempt to

  14. Increased effectiveness of competitive rhizobium strains upon inoculation of Cajanus cajan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field study was conducted in lysimeters containing 15N-enriched soil to determine the effects of four competitive rhizobium strains upon yield parameters of pigeon peas (Cajanus cajan). The greatest differences observed were in seed yields; strain P132 effected the highest seed yield (121 +/- 20 g per plant), and the control strain (indigenous rhizobia) effected the lowest yield (43.9 +/- 8 g per plant). With the exception of seeds and pods, the dry matter weights were not different. Although there appeared to be no effect by inoculum strains on the fractional content of N derived from biological nitrogen fixation when the total plant biomass was considered, strains P132 and 401 partitioned more of the N derived from fixation into seeds and leaves than did the other strains. Because the seeds comprised the major portion of plant N, more total N and more N derived from biological nitrogen fixation (about half of total N) were found in plants inoculated with P132, whereas the smallest amount was found in the uninoculated controls. P132 was also the best competitor with respect to indigenous rhizobia and accounted for all of the nodules found on the plants in which it was inoculated

  15. Modeling effects of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards on the competition between striatal learning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedecker, Joschka; Lampe, Thomas; Riedmiller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A common assumption in psychology, economics, and other fields holds that higher performance will result if extrinsic rewards (such as money) are offered as an incentive. While this principle seems to work well for tasks that require the execution of the same sequence of steps over and over, with little uncertainty about the process, in other cases, especially where creative problem solving is required due to the difficulty in finding the optimal sequence of actions, external rewards can actually be detrimental to task performance. Furthermore, they have the potential to undermine intrinsic motivation to do an otherwise interesting activity. In this work, we extend a computational model of the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatal reinforcement learning systems to account for the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. The model assumes that the brain employs both a goal-directed and a habitual learning system, and competition between both is based on the trade-off between the cost of the reasoning process and value of information. The goal-directed system elicits internal rewards when its models of the environment improve, while the habitual system, being model-free, does not. Our results account for the phenomena that initial extrinsic reward leads to reduced activity after extinction compared to the case without any initial extrinsic rewards, and that performance in complex task settings drops when higher external rewards are promised. We also test the hypothesis that external rewards bias the competition in favor of the computationally efficient, but cruder and less flexible habitual system, which can negatively influence intrinsic motivation and task performance in the class of tasks we consider. PMID:24137146

  16. Modeling effects of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards on the competition between striatal learning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joschka eBoedecker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A common assumption in psychology, economics, and other fields holds that higher performance will result if extrinsic rewards (such as money are offered as an incentive. While this principle seems to work well for tasks that require the execution of the same sequence of steps over and over, with little uncertainty about the process, in other cases, especially where creative problem solving is required due to the difficulty in finding the optimal sequence of actions, external rewards can actually be detrimental to task performance. Furthermore, they have the potential to undermine intrinsic motivation to do an otherwise interesting activity. In this work, we extend a computational model of the prefrontal and dorsolateral striatal reinforcement learning systems to account for the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. The model assumes that the brain employs both a goal-directed and a habitual learning system, and competition between both is based on the trade-off between the cost of the reasoning process and value of information. The goal-directed system elicits internal rewards when its models of the environment improve, while the habitual system, being model-free, does not. Our results account for the phenomena that initial extrinsic reward leads to reduced activity after extinction compared to the case without any initial extrinsic rewards, and that performance in complex task settings drops when higher external rewards are promised. We also test the hypothesis that external rewards bias the competition in favor of the computationally efficient, but cruder and less flexible habitual system, which can negatively influence intrinsic motivation and task performance in the class of tasks we consider.

  17. The Effects of Athletic Competition on Character Development in College Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Sharon Kay

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that there are inherent problems in athletic competition relating to character development in college student athletes. A review of the research supports the claim that athletic competitions do not build character. The author proposes ways to address this problem and provides personal observations and published research to…

  18. Phonological Competition within the Word: Evidence from the Phoneme Similarity Effect in Spoken Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Goldberg, Ariel M.

    2012-01-01

    Theories of spoken production have not specifically addressed whether the phonemes of a word compete with each other for selection during phonological encoding (e.g., whether /t/ competes with /k/ in cat). Spoken production theories were evaluated and found to fall into three classes, theories positing (1) no competition, (2) competition among…

  19. Effectiveness of 14-15 years old tennis players’ competition functioning considering correction of their psychological fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makuts T.B.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determination influence of individualized psychological training on effectiveness of 14-15 years old tennis players’ competition functioning. Material: in the research 24 tennis players of 14-15 years’ age participated. Individualized psychological training consisted of 15 sessions of total duration of 1.5 months. Results: We substantiated necessity of individualized approach to tennis players’ psychological training. Individual psychological profiles for tennis players, which determined content of psychological training and their selection, were worked out. Informative indicators for assessment of 14-15 years old tennis players’ competition functioning were determined: 1 percentage of won and lost scores at the account of own actions; 2 integral criteria of tennis players’ competition functioning assessment (coefficient of stability and effectiveness; complex indicator of efficiency. Conclusions: it is recommended to consider individual potentials and bents of sportsmen in the course of psychological training.

  20. Adsorption studies of Dichloromethane on some commercially available GACs: Effect of kinetics, thermodynamics and competitive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to compare the effectiveness of four commercially available granular activated carbons (GACs); coconut (CGAC), wood (WGAC), lignite (LGAC) and bituminous (BGAC) for the removal of dichloromethane (DCM) from aqueous solution by batch process. Various parameters such as thermodynamics, kinetics, pH, concentration of adsorbate, dosages of adsorbent and competitive ions effect on DCM adsorption were investigated. Maximum adsorption capacity (45.5 mg/g for CGAC) was observed at pH 6.0-8.0. The kinetics data indicate better applicability of pseudo-second-order kinetics model at 25 and 35 deg. C. Freundlich model was better obeyed on CGAC, WGAC, and BGAC, while LGAC followed Langmuir model. The adsorption process for 100 mg/L initial DCM concentration on CGAC was exothermic in nature. The adsorption of DCM on various adsorbents involves physical adsorption process. The adsorption of DCM over a large range of initial concentration on CGAC and LGAC is effective even in presence of ionic salts.

  1. Adsorption studies of Dichloromethane on some commercially available GACs: Effect of kinetics, thermodynamics and competitive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Moonis Ali; Kim, Seong-wook [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, 202002 (India); Abou-Shanab, R.A.I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Mubarak City for Scientific Research, Alexandria (Egypt); Bhatnagar, Amit [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hocheol [Geologic Environment Division, KIGAM, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byong-Hun, E-mail: bhjeon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this work was to compare the effectiveness of four commercially available granular activated carbons (GACs); coconut (CGAC), wood (WGAC), lignite (LGAC) and bituminous (BGAC) for the removal of dichloromethane (DCM) from aqueous solution by batch process. Various parameters such as thermodynamics, kinetics, pH, concentration of adsorbate, dosages of adsorbent and competitive ions effect on DCM adsorption were investigated. Maximum adsorption capacity (45.5 mg/g for CGAC) was observed at pH 6.0-8.0. The kinetics data indicate better applicability of pseudo-second-order kinetics model at 25 and 35 deg. C. Freundlich model was better obeyed on CGAC, WGAC, and BGAC, while LGAC followed Langmuir model. The adsorption process for 100 mg/L initial DCM concentration on CGAC was exothermic in nature. The adsorption of DCM on various adsorbents involves physical adsorption process. The adsorption of DCM over a large range of initial concentration on CGAC and LGAC is effective even in presence of ionic salts.

  2. Political Failures and Intergovernmental Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Hindriks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In normative public economics, intergovernmental competition is usually viewed as harmful. Although empirical support for this position does not abound, market integration has intensified competition among developed countries. In this paper we argue that when assessing welfare effects of intergovernmental competition for various forms of political failures (the public choice critique, the outcome is ambiguous and competition can be welfare improving.

  3. Above-ground and below-ground plant responses to fertilization in two subarctic ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sundqvist, Maja K.; Metcalfe, D.; Wilson, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Soil nutrient supply is likely to change in the Arctic due to altered process rates associated with climate change. Here, we compare the responses of herbaceous tundra and birch forest understory to fertilization, considering both above- and below-ground responses. We added nitrogen and phosphorus t

  4. Belowground heathland responses after 2 years of combined warming, elevated CO2 and summer drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Ambus, Per;

    2010-01-01

    scale experiment on temperate heathland, manipulation of precipitation and temperature was performed with retractable curtains, and atmospheric CO2 concentration was increased by FACE. The combination of elevated CO2 and warming was expected to affect belowground processes additively, through increased...

  5. THE OPTIMIZATION OF THE TRAINING STRATEGIES IN WHAT CONCERNS OBTAINING A BIGGER TRANSFER OF THE TRAINING EFFECT FOR THE COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DULGHERU MIRELA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The personal experiences in the position of performance athletes, put us in the situation to do observations about the differences between the segmentary muscular contraction regime during training and theone of the solicitations in the competition effort. In the present paper we want to acknowledge and demonstrate the existence of a competition specific bio-motor (un-metabolic of which if we do not take it into account we risk to have low transfer premises of the training effect towards the competition. In the present paper we usedclassic materials and methods and modern ones of research (the bibliographic study method, the observation method, the logical method, the measurements and recordings method, the graphic method and the experimental one. In our paper we will present the video recorded data of the executions during the competitions and thetraining of an athlete that was part of the investigated subjects’ batch. I put experimentally in evidence the differences in the speed and positions distribution and also in the strengths and speeds distribution during training and competition reaching the conclusion that these differences are obvious and generate changes in thecommands succession. The conclusion that we reached refers to the fact that the administration and regulation process of the physical effort in concordance with the competition effort’s specificity must be revised, known being the fact that because of ignoring the differential nature of the effort’s specificity mistakes are made inchoosing the means and dosages, means are chosen without taking into account the existent differences between the segmentary contraction regime during practice and the one of the solicitations during the competition effort

  6. The effects of trade liberalization on productivity growth in Brazil: competition or technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos B. Lisboa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of trade liberalization on productivity growth in Brazil. In contrast with the previous literature, we examine whether this relationship is driven by product or input market effects, by including both output and input tariffs in firm-level productivity regressions and allowing for imperfect competition in the product market. The results show that the reductions of input tariffs were more important to explain the productivity growth that took place during trade liberalization in Brazil. Moreover, we find that the reduction in input tariffs led to a rise in mark-ups, while the reduction in output tariffs did the opposite.Este artigo examina os efeitos da liberalização comercial sobre o crescimento da produtividade no Brasil. Em contraste com a literatura anterior, testamos se essa relação é derivada do mercado de produto ou de insumos, incluindo tanto as tarifas de produto e com as de insumos em regressões de produtividade ao nível da firma. Os resultados mostram que o mercado de insumos é mais importante que o efeito da concorrência para explicar o crescimento da produtividade no Brasil. Verificamos também que a redução das tarifas de insumo aumenta as margens de lucro, enquanto a redução de tarifas de produto tem o efeito oposto.

  7. Competitive Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Pierrette; Hiller, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of competitive intelligence since 1994, including terminology and definitions and analytical techniques. Addresses the issue of ethics; explores how information technology supports the competitive intelligence process; and discusses education and training opportunities for competitive intelligence, including core competencies…

  8. A PATH ANALYTICAL ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL INTEGRATION PRACTICES' EFFECTS ON MANUFACTURING FLEXIBILITY AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei CAO; Qingyu ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    To cope with an increasingly turbulent environment, manufacturing firms increasingly implement integration practices to enhance flexibility in the production process. This research develops a framework to explore the relationships among organizational integration practices, manufacturing flexibility, and competitive advantage. The study develops valid and reliable instruments to measure these constructs, and it applies structural equation modeling to test relationships among these variables using a large sample. The results indicate strong, positive, and direct relationships between organizational integration practices and manufacturing flexibility, and between manufacturing flexibility and competitive advantage. The results also indicate that organizational integration practices enhance competitive advantage directly as well as indirectly by facilitating manufacturing flexibility.

  9. Effects of litters with different concentrations of phenolics on the competition between Calluna vulgaris and Deschampsia flexuosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland-Zijlstra, J.D.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the outcome of competition between ericaceous plants and grasses is strongly affected by the concentrations of phenolics in the litter that they produce. To test the effect of phenolic-rich litter on soluble soil nitrogen concentrations, plant nitrogen uptake and inter-specific

  10. Models of Experimentally Derived Competitive Effects Predict Biogeographical Differences in the Abundance of Invasive and Native Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sa; Ni, Guangyan; Callaway, Ragan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mono-dominance by invasive species provides opportunities to explore determinants of plant distributions and abundance; however, linking mechanistic results from small scale experiments to patterns in nature is difficult. We used experimentally derived competitive effects of an invader in North America, Acroptilon repens, on species with which it co-occurs in its native range of Uzbekistan and on species with which it occurs in its non-native ranges in North America, in individual-based models. We found that competitive effects yielded relative abundances of Acroptilon and other species in models that were qualitatively similar to those observed in the field in the two ranges. In its non-native range, Acroptilon can occur in nearly pure monocultures at local scales, whereas such nearly pure stands of Acroptilon appear to be much less common in its native range. Experimentally derived competitive effects of Acroptilon on other species predicted Acroptilon to be 4–9 times more proportionally abundant than natives in the North American models, but proportionally equal to or less than the abundance of natives in the Eurasian models. Our results suggest a novel way to integrate complex combinations of interactions simultaneously, and that biogeographical differences in the competitive effects of an invader correspond well with biogeographical differences in abundance and impact. PMID:24265701

  11. Models of experimentally derived competitive effects predict biogeographical differences in the abundance of invasive and native plant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Xiao

    Full Text Available Mono-dominance by invasive species provides opportunities to explore determinants of plant distributions and abundance; however, linking mechanistic results from small scale experiments to patterns in nature is difficult. We used experimentally derived competitive effects of an invader in North America, Acroptilon repens, on species with which it co-occurs in its native range of Uzbekistan and on species with which it occurs in its non-native ranges in North America, in individual-based models. We found that competitive effects yielded relative abundances of Acroptilon and other species in models that were qualitatively similar to those observed in the field in the two ranges. In its non-native range, Acroptilon can occur in nearly pure monocultures at local scales, whereas such nearly pure stands of Acroptilon appear to be much less common in its native range. Experimentally derived competitive effects of Acroptilon on other species predicted Acroptilon to be 4-9 times more proportionally abundant than natives in the North American models, but proportionally equal to or less than the abundance of natives in the Eurasian models. Our results suggest a novel way to integrate complex combinations of interactions simultaneously, and that biogeographical differences in the competitive effects of an invader correspond well with biogeographical differences in abundance and impact.

  12. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    International tests on competences, such as TIMSS or PISA, and knowledge of young students have revealed low average scores in many countries, often unexpectedly. One effective measure to increase the average standard of a population is to bring the last third of the group to a higher level. Therefore, many nations put some effort into this activity. This brings the danger that not enough attention is paid to students at the other end, those who are talented. Indeed, it is a very difficult task for a teacher to support the less able and at the same time challenge the gifted students, to lead them to the limits of their abilities and provide for a smooth transition to university study. Physics competitions have been proven to fulfil these last demands to a large degree, and therefore are an important additional and, to some extent, complementary tool for the promotion of talented students. This third special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics contains three papers, each dealing with a different form of science contest. The first continues the series of presentations of tasks performed at the International Young Physicists' Tournament, which was held in Vienna in 2011. First place went to the team from Singapore, and they have put their investigation on vertical oscillations of coupled magnets into written form (not required by the tournament, where an oral presentation and a defence and discussion are the central aspects). Their paper shows how rich in physics this problem is, and what level of solutions high-school students can already achieve. Sadly, those responsible for the organization of last year's International Physics Olympiad did not provide us with a report on this competition. This is unfortunate, since the Olympiad in Zagreb was very successful and, in particular, the experimental tasks were creative and demanding. Very similar to the aims and the execution of the Physics Olympiad is the International Olympiad on Astronomy

  13. The Joint Effect of Competition and Complexity on Customer Accounting System Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Morten; Ax, Christian

    complexity and competition firms face influences the degree of Customer Profitability Analysis (CPA) Model sophistication. Applying a path analysis on survey data from 217 firms reveals support for three hypotheses: (i) There is an inverted u-shaped relationship between competition intensity and customer......The importance of measuring customer profitability has recently been reiterated by the management accounting community. However, the stream of research on the factors influencing customer accounting (CA) design choices is still scarce and inconclusive. This paper addresses how the level of...... service complexity; (ii) There is a direct positive relationship between customer service complexity and CPA model sophistication; (iii) This positive association is stronger when competition is non-price based than when competition is price based. The study hereby contributes to research on CA design in...

  14. The Joint Effect of Competition and Complexity on Customer Accounting System Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Morten; Ax, Christian

    complexity and competition firms face influences the degree of Customer Profitability Analysis (CPA) Model sophistication. Applying a path analysis on survey data from 217 firms reveals support for three hypotheses: (i) There is an inverted u-shaped relationship between competition intensity and customer...... service complexity; (ii) There is a direct positive relationship between customer service complexity and CPA model sophistication; (iii) This positive association is stronger when competition is non-price based than when competition is price based. The study hereby contributes to research on CA design in......The importance of measuring customer profitability has recently been reiterated by the management accounting community. However, the stream of research on the factors influencing customer accounting (CA) design choices is still scarce and inconclusive. This paper addresses how the level of...

  15. The Effects of Tax Competition when Politicians Create Rents to Buy Political Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggert, Wolfgang; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    We set up a probabilistic voting model to explore the hypothesis that tax competition improves public sector efficiency and social welfare. In the absence of tax base mobility, distortions in the political process induce vote-maximising politicians to create rents to public sector employees....... Allowing tax base mobility may be welfare-enhancing up to a point, because the ensuing tax competition will reduce rents. However, if tax competition is carried too far, it will reduce welfare by causing an underprovision of public goods. Starting from an equilibrium where tax competition has eliminated...... all rents, a coordinated rise in capital taxation will always be welfare-improving. For plausible parameter values it will even be welfare-enhancing to carry tax coordination beyond the point where rents to public sector workers start to emerge...

  16. The effects of tax competition when politicians create rents to buy political support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggert, Wolfgang; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    2008-01-01

    We set up a probabilistic voting model to explore the hypothesis that tax competition improves public sector efficiency and social welfare. In the absence of tax base mobility, distortions in the political process induce vote-maximising politicians to create rents to public sector employees....... Allowing tax base mobility may be welfare-enhancing up to a point, because the ensuing tax competition will reduce rents. However, if tax competition is carried too far, it will reduce welfare by causing an underprovision of public goods. Starting from an equilibrium where tax competition has eliminated...... all rents, a coordinated rise in capital taxation will always be welfare-improving. For plausible parameter values it will even be welfare-enhancing to carry tax coordination beyond the point where rents to public sector workers start to emerge...

  17. Hotel Competitiveness Measurement Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Katalin Juhasz-Dora

    2015-01-01

    Competitiveness is becoming a very common expression used in business administration. The definition and its application still raises some questions due to the complexity of its meaning. The role of the measurement of competitiveness and its effect on performance and profitability is increasing in the field of hospitality and tourism as well. The measurement of hotel competitiveness is a current issue in business life due to globalization, sharing economy and the change in the consumber habit...

  18. Retail competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retail competition as the cornerstone of a competitive electricity marketplace was the subject of the seventh in the series of policy discussion papers developed at the Market Design Conference. Concern was expressed that because of the complexities involved in market design and technical implementation, the retail competition may lag behind other elements of the implementation of the new market design. A variety of key issues were debated, including the role of physical versus financial contracts, the form of retail competition and financial settlement systems in the short term, the requirement to separate 'competitive' (metering, billing, maintenance, consumer education) from non-competitive' (the transmission wires) services and the role of municipal electric utilities. It was agreed that the IMO should play an important role in defining and enforcing the separation of services, and that as a general rule, the development of policy in this area should be guided by the principle of maximizing the potential for competition

  19. Side Effects of Competition: the Role of Advertising and Promotion in Pharmaceutical Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Guy David; Sara Markowitz

    2011-01-01

    The extent of pharmaceutical advertising and promotion can be characterized by a balancing act between profitable demand expansions and potentially unfavorable subsequent regulatory actions. However, this balance also depends on the nature of competition (e.g. monopoly versus oligopoly). In this paper we model the firm's behavior under different competitive scenarios and test the model's predictions using a novel combination of sales, promotion, advertising, and adverse event reports data. We...

  20. Relative age effect on success in tennis competition in the older age-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián Agricola; Rudolf Psotta; Reza Abdollahipour

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The theory of relative age effect assumes that children and adolescents - athletes born at the beginning of the calendar year in sports competitions are more successful than those who were born in the later months of the same year. This percentage is based on advantage of fitness, morphological and psychological assumptions of the older athletes. AIM: The research objective of the present study was to verify the assumption of competitive success of older players in the elite...

  1. Consumer Benefits from Increased Competition in Shopping Outlets: Measuring the Effect of Wal-Mart

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Jerry A.; Leibtag, Ephraim

    2006-01-01

    Consumers often benefit from increased competition in differentiated product settings. In previous research Hausman (1997a, 1997b, 1999, 2002) has estimated the increased consumer welfare from the introduction of new brand, e.g. Apple Cinnamon Cheerios, and new products, e.g. mobile telephones. In this paper we consider consumer benefits from increased competition in a differentiated product setting: the spread of nontraditional retail outlets. Non-traditional outlets, including supercenters,...

  2. The effect of foreign competition on product switching activities: A firm level analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakhoda, Aadil

    2012-01-01

    Pressure from foreign competition on the decision to introduce new products or on production costs may influence firms to particpate in product switching activities. Firms switch products if they either add or drop products within their product range. I test whether pressure from foreign competition is likely to influence firms that concurrently add and drop (churn) products rather than firms that i) do not undertake any product switching activity, ii) add products only, or iii) drop products...

  3. Reproductive Ecology of Wyoming Big Sagebrush (Artemisia Tridentata SSP. Wyomingensis) : Effects of Herbivory and Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    Herbivory and plant competition affect sexual reproduction of plants in various ways. Exclusion of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and cattle, removal of plant competition (both inter- and intraspecific), and all combinations of the above treatments were used to examine the individual and combined affects on Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) reproduction. Reproduction of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis was divided into hierarchical levels of the number of: ...

  4. EFFECT OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONAL RESPONSE TO COMPETITIVE STRESSORS ON SPORTS ACHIEVEMENTS OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Bajpai; Avinash Yadav

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare sports competitive anxiety between national, state and district level male basketball players. For present study, 100 national level male basketball players (Ave. age 25.12 yrs.), 100 state level male basketball players (Ave. age 22.34 yrs.) and 100 district level male basketball players (Ave. age 21.92 yrs.) were selected as sample. The sample was collected through convenience sampling method. Sports Competitive Anxiety Test (SCAT) constructed and s...

  5. Effect of cluster-shell competition of $^{12}$C on $E0$ transitions in $^{16}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuno, H

    2016-01-01

    In $^{16}$O, we investigate the relation between the $E0$ monopole transition matrix elements and cluster-shell competition using antisymmetrized quasi cluster model (AQCM), where the dissolution of $alpha$ clusters into quasi clusters due to the effect of the spin-orbit force is introduced. We focus on the structure change when the strength of the spin-orbit force is varied. The ground state dominantly has a compact four $alpha$ structure (doubly magic structure of the $p$ shell), which is rather independent of the strength. However the first excited state ($0_2^+$) has $^{12}$C$+alpha$ cluster structure and this state is largely affected by the increase of the strength; the subclosure configuration of the $p_{3/2}$ shell for the $^{12}$C cluster part becomes more important than three $alpha$ configuration. The $E0$ transition from the ground state with compact four $alpha$ configuration to the $0^+_2$ state with $^{12}$C$+alpha$ cluster configuration is suppressed when increasing the spin-orbit strength. Al...

  6. Effects of increasing and decreasing physiological arousal on anticipation timing performance during competition and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Smith, Mike; Bryant, Elizabeth; Eyre, Emma; Cook, Kathryn; Hankey, Joanne; Tallis, Jason; Clarke, Neil; Jones, Marc V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the effects of changes in physiological arousal on timing performance can be accurately predicted by the catastrophe model. Eighteen young adults (8 males, 10 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethical approval. After familiarisation, coincidence anticipation was measured using the Bassin Anticipation Timer under four incremental exercise conditions: Increasing exercise intensity and low cognitive anxiety, increasing exercise intensity and high cognitive anxiety, decreasing exercise intensity and low cognitive anxiety and decreasing exercise intensity and high cognitive anxiety. Incremental exercise was performed on a treadmill at intensities of 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% heart rate reserve (HRR) respectively. Ratings of cognitive anxiety were taken at each intensity using the Mental Readiness Form 3 (MRF3) followed by performance of coincidence anticipation trials at speeds of 3 and 8 mph. Results indicated significant condition × intensity interactions for absolute error (AE; p = .0001) and MRF cognitive anxiety intensity scores (p = .05). Post hoc analysis indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in AE across exercise intensities in low-cognitive anxiety conditions. In high-cognitive anxiety conditions, timing performance AE was significantly poorer and cognitive anxiety higher at 90% HRR, compared to the other exercise intensities. There was no difference in timing responses at 90% HRR during competitive trials, irrespective of whether exercise intensity was increasing or decreasing. This study suggests that anticipation timing performance is negatively affected when physiological arousal and cognitive anxiety are high. PMID:25469534

  7. Linking soil moisture with chemical quality of soil organic matter to evaluate belowground carbon storage in savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, N.; Okin, G. S.; O'Donnell, F. C.; D'Odorico, P.; Meyer, T.; Dintwe, K.; Caylor, K. K.; Kim, S.; Ringrose, S.

    2010-12-01

    Belowground carbon storage is a function of soil organic carbon content and soil respiration, and both of these factors are profoundly influenced by soil moisture. Soil organic matter (SOM) comprises a broad pool, including labile plant residues, microbial biomass and more biologically recalcitrant humic substances. Water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) represents the active fraction of SOM that becomes available for decomposition during wetting, and the chemical quality of WEOC provides information about its biodegradability. Under conditions of decreasing soil moisture, both the SOC pool and soil respiration are expected to decrease, but depending on the rates of both the net effect on soil carbon storage is unclear. Therefore, in the semiarid savanna ecosystem, the influence of WEOC chemical quality on SOM mineralization and soil respiration may be extremely important. In this study, we address this notion by comparing SOC content, C:N ratios, and SOM quality at two savanna sites in the Kalahari Desert, Botswana with contrasting soil moisture content. We present new results showing higher SOC content and more humified SOC in the wetter savanna site. Evidence from UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy also suggests that at the drier site, there is great contrast with respect to the degree of humification in soils beneath and between canopy than at the wetter site. The WEOC at both sites also contains a substantial amount of amino acid-like fluorescence (Fig. 1) that may be derived from microbial biomass. Our SOM characterization at these two sites is being applied in SOC dynamics model validation. We will also discuss the implications of our findings for belowground C sequestration in light of projected climate change for the region. Fig 1. Representative fluorescence excitation emission matrices from WEOC under A. mellifera canopy (top) and bare ground (bottom) at the dry savanna site.

  8. Competition as an Effective Tool in Developing Social Marketing Programs: Driving Behavior Change through Online Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina ŞERBAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, social marketing practices represent an important part of people’s lives. Consumers’ understanding of the need for change has become the top priority for social organizations worldwide. As a result, the number of social marketing programs has increased, making people reflect more on their behaviors and on the need to take action. Competition in social marketing can bring many benefits. The more programs initiated, the more people will start to involve in society’s problems, hereby contributing to beneficial causes. However, social organizations are in the search for competitive advantages to differentiate them on the market. This paper aims to present the role of online communication in driving competitive advantage for social organizations. Using the structural equation model, the paper describes the relations between four characteristics of the online communication: credibility, attractiveness, persuasion and promotion and then presents the correlations between these variables and website competitiveness. The resulting model shows that owning a competitive advantage in social marketing can bring many advantages to both the non-profit organization and the consumer. Therefore, the online environment can be considered a good solution for better serving consumers’ social needs. Its contribution is significant especially in programs for children and adolescents, since teenagers spend more time on the Internet than adults and are more open to using the online channels of communication. In conclusion, this article opens new opportunities for social marketers to address society’s problems and supports the integration of the online communication tools in the competition strategy.

  9. Belowground carbon trade among tall trees in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Körner, Christian

    2016-04-15

    Forest trees compete for light and soil resources, but photoassimilates, once produced in the foliage, are not considered to be exchanged between individuals. Applying stable carbon isotope labeling at the canopy scale, we show that carbon assimilated by 40-meter-tall spruce is traded over to neighboring beech, larch, and pine via overlapping root spheres. Isotope mixing signals indicate that the interspecific, bidirectional transfer, assisted by common ectomycorrhiza networks, accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon (about 280 kilograms per hectare per year tree-to-tree transfer). Although competition for resources is commonly considered as the dominant tree-to-tree interaction in forests, trees may interact in more complex ways, including substantial carbon exchange. PMID:27081070

  10. Remittances and competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bayangos, V.B.; Jansen, K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper looks at the impact of workers' remittances on the competitiveness of the receiving economy. It extends existing research that concentrated on the exchange rate effects of remittances, the so-called Dutch disease effect, by adding labour market effects. The results show that the labour market effects of emigration and remittances have a significant impact on competitiveness that goes beyond the traditional exchange rate effect.

  11. External Costs and Benefits of Energy. Methodologies, Results and Effects on Renewable Energies Competitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study attempts to give a summarised vision of the concept of eternality in energy production, the social and economic usefulness of its evaluation and consideration as support to the political decision-marking in environmental regulation matters, technologies selection of new plants, priorities establishment on energy plans, etc. More relevant environmental externalisation are described, as are the effects on the health, ecosystems, materials and climate, as well as some of the socioeconomic externalisation such as the employment, increase of the GDP and the reduction and depletion of energy resources. Different methodologies used during the last years have been reviewed as well as the principals resulted obtained in the most relevant studies accomplished internationally on this topic. Special mention has deserved the European study National Implementation of the Extern E Methodology in the EU. Results obtained are represented in Table 2 of this study. Also they are exposed, in a summarised way, the results obtained in the evaluation of environmental externalisation of the Spanish electrical system in function of the fuel cycle. In this last case the obtained results are more approximated since have been obtained by extrapolation from the obtained for ten representative plants geographically distributed trough the Peninsula. Finally it has been analysed the influence that the internalization of the external costs of conventional energies can have in the competitiveness and in te market of renewable energy, those which originate less environmental effects and therefore produce much smaller external costs. The mechanisms of internalization and the consideration on the convenience or not of their incorporation in the price of energy have been also discussed. (Author) 30 refs

  12. The Impact of Supply Chain Management Practices on Supply Chain Performance in Jordan: The Moderating Effect of Competitive Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Bahjat Abdallah; Bader Yousef Obeidat; Noor Osama Aqqad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the impact of supply chain management practices on supply chainperformance in terms of supply chain efficiency and supply chain effectiveness. Additionally, we investigate themoderating effect of competitive intensity on the relationship between supply chain management practices andsupply chain performance. Data for this research were collected from 104 manufacturing companies in Jordan.Hierarchical regressions were used to test the hypothesized relationsh...

  13. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  14. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  15. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces. PMID:26794230

  16. The effect of nitrogen addition on biomass production and competition in three expansive tall grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large increase of grasses Calamagrostis epigejos, Bromus inermis and Brachypodium pinnatum has often been observed in many regions enriched by higher nitrogen (N) wet deposition inputs. Competitive relationships between these grasses under enhanced N loads have not yet been studied. Therefore an outdoor experiment was established which involved monocultures of Calamagrostis, Bromus and Brachypodium and their 1:1 mixtures in containers under two N treatments, i.e., unfertilized and fertilized (+50 kg N ha−1). In monocultures, the total aboveground biomass of Calamagrostis, Bromus and Brachypodium were 1.1, 3.6 and 2.5 times higher respectively due to enhanced N fertilization. Relative crowding and aggressivity coefficients indicate that Calamagrostis and Bromus dominate when mixed with Brachypodium at both levels of N availability. When mixed with Bromus, Calamagrostis is the poorer competitor at lower N loads, however, it can be dominating in N fertilized treatments. - Highlights: ► A large increase of tall grasses has often been observed in many ecosystems. ► Data on competitive relationships between grasses were investigated. ► Competition indices indicate that Calamagrostis and Bromus dominate in mixtures with Brachypodium. ► Calamagrostis is a better competitor when mixed with Bromus but only at higher N loads. ► N deposition may play a critical role in the expansion and persistence of grasses in the landscape. - Competition abilities of Calamagrostis and Bromus were greater than Brachypodium and the competitive superiority of Calamagrostis to Bromus was in N rich substrate.

  17. Interspecific competition effects on phosphorus accumulation by Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Zhang; Zhengwen Liu

    2011-01-01

    The competition between submersed plants has been recognized as an important factor influencing the structure of plant communities in shallow lakes.The ability of different species to take up and store nutrients from the surrounding ambience varies,and hence plant community structure might be expected to affect the cycling of nutrients in lake ecosystems.In this study,the uptake of phosphorus by Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria natans was studied and compared in monoculture and competitive mixed-culture plantings.Results showed that for both studied species the phosphorus concentrations of different tissues and of whole plants was unaffected by competition.However,the quantity of phosphorus accumulated by whole plants of H.verticillata was significantly higher in mixture culture than in monoculture,while that of V.natans was lower in the mixed culture.The results indicated that H.verticillata has a competitive advantage over V.natant,when the two species are grown in competition,and is able to accumulate a greater quantity of phosphorus.

  18. The Effect of TQM Practices on Corporate Performance and Competitive Advantage as Mediating Variable: Study at Manufacturing Companies in Makassar, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Munizu, Musran

    2013-01-01

    This study conducts a comprehensive review of the literature and develops a framework that links among TQM practices, competitive advantage, and corporate performance. The paper provides empirical support for direct and indirect effects of TQM practices on competitive advantage and corporate performance. The purpose of this research is to empirically investigate the impact of TQM practices on competitive advantage and corporate performance.The study utilized primary data obtained from a quest...

  19. Competitive intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Matsenko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Competitive intelligence (CI) helps company to make right strategic decision in uncertain competitive environment. Many companies do different kinds of marketing research, but still have not adopted CI tools yet, especially in those countries where they have just started to implement instruments of free market economy. This could be related to Russian situation. The thesis is organized into three chapters. Competitive intelligence theory is explained in the first chapter. In the second chapte...

  20. Plant Host Species and Geographic Distance Affect the Structure of Aboveground Fungal Symbiont Communities, and Environmental Filtering Affects Belowground Communities in a Coastal Dune Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Aaron S; Seabloom, Eric W; May, Georgiana

    2016-05-01

    Microbial symbionts inhabit tissues of all plants and animals. Their community composition depends largely on two ecological processes: (1) filtering by abiotic conditions and host species determining the environments that symbionts are able to colonize and (2) dispersal-limitation determining the pool of symbionts available to colonize a given host and community spatial structure. In plants, the above- and belowground tissues represent such distinct habitats for symbionts that we expect different effects of filtering and spatial structuring on their symbiont communities. In this study, we characterized above- and belowground communities of fungal endophytes-fungi living asymptomatically within plants-to understand the contributions of filtering and spatial structure to endophyte community composition. We used a culture-based approach to characterize endophytes growing in leaves and roots of three species of coastal beachgrasses in dunes of the USA Pacific Northwest. For leaves, endophyte isolation frequency and OTU richness depended primarily on plant host species. In comparison, for roots, both isolation frequency and OTU richness increased from the nutrient-poor front of the dune to the higher-nutrient backdune. Endophyte community composition in leaves exhibited a distance-decay relationship across the region. In a laboratory assay, faster growth rates and lower spore production were more often associated with leaf- than root-inhabiting endophytes. Overall, our results reveal a greater importance of biotic filtering by host species and dispersal-limitation over regional geographic distances for aboveground leaf endophyte communities and stronger effects of abiotic environmental filtering and locally patchy distributions for belowground root endophyte communities. PMID:26626912

  1. Decreased Empathic Responses to the 'Lucky Guy' in Love: The Effect of Intrasexual Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Zhang, Fangxiao; Wei, Chunli; Xu, Jialin; Wang, Qianfeng; Zhu, Lei; Roberts, Ian D; Guo, Xiuyan

    2016-01-01

    People have a greater desire to date highly attractive partners, which induces intrasexual competition between same-sex individuals. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether and how intrasexual competition modulates pain empathy for a same-sex rival and the underlying neural mechanism. Participants were scanned while processing the pain of a same-sex 'lucky guy' who had an attractive partner and one with a plain partner. The results revealed that participants reported lower pain intensity for the lucky guy. Neurally, reduced pain-related activations in anterior insula and anterior mid-cingulate cortex and increased activations in right superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and medial prefrontal gyrus (MPFC) were found for the lucky guy compared to the one with a plain partner. Right SFG and MPFC activations could predict participants' subsequent pain intensity ratings for the lucky guy. These findings suggest intrasexual competition can modulate normal empathic responses. PMID:27242579

  2. Decreased Empathic Responses to the ‘Lucky Guy’ in Love: The Effect of Intrasexual Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Wei, Chunli; Xu, Jialin; Wang, Qianfeng; Zhu, Lei; Roberts, Ian D.; Guo, Xiuyan

    2016-01-01

    People have a greater desire to date highly attractive partners, which induces intrasexual competition between same-sex individuals. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether and how intrasexual competition modulates pain empathy for a same-sex rival and the underlying neural mechanism. Participants were scanned while processing the pain of a same-sex ‘lucky guy’ who had an attractive partner and one with a plain partner. The results revealed that participants reported lower pain intensity for the lucky guy. Neurally, reduced pain-related activations in anterior insula and anterior mid-cingulate cortex and increased activations in right superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and medial prefrontal gyrus (MPFC) were found for the lucky guy compared to the one with a plain partner. Right SFG and MPFC activations could predict participants’ subsequent pain intensity ratings for the lucky guy. These findings suggest intrasexual competition can modulate normal empathic responses. PMID:27242579

  3. THE EFFECT OF SPORT COMPETITION ON SALIVARY STEROIDS IN AMATEUR FEMALE KARATE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Azarbayjani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was to investigate the impact of repeated competition on salivary cortisol and DHEA-S in amateur women karate athletes. We recruited 20 young elite female karate fighters [height 158 ± 7 cm (mean ± S.D., weight 59.5 ± 10.9 kg, age 21.1 ± 3.0 years], who were placed first till fourth in the Iranian championship tournament. Five ml of unstimulated whole saliva was collected 30-min before and 5 - min after first and last match in competition and analyzed for cortisol and DHEA-S concentrations. The results showed that participation in competition resulted in significantly increased saliva cortisol level (p 0.05. Significant differences insalivary steroids were not different between winners and losers (p > 0.05. The results of present study show that salivary cortisol concentration is a suitable index for showing competing stress.

  4. THE INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION EFFECTS ON GRASS PRODUCTIVITY OF DACTYLIS GLOMERATA L. AND LOLIUM PERENNE L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. RAZEC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the intraspecific competition and its influence on these species, Dactilys glomerata and Lolium perene were cropped in pure culture and mixtures.Research was carried out at ICDP Brasov, on a chernozem soil, well supplied in NPK minerals. Dressing was uniform for both crops and it consists in 100 kg N/ha applied integrally in spring, 50 kg P2O5/ha and 50 kg K2O/ha applied at the crop establishment. To asses the competition between these species it was determined the number of tillers, dynamic of tiller formation, morphological structure of tillers, specific weight, dynamic of DM accumulation during the first growth and vegetation period. It showed the existence of higher intraspecific competition for an only variety. Variety mixtures contribute at the better utilization of nutrition surface and improvement of photosynthetic efficiency, which influences the biomass production.

  5. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  6. Adsorption of divalent metals to metal oxide nanoparicles: Competitive and temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Valerie Ann

    The presence of metals in natural waters is becoming a critical environmental and public health concern. Emerging nanotechnology and the use of metal oxide nanoparticles has been identified as a potential remediation technique in removing metals from water. However, practical applications are still being explored to determine how to apply their unique chemical and physical properties for full scale remediation projects. This thesis investigates the sorption properties of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) to hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in single- and binary-adsorbate systems. Competitive sorption was evaluated in 1L batch binary-metal systems with 0.05g/L nano-hematite at pH 8.0 and pH 6.0. Results indicate that the presence of a secondary metal can affect the sorption process depending upon the molar ratios, such as increased or reduced adsorption. Thermodynamic properties were also studied in order to better understand the effects of temperature on equilibrium and kinetic adsorption capabilities. Understanding the thermodynamic properties can also give insight to determine if the sorption process is a physical, chemical or ion exchange reaction. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (DeltaH), entropy (DeltaS), and Gibbs free energy (DeltaG) were evaluated as a function of temperature, pH, and metal concentration. Results indicate that Pb(II) and Cu(II) adsorption to nano-hematite was an endothermic and physical adsorption process, while Zn(II) and Cd(II) adsorption was dependent upon the adsorbed concentration evaluated. However, metal adsorptions to nano-titanium dioxide were all found to be endothermic and physical adsorption processes; the spontaneity of metal adsorption was temperature dependent for both metal oxide nanoparticles.

  7. The Comparative Effect of Using Competitive and Cooperative Learning on the Reading Comprehension of Introvert and Extrovert EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touran Ahour

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to investigate the effect of two types of learning, competitive and cooperative, on the reading comprehension of introvert and extrovert EFL learners. To this end, 120 learners studying at Marefat English Language Institute in Tehran, Iran were selected, after taking a Preliminary English Test (PET, to participate in this quasi-experimental research. The participants  also answered the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI to categorize them into two personality types of introverts and extroverts. Therefore, there were four subgroups: 30 introverts and 30 extroverts undergoing the cooperative learning treatment, and 30 introverts and 30 extroverts experiencing the competitive learning treatment. The reading part of the PET was administered as the posttest of the study after each group was exposed to the treatment for 18 sessions in seven weeks. A two-way ANOVA was run on the collected data in the posttest of four groups. The results revealed that while learners generally outperformed in the competitive setting compared to the cooperative one, the extrovert was better off receiving cooperative instruction. Moreover, introverts excelled extroverts in the competitive group. However, there was no difference between the two personality groups in the cooperative situation.  

  8. THE INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION EFFECTS ON GRASS PRODUCTIVITY OF DACTYLIS GLOMERATA L. AND LOLIUM PERENNE L.

    OpenAIRE

    I. RAZEC; MARIA RAZEC; Neagu, M; VALUCA MICU

    2013-01-01

    To study the intraspecific competition and its influence on these species, Dactilys glomerata and Lolium perene were cropped in pure culture and mixtures.Research was carried out at ICDP Brasov, on a chernozem soil, well supplied in NPK minerals. Dressing was uniform for both crops and it consists in 100 kg N/ha applied integrally in spring, 50 kg P2O5/ha and 50 kg K2O/ha applied at the crop establishment. To asses the competition between these species it was determined the number of tillers,...

  9. Endophytic benefit for a competitive host is neutralized by increasing ratios of infected plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lianjie; Ren, Anzhi; Jing, Yuanfang; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Xinyu; Qin, Junhua; Gao, Yubao

    2016-01-01

    Leaf endophytes such as Epichloë can affect the competitive ability of host grasses, but the reported responses are inconsistent. We hypothesized that this inconsistency is caused, at least in part, by the following two aspects. One is that a competitive advantage might occur as a result of an increase in storage compounds for both growth and defense. Another is that the effect of the endophyte might be related to both water availability and host density. In a greenhouse experiment, we compared the competitive abilities of endophyte-infected (EI) and endophyte-free (EF) Leymus chinensis, a dominant grass native to the Inner Mongolia Steppe of China, subjected to ten treatments comprised of a factorial combination of two levels of water availability (well-watered and drought) and five proportions of EI to EF plants (12:0, 4:8, 6:6, 8:4, 0:12). The results showed that the competitive ability of EI plants was higher than that of EF under drought. Here, greater belowground biomass and water use efficiency might contribute to better competitiveness of EI plants. When competing under well-watered conditions, endophyte infection did not provide a benefit to the host plant in biomass accumulation, but more carbon was allocated to defense (total phenolics) in EI plants. This scenario could help EI plants suffer less damage than EF when exposed to herbivores in natural habitats. The competitive ability of EI plants was regulated by EI:EF ratios. Competitive ability of EI plants was higher than that of EF plants in mixtures with lower numbers of EI plants, but the beneficial effect of endophyte infection was neutralized in mixtures with higher numbers of EI plants. Overall, endophyte infection improved the competitive ability of the host under either drought or well-watered conditions but in the presence of herbivore, only this benefit was neutralized by increasing ratios of EI plants. We suspect that both the conditional beneficial effects and stabilizing effects of density

  10. Screening of Highly Effective Sinorhizobium meliloti Strains for 'Vector' Alfalfa and Testing of Its Competitive Nodulation Ability in the Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhao-Hai; CHEN Wen-Xin; HU Yue-Gao; SUI Xin-Hua; CHEN Dan-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Seventeen Sinorhizobium meliloti strains from seven provinces in China were used to screen highly effective strains for alfalfa cultivar in a greenhouse study and their symbiotic relationship and competitive ability were studied in the field.CCBAU30138 was the most effective strain,as evidenced by increase in dry weights.A field experiment showed that the inoculation of alfalfa with CCBAU30138 resulted in increases of 11.9%and 19.6%of dry matter production and crude protein production,respectively,in forage of monocultured plants.The total dry matter yields of alfalfa and tall fescue in binary culture were increased by 16.3%by inoculation of alfalfa with this strain.These results showed that S.Meliloti strain CCBAU30138 was an effective inoculant both in the greenhouse and in the field.The analysis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD)by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)from nodule extracts showed that the strain CCBAU30138 had high competitiveness in the field.It occupied 47.5%of nodules in alfalfa monoculture and 44.4% of nodules in alfalfa-tall fescue binary culture after 20 weeks of growth.In conclusion,a simple system to select highly effective and competitive symbiotic strains specific to alfalfa was established.Using this system.A strain suitable for the alfalfa cultivar'Vector’grown in Wuqiao County of Hebei Province was obtained.

  11. Adsorption of carbamazepine by carbon nanotubes: Effects of DOM introduction and competition with phenanthrene and bisphenol A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes, organic contaminants and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are co-introduced into the environment. Thus, the interactions between these components have to be evaluated to better understand their environmental behavior. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were used as sorbent, carbamazepine was the primary adsorbate, and bisphenol A and phenanthrene were used as competitors. Strong competition with bisphenol A and no effect of phenanthrene on adsorption of carbamazepine was obtained. The hydrophobic neutral fraction of the DOM exhibited the strongest reductive effect on carbamazepine adsorption, most probably due to interactions in solution. In contrast, the hydrophobic acid fraction decreased carbamazepine adsorption mainly via direct competition. When DOM and bisphenol A were co-introduced, the adsorption of carbamazepine was significantly reduced. This study suggests that the chemical nature of DOM can significantly affect the sorptive behavior of polar organic pollutants with carbon nanotubes when all are introduced to the aquatic system. Highlights: •Bisphenol A is an efficient competitor for carbamazepine. •Phenanthrene does not compete with carbamazepine. •DOM exhibited strong reductive effect on carbamazepine adsorption by SWCNTs. •HoN fraction decreased carbamazepine adsorption due to interactions in solution. •HoA fraction decreased carbamazepine adsorption via direct competition. -- In multi-component system including the main adsorbate and competitor, DOM exhibited significant effect on adsorption of contaminants by carbon nanotubes

  12. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    OpenAIRE

    L. E. O. C. Aragão; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D.B; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; E. Jiménez; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; N. Salinas; O. L. Phillips; L. O. Anderson; Alvarez, E.; T. R. Baker; P. H. Goncalvez; J. Huamán-Ovalle

    2009-01-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quanti...

  13. Below-ground herbivory limits induction of extrafloral nectar by above-ground herbivores

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants produce extrafloral nectar (EFN), and increase production following above-ground herbivory, presumably to attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Below-ground herbivores, alone or in combination with those above ground, may also alter EFN production depending on the specificity of this defence response and the interactions among herbivores mediated through plant defences. To date, however, a lack of manipulative experiments investigating EFN production induc...

  14. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities at fagus stands in differently polluted forest research plots

    OpenAIRE

    Al Sayegh-Petkovšek, Samar

    2005-01-01

    Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities at fagus stands were analysed. Eectomycorrhiza types were identified in soil cores from differently polluted beech forest research plots in the 1998 - 2001 period by mycobioindication method. Forest research plots were situated in the vicinity of thermal power plants (polluted plots: Zavodnje - Prednji vrh and Zasavje - Dobovec) and in unpolluted areas (in the vicinity of Kočevska Reka: Preža and Moravške gredice). Eighty-eight different ectomyco...

  15. Above- and belowground antifungal resistance in maize: aspects of organ-specific defense

    OpenAIRE

    Balmer, Dirk; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola causes devastating anthracnose on maize (Zea mays) and is responsible for annual losses of up to 1 billion dollars in the U.S. A key factor for its success is the capability to infect different plant organs. The predominant symptoms are leaf blight and stalk rot, but C. graminicola also infects roots. The vast majority of phytopathological studies were conducted on aerial disease stages, and only little is known about belowground defense re...

  16. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Li; Xugao Wang; Chao Liang; Zhanqing Hao; Lisha Zhou; Sam Ma; Xiaobin Li; Shan Yang; Fei Yao; Yong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We do...

  17. Competitive effects and instruments of power sector reforms. International reform concepts blockade structures, risk distribution. A political economy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power sectors with weak or inadequate competition structures are the rule, despite numerous attempts at reform. But can afford modern economies this defect for a long time? Why can the implementation of competition are blocked so effectively? The author studied international reform experiences and opens up interesting insights that can also reflect on problems of the German energy turnaround: The difficulty of timing and coordination of the reform components, the development of resistance levels of individual interest groups, breach of contract as a rational alternative, causes unwanted price effects, shifting interest situations of major stakeholders, change dynamics impending regulatory risks, pending financing risks, stranded cost-conflict situations for power stations disconnected from the grid and facilities and instruments of a political and regulatory risk management for reforms. With numerous examples, background analyzes and instruments to reform analysis, this book is aimed at investors, policy planners and analysts.

  18. Competition, Ownership and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baghdasaryan, Delia; la Cour, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical results support two concurrent views regarding the mediating role that ownership structure might play on the effect of competition on firm performance. According to one stream of literature, competition has a high, positive impact in companies that have an effective ownership structure....... On the contrary, inferences based on the x-inefficiency literature suggest the highest positive effect will be experienced by companies with inappropriate ownership structure. Our empirical analysis on a panel of Czech firms shows that the former view is supported if import competition is high...

  19. Above- and below-ground responses of Calamagrostis purpurea to UV-B radiation and elevated CO{sub 2} under phosphorus limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussell, J.S.; Gwynn-Jones, D.; Griffith, G.W.; Scullion, J. (Aberystwyth Univ., IBERS, Wales (United Kingdom))

    2012-08-15

    UV-B radiation and elevated CO{sub 2} may impact rhizosphere processes through altered below-ground plant resource allocation and root exudation, changes that may have implications for nutrient acquisition. As nutrients limit plant growth in many habitats, their supply may dictate plant response under elevated CO{sub 2}. This study investigated UV-B exposure and elevated CO{sub 2} effects, including interactions, on plant growth, tissue chemistry and rooting responses relating to P acquisition. The sub-arctic grass Calamagrostis purpurea was subjected to UV-B (0 or 3.04 kJ m-2day-1) and CO{sub 2} (ambient 380 or 650 ppmv) treatments in a factorial glasshouse experiment, with sparingly soluble P (0 or 0.152 mg P per plant as FePO{sub 4}) a further factor. It was hypothesized that UV-B exposure and elevated CO{sub 2} would change plant resource allocation, with CO{sub 2} mitigating adverse responses to UV-B exposure and aiding P uptake. Plant biomass and morphology, tissue composition and rhizosphere leachate properties were measured. UV-B directly affected chemical composition of shoots and interacted with CO{sub 2} to give a greater root biomass. Elevated CO{sub 2} altered the composition of both shoots and roots and increased shoot biomass and secondary root length, while leachate pH decreased. Below-ground responses to CO{sub 2} did not affect P acquisition although P limitation progressively reduced leachate pH and increased secondary root length. Although direct plant growth, foliar composition and below-ground nutrient acquisition responses were dominated by CO{sub 2} treatments, UV-B modified these CO{sub 2} responses significantly. These interactions have implications for plant responses to future atmospheric conditions. (Author)

  20. Competitiveness factors

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Liliana-Viorica

    2012-01-01

    Porter's theory supports the idea that, despite the globalization of production and trade, the competitive advantage is created in a national framework, nations, through their institutional, natural, cultural, economic characteristics ultimately determining the development of certain economic activities. The factors considered by Porter as determinants for the competitive advantage are grouped in four categories, the linkages between them being important as well

  1. Pop competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Cellino; Anna Soci

    2002-01-01

    Very few economic terms are used as much as competitiveness in economics. This article deals with the different meanings of competitiveness, at the level of a firm, at the level of the local area, and at the level of the country. It analyzes the problems of consistency among the available definitions and among the indicators used to measurecompetitiveness.

  2. Effects of sperm competition on genetic variation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss progeny using microsattelite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Moradyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the variation of spermatozoa traits among three male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss was used to examine how the relative influences of sperm density and duration of sperm motility account for sperm competition success. Sperm competition trial was conducted to study the fertilization ability of sperms from three male rainbow trout. The proportions of larvae sired by different males were quantified using DNA microsatellite analysis. Larvae sired by male number 2 dominated the offsprings this male sired 56% and 48% of the offspring checked in the paternity test using OMM1036 and Ocl8 loci respectively. Microsatellite DNA fingerprinting revealed that duration of sperm motility was conducive to sperm competition success. There was no significant relationship between fertilization success and either relative sperm count or duration of sperm motility sperm count showed an inverse relationship with competition success (P95% when sufficient numbers (107 of spermatozoa per egg were used. Therefore, the fertilization success did not depend on whether sperm from one, or from a mixture of more males were used.

  3. Market Competition in Upper Secondary Education: Perceived Effects on Teachers' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Ulf; Holm, Ann-Sofie

    2011-01-01

    The development and expansion of market solutions is one of the most important changes in Swedish education in the last 30 years. The aim of the article is to describe and analyse how students and staff in upper secondary schools perceive the impact of market competition on teachers' work. Three groups of actors in two Swedish regions were…

  4. The effect of credit rationing on the shape of the competition-innovation relationship

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bena, Jan

    -, č. 377 (2008), s. 1-48. ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : competition * research and development * innovation Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp377.pdf

  5. Effect of phenology on agonistic competitive interactions between invasive and native sheet-web spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Jeremy D.; Porter, Adam H.; Ginsberg, Howard; Jakob, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The phenologies of introduced relative to native species can greatly influence the degree and symmetry of competition between them. The European spider Linyphia triangularis (Clerck, 1757) (Linyphiidae) reaches very high densities in coastal Maine (USA). Previous studies suggest thatL. triangularis negatively affects native linyphiid species, with competition for webs as one mechanism. We documented phenological differences between L. triangularis and three native species that illustrate the potential for the reversal of size-based competitive advantage over the course of the year. To test whether relative size influences interaction outcome, we allowed a resident spider to build a web and then introduced an intruder. We examined whether the outcomes of agonistic interactions over the webs were influenced by the species of the resident (invasive or native), the relative size of the contestants, and the species × size interaction. We found that the importance of relative size differed among species. In interactions between L. triangularis and each of two native species, size played a greater role than resident species on the outcome of interactions, suggesting that competitive advantage reverses over the season based on phenology-related size differences. Linyphia triangularis had a negative impact on the third species regardless of relative size.

  6. Bank Bailouts, Competition, and the Disparate Effects for Borrower and Depositor Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Calderon, Cesar; Schaeck, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how government interventions into banking systems such as blanket guarantees, liquidity support, recapitalizations, and nationalizations affect banking competition. This debate is important because the pricing of banking products has implications for borrower and depositor welfare. Exploiting data for 124 countries that witnessed different policy responses to 41 ban...

  7. QuikSCience: Effective Linkage of Competitive, Cooperative, and Service Learning in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Judith D.; Bishop, Kristina; Walters, Howard

    2010-01-01

    The QuikSCience Challenge science education program combines a cooperative team project emphasizing community service with an academic competition for middle and high school students. The program aims to develop leadership abilities, motivate interest in ocean sciences, engage students in community service and environmental stewardship, and…

  8. STEM Clubs and Science Fair Competitions: Effects on Post-Secondary Matriculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Alpaslan

    2013-01-01

    As the global economic competition gets tougher, American policymakers and researchers are interested in finding ways to increase the number of students pursuing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)-related majors in order for the United States to continue its role as an economic powerhouse. A survey study was employed to…

  9. The Effects of Railway Investments in a Polycentric City: A Comparison of Competitive and Segmented Land Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Debrezion, G.; Pels, E.; Rietveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    The paper analyzes the effect of railway investment on land prices and land use in a polycentric city under various regulatory regimes of land markets. The introduction of a fast mode of transport (train), accessible in discrete locations, leads to an increase in city size. The stations of the fast mode induce dense residential settlements in their vicinity. As a result, the average residential and commercial land rents increase in both competitive and segmented land-market situations, compar...

  10. Effectiveness of 14-15 years old tennis players’ competition functioning considering correction of their psychological fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Makuts T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to determination influence of individualized psychological training on effectiveness of 14-15 years old tennis players’ competition functioning. Material: in the research 24 tennis players of 14-15 years’ age participated. Individualized psychological training consisted of 15 sessions of total duration of 1.5 months. Results: We substantiated necessity of individualized approach to tennis players’ psychological training. Individual psychological profiles for tennis players, which det...

  11. The Comparative Effect of Using Competitive and Cooperative Learning on the Reading Comprehension of Introvert and Extrovert EFL Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Touran Ahour; Pezhman Nourzad Haradasht

    2014-01-01

    This study was an attempt to investigate the effect of two types of learning, competitive and cooperative, on the reading comprehension of introvert and extrovert EFL learners. To this end, 120 learners studying at Marefat English Language Institute in Tehran, Iran were selected, after taking a Preliminary English Test (PET), to participate in this quasi-experimental research. The participants  also answered the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) to categorize them into two personality types...

  12. Extinction in periodic competitive stage-structured Lotka-Volterra model with the effects of toxic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Chen, Fengde

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a periodic competitive stage-structured Lotka-Volterra model with the effects of toxic substances. It is shown that toxic substances play an important role in the extinction of species. We obtain a set of sufficient conditions which guarantee that one of the components is driven to extinction while the other is globally attractive. The numerical simulation of an example verifies our main results.

  13. Effect of naloxone on food competition aggression in food-restricted high and low aggression pigeons (Columba livia)

    OpenAIRE

    Fachinelli C.; Torrecillas M.; Rodríguez Echandía E.L.

    2004-01-01

    We determined the effect of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone on aggression, emotion, feeder control, and eating behavior in high and low aggression female pigeons maintained at 80% of their normal weight and exposed to food competition interactions. Pigeons were divided into pairs by previously ranked high aggression (total time spent in offensive aggression exceeding 60 s/5 min; N = 6 pairs) and low aggression females (time spent in offensive aggression less than 10 s/5 min; N = 6 pai...

  14. Effects of state anxiety on music performance: Relationship between the Revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 subscales and piano performanc

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshie, M.; Shigemasu, K.; Kudo, K.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the Revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2R, Cox, Martens, & Russell, 2003; Jones & Swain, 1992; Martens, Vealey, & Burton, 1990) subscales and the quality of music performance to compare the anxiety-performance relationship in pianists with that in athletes and to gain insights into the effective coping strategies for music performance anxiety (MPA). Fifty one students (15 women and 36 men) aged 18-26 years (M = 20.6, SD = 2.3) ...

  15. The Effect of Information Technology on Competitive Advantage: Case of Food and Beverage Industry in South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Munizu, Musran

    2013-01-01

    This study attempt to investigate the effect of Information Technology (IT) on competitive advantage, especially food and beverage industry in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The research use survey approach and data was collected by questionnaire. The unit of analysis is big and medium scale companies. The respondents this research are the managers of companies. There were 126 companies were surveyed and total of 100 completed questionnaires were returned as the final sample. Two hypotheses have ...

  16. Effects of Entrepreneurship, Organization Capability, Strategic Decision Making and Innovation toward the Competitive Advantage of SMEs Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Boonthawan Wingwon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of entrepreneurship, organization capability, the strategic decision making and the innovation toward the competitive advantage of SME’s enterprise research was the quantitative research by using questionnaire as the research tools in collecting and compiling data from 596 small and medium business entrepreneurs in 4 provinces, i.e. Chiangrai, Chiangmai, Lamphun and Lampang province in Northern region. The data analysis was conducted by applying descriptive statistics of frequency,...

  17. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    OpenAIRE

    Viktória B-Béres; Gábor Vasas; Dalma Dobronoki; Sándor Gonda; Sándor Alex Nagy; István Bácsi

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were test...

  18. Belowground carbon allocation dynamics in changing environments: insights from in situ pulse labeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, M.

    2012-12-01

    Belowground carbon (C) allocation is a key process in ecosystems: it plays an important role for plant C storage, fuels root metabolism and provides substrates for soil microorganisms, with strong implications for microbial community composition and activity and thus soil organic matter turnover. Belowground C allocation has been well studied in young plants and mesocosms, and as long-term patterns in ecosystems. Much less is known on the short-term dynamics of C allocation in mature plants and ecosystems, which reflect more closely the actual processes underlying observed C allocation patterns and the mechanisms determining responses to changing environmental conditions. C allocation dynamics can best be analyzed with isotopic pulse labeling experiments, which permit a tracing of recently photo-assimilated C to carbohydrate pools, microbial communities and respiratory fluxes. This overview talk will highlight the potential and limitations of in situ isotopic tracer experiments for assessing belowground C allocation dynamics in changing environments, summarize some major recent findings and point towards emerging research questions.

  19. Competition and coexistence between a syntrophic consortium and a metabolic generalist, and its effect on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Simon M; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2016-09-01

    Syntrophic interactions, where species consume metabolites excreted by others, are common in microbial communities, and have uses in synthetic biology. Syntrophy is likely to arise when trade-offs favor an organism that specializes on particular metabolites, rather than all possible metabolites. Several trade-offs have been suggested; however, few models consider different trade-offs to test which are most consistent with observed patterns. Here, we develop a differential equation model to study competition between a syntrophic processing chain, where each microbe can perform one step in metabolizing an initial resource to a final state, and a metabolic generalist that can perform all metabolic functions. We also examine how competition affects the production of the final metabolic compound. We find that competitive outcomes can be predicted by a generalization of the R(⁎)-rule and relative nonlinearity. Therefore, the species that can persist at the lowest resource level is the competitive dominant in a constant environment, and species can coexist by partitioning variation in resources. We derive a simple rule for predicting production rates of the final metabolite, and show that competition may not maximize final metabolite production. We show that processing chains are inherently less efficient, because resources are lost during each step of the process. Our results also suggest which trade-offs are capable of explaining certain empirical observations. For example, processing chains appear to be more common in nutrient-rich environments; our model suggests that a specificity trade-off and an affinity-yield trade-off would not predict this, but a yield-maximum growth trade-off might. PMID:27320679

  20. Existence and stability of almost periodic solutions of nonautonomous competitive systems with weak Allee effect and delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wanqin; Ye, Yuan

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a class of nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra type multispecies competitive systems with weak Allee effect and delays are considered. By using Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence of almost periodic solutions for the Lotka-Volterra system. On the case of no delays of Allee effects, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov function, we get a sufficient condition for the globally attractivity of the almost periodic solution for the Lotka-Volterra system. Moreover, we also present an illustrative example to show the effectiveness of our results.

  1. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils: Effects of soil oxidation, metal sulfides and competitive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) for human nutrition. To find ways of limiting this potential risk, we investigated factors influencing Cd solubility relative to Fe and Zn during pre-harvest drainage of paddy soils, in which soil oxidation is accompanied by the grain-filling stage of rice growth. This was simulated in temperature-controlled 'reaction cell' experiments by first excluding oxygen to incubate soil suspensions anaerobically, then inducing aerobic conditions. In treatments without sulfur addition, the ratios of Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn in solution increased during the aerobic phase while Cd concentrations were unaffected and the Fe and Zn concentrations decreased. However, in treatments with added sulfur (as sulfate), up to 34 % of sulfur (S) was precipitated as sulfide minerals during the anaerobic phase and the Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution during the aerobic phase were lower than for treatments without S addition. When S was added, Cd solubility decreased whereas Fe and Zn were unaffected. When soil was spiked with Zn the Cd:Zn ratio was lower in solution during the aerobic phase, due to higher Zn concentrations. Decreased Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios during the grain filling stage could potentially limit Cd enrichment in paddy rice grain due to competitive ion effects for root uptake. - Research Highlights: → Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase in paddy soil solution during oxidation. → Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase because Fe and Zn concentrations decrease. → Cd concentrations do not change during oxidation. → Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution decrease when Zn is added to soil. → Metal sulfide precipitation lowers Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in soil solution.

  2. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils: Effects of soil oxidation, metal sulfides and competitive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livera, Jennifer de, E-mail: Jennifer.deLivera@adelaide.edu.au [Soil Science, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); McLaughlin, Mike J. [Soil Science, School of Agriculture Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Hettiarachchi, Ganga M. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Department of Agronomy, Kansas state University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Kirby, Jason K. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Beak, Douglas G. [CSIRO Land and Water, Environmental Biogeochemistry Program, Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2011-03-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) for human nutrition. To find ways of limiting this potential risk, we investigated factors influencing Cd solubility relative to Fe and Zn during pre-harvest drainage of paddy soils, in which soil oxidation is accompanied by the grain-filling stage of rice growth. This was simulated in temperature-controlled 'reaction cell' experiments by first excluding oxygen to incubate soil suspensions anaerobically, then inducing aerobic conditions. In treatments without sulfur addition, the ratios of Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn in solution increased during the aerobic phase while Cd concentrations were unaffected and the Fe and Zn concentrations decreased. However, in treatments with added sulfur (as sulfate), up to 34 % of sulfur (S) was precipitated as sulfide minerals during the anaerobic phase and the Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution during the aerobic phase were lower than for treatments without S addition. When S was added, Cd solubility decreased whereas Fe and Zn were unaffected. When soil was spiked with Zn the Cd:Zn ratio was lower in solution during the aerobic phase, due to higher Zn concentrations. Decreased Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios during the grain filling stage could potentially limit Cd enrichment in paddy rice grain due to competitive ion effects for root uptake. - Research Highlights: {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase in paddy soil solution during oxidation. {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios increase because Fe and Zn concentrations decrease. {yields} Cd concentrations do not change during oxidation. {yields} Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution decrease when Zn is added to soil. {yields} Metal sulfide precipitation lowers Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in soil solution.

  3. Advancing Understanding of the Role of Belowground Processes in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks trhrough Ground-Penetrating Radar. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Frank P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Coarse roots play a significant role in belowground carbon cycling and will likely play an increasingly crucial role in belowground carbon sequestration as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to rise, yet they are one of the most difficult ecosystem parameters to quantify. Despite promising results with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) as a nondestructive method of quantifying biomass of coarse roots, this application of GPR is in its infancy and neither the complete potential nor limitations of the technology have been fully evaluated. The primary goals and questions of this study fell into four groups: (1) GPR methods: Can GPR detect change in root biomass over time, differentiate live roots from dead roots, differentiate between coarse roots, fine roots bundled together, and a fine root mat, remain effective with varied soil moisture, and detect shadowed roots (roots hidden below larger roots); (2) CO2 enrichment study at Kennedy Space Center in Brevard County, Florida: Are there post-fire legacy effects of CO2 fertilization on plant carbon pools following the end of CO2application ? (3) Disney Wilderness Study: What is the overall coarse root biomass and potential for belowground carbon storage in a restored longleaf pine flatwoods system? Can GPR effectively quantify coarse roots in soils that are wetter than the previous sites and that have a high percentage of saw palmetto rhizomes present? (4) Can GPR accurately represent root architecture in a three-dimensional model? When the user is familiar with the equipment and software in a setting that minimizes unsuitable conditions, GPR is a relatively precise, non-destructive, useful tool for estimating coarse root biomass. However, there are a number of cautions and guidelines that should be followed to minimize inaccuracies or situations that are untenable for GPR use. GPR appears to be precise as it routinely predicts highly similar values for a given area across multiple

  4. Intraspecific competition in the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria: Effect of rearing density and gender on larval life history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Gibbs

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In insects, the outcome of intraspecific competition for food during development depends primarily upon larval density and larval sex, but effects will also depend on the particular trait under consideration and the species under study. Experimental manipulations of larval densities of a Madeiran population of the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria confirmed that intraspecific competition affected growth. As densities increased P. aegeria adults were smaller and larval development periods were longer. Sexes responded differently to rearing density. Females were more adversely affected by high density than males, resulting in females having smaller masses at pupation. Survivorship was significantly higher for larvae reared at low densities. No density effect on adult sex ratios was observed. Intraspecific competition during the larval stage would appear to carry a higher cost for females than males. This may confer double disadvantage since females are dependent on their larval derived resources for reproduction as they have little opportunity to accumulate additional resources as adults. This suggests that shortages of larval food could affect fecundity directly. Males, however, may be able to compensate for a small size by feeding as adults and/or by altering their mate location tactics.

  5. Effects of competition and cooperation interaction between agents on networks in the presence of a market capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonubi, A.; Arcagni, A.; Stefani, S.; Ausloos, M.

    2016-08-01

    A network effect is introduced taking into account competition, cooperation, and mixed-type interaction among agents along a generalized Verhulst-Lotka-Volterra model. It is also argued that the presence of a market capacity undoubtedly enforces a definite limit on the agent's size growth. The state stability of triadic agents, i.e., the most basic network plaquette, is investigated analytically for possible scenarios, through a fixed-point analysis. It is discovered that: (i) market demand is only satisfied for full competition when one agent monopolizes the market; (ii) growth of agent size is encouraged in full cooperation; (iii) collaboration among agents to compete against one single agent may result in the disappearance of this single agent out of the market; and (iv) cooperating with two rivals may become a growth strategy for an intelligent agent.

  6. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    importantly, weed density and time of emergence relative to the crop. Practices that (1) reduce the density of weeds, (2) maximise occupation of space or uptake of resources by the crop or (3) establish an early-season size advantage of the crop over the weeds will minimise the competitive effects of weeds on...... early-season competitive advantage to the crop and (3) maximising resource capture by the crop using competitive species, competitive cultivars, high sowing densities, optimal spatial arrangement, intercropping complimentary species or transplanting.......Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...

  7. Comparing the effectiveness of individualistic, altruistic, and competitive incentives in motivating completion of mental exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Heather; Loewenstein, George; Kopsic, Jessica; Volpp, Kevin G

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the impact of individually oriented, purely altruistic, and a hybrid of competitive and cooperative monetary reward incentives on older adults' completion of cognitive exercises and cognitive function. We find that all three incentive structures approximately double the number of exercises completed during the six-week active experimental period relative to a no incentive control condition. However, the altruistic and cooperative/competitive incentives led to different patterns of participation, with significantly higher inter-partner correlations in utilization of the software, as well as greater persistence once incentives were removed. Provision of all incentives significantly improved performance on the incentivized exercises. However, results of an independent cognitive testing battery suggest no generalizable gains in cognitive function resulted from the training. PMID:26595894

  8. Comparing the effectiveness of individualistic, altruistic, and competitive incentives in motivating completion of mental exercises☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Heather; Loewenstein, George; Kopsic, Jessica; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of individually oriented, purely altruistic, and a hybrid of competitive and cooperative monetary reward incentives on older adults’ completion of cognitive exercises and cognitive function. We find that all three incentive structures approximately double the number of exercises completed during the six-week active experimental period relative to a no incentive control condition. However, the altruistic and cooperative/competitive incentives led to different patterns of participation, with significantly higher inter-partner correlations in utilization of the software, as well as greater persistence once incentives were removed. Provision of all incentives significantly improved performance on the incentivized exercises. However, results of an independent cognitive testing battery suggest no generalizable gains in cognitive function resulted from the training. PMID:26595894

  9. Effect of competition on the production and activity of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losada, L.; Ajayi, O.; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2009-01-01

    different species of Aspergillus to determine relative species fitness in culture, and to analyze the presence of possible antifungal activity of secondary metabolites in extracts. The results show that, for the most part, at 30C only one species is able to survive direct competition with a second species....... In contrast, survival of both competitors was often observed at 37C. Consistent with these observations, antifungal activity of extracts from cultures grown at 30C was greater than that of extract from cultures at 37C. Interestingly, culture extracts from all species studied had some degree of...... antifungal activity, but in general, the extracts had greater antifungal activity when species were grown in the presence of a competitor. Using gas chromatography it was determined that the composition of extracts changed due to competition and a shift in temperature. These findings indicate that co...

  10. Interactive effects of copper pollution, competition and drought on plant growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus; Kjær, C.

    Previous studies have indicated that the toxicity of copper to plants in the field is enhanced compared to single-species laboratory tests with the same soil, i.e. under similar bioavailability conditions. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether this difference in toxicity between...... laboratory and field conditions may be explained by interactions between copper toxicity and climate (drought) or competition....

  11. Intraspecific competition in the ant Camponotus cruentatus: should we expect the 'dear enemy' effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Boulay, Raphaël; CERDÁ, XIM; Simon, Tovit; Roldan, María; Hefetz, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of competition and resource domination were analysed in the Mediterranean ant Camponotus cruentatus. In a plot located in southern Spain mature colonies are overdispersed, which is indicative of territoriality in other species. Unexpectedly, however, workers from neighbouring colonies commonly foraged in areas that overlapped by more than 44%. This suggests that while mature colonies possibly prevent the establishment of new colonies in the vicinity of their nests, they do not ...

  12. Lethal effects of habitat degradation on fishes through changing competitive advantage

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    Coral bleaching has caused catastrophic changes to coral reef ecosystems around the world with profound ecological, social and economic repercussions. While its occurrence is predicted to increase in the future, we have little understanding of mechanisms that underlie changes in the fish community associated with coral degradation. The present study uses a field-based experiment to examine how the intensity of interference competition between juveniles of two species of damselfish changes as ...

  13. Effects of combination of leaf resources on competition in container mosquito larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Reiskind, M.H.; Zarrabi, A.A.; Lounibos, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Resource diversity is critical to fitness in many insect species, and may determine the coexistence of competitive species and the function of ecosystems. Plant material provides the nutritional base for numerous aquatic systems, yet the consequences of diversity of plant material have not been studied in aquatic container systems important for the production of mosquitoes. To address how diversity in leaf detritus affects container-inhabiting mosquitoes, we examined how leaf species affect c...

  14. EFFECTIVE TEAMWORK AND LEADERSHIP, THE KEY TO GAINING COMPETITIVE EDGE IN THE NOWADAYS SERVICE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Theodor Valentin Purcarea; Monica Paula Ratiu

    2011-01-01

    Our paper is intended to present the critical role of the service organizations’ members represented by personnel (employees) in creating competitive advantage and driving growth and value. In order to face current economic challenges managers acting in the services industry need to recognize the importance of motivation and involvement of employees materialized in service team performance; also, leaders’ creativity influences the service organizations’ performance in the global business envi...

  15. Epigenetic effects on personality traits: early food provisioning and sibling competition

    OpenAIRE

    Carere, C; Drent, PJ; Koolhaas, JM; Groothuis, TGG; Drent, Piet J.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Groothuis, Ton G.G

    2005-01-01

    The relative contribution of genetic and non-genetic factors in shaping personality traits is of fundamental relevance to biologists and social scientists. Individual animals vary in the way they cope with challenges in their environment, comparable with variation in human personalities. This variation has a substantial genetic basis. Here we describe experiments showing the strength of environmental factors (food availability and sibling competition) in shaping personality traits in a passer...

  16. Diversity of larger consumers enhances interference competition effects on smaller competitors

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Francisco J.A.; Karlson, Agnes M. L.; Näslund, Johan; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2010-01-01

    Competition between large and small species for the same food is common in a number of ecosystems including aquatic ones. How diversity of larger consumers affects the access of smaller competitors to a limiting resource is not well understood. We tested experimentally how species richness (0–3 spp.) of benthic deposit-feeding macrofauna changes meiofaunal ostracods’ incorporation of fresh organic matter from a stable-isotope-labeled cyanobacterial bloom, using fauna from the species-poor Bal...

  17. Effect of fatigue on productivity of throws in competitive activity of basketball players on carriages

    OpenAIRE

    Mishin M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Constantly increasing competition on world sports arena puts forward more and more complex problems before sports pedagogics. Major of them is a problem of increase of level and reliability of sports result. Improvement of productivity of game actions in Wheelchair Basketball is closely connected with increase of accuracy of throws of a ball in a ring. Quality of this technique is a determinative in victory achievement. Increase of accuracy of throws of a ball and stability preservation can s...

  18. The effect of virus-blocking Wolbachia on male competitiveness of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Segoli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia blocks the transmission of dengue virus by its vector mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is currently being evaluated for control of dengue outbreaks. Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI that results in the developmental failure of offspring in the cross between Wolbachia-infected males and uninfected females. This increases the relative success of infected females in the population, thereby enhancing the spread of the beneficial bacterium. However, Wolbachia spread via CI will only be feasible if infected males are sufficiently competitive in obtaining a mate under field conditions. We tested the effect of Wolbachia on the competitiveness of A. aegypti males under semi-field conditions.In a series of experiments we exposed uninfected females to Wolbachia-infected and uninfected males simultaneously. We scored the competitiveness of infected males according to the proportion of females producing non-viable eggs due to incompatibility. We found that infected males were equally successful to uninfected males in securing a mate within experimental tents and semi-field cages. This was true for males infected by the benign wMel Wolbachia strain, but also for males infected by the virulent wMelPop (popcorn strain. By manipulating male size we found that larger males had a higher success than smaller underfed males in the semi-field cages, regardless of their infection status.The results indicate that Wolbachia infection does not reduce the competitiveness of A. aegypti males. Moreover, the body size effect suggests a potential advantage for lab-reared Wolbachia-males during a field release episode, due to their better nutrition and larger size. This may promote Wolbachia spread via CI in wild mosquito populations and underscores its potential use for disease control.

  19. Delaware's Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    One of corporate law's enduring issues has been the extent to which state-to-state competitive pressures on Delaware make for a race to the top or the bottom. States, or at least some of them, are said to compete with their corporate law to get corporate tax revenue and ancillary benefits. Delaware has "won" that race, with the overwhelming number of American large corporations chartering there. Here I argue that this long-standing debate is misconceived. Delaware's chief competitive pressure...

  20. Competitive Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Villar

    2007-01-01

    Competitive pricing is a pricing rule that combines two principles that are present in competitive markets. The profit principle (an action will be chosen only if it yields maximal payoffs), and the scarcity principle (markets make expensive those commodities that restrict production possibilities). It is shown that, under standard assumptions, these principles imply profit maximization at given prices. But also that they can be applied to economies with non-convex production sets (e.g. firms...

  1. Competition Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Icaza Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a review of the competition regime works of various authors, published under the auspices of the University of the Hemispheres and the Corporation for Studies and Publications. Analyzes the structure, the general concepts, case law taken for development. Includes comments on the usefulness of this work for the study of competition law and the contribution to the lawyers who want to practice in this branch of economic law.

  2. Competition Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Icaza Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the competition regime works of various authors, published under the auspices of the University of the Hemispheres and the Corporation for Studies and Publications. Analyzes the structure, the general concepts, case law taken for development. Includes comments on the usefulness of this work for the study of competition law and the contribution to the lawyers who want to practice in this branch of economic law.

  3. Companies Export Function: Identifying the Effects of Perceived Competitive Advantages, Adapting Marketing Tactics and Exporting Experience on Export Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoub Hossainee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information and communication technology (ICT has intensively affected the quality and quantity of competition among companies in their accessibility to the markets of other countries during the last two decades. The basic question that every company working in the international markets has faced with is the factors affecting export function. This study is conducted for the purpose of answering this question. Reviewing the related literature shows that among many factors which may affect export function, adapting marketing tactics, export experience, and perceived competitive advantage are the most remarkable ones. Based on this theoretical finding, the conceptual model of the research had created and five hypotheses were tested during this study. For adopting experimental data with the conceptual model, export companies in Fars province have been studied. Findings illustrate that four out of five hypotheses of the research have approved and only the direct relationship of marketing tactics adaption with export function has not been verified. The effect of marketing tactics adoption to export function was indirect and obtained through perceived competitive advantage as an intermediary variable.

  4. The effects of adult sex ratio on mating competition in male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in two wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuard, Pierre J C; Brown, Grant E; Grant, James W A

    2016-08-01

    When competing for mates, males typically exhibit higher rates of intrasexual aggression and courtship than females. Operational sex ratio, represented here by adult sex ratio (ASR) as a proxy, is likely the best predictor of this competition, which typically increases between members of one sex as members of the opposite sex become rarer. Moreover, in populations subject to high predation, males often decrease mating competitive behaviour due to predation risk. We explored the combined effects of ASR and population of origin (low vs. high ambient predation risk) on mating competition in male and female wild-caught Trinidadian guppies. Both male and female aggression rates increased with ASR, but the increase for males was only significant in the low-predation population. In regard to male mating tactics, courtship propensity was unaffected by ASR, while the propensity to sneak increased at male-biased ASRs. Guppies from a high predation population had lower aggression rates than their low predation counterpart, but male courtship and sneaking attempts did not differ between populations. Surprisingly, females were just as aggressive as males when competing for mates. These results highlight the trade-offs between antipredator and agonistic behaviour, which may affect sexual selection pressures in wild populations. PMID:27208810

  5. Companies Export Function: Identifying the Effects of Perceived Competitive Advantages, Adapting Marketing Tactics and Exporting Experience on Export Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technology (ICT has intensively affected the quality and quantity of competition among companies in their accessibility to the markets of other countries during the last two decades. The basic question that every company working in the international markets has faced with is the factors affecting export function. This study is conducted for the purpose of answering this question. Reviewing the related literature shows that among many factors which may affect export function, adapting marketing tactics, export experience, and perceived competitive advantage are the most remarkable ones. Based on this theoretical finding, the conceptual model of the research had created and five hypotheses were tested during this study. For adopting experimental data with the conceptual model, export companies in Fars province have been studied. Findings illustrate that four out of five hypotheses of the research have approved and only the direct relationship of marketing tactics adaption with export function has not been verified. The effect of marketing tactics adoption to export function was indirect and obtained through perceived competitive advantage as an intermediary variable.

  6. The effect of age on the mating competitiveness of male Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and G. palpalis palpalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Abila

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of age on male Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, Newstead, and Glossina palpalis palpalis, Austin (Diptera: Glossinidae competiveness were investigated with a view to estimate optimal age for sterile male release. Sterile insect technique involves the mass production, sterilization and sequential release of males of the target species to out compete the wild male population. Mating between released sterile males and wild females produce inviable progeny and the population is reduced over several generations to unsustainable levels. It is vital that the released male are of high quality and are sexually competitive. Age is one parameter affecting the sexual competiveness of the male tsetse fly. The optimal release age was estimated by assessing sexual competitiveness of flies of different age categories, 1, 5, 8 and 13-days after adult eclosion. A walk-in field-cage was used in order to approximate as closely as possible the actual field scenario during sterile insect release programes. It was shown that 8 and 13-day old males mated significantly more frequently, i.e. were more competitive, in the presence of equal numbers of 1 and 5-day old males. The age of male tsetse flies significantly affected competitiveness in both species studied. The ability of G. f. fuscipes to inseminate was not age dependent, and insemination occurred in all females that mated regardless of male age. In G. p. palpalis, however, 1-day old males were least able to inseminate. Mating duration was not significantly affected by age in both species. Eight to thirteen day old males of the test species are here recommended as the optimal sterile male release age.

  7. The Interaction between Root Herbivory and Competitive Ability of Native and Invasive-Range Populations of Brassica nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, Ayub M O; Stift, Marc; van Kleunen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis predicts that escape from intense herbivore damage may enable invasive plants to evolve higher competitive ability in the invasive range. Below-ground root herbivory can have a strong impact on plant performance, and invasive plants often compete with multiple species simultaneously, but experimental approaches in which EICA predictions are tested with root herbivores and in a community setting are rare. Here, we used Brassica nigra plants from eight invasive- and seven native-range populations to test whether the invasive-range plants have evolved increased competitive ability when competing with Achillea millefolium and with a community (both with and without A. millefolium). Further, we tested whether competitive interactions depend on root herbivory on B. nigra by the specialist Delia radicum. Without the community, competition with A. millefolium reduced biomass of invasive- but not of native-range B. nigra. With the community, invasive-range B. nigra suffered less than native-range B. nigra. Although the overall effect of root herbivory was not significant, it reduced the negative effect of the presence of the community. The community produced significantly less biomass when competing with B. nigra, irrespective of the range of origin, and independent of the presence of A. millefolium. Taken together, these results offer no clear support for the EICA hypothesis. While native-range B. nigra plants appear to be better in dealing with a single competitor, the invasive-range plants appear to be better in dealing with a more realistic multi-species community. Possibly, this ability of tolerating multiple competitors simultaneously has contributed to the invasion success of B. nigra in North America. PMID:26517125

  8. The Interaction between Root Herbivory and Competitive Ability of Native and Invasive-Range Populations of Brassica nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayub M O Oduor

    Full Text Available The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA hypothesis predicts that escape from intense herbivore damage may enable invasive plants to evolve higher competitive ability in the invasive range. Below-ground root herbivory can have a strong impact on plant performance, and invasive plants often compete with multiple species simultaneously, but experimental approaches in which EICA predictions are tested with root herbivores and in a community setting are rare. Here, we used Brassica nigra plants from eight invasive- and seven native-range populations to test whether the invasive-range plants have evolved increased competitive ability when competing with Achillea millefolium and with a community (both with and without A. millefolium. Further, we tested whether competitive interactions depend on root herbivory on B. nigra by the specialist Delia radicum. Without the community, competition with A. millefolium reduced biomass of invasive- but not of native-range B. nigra. With the community, invasive-range B. nigra suffered less than native-range B. nigra. Although the overall effect of root herbivory was not significant, it reduced the negative effect of the presence of the community. The community produced significantly less biomass when competing with B. nigra, irrespective of the range of origin, and independent of the presence of A. millefolium. Taken together, these results offer no clear support for the EICA hypothesis. While native-range B. nigra plants appear to be better in dealing with a single competitor, the invasive-range plants appear to be better in dealing with a more realistic multi-species community. Possibly, this ability of tolerating multiple competitors simultaneously has contributed to the invasion success of B. nigra in North America.

  9. Demolishing the competition: the longitudinal link between competitive video games, competitive gambling, and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2013-07-01

    The majority of research on the link between video games and aggression has focused on the violent content in games. In contrast, recent experimental research suggests that it is video game competition, not violence, that has the greatest effect on aggression in the short-term. However, no researchers have examined the long-term relationship between video game competition and aggression. In addition, if competition in video games is a significant reason for the link between video game play and aggression, then other competitive activities, such as competitive gambling, also may predict aggression over time. In the current study, we directly assessed the socialization (competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicts aggression over time) versus selection hypotheses (aggression predicts competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time). Adolescents (N = 1,492, 50.8 % female) were surveyed annually from Grade 9 to Grade 12 about their video game play, gambling, and aggressive behaviors. Greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling predicted higher levels of aggression over time, after controlling for previous levels of aggression, supporting the socialization hypothesis. The selection hypothesis also was supported, as aggression predicted greater competitive video game play and competitive gambling over time, after controlling for previous competitive video game play and competitive gambling. Our findings, taken together with the fact that millions of adolescents play competitive video games every day and that competitive gambling may increase as adolescents transition into adulthood, highlight the need for a greater understanding of the relationship between competition and aggression. PMID:23595418

  10. Competitive Reactions and the Cross-Sales Effects of Advertising and Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Steenkamp, Jan-Benedict; Nijs, V.R.; Hanssens, Dominique; Dekimpe, Marnik

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHow do competitors react to each other's price-promotion and advertising actions? How do these reactions influence the net sales impact we observe? We answer these questions by performing a large-scale empirical study of the short-run and long-run reactions to promotion and advertising shocks in over 400 consumer product categories, over a four-year time span. Competitive reaction can be passive, accommodating or retaliatory. We first develop a series of expectations on the type a...

  11. The Liberalisation of the Postal Service Market in Estonia and its Effect on Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Sepp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liberalisation of infrastructure sectors through opening up markets as a method for increasing the efficiency of infrastructure services is an international tendency. Emerging competition has been seen as an essential element in this process. On the other hand, the liberalisation of the market for universal services can cause several problems in ensuring quality and access to services. In this article we evaluate the results of liberalisation in the Estonian postal sector as an infrastructure specific sector offering a universal service in a decreasing market in a small country.

  12. The integration of gas and electricity: potential effects on competition in markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last years, an increasing number of gas and electricity companies have integrated their activities in both sectors. Following this trend, several Mergers and Acquisitions between gas and electricity companies have emerged, and some of them have been cross-borders operations that have given rise to multinational enterprises. This paper analyses the causes of the integration of gas and electricity activities, and examines its implications on regulation and competition policy, showing that these changes in the energy industry raise new challenges and compel to adopt new measures in that field of the economic policy. (Author) 25 refs

  13. Recovery of trees from drought depends on belowground sink control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Frank; Joseph, Jobin; Peter, Martina; Luster, Jörg; Pritsch, Karin; Geppert, Uwe; Kerner, Rene; Molinier, Virginie; Egli, Simon; Schaub, Marcus; Liu, Jian-Feng; Li, Maihe; Sever, Krunoslav; Weiler, Markus; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Gessler, Arthur; Arend, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Climate projections predict higher precipitation variability with more frequent dry extremes(1). CO2 assimilation of forests decreases during drought, either by stomatal closure(2) or by direct environmental control of sink tissue activities(3). Ultimately, drought effects on forests depend on the ability of forests to recover, but the mechanisms controlling ecosystem resilience are uncertain(4). Here, we have investigated the effects of drought and drought release on the carbon balances in beech trees by combining CO2 flux measurements, metabolomics and (13)CO2 pulse labelling. During drought, net photosynthesis (AN), soil respiration (RS) and the allocation of recent assimilates below ground were reduced. Carbohydrates accumulated in metabolically resting roots but not in leaves, indicating sink control of the tree carbon balance. After drought release, RS recovered faster than AN and CO2 fluxes exceeded those in continuously watered trees for months. This stimulation was related to greater assimilate allocation to and metabolization in the rhizosphere. These findings show that trees prioritize the investment of assimilates below ground, probably to regain root functions after drought. We propose that root restoration plays a key role in ecosystem resilience to drought, in that the increased sink activity controls the recovery of carbon balances. PMID:27428669

  14. Above-ground and below-ground competition between the willow Salix caprea L. and its understorey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, M.; Tesnerová, C.; Rydlová, Jana; Frouz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2016), s. 156-164. ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10377S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11635S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Mycorrhizae * Roots * Succession * Understorey * Willow Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.709, year: 2014

  15. Effects of Ultraviolet-B Irradiance on Intraspecific Competition and Facilitation of Plants: Self-Thinning, Size Inequality, and Phenotypic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Rui-Chang; Lin, Yue; Yue, Ming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Xiao; Chi, Hong; Chai, Yong-Fu; Wang, Mao

    2012-01-01

    (1) The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2) The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i) Self-thinning is the reduction in density that...

  16. Compared effects of competition by grasses (Graminoids) and broom (Cytisus scoparius) on growth and functional traits of beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica)

    OpenAIRE

    Provendier, Damien; Balandier, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The effect of two weeds (grasses and broom, Cytisus scoparius) competition on the growth and functional traits of European beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica) was investigated in an experimental plantation in the French Massif central. We hypothesized that grasses would have a much more harmful effect than broom on beech growth through strong competition for soil water and nitrogen. A randomized block design was used with three separate blocks, each possessing three types of vegetation; grasses ...

  17. Global Competitiveness Index and economic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Cazacu, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the linkage between economic growth and competitiveness on a panel of 28 European countries, during 2006-2013. We use Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) as a measure of national competitive capacities and find that a shock in competitiveness has a positive impact on GDP developments. Nevertheless, the results show that fast economic growth has a small positive effect on competitiveness, as increasing the competitive capacity of a nation is linked to many other factor...

  18. Advanced remote sensing to quantify temperate peatland capacity for belowground carbon capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, K. B.; Blanchard, S.; Schile, L. M.; Kolding, S.; Kelly, M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Miller, R.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate peatlands typically dominated by grasses and sedges generate among the greatest annual rates of net primary productivity (NPP, up to 4 kg C m-2) and soil carbon storage (up to 1 kg C m-2) for natural ecosystems. Belowground tissues represent 20-80% of total NPP, thus understanding the controls on belowground NPP (BNPP) in these wetland ecosystems is particularly important to quantifying peatland carbon balances. In addition, there is a growing need to quantify large-scale belowground C sequestration rates in wetlands to better understand marsh resilience to sea level rise and to help define eligibility for carbon offset credits. Since plant productivity influences wetland C budgets, combining field and remote sensing techniques for estimating above and belowground productivity of wetland vegetation over a large spatial extent will help to address these needs. We are working in a USGS long-term experimental wetland restoration site on drained peatland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Using the spatial variability in water depth and residence time across the 7 ha wetland, our goal is to develop practical methods to quantify and map BNPP of emergent marsh vegetation from remotely sensed estimates of aboveground plant characteristics and aboveground NPP. Field data collected on wetland plants hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus) and cattail (Typha spp.) were coupled with reflectance data from a field spectrometer (range 350-2500 nm) every two to three weeks during the summer of 2011. We are analyzing reflectance data to develop hyperspectral indices that predict the biophysical characteristics of wetland vegetation - biomass, leaf area index (LAI), and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) - which may be used to infer belowground biomass and productivity. Soil cores and root in-growth bags were used to calculate root biomass and productivity rates. Existing allometric relationships were used to calculate

  19. When overlap leads to competition: Effects of phonological encoding on word duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Loretta K; Watson, Duane G

    2015-12-01

    Some accounts of acoustic reduction propose that variation in word duration is a reflection of the speaker's internal production processes, but it is unclear why lengthening within a word benefits planning. The present study examines whether variability in word length is partly attributable to phonological encoding. In an event-description task, speakers produced words with longer durations when the word shared part of its phonology with a previously articulated word than when it did not. More importantly, lengthening was greater when the overlap was word-initial than when it was word-final. These differences in duration are in line with predictions of serial phonological competition models, which claim that words that overlap in onsets create more competition than words that overlap in offsets and are thus more difficult to produce. That word duration is sensitive to differences in production difficulty suggests a link between speakers' duration choices and phonological encoding. We propose that lengthening provides the production system with the necessary processing time to produce a word's sounds. PMID:25855202

  20. Effects of Intraguild Predation: Evaluating Resource Competition between Two Canid Species with Apparent Niche Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Kozlowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies determine which habitat components are important to animals and the extent their use may overlap with competitive species. However, such studies are often undertaken after populations are in decline or under interspecific stress. Since habitat selection is not independent of interspecific stress, quantifying an animal's current landscape use could be misleading if the species distribution is suboptimal. We present an alternative approach by modeling the predicted distributions of two sympatric species on the landscape using dietary preferences and prey distribution. We compared the observed habitat use of kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis and coyotes (Canis latrans against their predicted distribution. Data included locations of kit foxes and coyotes, carnivore scat transects, and seasonal prey surveys. Although habitats demonstrated heterogeneity with respect to prey resources, only coyotes showed habitat use designed to maximize access to prey. In contrast, kit foxes used habitats which did not align closely with prey resources. Instead, habitat use by kit foxes represented spatial and behavioral strategies designed to minimize spatial overlap with coyotes while maximizing access to resources. Data on the distribution of prey, their dietary importance, and the species-specific disparities between predicted and observed habitat distributions supports a mechanism by which kit fox distribution is derived from intense competitive interactions with coyotes.

  1. The Effect Of Customer Demand And Supplier Performance In Competitive Strategy And Business Performance Case Of Fixed Broadband In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina D. Pasaribu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Broadband telecommunication is significantly important to support and improve countrys competitiveness level. However Indonesia performance especially in Fixed Broadband is poor as the penetration rate is very low and far behind from other ASEAN countries. The industry is served by multi operators with one dominant operator. This dominant operator will be studied representing the industry in this study. A qualitative study Pasaribu et al. 2015 related to this paper has found that poor fulfillment of Customer Demand and poor Supplier Performance are two dominant external factors that cause the low performance. A model is proposed to frame the work it consists of four variables Customer Demand Supplier Performance Competitive Strategy and Business Performance. This study aims is use that Pasaribu et al. model directly to business units level to identify and analyze the relationships within the model and significance level of each relationship accordingly. By understanding the priority levels the improvement program could be more effectively planned and implemented. This study is expected to contribute on Fixed Broadband research wich is still very rare especially in Indonesia The research methodology is quantitative methods using survey technique. The respondents are management and customers of the dominant operator business units. Clustering by province regions gave 32 samples from the population of 58 business units. Partial Least Square modelling was used to analise the datas. The main result of this study is that the most significant relationship in the model is Supplier Performance to Competitive Strategy. Furthermore from indicators of Supplier Performance it was found that Quality Relationship has a very high effect among other indicators. By prioritizing these significant constructs it could be expected the related improvement program could be more effective.

  2. Competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on some native and reclamation species in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, E.B.; Knight, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on certain native and reclamation species. The first experiment was initiated by discing three sites in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, at three distances from introduced weed seed sources. Introduced weed colonization was greatest when a seed source was located nearby. Higher weed cover resulted in reductions of percent cover, density, and richness of the native species. The second experiment was conducted in the greenhouse and was designed to determine if there are changes in response of S. kali and the native grasses Agropyron smithii and Bouteloua gracilis to competition and water regime. Both grass species had lower biomass and higher stomatal resistance when growing in mixed culture with S. kali than in pure culture in the dry regime, but there were no significant differences in the wet regime. In general, the difference in plant response between mixed and pure cultures was more pronounced in the dry than in the wet regime. The third study was a greenhouse experiment on germination and competition of S. kali (a C/sub 4/ species) with native species Lepidium densiflorum (C/sub 3/), Chenopodium pratericola (C/sub 3/), A. smithii (C/sub 3/), and B. gracilis (C/sub 4/) under May, June, and July temperature regimes. Salsola kali germinated equally well in all three regimes, but the other C/sub 4/ species had highest germination in the July regime and the C/sub 3/ species in the May and June regimes. The fourth study was designed to examine the effect of weed colonization on the success of mine reclamation. Little effect was observed, but colonization by introduced annuals was very low. (ERB)

  3. The Investigation of The Effect of Supportive Attitudes of Police on Their Interfering Behaviors Towards Aggressive Spectators in Sports Competitions

    OpenAIRE

    PULUR, Atilla; İlter KAYNAK; Serdar ORHAN

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of being in a favour of a team of polices who are on duty in sports competition.Sample of the study is 609 policemen from Çevik Kuvvet Şube Müdürlüğü in Ankara, İstanbul, İzmir, Trabzon and Antalya. A questionnaire including 13 questions and X2 (Chi-scuare-Ki-Kare) test of SPSS Statistical Evaluation Software version 11.0 is applied in the study. For statistical acceptance level of 0.05 (p) is accepted.As a result of the study it is observed th...

  4. Magnetic field effect on the pairing competition in quasi-one-dimensional organic superconductors (TMTSF)2X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We microscopically study the effect of the magnetic field (Zeeman splitting) on the superconducting state in a model for quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors (TMTSF)2X. Using random phase approximation, we investigate the competition between spin singlet, spin triplet pairings and the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state. We obtain a phase diagram in the T (temperature)-hz (field) space. We show that consecutive transitions from singlet pairing to FFLO and further to Sz=1 triplet pairing can take place upon increasing the magnetic field when 2kF charge fluctuations coexist with 2kF spin fluctuations.

  5. Party-state relationship, an effect of the political competition. The party system and patronage in Romanian politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lonean

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the party-state relationship in post-communist Romania. It shows the connections between the existence of patronage, corruption and the states’ weak administrative capacity, on one hand, and the dynamics of the political party system, as an explanatory variable, on the other hand. The instability of the political parties in Romania and their changing relations within the system make the electorates’ task of anticipating and sanctioning their politics impossible. Consequently, the political parties have the possibility of extracting resources from the state without being held accountable in elections, as an effect of their dynamic, but non-robust competition.

  6. The Effect of Forming a Score-Based Competitive System in a Cyber-Drilling Atmosphere for Learning and Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir ÇELEN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on to carry out a structure, in which the desire of having a high score and seeing the name in the top list is used in web-based drills and helps students to be more willing in test solving. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of web-based drills on motivation and learning in a competitive atmosphere. Furthermore, the study also attempts to determine if the students’ levels and frequency of using a computer have an effect on the test scores in a web based system.Over a period of two week application students logged in the system using their own passwords and solve questions whenever they wanted. The names and photographs of the students who achieved the best scores were declared on the school’s website. In the study, an experimental design has been applied. The data were collected through the database in the web-based drill, pre and post survey to determine the level of and the reasons for students’ use of the website and history common exam results. According to the findings of the research, the website that has the competitive atmosphere has a positive effect on students’ achievement in their lessons. The application led to a change in students’ aim to visit the website and the frequency of their visits.

  7. Effects of intraspecific competition and food deprivation on the immature phase of Ascia monuste orseis (Lepidoptera, Pieridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. H. Barros-Bellanda

    Full Text Available The effect of intraspecific competition for food on larvae and of food deprivation for 24 h on 2nd and 4th instars of Ascia monuste orseis (Godart, 1819 was investigated. Intraspecific competition for food during the immature phase leads to long pupation time, high larval mortality, reduced adult weight, and reduced number of eggs per female. In food deprivation experiments, the major differences in A. monuste orseis performance were long pupation time in the group that was deprived during the 2nd instar; and a negative effect on reproduction in the group that was deprived during the 4th instar, with reduced adult weight. Both food deprived periods tested are critical, and deprivation during the 2nd instar seems to have an effect as drastic as during the 4th instar because it directly affects larvae survival. Immatures can resist food deprivation for 24 h during the 2nd and 4th instars (low mortality, have a compensatory behaviour (high ingestion and biomass gain during the 5th instar, and do not demonstrate cannibalistic behaviour during food deprivation.

  8. Assessment of the Effects of Light Availability on Growth and Competition Between Strains of Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Camila de Araujo; Lürling, Miquel; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Planktothrix agardhii strains isolated from a tropical water body were better competitors for light than Microcystis aeruginosa strains. These cyanobacteria are common in eutrophic systems, where light is one of the main drivers of phytoplankton, and Planktothrix is considered more shade-adapted and Microcystis more high-light tolerant. First, the effect of light intensities on growth was studied in batch cultures. Next, the minimum requirement of light (I*) and the effect of light limitation on the outcome of competition was investigated in chemostats. All strains showed similar growth at 10 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), demonstrating the ability of the two species to grow in low light. The optimum light intensity was lower for P. agardhii, but at the highest light intensity, Microcystis strains reached higher biovolume, confirming that P. agardhii has higher sensitivity to high light. Nonetheless, P. agardhii grew in light intensities considered high (500 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) for this species. M. aeruginosa showed a higher carrying capacity in light-limited condition, but I* was similar between all the strains. Under light competition, Microcystis strains displaced P. agardhii and dominated. In two cases, there was competitive exclusion and in the other two P. agardhii managed to remain in the system with a low biovolume (≈15 %). Our findings not only show that strains of P. agardhii can grow under higher light intensities than generally assumed but also that strains of M. aeruginosa are better competitors for light than supposed. These results help to understand the co-occurrence of these species in tropical environments and the dominance of M. aeruginosa even in low-light conditions. PMID:26691315

  9. Effects of Generational Competition and Substitution on Late Labour Participation and Labour Market Exit from a Multilevel Perspective*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Henriette Engelhardt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the effects of demographic, economic and labour market structures on labour market participation and on the transition to inactivity (exit for older males in eleven European countries. Theoretically, our analysis is guided by considerations of intragenerational competition and intergenerational substitution. Following Easterlin’s hypothesis that intragenerational competition rises with cohort size, we assume a negative effect of cohort size on labour market participation and a positive effect on early exit from the labour market. Taking into account that different cohorts are substitutes at least to a certain extent, we assume that the probability of an early exit will be reduced by a high intergenerational exchange ratio in favour of older workers. Thus, labour market participation is infl uenced by the populations’ age structure both when entering the labour force and during the career. Moreover, low shares of graduates in older cohorts are expected to reduce older workers’ chances of labour market participation. In addition to demographic structures, general economic conditions, such as per capita GDP and its development over time, act both to further and to hamper the employment of older workers. Additionally, labour market structures, such as unemployment rates, the extent of part-time work or the amount of service jobs infl uence individual participation and the transition to inactivity. To test these hypotheses, we use merged data from the fi rst two waves of SHARE and macro-level indicators from Eurostat. We estimate a two-level random-intercept logit model which allows us to determine the share of variance in international late careers that can be attributed to countryspecifi c factors and can quantify the relative impact of specifi c socio-demographic and socio-economic backgrounds. Our results imply that cross-national variance in labour market participation is mainly driven by the instance of long

  10. The energy administration, an effective alternative to improve the managerial competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This region's actual development is in need of immediate actions to reduce costs, protect the environment and increase company competitiveness versus a growing global economy. Energetic efficiency represents on of the principal opportunities to meets these goals. Numerous studies in companies in Cuba, Mexico, Colombia and Ecuador have shown poor energetic management and cleared that there are many costs reduction possibilities if they create technical capacities within the industry. The center of energy and environmental studies in the university of Cien Fuegos, created the total management of efficient energy, its main objective is to create in technical and organizational capacities in the corporations. Known as TGTEE, Total Management of Efficient Energy, has widened its popularity among the region and has achieved significant economic and social results, and leads to the construction of an energetic and environmental culture

  11. Effects of time delay on symmetric two-species competition subject to noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Linru; Mei, Dongcheng

    2008-03-01

    Noise and time delay act simultaneously on real ecological systems. The Lotka-Volterra model of symmetric two-species competition with noise and time delay was investigated in this paper. By means of stochastic simulation, we find that (i) the time delay induces the densities of the two species to periodically oscillate synchronously; (ii) the stationary probability distribution function of the two-species densities exhibits a transition from multiple to single stability as the delay time increases; (iii) the characteristic correlation time for the sum of the two-species densities squared exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of delay time. Our results have the implication that the combination of noise and time delay could provide an efficient tool for understanding real ecological systems.

  12. The competitive effects of horizontal mergers in the hospital industry: a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, M G; Schumann, L

    1991-10-01

    Woolley (1989) attempted to analyze the competitive impact of horizontal hospital mergers using the 'event study' method. Woolley characterized his results as consistent with traditional 'oligopoly' theories of market behavior. We scrutinize in detail a large number of his events, however, and find that most either generated concentration increases too small to plausibly produce market power, or could not have conferred monopoly returns on firms improperly characterized as rivals. Accordingly, any observed abnormal returns are likely attributable to some other cause; we suggest some alternative interpretations of his results. Our paper highlights the need for care in the selection of events and the identification of rivals when applying the event study method to the analysis of mergers. PMID:10114572

  13. Enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides: the kinetic effect of competitive adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsøe, Merete Norsker; Bloch, Line; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Insoluble potato dietary fibre, isolated from potato pulp, can be enzymatically hydrolysed with the pectolytic enzyme preparation Pectinex Ultra SP from Novo Nordisk A/S, in order to produce soluble fibre. The soluble fibre has valuable functional properties for the food industry. Cloned...... monocomponent enzymes from Pectinex Ultra SP (arabinofuranosidase, endoglucanase II, pectin lyase, polygalacturonase I, rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase, rhamnogalacturonase a, rhamnogalacturonase b and xylanase I) were added in order to increase the yield. Surprisingly, however, the yield is not increased...... when any of the monocomponent enzymes are added. To describe the results a new model designated 'the competitive activity adsorption model' is proposed. The model is based on the fact that the enzymes are adsorbed to the substrate before action. A combination of the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and...

  14. Numerical study of the influence of thermooptic effects on the competition of modes in diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A software package is developed for numerical analysis of radiation of edge-emitting diode lasers. The optical block of the package uses the three-dimensional diffraction method of counterpropagating beams. The current carrier density distribution in a quantum well is found from the diffusion equation, and the temperature distribution is found from the heat conduction equation. The software package can be used to analyse the competition of optical modes and to find the critical current at which single-mode lasing is quenched. The operation of a semiconductor laser having a built-in system of waveguides with antiresonance reflection is analysed. The conditions of single-mode generation with the output power above 1 W are found for this laser. (lasers)

  15. Sensitivity analysis of maximum doses for a below-ground vault low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a radionuclide migration analysis performed for a hypothetical below-ground vault radioactive waste disposal facility as part of a prototype license application. The facility design incorporated different concrete vault designs for the Class A and Class B/C wastes. The facility was located in a humid environment with relatively permeable soil. Doses were calculated for an individual using well water at the site boundary. Parameters of interest for the sensitivity study were the quantity of water percolating through the cover, the permeability of the native soil, and the subsurface concentrations of chemical affecting concrete degradation. Variation of the water percolation rate to simulate failure of the cover system resulted in peak doses which were a factor of 2.7 larger than for the base case. A factor of ten variation in the natural soil permeability also resulted in a factor of 2.7 increase in the maximum dose. Variations in the subsurface concentration of sulfate ion had little effect on the magnitude of the groundwater doses, but affected the longevity of the concrete structures. Having different failure times for the Class A and Class B/C disposal vaults was shown to be beneficial

  16. Case competitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses a teaching project with case competitions for MA students of specialised translation at the Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University. Drawing on a series of online questionnaires, the paper ascertains how the project was evaluated by the participating students...

  17. Children’s prosocial behavioural intentions toward outgroup members: The effects of intergroup competition, empathy and social perspective taking.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Dominic; Pelletier, Joseph; Van de Vyer, Julie; Cameron, Lindsey; Lee, E

    2015-01-01

    When will children decide to help outgroup peers? We examined how intergroup competition, social perspective taking (SPT), and empathy influence children's (5–10 years, N = 287) prosocial intentions towards outgroup members. Study 1 showed that, in a minimal group situation, prosociality was lower in an intergroup competitive than in a non-competitive or interpersonal context. Study 2 revealed that, in a real groups situation involving intergroup competition, prosociality was associated with ...

  18. Do plant traits predict the competitive abilities of closely related species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lauren M; Gibson, David J; Young, Bryan G

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species are a threat to every ecosystem. There is a strong incentive to predict which species will become invasive before they become too widespread and unmanageable. Different approaches have been advocated to assess invasive species potential. These include examining plant functional traits, quantifying competitive ability and phylogenetic comparison. In this study, we conducted experiments based on the above approaches in a multi-year, temporally replicated, set of experiments to compare these assessment methods to determine the invasive potential of Japanese chaff flower (Achyranthes japonica). We compared plant traits and competitive ability of Japanese chaff flower with two agricultural invasive species, Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) and tall waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), and one endangered plant species, bloodleaf (Iresine rhizomatosa), in the Amaranthaceae. Additionally, we assessed the invasive potential based on each of these approaches and determined the degree of agreement between them. A relatively conservative assessment integrating all three approaches would be that the competitive ability of closely related individuals with similar functional traits would share invasive potential. In a greenhouse experiment, each of the study species and soya beans were grown as monocultures and were evaluated to assess the drawdown of an aboveground (light) and a belowground (nitrogen) resource. In a field experiment, each study species was grown at varying densities per 15-cm-diameter pot with or without one or two soya bean plants, to simulate relative densities for soya beans grown in 38- and 76-cm-wide row spacing, respectively. In addition, Japanese chaff flower seedlings were planted either as un-manipulated seedlings or as a seedling cut back to the soil surface at the four-node stage (cut Japanese chaff flower) at which point seedlings have reached a perennial growth stage. The greenhouse experiment showed that each species drew down

  19. Effects of interspecific competition between two urban ant species, Linepithema humile and Monomorium minimum, on toxic bait performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Patricia; Silverman, Jules

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of interspecific competition on ant bait performance with two urban pest ants, the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), and the little black ant, Monomorium minimum (Buckley). In a laboratory study, the impact of a solid sulfluramid bait on M. minimum was diminished when L. humile were present, whereas the presence of M. minimum reduced the performance of a liquid fipronil bait against L. humile. Argentine ants were not adversely affected by sulfluramid bait at any time, whereas M. minimum was unaffected by fipronil bait until 14 d of exposure. In field studies measuring diel foraging activity, M. minimum seemed to delay L. humile foraging to food stations by approximately 30 min during summer 2001. However, L. humile subsequently recruited to food stations in very high numbers, thereby displacing M. minimum. L. humile visited food stations over an entire 24-h period, whereas M. minimum was only observed visiting food stations during daylight hours. Adjusting the timing of bait placement in the field may minimize any negative effects of interspecific competition between these two species on toxic bait performance. PMID:15889743

  20. Effects of experience on the dimensions of intensity, direction and frequency of the competitive anxiety and self-confidence: A study in athletes of individual and team sports

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Gimenes Fernandes; Sandra Adriana Neves Nunes; José Vasconcelos Raposo; Helder Miguel Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    The present study had the following objectives: i) to examine the inter-scale correlations between the three dimensions of responses (intensity, direction and frequency) of the CSAI-2R and its relationship with competitive experience, and ii) evaluate the effect of competitive experience anxiety (cognitive and somatic) and self-confidence in the total sample and for different types of modalities (individual vs. team). The sample consisted of 267 athletes (196 male and 71 female), of different...

  1. Competition in the Cryptocurrency Market

    OpenAIRE

    Gandal, Neil; Hałaburda, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    We analyze how network effects affect competition in the nascent cryptocurrency market. We do so by examining the changes over time in exchange rate data among cryptocurrencies. Specifically, we look at two aspects: (1) competition among different currencies, and (2) competition among exchanges where those currencies are traded. Our data suggest that the winner-take-all effect is dominant early in the market. During this period, when Bitcoin becomes more valuable against the U.S. dollar, it a...

  2. Will anticipated future climatic conditions affect belowground C utilization? - Insights into the role of microbial functional groups in a temperate heath/grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, Sabine; Michelsen, Anders; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Egsgaard, Helge; Kappel Schmidt, Inger; Jakobsen, Iver; Ambus, Per

    2013-04-01

    The global terrestrial soil organic matter stock is the biggest terrestrial carbon pool (1500 Pg C) of which about 4 % is turned over annually. Thus, terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to accelerate or diminish atmospheric climate change effects via belowground carbon processes. We investigated the effect of elevated CO2 (510 ppm), prolonged spring/summer droughts and increased temperature (1 ˚C) on belowground carbon allocation and on the recovery of carbon by the soil microbial community. An in-situ 13C-carbon pulse-labeling experiment was carried out in a temperate heath/grassland (Denmark) in May 2011. Recently assimilated 13C-carbon was traced into roots, soil and microbial biomass 1, 2 and 8 days after pulse-labeling. The importance of the microbial community in C utilization was investigated using 13C enrichment patterns in microbial functional groups on the basis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in roots. Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were distinguished from the decomposer groups of actinomycetes (belonging to the group of gram-positive bacteria) and saprophytic fungi. Mycorrhizal fungi specific PLFAs were not detected probably due to limited sample size in combination with restricted sensitivity of the used GC-c-IRMS setup. Climate treatments did not affect 13C allocation into roots, soil and microbial biomass carbon and also the total microbial biomass size stayed unchanged as frequently observed. However, climate treatments changed the composition of the microbial community: elevated CO2 significantly reduced the abundance of gram-negative bacteria (17:0cy) but did not affect the abundance of decomposers. Drought favored the bacterial community whereas increased temperatures showed reduced abundance of gram-negative bacteria (19:0cy) and changed the actinomycetes community (10Me16:0, 10Me18:0). However, not only the microbial community composition was affected by the applied climatic conditions, but also the activity of microbial

  3. Effect of food shortage on the physiology and competitive abilities of sand martin (Riparia riparia) nestlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, P; Konarzewski, M

    2001-09-01

    We examined developmental and behavioural plasticity of sand martin (Riparia riparia) nestlings hand-reared under laboratory conditions. We created six broods of six 4-day-old nestlings and randomly assigned them to one of the two following feeding regimens, each lasting for 3 days: (1) all nestmates fed a similar, limited amount of food (FR nestlings). This simulated synchronous hatching under conditions of food restriction. (2) Half the brood were food-restricted (FR/AL nestlings), and half were fed ad libitum (AL nestlings), as in asynchronously hatched broods with differential food allocation. Under both regimens, food restriction resulted in a reduction in body mass, intestinal mass, pectoral muscle mass, fat reserves, body temperature and resting metabolic rate (RMR). However, it simultaneously triggered a significant increase in intestinal uptake rates of L-proline and locomotor activity, quantified as frequency of crawling into the artificial nest tunnel by individual nestlings. Locomotor activity and intestinal uptake rates of L-proline by FR nestlings were higher than those of FR/AL young, while body temperature and RMR of FR nestlings were lower. We conclude that food-restricted nestlings responded actively to food shortages by upregulating their gut function, reducing the energy costs of maintenance and increasing locomotor activity. These behavioural and physiological responses were strongest in broods of similar-sized FR nestlings, which can be interpreted as an escalation of sibling competition. Thus, developmental and behavioural plasticity may be an important factor in the evolution of sibling rivalry. PMID:11551994

  4. Introduction of a 'carbon tax' and its effects on competitiveness in France and in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of a 'carbon tax' that is debated in France, following the Pigouvian principle of the 'polluter pays' and within a European framework, led us to examine more in depth the functioning of such a measure and the effects to foresee on French, and European, industrial competitiveness. While the controversy is focused on its apparent cost, we explain the virtuous spin-off effects and mechanisms of the internalisation of the carbon price by producers. The latter would indeed be incentivized to engage in an efficient substitution process across sources of energy and to intensify technological progress. Moreover, the 'double - even triple - dividend' of environmental taxation is a guarantee of the social acceptability of a tax that might be, in the long run, implemented under alternative forms. (author)

  5. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  6. Effects of plyometric training on endurance and explosive strength performance in competitive middle- and long-distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Alvarez, Cristian; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Baez, Eduardo B; Martínez, Cristian; Andrade, David C; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a short-term plyometric training program on explosive strength and endurance performance in highly competitive middle- and long-distance runners. Athletes were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, n = 18, 12 men) and an explosive strength training group (TG, n = 18, 10 men). Drop jump (DJ) from 20 (DJ20) and 40 cm (DJ40), countermovement jump with arms (CMJA), 20-m sprint time, and 2.4-km endurance run time test were carried out before and after 6 weeks of explosive strength training. Also, the combined standardized performance (CSP) in the endurance and explosive strength test was analyzed. After intervention, the CG did not show any significant change in performance, whereas the TG showed a significant reduction in 2.4-km endurance run time (-3.9%) and 20-m sprint time (-2.3%) and an increase in CMJA (+8.9%), DJ20 (+12.7%), and DJ40 (16.7%) explosive performance. Strength training group also exhibited a significant increase in CSP, although the CG showed significant reduction. We conclude that properly programmed concurrent explosive strength and endurance training could be advantageous for middle- and long-distance runners in their competitive performance, especially in events characterized by sprinting actions with small time differences at the end of the race. PMID:23838975

  7. Tax competition: A general review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raičević Božidar B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tax competition is increasingly attracting the attention of not only experts Although it is difficult to define precisely, grosso modo, it is actually a competition between states (jurisdictions in attracting capital (investors by tax instruments, especially tax incentives. The first recorded cases of tax competition emerged in 12th century (attracting wool weavers into regions of North Italy-Piemont. Today, tax competition has undreamt-of and very dynamic forms, both territorial and sectored. However, tax competition is accompanied not only by positive but also by rather strong negative effects. Positive effects worth mentioning are the following: 1. control of power, 2. innovations, and 3. incentives. However, negative effects, embodied in "unfair tax competition", provoke a range of unwanted and important distortions in international trade. All of them arise from requirements and wants of tax payers (especially companies to minimize or evade their tax obligations, on the one hand, as well as.

  8. Partitioning belowground CO2 emissions for a Miscanthus plantation in Lincolnshire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian; Bottoms, Emily; McNamara, Niall

    2013-04-01

    Miscanthus is a lignocellulosic crop that uses the Hatch-Slack (C4) photosynthetic pathway as opposed to most C3 vegetation native to the UK. Miscanthus can be grown for a number of practical end-uses but recently interest has increased in its viability as a bioenergy crop; both providing a renewable source of energy and helping to limit climate change by reducing carbon (C) emissions associated with energy generation. Recent studies have shown that Miscanthus plantations may increase stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC), however full greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets must be calculated. Consequently, we monitored emissions of N2O, CH4 and CO2 from Miscanthus roots, decomposing plant litter and soil individually to quantify and partition these emissions and better understand the influence of abiotic factors on SOC and GHG dynamics under Miscanthus. In January 2009 twenty-five 2 m2 plots were set up in a three-year old 11 hectare Miscanthus plantation in Lincolnshire, UK; with five replicates of five treatments. These treatments varied plant input to the soil by way of controlled exclusion techniques. Treatments excluded roots only ("No Roots"), surface litter only ("No Litter"), both roots and surface litter ("No Roots or Litter") or had double the litter amount added to the soil surface ("Double Litter"). A fifth treatment was a control with undisturbed roots and an average amount of litter added. Monthly measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions were taken at the soil surface from each treatment between March 2009 and March 2013, and soil C from the top 30 cm was monitored in all plots over the same period. Miscanthus-derived SOC was determined using the isotopic discrimination between C4 plant matter and C3 soil, and the treatments were compared to assess their effects on C inputs and outputs to the soil. Both CH4 and N2O emissions were below detection limits, mainly due to a lack of fertiliser additions and limited management of the agricultural site. However

  9. Logo competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Award of the prizes The price ceremony for the Staff Association’s new logo competition which took place on Friday 1st March at 5 p.m. was a big success. The first prize, an Ezee Suisse electric bike, was won by Paulo Rios, from Portugal. In his absence, the bike was handed to his brother Vitor. The other five winners of the competition also received their prize: Go Sport vouchers. A peize draw was then organized to award 22 other participants with prizes offered by our commercial partners (Aquaparc, BCGE, L’Occitane, Passeport Gourmand, Sephora, Theater La Comédie de Genève), whom we would like to warmly thank. After all prices were distributed the evening continued with discussions around a friendly drink.

  10. Competitive Framing

    OpenAIRE

    Ran Spiegler

    2014-01-01

    I present a simple framework for modeling two-firm market competition when consumer choice is "frame-dependent", and firms use costless "marketing messages" to influence the consumer's frame. This framework embeds several recent models in the "behavioral industrial organization" literature. I identify a property that consumer choice may satisfy, which extends the concept of Weighted Regularity due to Piccione and Spiegler (2012), and provide a characterization of Nash equilibria under this pr...

  11. Effects of interspecific competition on the growth of macrophytes and nutrient removal in constructed wetlands: A comparative assessment of free water surface and horizontal subsurface flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yucong; Wang, Xiaochang; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Zhao, Yaqian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Ge, Yuan; Xiong, Jiaqing

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of competition between adjoining interspecific colonies of Phragmites and Typha in two large field pilot-scale free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SSF) CWs is evaluated. According to findings, the effect of interspecific competition was notable for Phragmites australis, whereby it showed the highest growth performance in both FWS and SSF wetland. In a mixed-culture, P. australis demonstrates superiority in terms of competitive interactions for space between plants. Furthermore, the interspecific competition among planted species seemed to cause different ecological responses of plant species in the two CWs. For example, while relatively high density and shoot height determined the high aboveground dry weight of P. australis in the FWS wetland, this association was not evident in the SSF. Additionally, while plants nutrients uptake accounts for a higher proportion of the nitrogen removal in FWS, that in the SSF accounts for a higher proportion of the phosphorous removal. PMID:26874442

  12. Effects of experience on the dimensions of intensity, direction and frequency of the competitive anxiety and self-confidence: A study in athletes of individual and team sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gimenes Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study had the following objectives: i to examine the inter-scale correlations between the three dimensions of responses (intensity, direction and frequency of the CSAI-2R and its relationship with competitive experience, and ii evaluate the effect of competitive experience anxiety (cognitive and somatic and self-confidence in the total sample and for different types of modalities (individual vs. team. The sample consisted of 267 athletes (196 male and 71 female, of different sports, aged between 18 and 40 years (M = 24.30, SD = 5.62. Athletes completed the Brazilian version of the CSAI-2, which included the addition of the dimensions of direction and frequency response. Spearman test and Manova were used for the data analysis. Overall, it was found that the competitive experience has a high multivariate and significant effect on the dimensions of competitive anxiety. Both individual and team athletes with low competitive experience showed a trend to report lower levels of self-confidence intensity, compared to counterparts with high competitive experience. These results were discussed in view of the theoretic framework and practical implications planning Sport Psychology intervention programs in local athletes with different backgrounds.

  13. Effects of bacterial host and dichloromethane dehalogenase on the competitiveness of methylotrophic bacteria growing with dichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisi, D; Willi, L; Traber, H; Leisinger, T; Vuilleumier, S

    1998-04-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain DM4 and Methylophilus sp. strain DM11 can grow with dichloromethane (DCM) as the sole source of carbon and energy by virtue of homologous glutathione-dependent DCM dehalogenases with markedly different kinetic properties (the kcat values of the enzymes of these strains are 0.6 and 3.3 S-1, respectively, and the Km values are 9 and 59 microM, respectively). These strains, as well as transconjugant bacteria expressing the DCM dehalogenase gene (dcmA) from DM11 or DM4 on a broad-host-range plasmid in the background of dcmA mutant DM4-2cr, were investigated by growing them under growth-limiting conditions and in the presence of an excess of DCM. The maximal growth rates and maximal levels of dehalogenase for chemostat-adapted bacteria were higher than the maximal growth rates and maximal levels of dehalogenase for batch-grown bacteria. The substrate saturation constant of strain DM4 was much lower than the Km of its associated dehalogenase, suggesting that this strain is adapted to scavenge low concentrations of DCM. Strains and transconjugants expressing the DCM dehalogenase from strain DM11, on the other hand, had higher growth rates than bacteria expressing the homologous dehalogenase from strain DM4. Competition experiments performed with pairs of DCM-degrading strains revealed that a strain expressing the dehalogenase from DM4 had a selective advantage in continuous culture under substrate-limiting conditions, while strains expressing the DM11 dehalogenase were superior in batch culture when there was an excess of substrate. Only DCM-degrading bacteria with a dcmA gene similar to that from strain DM4, however, were obtained in batch enrichment cultures prepared with activated sludge from sewage treatment plants. PMID:9546153

  14. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Ruchala, Gabriele K.; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a stylized market for experience goods. If interaction is anonymous, such markets perform poorly: sellers are not trustworthy, and buyers do not trust sellers. If sellers are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples...... but is still at only a third of the first best. Adding more information by granting buyers access to all sellers’ complete history has, somewhat surprisingly, no effect. On the other hand, we find that competition, coupled with some minimal information, eliminates the trust problem almost completely...

  15. Magnetic field effect on the pairing state competition in quasi-one-dimensional organic superconductors (TMTSF)2X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effect of the magnetic field on the pairing state competition in organic conductors (TMTSF)2X by applying random phase approximation to a quasi-one-dimensional extended Hubbard model. We show that the singlet pairing, triplet pairing and the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) superconducting states may compete when charge fluctuations coexist with spin fluctuations. This rises a possibility of a consecutive transition from singlet pairing to FFLO state and further to Sz = 1 triplet pairing upon increasing the magnetic field. We also show that the singlet and Sz = 0 triplet components of the gap function in the FFLO state have 'd-wave' and 'f-wave' forms, respectively, which are strongly mixed.

  16. Effectiveness of competitive activity of high class hockey players accounting a level of their self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhnov A.P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study the effect of increasing the level of self-esteem on the efficiency of competitive activity of high class players. Material : the study involved sixteen athletes (Atlanta, Moscow region. - Continental Hockey League. Results : it was found that the application of special training self-esteem increases the level of implementation of technical and tactical action games. Number of goals increased by 8.92%, assists - 21.5%, the total number of shots on goal - to 20.02%. Conclusions : it is recommended specialized program correction level of self-esteem from 10 separate studies. Classes have different target setting: habit forming positive attitudes towards themselves, develop skills of active life position, securing high self-esteem. The program is used for two weeks in the preparatory period of training.

  17. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kammerhofer, N.; Egger, B.; Dobrev, Petre; Vaňková, Radomíra; Hofmann, J.; Schausberger, P.; Wieczorek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 22 (2015), s. 7005-7017. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14120 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Aboveground–belowground interactions * Frankliniella occidentalis * herbivores Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.526, year: 2014

  18. The effect of UV-B radiation enhancement on the interspecific competition between Skeletonema costatum and Heterosigma akashiwo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hui; TANG Xuexi; ZHANG Peiyu; CAI Hengjiang

    2005-01-01

    The responses of the interspecific competition between Skeletonema costatum and Heterosigma akashiwo to UV-B radiation enhancement were studied by the co-culture method. The results showed that Heterosigma akashiwo exhibited inhibition on the growth of Skeletonema costatum, and with the increase of initial inoculation density of Heterosigma akashiwo, heavier inhibition on Skeletonema costatum appeared. Under different inoculation proportions, Heterosigma akashiwo could always be in predominance in competition with Skeletonema costatum. The UV-B radiation treatment could change the competition relationship between Skeletonema costatum and Heterosigma akashiwo, which could increase the competitive dominance of Skeletonema costatum and decrease the competitive dominance of Heterosigma akashiwo. When the inoculation proportions of Heterosigma akashiwo and Skeletonema costatum were H:S=1:4 and H:S=1:1, Skeletonema costatum was in predominance in this competition; however, Heterosigma akashiwo was in predominance when the inoculation proportion was H:S=4:1.

  19. Effect of naloxone on food competition aggression in food-restricted high and low aggression pigeons (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fachinelli

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone on aggression, emotion, feeder control, and eating behavior in high and low aggression female pigeons maintained at 80% of their normal weight and exposed to food competition interactions. Pigeons were divided into pairs by previously ranked high aggression (total time spent in offensive aggression exceeding 60 s/5 min; N = 6 pairs and low aggression females (time spent in offensive aggression less than 10 s/5 min; N = 6 pairs. A pigeon in each pair received an sc dose of naloxone (1 mg kg-1 ml saline-1 and the other animal received the vehicle. Trials (10 min were performed 30 min after the naloxone/vehicle administration. The naloxone group of high aggression pigeons showed lower scores of total time spent in offensive aggression (control: 98.6 ± 12.0; naloxone: 46.8 ± 6.6 s; P < 0.05 and higher scores of time spent in emotional responses (control: 3.5 ± 0.6; naloxone: 10.8 ± 2.4 s; P < 0.05 than controls. The other behaviors scored, feeder control and eating behavior, were not affected in this group. The naloxone group of low aggression pigeons, however, showed higher scores of offensive aggression than their controls (5.3 ± 1.3; naloxone: 28.7 ± 8.0 s; P < 0.05. The present results suggest that opiate receptor mechanisms are implicated in offensive aggression responses in high and low aggression pigeons. However, as reported for brain 5-hydroxytryptamine manipulation and GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor manipulation, the effect of the opiate receptor antagonist on food competition aggression in pigeons was related to their pretreatment level of aggression.

  20. Acute Effects of Competitive Exercise on Risk-Taking in a Sample of Adolescent Male Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Anne C.; Hochman, Edward; Rosen, Marc I.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise acutely reduces cravings for tobacco and alcohol, but the mechanism accounting for this relationship is not fully understood. To explore exercise's effects on general risk-taking, we compared the performances of 20 adolescent male athletes on the balloon analog risk task (BART) immediately after periods of exercise (playing tennis) and rest. Statistically significant risk-taking effects were observed post-exercise. The established attenuating effect of exercise on desire for substanc...