WorldWideScience

Sample records for bedrock-aquifer transportable testing

  1. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual for the Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Allen M.

    2007-01-01

    A borehole testing apparatus has been designed to isolate discrete intervals of a bedrock borehole and conduct hydraulic tests or collect water samples for geochemical analyses. This borehole testing apparatus, referred to as the Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3), includes two borehole packers, which when inflated can form a pressure-tight seal against smooth borehole walls; a pump apparatus to withdraw water from between the two packers; a fluid-injection apparatus to inject water between the two packers; pressure transducers to monitor fluid pressure between the two packers, as well as above and below the packers; flowmeters to monitor rates of fluid withdrawal or fluid injection; and data-acquisition equipment to record and store digital records from the pressure transducers and flowmeters. The generic design of this apparatus was originally discussed in United States Patent Number 6,761,062 (Shapiro, 2004). The prototype of the apparatus discussed in this report is designed for boreholes that are approximately 6 inches in diameter and can be used to depths of approximately 300 feet below land surface. The apparatus is designed to fit in five hard plastic boxes that can be shipped by overnight freight car-riers. The equipment can be assembled rapidly once it is removed from the shipping boxes, and the length of the test interval (the distance between the two packers) can be adjusted to account for different borehole conditions without reconfiguring the downhole components. The downhole components of the Multifunction BAT3 can be lowered in a borehole using steel pipe or a cable; a truck mounted winch or a winch and tripod can be used for this purpose. The equipment used to raise and lower the downhole components of the Multifunction BAT3 must be supplied on site, along with electrical power, a compressor or cylinders of compressed gas to inflate the packers and operate downhole valves, and the proper length of tubing to connect the

  2. Ultramafic-derived arsenic in a fractured bedrock aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Peter C.; Kim, Jonathan; Wall, Andrew J.; Moen, Jonathan C.; Corenthal, Lilly G.; Chow, Daniel R.; Sullivan, Colleen M.; Bright, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Arsenic is elevated in groundwater from a fractured bedrock aquifer system in northern Vermont, USA. → The arsenic source is serpentinized ultramafic rock. → Antigorite, magnetite (MgCO 3 ) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) appear to be the main mineralogical hosts of arsenic in the ultramafic rock. → Arsenic appears to be introduced to the ultramafic rock when As-bearing fluids are driven out of sediments during subduction. → The occurrence of serpentinized ultramafic rocks in many orogenic belts suggests that similar arsenic anomalies may occur in geologically-similar terranes globally. - Abstract: In the fractured bedrock aquifer of northern Vermont, USA, As concentrations in groundwater range from 3 ) with lesser amounts in magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ). Hydrochemistry of monitoring wells drilled into fractured ultramafic rock in a groundwater recharge area with no anthropogenic As source reveals above background As (2-9 μg/L) and an Mg-HCO 3 hydrochemical signature that reflects dissolution of antigorite and magnesite, confirming that As in groundwater can be derived from ultramafic rock dissolution. Arsenic mobility in groundwater affected by ultramafic rock dissolution may be enhanced by alkaline pH values and relatively high HCO 3 - concentrations.

  3. Ultramafic-derived arsenic in a fractured bedrock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P.C.; Kim, J.; Wall, A.J.; Moen, J.C.; Corenthal, L.G.; Chow, D.R.; Sullivan, C.M.; Bright, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In the fractured bedrock aquifer of northern Vermont, USA, As concentrations in groundwater range from chemical extraction, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stoichiometric analysis indicates that the majority of the As is located in antigorite and magnesite (MgCO3) with lesser amounts in magnetite (Fe3O4). Hydrochemistry of monitoring wells drilled into fractured ultramafic rock in a groundwater recharge area with no anthropogenic As source reveals above background As (2-9??g/L) and an Mg-HCO3 hydrochemical signature that reflects dissolution of antigorite and magnesite, confirming that As in groundwater can be derived from ultramafic rock dissolution. Arsenic mobility in groundwater affected by ultramafic rock dissolution may be enhanced by alkaline pH values and relatively high HCO3- concentrations. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Flow and sorption controls of groundwater arsenic in individual boreholes from bedrock aquifers in central Maine, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiang [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9 W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College and Graduate Center, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Culbertson, Charles W.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Schalk, Charles W. [U.S. Geological Survey, Maine Water Science Center, 196 Whitten Road, Augusta, ME 04330 (United States); Johnson, Carole D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of Geophysics, 11 Sherman Place, Unit 5015, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Marvinney, Robert G. [Maine Geological Survey, 93 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333 (United States); Stute, Martin [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9 W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yan.zheng@qc.cuny.edu [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9 W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College and Graduate Center, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To understand the hydrogeochemical processes regulating well water arsenic (As) evolution in fractured bedrock aquifers, three domestic wells with [As] up to 478 μg/L are investigated in central Maine. Geophysical logging reveals that fractures near the borehole bottom contribute 70–100% of flow. Borehole and fracture water samples from various depths show significant proportions of As (up to 69%) and Fe (93–99%) in particulates (> 0.45 μm). These particulates and those settled after a 16-day batch experiment contain 560–13,000 mg/kg of As and 14–35% weight/weight of Fe. As/Fe ratios (2.5–20 mmol/mol) and As partitioning ratios (adsorbed/dissolved [As], 20,000–100,000 L/kg) suggest that As is sorbed onto amorphous hydrous ferric oxides. Newly drilled cores also show enrichment of As (up to 1300 mg/kg) sorbed onto secondary iron minerals on the fracture surfaces. Pumping at high flow rates induces large decreases in particulate As and Fe, a moderate increase in dissolved [As] and As(III)/As ratio, while little change in major ion chemistry. The δD and δ{sup 18}O are similar for the borehole and fracture waters, suggesting a same source of recharge from atmospheric precipitation. Results support a conceptual model invoking flow and sorption controls on groundwater [As] in fractured bedrock aquifers whereby oxygen infiltration promotes the oxidation of As-bearing sulfides at shallower depths in the oxic portion of the flow path releasing As and Fe; followed by Fe oxidation to form Fe oxyhydroxide particulates, which are transported in fractures and sorb As along the flow path until intercepted by boreholes. In the anoxic portions of the flow path, reductive dissolution of As-sorbed iron particulates could re-mobilize As. For exposure assessment, we recommend sampling of groundwater without filtration to obtain total As concentration in groundwater. - Highlights: • Most Fe and some As exist as particulates in the tested borehole and fracture water.

  5. The relationship between hydrogeologic properties and sedimentary facies: an example from Pennsylvanian bedrock aquifers, southwestern Indiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.T.; Barnhill, M.; Revenaugh, J.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the hydrogeologic properties and sedimentary facies of shallow Pennsylvanian bedrock aquifers was examined using detailed sedimentologic descriptions, aquifer (slug) tests, and gamma ray logs. The main goal of the study was to determine if it was possible to reliably estimate near-well hydraulic conductivities using core descriptions and logging data at a complex field site, based on assignment of consistent conductivity indicators to individual facies. Lithologic information was gathered from three sources: core descriptions, simplified lithologic columns derived from the core descriptions, and drillers' logs. Gamma ray data were collected with a conventional logging instrument. Slug tests were conducted in all wells containing screened zones entirely within the Pennsylvanian facies of interest. Simplified subsets of sedimentologic facies were assembled for classification of subsurface geology, and all rocks within the screened intervals of test wells were assigned to individual facies based on visual descriptions. Slug tests were conducted to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity (a spatial average within the screened interval) in the immediate vicinity of the wells, with measured values varying from 10 -4 m/s to 10 -8 m/s. Gamma ray logs from these wells revealed variations in raw counts above about 1.5 orders of magnitude. Data were combined using simple linear and nonlinear inverse techniques to derive relations between sedimentologic facies, gamma ray signals, and bulk hydraulic conductivities. The analyses suggest that facies data alone, even those derived from detailed core descriptions, are insufficient for estimating hydraulic conductivity in this setting to better than an order of magnitude. The addition of gamma ray data improved the estimates, as did selective filtering of several extreme values from the full data set. Better estimates might be obtained through more careful field measurements and reduction of

  6. Nitrate distribution and potential attenuation mechanisms of a municipal water supply bedrock aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opazo, Tomás; Aravena, Ramón; Parker, Beth

    2016-01-01

    The Silurian bedrock aquifer constitutes a major aquifer system for groundwater supply across the Ontario province in Canada. The application of natural and industrial fertilizers near urban centers has led to groundwater NO_3"−-N concentrations that sometimes have exceeded the drinking water limit, posing a threat to the usage of groundwater for the human consumption. Therefore, there is a growing interest and concern about how nitrate is being leached, transported and potentially attenuated in bedrock aquifers. This study assesses the local distribution of groundwater NO_3"− in the up-gradient area of two historically impacted municipal wells, called Carter Wells, in the City of Guelph, Canada, in order to evaluate the potential nitrate attenuation mechanisms, using both groundwater geochemical and isotopic analysis ("3H, δ"1"5N-NO_3, δ"1"8O-NO_3, δ"1"8O-SO_4, δ"3"4S-SO_4) and a detailed vertical hydrogeological and geochemical bedrock characterization. The results indicate that probably the main source of nitrate to the Carter Wells is the up-gradient Arkell Research Station (ARS), an agricultural research facility where manure has been historically applied. The overburden and bedrock groundwater with high NO_3 concentrations at the ARS exhibits a manure-related δ"1"5N and δ"1"8O signature, isotopically similar to the high nitrate in the down-gradient groundwater from domestic wells and from the Carter Wells. The nitrate spatial distribution appears to be influenced and controlled by the geology, in which more permeable rock is found in the Guelph Formation which in turn is related to most of the high NO_3"− groundwater. The presence of an underlying low permeability Eramosa Formation favors the development of oxygen-depleted conditions, a key factor for the occurrence of denitrification. Groundwater with low NO_3"−-N concentrations associated with more oxygen-limited conditions and coincident with high SO_4"2"− concentrations are related to more

  7. Flow and sorption controls of groundwater arsenic in individual boreholes from bedrock aquifers in central Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Culbertson, Charles W.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Schalk, Charles W.; Johnson, Carole D.; Marvinney, Robert G.; Stute, Martin; Zheng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    To understand the hydrogeochemical processes regulating well water arsenic (As) evolution in fractured bedrock aquifers, three domestic wells with [As] up to 478 μg/L are investigated in central Maine. Geophysical logging reveals that fractures near the borehole bottom contribute 70-100% of flow. Borehole and fracture water samples from various depths show significant proportions of As (up to 69%) and Fe (93-99%) in particulates (>0.45 μm). These particulates and those settled after a 16-day batch experiment contain 560-13,000 g/kg of As and 14-35% weight/weight of Fe. As/Fe ratios (2.5-20 mmol/mol) and As partitioning ratios (adsorbed/dissolved [As], 20,000-100,000 L/kg) suggest that As is sorbed onto amorphous hydrous ferric oxides. Newly drilled cores also show enrichment of As (up to 1300 mg/kg) sorbed onto secondary iron minerals on the fracture surfaces. Pumping at high flow rates induces large decreases in particulate As and Fe, a moderate increase in dissolved [As] and As(III)/As ratio, while little change in major ion chemistry. The δD and δ18O are similar for the borehole and fracture waters, suggesting a same source of recharge from atmospheric precipitation. Results support a conceptual model invoking flow and sorption controls on groundwater [As] in fractured bedrock aquifers whereby oxygen infiltration promotes the oxidation of As-bearing sulfides at shallower depths in the oxic portion of the flow path releasing As and Fe; followed by Fe oxidation to form Fe oxyhydroxide particulates, which are transported in fractures and sorb As along the flow path until intercepted by boreholes. In the anoxic portions of the flow path, reductive dissolution of As-sorbed iron particulates could re-mobilize As. For exposure assessment, we recommend sampling of groundwater without filtration to obtain total As concentration in groundwater.

  8. Characterising Bedrock Aquifer Systems in Korea Using Paired Water-Level Monitoring Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Min Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on characterising aquifer systems based on water-level changes observed systematically at 159 paired groundwater monitoring wells throughout Korea. Using spectral analysis, principal component analysis (PCA, and cross-correlation analysis with linear regression, aquifer conditions were identified from the comparison of water-level changes in shallow alluvial and deep bedrock monitoring wells. The spectral analysis could identify the aquifer conditions (i.e., unconfined, semi-confined and confined of 58.5% of bedrock wells and 42.8% of alluvial wells: 93 and 68 wells out of 159 wells, respectively. Even among the bedrock wells, 50 wells (53.7% exhibited characteristics of the unconfined condition, implying significant vulnerability of the aquifer to contaminants from the land surface and shallow depths. It appears to be better approach for deep bedrock aquifers than shallow alluvial aquifers. However, significant portions of the water-level changes remained unclear for categorising aquifer conditions due to disturbances in data continuity. For different aquifer conditions, PCA could show typical pattern and factor scores of principal components. Principal component 1 due to wet-and-dry seasonal changes and water-level response time was dominant covering about 55% of total variances of each aquifer conditions, implying the usefulness of supplementary method of aquifer characterisation. Cross-correlation and time-lag analysis in the water-level responses to precipitations clearly show how the water levels in shallow and deep wells correspond in time scale. No significant differences in time-lags was found between shallow and deep wells. However, clear time-lags were found to be increasing from unconfined to confined conditions: from 1.47 to 2.75 days and from 1.78 to 2.75 days for both shallow alluvial and deep bedrock wells, respectively. In combination of various statistical methods, three types of water-level fluctuation

  9. Bedrock aquifers of eastern San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles

    1986-01-01

    This study is one of a series of studies appraising the waterbearing properties of the Navajo Sandstone and associated formations in southern Utah.  The study area is about 4,600 square miles, extending from the Utah-Arizona State line northward to the San Juan-Grand County line and westward from the Utah-Colorado State line to the longitude of about 109°50'.Some of the water-yielding formations are grouped into aquifer systems. The C aquifer is comprised of the DeChelly Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation.  The P aquifer is comprised of the Cedar Mesa Member of the Cutler Formation and the undifferentiated Cutler Formation. The N aquifer is comprised of the sedimentary section that includes the Wingate Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, Navajo Sandstone, Carmel Formation, and Entrada sandstone.  The M aquifer is comprised of the Bluff Sandstone Member and other sandstone units of the Morrison Formation.  The D aquifer is comprised of the Burro Canyon Formation and Dakota Sandstone.  Discharge from the ground-water reservoir to the San Juan River between gaging stations at Four Corners and Mexican Hat is about 66 cubic feet per second.The N aquifer is the main aquifer in the study area. Recharge by infiltration of precipitation is estimated to be 25,000 acre-feet per year.  A major ground-water divide exists under the broad area east of Monticello.  The thickness of the N aquifer, where the sedimentary section is fully preserved and saturated, generally is 750 to 1,250 feet.   Hydraulic conductivity values obtained from aquifer tests range from 0.02 to 0.34 foot per day.  The total volume of water in transient storage is about 11 million acre-feet. Well discharge somewhat exceeded 2,340 acre-feet during 1981.  Discharge to the San Juan River from the N aquifer is estimated to be 6.9 cubic feet per second. Water quality ranges from a calcium bicarbonate to sodium chloride type water

  10. Detections of MTBE in surficial and bedrock aquifers in New England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in 24% of water samples collected from surficial and bedrock aquifers in areas of New England. MTBE was the most frequently detected volatile organic compound among the 60 volatile chemicals analyzed and was present in 33 of 133 wells sampled from July 1993 through September 1995. The median MTBE concentration measured in ground-water samples was 0.45 microgram per liter and concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 microgram per liter. The network of wells sampled for MTBE consisted of 103 monitoring wells screened in surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers and 30 domestic-supply wells in fractured crystalline bedrock aquifers. Seventy-seven percent of all MTBE detections were from 26 shallow monitoring wells screened in surficial aquifers. MTBE was detected in42% of monitoring wells in urban areas. In agricultural areas, MTBE was detected i 8% (2 of 24) of wells and was not detected in undeveloped areas. Sixty-two percent of the MTBE detections in surficial aquifers were from wells within 0.25 mile of gasoline stations or underground gasoline storage tanks; all but one of these wells were in Connecticut and Massachusetts, where reformulated gasoline is used. MTBE was detected in 23% of deep domestic-supply wells that tapped fractured bedrock aquifers. MTBE was detected in bedrock wells only in Connecticut and Massachusetts; land use near the wells was suburban to rural, and none of the sampled bedrock wells were within 0.25 mile of a gasoline station

  11. Denitrification and dilution along fracture flowpaths influence the recovery of a bedrock aquifer from nitrate contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonathan J., E-mail: jon.kim@vermont.gov [Vermont Geological Survey, 1 National Life Drive, Main 2, Montpelier, VT 05620 (United States); Comstock, Jeff [Vermont Agency of Agriculture, 116 State Street, Montpelier, VT 05620 (United States); Ryan, Peter [Dept. of Geology, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Heindel, Craig [Waite-Heindel Environmental Management, 7 Kilburn Street, Suite 301, Burlington, VT 05401 (United States); Koenigsberger, Stephan [Dept. of Geology, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    In 2000, elevated nitrate concentrations ranging from 12 to 34 mg/L NO{sub 3}−N were discovered in groundwater from numerous domestic bedrock wells adjacent to a large dairy farm in central Vermont. Long-term plots and contours of nitrate vs. time for bedrock wells showed “little/no”, “moderate”, and “large” change patterns that were spatially separable. The metasedimentary bedrock aquifer is strongly anisotropic and groundwater flow is controlled by fractures, bedding/foliation, and basins and ridges in the bedrock surface. Integration of the nitrate concentration vs. time data and the physical and chemical aquifer characterization suggest two nitrate sources: a point source emanating from a waste ravine and a non-point source that encompasses the surrounding fields. Once removed, the point source of NO{sub 3} (manure deposited in a ravine) was exhausted and NO{sub 3} dropped from 34 mg/L to < 10 mg/L after ~ 10 years; however, persistence of NO{sub 3} in the 3 to 8 mg/L range (background) reflects the long term flux of nitrates from nutrients applied to the farm fields surrounding the ravine over the years predating and including this study. Inferred groundwater flow rates from the waste ravine to either moderate change wells in basin 2 or to the shallow bedrock zone beneath the large change wells are 0.05 m/day, well within published bedrock aquifer flow rates. Enrichment of {sup 15}N and {sup 18}O in nitrate is consistent with lithotrophic denitrification of NO{sub 3} in the presence of dissolved Mn and Fe. Once the ravine point-source was removed, denitrification and dilution collectively were responsible for the down-gradient decrease of nitrate in this bedrock aquifer. Denitrification was most influential when NO{sub 3}−N was > 10 mg/L. Our multidisciplinary methods of aquifer characterization are applicable to groundwater contamination in any complexly-deformed and metamorphosed bedrock aquifer. - Highlights: • Bedrock wells contaminated

  12. Flow and sorption controls of groundwater arsenic in individual boreholes from bedrock aquifers in central Maine, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Culbertson, Charles W; Nielsen, Martha G; Schalk, Charles W; Johnson, Carole D; Marvinney, Robert G; Stute, Martin; Zheng, Yan

    2015-02-01

    To understand the hydrogeochemical processes regulating well water arsenic (As) evolution in fractured bedrock aquifers, three domestic wells with [As] up to 478 μg/L are investigated in central Maine. Geophysical logging reveals that fractures near the borehole bottom contribute 70-100% of flow. Borehole and fracture water samples from various depths show significant proportions of As (up to 69%) and Fe (93-99%) in particulates (>0.45 μm). These particulates and those settled after a 16-day batch experiment contain 560-13,000 mg/kg of As and 14-35% weight/weight of Fe. As/Fe ratios (2.5-20 mmol/mol) and As partitioning ratios (adsorbed/dissolved [As], 20,000-100,000 L/kg) suggest that As is sorbed onto amorphous hydrous ferric oxides. Newly drilled cores also show enrichment of As (up to 1300 mg/kg) sorbed onto secondary iron minerals on the fracture surfaces. Pumping at high flow rates induces large decreases in particulate As and Fe, a moderate increase in dissolved [As] and As(III)/As ratio, while little change in major ion chemistry. The δD and δ(18)O are similar for the borehole and fracture waters, suggesting a same source of recharge from atmospheric precipitation. Results support a conceptual model invoking flow and sorption controls on groundwater [As] in fractured bedrock aquifers whereby oxygen infiltration promotes the oxidation of As-bearing sulfides at shallower depths in the oxic portion of the flow path releasing As and Fe; followed by Fe oxidation to form Fe oxyhydroxide particulates, which are transported in fractures and sorb As along the flow path until intercepted by boreholes. In the anoxic portions of the flow path, reductive dissolution of As-sorbed iron particulates could re-mobilize As. For exposure assessment, we recommend sampling of groundwater without filtration to obtain total As concentration in groundwater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie C.C.; Aravena, Ramon; Canals, Àngels; Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ 13 C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ 37 Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ 37 Cl and δ 13 C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ( 13 C, 35 Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer

  14. Denitrification and dilution along fracture flowpaths influence the recovery of a bedrock aquifer from nitrate contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jonathan J.; Comstock, Jeff; Ryan, Peter; Heindel, Craig; Koenigsberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, elevated nitrate concentrations ranging from 12 to 34 mg/L NO_3−N were discovered in groundwater from numerous domestic bedrock wells adjacent to a large dairy farm in central Vermont. Long-term plots and contours of nitrate vs. time for bedrock wells showed “little/no”, “moderate”, and “large” change patterns that were spatially separable. The metasedimentary bedrock aquifer is strongly anisotropic and groundwater flow is controlled by fractures, bedding/foliation, and basins and ridges in the bedrock surface. Integration of the nitrate concentration vs. time data and the physical and chemical aquifer characterization suggest two nitrate sources: a point source emanating from a waste ravine and a non-point source that encompasses the surrounding fields. Once removed, the point source of NO_3 (manure deposited in a ravine) was exhausted and NO_3 dropped from 34 mg/L to 10 mg/L. Our multidisciplinary methods of aquifer characterization are applicable to groundwater contamination in any complexly-deformed and metamorphosed bedrock aquifer. - Highlights: • Bedrock wells contaminated with nitrates at a dairy farm in Vermont, U.S.A. • Nitrate concentration vs. time patterns for wells were spatially separable. • Multidisciplinary aquifer characterization used physical and chemical methods. • Denitrification dominant over dilution along fracture flowpaths • Conceptual model shows exhaustion of a nitrate point-source over 12 years.

  15. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  16. Hydrogeology - AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_BEDROCK_IDNR_IN: Bedrock Aquifer Systems of Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:500,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_BEDROCK_IDNR_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows bedrock aquifer systems of the State of Indiana. The source scale of the map depicting the aquifers...

  17. Fingerprinting TCE in a bedrock aquifer using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojkasek-Lima, Paulo; Aravena, Ramon; Parker, Beth L; Cherry, John A

    2012-01-01

    A dual isotope approach based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) was used to identify sources of persistent trichloroethylene (TCE) that caused the shut-down in 1994 of a municipal well in an extensive fractured dolostone aquifer beneath Guelph, Ontario. Several nearby industrial properties have known subsurface TCE contamination; however, only one has created a comprehensive monitoring network in the bedrock. The impacted municipal well and many monitoring wells were sampled for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic parameters, and CSIA. A wide range in isotope values was observed at the study site. The TCE varies between -35.6‰ and -21.8‰ and from 1.6‰ to 3.2‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. In case of cis-1,2-dichloroethene, the isotope values range between -36.3‰ and -18.9‰ and from 2.4‰ to 4.7‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. The dual isotope approach represented by a plot of δ(13) C vs. δ(37) Cl shows the municipal well samples grouped in a domain clearly separate from all other samples from the property with the comprehensive well network. The CSIA results collected under non-pumping and short-term pumping conditions thus indicate that this particular property, which has been studied intensively for several years, is not a substantial contributor of the TCE presently in the municipal well under non-pumping conditions. This case study demonstrates that CSIA signatures would have been useful much earlier in the quest to examine sources of the TCE in the municipal well if bedrock monitoring wells had been located at several depths beneath each of the potential TCE-contributing properties. Moreover, the CSIA results show that microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE occurs in some parts of the bedrock aquifer. At this site, the use of CSIA for C and Cl in combination with analyses of VOC and redox parameters proved to be important due to the complexity introduced by

  18. Estimation of the groundwater resources of the bedrock aquifers at the Kettle Moraine Springs State Fish Hatchery, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Charles; Feinstein, Daniel T.; Buchwald, Cheryl A.; Hunt, Randall J.; Haserodt, Megan J.

    2017-10-12

    (COAS) near the Kettle Moraine Springs State Fish Hatchery.Three groundwater-flow models were used to estimate the water resources available to the hatchery from bedrock aquifers under selected scenarios of well placement and seasonal water requirements and subject to constraints on the effects of pumping on neighboring wells, local springs, and creeks. Model input data (recharge, water withdrawal, and boundary conditions) for these models were compiled from a number of data and information sources.The first model, named the “KMS model,” (KMS stands for Kettle Moraine Springs) is an inset model derived from a published USGS regional Lake Michigan Basin model and was constructed to simulate groundwater pumping from the semiconfined Silurian aquifer. The second model, named the “Pumping Test model,” was constructed to evaluate an aquifer pumping test conducted in the COAS as part of this project. The Pumping Test model was also used to simulate the local effects of 20 years of groundwater pumping from this deep bedrock aquifer for future hatchery operations. The third model, named the “LMB modified model,” is a version of the published Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) model that was modified with aquifer parameters refined in an area around the hatchery (approximately a 5-mile radius circle, corresponding to the area stressed by the aquifer pumping test). This LMB modified model was applied to evaluate regional effects of pumping from the confined COAS.The available Silurian aquifer groundwater resource was estimated using the KMS model with three scenarios—named “AllConstraints,” “Constraints2,” and “Constraints3”—that specified local water-level and flow constraints such as drawdown at nearby household wells, water levels inside pumping well boreholes, and flow in local streams and springs. Each scenario utilized the MODFLOW Groundwater Management Process (GWM) to select three locations from six candidate locations that provided the greatest

  19. Water resources of Rockland County, New York, 2005-07, with emphasis on the Newark Basin Bedrock Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns over the state of water resources in Rockland County, NY, prompted an assessment of current (2005-07) conditions. The investigation included a review of all water resources but centered on the Newark basin aquifer, a fractured-bedrock aquifer over which nearly 300,000 people reside. Most concern has been focused on this aquifer because of (1) high summer pumping rates, with occasional entrained-air problems and an unexplained water-level decline at a monitoring well, (2) annual withdrawals that have approached or even exceeded previous estimates of aquifer recharge, and (3) numerous contamination problems that have caused temporary or long-term shutdown of production wells. Public water supply in Rockland County uses three sources of water in roughly equal parts: (1) the Newark basin sedimentary bedrock aquifer, (2) alluvial aquifers along the Ramapo and Mahwah Rivers, and (3) surface waters from Lake DeForest Reservoir and a smaller, new reservoir supply in the Highlands part of the county. Water withdrawals from the alluvial aquifer in the Ramapo River valley and the Lake DeForest Reservoir are subject to water-supply application permits that stipulate minimum flows that must be maintained downstream into New Jersey. There is a need, therefore, at a minimum, to prevent any loss of the bedrock-aquifer resource--to maintain it in terms of both sustainable use and water-quality protection. The framework of the Newark basin bedrock aquifer included characterization of (1) the structure and fracture occurrence associated with the Newark basin strata, (2) the texture and thickness of overlying glacial and alluvial deposits, (3) the presence of the Palisades sill and associated basaltic units on or within the Newark basin strata, and (4) the streams that drain the aquifer system. The greatest concern regarding sustainability of groundwater resources is the aquifer response to the seasonal increase in pumping rates from May through October (an average increase

  20. Detecting a Defective Casing Seal at the Top of a Bedrock Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Sandra K; Chesnaux, Romain; Rouleau, Alain

    2016-03-01

    An improperly sealed casing can produce a direct hydraulic connection between two or more originally isolated aquifers with important consequences regarding groundwater quantity and quality. A recent study by Richard et al. (2014) investigated a monitoring well installed in a fractured rock aquifer with a defective casing seal at the soil-bedrock interface. A hydraulic short circuit was detected that produced some leakage between the rock and the overlying deposits. A falling-head permeability test performed in this well showed that the usual method of data interpretation is not valid in this particular case due to the presence of a piezometric error. This error is the direct result of the preferential flow originating from the hydraulic short circuit and the subsequent re-equilibration of the piezometric levels of both aquifers in the vicinity of the inlet and the outlet of the defective seal. Numerical simulations of groundwater circulation around the well support the observed impact of the hydraulic short circuit on the results of the falling-head permeability test. These observations demonstrate that a properly designed falling-head permeability test may be useful in the detection of defective casing seals. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  1. A reconnaissance spatial and temporal assessment of methane and inorganic constituents in groundwater in bedrock aquifers, Pike County, Pennsylvania, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Pike County in northeastern Pennsylvania is underlain by the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale and other shales, formations that have potential for natural gas development. During 2012–13, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pike County Conservation District conducted a reconnaissance study to assess baseline shallow groundwater quality in bedrock aquifers prior to possible shale-gas development in the county. For the spatial component of the assessment, 20 wells were sampled in summer 2012 to provide data on the occurrence of methane and other aspects of existing groundwater quality throughout the county, including concentrations of inorganic constituents commonly present at low levels in shallow, fresh groundwater but elevated in brines. For the temporal component of the assessment, 4 of the 20 wells sampled in summer 2012 were sampled monthly from July 2012 through June 2013 to provide data on seasonal variability in groundwater quality. All water samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, selected inorganic trace constituents (including metals and other elements), stable isotopes of water, radon-222, gross alpha- and gross beta-particle activity, dissolved gases (methane, ethane, and ethene), and, if possible, isotopic composition of methane. Additional analyses for boron and strontium isotopes, age-dating of water, and radium-226 were done on water samples collected from six wells in June 2013.

  2. Interactions between deep bedrock aquifers and surface water in function of recharge and topography: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderniaux, P.; Davy, P.; Le Borgne, T.; Bresciani, E.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.

    2011-12-01

    are used on the whole modelled area, so that the river network is not prescribed but dependent on simulated groundwater conditions. Different recharge conditions were tested (from 20 to 500 mm/yr). Results show that streamline lengths and groundwater ages have exponential distributions with characteristic lengths increasing with decreasing recharge. The total area of discharge zones decreases with recharge. Groundwater age is quite variable and increases with depth, but the variability is much more important in discharge areas than recharge areas. The proportion of groundwater discharge into the sea (compared to total recharge) increases when total recharge decreases. The model was also used to test the influence of heterogeneity or hydraulic conductivity contrast between shallow and deep layers on deep groundwater fluxes. In a completely homogeneous model, deep fluxes are correlated with recharge fluxes. Correlation decreases while contrast increases. If the permeability of the shallow weather zone is now 3 orders of magnitude larger than of deep aquifer, we observed that simulated deep groundwater fluxes increase locally, despite total recharge at the level of the ground surface decreases.

  3. Microbiology of transitional groundwater of the porous overburden and underlying fractured bedrock aquifers in Olkiluoto 2004, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    2006-07-01

    following present day hypotheses can be drawn. Continued investigations will update and test them. 1. The transient between the shallow and deep biospheres occurs at a very shallow depth, typically within the first 15-25 m. 2. The shallow biosphere is dominated by oxygen consuming microorganisms that will block oxygen migration to deeper groundwater. 3. The groundwater depression caused by construction of ONKALO will most probably move the borderline between the shallow and deep biosphere downwards. 4. As the groundwater depression zone deepens, oxygen will intrude from above and microbial oxidation of ferrous iron and pyrite will occur with a concomitant decrease in pH and the deposition of ferric iron oxides in the aquifers. Later, when the repository is closed and the groundwater level is restored, those oxides will add to the radionuclide retention capacity of the rock. 5. At present, a deep biosphere signature is found at relatively shallow depths in Olkiluoto compared to other sites investigated with the same methods (The SKB sites Forsmark, Oskarshamn and Aespoe). (orig.)

  4. How Well Does Fracture Set Characterization Reduce Uncertainty in Capture Zone Size for Wells Situated in Sedimentary Bedrock Aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. C.; Novakowski, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    beyond a threshold concentration within the specified time. Aquifers are simulated by drawing the random spacings and apertures from specified distributions. Predictions are made of capture zone size assuming various degrees of knowledge of these distributions, with the parameters of the horizontal fractures being estimated using simulated hydraulic tests and a maximum likelihood estimator. The uncertainty is evaluated by calculating the variance in the capture zone size estimated in multiple realizations. The results show that despite good strategies to estimate the parameters of the horizontal fractures the uncertainty in capture zone size is enormous, mostly due to the lack of available information on vertical fractures. Also, at realistic distances (less than ten kilometers) and using realistic transmissivity distributions for the horizontal fractures the uptake of solute from fractures into matrix cannot be relied upon to protect the production well from contamination.

  5. Methods for testing transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data

  6. TMIST-2 Transport Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R Longhurst

    2008-01-01

    In anticipation of the TMIST-2 experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor, there was a need to determine if the tritium that is expected to be observed at the outlet of the experiment would be seen or if it may be lost on its way from the experiment in the core to the measurement station. To assist in resolving that issue, a bench-scale experiment was conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory's Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility using deuterium and a mass spectrometer in lieu of tritium with ion chambers, bubblers, and scintillation counting. The experiment replicated the concentration of the hydrogen isotope, the flow rates anticipated, and the residence times. It was found that there was initial uptake on tubing walls, presumably due to oxidation of the hydrogen isotopes to water and adsorption or isotopic exchange, but that saturates relatively quickly, and once saturated, the concentration of deuterium at the outlet of the tubing system was essentially the same as it was at the experiment inlet under the conditions modeled in the experiment

  7. Microbiology of transitional groundwater of the porous overburden and underlying shallow fractured bedrock aquifers in Olkiluoto, Finland. October 2005 - January 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    2007-05-01

    The subsurface biosphere on Earth appears to be far more expansive and metabolically and phylogenetically complex than previously thought. A diverse suite of subsurface environments has been reported to support microbial ecosystems, extending from a few meters below the surface to several thousand meters. The discovery of a deep biosphere will have several important implications for underground repositories for radioactive wastes. The main potential effects of microorganisms in the context of a KBS-3 type repository for spent fuel in the bedrock of Olkiluoto are: (1) Oxygen reduction and maintenance of anoxic and reduced conditions. (2) Bio-immobilisation and bio-mobilisation of radionuclides, and the effects from microbial metabolism on radionuclide mobility. (3) Sulphate reduction to sulphide and the risk for copper sulphide corrosion. The main objective of this study was to characterize the geochemistry, biomass and microbial diversity of shallow subsurface groundwater at Olkiluoto, from 4.0 m down to 14.9 m. This objective also permitted the determination of whether or not there is any transition in the shallow depths at Olkiluoto to microbial conditions associated with the deep subsurface. This was the second investigation that covered both shallow and some moderately deep groundwater microbiology in Olkiluoto. The analysis of microbiology is very important for proper understanding of the evolution of geochemical processes in and around the underground research facility ONKALO being constructed at Olkiluoto by Posiva since autumn 2004, as well as for the planned KBS-3 type spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto. There are several conclusions from this investigation that are of importance for ONKALO. The following present day conclusions can be drawn. Continued investigations will update and test them: The shallow biosphere was dominated by oxygen consuming microorganisms that block oxygen migration to deeper groundwater. This effect was most pronounced during the

  8. Methods for testing transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents progress to date under a three-year contract for developing ''Methods for Testing Transport Models.'' The work described includes (1) choice of best methods for producing ''code emulators'' for analysis of very large global energy confinement databases, (2) recent applications of stratified regressions for treating individual measurement errors as well as calibration/modeling errors randomly distributed across various tokamaks, (3) Bayesian methods for utilizing prior information due to previous empirical and/or theoretical analyses, (4) extension of code emulator methodology to profile data, (5) application of nonlinear least squares estimators to simulation of profile data, (6) development of more sophisticated statistical methods for handling profile data, (7) acquisition of a much larger experimental database, and (8) extensive exploratory simulation work on a large variety of discharges using recently improved models for transport theories and boundary conditions. From all of this work, it has been possible to define a complete methodology for testing new sets of reference transport models against much larger multi-institutional databases

  9. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Alison [Arup, 50 Ringsend Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Nitsche, Janka [RPS, West Pier Business Campus, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Archbold, Marie [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Deakin, Jenny [Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. - Graphical abstract: Contrasting nitrate isotope signatures of groundwater in a free draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly drained catchment underlain by a low transmissivity aquifer. - Highlights: • Comparison of N fate and

  10. Test for radioactive material transport package safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Wang Xuexin; Ma Anping

    2012-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive material transport in China were introduced. Test facilities and data acquiring instruments for radioactive material package in China Institute for Radiation Protection were also introduced in this paper, which were used in drop test and thermal test. Test facilities were constructed according to the requirements of IAEA's 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (TS-R-l) and Chinese 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (GB 11806-2004). Drop test facilities were used in free drop test, penetration test, mechanical test (free drop test Ⅰ, free drop test Ⅱ and free drop test Ⅲ) of type A and type B packages weighing less than thirteen tons. Thermal test of type B packages can be carried out in the thermal test facilities. Certification tests of type FCo70-YQ package, type 30A-HB-01 package, type SY-I package and type XAYT-I package according to regulations were done using these facilities. (authors)

  11. Transport Network Technologies – Study and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozorgebrahimi, K.; Channegowda, M.; Colmenero, A.

    Following on from the theoretical research into Carrier Class Transport Network Technologies (CCTNTs) documented in DJ1.1.1, this report describes the extensive testing performed by JRA1 Task 1. The tests covered EoMPLS, Ethernet OAM, Synchronous Ethernet, PBB-TE, MPLS-TP, OTN and GMPLS...

  12. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  13. Directory of transport packaging test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    Radioactive materials are transported in packagings or containers which have to withstand certain tests depending on whether they are Type A or Type B packagings. In answer to a request by the International Atomic Energy Agency, 13 Member States have provided information on the test facilities and services existing in their country which can be made available for use by other states by arrangement for testing different kinds of packagings. The directory gives the technical information on the facilities, the services, the tests that can be done and in some cases even the financial arrangement is included

  14. Aspheric surface testing by irradiance transport equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomali, Ramin; Darudi, Ahmad; Nasiri, Sadollah; Asgharsharghi Bonab, Armir

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a method for aspheric surface testing is presented. The method is based on solving the Irradiance Transport Equation (ITE).The accuracy of ITE normally depends on the amount of the pick to valley of the phase distribution. This subject is investigated by a simulation procedure.

  15. LCLS-II CRYOMODULE TRANSPORT SYSTEM TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); McGee, Michael W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    The Cryomodules (CM) for the Linear Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will be shipped to SLAC (Menlo Park, California) from JLab (Newport News, Virginia) and FNAL (Batavia, Illinois). A transportation system has been designed and built to safely transport the CMs over the road. It uses an array of helical isolator springs to attenuate shocks on the CM to below 1.5g in all directions. The system rides on trailers equipped with Air-Ride suspension, which attenuates vibration loads. The prototype LCLS-II CM (pCM) was driven 750 miles to test the transport system; shock loggers recorded the shock attenuation on the pCM and vacuum gauges were used to detect any compromises in beamline vacuum. Alignment measurements were taken before and after the trip to check whether cavity positions had shifted beyond the ± 0.2mm spec. Passband frequencies and cavity gradients were measured at 2K at the Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at JLab to identify any degradation of CM performance after transportation. The transport system was found to have safely carried the CM and is cleared to begin shipments from JLab and FNAL to SLAC.

  16. Metallic insulation transport and strainer clogging tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvaerinen, J.; Hongisto, O.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments to probe the transport and clogging properties of metallic (metal reflective) insulation have been carried out in order to provide data for evaluation of their influence on the emergency core cooling and containment spray systems of the Finnish boiling water reactors in the event of a design basis accident. The specific metallic insulation tested was DARMET, provided by Darchem Engineering Ltd. The inner foils of Darmet are dimped. Available literature on the metallic insulation performance under design basis accident conditions has been reviewed. On the basis of the review a parametric approach has been chosen for the transport and clogging experiments. This approach involves testing a wide size range of various shapes of foil pieces. Five sets of experiments have been carried out. The first three sets investigate transport properties of the foil pieces, starting from sedimentation in stagnant waste pool and proceeding to transport in horizontal and vertically circulating flows. The clogging experiments have been addressed the differential pressures obtained due to accumulation of both pure and metallic and a mixture of metallic and fibrous (mineral wool) depris. (4 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.)

  17. Pion interferometric tests of transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, S.S.; Gyulassy, M.; Gavin, S. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1990-01-08

    In hadronic reactions, the usual space-time interpretation of pion interferometry often breaks down due to strong correlations between spatial and momentum coordinates. We derive a general interferometry formula based on the Wigner density formalism that allows for arbitrary phase space and multiparticle correlations. Correction terms due to intermediate state pion cascading are derived using semiclassical hadronic transport theory. Finite wave packets are used to reveal the sensitivity of pion interference effects on the details of the production dynamics. The covariant generalization of the formula is shown to be equivalent to the formula derived via an alternate current ensemble formalism for minimal wave packets and reduces in the nonrelativistic limit to a formula derived by Pratt. The final expression is ideally suited for pion interferometric tests of Monte Carlo transport models. Examples involving gaussian and inside-outside phase space distributions are considered. (orig.).

  18. Pion interferometric tests of transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.; Gyulassy, M.; Gavin, S.

    1990-01-01

    In hadronic reactions, the usual space-time interpretation of pion interferometry often breaks down due to strong correlations between spatial and momentum coordinates. We derive a general interferometry formula based on the Wigner density formalism that allows for arbitrary phase space and multiparticle correlations. Correction terms due to intermediate state pion cascading are derived using semiclassical hadronic transport theory. Finite wave packets are used to reveal the sensitivity of pion interference effects on the details of the production dynamics. The covariant generalization of the formula is shown to be equivalent to the formula derived via an alternate current ensemble formalism for minimal wave packets and reduces in the nonrelativistic limit to a formula derived by Pratt. The final expression is ideally suited for pion interferometric tests of Monte Carlo transport models. Examples involving gaussian and inside-outside phase space distributions are considered. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of percolation rate of bedrock aquifer in coastal area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Jung, Hae Ryong; Park, Joo Wan; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Cheong, Jae Yeol [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Ju [NEXGEO Co. Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Seong Chun [GeoGreen21 Co. Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Estimation of groundwater hydrologic cycle pattern is one of the most critical issues in sustainable management of groundwater resources in coastal area. This study estimated groundwater percolation by using the water balance methodology and hydrogeological characteristics of land use and soil. Evapotranspiration was computed by using the Thornthwaite method, and surface runoff was determined by using the SCS-CN technique. Groundwater storage change was obtained as 229 mm/a (17.8% of the average annual rainfall, 1286 mm/a), with 693 mm/a (60.1%) of evapotranspiration and 124 mm/a (9.6%) of surface runoff. Rainfall and groundwater storage change was highly correlated, comparing with the relationships between rainfall and evapotranspiration, and between rainfall and surface runoff. This result indicates that groundwater storage change responds more sensitively to precipitation than evapotranspiration and surface runoff.

  20. Evaluation of percolation rate of bedrock aquifer in coastal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hwan; Jung, Hae Ryong; Park, Joo Wan; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Cheong, Jae Yeol; Park, Sun Ju; Jun, Seong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of groundwater hydrologic cycle pattern is one of the most critical issues in sustainable management of groundwater resources in coastal area. This study estimated groundwater percolation by using the water balance methodology and hydrogeological characteristics of land use and soil. Evapotranspiration was computed by using the Thornthwaite method, and surface runoff was determined by using the SCS-CN technique. Groundwater storage change was obtained as 229 mm/a (17.8% of the average annual rainfall, 1286 mm/a), with 693 mm/a (60.1%) of evapotranspiration and 124 mm/a (9.6%) of surface runoff. Rainfall and groundwater storage change was highly correlated, comparing with the relationships between rainfall and evapotranspiration, and between rainfall and surface runoff. This result indicates that groundwater storage change responds more sensitively to precipitation than evapotranspiration and surface runoff

  1. Science and Society Test for Scientists: Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafemeister, David

    1976-01-01

    Presents numerous questions concerning transportation systems, energy consumption, noise, air pollution and other transportation oriented topics. Solutions are provided using undergraduate pre-calculus mathematics. (CP)

  2. A class of ejecta transport test problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerberg, James E.; Buttler, William T.; Oro, David M.; Rousculp, Christopher L.; Morris, Christopher; Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2011-01-01

    Hydro code implementations of ejecta dynamics at shocked interfaces presume a source distribution function ofparticulate masses and velocities, f 0 (m, v;t). Some of the properties of this source distribution function have been determined from extensive Taylor and supported wave experiments on shock loaded Sn interfaces of varying surface and subsurface morphology. Such experiments measure the mass moment of f o under vacuum conditions assuming weak particle-particle interaction and, usually, fully inelastic capture by piezo-electric diagnostic probes. Recently, planar Sn experiments in He, Ar, and Kr gas atmospheres have been carried out to provide transport data both for machined surfaces and for coated surfaces. A hydro code model of ejecta transport usually specifies a criterion for the instantaneous temporal appearance of ejecta with source distribution f 0 (m, v;t 0 ). Under the further assumption of separability, f 0 (m,v;t 0 ) = f 1 (m)f 2 (v), the motion of particles under the influence of gas dynamic forces is calculated. For the situation of non-interacting particulates, interacting with a gas via drag forces, with the assumption of separability and simplified approximations to the Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient, the dynamical equation for the time evolution of the distribution function, f(r,v,m;t), can be resolved as a one-dimensional integral which can be compared to a direct hydro simulation as a test problem. Such solutions can also be used for preliminary analysis of experimental data. We report solutions for several shape dependent drag coefficients and analyze the results of recent planar dsh experiments in Ar and Xe.

  3. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  4. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  5. Impact testing of transportation-flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, A.J.

    1985-07-01

    The literature describing flask testing is reviewed and it is concluded that, even though there are numerous references to instrumented impact testing of flasks, there remains a need for a collection of data from carefully constructed and fully instrumented model tests for thorough validation of analytical tools. (author)

  6. HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-17

    HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation (Live 27928, suggested one time and associated Test 27929, required initially and every 36 months) addresses the Department of Transportation (DOT) function-specific training requirements of the hazardous materials packagings and transportation (HMPT) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) lab-wide training. This course addresses the requirements of the DOT that are unique to hazardous waste shipments. Appendix B provides the Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) reference material needed for this course.

  7. The emerging role of transport systems in liver function tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, Bruno; Heger, Michal; de Graaf, Wilmar; Paumgartner, Gustav; van Gulik, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Liver function tests are of critical importance for the management of patients with severe or terminal liver disease. They are also used as prognostic tools for planning liver resections. In recent years many transport systems have been identified that also transport substances employed in liver

  8. Qualification test of packages for transporting radioactive materials and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Santos, P. de; Miaw, S.T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1979 the Waste Treatment Division of Nuclear Tecnology Development Center has been developed and tested packagings for transporting radioactive materials and wastes. The Division has designed facilities for testing Type A packages in accordance with the adopted regulations. The Division has tested several packages for universities, research centers, industries, INB, FURNAS, etc. (author) [pt

  9. FCTESTNET - Testing fuel cells for transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, R.G.; Foster, D.L.; Smokers, R.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    FCTESTNET (Fuel Cell Testing and Standardization Network) is an ongoing European network project within Framework Program 5. It is a three-year project that commenced January 2003, with 55 partners from European research centers, universities, and industry, working in the field of fuel cell R and D.

  10. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10{sup {minus}7} cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results.

  11. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10 -7 cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results

  12. The effects of transport by car on coagulation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Merve; Erdogan, Serpil; Akturk, Onur; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-10-26

    This research investigated the effects of the transport of blood samples between centers/laboratories by car on coagulation tests. Five tubes of blood samples were taken from 20 healthy volunteers. The samples consisted of a baseline (control) group, centrifuged and noncentrifuged transported samples; centrifuged and noncentrifuged untransported samples. The groups of centrifuged and noncentrifuged samples were transported by car for 2 h. The centrifuged and noncentrifuged untransported samples were incubated in the laboratory until the transported samples arrived. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests were conducted for all samples. Significant differences between the baseline group and the centrifuged and noncentrifuged transported samples and the noncentrifuged untransported samples were found for APTT levels (pcar.

  13. Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.H. Liu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4

  14. Intra-site Secure Transport Vehicle test and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the past many DOE and DoD facilities involved in handling nuclear material realized a need to enhance the safely and security for movement of sensitive materials within their facility, or ''intra-site''. There have been prior efforts to improve on-site transportation; however, there remains a requirement for enhanced on-site transportation at a number of facilities. The requirements for on-site transportation are driven by security, safety, and operational concerns. The Intra-site Secure Transport Vehicle (ISTV) was designed to address these concerns specifically for DOE site applications with a standardized vehicle design. This paper briefly reviews the ISTV design features providing significant enhancement of onsite transportation safety and security, and also describes the test and evaluation activities either complete of underway to validate the vehicle design and operation

  15. Design and Test Space Exploration of Transport-Triggered Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach in the high level design and test of transport-triggered architectures (TTA), a special type of application specific instruction processors (ASIP). The proposed method introduces the test as an additional constraint, besides throughput and circuit area. The

  16. Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is information useful to applicants who are preparing for the Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test. The guide describes the basic aeronautical knowledge and associated requirements for certification, as well as information on source material, instructions for taking the official test, and questions that are…

  17. PTC test bed upgrades to provide ACSES testing support capabilities at transportation technology center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    FRA Task Order 314 upgraded the Positive Train Control (PTC) Test Bed at the Transportation Technology Center to support : testing of PTC systems, components, and related equipment associated with the Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement System : (ACSES)...

  18. Lab-scale tests on ISV vapor transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Gardner, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a promising technology for remediating buried waste sites and contaminated soil sites. However, concerns exist that low soil permeabilities may limit vapor transport away from the advancing melt front and cause a melt expulsion that breaches ISV containment. As a result, two ISV lab tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) using INEL soil (permeability: 10 -6 cm/s) and a low permeability (10 -10 cm/s) clay material. The clay test also had a ceramic tube inserted vertically through the center of the area being melted to provide one-dimensional data on vapor transport. Results confirm that low soil permeabilities can limit vapor transport away from the advancing ISV melt front. In addition, peak pressures inside the ceramic tube were significantly greater than those outside the tube, indicating the importance of horizontal vapor transport around the advancing ISV melt front

  19. Testing of a transport cask for research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Silva, Luiz Leite da; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2011-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries which operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a tri-national team and a half-scale model for MTR fuel constructed in Argentina and tested in Brazil. Two test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. Although the specimen has not successfully performed the tests, its overall performance was considered very satisfactory, and improvements are being introduced to the design. A third test sequence is planned for 2011. (author)

  20. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  1. Implementation and testing of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean J.

    2012-01-01

    Detection, identification, and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) all face the same basic challenge: to varying degrees, each must infer the presence, composition, and configuration of the SNM by analyzing a set of measured radiation signatures. Solutions to this problem implement inverse radiation transport methods. Given a set of measured radiation signatures, inverse radiation transport estimates properties of the source terms and transport media that are consistent with those signatures. This paper describes one implementation of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver. The solver simultaneously analyzes gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity measurements to fit a one-dimensional radiation transport model with variable layer thicknesses using nonlinear regression. The solver's essential components are described, and its performance is illustrated by application to benchmark experiments conducted with plutonium metal. - Highlights: ► Inverse problems, specifically applied to identifying and characterizing radiation sources . ► Radiation transport. ► Analysis of gamma spectroscopy and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. ► Experimental testing of the inverse solver against measurements of plutonium.

  2. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  3. Test Report for Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATO) Prototype.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbe, Jeffery G.; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-06-01

    A prototype design for a plutonium air transport package capable of carrying 7.6 kg of plutonium oxide and surviving a ''worst-case'' plane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A series of impact tests were conducted on half-scale models of this design for side, end, and comer orientations at speeds close to 282 m/s onto a target designed to simulate weathered sandstone. These tests were designed to evaluate the performance of the overpack concept and impact-limiting materials in critical impact orientations. The impact tests of the Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP) prototypes were performed at SNL's 10,000-ft rocket sled track. This report describes test facilities calibration and environmental testing methods of the PMATP under specific test conditions. The tests were conducted according to the test plan and procedures that were written by the authors and approved by SNL management and quality assurance personnel. The result of these tests was that the half-scale PMATP survived the ''worst-case'' airplane crash conditions, and indicated that a full-scale PMATP, utilizing this overpack concept and these impact-limiting materials, would also survive these crash conditions.

  4. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  5. Vehicle for transporting instruments for testing against a wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, E.A.; Goldsmith, H.A.; Proudlove, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a non-destructive testing apparatus and, in particular, to a vehicle that can be moved at will, for transporting instruments for testing against a surface remote from the operator. Under this invention a vehicle is intended, for instance, for testing the vessel of an installation containing a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor of the pond type. Such an installation includes a nuclear reactor comprising an assembly containing a nuclear fuel immersed in a pond of liquid metal coolant, located in a vessel which is itself placed in a concrete containment vessel [fr

  6. Transport processes in partially saturate concrete: Testing and liquid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Chiara

    The measurement of transport properties of concrete is considered by many to have the potential to serve as a performance criterion that can be related to concrete durability. However, the sensitivity of transport tests to several parameters combined with the low permeability of concrete complicates the testing. Gas permeability and diffusivity test methods are attractive due to the ease of testing, their non-destructive nature and their potential to correlate to in-field carbonation of reinforced concrete structures. This work was aimed at investigating the potential of existing gas transport tests as a way to reliably quantify transport properties in concrete. In this study gas permeability and diffusivity test methods were analyzed comparing their performance in terms of repeatability and variability. The influence of several parameters was investigated such as moisture content, mixture proportions and gas flow. A closer look to the influence of pressure revealed an anomalous trend of permeability with respect to pressure. An alternative calculation is proposed in an effort to move towards the determination of intrinsic material properties that can serve as an input for service life prediction models. The impact of deicing salts exposure was also analyzed with respect to their alteration of the degree of saturation as this may affect gas transport in cementitious materials. Limited information were previously available on liquid properties over a wide range of concentrations. To overcome this limitation, this study quantified surface tension, viscosity in presence of deicing salts in a broad concentration range and at different temperatures. Existing models were applied to predict the change of fluid properties during drying. Vapor desorption isotherms were obtained to investigate the influence of deicing salts presence on the non-linear moisture diffusion coefficient. Semi-empirical models were used to quantify the initiation and the rate of drying using liquid

  7. Thermal testing of packages for transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be shown capable of surviving tests specified by regulations such as Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (called 10CFR71 in this paper) within the United States. Equivalent regulations hold for other countries such as Safety Series 6 issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The containers must be shown to be capable of surviving, in order, drop tests, puncture tests, and thermal tests. Immersion testing in water is also required, but must be demonstrated for undamaged packages. The thermal test is intended to simulate a 30 minute exposure to a fully engulfing pool fire that could occur if a transport accident involved the spill of large quantities of hydrocarbon fuels. Various qualification methods ranging from pure analysis to actual pool fire tests have been used to prove regulatory compliance. The purpose of this paper is to consider the alternatives for thermal testing, point out the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and to provide the designer with the information necessary to make informed decisions on the proper test program for the particular shipping container under consideration. While thermal analysis is an alternative to physical testing, actual testing is often emphasized by regulators, and this report concentrates on these testing alternatives

  8. GIS Modelling of Radionuclide Transport from the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakay, L.; Zakarin, E.; Mahura, A.; Baklanov, A.; Sorensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the software complex GIS-project MigRad (Migration of Radionuclide) was developed, tested and applied for the territory of the Semipalatinsk test site/ polygon (Republic of Kazakhstan), where since 1961, in total 348 underground nuclear explosions were conducted. The MigRad is oriented on integration of large volumes of different information (mapping, ground-based, and satellite-based survey): and also includes modeling on its base local redistribution of radionuclides by precipitation and surface waters and by long-range transport of radioactive aerosols. The existing thermal anomaly on territory of the polygon was investigated in details, and the object-oriented analysis was applied for the studied area. Employing the RUNOFF model, the simulation of radionuclides migration with surface waters was performed. Employing the DERMA model, the simulation of long-term atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition patterns for cesium was conducted from 3 selected locations (Balapan, Delegen, and Experimental Field). Employing geoinformation technology, the mapping of the of the high temperature zones and epicenters of radioactive aerosols transport for the territory of the test site was carried out with post-processing and integration of modelling results into GIS environment. Contamination levels of pollution due to former nuclear explosions for population and environment of the surrounding polygon territories of Kazakhstan as well as adjacent countries were analyzed and evaluated. The MigRad was designed as instrument for comprehensive analysis of complex territorial processes influenced by former nuclear explosions on the territory of Semipalatinsk test site. It provides possibilities in detailed analyses for (i) extensive cartographic material, remote sensing, and field measurements data collected in different level databases; (ii) radionuclide migration with flows using accumulation and redistribution of soil particles; (iii) thermal anomalies

  9. Design and tests of a package for the transport of radioactive sources; Projeto e testes de uma embalagem para o transporte de fontes radioativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Paulo de Oliveira, E-mail: pos@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The Type A package was designed for transportation of seven cobalt-60 sources with total activity of 1 GBq. The shield thickness to accomplish the dose rate and the transport index established by the radioactive transport regulation was calculated by the code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5). The sealed cobalt-60 sources were tested for leakages. according to the regulation ISO 9978:1992 (E). The package was tested according to regulation Radioactive Material Transport CNEN. The leakage tests results pf the sources, and the package tests demonstrate that the transport can be safe performed from the CDTN to the steelmaking industries

  10. Thermal tests of a transport / Storage cask in buried conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, H.; Gomi, Y.; Saegusa, T.; Ito, C.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal tests for a hypothetical accident which simulated accidents caused by building collapse in case of an earthquake were conducted using a full-scale dry type transport and storage cask (total heat load: 23 kW). The objectives of these tests were to clarify the heat transfer features of the buried cask under such accidents and the time limit for maintaining the thermal integrity of the cask. Moreover, thermal analyses of the test cask under the buried conditions were carried out on basis of experimental results to establish methodology for the thermal analysis. The characteristics of the test cask are described as well as the test method used. The heat transfer features of the buried cask under such accidents and a time for maintaining the thermal integrity of the cask have been obtained. (O.M.)

  11. 75 FR 59105 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... 2105-AE03 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug... the Federal workplace drug testing program but also pointed out that ``* * * the Department of.... Executive Order 12866 and Regulatory Flexibility Act This Interim Final Rule is not significant for purposes...

  12. Testing the quality of underground transport in Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statescu Alexandru

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In a city with overcrowded traffic, a component of the common transport is Bucharest transportation of metro (subway passenger transport on the railway network underground and surface and is the core activity of METROREX S.A. The company aims each year a greater number of passengers according to the charts of the movement of subway trains to ensure adequate transport capacity as required and optimal conditions of comfort and safety. Each year, the company aims to find out the opinion of passengers on the transport conditions and, in this respect, organize a survey with the aim of testing the quality of underground transport in Bucharest in 16 subway stations considered to be representative. In this paper I intend to do an analysis using statistical research methods, of the quality of underground transport in Bucharest, using data from the survey conducted in the year 2014. Data collection in the stations was realized through 32 operators, by 2 in each station (one in each direction of travel by completing questionnaires (using interview technique or face to face technique, using a sample considered representative of 2,400 travelers with a margin of error of ± 2% on a 95% probability level. Data collection was made during the period when passenger traffic is large enough to provide a good representation of data and cover the entire program running underground. The questionnaire contains eight questions that have allowed those who responded to the survey to fit in the time between trains in circulation. In 2016, the structure of the questionnaire was modified, questions were modified for a more effective assessment of characteristics of observation. The answers to the questions contained in the questionnaire were collected by operators in the 16 subway stations: Piața Unirii 1 and 2, Piața Victoriei 1 and 2, Dristor 2, Nicolae Grigorescu, Universitate, Piața Sudului, Pipera, Eroilor, Gara de Nord 1, Obor, Crângași, Pantelimon, Parc Bazilescu

  13. Certification test for safety of new fuel transportation package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Sugawa, Osami; Suga, Masao.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this certification test is to prove the safety of new fuel transportation package against a fire of actual size caused by traffic accidents. After the fire test, the fuel assemblies were covered with coal-tar like material vaporized from anti-shock material used in the container. Surface color of BWR-type fuel assembly was dark grey that is supposed to be the color of oxide of Zircaloy. As for PWR-type fuel assembly, the condition encountered during fire test caused no change to the outlook of the rod element. Both the BWR and PWR type fuel rod elements showed no deformation and were completely sound. Therefore it may be concluded that the container protected the mimic fuel assemblies against fire of 30 minutes duration and caused no damage. This report is the result of the above experiments and examinations, and we appreciate the cooperation of those who are concerned. (J.P.N.)

  14. Development and Testing of Intelligent Alcohol Transportation Security System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velaphi Msomi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and testing of intelligent liquid transportation security system are being reported in this paper. The targeted fluid to be secured was ethanol alcohol and this was due to the theft cases occurring during the transportation of this product from the supplier to the customer. The system was developed such that only the radar level sensor (VEGAPULS 62 might be in contact with the fluid and the rest of the system remained outside the liquid carrying container to be secured. The system was developed such that it reports any abnormal liquid level drop through short message service (SMS. The functioning of the developed system was tested through the use of 1040 L Intermediate Bulk Container (IBC filled with water which was hauled for about 1.5 km. The liquid theft was simulated and the system sent two SMS. The first SMS reported the beginning of water level drop and the second one reported the ending of water level drop. The second SMS reported the amount of liquid that was taken out of the container.

  15. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-01-01

    : identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project

  16. Basic tests on integrity evaluation for natural hexafluoride transporting container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Yoshio; Yamakawa, Hidetsugu; Kato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Seiichi

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the affected factors that needed to integrity evaluation for UF 6 transporting 48Y cylinder, were confirmed by basic tests and preliminary analysis. The factors were the sealing parts and external surface emissivity that ruled both the behavior under fire accident condition and the fire resistance capability of the cylinder, and the external pressure resistance capability at the sunk accident. The results obtained as follows. (1) Confirming tests for fire resistance of cylinder valve and plug, seat leakage of the valve caused at 150 degrees C. by unequal thermal expansion between the valve body and the stem. The tin-lead solder coating the tapered thread of valve and plug, melted at 200 degrees C., then the sealing boundary broke. (2) An external emissivity influence to radiation heat transfer measured with test pieces heated by electric oven. The covered paints of the specimen burned and separated, the emissivity changed 0.4 to 0.6, dependent on the surrounding temperature. Type 48Y cylinder filled with 12.5 tons of UF 6 and the measured emissivity was used the computer code analysis. The hydraulic breaking did not happen under the fire accident condition at 800 degrees C., for 30 minutes. (3) The external pressure test of the valve endured the hydrostatic pressure at 3000 meters, which corresponded to about five times the cylinder body buckling strength. (author)

  17. Development of Onsite Transportation Safety Documents for Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank Hand; Willard Thomas; Frank Sciacca; Manny Negrete; Susan Kelley

    2008-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders require each DOE site to develop onsite transportation safety documents (OTSDs). The Nevada Test Site approach divided all onsite transfers into two groups with each group covered by a standalone OTSD identified as Non-Nuclear and Nuclear. The Non-Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive hazardous material in less than Hazard Category (HC)-3 quantities and all chemically hazardous materials. The Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive material equal to or greater than HC-3 quantities and radioactive material mated with high explosives regardless of quantity. Both OTSDs comply with DOE O 460.1B requirements. The Nuclear OTSD also complies with DOE O 461.1A requirements and includes a DOE-STD-3009 approach to hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis as needed. All Nuclear OTSD proposed transfers were determined to be non-equivalent and a methodology was developed to determine if 'equivalent safety' to a fully compliant Department of Transportation (DOT) transfer was achieved. For each HA scenario, three hypothetical transfers were evaluated: a DOT-compliant, uncontrolled, and controlled transfer. Equivalent safety is demonstrated when the risk level for each controlled transfer is equal to or less than the corresponding DOT-compliant transfer risk level. In this comparison the typical DOE-STD-3009 risk matrix was modified to reflect transportation requirements. Design basis conditions (DBCs) were developed for each non-equivalent transfer. Initial DBCs were based solely upon the amount of material present. Route-, transfer-, and site-specific conditions were evaluated and the initial DBCs revised as needed. Final DBCs were evaluated for each transfer's packaging and its contents

  18. Tritium transport calculations for the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Jana, E-mail: jana.freund@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Abou-Sena, Ali; Franza, Fabrizio; Kondo, Keitaro

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Delivery of material data for the tritium balance in the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module. • Description of the topological models in TMAP and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). • Computation of release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas. • Computation of the loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line. - Abstract: The IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module (TRTM) is projected to measure online the tritium release from breeder ceramics and beryllium pebble beds under high energy neutron irradiation. Tritium produced in the pebble bed of TRTM is swept out continuously by a purge gas flow, but can also permeate into the module's metal structures, and can be lost by permeation to the environment. According analyses on the tritium inventory are performed to support IFMIF plant safety studies, and to support the experiment planning. This paper describes the necessary elements for calculation of the tritium transport in the Tritium Release Test Module as follows: (i) applied equations for the tritium balance, (ii) material data from literature and (iii) the topological models and the computation of the five different cases; namely release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas, loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line in detail. The problem of tritium transport in the TRTM has been studied and analyzed by the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). TMAP has been developed at INEEL and now exists in Version 7. FUS-TPC Code was written in MATLAB with the original purpose to study the tritium transport in Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) blanket and in a later version the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket by [6] (Franza, 2012). This code has been further modified to be applicable to the TRTM. Results from the

  19. Tritium transport calculations for the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Jana; Arbeiter, Frederik; Abou-Sena, Ali; Franza, Fabrizio; Kondo, Keitaro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Delivery of material data for the tritium balance in the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module. • Description of the topological models in TMAP and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). • Computation of release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas. • Computation of the loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line. - Abstract: The IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module (TRTM) is projected to measure online the tritium release from breeder ceramics and beryllium pebble beds under high energy neutron irradiation. Tritium produced in the pebble bed of TRTM is swept out continuously by a purge gas flow, but can also permeate into the module's metal structures, and can be lost by permeation to the environment. According analyses on the tritium inventory are performed to support IFMIF plant safety studies, and to support the experiment planning. This paper describes the necessary elements for calculation of the tritium transport in the Tritium Release Test Module as follows: (i) applied equations for the tritium balance, (ii) material data from literature and (iii) the topological models and the computation of the five different cases; namely release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas, loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line in detail. The problem of tritium transport in the TRTM has been studied and analyzed by the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). TMAP has been developed at INEEL and now exists in Version 7. FUS-TPC Code was written in MATLAB with the original purpose to study the tritium transport in Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) blanket and in a later version the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket by [6] (Franza, 2012). This code has been further modified to be applicable to the TRTM. Results from the

  20. Design and tests of a package for the transport of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    The Type A package was designed for transportation of seven cobalt-60 sources with total activity of 1 GBq. The shield thickness to accomplish the dose rate and the transport index established by the radioactive transport regulation was calculated by the code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5). The sealed cobalt-60 sources were tested for leakages. according to the regulation ISO 9978:1992 (E). The package was tested according to regulation Radioactive Material Transport CNEN. The leakage tests results pf the sources, and the package tests demonstrate that the transport can be safe performed from the CDTN to the steelmaking industries

  1. Bench-test comparison of 26 emergency and transport ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Her, Erwan; Roy, Annie; Marjanovic, Nicolas

    2014-10-15

    Numerous emergency and transport ventilators are commercialized and new generations arise constantly. The aim of this study was to evaluate a large panel of ventilators to allow clinicians to choose a device, taking into account their specificities of use. This experimental bench-test took into account general characteristics and technical performances. Performances were assessed under different levels of FIO2 (100%, 50% or Air-Mix), respiratory mechanics (compliance 30,70,120 mL/cmH2O; resistance 5,10,20 cmH2O/mL/s), and levels of leaks (3.5 to 12.5 L/min), using a test lung. In total 26 emergency and transport ventilators were analyzed and classified into four categories (ICU-like, n = 5; Sophisticated, n = 10; Simple, n = 9; Mass-casualty and military, n = 2). Oxygen consumption (7.1 to 15.8 L/min at FIO2 100%) and the Air-Mix mode (FIO2 45 to 86%) differed from one device to the other. Triggering performance was heterogeneous, but several sophisticated ventilators depicted triggering capabilities as efficient as ICU-like ventilators. Pressurization was not adequate for all devices. At baseline, all the ventilators were able to synchronize, but with variations among respiratory conditions. Leak compensation in most ICU-like and 4/10 sophisticated devices was able to correct at least partially for system leaks, but with variations among ventilators. Major differences were observed between devices and categories, either in terms of general characteristics or technical reliability, across the spectrum of operation. Huge variability of tidal volume delivery with some devices in response to modifications in respiratory mechanics and FIO2 should make clinicians question their use in the clinical setting.

  2. Transportability Testing of the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) 10-Ton Dump Truck, TP-94-01, Rev. 2, June 2004, "Transportability Testing Procedures"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barickman, Philip W

    2007-01-01

    ... (FMTV) 10-ton dump truck manufactured by Stewart and Stevenson Systems, Inc., Sealy, Texas. The testing was conducted in accordance with TP-94-01, Revision 2, June 2004 "Transportability Testing Procedures...

  3. Surface self-potential patterns related to transmissive fracture trends during a water injection test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRoches, A. J.; Butler, K. E.; MacQuarrie, K. TB

    2018-03-01

    Variations in self-potential (SP) signals were recorded over an electrode array during a constant head injection test in a fractured bedrock aquifer. Water was injected into a 2.2 m interval isolated between two inflatable packers at 44 m depth in a vertical well. Negative SP responses were recorded on surface corresponding to the start of the injection period with strongest magnitudes recorded in electrodes nearest the well. SP response decreased in magnitude at electrodes further from the well. Deflation of the packer system resulted in a strong reversal in the SP signal. Anomalous SP patterns observed at surface at steady state were found to be aligned with dominant fracture strike orientations found within the test interval. Numerical modelling of fluid and current flow within a simplified fracture network showed that azimuthal patterns in SP are mainly controlled by transmissive fracture orientations. The strongest SP gradients occur parallel to hydraulic gradients associated with water flowing out of the transmissive fractures into the tighter matrix and other less permeable cross-cutting fractures. Sensitivity studies indicate that increasing fracture frequency near the well increases the SP magnitude and enhances the SP anomaly parallel to the transmissive set. Decreasing the length of the transmissive fractures leads to more fluid flow into the matrix and into cross-cutting fractures proximal to the well, resulting in a more circular and higher magnitude SP anomaly. Results from the field experiment and modelling provide evidence that surface-based SP monitoring during constant head injection tests has the ability to identify groundwater flow pathways within a fractured bedrock aquifer.

  4. Neptunium Transport Behavior in the Vicinity of Underground Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P; Tinnacher, R M; Zavarin, M; Williams, R W; Kersting, A B

    2010-12-03

    We used short lived {sup 239}Np as a yield tracer and state of the art magnetic sector ICP-MS to measure ultra low levels of {sup 237}Np in a number of 'hot wells' at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The results indicate that {sup 237}Np concentrations at the Almendro, Cambric, Dalhart, Cheshire and Chancellor sites, are in the range of 3 x 10{sup -5} to 7 x 10{sup -2} pCi/L and well below the MCL for alpha emitting radionuclides (15 pCi/L) (EPA, 2009). Thus, while Np transport is believed to occur at the NNSS, activities are expected to be well below the regulatory limits for alpha-emitting radionuclides. We also compared {sup 237}Np concentration data to other radionuclides, including tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and plutonium, to evaluate the relative {sup 237}Np transport behavior. Based on isotope ratios relative to published unclassified Radiologic Source Terms (Bowen et al., 1999) and taking into consideration radionuclide distribution between melt glass, rubble and groundwater (IAEA, 1998), {sup 237}Np appears to be substantially less mobile than tritium and other non-sorbing radionuclides, as expected. However, this analysis also suggests that {sup 237}Np mobility is surprisingly similar to that of plutonium. The similar transport behavior of Np and Pu can be explained by one of two possibilities: (1) Np(IV) and Pu(IV) oxidation states dominate under mildly reducing NNSS groundwater conditions resulting in similar transport behavior or (2) apparent Np transport is the result of transport of its parent {sup 241}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes and subsequent decay to {sup 237}Np. Finally, measured {sup 237}Np concentrations were compared to recent Hydrologic Source Term (HST) models. The 237Np data collected from three wells in Frenchman Flat (RNM-1, RNM-2S, and UE-5n) are in good agreement with recent HST transport model predictions (Carle et al., 2005). The agreement

  5. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also

  6. Transporters affecting biochemical test results: Creatinine-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, X; Bleasby, K; Chan, G H; Nunes, I; Evers, R

    2016-11-01

    Creatinine is eliminated by the kidneys through a combination of glomerular filtration and active transport. Drug-induced increases in serum creatinine (SCr) and/or reduced creatinine renal clearance are used as a marker for acute kidney injury. However, inhibition of active transport of creatinine can result in reversible and, therefore, benign increases in SCr levels. Herein, the transporters involved in creatinine clearance are discussed, in addition to limitations of using creatinine as a biomarker for kidney damage. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Missouri S&T hydrogen transportation test bed equipment & construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Investments through the National University Transportation Center at Missouri University of Science and Technology have really scored on the Centers mission areas and particularly Transition-state fuel vehicle infrastructure leading to a hydrogen ...

  8. Technical committee on transport package test standards (for radioactive materials transport). Vienna, 6-10 August 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.

    1979-11-01

    The report of a meeting of the technical committee on transport package test standards is presented. The committee assigned high priority to work on Low Level Solid material and Low Specific Activity material, on the justification for and requirements of a Crush Test and on leakage from packages

  9. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  10. 75 FR 38422 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Office of..., 2011. DATES: This rule is effective July 2, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For program issues... Federal Regulations, as follows: PART 40--PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING...

  11. South Coast Air Quality Management District Truck Testing | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL South Coast Air Quality Management District Truck Evaluation South Coast Air Quality Management District Truck Evaluation Photo of heavy-duty truck cab. Electric drayage truck Cargo Transportation project, conducted in partnership with the South Coast Air Quality Management

  12. Wind Turbine Blade Nondestructive Testing with a Transportable Radiography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Fantidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are becoming widely used as they are an environmentally friendly way for energy production without emissions; however, they are exposed to a corrosive environment. In addition, as wind turbines typically are the tallest structures in the surrounding area of a wind farm, it is expected that they will attract direct lightning strikes several times during their operating life. The purpose of this paper is to show that the radiography with a transportable unit is a solution to find defects in the wind turbine blade and reduce the cost of inspection. A transportable neutron radiography system, incorporating an Sb–Be source, has been simulated using the MCNPX code. The simulated system has a wide range of radiography parameters.

  13. The effect of proposed crush tests on transport containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Crush tests were performed on two AECL F112 packaging specimens, two simulated AECL-CRNL 4H packaging specimens, and on empty steel drums. The 9 m drop test was carried out on two simulated AECL-CRNL 4H packaging specimens for comparison with the effects of the crush test. The tests were filmed using high speed photography and 35mm still photographs

  14. Comparison of neutron transport calculations with NRC test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koban, J.; Hofmann, W.

    1981-02-01

    For an exactly defined reactor arrangement (PCA = Pool Critical Assembly) neutron fluxes, neutron spectra and reaction rates for several neutron detectors were calculated by means of one and two dimensional transport codes. An international comparison proved the methods applied at KWU to be adequate. There were difficulties, however, in considering the three dimensions of the assembly which result mainly from its small dimension. This fact applies to all participants who didn't use three dimensional codes. (orig.) [de

  15. Advanced testing and characterization of transportation soils and bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research study was intended to develop laboratory test procedures for advance testing and characterization of fine-grained cohesive soils and oil sand materials. The test procedures are based on typical field loading conditions and the loading...

  16. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. I. General considerations and test particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Kleva, R.G.; Oberman, C.

    1978-05-01

    A systematic theory is developed for the computation of electron transport in stochastic magnetic fields. Small scale magnetic perturbations arising, for example, from finite-β micro-instabilities are assumed to destroy the flux surfaces of a standard tokamak equilibrium. Because the magnetic lines then wander in a volume, electron radial flux is enhanced due to the rapid particle transport along as well as across the lines. By treating the magnetic lines as random variables, it is possible to develop a kinetic equation for the electron distribution function. This is solved approximately to yield the diffusion coefficient

  17. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. I. General considerations and test particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.; Kleva, R.G.; Oberman, C.

    1978-05-01

    A systematic theory is developed for the computation of electron transport in stochastic magnetic fields. Small scale magnetic perturbations arising, for example, from finite-..beta.. micro-instabilities are assumed to destroy the flux surfaces of a standard tokamak equilibrium. Because the magnetic lines then wander in a volume, electron radial flux is enhanced due to the rapid particle transport along as well as across the lines. By treating the magnetic lines as random variables, it is possible to develop a kinetic equation for the electron distribution function. This is solved approximately to yield the diffusion coefficient.

  18. Testing of Type A and B packages in accordance with IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, F.; Runge, K.; Birkigt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1984-01-01

    Revised and extended version of a paper presented during the Interregional Training Course on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials, organized by the IAEA, Harwell, May 1982, dealing with the test conditions for Type A and Type B packages as well as possible test methods, the performance of testing, and the assessmnt of test results

  19. Thermal testing transport packages for radioactive materials: Reality vs regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The principle objective of this paper is to provide information that will help describe the physical thermal tests performed to demonstrate compliance with the hypothetical accident conditions specified in 10 CFR 71.73. Physical testing should be applied to packages that cannot be modeled by analysis to adequately predict their response to hypothetical accident conditions. These tests should be used when chemical decomposition or material changes occur during an accident that would be difficult to analytically predict or model

  20. Testing the transport energy-environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis in the EU27 countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pablo-Romero, M.P.; Cruz, L.; Barata, E.

    2017-01-01

    Transport activities are essential for economic and social development. Nevertheless, the transport sector has also shown the fastest growth in energy consumption in the European Union and its contribution to increasing greenhouse gas emissions merits the thorough attention of academics and policy makers. In this paper we analyze the relationship of economic growth and transport activities with transport final energy consumption. Energy Kuznets curves are estimated for a panel data set covering the EU27 countries in the period 1995–2009 for total transport energy use, household transport energy use, and productive transport energy use (all three in absolute and per capita energy use terms). The productive transport energy use and gross value added relationship are further considered as per hour worked. Finally, the control variables of energy prices and differences in the economic structures are tested. Empirical results show that the elasticity of transport energy use with respect to gross value added in per capita terms decreases from a threshold for the three transport energy consumption variables, but the turning point of improved environmental quality is not reached in any instance. - Highlights: • Transport EKCs are estimated for the EU countries in the 1995–2009 period. • Total, household and production activity transport energy uses are analyzed. • Data support a concave shape, but the turning point is not reached. • Richer countries have more limited potential for energy efficiency policies. • EKCs elasticity values are considered to support policy interpretations.

  1. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  2. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.E

    2001-07-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  3. DOE uses transportable irradiator for demonstration and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), has a transportable irradiator that was built to travel to various locations to demonstrate the benefits of low-dose irradiation for the processing of food. Part of a DOE program designed to establish irradiation facilities in Alaska, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Washington, the mobile unit can also be used for research, pilot-scale processing, operator training, and education. The irradiation unit consists of two lead-lined cylindrical chambers-an irradiation chamber and a source chamber-inside a steel casing. During operation, the item to be irradiated is placed inside the irradiation chamber, which is then rotated until a window in the chamber lines up with a screened window in the source chamber. The source chamber contains the transportation cask containing the four capsules of cesium-137 that are used as the source of gamma radiation. During operation, the lid of the cask is raised, pulling the capsules into operating position. In this alignment, the product is irradiated for a predetermined length of time. Then the lid of the cask is lowered and the irradiation chamber is rotated back to its original position for removal of the product

  4. Demonstration test for transporting vitrified high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, C.; Kato, Y.; Kato, O.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the integrity of the cask against a 0.3-m free-drop test and to confirm the drop-test analytical method. 1. Test cask; The cask used in the drop test is characterized structurally as follows. (1) The Cask body is covered with a neutron absorber covered with a thin steel plate. Fins are attached between the cask body and thin steel plate. (2) The impact energy was absorbed mainly by the inelastic deformation of the neutron absorber and thin steel plate. 2. Test methods; Electric heaters were put into the package to reproduce the real cask conditions. Strains and accelerations due to the drop were measured at the drop by the strain gauges and accelerometers attached on the cask. 3. Analysis; We use the DYNA-3D and NIKE-2D codes to analyze the drop test. A half symmetrical model was applied to overall analysis to calculate the strains and accelerations at the cask body. The maximum acceleration value obtained by the overall analysis and basket model were used to statistically calculate the strains at the basket. 4. Results; The cask integrity was comfirmed through the strains and the results of He leak test. (author)

  5. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  6. Test of models for electron transport in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, D.G.; Manheimer, W.M.; Busquet, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines five different models of electron thermal transport in laser produced spherical implosions. These are classical, classical with a flux limit f, delocalization, beam deposition model, and Fokker-Planck solutions. In small targets, the results are strongly dependent on f for flux limit models, with small f's generating very steep temperature gradients. Delocalization models are characterized by large preheat in the center of the target. The beam deposition model agrees reasonably well with the Fokker-Planck simulation results. For large, high gain fusion targets, the delocalization model shows the gain substantially reduced by the preheat. However, flux limitation models show gain largely independent of f, with the beam deposition model also showing the same high gain

  7. Experimental tests of transport models using modulated ECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBoo, J.C.; Kinsey, J.E.; Bravenec, R.

    1998-12-01

    Both the dynamic and equilibrium thermal responses of an L-mode plasma to repetitive ECH heat pulses were measured and compared to predictions from several thermal transport models. While no model consistently agreed with all observations, the GLF23 model was most consistent with the perturbated electron and ion temperature responses for one of the cases studied which may indicate a key role played by electron modes in the core of these discharges. Generally, the IIF and MM models performed well for the perturbed electron response while the GLF23 and IFS/PPPL models agreed with the perturbed ion response for all three cases studied. No single model agreed well with the equilibrium temperature profiles measured

  8. 75 FR 13009 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 [Docket DOT-OST-2008-0088] RIN OST 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs Correction In rule document 2010-3731 beginning on page 8528 in the issue of Thursday, February 25, 2010, make the...

  9. Destructive testing of transport packaging. Quality assurance applied to transport packaging in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses several aspects of quality assurance as applied to packaging, including such requirements for an adequate quality assurance program as assignment of responsibilities, inspections, and audits. In certain cases, we have determined the margin of safety inherent in specific package designs. Testing of packaging to destruction, by subjecting it to conditions far beyond the present accident criteria, was carried out to establish the levels of impact, puncture, crush, and fire at which present designs would fail. A second area in which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has applied quality assurance is qualification testing. The standards for testing prototypes require essentially no loss of contents under the specified accident test conditions. Qualifying a design with an acceptable degree of reliability by testing it at the specified stress levels with no measurable effect requires large numbers of samples to be tested. Testing the prototype under conditions well above the criteria is shown to offer one of the most effective means of demonstrating the adequacy of a design. Scenario tests, i.e., staged accidents or full-scale tests in which vehicles with samples of packages on board are crashed under specified conditions, in most cases present singular points on a curve. One-point tests in most cases will disprove a package design if it fails but may not confirm that a design will not fail. At the same time, much information and some public assurances can be obtained from such tests. (author)

  10. Modelling transport of chokka squid (Loligo reynaudii) paralarvae off South Africa: reviewing, testing and extending the ‘Westward Transport Hypothesis'

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Martins, RS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available hydrodynamic model (ROMS) to test the WTH and assessed four factors that might influence successful transport – Release Area, Month, Specific Gravity (body density) and Diel Vertical Migration (DVM) – in numerical experiments that estimated successful transport...

  11. 75 FR 26183 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... 2105-AE01 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Office of...: For program issues, Bohdan Baczara, Office of Drug and Alcohol Policy and Compliance, 1200 New Jersey... of Federal Regulations, as follows: [[Page 26184

  12. Longitudinal Acceleration Tests of Overhead Luggage Bins and Auxiliary Fuel Tank in a Transport Airplane Airframe Section

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Robert

    1999-01-01

    This report contains the description and test results of overhead stowage bin calibrations and longitudinal impact testing of a 10-foot transport airframe section conducted at the Transportation Research Center Inc. (TRC...

  13. Longitudinal Acceleration Test of Overhead Luggage Bins and Auxiliary Fuel Tank in a Transport Airplane Airframe Section, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Robert

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the description and test results of overhead stowage bin calibrations and longitudinal impact testing of a 10-foot transport airframe section conducted at the Transportation Research Center Inc. (TRC...

  14. Testing intermolecular potential functions using transport property data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, A.A.; Dickinson, E.; Gray, P.; Scott, A.C.

    1975-01-01

    The viscosity of hydrogen has been measured at eight temperatures from 273 to 1060K, using a capillary-flow viscometer. The results have been used to test the repulsive part of a recently formulated H 2 /H 2 intermolecular potential function, obtained from molecular-beam measurements. Agreement between the experimental and predicted values for viscosity is within 3.5%, which corresponds approximately to the combined quoted uncertainties in the two sets of data. However, if the value of the distance parameter of the potential is reduced by about 1.5%, the agreement obtained is within 0.75% over the whole temperature range. This modified potential function gives better agreement with the available higher temperature viscosities and second virial coefficients. (author)

  15. Changes of peritoneal transport parameters with time on dialysis: assessment with sequential peritoneal equilibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2017-10-27

    Sequential peritoneal equilibration test (sPET) is based on the consecutive performance of the peritoneal equilibration test (PET, 4-hour, glucose 2.27%) and the mini-PET (1-hour, glucose 3.86%), and the estimation of peritoneal transport parameters with the 2-pore model. It enables the assessment of the functional transport barrier for fluid and small solutes. The objective of this study was to check whether the estimated model parameters can serve as better and earlier indicators of the changes in the peritoneal transport characteristics than directly measured transport indices that depend on several transport processes. 17 patients were examined using sPET twice with the interval of about 8 months (230 ± 60 days). There was no difference between the observational parameters measured in the 2 examinations. The indices for solute transport, but not net UF, were well correlated between the examinations. Among the estimated parameters, a significant decrease between the 2 examinations was found only for hydraulic permeability LpS, and osmotic conductance for glucose, whereas the other parameters remained unchanged. These fluid transport parameters did not correlate with D/P for creatinine, although the decrease in LpS values between the examinations was observed mostly for patients with low D/P for creatinine. We conclude that changes in fluid transport parameters, hydraulic permeability and osmotic conductance for glucose, as assessed by the pore model, may precede the changes in small solute transport. The systematic assessment of fluid transport status needs specific clinical and mathematical tools beside the standard PET tests.

  16. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  17. Decision-Making in Pediatric Transport Team Dispatch Using Script Concordance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapreyar, Prakadeshwari; Marcdante, Karen; Zhang, Liyun; Simpson, Pippa; Meyer, Michael T

    2017-11-01

    Our objective was to compare decision-making in dispatching pediatric transport teams by Medical Directors of pediatric transport teams (serving as experts) to that of Pediatric Intensivists and Critical Care fellows who often serve as Medical Control physicians. Understanding decision-making around team composition and dispatch could impact clinical management, cost effectiveness, and educational needs. Survey was developed using Script Concordance Testing guidelines. The survey contained 15 transport case vignettes covering 20 scenarios (45 questions). Eleven scenarios assessed impact of intrinsic patient factors (e.g., procedural needs), whereas nine assessed extrinsic factors (e.g., weather). Pediatric Critical Care programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (the United States). Pediatric Intensivists and senior Critical Care fellows at Pediatric Critical Care programs were the target population with Transport Medical Directors serving as the expert panel. None. Survey results were scored per Script Concordance Testing guidelines. Concordance within groups was assessed using simple percentage agreement. There was little concordance in decision-making by Transport Medical Directors (median Script Concordance Testing percentage score [interquartile range] of 33.9 [30.4-37.3]). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the median Script Concordance Testing scores among the senior fellows and Pediatric Intensivists (31.1 [29.6-33.2] vs 29.7 [28.3-32.3], respectively; p = 0.12). Transport Medical Directors were more concordant on reasoning involving intrinsic patient factors rather than extrinsic factors (10/21 vs 4/24). Our study demonstrates pediatric transport team dispatch decision-making discordance by pediatric critical care physicians of varying levels of expertise and experience. Script Concordance Testing at a local level may better elucidate standards in medical decision-making within

  18. Specification of test criteria and probabilistic approach: the case of plutonium air transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Pages, P.; Ringot, C.; Tomachewsky, E.

    1989-03-01

    The safety of international transportation relies on compliance with IAEA regulations which specify a serie of test which the package is supposed to withstand. For Plutonium air transport some national regulations are more stringent than the IAEA one, namely the US one. For example the drop test is to be performed at 129 m.s -1 instead of 13.4 m.s -1 . The development of international Plutonium exchanges has raised the question of the adequacy of both those standards. The purpose of this paper is to show how a probabilistic approach helps in assessing the efficiency of a move towards more stringent tests

  19. 75 FR 8526 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... 2105-AD64 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Office of... required method. However, in response to comments requesting additional flexibility in testing methods, the... may increase flexibility and lower costs for employers who choose to use them over more expensive...

  20. Test-Retest Reliability of a Survey to Measure Transport-Related Physical Activity in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badland, Hannah; Schofield, Grant

    2006-01-01

    The present research details test-retest reliability of a newly developed, telephone-administered TPA survey for adults. This instrument examines barriers, perceptions, and current travel behaviors to place of work/study and local convenience shops. Demonstrated test-retest reliability of the Active Friendly Environments-Transport-Related Physical…

  1. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  2. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  3. Comparison of diffusion and transport theory analysis with experimental results in fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyabama, N.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Lee, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic analysis has been performed by 3 dimensional diffusion and transport methods to calculate the measured control rod worths and subassembly wise power distribution in fast breeder test reactor. Geometry corrections (rectangular to hexagonal and diffusion to transport corrections are estimated for multiplication factors and control rod worths. Calculated control rod worths by diffusion and transport theory are nearly the same and 10% above measured values. Power distribution in the core periphery is over predicted (15%) by diffusion theory. But, this over prediction reduces to 8% by use of the S N method. (authors). 9 refs., 4 tabs., 3 fig

  4. Drop Test Using Finite Element Method for Transport Package of Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoxiao; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Li Gouqiang; Wang Xuexin; Tang Rongyao

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical test for transport package of radioactive material is one of the important tests for demonstrating package structure design. Drop test of package is a kind of destructive test. It is a common method of adopting the pre-analysis to determine drop orientation.Mechanical test of a sealed source package was calculated with finite element method (FEM) software. Based on the analysis of the calculation results, some values were obtained such as the stress, strain, acceleration and the drop orientation which causes the most severe damage, and the calculation results were compared with the results of test. (authors)

  5. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology, Winfrith, UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Transport packages for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international regulations. The involvement of AEA Technology is traced from the establishment of the early IAEA Regulations. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide variety of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described with references to practical experience in the form of a short bibliography. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700te); air guns for impacts up to sonic velocities; pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities and instruments; criticality simulations and leak test instruments. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  6. Intermodal transportation of low-level radioactive waste to the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) presently serves as a disposal site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated by DOE-approved generators. The environmental impacts resulting from the disposal of LLW at the NTS are discussed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Nevada Test Site Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada (NTS EIS). During the formal NTS EIS scoping period, it became clear that transportation of LLW was an issue that required attention. Therefore, the Nevada Transportation Protocol Working Group (TPWG) was formed in 1995 to identify, prioritize, and understand local issues and concerns associated with the transportation of LLW to the NTS. Currently, generators of LLW ship their waste to the NTS by legal-weight truck. In 1995, the TPWG suggested the DOE could reduce transportation costs and enhance public safety by using rail transportation. The DOE announced, in October 1996, that they would study the potential for intermodal transportation of LLW to the NTS, by transferring the LLW containers from rail cars to trucks for movements to the NTS. The TPWG and DOE/NV prepared the NTS Intermodal Transportation Facility Site and Routing Evaluation Study to present basic data and analyses on alternative rail-to-truck transfer sites and related truck routes for LLW shipments to the NTS. This Environmental Assessment (EA) identifies the potential environmental impacts and transportation risks of using new intermodal transfer sites and truck routes or continuing current operations to accomplish the objectives of minimizing radiological risk, enhancing safety, and reducing cost. DOE/NV will use the results of the assessment to decide whether or not to encourage the LLW generators and their transportation contractors to change their current operations to accomplish these objectives

  7. Mathematical Basis and Test Cases for Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport Modeling in GDSA-PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report provides documentation of the mathematical basis for a colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport modeling capability that can be incorporated into GDSA-PFLOTRAN. It also provides numerous test cases against which the modeling capability can be benchmarked once the model is implemented numerically in GDSA-PFLOTRAN. The test cases were run using a 1-D numerical model developed by the author, and the inputs and outputs from the 1-D model are provided in an electronic spreadsheet supplement to this report so that all cases can be reproduced in GDSA-PFLOTRAN, and the outputs can be directly compared with the 1-D model. The cases include examples of all potential scenarios in which colloid-facilitated transport could result in the accelerated transport of a radionuclide relative to its transport in the absence of colloids. Although it cannot be claimed that all the model features that are described in the mathematical basis were rigorously exercised in the test cases, the goal was to test the features that matter the most for colloid-facilitated transport; i.e., slow desorption of radionuclides from colloids, slow filtration of colloids, and equilibrium radionuclide partitioning to colloids that is strongly favored over partitioning to immobile surfaces, resulting in a substantial fraction of radionuclide mass being associated with mobile colloids.

  8. Test of 1-D transport models, and their predictions for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.; Bateman, G.; Boucher, D.

    2001-01-01

    A number of proposed tokamak thermal transport models are tested by comparing their predictions with measurements from several tokamaks. The necessary data have been provided for a total of 75 discharges from C-mod, DIII-D, JET, JT-60U, T10, and TFTR. A standard prediction methodology has been developed, and three codes have been benchmarked; these 'standard' codes have been relied on for testing most of the transport models. While a wide range of physical transport processes has been tested, no single model has emerged as clearly superior to all competitors for simulating H-mode discharges. In order to winnow the field, further tests of the effect of sheared flows and of the 'stiffness' of transport are planned. Several of the models have been used to predict ITER performance, with widely varying results. With some transport models ITER's predicted fusion power depends strongly on the 'pedestal' temperature, but ∼ 1GW (Q=10) is predicted for most models if the pedestal temperature is at least 4 keV. (author)

  9. Tests of 1-D transport models, and their predictions for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Bateman, G.; Boucher, D.

    1999-01-01

    A number of proposed tokamak thermal transport models are tested by comparing their predictions with measurements from several tokamaks. The necessary data have been provided for a total of 75 discharges from C-mod, DIII-D, JET, JT-60U, T10, and TFTR. A standard prediction methodology has been developed, and three codes have been benchmarked; these 'standard' codes have been relied on for testing most of the transport models. While a wide range of physical transport processes has been tested, no single model has emerged as clearly superior to all competitors for simulating H-mode discharges. In order to winnow the field, further tests of the effect of sheared flows and of the 'stiffness' of transport are planned. Several of the models have been used to predict ITER performance, with widely varying results. With some transport models ITER's predicted fusion power depends strongly on the 'pedestal' temperature, but ∼ 1GW (Q=10) is predicted for most models if the pedestal temperature is at least 4 keV. (author)

  10. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test Site, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Rulison site in west-central Colorado was the location of an underground detonation of a 40-kiloton nuclear device in 1969. The test took place 2,568 m below ground surface in the Mesaverde Formation. Though located below the regional water table, none of the bedrock formations at the site yielded water during hydraulic tests, indicating extremely low permeability conditions. The scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Mesaverde Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, with transport of strontium and cesium also sensitive to the sorption coefficient

  11. Qualification testing facility for packages to be used for transport and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    The radioactive materials (RAM) packaging have to comply to all modes and transport condition, routine or in accident conditions possibly to occur during transportation operations. It is well known that the safety in the transport of RAM is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required for the package. The quality of these packages - type A, B or C has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the ROMANIAN nuclear regulation conditions provided by CNCAN Order no. 357/22.12.2005- 'Norms for a Safe Transport of Radioactive Material', the IAEA Vienna Recommendation stipulated in the Safety standard TS-R-1- Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, and other applicable international recommendations. The paper will describe the components of the designed testing facilities, and the qualification testing to be performed for all type A, B and C packages subjected to the testing. In addition, a part of the qualification tests for a package (designed and manufactured in INR Pitesti) used for transport and storage of spent fuel LEU elements of a TRIGA nuclear reactor will be described and analyzed. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM packages will comply with the national safe standards as well as with the IAEA applicable recommendation provided by the TS-R-1 safety standard. (author)

  12. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  13. Fire test of container for radioactive materials under the condition of transportation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Sanae; Shimada, Hirohisa

    1986-01-01

    To secure the safe transportation of container for radioactive materials, furnace and open fire test for the thermal test of container are provided. Therefore, we have carried out furnace and open fire test using test model simulating a transportation state. Test model used in this test is made of stainless steel with diameter of 200 mm and length of 400 mm, and is set on the rest as in the case of transportation state. From the data on temperature measurement, some interesting results are obtained as follows. Near the surface of model, the temperature gradient in the direction perpendicular to the surface of model with the rest is greater than that without the rest. The temperature rise at the center of the model with the rest is less than that without the rest. In the experiment, temperature distributions are measured in the three radial directions. The temperature differences among three distributions in the model with rest are greater than that without rest. On the other hand, in the furnace test, the heat transfer coefficient on the surface of test model with the rest is 90 - 140 kcal/m 2 h · K for the range of furnace temperature from 700 to 950 deg C and this value is almost equal to the value without the rest. (author)

  14. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Alison; Nitsche, Janka; Archbold, Marie; Deakin, Jenny; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ(15)N and δ(18)O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fleet servicing facilities for testing and maintaining rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Preston, M.K.; Keith, D.A.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of Fleet Servicing Facilities (FSF). Such facilities are intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the waste handling plants in the United States presently receiving radioactive wastes have an onsite FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing all of these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the transport system is placed into service. Thus a need is indicated for FSFs or their equivalent at various radioactive materials receiving sites. This paper also compares the respective capital costs and operating characteristics of the following three concepts of a spent fuel cask transportation FSF; integrated FSF, colocated FSF, and independent FSF

  16. Performance testing of the sediment-contaminant transport model, SERATRA, at different rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.

    1982-04-01

    Mathematical models of sediment-contaminant migration in surface water must account for transport, intermedia transfer, decay and degradation, and transformation processes. The unsteady, two dimensional, sediment-contaminant transport code, SERATRA (Onishi, Schreiber and Codell 1980) includes these mechanisms. To assess the accuracy of SERATRA to simulate the sediment-contaminant transport and fate processes, the code was tested against one-dimensional analytical solutions, checked for its mass balance, and applied to field sites. The field application cases ranged from relatively simple, steady conditions to unsteady, nonuniform conditions for large, intermediate, and small rivers. It was found that SERATRA is capable of simulating sediment-contaminant transport under a wide range of conditions

  17. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rio Blanco underground nuclear test site, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.; Earman, S.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-10-01

    DOE is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater is part of preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations allow prioritization of test areas in terms of risk, provide a basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work, and provide a framework for assessing site characterization data needs. The Rio Blanco site in Colorado was the location of the simultaneous detonation of three 30-kiloton nuclear devices. The devices were located 1780, 1899, and 2039 below ground surface in the Fort Union and Mesaverde formations. Although all the bedrock formations at the site are thought to contain water, those below the Green River Formation (below 1000 in depth) are also gas-bearing, and have very low permeabilities. The transport scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Fort Union Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affect radionuclide transport at the site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values. Given the sparse data, the modeling results may differ significantly from reality. Confidence in transport predictions can be increased by obtaining more site data, including the amount of radionuclides which would have been available for transport (i.e., not trapped in melt glass or vented during gas flow testing), and the hydraulic properties of the formation. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  18. The terminator "toy" chemistry test: a simple tool to assess errors in transport schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Lauritzen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This test extends the evaluation of transport schemes from prescribed advection of inert scalars to reactive species. The test consists of transporting two interacting chemical species in the Nair and Lauritzen 2-D idealized flow field. The sources and sinks for these two species are given by a simple, but non-linear, "toy" chemistry that represents combination (X + X → X2 and dissociation (X2 → X + X. This chemistry mimics photolysis-driven conditions near the solar terminator, where strong gradients in the spatial distribution of the species develop near its edge. Despite the large spatial variations in each species, the weighted sum XT = X + 2X2 should always be preserved at spatial scales at which molecular diffusion is excluded. The terminator test demonstrates how well the advection–transport scheme preserves linear correlations. Chemistry–transport (physics–dynamics coupling can also be studied with this test. Examples of the consequences of this test are shown for illustration.

  19. Relevance of IAEA tests to severe accidents in nuclear fuel cycle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    The design and performance standards for packages used for the transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials, are defined in the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials, TS-R-1, in order to ensure safety under both normal and accident conditions of transport. The underlying philosophy is that safety is vested principally in the package and the design and performance criteria are related to the potential hazard. Type B packages are high duty packages which are used for the transport of the more radioactive materials, notably spent fuel and vitrified high-level waste (VHLW). Tests are specified in the IAEA Regulations to ensure the integrity of these packages in potential transport accidents involving impacts, fires or immersion in water. The mechanical tests for Type B packages include drop tests onto an unyielding surface without giving rise to a significant release of radioactivity. The objects which a package could impact in real life transport accidents, such as concrete roads, bridge abutments and piers, will yield to some extent and absorb some of the energy of the moving package. Impact tests onto an unyielding surface are therefore relevant to impacts onto real-life objects at much higher speeds. The thermal test specifies that Type B packages should be able to withstand a fully engulfing fire of 8000 C for 30 minutes. Analytical studies backed up by experimental tests have shown that these packages can withstand such conditions without significant release of radioactivity. The Regulations also specify immersion tests for Type B packages; 15 metres for 8 hours without significant release of radioactivity and, in addition for spent fuel and VHLW packages, 200 metres for 1 hour without rupture of the containment. Studies have shown that spent fuel and VHLW casks would meet these conditions. Therefore, there is a large body of evidence to show that the current IAEA Type B test requirements are severe and cover all the situations which can

  20. Nuclear waste transportation package testing: A review of selected programs in the United States and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snedeker, D.F.

    1990-12-01

    This report provides an overview of some recent nuclear waste transportation package development programs. This information is intended to aid the State of Nevada in its review of US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear waste transportation programs. This report addresses cask testing programs in the United Kingdom and selected 1/4 and full scale testing in the US. Facilities that can provide cask testing services, both in the US and to a limited extent abroad, are identified. The costs for different type test programs are identified as a means to estimate costs for future test programs. Not addressed is the public impact such testing might have in providing an increased sense of safety or confidence. The British test program was apparently quite successful in demonstrating safety to the public at the time. There is no US test effort that is similar in scope for direct comparison. Also addressed are lessons learned from testing programs and areas that may merit possible future integrated examination. Areas that may require further examination are both technical and institutional. This report provides information which, when combined with other sources of information will enable the State of Nevada to assess the following areas: feasibility of full scale testing; costs of full scale tests; potential benefits of testing; limits that full scale testing impose; and disadvantages of emphasis on testing vs analytical solutions. This assessment will then allow the state to comment on DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) plans for the development and licensing of new shipping cask designs. These plans currently expect contractors to perform engineering testing for materials development, quarter scale model testing to validate analytical assessments and full scale prototype testing of operational features. DOE currently plans no full scale or extra-regulatory destructive testing to aid in cask licensing. 1 tab

  1. Quality assurance requirements in the testing of packages to be used for safe transportation of RAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, Gheorghe; Nistor, Viorica; Mihaiu, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the Type A, B or C packages used for transport and storage of Radioactive Material (RAM) has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the Transport Regulations, within the Reliability and Testing Laboratory, Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti, where has designed and developed a new Romanian Testing Facility. The qualifications testing are performed under a strict quality assurance programme based on the specific procedures prior approved by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activity Control). This paper describe the quality assurance programme in accordance with the quality management system developed in order to meet the requirements provided by the national regulations as well as to the requirements of the IAEA's safety standard TS-R-1 related to testing of packages to be used for transport of RAM and also provides an overview of the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM Packages, developed by the INR's Reliability and Testing Laboratory within an Excellence Scientific Contract. (authors)

  2. Parameters estimation for reactive transport: A way to test the validity of a reactive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Mohit; Cheikh Anta Ndiaye, Mame; Carrayrou, Jérôme

    The chemical parameters used in reactive transport models are not known accurately due to the complexity and the heterogeneous conditions of a real domain. We will present an efficient algorithm in order to estimate the chemical parameters using Monte-Carlo method. Monte-Carlo methods are very robust for the optimisation of the highly non-linear mathematical model describing reactive transport. Reactive transport of tributyltin (TBT) through natural quartz sand at seven different pHs is taken as the test case. Our algorithm will be used to estimate the chemical parameters of the sorption of TBT onto the natural quartz sand. By testing and comparing three models of surface complexation, we show that the proposed adsorption model cannot explain the experimental data.

  3. Application of column tests and electrical resistivity methods for leachate transport monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowaniak Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the human civilization leads to the pollution of environment. One of the contamination which are a real threat to soil and groundwater are leachates from landfills. In this paper the solute transport through soil was considered. For this purpose, the laboratory column tests of chlorides tracer and leachates transport on two soil samples have been carried out. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied as auxiliary tool to follow the movements of solute through the soil column what allowed to compare between the results obtained with column test method and electrical resistivity measurements. Breakthrough curves obtained by conductivity and resistivity methods represents similar trends which leads to the conclusion about the suitability of electrical resistivity methods for contamination transport monitoring in soil-water systems.

  4. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  5. Validation of a fracture mechanics approach to nuclear transportation cask design through a drop test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under contract to the Department of Energy, is conducting a research program to develop and validate a fracture mechanics approach to cask design. A series of drop tests of a transportation cask is planned for the summer of 1986 as the method for benchmarking and, thereby, validating the fracture mechanics approach. This paper presents the drop test plan and background leading to the development of the test plan including structural analyses, material characterization, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques necessary for defining the test plan properly

  6. 75 FR 8524 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... 2105-AD67 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Office of... IFR to mitigate this conflict between the DOT rules and what we view as beneficial State laws by.... It merely eliminated a conflict that would have precluded parties from complying with certain State...

  7. Design data sheets Near-Surface Test Facility Bottom Loading Transporter (BLT): Title 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This document is an accumulation of all the Design Data Sheets relative to the handling equipment in the transporter for the Near-Surface Test Facility. The Data Sheets are in ascending numerical order. Each Data Sheet, regardless of the number of pages, shall stand by itself within this document

  8. 77 FR 60318 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... 2105-AE14 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: 6-acetylmorphine... 12866 and Regulatory Flexibility Act This Final Rule is not significant for purposes of Executive Order... certify, under the Regulatory Flexibility Act, that this rule does not have a significant economic impact...

  9. 75 FR 8528 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... OST 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Office... of small entities, for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The Department makes these... necessary for the Department to conduct a regulatory evaluation or Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for this...

  10. Normal conditions of transport thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.W.; Alstine, M.N. van; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance. The type B shipping container used in the study is a double containment fiberboard drum package. The package is primarily used to transport uranium and plutonium metals and oxides. A normal condition of transport (NCT) thermal test was performed to benchmark an NCT analysis of the package. A 21 W heater was placed in an instrumented package to simulate the maximum source decay heat. The package reached thermal equilibrium 120 hours after the heater was turned on. Testing took place indoors to minimize ambient temperature fluctuations. The thermal analysis of the package used fiberboard properties reported in the literature and resulted in temperature significantly greater than those measured during the test. Details of the NCT test will be described and transient temperatures at key thermocouple locations within the package will be presented. Analytical results using nominal fiberboard properties will be presented. Explanations of the results and the attempt to benchmark the analysis will be presented. The discovery that fiberboard has an anisotropic thermal conductivity and its effect on thermal performance will also be discussed

  11. Leaktightness definitions for and leakage tests on packages for the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, L.

    1989-07-01

    In 1986, the International Organization for Standardization asked a group of experts representing some fifteen countries to draft a standard for the leaktightness of packagings used for the transport of radioactive materials. Progress of work and test before shipping of packages are reviewed

  12. Solar-energy heats a transportation test center--Pueblo, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Petroleum-base, thermal energy transport fluid circulating through 583 square feet of flat-plate solar collectors accumulates majority of energy for space heating and domestic hot-water of large Test Center. Report describes operation, maintenance, and performance of system which is suitable for warehouses and similar buildings. For test period from February 1979 to January 1980, solar-heating fraction was 31 percent, solar hot-water fraction 79 percent.

  13. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, P.C. [BNFL International Transport, Spent Fuel Services (United Kingdom); Dallongeville, M. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France)

    2004-07-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme.

  14. Testing of LWR fuel rods to support criticality safety analysis of transport accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, P.C.; Dallongeville, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the transport of low enriched materials, criticality safety may be demonstrated by applying pessimistic modelling assumptions that bound any realistic case. Where Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel is being transported, enrichment levels are usually too high to permit this approach and more realistic data is needed. This requires a method by which the response of LWR fuel under impact accident conditions can be approximated or bounded. In 2000, BNFL and COGEMA LOGISTICS jointly commenced the Fuel Integrity Project (FIP) whose objective was to develop such methods. COGEMA LOGISTICS were well advanced with a method for determining the impact response of unirradiated fuel, but required further test data before acceptance by the Transport Regulators. The joint project team extensively discussed the required inputs to the FIP, from which it was agreed that BNFL would organise new tests on both unirradiated and irradiated fuel samples and COGEMA LOGISTICS would take major responsibility for evaluating the test results. Tests on unirradiated fuel rod samples involved both dynamic and quasi-static loading on fuel samples. PWR fuel rods loaded with uranium pellets were dropped vertically from 9m onto a rigid target and this was repeated on BWR fuel rods, similar tests on empty fuel rods were also conducted. Quasi-static tests were conducted on 530 mm long PWR and BWR fuel specimens under axial loading. Tests on irradiated fuel samples were conducted on high burn-up fuel rods of both PWR and BWR types. These were believed original to the FIP project and involved applying bending loads to simply supported pressurised rod specimens. In one test the fuel rod was heated to nearly 500oC during loading, all specimens were subject to axial impact before testing. Considerable experience of fuel rod testing and new data was gained from this test programme

  15. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, R.; Quintana, F.; Márquez Turiello, R.; Furnari, J.C.; Pimenta Mourão, R.

    2013-01-01

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author) [es

  16. Transport Modeling Analysis to Test the Efficiency of Fish Markets in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamis S. Al-Abri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oman’s fish exports have shown an increasing trend while supplies to the domestic market have declined, despite increased domestic demand caused by population growth and income. This study hypothesized that declining fish supplies to domestic markets were due to inefficiency of the transport function of the fish marketing system in Oman. The hypothesis was tested by comparing the observed prices of several fish species at several markets with optimal prices. The optimal prices were estimated by the dual of a fish transport cost- minimizing linear programming model. Primary data on market prices and transportation costs and quantities transported were gathered through a survey of a sample of fish transporters. The quantity demanded at market sites was estimated using secondary data. The analysis indicated that the differences between the observed prices and the estimated optimal prices were not significantly different showing that the transport function of fish markets in Oman is efficient. This implies that the increasing trend of fish exports vis-à-vis the decreasing trend of supplies to domestic markets is rational and will continue. This may not be considered to be equitable but it is efficient and may have long-term implications for national food security and have an adverse impact on the nutritional and health status of the rural poor population. Policy makers may have to recognize the trade off between the efficiency and equity implications of the fish markets in Oman and make policy decisions accordingly in order to ensure national food security.

  17. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  18. Analysis and model testing of a Super Tiger Type B waste transport system in accident environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.A.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Romesberg, L.E.; Joseph, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating the response of a Type B packaging containing drums of contact-handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU) as a part of a program to evaluate the adequacy of experimental and analytical methods for assessing the safety of waste transport systems in accident environments. A US NRC certified Type B package known as the Super Tiger was selected for the study. This overpack consists of inner and outer steel shells separated by rigid polyurethane foam and can be used for either highway or rail transportation. Tests using scale models of the vehicular system are being conducted in conjunction with computer analyses

  19. Packaging and transport case of test fuel assembly irradiated in the Creys-Malville reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffroy, J.; Vivien, J.; Pouard, M.; Dujardin, G.N.; Veron, B.; Michoux, H.

    1986-06-01

    Some irradiated fuel assemblies from the fast neutron Creys Malville reactor will be sent to hot laboratories to follow fuel behavior. These test assemblies will be examined after a limited cooling time and transport is realized at high residual power (about 10kW) and cladding temperature should not rise over 500deg C. The fuel assemblies are not dismantled and transported into sodium. The assembly is placed into a case containing sodium plugged and put into a packaging. Dimensioning, thermal behavior, radiation protection and containment are examined [fr

  20. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG'S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG'S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria

  1. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High-Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  2. False-positive cryptococcal antigen test associated with use of BBL Port-a-Cul transport vials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah A; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2011-02-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed.

  3. False-Positive Cryptococcal Antigen Test Associated with Use of BBL Port-A-Cul Transport Vials▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah A.; Sholtis, Mary; Parshall, Sharon; Hall, Gerri S.; Procop, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 52 residual CSF and serum specimens, which were originally negative with the Cryptococcal Antigen Latex Agglutination System (CALAS), were shown to become falsely positive after placement in BBL Port-A-Cul anaerobic transport vials. This transport device, although excellent for specimen transportation for subsequent culture, should not be used if cryptococcal antigen testing is needed. PMID:21159939

  4. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Transportation/Automotive Mechanics. Volume II: Theory. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, James F., Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of transportation/automotive mechanics test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a test item…

  5. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  6. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz; Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O.; Novara, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  8. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA

  9. Multiple-tracer tests for contaminant transport process identification in saturated municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodman, N.D.; Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Multiple tracers were applied to saturated MSW to test dual-porosity properties. • Lithium demonstrated to be non-conservative as a tracer. • 260 mm diameter column too small to test transport properties of MSW. • The classical advection-dispersion mode was rejected due to high dispersivity. • Characteristic diffusion times did not vary with the tracer. - Abstract: Two column tests were performed in conditions emulating vertical flow beneath the leachate table in a biologically active landfill to determine dominant transport mechanisms occurring in landfills. An improved understanding of contaminant transport process in wastes is required for developing better predictions about potential length of the long term aftercare of landfills, currently measured in timescales of centuries. Three tracers (lithium, bromide and deuterium) were used. Lithium did not behave conservatively. Given that lithium has been used extensively for tracing in landfill wastes, the tracer itself and the findings of previous tests which assume that it has behaved conservatively may need revisiting. The smaller column test could not be fitted with continuum models, probably because the volume of waste was below a representative elemental volume. Modelling compared advection-dispersion (AD), dual porosity (DP) and hybrid AD–DP models. Of these models, the DP model was found to be the most suitable. Although there is good evidence to suggest that diffusion is an important transport mechanism, the breakthrough curves of the different tracers did not differ from each other as would be predicted based on the free-water diffusion coefficients. This suggested that solute diffusion in wastes requires further study

  10. Multiple-tracer tests for contaminant transport process identification in saturated municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodman, N.D., E-mail: n.d.woodman@soton.ac.uk; Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Multiple tracers were applied to saturated MSW to test dual-porosity properties. • Lithium demonstrated to be non-conservative as a tracer. • 260 mm diameter column too small to test transport properties of MSW. • The classical advection-dispersion mode was rejected due to high dispersivity. • Characteristic diffusion times did not vary with the tracer. - Abstract: Two column tests were performed in conditions emulating vertical flow beneath the leachate table in a biologically active landfill to determine dominant transport mechanisms occurring in landfills. An improved understanding of contaminant transport process in wastes is required for developing better predictions about potential length of the long term aftercare of landfills, currently measured in timescales of centuries. Three tracers (lithium, bromide and deuterium) were used. Lithium did not behave conservatively. Given that lithium has been used extensively for tracing in landfill wastes, the tracer itself and the findings of previous tests which assume that it has behaved conservatively may need revisiting. The smaller column test could not be fitted with continuum models, probably because the volume of waste was below a representative elemental volume. Modelling compared advection-dispersion (AD), dual porosity (DP) and hybrid AD–DP models. Of these models, the DP model was found to be the most suitable. Although there is good evidence to suggest that diffusion is an important transport mechanism, the breakthrough curves of the different tracers did not differ from each other as would be predicted based on the free-water diffusion coefficients. This suggested that solute diffusion in wastes requires further study.

  11. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-10-01

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the

  12. Advisory group on transport package test standards. Vienna, 19-23 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, P.; Taylor, W.R.

    1978-03-01

    The IAEA convened the Advisory Group to (1) consider any available data on transport accidents and any risk assessments performed in Member States, with a view to making a critical study of the continuing adequacy of the package test requirements included in the current version of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (Safety Series No.6, 1973 Revised Edition), and (2) make recommendations concerning the future planning and conduct of this study. The reports and recommendations are presented of the four working groups assigned, i.e., Statistical Data on Accidents and ''Near Accidents'', Incidents of Accidents and Risk Assessments, Review Package Testing Requirements, and Review Basis for the Radiation Levels for Packages

  13. Thermal test and analysis for transporting vitrified high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, H.; Gomi, Y.; Ozaki, S.; Kato, O.; Tamaki, H.

    1993-01-01

    As a part of the safety demonstration tests for transport casks of high level radioactive vitrified wastes, the thermal tests of the cask (left unattended at an ambient temperature of 38degC for a period of one week) were executed before and after the side free drop test (from height of 30 cm). This condition was set according to the prospect of the damage of contents (baskets, etc.) by the impact force at the drop test. It was shown that the cask temperatures at the representative parts, such as the vitrified wastes, the containment system, and the protection wire net, were lower than allowable values. From the result of measured temperatures it was considered that no damages and no large deformations could happen to the contents in this drop test. Thermal analysis was also done to establish the analysis model. (J.P.N.)

  14. Safety Evaluation of Radioactive Material Transport Package under Stacking Test Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Chan; Seo, Ki Seog; Yoo, Seong Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive waste transport package was developed to transport eight drums of low and intermediate level waste(LILW) in accordance with the IAEA and domestic related regulations. The package is classified with industrial package IP-2. IP-2 package is required to undergo a free drop test and a stacking test. After free drop and stacking tests, it should prevent the loss or dispersal of radioactive contents, and loss of shielding integrity which would result in more than 20 % increase in the radiation level at any external surface of the package. The objective of this study is to establish the safety test method and procedure for stacking test and to prove the structural integrities of the IP-2 package. Stacking test and analysis were performed with a compressive load equal to five times the weight of the package for a period of 24 hours using a full scale model. Strains and displacements were measured at the corner fitting of the package during the stacking test. The measured strains and displacements were compared with the analysis results, and there were good agreements. It is very difficult to measure the deflection at the container base, so the maximum deflection of the container base was calculated by the analysis method. The maximum displacement at the corner fitting and deflection at the container base were less than their allowable values. Dimensions of the test model, thickness of shielding material and bolt torque were measured before and after the stacking test. Throughout the stacking test, it was found that there were no loss or dispersal of radioactive contents and no loss of shielding integrity. Thus, the package was shown to comply with the requirements to maintain structural integrity under the stacking condition.

  15. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  16. Gas transport during in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing of inert gas therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Katz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New gas therapies using inert gases such as xenon and argon are being studied, which require in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments. Examples of the kinetics of gas transport during such experiments are analyzed in this paper. Using analytical and numerical models, we analyze an in vitro experiment for gas transport to a 96 cell well plate and an in vivo delivery to a small animal chamber, where the key processes considered are the wash-in of test gas into an apparatus dead volume, the diffusion of test gas through the liquid media in a well of a cell test plate, and the pharmacokinetics in a rat. In the case of small animals in a chamber, the key variable controlling the kinetics is the chamber wash-in time constant that is a function of the chamber volume and the gas flow rate. For cells covered by a liquid media the diffusion of gas through the liquid media is the dominant mechanism, such that liquid depth and the gas diffusion constant are the key parameters. The key message from these analyses is that the transport of gas during preclinical experiments can be important in determining the true dose as experienced at the site of action in an animal or to a cell.

  17. Mock-up tests of rail-mounted vehicle type in-vessel transporter/manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, K.; Kakaudate, S.; Fukatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    A rail-mounted vehicle system has been developed for remote maintenance of in-vessel components for fusion experimental reactor. In this system, a rail deploying/storing system is installed at outside of the reactor core and used to deploy a rail transporter and vehicle/manipulator for the in-vessel maintenance. A prototype of the rail deploying/storing system has been fabricated for mockup tests. This paper describes structural design of the prototypical rail deploying/storing system and results of the performance tests such as payload capacity, position control and rail deployment/storage performance

  18. Numerical study of thermal test of a cask of transportation for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Tiago A.S.; Santos, André A.C. dos; Vidal, Guilherme A.M.; Silva Junior, Geraldo E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study numerical simulations of a transport cask for radioactive material were made and the numerical results were compared with experimental results of tests carried out in two different opportunities. A mesh study was also made regarding the previously designed geometry of the same cask, in order to evaluate its impact in relation to the stability of numerical results for this type of problem. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results allowed to evaluate the need to plan and carry out a new test in order to validate the CFD codes used in the numerical simulations

  19. Impacts of transportation on a test and evaluation facility for nuclear waste disposal: a systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadarajan, R.V.; Peterson, R.W.; Joy, D.S.; Gibson, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    An essential element of the Test and Evaluation Facility (TEF) is a waste packaging facility capable of producing a small number Test and Evaluation Facility of packages consisting of several different waste forms. The study envisions three scenarios for such a packaging facility: (1) modify an existing hot cell facility such as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (EMAD) facility at the Nevada Test Site so that it can serve as a packaging facility for the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the EMAD Option. (2) Build a new generic packaging facility (GPF) at the site of the TEF. In other words, colocate the GPF and the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the GPF Option, and (3) utilize the EMAD facility in conjunction with a colocated GPF (of minimal size and scope) at the TEF. This scenario is referred to as the Split Option. The results of the system study clearly bring out the fact that transportation has a significant impact on the selection and siting of the waste packaging facility. Preliminary conclusions, subject to the assumptions of the study, include the following: (1) regardless of the waste form, the GPF option is preferable to the other two in minimizing both transportation costs and logistical problems, (2) for any given scenario and choice of waste forms, there exists a candidate TEF location for which the transportation costs are at a minimum compared to the other locations, (3) in spite of the increased transportation costs and logistical complexity, the study shows that the overall system costs favor modification of an existing hot cell facility for the particular case considered

  20. Design and initial tests of beam current monitoring systems for the APS transport lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xucheng.

    1992-01-01

    The non-intercepting beam current monitoring systems suitable for a wide, range of beam parameters have been developed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) low energy transport lines and high energy transport line. The positron or electron beam pulse in the transport lines wig have peak beam currents ranging from 8 mA to 29 A with pulse widths varying from 120 ps to 30 ns and pulse repetition rates from 2 Hz to 60 Hz. The peak beam current or total beam charge is measured with the fast or integrating current transformer, respectively, manufactured by Bergoz. In-house high speed beam signal processing electronics provide a DC level output proportional to the peak current or total charge for the digitizer input. The prototype systems were tested on the linacs which have beam pulse structures similar to that of the APS transport lines. This paper describes the design of beam signal processing electronics and grounding and shielding methods for current transformers. The results of the initial operations are presented. A short introduction on the preliminary design of current monitoring systems for the APS rings is also included

  1. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress

  2. Containment performance of transportable storage casks at 9m drop test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobita, H. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan); Araki, K. [Hitachi Zosen Diesel and Engineering Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Spent fuel transportable storage casks usually have a double lid closure system, which consists of primary and secondary lids, and gaskets, to keep the containment function during transportation and storage, and to monitor a leakage or containment function during storage. Metal gasket is planning to be used not only during storage but transportation of both before and after storage. As metal gasket will degrade its containment function by creep during storage period of 50 years, relative displacement such as opening and slide displacement between the flange of the containment vessel and the lid should be restricted to a small range. To maintain the containment performance, we provisionally adopted the maximum opening limit of 0.1mm and the maximum slide displacement limit of 3.0mm in the full-scale cask design based on the report of the fundamental experiment on the metal gasket which examines the relation between leakage rate and sealing gap. The purpose of this study is to analyse the behaviour of the sealed parts (lid and vessel body) under 9m-drop impact test conditions and to establish some analytical method to evaluate this behaviour. In this study, the drop test of 1/3scale model of Hitz-B69 cask with the double lids closure system was carried out, the behaviours of the seal part were measured by displacement sensors, and they were compared with the result of the numerical analysis carried out separateley.

  3. Simulation of the Twin Lake tracer tests using different transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleris, V.; Klukas, M.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    The 1983 Twin Lake tracer test was simulated using two different sets of the aquifer parameters and three different numerical models. The purpose of the simulations was to identify the parameter set and the model most appropriate to describe the transport phenomena in the Twin Lake aquifer. It is shown that a reliable estimation of the aquifer parameters cannot be obtained from the flow model alone. Transport models must also be used to obtain a reliable estimate of parameters. The method-of-characteristics and random-walk models were used for this purpose. The sensitivity of the results to different execution parameters was evaluated and the required computational efforts were compared. Finally, results obtained by the method of characteristics were compared with the results of a finite element simulation carried out with the same spatial discretization. The comparison demonstrates the influence of the numerical dispersion on the results of the finite element method. Travel time calculations represent a simple way to test the accuracy of the aquifer parameters before transport modeling is done. (Author) (14 refs, 19 figs., 3 tabs.)

  4. Development and Testing of a Variable Conductance Thermal Acquisition, Transport, and Switching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, David C.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Stouffer, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a scalable thermal management architecture for instruments, subsystems, or systems that must operate in severe space environments with wide variations in sink temperature. The architecture involves a serial linkage of one or more hot-side variable conductance heat pipes (VCHPs) to one or more cold-side loop heat pipes (LHPs). The VCHPs provide wide area heat acquisition, limited distance thermal transport, modest against gravity pumping, concentrated LHP startup heating, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. The LHPs provide localized heat acquisition, long distance thermal transport, significant against gravity pumping, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. The single-VCHP, single-LHP system described herein was developed to maintain thermal control of a small robotic lunar lander throughout the lunar day-night thermal cycle. It is also applicable to other variable heat rejection space missions in severe environments. Operationally, despite a 60-70% gas blocked VCHP condenser during ON testing, the system was still able to provide 2-4 W/K ON conductance, 0.01 W/K OFF conductance, and an end-to-end switching ratio of 200-400. The paper provides a detailed analysis of VCHP condenser performance, which quantified the gas blockage situation. Future multi-VCHP/multi-LHP thermal management system concepts that provide power/transport length scalability are also discussed.

  5. Packaging and transportation system for K-Basin spent fuel-component testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kee, A.T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the cask/transportation system that was designed, procured and delivered to the Hanford K-Basin site at Richland, Washington. The performance requirements and design of the various components -- cask, trailer with cask tie-down system, and the cask operation equipment for the load-out pit -- will be discussed. The presentation will include the details of the factory acceptance testing and its results. The performance requirements for the cask/transportation system was dictated by the constraints imposed by the large number of high priority shipments and the spent fuel pool environment, and the complex interface requirements with other equipment and facility designs. The results of the testing form the basis for the conclusion that the system satisfies the site performance requirements. The cask/transportation system design was driven by the existing facility constraints and the limitations imposed by the large number of shipments over a short two-year period. This system may be useful information for other DOE facilities that may be or will be in a similar situation

  6. Optical analysis of pollution transport in geotechnical centrifuge tests; Analyse optique du transport de polluant lors d'essais geotechniques en centrifugeuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allersma, H.G.B. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Materials Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Esposito, G.M. [Delft University of Technology, TNO-Building and Construction Research, Formerly Delft (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    An optical method based on image processing techniques has been described for performing measurements on pollution transport phenomena in soil in centrifuge tests. The geometry of the polluted areas as well as the concentration of the pollution can be measured in two-dimensional tests. (author)

  7. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  8. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gnome underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary site risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gnome site in southeastern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 3.5-kiloton nuclear device in 1961, and a hydrologic tracer test using radionuclides in 1963. The tracer test involved the injection of tritium, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs directly into the Culebra Dolomite, a nine to ten-meter-thick aquifer located approximately 150 in below land surface. The Gnome nuclear test was carried out in the Salado Formation, a thick salt deposit located 200 in below the Culebra. Because salt behaves plastically, the cavity created by the explosion is expected to close, and although there is no evidence that migration has actually occurred, it is assumed that radionuclides from the cavity are released into the overlying Culebra Dolomite during this closure process. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides may be present in concentrations exceeding drinking water regulations outside the drilling exclusion boundary established by DOE. Calculated mean tritium concentrations peak at values exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 20,000 pCi/L at distances of up to almost eight kilometers west of the nuclear test

  9. Blood transport method for chromosome analysis of residents living near Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodzi, Mohd; Ihda, Shozo; Yokozeki, Masako; Takeichi, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kimio; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2009-12-01

    A study was conducted to compare the storage conditions and transportation period for blood samples collected from residents living in areas near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). Experiments were performed to simulate storage and shipping environments. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood was stored in 15-ml tubes (condition A: current transport method) in the absence or in 50-ml flasks (condition B: previous transport method) in the presence of RPMI-1640 and 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Samples were kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and cell viability was assessed after 3, 8, 12 and 14 days of storage. RPMI-1640, 20% FBS and further PHA were added to blood samples under condition A in 50-ml flasks for culture. Whole-blood samples under condition B were directly incubated without further sub-culturing process, neither media nor PHA were added, to adopt a similar protocol to that employed in the previous transport method. Samples in condition A and condition B were incubated for 48 hr at 37 degrees C and their mitotic index was determined. The results showed that viable lymphocytes were consistent in both storage conditions but the mitotic index was higher in condition A than in condition B. Although further confirmation studies have to be carried out, previous chromosomal studies and the present experiment have shown that PHA-stimulated blood could be stored without culture medium for up to 8 days under condition A. The present results will be useful for cytogenetic analysis of blood samples that have been transported long distances wherever a radiation accident has occurred.

  10. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gasbuggy underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gasbuggy site in northwestern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 29-kiloton nuclear device in 1967. The test took place in the Lewis Shale, approximately 182 m below the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, which is the aquifer closest to the detonation horizon. The conservative assumption was made that tritium was injected from the blast-created cavity into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone by the force of the explosion, via fractures created by the shot. Model results suggest that if radionuclides produced by the shot entered the Ojo Alamo, they are most likely contained within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity, followed by the variance in hydraulic conductivity, the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, the transverse hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient, and uncertainty in the source size. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affects calculations of radionuclide transport at the Gasbuggy site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation at the site; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values

  11. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  12. Surrogate fuel assembly multi-axis shaker tests to simulate normal conditions of rail and truck transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Greg John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grey, Carissa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelhardt, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    This report describes the third set of tests (the “DCLa shaker tests”) of an instrumented surrogate PWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this set of tests was to measure strains and accelerations on Zircaloy-4 fuel rods when the PWR assembly was subjected to rail and truck loadings simulating normal conditions of transport when affixed to a multi-axis shaker. This is the first set of tests of the assembly simulating rail normal conditions of transport.

  13. Testing of a "smart-pebble" for measuring particle transport statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Avgeris, Loukas; Valyrakis, Manousos

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from novel experiments aiming to assess coarse sediment transport statistics for a range of transport conditions, via the use of an innovative "smart-pebble" device. This device is a waterproof sphere, which has 7 cm diameter and is equipped with a number of sensors that provide information about the velocity, acceleration and positioning of the "smart-pebble" within the flow field. A series of specifically designed experiments are carried out to monitor the entrainment of a "smart-pebble" for fully developed, uniform, turbulent flow conditions over a hydraulically rough bed. Specifically, the bed surface is configured to three sections, each of them consisting of well packed glass beads of slightly increasing size at the downstream direction. The first section has a streamwise length of L1=150 cm and beads size of D1=15 mm, the second section has a length of L2=85 cm and beads size of D2=22 mm, and the third bed section has a length of L3=55 cm and beads size of D3=25.4 mm. Two cameras monitor the area of interest to provide additional information regarding the "smart-pebble" movement. Three-dimensional flow measurements are obtained with the aid of an acoustic Doppler velocimeter along a measurement grid to assess the flow forcing field. A wide range of flow rates near and above the threshold of entrainment is tested, while using four distinct densities for the "smart-pebble", which can affect its transport speed and total momentum. The acquired data are analyzed to derive Lagrangian transport statistics and the implications of such an important experiment for the transport of particles by rolling are discussed. The flow conditions for the initiation of motion, particle accelerations and equilibrium particle velocities (translating into transport rates), statistics of particle impact and its motion, can be extracted from the acquired data, which can be further compared to develop meaningful insights for sediment transport

  14. Rail-Cask Tests: Normal-Conditionsof- Transport Tests of Surrogate PWR Fuel Assemblies in an ENSA ENUN 32P Cask.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ross, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grey, Carissa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Uncapher, William Leonard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arviso, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garmendia, Rafael [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez Perez, Ismael [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Palacio, Alejandro [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, Guillermo [Equipos Nucleares Sociedad Anonima, Madrid (Spain); Garrido, David [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez Casas, Ana [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez Garcia, Luis [COORDINADORA, Madrid (Spain); Chilton, Lyman Wes [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walz, Jacob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gershon, Sabina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klymyshyn, Nicholas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, Brady [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pena, Ruben [Transportation Technology Center, Inc., Pueblo, CO (United States); Walker, Russell [Transportation Technology Center, Inc., Pueblo, CO (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report describes tests conducted using a full-size rail cask, the ENSA ENUN 32P, involving handling of the cask and transport of the cask via truck, ships, and rail. The purpose of the tests was to measure strains and accelerations on surrogate pressurized water reactor fuel rods when the fuel assemblies were subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport within the rail cask. In addition, accelerations were measured on the transport platform, the cask cradle, the cask, and the basket within the cask holding the assemblies. These tests were an international collaboration that included Equipos Nucleares S.A., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Coordinadora Internacional de Cargas S.A., the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. All test results in this report are PRELIMINARY – complete analyses of test data will be completed and reported in FY18. However, preliminarily: The strains were exceedingly low on the surrogate fuel rods during the rail-cask tests for all the transport and handling modes. The test results provide a compelling technical basis for the safe transport of spent fuel.

  15. Method of online cleanliness control for upward-facing transport mirrors in integration test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Longbiao; Qin Lang; Zhou Guorui; Ye Yayun; Zhang Chuanchao; Miao Xinxiang; Wang Hongbin; Yuan Xiaodong; Wang Xiaohong; Cheng Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    An online cleanliness control method based on the online monitoring system was developed for controlling the particle pollution and damage of upward-facing transport mirrors in the integration test bed. By building up gas knife system, the online cleanliness processing was effectively achieved for the particle pollution on the mirror surface. By using the gas screen, the cleanliness of the mirror surface was effectively online maintained. The image processing system was applied to assessing the effect of online cleanliness processing. The experimental results indicate that the particle pollution was reduced by the gas knife and the gas screen was useful to avoid the settlement of particle pollution. (authors)

  16. Testing ZigBee Motes for Monitoring Refrigerated Vegetable Transportation under Real Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ruiz-Garcia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality control and monitoring of perishable goods during transportation and delivery services is an increasing concern for producers, suppliers, transport decision makers and consumers. The major challenge is to ensure a continuous ‘cold chain’ from producer to consumer in order to guaranty prime condition of goods. In this framework, the suitability of ZigBee protocol for monitoring refrigerated transportation has been proposed by several authors. However, up to date there was not any experimental work performed under real conditions. Thus, the main objective of our experiment was to test wireless sensor motes based in the ZigBee/IEEE 802.15.4 protocol during a real shipment. The experiment was conducted in a refrigerated truck traveling through two countries (Spain and France which means a journey of 1,051 kilometers. The paper illustrates the great potential of this type of motes, providing information about several parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, door openings and truck stops. Psychrometric charts have also been developed for improving the knowledge about water loss and condensation on the product during shipments.

  17. 40 CFR 80.583 - What alternative sampling and testing requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, or ECA marine fuel... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel... alternative sampling and testing requirements apply to importers who transport motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM...

  18. Accuracy of CFC groundwater dating in a crystalline bedrock aquifer: Data from a site in southern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockgård, Niclas; Rodhe, Allan; Olsson, K. A.

    The concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) and tritium were determined in groundwater in fractured crystalline bedrock at Finnsjön, Sweden. The specific goal was to investigate the accuracy of CFC dating in such an environment, taking potential degradation and mixing of water into consideration. The water was sampled to a depth of 42 m in three boreholes along an 800-m transect, from a recharge area to a local discharge area. The CFC-113 concentration was at the detection limit in most samples. The apparent recharge date obtained from CFC-11 was earlier than from CFC-12 for all samples, with a difference of over 20 years for some samples. The difference was probably caused by degradation of CFC-11. The CFC-12 dating of the samples ranged from before 1945 to 1975, with the exception of a sample from the water table, which had a present-day concentration. Conclusions about flow paths or groundwater velocity could not be drawn from the CFCs. The comparison between CFC-12 and tritium concentrations showed that most samples could be unmixed or mixtures of waters with different ages, and the binary mixtures that matched the measured concentrations were determined. The mixing model approach can be extended with additional tracers. Précision de la datation au CFC dans un aquifère rocheux-fracturé: données d'un site du sud de la Suède. Les concentrations en chlorofluorocarbones (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) et entritium ont été déterminées dans l'eau souterraine d'un massif fracturé à Finnsjön en Suède. Le but de cette étude est de mieux cerner la précision de la méthode de datation au CFC dans ce type d'environnement hydrogéologique, tout en considérant d'éventuels phénomènes de dégradation et de mélange d'eaux. L'eau a été échantillonnée à une profondeur de 42 mètres dans trois forages alignés sur 800 mètres entre une zone de recharge et une zone de déversement. Les concentrations en CFC-113 sont dans la plupart des échantillons à la limite de détection. Pour tous les échantillons, la date de la recharge établie avec le CFC-11 est antérieure à la date établie avec le CFC-12. La différence entre les deux dates peut dépasser 20 ans et s'explique-probablement-par la dégradation du CFC-11. Les dates de recharge de la nappe mesurées au CFC-12 sont comprises entre 1945 et 1975, excepté pour un échantillon qui possède une concentration actuelle. Il n'est pas possible de tirer des conclusions concernant la direction des écoulements et la vitesse de l'eau souterraine. La comparaison entre CFC-12 et tritium montre que des échantillons pourraient être soit le résultat du mélange d'eaux d'âges différents, soit des échantillons non-mélangés. Dans le cas d'un mélange binaire, les rapports du mélange composant la concentration mesurée sont déterminés. L'approche par modèle de mélange peut être étendue à des traceurs additionnels. Precisión en la datación de aguas subterráneas utilizando CFC en un acuífero de rocas cristalinas: datos provenientes de un sitio al sur de Suecia. Se determinaron las concentraciones de clorofluorucarbonos (CFC-11, CFC-12, y CFC-113) y de tritio en aguas subterráneas alojadas en rocas cristalinas fracturadas de Finnsjön, Suecia. El objetivo específico consistió en investigar la precisión de la datación de aguas subterráneas con CFC en este tipo de ambiente, tomando en consideración la degradación potencial y la mezcla de agua. Las muestras de agua se tomaron a una profundidad de 42 m en tres pozos ubicados a lo largo de una línea de 800 m transversal a una zona de recarga y de zona de descarga local. En la mayoría de las muestras se encontró que la concentración de CFC-113 estuvo en el límite de detección. La edad que se estimó en todas las muestras para la recarga aparente en base a CFC-11 fue más joven que la edad proveniente de CFC-12, con una diferencia de más de 20 años para algunas muestras. Esta diferencia fue causada probablemente por la degradación del CFC-11. La datación CFC-12 de las muestras varió de antes de 1945 a 1975, con la excepción de una muestra tomada en el nivel freático, la cual presentó concentración actual. No fue posible obtener conclusiones acerca de las trayectorias de flujo o la velocidad de agua subterránea a partir de los CFCs. La comparación entre las concentraciones de CFC-12 y tritio mostró que la mayoría de las muestras pueden tener composición sencilla o bien consistir de mezclas de aguas de diferentes edades. Esta comparación también permitió determinar las mezclas binarias que corresponden a las concentraciones medidas. Pueden utilizarse trazadores adicionales para ampliar el modelo de mezclas propuesto.

  19. Transportability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    and dump trucks are exceptions and may be tested at a curb weight or weight less than the gross weight. Consult with SDDCTEA for these types of...will be provided by a hydraulic actuator system. Accomplish the provision loading for the durations specified in MIL-STD-209K. Measure the loads...to flight testing. (b) Once rigged, attach the sling set apex to the cargo hook of a mobile or overhead crane and hoist the item from the ground

  20. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada Operations Office (now known as the Nevada Site Office) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the 'Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada' (DOE/EIS 0243). The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at Area 5 and Area 3. No shipments were disposed of at Area 3 in fiscal year (FY) 2008. This document satisfies requirements regarding low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during FY 2008. No transuranic (TRU) waste shipments were made from or to the NTS during FY 2008

  1. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2016 Meteorological, Radiological, and Wind Transported Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if wind blowing across the Clean Slate sites is transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites.

  2. Shielding designs and tests of a new exclusive ship for transporting spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Ito, D.; Kitano, T.; Ueki, K.; Akiyama, H.; Obara, I.; Sanui, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Rokuei-Maru, a ship built specially for the transport of spent nuclear fuels in casks, was launched April in 1996. She is the first ship to comply with special Japanese regulations, KAISA 520, based on the INF code. DOT3.5 and MCNP-4A were used for the evaluation of dose equivalent rates of her shielding structures. On-board gamma-ray shielding tests were executed to confirm the effectiveness of the ship's shielding performance. The tests confirmed that effective shielding has been achieved and the dose equivalent rate in the accommodation and other inhabited spaces is sufficiently lower than the regulated limitations. This was achieved by employing the appropriate calculation methods and shielding materials. (author)

  3. Analysis of data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, T.C.

    1986-06-01

    This report analyzes data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps performed during the period 1980-1983. Phenomena which have been known to cause pump-induced flow oscillations in pressurized piping systems under two-phase conditions are reviewed and the data analyzed to determine whether any of the identified phenomena could have been responsible for the instabilities observed in those tests. Tentative explanations for the most severe instabilities are given based on those analyses. It is shown that suction pipe geometry probably plays an important role in promoting instabilities, so additional experiments to investigate the effect of suction pipe geometry on the stability of flow in a closed pipe loop under two-phase conditions are recommended

  4. Testing and implementation of a transportable and robust radio-element mapping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Bezuidenhout

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray spectroscopy has been successfully applied as a survey tool in the fields of morphology, geology and mineral exploration. Gamma ray surveys are regularly done at ground level, which frequently requires transecting remote and unforgiving environments. Thus a need for the development of a transportable, robust and portable gamma ray detection system was identified. In addition to collecting radiation data, such a system was required to also provide the geographic position of the data and allow for various analyses tools to be utilised in the field. These functions were achieved by integrating a USB-driven scintillation detector with a field tablet and creating software to control acquisition and analyses of radiation data, as well as logging position. The system was tested in different geographical locations under different modes of transport. The instrument was tested by employing several different methods of data analysis in order to extract natural nuclide condensations. The consistency in the obtained data demonstrated the reliability of the instrument in the different environments. The system also successfully replicated previous radio-element survey findings and provided information on several geographical phenomena, including information on the geology, paved road structure and beach sediment characteristics.

  5. Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

    2006-09-30

    The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

  6. On the Causal Nexus of Road Transport CO2 Emissions and Macroeconomic Variables in Tunisia: Evidence from Combined Cointegration Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Khraief, Naceur; Dhaoui, Abderrazak

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the causal relationship between road transportation energy consumption, fuel prices, transport sector value added and CO2 emissions in Tunisia for the period 1980-2012. We apply the newly developed combined cointegration test proposed by Bayer and Hanck (2013) and the ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration to establish the existence of long-run relationship in presence of structural breaks. The direction of causality between these variables is determined via vec...

  7. Construction and testing of a transportable solar adsorption refrigerator; Construction et test d'un refrigerateur solaire a adsorption transportable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J.; Dind, P.

    2002-07-01

    The report describes the development of an autonomous solar adsorption refrigerator characterized by its compactness and transportability. The refrigerator utilizes water as the working fluid and silicagel as the adsorbent and operates discontinuously over the day/night cycle. For a cooling volume of about 100 liters a collector-adsorber surface of 1 m{sup 2} is required and the total mass of the system amounts to about 150 kg. In order to keep its mass as low as possible the apparatus has been built with light weight materials. The cold-storage room has been insulated with a high-performance insulation material, thus minimizing thermal losses without excessively reducing the cooled volume. A new automatic valve system has been developed making superfluous any manual manipulation during normal operation. The dimensioning of the cooling system allows to cool the equivalent of 2.5 to 3.7 kg of water by 30 K daily in a climate of the Sahelien type. The cooling energy is stored in the form of ice in the evaporator and allows to bridge a period of three overcast-sky days. The construction of the solar refrigerator was made in cooperation with small regional enterprises and workshops. The cooperation with a non governmental organization allowed to test the system from May to September 2002 in a Subsaharian region of Africa where an equivalent model had been built using locally available materials. Likewise, a market study has been made in Burkina Faso in order to analyze the potential of solar adsorption refrigerators in this region. The result of the study suggests that the opening of a production workshop for such refrigerators in Burkina Faso is promising.

  8. Towards sustainable urban transportation: Test, demonstration and development of fuel cell and hybrid-electric buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkesson, Anders

    2008-05-01

    Several aspects make today's transport system non-sustainable: - Production, transport and combustion of fossil fuels lead to global and local environmental problems. - Oil dependency in the transport sector may lead to economical and political instability. - Air pollution, noise, congestion and land-use may jeopardise public health and quality of life, especially in urban areas. In a sustainable urban transport system most trips are made with public transport because high convenience and comfort makes travelling with public transport attractive. In terms of emissions, including noise, the vehicles are environmentally sustainable, locally as well as globally. Vehicles are energy-efficient and the primary energy stems from renewable sources. Costs are reasonable for all involved, from passengers, bus operators and transport authorities to vehicle manufacturers. The system is thus commercially viable on its own merits. This thesis presents the results from three projects involving different concept buses, all with different powertrains. The first two projects included technical evaluations, including tests, of two different fuel cell buses. The third project focussed on development of a series hybrid-bus with internal combustion engine intended for production around 2010. The research on the fuel cell buses included evaluations of the energy efficiency improvement potential using energy mapping and vehicle simulations. Attitudes to hydrogen fuel cell buses among passengers, bus drivers and bus operators were investigated. Safety aspects of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel were analysed and the use of hydrogen compared to electrical energy storage were also investigated. One main conclusion is that a city bus should be considered as one energy system, because auxiliaries contribute largely to the energy use. Focussing only on the powertrain is not sufficient. The importance of mitigating losses far down an energy conversion chain is emphasised. The Scania hybrid fuel cell

  9. Shielding tests for a new ship for the transport of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, D.; Kitano, T.; Akiyama, H.; Ueki, K.; Sanui, T.

    1998-01-01

    a new ship for the transport of spent nuclear fuels which uses serpentine concrete as its major shielding material has been constructed. The shielding calculations are based on DOT3.5 code (CCC-276) and the DLC23). Experiments with Cf-252 and Co-60 sources were carried out to confirm the validity of this method of calculating the shielding effectiveness of serpentine concrete. In these experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalent rates were measured in various arrangements to simulate the shielding structures of the ship, the calculations for each arrangement were performed by this shielding calculation method. For both neutron and gamma-rays, the calculation results agreed with the experiments very well, confirming that this calculation method used in the ship's shielding design is valid. Two kinds of on-board gamma-ray shielding tests were performed to confirm the ship's actual shielding effectiveness. In one kind of test, gamma-ray dose equivalent rates were measured for each shielding wall using Co-60 sources. In the other kind of test, gamma-ray dose equivalent rates in the ship's accommodation area were measured when a strong Co-60 source was placed in a loaded shipping cask's position. In both gamma-ray shielding tests all measured dose equivalent rates were less than the calculated values, confirming that the ship's actual shielding is sufficient to meet safety requirements. (authors)

  10. Concept on groundwater flow and mass transport through heterogeneous porous media and application to in-situ test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Koichiro; Umeki, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    Generally, geological media is modelled as porous or fractured media depending on their characteristics. Since the channels of groundwater flow and the transport paths are determined by the heterogeneity of the geological media, quantitative understanding of the heterogeneity is an important issue for modelling flow and transport processes through them. Therefore, it becomes popular way to develop statistical identification approaches of the heterogeneous field by using data from in-situ test and conduct validation studies of flow and transport models through the field by comparing with observed data. In this report, the theories of the identification approach and the concept on groundwater flow and mass transport are explained briefly and the application to tracer tests conducted at Grimsel test site, Switzerland, are described. (author)

  11. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2008-03-01

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  12. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2008-03-15

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  13. Performance test results of ion beam transport for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428, Gujarat (India); Uhlemann, R, E-mail: mukti@ipr.res.i [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute fur Energieforschung IEF-4, Plasmaphysik D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    A neutral beam injector is built at IPR to heat the plasma of SST-1 and its upgrade. It delivers a maximum beam power of 1.7 MW for 55 kV Hydrogen beam or 80 kV Deuterium beam. At lower beam voltage, the delivered power falls to 500 kW at 30 kV Hydrogen beam which is adequate to heat SST-1 plasma ions to {approx} 1 keV. Process of acceleration of ions to the required beam voltage, conversion of ions to neutrals and removal of un-neutralized ions and the beam diagnostic systems occupy a large space. The consequence is that linear extent of the neutral beam injector is at least a few meters. Also, port access provides a very narrow duct. Even a very good injector design and fabrication practices keep beam divergence at a very low but finite value. The result is beam transport becomes an important issue. Since a wide area beam is constructed by hundreds of beam lets, it becomes essential they be focused in such a way that beam transport loss is minimized. Horizontal and vertical focal lengths are two parameters, in addition to beam divergence, which give a description of the beam transport. We have obtained these two parameters for our injector by using beam transport code; making several hundred simulation runs by varying optical parameters of the beam. The selected parameters set has been translated into the engineering features of the extractor grid set of the ion source. Aperture displacement technique is used to secure the horizontal beam focusing at 5.4 m. Combination of both aperture displacement and inclining of two grid halves to {approx} 17 mrad are secured for vertical beam focusing at 7 m from earth grid of the ion source. The gaps between the design, engineered and performance tested values usually arise due to lack of exercising control over fabrication processes or due to inaccuracies in the assumption made in the model calculations of beam optics and beam transport. This has been the case with several injectors, notably with JET injector. To overcome

  14. Testing in support of transportation of residues in the pipe overpack container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.; Bronowski, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plants call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The tests described here were performed to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II. Using a more robust container will assure the fissile materials in each container can not be mixed with the fissile material from the other containers and will provide criticality control. This will allow an increase in the payload of the TRUPACT-II from 325 fissile gram equivalents to 2,800 fissile gram equivalents

  15. Inverse transport for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Issartel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An international monitoring system is being built as a verification tool for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Forty stations will measure on a worldwide daily basis the concentration of radioactive noble gases. The paper introduces, by handling preliminary real data, a new approach of backtracking for the identification of sources of passive tracers after positive measurements. When several measurements are available the ambiguity about possible sources is reduced significantly. The approach is validated against ETEX data. A distinction is made between adjoint and inverse transport shown to be, indeed, different though equivalent ideas. As an interesting side result it is shown that, in the passive tracer dispersion equation, the diffusion stemming from a time symmetric turbulence is necessarily a self-adjoint operator, a result easily verified for the usual gradient closure, but more general.

  16. Report on stages 3 and 4: testing of coupled chemical transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.

    1991-01-01

    Chemval is an international exercise aimed at the verification and validation of predictive models describing groundwater speciation and geochemical transport. As a component of the CEC Mirage project (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere) - second phase, Chemval is being carried out within the framework of the third Community R and D programme on radioactive waste management and storage (1985-89). This report describes the methodology employed and results obtained for 15 verification tests of varying complexity. The outcome of validation studies against two well-characterized experimental systems is also assessed in terms of the requirements for radiological risk assessment. Chemval is funded jointly by the Commission of the European Communities and Her majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution - UK Department of the Environment. 75 refs., 67 figs; 21 tabs

  17. Exposure assessment of groundwater transport of tritium from the Central Nevada Test Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, K.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1995-04-01

    This exposure assessment provides a range of possible human health risk at two locations due to groundwater transport from the Faultless underground nuclear test. These locations correspond to the boundary of the land under DOE control (where no wells currently exist) and the closest existing well (Six Mile Well). The range in excess risk is within the EPA goal for excess risk due to environmental contaminants (10 -6 ) at Six Mile Well. Calculations considering high spatial variability in hydraulic properties and/or high uncertainty in the mean groundwater velocity are also within the EPA goal. At the DOE boundary, the range in excess risk exceeds the EPA goal, regardless of the values of spatial variability and uncertainty. The range in values of excess risk can be reduced with additional field data from the site; however, incorporation of additional data, which would likely be obtained at great expense, is unlikely to result in significant refinement of the results

  18. The AMT maglev test sled -- EML weapons technology transition to transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaaf, J.C. Jr. [BDM Federal, Huntsville, AL (United States); Zowarka, R.C. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Davey, K. [American Maglev Technology, Inc., Edgewater, FL (United States); Weldon, J.M. [Parker Kinetic Designs, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Technology spinoffs from prior electromagnetic launcher work enhance a magnetic levitation transportation system test bed being developed by American Maglev Technology of Florida. This project uses a series wound linear DC motor and brushes to simplify the magnetic levitation propulsion system. It takes advantage of previous related work in electromagnetic launcher technology to achieve success with this innovative design. Technology and knowledge gained from developments for homopolar generators and proposed railgun arc control are key to successful performance. This contribution supports a cost effective design that is competitive with alternative concepts. Brushes transfer power from the guideway (rail) to the vehicle (armature) in a novel design that activates the guideway only under the vehicle, reducing power losses and guideway construction costs. The vehicle carries no power for propulsion and levitation, and acts only as a conduit for the power through the high speed brushes. Brush selection and performance is based on previous EML homopolar generator research. A counterpulse circuit, first introduced in an early EML conference, is used to suppress arcing on the trailing brush and to transfer inductive energy to the next propulsion coil. Isolated static lift and preliminary propulsion tests have been completed, and integrated propulsion and lift tests are scheduled in early 1996.

  19. Development and performance tests of the bridge-transported servo manipulator system for remote maintenance jobs in a hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jae Hyun; Park, Byung Suk; Ko, Byung Seung; Yoon, Ji Sup; Jung, Ki Jung

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a prototype of the Bridge-Transported Servo Manipulator (BTSM) system introduced, which has been developed to do operation and maintenance jobs remotely in a hot cell. The system consists of a telescopic transporter, a slave arm, a master arm, and a control system. Several tests such as a positional tracking, a weight handling, reliability, and operability have been performed and test results are presented. Based on the test results, an upgraded system which will be used during demonstrations of the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) has been designed.

  20. Hybrid advection scheme for 3-dimensional atmospheric models. Testing and application for a study of NO{sub x} transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubov, V A; Rozanov, E V [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schlesinger, M E; Andronova, N G [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    1998-12-31

    The problems of ozone depletion, climate change and atmospheric pollution strongly depend on the processes of production, destruction and transport of chemical species. A hybrid transport scheme was developed, consisting of the semi-Lagrangian scheme for horizontal advection and the Prather scheme for vertical transport, which have been used for the Atmospheric Chemical Transport model to calculate the distributions of different chemical species. The performance of the new hybrid scheme has been evaluated in comparison with other transport schemes on the basis of specially designed tests. The seasonal cycle of the distribution of N{sub 2}O simulated by the model, as well as the dispersion of NO{sub x} exhausted from subsonic aircraft, are in a good agreement with published data. (author) 8 refs.

  1. Hybrid advection scheme for 3-dimensional atmospheric models. Testing and application for a study of NO{sub x} transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubov, V.A.; Rozanov, E.V. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schlesinger, M.E.; Andronova, N.G. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The problems of ozone depletion, climate change and atmospheric pollution strongly depend on the processes of production, destruction and transport of chemical species. A hybrid transport scheme was developed, consisting of the semi-Lagrangian scheme for horizontal advection and the Prather scheme for vertical transport, which have been used for the Atmospheric Chemical Transport model to calculate the distributions of different chemical species. The performance of the new hybrid scheme has been evaluated in comparison with other transport schemes on the basis of specially designed tests. The seasonal cycle of the distribution of N{sub 2}O simulated by the model, as well as the dispersion of NO{sub x} exhausted from subsonic aircraft, are in a good agreement with published data. (author) 8 refs.

  2. Test program of the drop tests with full scale and 1/2.5 scale models of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Matsuoka, T.; Kishimoto, J.; Ishiko, D.; Saito, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2004-01-01

    MHI have been developing 5 types of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask (MSF cask fleet) as a cask line-up. In order to demonstrate their safety, a representative cask model for the cask fleet have been designed for drop test regulated in IAEA TS-R-1. The drop test with a full and a 1/2.5 scale models are to be performed. It describes the test program of the drop test and manufacturing process of the scale models used for the tests

  3. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  4. Qualification testing facility for type A, B and C packages to be used for transport and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.; Nistor, V.; Vasile, A.; Cojocaru, V.

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the Economic Commission for Europe-Committee on inland transport (ADR- European Agreement-concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by road, 2007 Edition) the Safety and Security of the dangerous goods class No. 7 - Radioactive Materials during transport in all different modes - by road, by rail, by sea, by inland rivers or by air - have to be ensured at a very high level. The radioactive materials (RAM) packaging have to comply to all transport conditions, routine or in accident conditions, possibly to occur during transportation operations. It is well known that the safety in the transport of RAM is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required for the package. The quality of these packages - type A, B or C has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the Romanian nuclear regulation conditions provided by CNCAN Order no. 357/22.12.2005- N orms for a Safe Transport of Radioactive Material , the IAEA Vienna Recommendation (1, 2) stipulated in the Safety standard TS-R-1- Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, and other applicable international recommendations. The paper will describe the components of the designed testing facilities, and the qualification testing to be performed for all type A, B and C packages subjected to the testing Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM packages will comply with the national safe standards as well as with the IAEA applicable recommendation provided by the TS-R-1 safety standard. (authors)

  5. Barometric gas transport along faults and its application to nuclear test-ban monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, C.R.; Heinle, R.A.; Hudson, G.M.; Nitao, J.J.; Zucca, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    Underground nuclear explosions produce a unique but evanescent set of radionuclide gases that potentially can be used in the context of an on-site, test-ban monitoring program to differentiate them from other detected events such as earthquakes or mining activity. In Part I of this report we describe an experiment to evaluate the upward transport of gases from an underground explosion using two gas tracers with very different diffusivities that were released in a 400-m-deep, chemical explosive detonation. The less diffusive (more massive) tracer was detected on a nearby geologic fault 50 days following the detonation while the more diffusive tracer was detected 375 days after release. Computer simulations indicate that the arrival time and the chromatographic behavior of transport are characteristic of barometrically induced flow in a fractured, porous matrix regime. For a hypothetical 1-kiloton fission explosion subject to the same weather and gas transport conditions of the chemical explosion, simulations predict the detectability of argon-37 after 80 days in spite of depletion by radioactive decay. Largely because of the earlier arrival of xenon-133, owing to its lower binary gas diffusivity, the exceedingly short lived isotope should also be detectable - arriving about 30 days earlier than argon. In Part II we consider that our prediction of the detectability of argon and xenon is based upon the small volume (0.00001 m 3 ) sampling technique of the NPE tracer-gas sampling study while actual sampling for radionuclides would involve drawing much larger volume (possibly 0.1-1 m 3 ) gas samples from the near-surface. Extraction of such a large volume of gas from 1-5 meter depths in the soil raises the possibility of significant atmospheric infiltration, leading to substantial dilution of the extracted gas sample. However, an infiltration experiment suggests that significant dilution would not, in fact, occur at the most prolific sampling stations of the earlier gas

  6. Solute transport processes in a highly permeable fault zone of Lindau fractured rock test site (Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmelsbach, T. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany). Dept. of Applied Geology; Hoetzl, H. [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany). Dept. of Applied Geology; Maloszewski, P. [GSF-Inst. for Hydrology, Munich-Neuherberg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The results of field tracer experiments performed in the Lindau fractured rock test site (southern Black Forest, Germany) and subsequent modeling are presented. A vertical, hydrothermally mineralized fault zone, with a permeability much greater than the surrounding granite mass, lies beneath a planned dam site. A dense network of boreholes and tunnels were used to investigate scaling effects of solute transport processes in fractured rock. A series of tracer experiments using deuterium and dye tracers were performed over varying distances and under different testing procedures, resulting in different flow field conditions. Large-scale tracer experiments were performed under natural flow field conditions, while small-scale tracer experiments were performed under artificially induced radial-convergent and injection-withdrawal flow fields. The tracer concentration curves observed in all experiments were strongly influenced by the matrix diffusion. The curves were evaluated with the one-dimensional single fissure dispersion model (SFDM) adjusted for the different flow field conditions. The fitting model parameters found determined the fracture aperture, and matrix and fissure porosities. The determined fracture aperture varied between the sections having different hydraulic conductivity. The determined values of matrix porosity seemed to be independent of the scale of the experiment. The modeled matrix porosities agreed well with values determined in independent laboratory investigations of drill cores using mercury porosimetry. In situ fissure porosity, determined only in small-scale experiments, was independent of the applied geometry of the artificially induced flow fields. The dispersivities were found to be independent of the scale of experiment but dependent on the flow conditions. The values found in forced gradient tests lie between 0.2 and 0.3 m, while values in experiments performed under natural flow conditions were one order of magnitude higher.

  7. Annotated bibliography of literature relating to wind transport of plutonium-contaminated soils at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.

    1993-12-01

    During the period from 1954 through 1963, a number of tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to determine the safety of nuclear devices with respect to storage, handling, transport, and accidents. These tests were referred to as ''safety shots.'' ''Safety'' in this context meant ''safety against fission reaction.'' The safety tests were comprised of chemical high explosive detonations with components of nuclear devices. The conduct of these tests resulted in the dispersion of plutonium, and some americium over areas ranging from several tens to several hundreds of hectares. Of the various locations used for safety tests, the site referred to as ''Plutonium Valley'' was subject to a significant amount of plutonium contamination. Plutonium Valley is located in Area 11 on the eastern boundary of the NTS at an elevation of about 1036 m (3400 ft). Plutonium Valley was the location of four safety tests (A,B,C, and D) conducted during 1956. A major environmental, health, and safety concern is the potential for inhalation of Pu 239,240 by humans as a result of airborne dust containing Pu particles. Thus, the wind transport of Pu 239,240 particles has been the subject of considerable research. This annotated bibliography was created as a reference guide to assist in the better understanding of the environmental characteristics of Plutonium Valley, the safety tests performed there, the processes and variables involved with the wind transport of dust, and as an overview of proposed clean-up procedures

  8. Valve stem packing seal test results for primary heat transport system conditions in Canadian nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.; Farrell, J.M.; Coutinho, R.F.

    1978-06-01

    Valve stem packing tests were done to obtain performance data on packing already in CANDU-PHW reactor service and on alternative packings. Most of the tests were replicated. Results are presented for ten packings tested under two stem cycle modes; leakage, packing consolidation and packing friction were the main responses. Packing tests were performed with water at close to CANDU-PHW reactor primary heat transport (PHT) system conditions (288 deg C and 10 MPa), but without ionizing radiation. The test rigs had rising, rotating stems. Stuffing box dimensions were typical of a standard Velan valve; packings were spring loaded to control applied packing stress

  9. Transport of liquid state nitrogen through long length service lines during thermal/vacuum testing. [in a Nimbus 6 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and analytical aspects associated with the transport are presented. Included is a definition of the problems and difficulties imposed by the servicing of a typical solid cryogen system, as well as a discussion of the transport requirements and of the rationale which governed their solution. A successful detailed transport configuration is defined, and the application of established mathematics to the design approach is demonstrated. The significance of head pressure, pressure drop, line friction, heat leak, Reynolds number, and the fundamental equilibrium demands of pressure and temperature were examined as they relate to the achievement of liquid state flow. Performance predictions were made for the transport system, and several analytical quantities are tabulated. These data are analyzed and compared with measured and calculated results obtained while actually servicing a solid cryogen system during thermal/vacuum testing.

  10. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations: Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Iiro; Virtanen, Ilpo; Pevtsov, Alexei; Yeates, Anthony; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. We test the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and study how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affect the simulation. We compare the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion and input data. We also compare the simulated magnetic field with observations. We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. While the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, that often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are rather minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  11. Specification of test criteria for containers to be used in the air transport of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Edwards, A.R.; Hall, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    Potential accidents in the transport by aeroplane of plutonium are considered. Past literature on the subject is reviewed. Civilian air accident statistics are surveyed: impact and fire are shown to be the major threats. Probabilities (given an accident) are derived for encountering and impact of above any given speed as a function of speed, and a fire of above any given duration, as a function of duration. The crash of two typical jet cargo aircraft (BAC-111, Boeing-707) against a rigid normal surface is considered and cargo hold decelerations derived from a one-dimensional model. The response of a cargo to such decelerations is calculated for loads of two typical containers, and related to the velocity of impact into a hard target necessary to produce similar damage in single containers. Free fall of containers and the effect on the surface struck are discussed. The response of two typical containers to a fire is calculated, allowing for the charring of insulating/shock absorbing material. Calculations without charring appear pessimistic. The consequences of plutonium release are estimated and risk spectra derived for two failure assumptions. The implications for container test criteria are discussed, and recommendations made

  12. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  13. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. III. Kinetics of test-particle diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Kleva, R.G.

    1982-07-01

    A discussion is given of test particle transport in the presence of specified stochastic magnetic fields, with particular emphasis on the collisional limit. Certain paradoxes and inconsistencies in the literature regarding the form of the scaling laws are resolved by carefully distinguishing a number of physically distinct correlation lengths, and thus by identifying several collisional subregimes. The common procedure of averaging the conventional fluid equations over the statistics of a random field is shown to fail in some important cases because of breakdown of the Chapman-Enskog ordering in the presence of a stochastic field component with short autocorrelation length. A modified perturbation theory is introduced which leads to a Kubo-like formula valid in all collisionality regimes. The direct-interaction approximation is shown to fail in the interesting limit in which the orbit exponentiation length L/sub K/ appears explicitly. A higher order renormalized kinetic theory in which L/sub K/ appears naturally is discussed and used to rederive more systematically the results of the heuristic scaling arguments

  14. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, Pattrick

    2010-01-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogeneous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R and D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part

  15. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  16. VEHIL: a full-scale test methodology for intelligent transport systems, vehicles and subsystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, L.; Verburg, D.J.; Lupker, H.A.; Kusters, L.J.J.

    2000-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency and safety of today's road transport, the application of driver support systems and fully automated, intelligent transport systems becomes increasingly important. The safety and reliability requirements of these systems and their complexity are high, which results in a

  17. Conceptualization of flow and transport in a limestone aquifer by multiple dedicated hydraulic and tracer tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Brauns, Bentje; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    2018-01-01

    Limestone aquifers are of great interest as a drinking water resource in many countries. They often have a complex crushed and fractured geology, which makes the analysis and description of flow and transport processes in such aquifers a challenging task. In this study, the solute transport behav...

  18. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operating on different measuring principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, Corjan; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-campos, Leonardo; Bakker, Gerben; Riksen, Michel

    2018-01-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And

  19. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operation on different measuring priciples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, C.; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Bakker, G.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2018-01-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And

  20. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modeling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the western hemisphere should not pass into the eastern hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the eastern hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  1. Normal Condition on Transport Thermal Analysis and Testing of a Type B Drum Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.W.; van Alstine, M.N.; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance

  2. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  3. Real rock-microfluidic flow cell: A test bed for real-time in situ analysis of flow, transport, and reaction in a subsurface reactive transport environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajveer; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn A; Fouke, Bruce W; Sanford, Robert A; Carrera, Martin; Werth, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological interactions between groundwater and sedimentary rock directly control the fundamental subsurface properties such as porosity, permeability, and flow. This is true for a variety of subsurface scenarios, ranging from shallow groundwater aquifers to deeply buried hydrocarbon reservoirs. Microfluidic flow cells are now commonly being used to study these processes at the pore scale in simplified pore structures meant to mimic subsurface reservoirs. However, these micromodels are typically fabricated from glass, silicon, or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and are therefore incapable of replicating the geochemical reactivity and complex three-dimensional pore networks present in subsurface lithologies. To address these limitations, we developed a new microfluidic experimental test bed, herein called the Real Rock-Microfluidic Flow Cell (RR-MFC). A porous 500μm-thick real rock sample of the Clair Group sandstone from a subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir of the North Sea was prepared and mounted inside a PDMS microfluidic channel, creating a dynamic flow-through experimental platform for real-time tracking of subsurface reactive transport. Transmitted and reflected microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser microscopy techniques were used to (1) determine the mineralogy, geochemistry, and pore networks within the sandstone inserted in the RR-MFC, (2) analyze non-reactive tracer breakthrough in two- and (depth-limited) three-dimensions, and (3) characterize multiphase flow. The RR-MFC is the first microfluidic experimental platform that allows direct visualization of flow and transport in the pore space of a real subsurface reservoir rock sample, and holds potential to advance our understandings of reactive transport and other subsurface processes relevant to pollutant transport and cleanup in groundwater, as well as energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ion and solvent Transport in Polypyrrole: Experimental Test of Osmotic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Skaarup, Steen

    2005-01-01

    Ion and solvent transport in the conjugated polymer actuator material, polypyrrole, doped with the immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulphonate, has been investigated by simultaneous cyclic voltammetry and Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance measurements. The purpose was to elucidate the pre...... from almost pure cation transport to ca. equal amount of anion transport; exchanging Br- for Cl- ions has only negligible effect at lower concentrations at equal osmotic pressures. Ca. 4 H2O molecules are tightly bound to each Na+ ion at concentrations ... the precise nature of the mobile species during redox cycling, and to seek confirmation for the osmotic mechanism of actuation. Three testable aspects of the model were confirmed: The number of inserted H2O molecules decreases with electrolyte concentration; at the same time the mechanism gradually changes...

  5. SPECT Imaging as a Tool for Testing and Challenging Assumptions About Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; DeVol, T. A.; Tornai, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging has shown promise for unraveling the influence of physical, chemical and biological processes on contaminant transport. Micro-CT scans, for instance, are increasingly utilized to image the pore-scale structure of rocks and soils, which can subsequently be used within modeling studies. A disadvantage of micro-CT, however, is that this imaging modality does not directly detect contaminants. In contrast, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) can provide the three-dimensional distribution of gamma emitting materials and is thus ideal for imaging the transport of radionuclides. SPECT is of particular interest as a tool for both directly imaging the behavior of long-lived radionuclides of interest, e.g., 99Tc and 137Cs, as well as monitoring shorter-lived isotopes as in-situ tracers of flow and biogeochemical processes. We demonstrate the potential of combining CT and SPECT imaging to improve the mechanistic understanding of flow and transport processes within a heterogeneous porous medium. In the experiment, a column was packed with 0.2mm glass beads with a cylindrical zone of 2mm glass beads embedded near the outlet; this region could be readily identified within the CT images. The column was injected with a pulse of NaCl solution spiked with 99mTcO4- and monitored using SPECT while aliquots of the effluent were used to analyze the breakthrough of both solutes. The breakthrough curves could be approximately replicated by a one-dimensional transport model, but the SPECT data revealed that the tracers migrated around the inclusion of larger beads. Although the zone of large-diameter beads was expected to act as a preferential pathway, the observed behavior could only be replicated in numerical transport simulations if this region was treated as a low-permeability zone relative to the rest of the column. This simple experiment demonstrates the potential of SPECT for investigating flow and transport phenomena within a porous medium.

  6. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  7. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Chicago Bridge and Iron, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Chicago Bridge and Iron, Research and Development Center located in Plainfield, Illinois offers the total capabilities required to perform design verification testing of hazardous waste shipping containers. The tests, defined in the United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71 (10CFR71), include vertical drop tests, puncture tests, crush tests, immersion tests, thermal tests, and container leak rate tests. Container structural design analysis, container manufacturing analysis, materials development testing plus dimensional analysis of individual components is also available. The test facilities meet or exceed the requirements given in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide, Safety Series No. 37, 1987. Additional capabilities for the design and fabrication of scale models and components for the test programme are also presented. (author)

  8. Final test report for NTCIP 1203 V2.25--dynamic message signs (DMS) as deployed by the Virginia department of transportation (VDOT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-25

    This report presents the results of the ITS Standards Testing Program for the field testing, assessment, and evaluation of the NTCIP standards that apply in the domain of Dynamic Message Signs (DMS). Specifically, the National Transportation Communic...

  9. Decree of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission No. 8 as of 25 June 1981 on the testing of equipment for radioactive waste transport, storage and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Decree stipulates that manufacturers and users of equipment for radioactive waste transportation, storage and disposal are obliged to have the equipment tested. This duty concerns radioactive waste transport casks, shielding containers, etc., except for nuclear fuel transporting facilities. Authorization to act as the national testing body was granted to the Institute for Research, Production and Application of Radioisotopes. The Decree entered into force on 1 July 1981. (J.B.)

  10. Assessment of the announced North Korean nuclear test using long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meutter, Pieter; Camps, Johan; Delcloo, Andy; Termonia, Piet

    2017-08-18

    On 6 January 2016, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea announced to have conducted its fourth nuclear test. Analysis of the corresponding seismic waves from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site showed indeed that an underground man-made explosion took place, although the nuclear origin of the explosion needs confirmation. Seven weeks after the announced nuclear test, radioactive xenon was observed in Japan by a noble gas measurement station of the International Monitoring System. In this paper, atmospheric transport modelling is used to show that the measured radioactive xenon is compatible with a delayed release from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site. An uncertainty quantification on the modelling results is given by using the ensemble method. The latter is important for policy makers and helps advance data fusion, where different nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty monitoring techniques are combined.

  11. In-situ testing of aircraft and satellites using a transportable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A transportable reverberation chamber with vibrating walls to create high field strength has been developed, called Vibrating Intrinsic Reverberation Chamber (VIRC). It creates a statistically uniform electromagnetic field without the use of a rotating mode stirrer, resulting in a better homogeneity

  12. Sepia ink as a surrogate for colloid transport tests in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Gómez, Diego; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; López-Periago, J. Eugenio; Paradelo, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    We examined the suitability of the ink of Sepia officinalis as a surrogate for transport studies of microorganisms and microparticles in porous media. Sepia ink is an organic pigment consisted on a suspension of eumelanin, and that has several advantages for its use as a promising material for introducing the frugal-innovation in the fields of public health and environmental research: very low cost, non-toxic, spherical shape, moderate polydispersivity, size near large viruses, non-anomalous electrokinetic behavior, low retention in the soil, and high stability. Electrokinetic determinations and transport experiments in quartz sand columns and soil columns were done with purified suspensions of sepia ink. Influence of ionic strength on the electrophoretic mobility of ink particles showed the typical behavior of polystyrene latex spheres. Breakthrough curve (BTC) and retention profile (RP) in quartz sand columns showed a depth dependent and blocking adsorption model with an increase in adsorption rates with the ionic strength. Partially saturated transport through undisturbed soil showed less retention than in quartz sand, and matrix exclusion was also observed. Quantification of ink in leachate fractions by light absorbance is direct, but quantification in the soil profile with moderate to high organic matter content was rather cumbersome. We concluded that sepia ink is a suitable cheap surrogate for exploring transport of pathogenic viruses, bacteria and particulate contaminants in groundwater, and could be used for developing frugal-innovation related with the assessment of soil and aquifer filtration function, and monitoring of water filtration systems in low-income regions.

  13. Testing the feasibility of using a conveyor belt to load weanling and nursery pigs for transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transportation is known to be a multi-faceted stressor, with the process of loading being one of the most significant factors impacting the stress to which animals are exposed. This project was designed to determine if using a conveyor to load pigs into the top deck of a simulated straight deck trai...

  14. Right to the city: Applying justice tests to public transport investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazari Adli, Saeid; Donovan, Stuart

    Many policy-makers are grappling with the twin challenges posed by growing travel demands and persistent socioeconomic inequality. To address these issues, numerous studies propose and apply “justice tests”, which relate the effects of transport policies to prevailing socioeconomic deprivation.

  15. Alterations in rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) parameters: point-of-care testing vs analysis after pneumatic tube system transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Schuster, T; Moessmer, G; Kochs, E F; Wagner, K J

    2012-10-01

    Thromboelastometry as point-of-care (POC) testing enables the analysis of the clotting process at the bedside, providing rapid results to guide haemostatic therapy. However, POC testing utilizes medical staff who are managing critically ill patients, as non-laboratory personnel may not be sufficiently trained to run the devices. To resolve these problems, thromboelastometry can be performed in the central laboratory and rapid transport of samples can be accomplished via a pneumatic tube system (PTS). This study compares thromboelastometry parameters of blood samples analysed immediately with those analysed after PTS transport. In patients with normal haemostasis, two arterial blood samples were collected from each patient (n=92) in citrated plastic tubes to investigate the assays INTEM (n=35), EXTEM (n=27), and FIBTEM (n=30). One blood sample was analysed immediately, the other sample after PTS transport. Thromboelastometry was performed using a single ROTEM(®) device. The mean clot firmness values were significantly lower for PTS samples in both the INTEM (-0.7 mm cf. -1.1 mm) and EXTEM (-1.4 cf. -1.7 mm) assays. INTEM coagulation time (CT) was significantly lower in PTS samples with a mean difference of -13 s. EXTEM CT was significantly higher in PTS samples with a mean difference of +3.9 s. Thromboelastometry parameters of blood samples analysed after PTS transport are significantly altered compared with those analysed immediately. However, in patients with normal haemostasis, the alterations were small and without clinical consequence, implying that analysis after PTS transport is an acceptable alternative to prompt analysis at the bedside. Further studies should focus on patients with impaired haemostasis.

  16. TCV software test and validation tools and technique. [Terminal Configured Vehicle program for commercial transport aircraft operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straeter, T. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes techniques for testing and validating software for the TCV (Terminal Configured Vehicle) program which is intended to solve problems associated with operating a commercial transport aircraft in the terminal area. The TCV research test bed is a Boeing 737 specially configured with digital computer systems to carry out automatic navigation, guidance, flight controls, and electronic displays research. The techniques developed for time and cost reduction include automatic documentation aids, an automatic software configuration, and an all software generation and validation system.

  17. SOAC - State-of-the-Art Car Engineering Tests at Department of Transportation High Speed Ground Test Center : Volume 2. Performance Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The six-volume report presents the technical methodology, data samples, and results of tests conducted on the SOAC on the Rail Transit Test Track at the High Speed Ground Test Center in Pueblo, Colorado during the period April to July 1973. The Test ...

  18. An experimental program for testing the validity of flow and transport models in unsaturated tuff: The Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shephard, L.E.; Glass, R.J.; Siegel, M.D.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater flow and contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone are receiving increased attention as options for waste disposal in saturated media continue to be considered as a potential means for resolving the nation's waste management concerns. An experimental program is being developed to test the validity of conceptual flow and transport models that are being formulated to predict the long-term performance at Yucca Mountain. This program is in the developmental stage and will continue to evolve as information is acquired and knowledge is improved with reference to flow and transport in unsaturated fractured media. The general approach for directing the validation effort entails identifying those processes which may cause the site to fail relative to imposed regulatory requirements, evaluating the key assumptions underlying the conceptual models used or developed to describe these processes, and developing new conceptual models as needed. Emphasis is currently being placed in four general areas: flow and transport in unsaturated fractures; fracture-matrix interactions; infiltration flow instability; and evaluation of scale effects in heterogeneous fractured media. Preliminary results and plans or each of these areas for both the laboratory and field investigation components will be presented in the manuscript. 1 ref

  19. Guide to the design, testing and use of packaging for the safe transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This guide gives to designers, manufacturers and users of packaging, advice supplementary to, or in amplification of, the recommendations made by the International Atomic Energy Agency for the safe transport of radioactive materials as given in IAEA Safety Series No. 6 (1973) and the advisory material given in IAEA Safety Series No. 37 (1973). This guide should be read and used in conjunction with these recommendations, the appropriate national regulations and any applicable regulations or requirements of the carriers concerned. (author)

  20. Test facility of transport packagings for radioactive materials in the St. Petersburg region (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskov, V.D.; Korotkov, G.V.; Drozdov, V.P.; Ershov, V.N.; Yanovskaya, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the test facility located near St. Petersburg (Russia) where test of packagings of mass up to 140 tons are carried out. The results of tests of some new designs of packaging for irradiated nuclear fuel are briefly considered. (author)

  1. Stress test performed on gas transport pipelines as a method for quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuelzer, J.; Baessler, R.

    1991-01-01

    Modern pipeline construction increasingly uses the stress test as an integral component test while aiming at enhanced safety and availability. The application described by the article highlights the particular fact that expanded and non-expanded pipes of identical material quality will reveal a different behaviour in the stress test. (orig.) [de

  2. Technical committee on transport package test standards, Tokyo, Japan, 28 September - 2 October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, P.

    The Technical Committee looked into the following tasks: a) the additional 200 m water immersion test for packages designed for irradiated fuel when the activity exceeds 10 6 Ci; b) the proposed addition of a crush test for light weight Type B and fissile materials packages; c) the proposed new text for thermal test

  3. Benchmark test of drift-kinetic and gyrokinetic codes through neoclassical transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, S.; Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Idomura, Yasuhiro

    2009-09-01

    Two simulation codes that solve the drift-kinetic or gyrokinetic equation in toroidal plasmas are benchmarked by comparing the simulation results of neoclassical transport. The two codes are the drift-kinetic δf Monte Carlo code (FORTEC-3D) and the gyrokinetic full- f Vlasov code (GT5D), both of which solve radially-global, five-dimensional kinetic equation with including the linear Fokker-Planck collision operator. In a tokamak configuration, neoclassical radial heat flux and the force balance relation, which relates the parallel mean flow with radial electric field and temperature gradient, are compared between these two codes, and their results are also compared with the local neoclassical transport theory. It is found that the simulation results of the two codes coincide very well in a wide rage of plasma collisionality parameter ν * = 0.01 - 10 and also agree with the theoretical estimations. The time evolution of radial electric field and particle flux, and the radial profile of the geodesic acoustic mode frequency also coincide very well. These facts guarantee the capability of GT5D to simulate plasma turbulence transport with including proper neoclassical effects of collisional diffusion and equilibrium radial electric field. (author)

  4. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories' Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment

  5. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.I.; Meike, A.; Chuu, Y.J.; Sawvel, A.; Lin, W.

    1999-07-01

    Transport of bacteria is investigated as part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain Tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures, cultured, and injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C and to 60 C at the top and bottom of the block. Samples were collected from boreholes located approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant microbes also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time until the heater was deactivated. Negative indications in the collection holes after the heater was deactivated support the supposition that these bacteria were the species that were injected. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the collection boreholes suggests no pattern to the migration of bacteria through the block. The relationship between bacterial migration and the movement of water is not yet understood. These observations indicate the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting. The implications for colloid transport need to be reviewed.

  6. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.I.; Meike, A.; Chuu, Y.J.; Sawvel, A.; Lin, W.

    1999-01-01

    Transport of bacteria is investigated as part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain Tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures, cultured, and injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C and to 60 C at the top and bottom of the block. Samples were collected from boreholes located approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant microbes also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time until the heater was deactivated. Negative indications in the collection holes after the heater was deactivated support the supposition that these bacteria were the species that were injected. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the collection boreholes suggests no pattern to the migration of bacteria through the block. The relationship between bacterial migration and the movement of water is not yet understood. These observations indicate the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting. The implications for colloid transport need to be reviewed

  7. Simulation of the fusion materials irradiation test facility lithium and heat transport systems for abnormal events study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, W.F.; Elyashar, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    A digital computer model of Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility's heat transport system has been developed. The model utilizes a set of coupled differential equations to simulate the dynamic behavior of the primary and secondary heat transport loop systems. The model has been used to investigate the stability of the proposed control schemes for lithium temperature and flow rate and for an extensive study of equipment failures and malfunction analysis. It was determined that certain equipment failures and malfunctions in the primary loop require a response from the control system within less than one second of the occurrence of the failure. The effects of equipment failures in the secondary loop were found to be less dramatic than the equivalent failures in the primary loop. The failures in the secondary loop generally required control action in time frames of the order of minutes

  8. Development of a transportable neutron radiography system for non-destructive tests application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Ademir X. da; Crispim, Verginia R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a transportable neutron radiography system utilizing californium-252. Studies about moderation, collimation and shielding are showed. A Monte Carlo Code, MCNP3b, has been used to obtain a maximum and more homogeneous thermal neutron flux in the collimator outlet next to the image plain, and an adequate radiation shielding to attend radiological protection rules. With the presented collimator, it was possible to obtain for the thermal neutron flux, at the collimator outlet and next to the image plain, a L/D ratio 7,5, for neutron flux up to 6 X 10 -6 cm -2 .s -1 per neutron source. (author)

  9. Human factors engineering applications in the testing of the legal weight truck cask transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.C.; Peck, M. III; Sealock, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) will collect performance data to be used in limited human factors engineering analysis of the light weight tractor as a component of the legal weight truck cask transport system. The Management and Operating contractor will provide an analysis and comparison of limited data on driver behavior and subjective driver evaluations of the light weight tractor performance versus that of a heavier baseline tractor. A significant difference in performance data would suggest that given tractor configurations affect driver behavior differently

  10. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a sample filter through which no sample air is intended to flow during performance of this test. (4) A channel is... a device or means to allow or cause the aerosol to be routed to one of several channels. (c...

  11. 75 FR 5722 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... personal identifying information about an employee (other than a social security number (SSN) or other... testing required under this part. (c) As a drug testing laboratory located in Canada or Mexico which is... procedures. (d) As an IITF located in Canada or Mexico which is not certified by HHS under the NLCP, you are...

  12. Testing the Münch hypothesis of long distance phloem transport in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Michael; Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem, but this h......Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem......, but this hypothesis has long faced major challenges. The key issue is whether the conductance of sieve tubes, including sieve plate pores, is sufficient to allow pressure flow. We show that with increasing distance between source and sink, sieve tube conductivity and turgor increases dramatically in Ipomoea nil. Our...... results provide strong support for the Münch hypothesis, while providing new tools for the investigation of one of the least understood plant tissues....

  13. Testing of a benchscale Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport system for treating contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, K.M.; Lunsford, T.R.; Panjabi, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Reverse Osmosis/Coupled Transport process is a innovative means of removing radionuclides from contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site. Specifically, groundwater in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site has been contaminated with uranium, technetium, and nitrate. Investigations are proceeding to determine the most cost effective method to remove these contaminants. The process described in this paper combines three different membrane technologies (reverse osmosis, coupled transport, and nanofiltration to purify the groundwater while extracting and concentrating uranium, technetium, and nitrate into separate solutions. This separation allows for the future use of the radionuclides, if needed, and reduces the amount of waste that will need to be disposed of. This process has the potential to concentrate the contaminants into solutions with volumes in a ratio of 1/10,000 of the feed volume. This compares to traditional volume reductions of 10 to 100 for ion exchange and stand-alone reverse osmosis. The successful demonstration of this technology could result in significant savings in the overall cost of decontaminating the groundwater

  14. Impact analysis and testing of tritiated heavy water transportation packages including hydrodynamic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Tulk, J.D.; Gavin, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has recently designed a new Type B(M) Tritiated Heavy Water Transportation Package (THWTP) for the road transportation of tritiated heavy water from its operating nuclear stations to the Tritium Removal Facility in Ontario. These packages must demonstrate the ability to withstand severe shock and impact scenarios such as those prescribed by IAEA standards. The package, shown in figure 1, comprises an inner container filled with tritiated heavy water, and a 19 lb/ft 3 polyurethane foam-filled overpack. The overpack is of sandwich construction with 304L stainless steel liners and 10.5 inch thick nominal foam walls. The outer shell is 0.75 inch thick and the inner shell is 0.25 inch thick. The primary containment boundary consists of the overpack inner liner, the containment lid and outer containment seals in the lid region. The total weight of the container including the 12,000 lb. payload is 36,700 lb. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the hydrodynamic effect of the tritiated heavy water payload on the structural integrity of the THWTP during a flat end drop from a height of 9 m. The study consisted of three phases: (i) developing an analytical model to simulate the hydrodynamic effects of the heavy water payload during impact; (ii) performing an impact analysis for a 9 m flat end drop of the THWTP including fluid structure interaction; (iii) verification of the analytical models by experiment

  15. The specification and testing of radioactive sources designated as ''special form'' under the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Bodimeade, A.H.; Hall, E.G.; Taylor, C.B.G.

    1982-01-01

    The object of this study is to remove some of the uncertainties associated with the application of the IAEA Regulations insofar as they apply to Special Form materials. The first part of this project involved a comparison of the ISO and IAEA Regulations. An analysis of the physical tests has been carried out. The second and most important part of the project involved an assessment of the leakage tests used to evaluate the capsules after each of the physical tests. The work has defined and confirmed by experiment the relationship between the IAEA and ISO impact and percussion tests. The practical application of the tests particularly with regard to specimen orientation will be aided by the data now available. The work has established the sensitivities of the primary volumetric leak test methods and practical procedures are outlined. Volumetric leak test methods, with sentivities approximately 10 - 5 mbar l/s, are considered to be more reliable in detecting leakage paths in capsules than methods using solid leachable or non-leachable radioactive contents. The work reported should assist in the updating and clarification and harmonisation of IAEA Safety Series Nos 6 and 37 and ISO 4919 and ISO TR 4826

  16. Technology Development for Integrated Safety Test of Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation and Storage System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kiseog; Seo, J. S.; Lee, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    A dedicated review on the U. S. NRC Regulation 10 CFR Part 72 and regulatory guide NUREG/1536 has been performed. The safety requirements for spent nuclear fuel dry storage cask are analyzed and summarized in structural, thermal, shielding, criticality, materials, tests and maintenance aspects. Also a guideline for preparing the safety analysis report is provided. The heat flow analysis was performed by varying the dimensions of the heat flow test facility. From the heat flow analysis for the test facility, as the test facility became test facility. From the heat flow analysis for the test facility, as the test facility became bigger; the thermal effect became smaller. Therefore, the dimensions of the heat flow test facility was designed with 5m Χ 5m Χ 6m(H). Analyses of heat transfer characteristics and mechanism for spent PWR fuel assemblies, option study for production of the effective thermal conductivity and option study for effective thermal conductivity test have been performed to obtain the basic data for production of the effective thermal conductivity. It became clear that the diffusion coefficient of chloride ion of concrete remarkably increases along with the temperature rise, and that there is a linear relation between the logarithm values of the diffusion coefficients and the reciprocal of the temperature. It is understood to be able to express the temperature dependency of the diffusion coefficient roughly by an Arrhenius equation as the velocity coefficient is provided as the diffusion coefficient. The specifications and characteristics of storage facilities under operation including dual purpose casks were investigated. Components subject to material degradation were examined. Based on literature survey, investigating a drop analysis incorporating with material degradation, the basic data to develop an analysis methodology was obtained

  17. Estimation of Transport Parameters Using Forced Gradient Tracer Tests in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Illangasekare, Tissa

    2003-01-01

    .... The focus was on both reactive and sorptive parameters. The experimental component of the study was conducted in a three-dimensional, intermediate-scale test tank to obtain accurate data on the behavior of nonreactive and sorptive tracers...

  18. Real Time Global Tests of the ALICE High Level Trigger Data Transport Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, B.; Cicalo J.; Cleymans, C.; de Vaux, G.; Fearick, R.W.; Lindenstruth, V.; Richter, M.; Rorich, D.; Staley, F.; Steinbeck, T.M.; Szostak, A.; Tilsner, H.; Weis, R.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.

    2008-01-01

    The High Level Trigger (HLT) system of the ALICE experiment is an online event filter and trigger system designed for input bandwidths of up to 25 GB/s at event rates of up to 1 kHz. The system is designed as a scalable PC cluster, implementing several hundred nodes. The transport of data in the system is handled by an object-oriented data flow framework operating on the basis of the publisher-subscriber principle, being designed fully pipelined with lowest processing overhead and communication latency in the cluster. In this paper, we report the latest measurements where this framework has been operated on five different sites over a global north-south link extending more than 10,000 km, processing a ``real-time'' data flow.

  19. Non destructive testing of medium and high voltage cables with a transportable radiography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Bandekas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A power cable is the most important part in a power transmission system. The cables must be total quality dedicated andcertified for development, manufacturing and installation, however are exposed to a corrosive environment. The purpose ofthis paper is to show that the fast neutron radiography with a transportable system is a solution to find defects in the cablesand reduce the cost of inspection. The design, regarding the materials considered, was compatible with the European UnionDirective on “Restriction of Hazardous Substances” (RoHS 2002/95/EC, hence excluding the use of cadmium and lead.Wide width values for the collimator ratio were calculated. With suitable collimator design it was possibly to optimize theneutron radiography parameters. Finally the shielding design was examined closely. The proposed system has been simulatedusing the MCNPX code.

  20. Crash test of a nuclear spent fuel cask and truck transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, M.; Yoshimura, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories has conducted a 96 kph (60 mph) full scale truck impact test for ERDA's Environmental Control Technology Division. Rockets propelled a 20, 500-kg (22-ton) cask mounted on its shipping trailer, coupled to a conventional cab-over tractor, into a massive, heavily reinforced concrete target. This summary report describes and compares the results of the computer analysis, scale model, and full scale tests

  1. Field test facility for monitoring water/radionuclide transport through partially saturated geologic media: design, construction, and preliminary description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Campbell, A.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Hoober, H.H.; Schwarzmiller, K.O.

    1979-11-01

    Shallow land burial has been a common practice for disposing radioactive waste materials since the beginning of plutonium production operations. Accurate monitoring of radionuclide transport and factors causing transport within the burial sites is essential to minimizing risks associated with disposal. However, monitoring has not always been adequate. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun a program aimed at better assuring and evaluating containment of radioactive wastes at shallow land burial sites. This program includes a technological base for monitoring transport. As part of the DOE program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing geohydrologic monitoring systems to evaluate burial sites located in arid regions. For this project, a field test facility was designed and constructed to assess monitoring systems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste and to provide information for evaluating site containment performance. The facility is an integrated network of monitoring devices and data collection instruments. This facility is used to measure water and radionuclide migration under field conditions typical of arid regions. Monitoring systems were developed to allow for measurement of both mass and energy balance. Work on the facility is ongoing. Continuing work includes emplacement of prototype monitoring instruments, data collection, and data synthesis. At least 2 years of field data are needed to fully evaluate monitoring information

  2. Safe transport of radioactive materials - Leakage testing on packages. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for relating permissible activity release rates of the radioactive contents carried within a containment system to equivalent gas leakage rates under specified test conditions. This approach is called gas leakage test methodology. However, in this International Standard it is recognized that other methodologies might be acceptable. When other methodologies are to be used, it shall be shown that the methodology demonstrates that any release of the radioactive contents will not exceed the regulatory requirements. The use of any alternative methodology shall be by agreement with the competent authority. This International Standard provides both overall and detailed guidance on the complex relationships between an equivalent gas leakage test and a permissible activity release rate. Whereas the overall guidance is universally agreed upon, the use of the detailed guidance shall be agreed upon with the competent authority during the Type B package certification process. It should be noted that, for a given package, demonstration of compliance is not limited to a single methodology. While this International Standard does not require particular gas leakage test procedures, it does present minimum requirements for any test that is to be used. It is the responsibility of the package designer or consignor to estimate or determine the maximum permissible release rate of radioactivity to the environment and to select appropriate leakage test procedures that have adequate sensitivity. This International Standard pertains specifically to Type B packages for which the regulatory containment requirements are specified explicitly

  3. Interactions between cask components and content of packaging for the transport of radioactive material during drop tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quercetti, T.; Ballheimer, V.; Zeisler, P.; Mueller, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical, numerical and experimental investigations on the phenomenon of interactions between cask components and content of packages for the transport of radioactive material during drop tests required according to the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. Radial and axial gaps between cask components and content are usually necessary for thermal reasons but larger gaps can exist because of the geometrical dimensions of the specified content. Consequently interactions between content and cask components (lid system, cask body, etc.) are possible and can not be excluded during drop tests. Interactions in this context are relative movements between cask and content which are mainly due to elastic spring effects after releasing the cask for the free drop. These relative movements can cause interior collisions between content and cask during the main impact of the package onto the unyielding target. Drop tests with various types of Type A and Type B packages fully instrumented with strain gauges and accelerometers showed that these interactions respectively interior collisions can be considerable relating to high forces acting on cask lids, lid bolts and the content. Of course the real quantitative consequences of the interactions depend upon different conditions, among others the drop orientation, the design characteristics of the impact limiters, the dimensions of the gaps, the material characteristics of the contents, etc. . In order to investigate more precisely the phenomenon of interactions BAM carried out finite element calculations for the named casks using the ABAQUS/ Standard and ABAQUS/ Explicit computer code comparing them with results obtained from experiments. Additionally, tests with a simplified model instrumented with accelerometers were carried out accompanied by finite element calculations and analytical calculations using MATHEMATICA. The investigations on the mentioned phenomena of interaction

  4. Long-range tropospheric transport of uranium and plutonium weapons fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site to Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Cato Christian; Fifield, L Keith; Oughton, Deborah H; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Bartnicki, Jerzy; Tims, Stephen G; Høibråten, Steinar; Salbu, Brit

    2013-09-01

    A combination of state-of-the-art isotopic fingerprinting techniques and atmospheric transport modelling using real-time historical meteorological data has been used to demonstrate direct tropospheric transport of radioactive debris from specific nuclear detonations at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan to Norway via large areas of Europe. A selection of archived air filters collected at ground level at 9 stations in Norway during the most intensive atmospheric nuclear weapon testing periods (1957-1958 and 1961-1962) has been screened for radioactive particles and analysed with respect to the concentrations and atom ratios of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Digital autoradiography screening demonstrated the presence of radioactive particles in the filters. Concentrations of (236)U (0.17-23nBqm(-3)) and (239+240)Pu (1.3-782μBqm(-3)) as well as the atom ratios (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.237) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.7) varied widely indicating several different sources. Filter samples from autumn and winter tended to have lower atom ratios than those sampled in spring and summer, and this likely reflects a tropospheric influence in months with little stratospheric fallout. Very high (236)U, (239+240)Pu and gross beta activity concentrations as well as low (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.077), (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.00025-0.00062) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.046) atom ratios, characteristic of close-in and tropospheric fallout, were observed in filters collected at all stations in Nov 1962, 7-12days after three low-yield detonations at Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan). Atmospheric transport modelling (NOAA HYSPLIT_4) using real-time meteorological data confirmed that long range transport of radionuclides, and possibly radioactive particles, from Semipalatinsk to Norway during this period was plausible. The present work shows that direct tropospheric transport of fallout from atmospheric nuclear detonations periodically may have

  5. Testing and development of electric vehicle batteries for EPRI Electric Transportation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory conducted an electric-vehicle battery testing and development program for the Electric Power Research Institute. As part of this program, eighteen battery modules previously developed by Johnson Controls, Inc. were tested. This type of battery (EV-2300 - an improved state-of-the-art lead-acid battery) was designed specifically for improved performance, range, and life in electric vehicles. In order to obtain necessary performance data, the batteries were tested under various duty cycles typical of normal service. This program, supported by the Electric Power Research Institute, consisted of three tasks: determination of the effect of cycle life vs peak power and rest period, determination of the impact of charge method on cycle life, and evaluation of the EV-2300 battery system. Two supporting studies were also carried out: one on thermal management of electric-vehicle batteries and one on enhanced utilization of active material in lead-acid batteries.

  6. Field test facility for monitoring water/radionuclide transport through partially saturated geologic media: design, construction, and preliminary description. Appendix I. Engineering drawings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Campbell, A.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Hoober, H.H.; Schwarzmiller, K.O.

    1979-11-01

    The engineering plans for a test facility to monitor radionuclide transport in water through partially saturated geological media are included. Drawings for the experimental set-up excavation plan and details, lysimeter, pad, access caisson, and caisson details are presented

  7. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site, Fiscal Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada'' (DOE/EIS 0243). The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at Area 3 and Area 5. This document satisfies requirements with regard to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during fiscal year (FY) 2006

  8. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site, Fiscal Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada Operations Office (now known as the Nevada Site Office) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada'' (DOE/EIS 0243). The DOE, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at Area 5 and Area 3. Since 2006, the Area 3 RWMS has been in cold stand-by. This document satisfies requirements regarding low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to and from the NTS during FY 2009. In addition, this document provides shipment, volume, and route information on transuranic (TRU) waste shipped from the NTS to the Idaho National Laboratory, near Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  9. Direct tropospheric transport of debris from nuclear weapon detonations at the Semipalatinsk test site to Western Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Cato C.; Oughton, Deborah H.; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Salbu, Brit [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas (Norway); Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT0200 (Australia); Bartnicki, Jerzy [Norwegian Meteorological institute (met.no), Oslo (Norway); Hoeibraaten, Steinar [Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), Kjeller (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    During 7.11.1962 through 13.11.1962 a wave of highly elevated gross beta activities were registered at surveillance air filter stations situated in different regions of Norway. A selection of air filters collected daily during this time period, was screened for radioactive particles using digital autoradiography and analysed with respect to the concentrations and atom ratios of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Elevated concentrations of {sup 236}U (1.4-20.1 nBq m{sup -3}) and {sup 239+240}Pu (5.6-782 μBq m{sup -3}) were found to be in good correlation with the observed gross beta activities (R{sup 2}>0.9), indicating the presence of fresh fallout from nuclear weapon detonations. The digital autoradiography images demonstrated the presence of radioactive particles in the filters. Low {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu (0.0517-0.083), {sup 241}Pu/{sup 239}Pu (0.00025-0.00062) and {sup 236}U/{sup 239}Pu (0.0188-0.046) atom ratios, characteristic of close-in and tropospheric fallout, were observed in filters collected during this incidence. Atmospheric transport modelling (NOAA HYSPLIT-4) using real-time meteorological data confirmed that long range transport to Norway of radioactive debris, including particles, from detonations 7 - 12 days earlier at the Semipalatinsk test site, Kazakhstan during this period was plausible. The present work shows that direct tropospheric transport of fallout from atmospheric nuclear detonations periodically may have had much larger influence than previously anticipated on radionuclide air concentrations and deposition at locations far from the test site. (authors)

  10. The International intraval project. Phase 1, test case 13: Experimental study of brine transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbergen, P.

    1992-01-01

    INTRAVAL is an international coordinated research program for predicting the potential radionuclide migration in the geosphere with the use of mathematical models. Such models are used to help assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. This report describes the findings of the project teams involved in test case 13 of INTRAVAL Phase 1. The test case is based on laboratory experiments dealing with flow and dispersion of brine in a porous medium. The purpose of these experiments was twofold : (i) to investigate some of the relevant processes in brine transport in porous media, and (ii) to provide sets of data to be used for (partial) validation of transport models. The experiments were carried out in a column packed with glass beads of diameter 0.40 to 0.52 mm. Salt water was injected through nine holes at the bottom and withdrawn through nine holes at the top. Initially a low salt concentration was used which was then displaced with higher concentrated salt water. The salt mass-fraction was detected using an array of electrodes such that breakthrough curves were obtained at five different levels in the column. The report reviews a number of conceptual models and the corresponding numerical codes employed by different modelling teams. The experiments on one- and two-dimensional flow and transport were simulated by various groups. The question underlying the experiments, namely the applicability of Fick's laws over the whole range of salt concentration, could be addressed satisfactorily. All models could simulate low-concentration experiment using a dispersivity value of 0.8 mm to 1.00 mm. However, using the same dispersivity value, it was not possible to simulate high concentration experiments. Another question intended to be studied by the experiments was the validity of Darcy's law at high concentrations. Two-dimensional experiments were carried out for this purpose. In practice, calculations were hampered by extremely high demand on

  11. Long-term reactive transport modelling of stabilized/solidified waste: from dynamic leaching tests to disposal scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windt, Laurent de [Ecole des Mines de Paris, CG-Hydrodynamics and Reaction Group, 35 R. St-Honore, 77300 Fontainebleau (France)]. E-mail: laurent.dewindt@ensmp.fr; Badreddine, Rabia [INERIS, Direction des Risques Chroniques, Unite Dechets et Sites Pollues, Parc Technologique Alata BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Lagneau, Vincent [Ecole des Mines de Paris, CG-Hydrodynamics and Reaction Group, 35 R. St-Honore, 77300 Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-01-31

    Environmental impact assessment of hazardous waste disposal relies, among others, on standardized leaching tests characterized by a strong coupling between diffusion and chemical processes. In that respect, this study shows that reactive transport modelling is a useful tool to extrapolate laboratory results to site conditions characterized by lower solution/solid (L/S) ratios, site specific geometry, infiltration, etc. A cement solidified/stabilized (S/S) waste containing lead is investigated as a typical example. The reactive transport model developed in a previous study to simulate the initial state of the waste as well as laboratory batch and dynamic tests is first summarized. Using the same numerical code (HYTEC), this model is then integrated to a simplified waste disposal scenario assuming a defective cover and rain water infiltration. The coupled evolution of the S/S waste chemistry and the pollutant plume migration are modelled assessing the importance of the cracking state of the monolithic waste. The studied configurations correspond to an undamaged and fully sealed system, a few main fractures between undamaged monoliths and, finally, a dense crack-network in the monoliths. The model considers the potential effects of cracking, first the increase of rain water and carbon dioxide infiltration and, secondly, the increase of L/S ratio and reactive surfaces, using either explicit fracture representation or dual porosity approaches.

  12. 76 FR 18072 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs CFR Correction In Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations...) * * * (2) * * * (i) Positive, with drug(s)/metabolite(s) noted, with numerical values for the drug(s) or drug metabolite(s). (ii) Positive-dilute, with drug(s)/metabolite(s) noted, with numerical values for...

  13. 77 FR 26471 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... scientific methodologies the laboratories must use for testing. Because of these requirements and to create... of Forensic Toxicologists (SOFT) & The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists (TIAFT... drug or drug metabolite in his or her system, as in the case of other drugs (see Sec. 40.137...

  14. Intestinal transport and fermentation of resistant starch evaluated by the hydrogen breath test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, M; Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1994-01-01

    To study fermentability of different samples of resistant starch (RS), compared to one another and to lactulose, and to study the effect on gastric emptying of addition of RS to test meal. Finally to study if adaptation to RS results in a measurable change in fermentation pattern, (H2/CH4...

  15. Interpersonal Transport of Droplet Nuclei among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been...

  16. Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Aerosols among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of aerosols exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been...

  17. The reactor accident at Chernobyl: A possibility to test colloid-controlled transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Gunten, H.R.; Waber, U.; Krahenbuhl, U.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive fall-out from the damaged nuclear power plant at Chernobyl (USSR) has been measured between May 2 and May 20, 1986 in the River Glatt (Zurich, Switzerland) and in a shallow groundwater stream which is hydraulically connected to the river. Water infiltrating from the river into the groundwater was sampled at different distances and depths by means of a system of piezometer tubes which are part of an experimental installation for the investigation of groundwater quality and migration processes. The aquifer is a quarternary glaciofluvial deposit consisting of stones, gravel, sand, silt and clays. It is typical for large parts of alpine and peri-alpine regions and contains in Switzerlamd about 80% of the drinking water supplies. The radionuclides Tc-99m, Ru-103, I-131, Te-132, Cs-134 and Cs-137 were measured several times in the river water and in the groundwater using calibrated Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometers. Based on the present state of data evaluation the authors conclude that anionic species like iodides, ruthenates or tellurates are not or only slightly sorbed, whereas cesium is completely retained during infiltration from the river into the groundwater. Colloid (>0.05 μm) controlled migration of radionuclides in this heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposits is a transport mechanism of minor importance. However, with the present data it cannot be excluded completely

  18. Experimentally testing the dependence of momentum transport on second derivatives using Gaussian process regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lee, J. P.; Marzouk, Y. M.; Rice, J. E.; White, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    It remains an open question to explain the dramatic change in intrinsic rotation induced by slight changes in electron density (White et al 2013 Phys. Plasmas 20 056106). One proposed explanation is that momentum transport is sensitive to the second derivatives of the temperature and density profiles (Lee et al 2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 125006), but it is widely considered to be impossible to measure these higher derivatives. In this paper, we show that it is possible to estimate second derivatives of electron density and temperature using a nonparametric regression technique known as Gaussian process regression. This technique avoids over-constraining the fit by not assuming an explicit functional form for the fitted curve. The uncertainties, obtained rigorously using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, are small enough that it is reasonable to explore hypotheses which depend on second derivatives. It is found that the differences in the second derivatives of n{e} and T{e} between the peaked and hollow rotation cases are rather small, suggesting that changes in the second derivatives are not likely to explain the experimental results.

  19. Design, construction and testing of annular diffusers for high speed civil transportation combustor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhio, Cyril B.

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical and an experimental design study of subsonic flow through curved-wall annular diffusers is being carried out in order to establish the most pertinent design parameters for such devices and the implications of their application in the design of engine components in the aerospace industries. This investigation consists of solving numerically the full Navier Stokes and Continuity equations for the time-mean flow. Various models of turbulence are being evaluated for adoption throughout the study and comparisons would be made with experimental data where they exist. Assessment of diffuser performance based on the dissipated mechanical energy would also be made. The experimental work involves the application of Computer Aided Design software tool to the development of a suitable annular diffuser geometry and the subsequent downloading of such data to a CNC machine at Central State University. The results of the investigations are expected to indicate that more cost effective component design of such devices as effective component design of such devices as diffusers which normally contain complex flows can still be achieved. In this regard a review paper was accepted and presented at the First International Conference on High Speed Civil Transportation Research held at North Carolina A&T in December of 1994.

  20. Use of FTA gene guard filter paper for the storage and transportation of tumor cells for molecular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Larry J; Madigan, Merle N; Carter, Alexis B; Earls, Lori

    2002-01-01

    Efficient methods of storing tumor specimens for molecular testing are needed in the modern surgical pathology laboratory. The FTA Gene Guard system is a novel method for the collection and room temperature storage of blood samples for DNA testing. The method uses index card-sized filter papers that provide an ideal medium on which to store tumor specimens for DNA testing. To determine whether FTA filter paper can be used in the surgical pathology laboratory to store tumor cells for DNA testing. Cell suspensions were prepared from 60 surgical specimens, and DNA was extracted either immediately or after storage on FTA paper. The DNA extracted by each method was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the beta-globin and interferon gamma genes, and the results were compared. Fifteen lymph node specimens stored on FTA paper were then tested for immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangement by PCR, and these results were compared with those obtained for immediately extracted DNA. University medical center. The DNA extracted from cells stored on FTA paper performed as well in the PCR as the freshly extracted DNA in nearly all cases (>95%). The results of tests for IgH gene rearrangements showed 100% concordance between the 2 methods of DNA extraction.Conclusion.-Cells from surgical specimens can be stored on FTA paper for extended lengths of time, and DNA can be extracted from these cells for PCR-based testing. FTA filter paper is a reliable medium for the storage and/or transport of tumor cells for PCR-based DNA analysis.

  1. Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test: Fiscal Year 1998 Status Report Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program Deliverable SPU85M4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussod, G.Y.; Turin, H.J.; Lowry, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the status of the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) and documents the progress of construction activities and site and laboratory characterization activities undertaken in fiscal year 1998. Also presented are predictive flow-and-transport simulations for Test Phases 1 and 2 of testing and the preliminary results and status of these test phases. Future anticipated results obtained from unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport testing in the Calico Hills Formation at Busted Butte are also discussed in view of their importance to performance assessment (PA) needs to build confidence in and reduce the uncertainty of site-scale flow-and-transport models and their abstractions for performance for license application. The principal objectives of the test are to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain, as identified by the PA working group in February 1997. These include but are not restricted to: (1) The effect of heterogeneities on flow and transport in unsaturated and partially saturated conditions in the Calico Hills Formation. In particular, the test aims to address issues relevant to fracture-matrix interactions and permeability contrast boundaries; (2) The migration behavior of colloids in fractured and unfractured Calico Hills rocks; (3) The validation through field testing of laboratory sorption experiments in unsaturated Calico Hills rocks; (4) The evaluation of the 3-D site-scale flow-and-transport process model (i.e., equivalent-continuum/dual-permeability/discrete-fracture-fault representations of flow and transport) used in the PA abstractions for license application; and (5) The effect of scaling from lab scale to field scale and site scale

  2. Development and evaluation of measurement devices used to support testing of radioactive material transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapher, W.L.; Ammerman, D.J.; Stenberg, D.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Arviso, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive material package designers use structural testing to verify and demonstrate package performance. A major part of evaluating structural response is the collection of instrumentation measurement data. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has an ongoing program to develop and evaluate measurement devices to support testing of radioactive material packages. Measurement devices developed in support of this activity include evaluation channels, ruggedly constructed linear variable differential transformers, and piezoresistive accelerometers with enhanced measurement capabilities. In addition to developing measurement devices, a method has been derived to evaluate accelerometers and strain gages for measurement repeatability, ruggedness, and manufacturers' calibration data under both laboratory and field conditions. The developed measurement devices and evaluation technique will be discussed and the results of the evaluation will be presented

  3. Tests of a 3 meter curved superconducting beam transport dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.E.; Carroll, A.S.; Danby, G.T.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.W.; Leonhardt, W.J.; Prodell, A.G.; Weisenbloom, J.

    1981-01-01

    Initial tests of one of the curved 3 m long superconducting dipole magnets intended to generate 6.0 T and produce a 20.4 0 bend in the primary proton beam to a new D-target station at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS have been completed. Although this magnet, whose window frame design generally follows that of the successful 8 0 and Model T superconducting dipoles, demonstrates many of the desirable characteristics of these earlier magnets such as excellent quench propagation and good ramping properties, it has only reached a disappointingly low magnetic field of 3.5 to 4.0 T. Because of the great interest in superconducting magnet technology, this report will describe the diagnostic tests performed and plans for future modifications

  4. Testing bidirectional effects between cannabis use and depressive symptoms: moderation by the serotonin transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Roy; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-09-01

    Evidence for the assumption that cannabis use is associated with depression and depressive symptoms is inconsistent and mostly weak. It is likely that the mixed results are due to the fact that prior studies ignored the moderating effects of an individual's genetic vulnerability. The present study takes a first step in scrutinizing the relationship between cannabis use and depressive symptoms by taking a developmental molecular-genetic perspective. Specifically, we concentrated on changes in cannabis use and depressive symptoms over time in a simultaneous manner and differences herein for individuals with and without the short allele of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype. Data were from 310 adolescents over a period of 4 years. We used a parallel-process growth model, which allows co-development of cannabis use and depressive symptoms throughout adolescence, and the possible role of the 5-HTTLPR genotype in this process. We used data from the younger siblings of these adolescents in an attempt to replicate potential findings. The parallel-process growth model shows that cannabis use increases the risk for an increase in depressive symptoms over time but only in the presence of the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR genotype. This effect remained significant after controlling for covariates. We did not find conclusive support for the idea that depressive symptoms affect cannabis use. These findings were replicated in the sample of the younger siblings. The findings of the present study show first evidence that the links between cannabis use and depressive symptoms are conditional on the individual's genetic makeup. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Development and Flight Test of an Augmented Thrust-Only Flight Control System on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Pappas, Drew

    1996-01-01

    An emergency flight control system using only engine thrust, called Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA), has been developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. In this thrust-only control system, pilot flight path and track commands and aircraft feedback parameters are used to control the throttles. The PCA system was installed on the MD-11 airplane using software modifications to existing computers. Flight test results show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds and altitudes. The PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any non-nal flight controls have been demonstrated, including instrument landing system-coupled hands-off landings. The PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. In addition, PCA was tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control; describes the MD-11 airplane and systems; and discusses PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  6. Development and Flight Test of an Emergency Flight Control System Using Only Engine Thrust on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John J.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1997-01-01

    An emergency flight control system that uses only engine thrust, called the propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system, was developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. The PCA system is a thrust-only control system, which augments pilot flightpath and track commands with aircraft feedback parameters to control engine thrust. The PCA system was implemented on the MD-11 airplane using only software modifications to existing computers. Results of a 25-hr flight test show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds, altitudes, and configurations. PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any normal flight controls were demonstrated, including ILS-coupled hands-off landings. PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. The PCA system was also tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control, a history of accidents or incidents in which some or all flight controls were lost, the MD-11 airplane and its systems, PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  7. Numerical Test of Different Approximations Used in the Transport Theory of Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed theories for perpendicular diffusion work remarkably well. The diffusion coefficients they provide agree with test-particle simulations performed for different turbulence setups ranging from slab and slab-like models to two-dimensional and noisy reduced MHD turbulence. However, such theories are still based on different analytical approximations. In the current paper we use a test-particle code to explore the different approximations used in diffusion theory. We benchmark different guiding center approximations, simplifications of higher-order correlations, and the Taylor-Green-Kubo formula. We demonstrate that guiding center approximations work very well as long as the particle's unperturbed Larmor radius is smaller than the perpendicular correlation length of the turbulence. Furthermore, the Taylor-Green-Kubo formula and the definition of perpendicular diffusion coefficients via mean square displacements provide the same results. The only approximation that was used in the past in nonlinear diffusion theory that fails is to replace fourth-order correlations by a product of two second-order correlation functions. In more advanced nonlinear theories, however, this type of approximation is no longer used. Therefore, we confirm the validity of modern diffusion theories as a result of the work presented in the current paper.

  8. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-01-01

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for

  9. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-09-28

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for

  10. Force reconstruction for the slapdown test of a nuclear transportation cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    Two force reconstruction techniques were used to evaluate the slapdown response of a 1/3 scale model solid steel, spent fuel cask dropped 30 ft onto an unyielding target. The two techniques are: the sum of weighted acceleration technique (SWAT) and the deconvolution technique (DECON). A brief description and the calibration of the techniques as applied to the cask are presented. For the slapdown test, both techniques yielded very similar resultant forces and provided more accurate definition of the force-time history for the cask than is available from conventional data reduction methods. An applied moment, a measurement previously unobtainable from conventional cask accelerometer data reduction techniques, was determined with SWAT. The angular velocity calculated with SWAT was verified with photometric measurements. 9 refs., 22 figs

  11. Field testing, comparison, and discussion of five aeolian sand transport measuring devices operating on different measuring principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Nolet, Corjan; Etyemezian, Vicken; Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Bakker, Gerben; Riksen, Michel

    2018-06-01

    Five types of sediment samplers designed to measure aeolian sand transport were tested during a wind erosion event on the Sand Motor, an area on the west coast of the Netherlands prone to severe wind erosion. Each of the samplers operates on a different principle. The MWAC (Modified Wilson And Cooke) is a passive segmented trap. The modified Leatherman sampler is a passive vertically integrating trap. The Saltiphone is an acoustic sampler that registers grain impacts on a microphone. The Wenglor sampler is an optical sensor that detects particles as they pass through a laser beam. The SANTRI (Standalone AeoliaN Transport Real-time Instrument) detects particles travelling through an infrared beam, but in different channels each associated with a particular grain size spectrum. A procedure is presented to transform the data output, which is different for each sampler, to a common standard so that the samplers can be objectively compared and their relative efficiency calculated. Results show that the efficiency of the samplers is comparable despite the differences in operating principle and the instrumental and environmental uncertainties associated to working with particle samplers in field conditions. The ability of the samplers to register the temporal evolution of a wind erosion event is investigated. The strengths and weaknesses of the samplers are discussed. Some problems inherent to optical sensors are looked at in more detail. Finally, suggestions are made for further improvement of the samplers.

  12. Experimental drop tests in the frame of the component testing of transport casks for radioactive materials; Durchfuehrung experimenteller Fallpruefungen im Rahmen der mechanischen Bauartpruefung von Transportbehaeltern fuer radioaktive Stoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musolff, A.; Droste, B.; Quercetti, T.; Mueller, K. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    The Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM) is the responsible German authority for component testing of packaging containers for radioactive materials in the frame of the licensing process. The tests are performed according to the national and international legal regulations for the transport of radioactive materials. This includes the evaluation of the mechanical and thermal behavior under defined testing conditions and the radionuclide release in case of severe accidents. The most important test concerning the accident resistance is the experimental drop tests from 9 m height on a firm base plate and from 1 m height on a steel mandrel. The tested sample was a 1:2 model cask CASTOR {sup registered} HAW/Tb2 of the original type CASTOR {sup registered} HAW28M. The tests were performed at the BAM test ground in Hortswalde. The documented test results will be part of the safety analysis in the frame of the licensing process for the transport and storage cask.

  13. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C. I.; Chuu, Y. J.; Lin, W.; Meike, A.; Sawvel, A.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the transport of bacteria in a large, thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. The study was part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), thermochemical and physical studies conducted on a 10 ft x 10 ft x 14 ft block of volcanic tuff excavated on 5 of 6 sides out of Fran Ridge, Nevada. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures. The double-drug-resistant mutants, which could be thus distinguished from the indigenous species, were injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly and steadily over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C. Samples (cotton cloths inserted the length of the hole, glass fiber swabs, and filter papers) were collected from the boreholes that were approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant bacteria were found in the collection boreholes nine months after injection. Surprisingly, they also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. These bacteria appear to be the species that were injected. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the observation boreholes and heater boreholes suggests that a random motion could be the pattern that the bacteria migrated in the block. These observations indicated the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting

  14. Structural safety test and analysis of type IP-2 transport packages with bolted lid type and thick steel plate for radioactive waste drums in a NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hak; Seo, Ki Seog; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jeong Mook

    2007-01-01

    If a type IP-2 transport package were to be subjected to a free drop test and a penetration test under the normal conditions of transport, it should prevent a loss or dispersal of the radioactive contents and a more than 20% increase in the maximum radiation level at any external surface of the package. In this paper, we suggested the analytic method to evaluate the structural safety of a type IP-2 transport package using a thick steel plate for a structure part and a bolt for tying a bolt. Using an analysis a loss or disposal of the radioactive contents and a loss of shielding integrity were confirmed for two kinds of type IP-2 transport packages to transport radioactive waste drums from a waste facility to a temporary storage site in a nuclear power plant. Under the free drop condition the maximum average stress at the bolts and the maximum opening displacement of a lid were compared with the tensile stress of a bolt and the steps in a lid, which were made to avoid a streaming radiation in the shielding path, to evaluate a loss or dispersal of radioactive waste contents. Also a loss of shielding integrity was evaluated using the maximum decrease in a shielding thickness. To verify the impact dynamic analysis for free drop test condition and evaluate experimentally the safety of two kinds of type IP-2 transport packages, free drop tests were conducted with various drop directions

  15. Numerical model of turbulence, sediment transport, and morphodynamics tested in the Colorado River at Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. V.; Grams, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present a parallelized, three-dimensional, turbulence-resolving model using the Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) technique, tested at the scale of the river-reach in the Colorado River. DES is a hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS). RANS is applied to the near-bed grid cells, where grid resolution is not sufficient to fully resolve wall turbulence. LES is applied in the flow interior. We utilize the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence closure with a rough wall extension. The model resolves large-scale turbulence using DES and simultaneously integrates the suspended sediment advection-diffusion equation. The Smith and McLean suspended sediment boundary condition is used to calculate the upward and downward settling of sediment fluxes in the grid cells attached to the bed. Model results compare favorably with ADCP measurements of flow taken on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon during the High Flow Experiment (HFE) of 2008. The model accurately reproduces the size and position of the major recirculation currents, and the error in velocity magnitude was found to be less than 17% or 0.22 m/s absolute error. The mean deviation of the direction of velocity with respect to the measured velocity was found to be 20 degrees. Large-scale turbulence structures with vorticity predominantly in the vertical direction are produced at the shear layer between the main channel and the separation zone. However, these structures rapidly become three-dimensional with no preferred orientation of vorticity. Cross-stream velocities, into the main recirculation zone just upstream of the point of reattachment and out of the main recirculation region just downstream of the point of separation, are highest near the bed. Lateral separation eddies are more efficient at storing and exporting sediment than previously modeled. The input of sediment to the eddy recirculation zone occurs in the interface of the eddy and main channel. Pulsation of the

  16. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-31

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

  17. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios

  18. ASSESSING EXPOSURE TO THE PUBLIC FROM LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLW) TRANSPORTATION TO THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.J.; Campbell, S.; Church, B.W.; Shafer, D. S.; Gillespie, D.; Sedano, S.; Cebe, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one of two regional sites where low-level radioactive waste (LLW) from approved DOE and U.S. DOD generators across the United States is disposed. In federal fiscal year (FY) 2002, over 57,000 cubic meters of waste was transported to and disposed at the NTS. DOE and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations ensure that radiation exposure from truck shipments to members of the public is negligible. Nevertheless, particularly in rural communities along transportation routes in Utah and Nevada, there is perceived risk from members of the public about incremental exposure from LLW trucks, especially when ''Main Street'' and the LLW transportation route are the same. To better quantify the exposure to gamma radiation, a stationary monitoring array of four pressurized ion chambers (PICs) have been set up in a pullout just before LLW trucks reach the entrance to the NTS. The PICs are positioned at a distance of one meter from the sides of the truck trailer and at a height appropriate for the design of the trucks that will be used in FY2003 to haul LLW to the NTS. The use of four PICs (two on each side of the truck) is to minimize and to correct for non-uniformity where radiation levels from waste packages vary from side to side, and from front to back in the truck trailer. The PIC array is being calibrated by collecting readings from each PIC exposed to a known 137Cs source that was positioned at different locations on a flatbed stationed in the PIC array, along with taking secondary readings from other known sources. Continuous data collection using the PICs, with and without a truck in the array, is being used to develop background readings. In addition, acoustic sensors are positioned on each side of the PIC array to record when a large object (presumably a truck) enters the array. In FY2003, PIC surveys from as many incoming LLW trucks as possible will be made and survey data

  19. Summary of a Gas Transport Tracer Test in the Deep Cerros Del Rio Basalts, Mesita del Buey, Los Alamos NM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rahn, Thomas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ortiz, John Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, Larry Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Snyder, Emily Elisabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-16

    Here we describe results from a tracer test in the Cerros del Rio basalt beneath Mesita del Buey, Technical Area 54 (TA-54) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory). This report follows from plans outlined in our previous Tracer Test Work Plan (LANL 2016). These activities were conducted by LANL to further characterize subsurface properties of the Cerros del Rio basalts at Material Disposal Area (MDA) L (Figure 1.1-1). The work presented follows from the “Interim Measures Work Plan for Soil-Vapor Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Material Disposal Area L, Technical Area 54, Revision 1,” submitted to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in September 2014 (LANL 2014). Remediation of the MDA L vapor plume by soil-vapor extraction (SVE) is recommended as part of the final remedy in the “Corrective Measures Evaluation Report for Material Disposal Area L, Solid Waste Management Unit 54-006, at Technical Area 54, Revision 2” to meet a remedial action objective of preventing groundwater from being impacted above a regulatory standard by the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to groundwater through soil vapor (LANL 2011).

  20. Aspects of the statistical theory of stochastic magnetic fields: test particle transport and turbulent collisionless tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this work is concerned with test particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. In the absence of collisions, the test particle self-diffusion coefficient is given by D = D/sub m/ V (in the zero gyroradius limit), where D/sub m/ is the magnetic diffusion coefficient due to a given spectrum of magnetic fluctuations and V is the particle velocity along a field line. The effect of collisions, either classical or turbulent, on this result is considered. The second part of this work is concerned with the evolution of the collisionless tearing mode in the presence of a stochastic magnetic field. A statistical closure approximation, obtained from the DIA by neglecting a mode-coupling term, is used to derive a nonlinear dispersion relation. For L 0 < L/sub K/ the dominant nonlinear effect is shown to be a turbulent broadening of the perturbed current layer. Saturation occurs when the perturbed current layer broadens to the point where Δ' = 0, where Δ' is the jump in the logarithmic derivative of the vector potential across the perturbed current layer

  1. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  2. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia

    2014-01-01

    is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon......, showed a wide range in δ13C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ37Cl values for TCE...

  3. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donohue, Shane; McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick; Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar settings across Ireland suggest the phenomena observed in this study are more widespread than previously suspected. - Highlights: • Multidisciplinary approach defines pollutant plume in a poorly productive aquifer. • Geophysics helps define domestic wastewater effluent extent and aquifer geometry. • Ground attenuates wastewater pollutants despite the absence of significant vadose zone. • Faecal indicator microorganisms impacted groundwater quality at 100 m + from source

  4. Evaluation of repeated measurements of radon-222 concentrations in well water sampled from bedrock aquifers of the Piedmont near Richmond, Virginia, USA: Effects of lithology and well characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Shelley A.; Billmeyer, Ernest R.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in 26 ground water wells of two distinct lithologies in the Piedmont of Virginia were measured to assess variation in ground water radon concentrations (GWRC), to evaluate differences in concentrations related to well characteristics, lithology, and spatial distributions, and to assess the feasibility of predicting GWRC. Wells were sampled in accordance with American Public Health Association Method 7500 Rn-B, with modifications to include a well shaft profile analysis that determined the minimum purge time sufficient to remove the equivalent of one column of water from each well. Statistically significant differences in GWRC were found in the Trssu (1482±1711 pCi/L) and Mpg (7750±5188 pCi/L) lithologies, however, no significant differences were found among GWRC at each well over time. Using multiple regression, 86% of the variability (R 2 ) in the GWRC was explained by the lithology, latitudinal class, and water table elevation of the wells. The GWRC in a majority of the wells studied exceed US Environmental Protection Agency designated maximum contaminant level and AMCL. Results support modifications to sampling procedures and indicate that, in previous studies, variations in GWRC concentrations over time may have been due in part to differences in sampling procedures and not in source water

  5. Occurrence of geogenic contaminants in private wells from a crystalline bedrock aquifer in western Quebec, Canada: Geochemical sources and health risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondu, Raphaël; Cloutier, Vincent; Rosa, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Nineteen private wells were investigated in order to evaluate the groundwater quality and the issues associated with well water use in a fractured metasedimentary aquifer of the Canadian Shield, in western Quebec (Canada). Groundwater sampling and analysis reveal that the quality of well water is both a potential aesthetic and health concern for the residents. Aesthetic problems are mainly related to the high levels of hardness and dissolved iron and manganese. Potential health risks are associated with the occurrence of brackish groundwater, high manganese concentrations, and arsenic concentrations exceeding the Canadian guideline value of 10 μg/l. Brackish groundwater is suspected to be derived from the mixing of fresh groundwaters with deep calcium-sodium-chloride brines of the Canadian Shield. The occurrences of iron, manganese and arsenic, primarily derived from the natural weathering of bedrock, are highly dependent on the geochemical conditions in groundwater, particularly the redox potential. Arsenic occurs mainly as arsenite (As(III)) and is thought to be released by the dissolution of iron and manganese oxyhydroxides under reducing conditions. Information obtained from well owners indicates that most households use ion exchange water softeners to minimize aesthetic problems of excessive hardness and dissolved iron and manganese concentrations. Homeowners generally take protective measures to reduce their exposure to arsenic when they are aware of the contamination. The exposure to arsenic and manganese may pose health risks for residents that do not take protective measures. The quality of well water is of paramount importance for human health in rural areas. Information on the contaminant sources and individual mitigation measures is essential to assess the health risks associated with groundwater consumption and to ensure the protection of public health.

  6. Chemistry and age of groundwater in bedrock aquifers of the Piceance and Yellow Creek watersheds, Rio Blanco County, Colorado, 2010-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P.B.; Thomas, J.C.; Hunt, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen monitoring wells completed in the Uinta and Green River Formations in the Piceance Creek and Yellow Creek watersheds in Rio Blanco County, Colorado, were sampled for chemical, isotopic, and groundwater-age tracers to provide information on the overall groundwater quality, the occurrence and distribution of chemicals that could be related to the development of underlying natural-gas reservoirs, and to better understand groundwater residence times in the flow system. Methane concentrations in groundwater ranged from less than 0.0005 to 387 milligrams per liter. The methane was predominantly biogenic in origin, although the biogenic methane was mixed with thermogenic methane in water from seven wells. Three BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene) were detected in water from six of the wells, but none of the concentrations exceeded Federal drinking-water standards. The presence of thermogenic methane in the aquifers indicates a connection and vulnerability to chemicals in deeper geologic units. Helium-4 data indicate that groundwater had ages ranging from less than 1,000 years to greater than 50,000 years. The presence of old groundwater in parts of the aquifers indicates that these aquifers may not be useful for large-scale water supply because of low recharge rates.

  7. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, Shane [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick [Department of Applied Sciences, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk (Ireland); Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar settings across Ireland suggest the phenomena observed in this study are more widespread than previously suspected. - Highlights: • Multidisciplinary approach defines pollutant plume in a poorly productive aquifer. • Geophysics helps define domestic wastewater effluent extent and aquifer geometry. • Ground attenuates wastewater pollutants despite the absence of significant vadose zone. • Faecal indicator microorganisms impacted groundwater quality at 100 m + from source.

  8. Theoretical and experimental determination of matrix diffusion and related solute transport properties of fractured tuffs from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, G.R.

    1982-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the chemical and physical factors which affect molecular diffusion of dissolved substances from fractures into a tuffaceous rock matrix have been made on rocks from G-Tunnel and Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A variety of groundwater tracers, which may be useful in field tests at the NTS, have also been developed and tested. Although a number of physical/chemical processes may cause nonconvective transport of dissolved species from fractures into the tuff matrix, molecular diffusion seems to be the most important process. Molecular diffusion in these rocks is controlled by the composition of the groundwater through multicomponent effects and several rock properties. The porosities of the samples studied ranged from about 0.1 to 0.4. The constrictivity-tortuosity parameter ranged from 0.1 and 0.3 and effective matrix-diffusion coefficients were measured to be between 2 to 17. x 10 -7 c, 2 /s for sodium halides and sodium pentafluorobenzoate. Total porosity was found to be the principle factor accounting for the variation in effective diffusion coefficients. The constrictivity-tortuosity factor was found to have a fair correlation (r = 0.75) with the median pore diameters measured by mercury intrusion. Measurements of bulk-rock electrical impedance changes with frequency indicate that the constrictivity factor has a maximum value of 0.8 to 1, but may be smaller. If the larger values are correct, then the diffusion paths in tuff are more tortuous than in granular media. Computation of the full diffusion-coefficient matrix for various tracers in J-13 well water from the NTS indicates coupling of the diffusion fluxes of all ionic species. These effects are being incorporated into a numerical model of multicomponent-matrix diffusion

  9. Drop Weight Device Fabrication and Tests for a Dynamic Material Property of Shock-Absorbing Material and Structure in Transportation Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeon, Jea Eon; Han, Sang Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hoon; Seo, Ki Seok

    2009-01-01

    A radioactive material transportation package consists of canister and impact limiters. IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1 recommends a drop test to evaluate the structural integrity of a transportation package under a hypothetical accident condition. The free drop test of a transportation package from 9 m height simulates one of accident conditions. The transportation package has a potential energy corresponding to 9 m drop height, and this energy changes to a kinetic energy when it impacts on the target. The energy is absorbed by a deformation of shock-absorbing material so that the minimum energy is transferred to canister. Accordingly, the shock-absorbing material is a very important part in transportation package design. Since the data for shock-absorbing material characteristics is acquired by a static test in general, it is quite different to that of dynamic characteristics. And the dynamic characteristics data is hardly found in literature. In this study, a drop weight facility was designed and fabricated which produces an impact speed like that of free drop of 9 m height. Several materials considered for an impact limiter and impact limiter structures were tested by a drop weight facility to acquire a dynamic material characteristics data

  10. Drop Weight Device Fabrication and Tests for a Dynamic Material Property of Shock-Absorbing Material and Structure in Transportation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeon, Jea Eon; Han, Sang Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hoon; Seo, Ki Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    A radioactive material transportation package consists of canister and impact limiters. IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1 recommends a drop test to evaluate the structural integrity of a transportation package under a hypothetical accident condition. The free drop test of a transportation package from 9 m height simulates one of accident conditions. The transportation package has a potential energy corresponding to 9 m drop height, and this energy changes to a kinetic energy when it impacts on the target. The energy is absorbed by a deformation of shock-absorbing material so that the minimum energy is transferred to canister. Accordingly, the shock-absorbing material is a very important part in transportation package design. Since the data for shock-absorbing material characteristics is acquired by a static test in general, it is quite different to that of dynamic characteristics. And the dynamic characteristics data is hardly found in literature. In this study, a drop weight facility was designed and fabricated which produces an impact speed like that of free drop of 9 m height. Several materials considered for an impact limiter and impact limiter structures were tested by a drop weight facility to acquire a dynamic material characteristics data.

  11. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Volume 1, Appendix I: Transportation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to address local issues concerning current and potential operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), to document the results of the NTS transportation risk analysis, and to provide information and supporting documentation for the NTS Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Stakeholders have identified transportation, health, and safety issues as their paramount concern. In response to these concerns, the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) solicited and received input from the public through public meetings and in meetings with federal, state, local, and tribal organizations; and commissioned a transportation risk analysis. The stakeholders and DOE went on to establish the Transportation Protocol Working Group and Big Group to further discuss transportation issues associated with NTS transportation activities. This study used two different models: ADROIT for Defense Program activities and a RADTRAN-like model for waste management activities. Because of national security concerns associated with special nuclear material, the DOE has developed ADROIT to assist in defining the potential risk associated with Defense Program transportation activities. RADTRAN is a computer model which analyzes data without exposing the steps taken to reach the end result. So the public could see every step in the process, a RADTRAN-like model was used. This model is composed of a combination of spreadsheet and FORTRAN codes, that can be used by the stakeholder on a personal computer. This model is available to the public upon request. A detailed discussion of the results of the model are contained in this Appendix

  12. Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the State of Nevada. Transportation study, Volume 1, Appendix I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report has been prepared to address local transportation issues concerning current and potential operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), to document the results of the NTS transportation risk analysis, and to provide information and supporting documentation for the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the NTS and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. Four alternatives are evaluated in the NTS EIS: Alternative 1, Continue Current Operations, (No Action); Alternative 2, Discontinue Operations; Alternative 3, Expanded Use; and Alternative 4, Alternate Use of Withdrawn Lands. The transportation risk analysis estimated the health risk from highway transportation of DOE-generated low-level waste, mixed waste, and defense-related nuclear materials for each of the four alternatives

  13. Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2

  14. Saving lives or saving dollars: The Trump administration rescinds plans to require sleep apnea testing in commercial transportation operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan SF

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. In another move favoring business interests and against the common good, the Trump administration’s Department of Transportation announced recently that they are rescinding plans to require testing for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA in train and commercial motor vehicle operators (1. As exemplified by its withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, this decision is another example of how the current administration disregards scientific findings and present-day events in establishing policy that will be detrimental to Americans. Let us step back for a moment and briefly review the evidence that the Trump administration has ignored. •\tIt is well established that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA can result in daytime sleepiness (2 and that sleepiness is detrimental to safe operation of a train or motor vehicle. •\tMany studies have established that persons with OSA have an increased risk of motor vehicle crashes (3. •\tStudies in commercial truck drivers have observed that this population has …

  15. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hua-Guang; Zhang, Rong; Li, Xin; Li, Fang-Fei; Wang, Ya-Chen; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lu, Ling-Long; Feng, Tao

    2015-07-05

    The relationship between monosymptomatic resting tremor (mRT) and Parkinson's disease (PD) remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the function of presynaptic dopaminergic neurons in patients with mRT by dopamine transporter positron emission tomography (DAT-PET) and to evaluate the utility of clinical features or electrophysiological studies in differential diagnosis. Thirty-three consecutive patients with mRT were enrolled prospectively. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and electromyography were tested before DAT-PET. Striatal asymmetry index (SAI) was calculated, and a normal DAT-PET was defined as a SAI of hygiene score, walking in motor experiences of daily living (Part II) and motor examination (Part III) were significant different between two groups (P postural tremor tend to be higher in the SWEDDs group (P = 0.08 and P = 0.05, respectively). mRT is heterogeneous in presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration, which can be determined by DAT-PET brain imaging. Clinical and electrophysiological features may provide clues to distinguish PD from SWEDDs.

  16. Transport Statistics - Transport - UNECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes UNECE and the SDGs Climate Change Gender Ideas 4 Change UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Transport Areas of Work Transport Statistics Transport Transport Statistics About us Terms of Reference Meetings and Events Meetings Working Party on Transport Statistics (WP.6

  17. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Guang Zheng; Rong Zhang; Xin Li; Fang-Fei Li; Ya-Chen Wang; Xue-Mei Wang; Ling-Long Lu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The relationship between monosymptomatic resting tremor (mRT) and Parkinson's disease (PD) remains controversial.In this study,we aimed to assess the function ofpresynaptic dopaminergic neurons in patients with mRT by dopamine transporter positron emission tomography (DAT-PET) and to evaluate the utility of clinical features or electrophysiological studies in differential diagnosis.Methods:Thirty-three consecutive patients with mRT were enrolled prospectively.The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and electromyography were tested before DAT-PET.Striatal asymmetry index (SAI) was calculated,and a normal DAT-PET was defined as a SAI of <15%.Scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits (SWEDDs) were diagnosed in patients with a subsequent normal DAT-PET and structural magnetic resonance imaging.Results:Twenty-eight mRT patients with a significant reduction in uptake of DAT binding in the striatum were diagnosed with PD,while the remained 5 with a normal DAT-PET scan were SWEDDs.As for UPRDS,the dressing and hygiene score,walking in motor experiences of daily living (Part Ⅱ) and motor examination (Part Ⅲ) were significant different between two groups (P < 0.05 andP< 0.01,respectively).Bilateral tremor was more frequent in the SWEDDs group (P < 0.05).The frequency of resting tremor and the amplitude of postural tremor tend to be higher in the SWEDDs group (P =0.08 and P =0.05,respectively).Conclusions:mRT is heterogeneous in presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration,which can be determined by DAT-PET brain imaging.Clinical and electrophysiological features may provide clues to distinguish PD from SWEDDs.

  18. Testing of Streckeisen STS-5A and Nanometrics Trillium 120PH Sensors for the Alaska Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Baghbadorani, A.; Aderhold, K.; Bloomquist, D.; Frassetto, A.; Miller, P. E.; Busby, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    Starting in 2014, the IRIS Transportable Array facility began to install and operate seismic stations in Alaska and western Canada. By the end of the project, the full deployment of the array will cover a grid of 280 stations spaced about 85 km apart covering all of mainland Alaska and parts of the Yukon, British Columbia, and the Northwest Territories. Approximately 200 stations will be operated directly by IRIS through at least 2019. A key aspect of the Alaska TA is the need for stations to operate autonomously, on account of the high cost of installation and potential subsequent visits to remote field-sites to repair equipment. The TA is using newly developed broadband seismometers Streckeisen STS-5A and Nanometrics Trillium-120PH, designed for installation in shallow posthole emplacements. These new instruments were extensively vetted beforehand, but they are still relatively new to the TA inventory. Here we will assess their performance under deployment conditions and after repeated commercial shipping and travel to the field. Our objective is to provide a thorough accounting of the identified failures of the existing inventory of posthole instruments. We will assess the practices and results of instrument testing by the PASSCAL Instrument Center/Array Operations Facility (PIC/AOF), Alaska Operations Center (AOC), and broadband seismic sensor manufacturers (Streckeisen, Nanometrics) in order to document potential factors in and stages during the process for instrument failures. This will help to quantify the overall reliability of the TA seismic sensors and quality of TA practices and data collection, and identify potential considerations in future TA operations. Our results show that the overall rate of failure of all posthole instruments is improved station performance after sensor replacement, and that these are key elements in assessing whether or not a sensor should be replaced in the field.

  19. Description of the blowdown test facility COG program on in-reactor fission product release, transport, and deposition under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbach, P.J.; Wood, J.C.

    1987-06-01

    Loss-of-coolant accidents with additional impairment of emergency cooling would probably result in high fuel temperatures leading to severe fuel damage (SFD) and significant fission product activity would then be transported along the PHTS to the break where a fraction of it would be released and transport under such conditions, there are many interacting and sometimes competing phenomena to consider. Laboratory simulations are being used to provide data on these individual phenomena, such as UO 2 oxidation and Zr-UO 2 interaction, from which mathematical models can be constructed. These are then combined into computer codes to include the interaction effects and assess the overall releases. In addition, in-reactor tests are the only source of data on release and transport of short-lived fission product nuclides, which are important in the consequence analysis of CANDU reactor accidents. Post-test decontamination of an in-reactor test facility also provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate techniques and obtain decontamination data relevant to post-accident rehabilitation of CANDU power reactors. Specialized facilities are required for in-reactor testing because of the extensive release of radioactive fission products and the high temperatures involved (up to 2500 degrees Celsius). To meet this need for the Canadian program, the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) has been built in the NRU reactor at Chalk River. Between completion of construction in mid-1987 and the first Zircaloy-sheathed fuel test in fiscal year 1987/88, several commissioning tests are being performed. Similarly, extensive development work has been completed to permit application of instrumentation to irradiated fuel elements, and in support of post-test fuel assembly examination. A program of decontamination studies has also been developed to generate information relevant to post-accident decontamination of power reactors. The BTF shared cost test program funded by the COG High Temperature

  20. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  1. Development and testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rock. An overview of the Nagra/JNC radionuclide retardation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Alexander, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    The joint Nagra/JNC radionuclide Retardation Programme has now been ongoing for more thean 10 years with the main aim of direct testing of radionuclide transport models for fractured crystalline rocks in as realistic a manner as possible. A large programme of field, laboratory and natural analogue studies has been carried out at the Grimsel Test Site in the central Swiss Alps. The understanding and modelling of both the processes and the structures influencing radionuclide transport in fractured crystalline rocks have matured as has the experimental technology, which has contributed to develop confidence in the applicability of the underlying research models in a repository performance assessment. In this report, the successes and set-backs of this programme are discussed as is the general approach to the thorough testing of the process models and of model assumptions. (author)

  2. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980's at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments

  3. Numerical study of thermal test of a cask of transportation for radioactive material; Estudo numérico do ensaio térmico de um casco de transporte para material radioativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Tiago A.S.; Santos, André A.C. dos; Vidal, Guilherme A.M.; Silva Junior, Geraldo E., E-mail: tiago.vieira.eng@gmail.com, E-mail: gvidal.ufmg@gmail.com, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: geraldo.esilva@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this study numerical simulations of a transport cask for radioactive material were made and the numerical results were compared with experimental results of tests carried out in two different opportunities. A mesh study was also made regarding the previously designed geometry of the same cask, in order to evaluate its impact in relation to the stability of numerical results for this type of problem. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results allowed to evaluate the need to plan and carry out a new test in order to validate the CFD codes used in the numerical simulations.

  4. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ars

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping

  5. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ars, Sébastien; Broquet, Grégoire; Yver Kwok, Camille; Roustan, Yelva; Wu, Lin; Arzoumanian, Emmanuel; Bousquet, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping with the distances

  6. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moeys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedotransfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved.

    Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42. Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = −0.26 due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72. Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is

  7. Functional test of pedotransfer functions to predict water flow and solute transport with the dual-permeability model MACRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeys, J.; Larsbo, M.; Bergström, L.; Brown, C. D.; Coquet, Y.; Jarvis, N. J.

    2012-07-01

    Estimating pesticide leaching risks at the regional scale requires the ability to completely parameterise a pesticide fate model using only survey data, such as soil and land-use maps. Such parameterisations usually rely on a set of lookup tables and (pedo)transfer functions, relating elementary soil and site properties to model parameters. The aim of this paper is to describe and test a complete set of parameter estimation algorithms developed for the pesticide fate model MACRO, which accounts for preferential flow in soil macropores. We used tracer monitoring data from 16 lysimeter studies, carried out in three European countries, to evaluate the ability of MACRO and this "blind parameterisation" scheme to reproduce measured solute leaching at the base of each lysimeter. We focused on the prediction of early tracer breakthrough due to preferential flow, because this is critical for pesticide leaching. We then calibrated a selected number of parameters in order to assess to what extent the prediction of water and solute leaching could be improved. Our results show that water flow was generally reasonably well predicted (median model efficiency, ME, of 0.42). Although the general pattern of solute leaching was reproduced well by the model, the overall model efficiency was low (median ME = -0.26) due to errors in the timing and magnitude of some peaks. Preferential solute leaching at early pore volumes was also systematically underestimated. Nonetheless, the ranking of soils according to solute loads at early pore volumes was reasonably well estimated (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, between 0.54 and 0.72). Moreover, we also found that ignoring macropore flow leads to a significant deterioration in the ability of the model to reproduce the observed leaching pattern, and especially the early breakthrough in some soils. Finally, the calibration procedure showed that improving the estimation of solute transport parameters is probably more important than the

  8. Monte Carlo tests of small-world architecture for coarse-grained networks of the United States railroad and highway transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Preston R.; El-Zabet, Jermeen; Hassan, Seerat; Briguglio, Joseph; Aliaj, Enela; Radcliffe, Maria; Mirza, Taha; Comar, Timothy; Nadolski, Jeremy; Huebner, Cynthia D.

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have shown that human transportation networks exhibit small-world structure, meaning they have high local clustering and are easily traversed. However, some have concluded this without statistical evaluations, and others have compared observed structure to globally random rather than planar models. Here, we use Monte Carlo randomizations to test US transportation infrastructure data for small-worldness. Coarse-grained network models were generated from GIS data wherein nodes represent the 3105 contiguous US counties and weighted edges represent the number of highway or railroad links between counties; thus, we focus on linkage topologies and not geodesic distances. We compared railroad and highway transportation networks with a simple planar network based on county edge-sharing, and with networks that were globally randomized and those that were randomized while preserving their planarity. We conclude that terrestrial transportation networks have small-world architecture, as it is classically defined relative to global randomizations. However, this topological structure is sufficiently explained by the planarity of the graphs, and in fact the topological patterns established by the transportation links actually serve to reduce the amount of small-world structure.

  9. Transport infrastructure monitoring: Testing of the NIODIM optical displacement monitoring system at the Sihlhochstrasse bridge in Zürich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagene, J. K.

    2012-04-01

    A gound based optical displacement monitoring system, "NIODIM", is being developed by Norsk Elektro Optikk in the framework of the activities of the European project "Integrated System for Transport Infrastructure surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing" (ISTIMES), funded in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013). The optical displacement monitoring system has now participated in two real life field campaigns one in Switzerland and one in Italy. The test campaign in Switzerland during a week in May 2011 will be presented below. The NIODIM system is based on a camera part mounted on firm ground and this camera is imaging a reference point, normally a light emitting diode (LED) which is supposed to be mounted on an object susceptible to move or oscillate. A microprocessor based unit is processing the acquired images and is calculating the displacement. The Sihlhochstrasse bridge is placed on concrete pillars in the river Sihl in Zürich and the motorway is one of the entrance routes to the city. A site visit had been performed in advance and it had been decided to mount the camera part as well as the processing unit at the lower part of the pillar above the relatively dry riverbed. The reference point in form of a light emitting diode was to be mounted below the bridge deck. However, due to practical access limitations it was not possible to place the reference LED in the middle between pillar pairs, but the LED had to be placed closer to next pair of the pillars downstream the river thus increasing the distance and possibly reducing the potential displacement. A lower signal due to reduced sensitivity (length) and due to lower deflection (better support from the pillar) had to be expected. The system would be powered by a generator placed on the riverbed. Arriving at the river front the fist day of the field trials was a surprise to most the campaign members. Due to heavy rain the week before, and in particular up in the mountains, the water

  10. Transport simulations of TFTR experiments to test theoretical models for χe and χi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1990-08-01

    1-1/2-d BALDUR transport code predictions using recent theoretically-based models for thermal and particle transport are compared to measured profiles of electron plasma density and electron and ion temperatures for TFTR ohmic, L-mode and supershot discharges. The profile consistent drift wave model is found to overestimate ion temperatures at high heating powers, so that a third mode or loss process is needed in addition to drift wave transport (TEM, η i ) and an edge loss model. None of several versions of local multiple mode models, using the 1989 Carreras-Diamond resistive ballooning model, gives T e , T i within 20% for all three TFTR regimes studied. 36 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Multi-Scale Thermal Heat Tracer Tests for Characterizing Transport Processes and Flow Channelling in Fractured Media: Theory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Bernardie, J.; Klepikova, M.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.; Guihéneuf, N.; Gerard, M. F.; Lavenant, N.

    2017-12-01

    The characterization of flow and transport in fractured media is particularly challenging because hydraulic conductivity and transport properties are often strongly dependent on the geometric structure of the fracture surfaces. Here we show how thermal tracer tests may be an excellent complement to conservative solute tracer tests to infer fracture geometry and flow channeling. We performed a series of thermal tracer tests at different scales in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The first type of thermal tracer tests are push-pull tracer tests at different scales. The temporal and spatial scaling of heat recovery, measured from thermal breakthrough curves, shows a clear signature of flow channeling. In particular, the late time tailing of heat recovery under channeled flow is shown to diverge from the T(t) α t-1,5 behavior expected for the classical parallel plate model and follow the scaling T(t) α 1/t(logt)2 for a simple channel modeled as a tube. Flow channeling is also manifested on the spatial scaling of heat recovery as flow channeling affects the decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude and the increase of the peak time with scale. The second type of thermal tracer tests are flow-through tracer tests where a pulse of hot water was injected in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer while pumping at the same flow rate in another fracture at a distance of about 10 meters to create a dipole flow field. Comparison with a solute tracer test performed under the same conditions also present a clear signature of flow channeling. We derive analytical expressions for the retardation and decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude for different fracture geometries and show that the observed differences between thermal and solute breakthrough can be explained only by channelized flow. These results suggest that heat transport is much more sensitive to fracture heterogeneity and flow

  12. Obtaining and testing of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungies inocula for the modification of radionuclides transport into the plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryipka, A.V.; Sorochins'kij, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    Spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungies have been isolaten from the plants collected at the Chernobyl zone. Selection of the plants were done due to their high radionuclides' accumulation ability and AM colonization level as well. These spores were used to start the inocula production for the plant treatment aimed to affect radionuclides transport. Spores identification was done based on their morphological and molecular features. Three different AM inocula with high potential to modify 90 Sr and 137 Cs transport at the phytoremediation experiments were obtained

  13. Lessons in the Design and Characterization Testing of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on some of the more challenging design processes and characterization tests of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T)-Active Controls Testbed (ACT). The model was successfully tested in four entries in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to satisfy the goals and objectives of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Supersonic Project Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic effort. Due to the complexity of the S4T-ACT, only a small sample of the technical challenges for designing and characterizing the model will be presented. Specifically, the challenges encountered in designing the model include scaling the Technology Concept Airplane to model scale, designing the model fuselage, aileron actuator, and engine pylons. Characterization tests included full model ground vibration tests, wing stiffness measurements, geometry measurements, proof load testing, and measurement of fuselage static and dynamic properties.

  14. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  15. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  16. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  17. Simulation of variable-density flow and transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes during a tracer test at Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hubao; Schwartz, Frank W.; Wood, Warren W.; Garabedian, S.P.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    A multispecies numerical code was developed to simulate flow and mass transport with kinetic adsorption in variable-density flow systems. The two-dimensional code simulated the transport of bromide (Br−), a nonreactive tracer, and lithium (Li+), a reactive tracer, in a large-scale tracer test performed in a sand-and-gravel aquifer at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. A two-fraction kinetic adsorption model was implemented to simulate the interaction of Li+ with the aquifer solids. Initial estimates for some of the transport parameters were obtained from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting procedure, where the breakthrough curves from column experiments were matched with one-dimensional theoretical models. The numerical code successfully simulated the basic characteristics of the two plumes in the tracer test. At early times the centers of mass of Br− and Li+ sank because the two plumes were closely coupled to the density-driven velocity field. At later times the rate of downward movement in the Br− plume due to gravity slowed significantly because of dilution by dispersion. The downward movement of the Li+ plume was negligible because the two plumes moved in locally different velocity regimes, where Li+ transport was retarded relative to Br−. The maximum extent of downward transport of the Li+ plume was less than that of the Br− plume. This study also found that at early times the downward movement of a plume created by a three-dimensional source could be much more extensive than the case with a two-dimensional source having the same cross-sectional area. The observed shape of the Br− plume at Cape Cod was simulated by adding two layers with different hydraulic conductivities at shallow depth across the region. The large dispersion and asymmetrical shape of the Li+ plume were simulated by including kinetic adsorption-desorption reactions.

  18. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  19. Final test report for traffic management data dictionary (TMDD) and related standards as deployed by the Utah department of transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-23

    This report presents the results of the ITS Standards Testing Program for the field testing, assessment, and evaluation of the three volumes comprising the Standards for Traffic Management Center to Center Communications (TMDD) version 2.1 and the NT...

  20. Intermodal Storage and Transport Frame (ISTF) MIL-STD-1660 Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barickman, Philip

    2004-01-01

    .... The ISTF was evaluated by the testing procedures set forth in MIL-STD-1660. Stacking, vibration, edgewise rotational drop, incline impact, sling compatibility, forklifting, and disassembly testing were conducted on the ISTF units...

  1. Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

    1980-05-01

    This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository

  2. Pseudohyperkalaemia in leukaemic patients: the effect of test tube type and form of transport to the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Cermáková, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of the tube type used for primary sample collection and the manner of transport prior to assessment (either manual or by pneumatic tube) on the degree of pseudohyperkalaemia in leukaemic patients. Blood from six leukaemic patients was collected into seven primary sample tubes (Monovette®, Sarstedt): sample A, heparinized blood gas syringe (potassium reference value); sample B, plasma Li-heparin without separator gel; sample C, plasma Li-heparin with separator gel; and sample D, serum with separator gel. The primary sample tubes designated B, C and D were transported to the laboratory manually. Duplicates of the same sample tubes, B(PT), C(PT) and D(PT), were sent to the laboratory by pneumatic tube. In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), there was no increase in the concentration of potassium in samples B, C and D when compared to the reference value. Transport of the samples by pneumatic tube led to a pronounced increase in potassium concentration in samples B(PT) and C(PT), whereas there was no increase in sample D(PT) when compared to the reference value. In the patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), an increase in potassium concentration occurred in sample D and in samples B(PT), C(PT) and D(PT). A similar finding was observed in the patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), furthermore with an extremely high concentration of potassium in samples C and C(PT). Manual transport of non-coagulable blood (plasma Li-heparin without separator gel) to the laboratory results in the least possible artificial increase in potassium concentration in the sample.

  3. Tests of regional elemental tracers of pollution aerosols. 1. Distinctness of regional signatures, stability during transport, and empirical validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Wunschel, K.R.; Rahn, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    The two major requirements for a successful regional tracer system are distinctness of signatures and stability of signatures during transport. Dissimilarity of the five regional signatures from eastern North America is shown by collinearity diagnostics and by apportionment of synthetic samples generated randomly. Stability of regional signatures during transport is shown first by use of tracer elements in coarse and fine aerosol to predict the maximum possible change of ratios from particle-size effects alone and then by examination of actual changes in signatures during transport from the Midwest to Underhill, VT. Two recent empirical validations of the tracer system are presented: qualitative agreement of pulses of mid-western aerosol in Vermont with pulses of perfluorocarbon tracer gas released in Ohio during CAPTEX '83 and reproduction of our three major northeastern and mid-western signatures by other investigators. The tracer system currently uses the seven elements As, Se, Sb, Zn, In, noncrustal Mn, and noncrustal V as measured by instrumental neutron activation

  4. Methodological study of the diffusion of interacting cations through clays. Application: experimental tests and simulation of coupled chemistry-diffusion transport of alkaline ions through a synthetical bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkior, Th.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this work deals with the project of underground disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological formations. It concerns the study of the migration of radionuclides through clays. In these materials, the main transport mechanism is assumed to be diffusion under natural conditions. Therefore, some diffusion experiments are conducted. With interacting solutes which present a strong affinity for the material, the duration of these tests will be too long, for the range of concentrations of interest. An alternative is to determine on one hand the geochemical retention properties using batch tests and crushed rock samples and, on the other hand, to deduce the transport parameters from diffusion tests realised with a non-interacting tracer, tritiated water. These data are then used to simulate the migration of the reactive elements with a numerical code which can deal with coupled chemistry-diffusion equations. The validity of this approach is tested by comparing the numerical simulations with the results of diffusion experiments of cations through a clay. The subject is investigated in the case of the diffusion of cesium, lithium and sodium through a compacted sodium bentonite. The diffusion tests are realised with the through-diffusion method. The comparison between the experimental results and the simulations shows that the latter tends to under estimate the propagation of the considered species. The differences could be attributed to surface diffusion and to a decrease of the accessibility to the sites of fixation of the bentonite, from the conditions of clay suspensions in batch tests to the situation of compacted samples. The influence of the experimental apparatus used during the diffusion tests on the results of the measurement has also been tested. It showed that these apparatus have to be taken into consideration when the experimental data are interpreted. A specific model has been therefore developed with the numerical code CASTEM 2000. (author)

  5. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2......, 4 and 5, respectively. It is not the intention of the book to give a broad review of the literature on this very wide topic. The book tries to pick up information which is of engineering importance. An obstacle to the study of sedimentation is the scale effect in model tests. Whenever small...

  6. Testing the accuracy of correlations for multicomponent mass transport of adsorbed gases in metal-organic frameworks: diffusion of H2/CH4 mixtures in CuBTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Seda; Liu, Jinchen; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2008-08-05

    Mass transport of chemical mixtures in nanoporous materials is important in applications such as membrane separations, but measuring diffusion of mixtures experimentally is challenging. Methods that can predict multicomponent diffusion coefficients from single-component data can be extremely useful if these methods are known to be accurate. We present the first test of a method of this kind for molecules adsorbed in a metal-organic framework (MOF). Specifically, we examine the method proposed by Skoulidas, Sholl, and Krishna (SSK) ( Langmuir, 2003, 19, 7977) by comparing predictions made with this method to molecular simulations of mixture transport of H 2/CH 4 mixtures in CuBTC. These calculations provide the first direct information on mixture transport of any species in a MOF. The predictions of the SSK approach are in good agreement with our direct simulations of binary diffusion, suggesting that this approach may be a powerful one for examining multicomponent diffusion in MOFs. We also use our molecular simulation data to test the ideal adsorbed solution theory method for predicting binary adsorption isotherms and a method for predicting mixture self-diffusion coefficients.

  7. Overall evaluation of the modelling of the TRUE-1 tracer tests - Task 4. The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, Paul; Elert, Mark

    2003-09-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. The task was carried out in 1995-2000 and consisted of several modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests, including predictive modelling where experimental results were not available beforehand. This report presents an overall evaluation of the achievements of Task 4. The specific objectives of the overall evaluation were to highlight innovative and successful modelling approaches developed, to assess the stages of the task which proved most beneficial for conceptual understanding of transport processes at the TRUE-1 site and to assess the success of various steering tools. A concise summary of scientific achievements is given and conclusions drawn with respect to unresolved technical issues. Recommendations are presented that can optimise the management of future modelling tasks

  8. Vapor Transport Through Fractures and Other High-Permeability Paths: Its Role in the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y. W.

    2001-12-01

    Heating unsaturated fractured tuff sets off a series of complicated thermal-hydrological (TH) processes, which result in large-scale redistribution of moisture in the host rock. Moisture redistribution arises from boiling of water near heat sources, transport of vapor away from those heat sources, condensation of that vapor in cooler rock, and subsequent gravity drainage of condensate through fractures. Vapor transport through high-permeability paths, which include both the fractures in the rock and other conduits, contributes to the evolution of these TH processes in two ways. First, the highly permeable natural fractures provide easy passage for vapor away from the heat sources. Second, these fractures and other highly permeable conduits allow vapor (and the associated energy) to escape the rock through open boundaries of the test domain. The overall impact of vapor transport on the evolution of the TH processes can be more easily understood in the context of the Drift Scale Test (DST), the largest ever in situ heater test in unsaturated fractured tuff. The DST, in which a large volume of rock has been heated for four years now, is located in the middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) stratigraphic unit of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The fractured tuff in Tptpmn contains many well-connected fractures. In the DST, heating is provided by nine cannister heaters placed in a five-meter-diameter Heated Drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters installed orthogonal to the axis of the HD. The test has many instrumentation boreholes, some of which are not sealed by packers or grout and may provide passage for vapor and energy. Of these conduits, the boreholes housing the wing heaters are most important for vapor transport because of their proximity to heat sources. While part of the vapor generated by heating moves away from the heat sources through the fractures and condenses elsewhere in the rock, the rest of the vapor, under gas-pressure difference, enters the HD by way of the high

  9. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  10. Piloted simulation tests of propulsion control as backup to loss of primary flight controls for a mid-size jet transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, John; Mah, Robert; Davis, Gloria; Conley, Joe; Hardy, Gordon; Gibson, Jim; Blake, Matthew; Bryant, Don; Williams, Diane

    1995-01-01

    Failures of aircraft primary flight-control systems to aircraft during flight have led to catastrophic accidents with subsequent loss of lives (e.g. , DC-1O crash, B-747 crash, C-5 crash, B-52 crash, and others). Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) investigated the use of engine thrust for emergency flight control of several airplanes, including the B-720, Lear 24, F-15, C-402, and B-747. A series of three piloted simulation tests have been conducted at Ames Research Center to investigate propulsion control for safely landing a medium size jet transport which has experienced a total primary flight-control failure. The first series of tests was completed in July 1992 and defined the best interface for the pilot commands to drive the engines. The second series of tests was completed in August 1994 and investigated propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) display requirements and various command modes. The third series of tests was completed in May 1995 and investigated PCA full-flight envelope capabilities. This report describes the concept of a PCA, discusses pilot controls, displays, and procedures; and presents the results of piloted simulation evaluations of the concept by a cross-section of air transport pilots.

  11. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-08-01

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs

  12. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak ''HBT'' [High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n e ∼ 1 - 5 x 10 14 (cm -3 ), T e ∼ 4 - 10 (eV), B t ∼ 0.2 - 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C II (4267A, emitted by the C + ions) and C III (4647A, emitted by the C ++ ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is ''classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H α emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time τ p is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time τ E ; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy

  13. Can Transport of Saharan Dust Explain Extensive Clay Deposits in the Amazon Basin? A Test Using Radiogenic Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Abouchami, W.; Näthe, K.; Kumar, A.; Galer, S. J.; Jochum, K. P.; Williams, E.; Horbe, A. M.; Rosa, J. W.; Adams, D. K.; Balsam, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Bodélé Depression, located in the Southern Sahara, is a huge source of atmospheric dust and thus an important element in biogeochemical cycles and the radiative budget of Earth's atmosphere. Previous studies have shown that Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic acts as an important source of mineral nutrients to the Amazon rainforest. The Belterra Clay, which outcrops extensively across the Amazon Basin in Brazil, has been proposed to result from dry deposition of African dusts. We have investigated this hypothesis by measuring the radiogenic isotopic composition (Sr, Nd and Pb) of a suite of samples from the Belterra Clay, the Bodélé Depression, dusts deposits collected at various locations along the airmass transport trajectory, as well as loess from the Cape Verde Islands. Radiogenic isotope systems are powerful tracers of provenance and can be used to fingerprint dust sources and atmospheric transport patterns. Our results identify distinct isotopic signatures in the Belterra Clay samples and the African sources. The Belterra Clay display radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios associated with non-radiogenic Nd isotope signatures. In contrast, Bodélé samples and dusts deposits show lower Pb isotope ratios, variable 87Sr/86Sr, and relatively homogeneous Nd isotopic compositions, albeit more radiogenic than those of the Belterra Clay. Our data show unambiguously that the Belterra Clay is not derived from African dust deposition, nor from the Andean chain, as originally suggested by W. Sombroek. Rather, isotopic compositions and Nd model ages are consistent with simple mixing of Archean and younger Proterozoic terranes within the Amazon Basin as a result of weathering and erosion under humid tropical conditions. Whether Saharan dusts contribute to the fertilization in the Amazon Basin cannot be ruled out, however, since the African dust isotopic signature is expected to be entirely overprinted by local sources. Radiogenic isotope data obtained on

  14. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm 3 , 0.001 g/cm 3 ) in a 10×10×50 cm 3 water phantom (1 g/cm 3 ). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response

  15. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jia, X; Jiang, S [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, 0.001 g/cm{sup 3}) in a 10×10×50 cm{sup 3} water phantom (1 g/cm{sup 3}). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response.

  16. E-comparisons: A new approach to round robin tests for environmental noise assessment in transport infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, C.; Pavón, I.; Pagan Munoz, R.; Crocker, M.

    The increasing importance of pollutant noise has led to the creation of many new noise testing laboratories in recent years. For this reason and due to the legal implications that noise reporting may have, it is necessary to create procedures intended to guarantee the quality of the testing and its

  17. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Aw, Wanping; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-11-04

    In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid) in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., 421C>A (major) and 376C>T (minor), in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  18. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Kaneko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, i.e., 421C>A (major and 376C>T (minor, in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  19. Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Drone Integration Pilot Program MEET THE SECRETARY TRANSPORTATION TUESDAY FEATURED NEWS The Briefing Room Connect With ... Carriers - Get a DOT Number Find Your State Transportation Department 5 Star Automobile Crash Test Ratings Office ...

  20. Transport not as others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhier, Fabien.

    1979-01-01

    Transport of radioactive materials will increase with the development of nuclear power station. Problems arising are examined. Some examples of past accidents are given. Thermal and impact tests of containers and categories of transport are recalled [fr

  1. PORFLO - a continuum model for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport in porous media. Model theory, numerical methods, and computational tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchal, A.K.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1985-09-01

    Postclosure performance assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in flood basalts at Hanford requires that the processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport be numerically modeled at appropriate space and time scales. A suite of computer models has been developed to meet this objective. The theory of one of these models, named PORFLO, is described in this report. Also presented are a discussion of the numerical techniques in the PORFLO computer code and a few computational test cases. Three two-dimensional equations, one each for fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transport, are numerically solved in PORFLO. The governing equations are derived from the principle of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in a stationary control volume that is assumed to contain a heterogeneous, anisotropic porous medium. Broad discrete features can be accommodated by specifying zones with distinct properties, or these can be included by defining an equivalent porous medium. The governing equations are parabolic differential equations that are coupled through time-varying parameters. Computational tests of the model are done by comparisons of simulation results with analytic solutions, with results from other independently developed numerical models, and with available laboratory and/or field data. In this report, in addition to the theory of the model, results from three test cases are discussed. A users' manual for the computer code resulting from this model has been prepared and is available as a separate document. 37 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin method based on the optimal test space norm for one-dimensional transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti; Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the finite element analysis of convection dominated flow problems within the recently developed Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) variational framework. We demonstrate how test function spaces that guarantee numerical stability can

  3. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

    2002-11-19

    Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized

  4. Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin method based on the optimal test space norm for steady transport problems in one space dimension

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti; Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the finite element analysis of convection-dominated flow problems within the recently developed Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) variational framework. We demonstrate how test function spaces that guarantee numerical stability can be computed automatically with respect to the optimal test space norm. This makes the DPG method not only stable but also robust, that is, uniformly stable with respect to the Péclet number in the current application. We employ discontinuous piecewise Bernstein polynomials as trial functions and construct a subgrid discretization that accounts for the singular perturbation character of the problem to resolve the corresponding optimal test functions. We also show that a smooth B-spline basis has certain computational advantages in the subgrid discretization. The overall effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on two problems for the linear advection-diffusion equation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin method based on the optimal test space norm for steady transport problems in one space dimension

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2013-05-01

    We revisit the finite element analysis of convection-dominated flow problems within the recently developed Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) variational framework. We demonstrate how test function spaces that guarantee numerical stability can be computed automatically with respect to the optimal test space norm. This makes the DPG method not only stable but also robust, that is, uniformly stable with respect to the Péclet number in the current application. We employ discontinuous piecewise Bernstein polynomials as trial functions and construct a subgrid discretization that accounts for the singular perturbation character of the problem to resolve the corresponding optimal test functions. We also show that a smooth B-spline basis has certain computational advantages in the subgrid discretization. The overall effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on two problems for the linear advection-diffusion equation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin method based on the optimal test space norm for one-dimensional transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2011-05-14

    We revisit the finite element analysis of convection dominated flow problems within the recently developed Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) variational framework. We demonstrate how test function spaces that guarantee numerical stability can be computed automatically with respect to the so called optimal test space norm by using an element subgrid discretization. This should make the DPG method not only stable but also robust, that is, uniformly stable with respect to the Ṕeclet number in the current application. The e_ectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on two problems for the linear advection-di_usion equation.

  7. SIMASS - MODELO PARA SIMULAR O TRANSPORTE DE ÁGUA E SOLUTOS NO SOLO I: DESENVOLVIMENTO E TESTE DE SENSIBILIDADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Nunes da Costa

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Desenvolveu-se um modelo matemático, denominado SIMASS, para simular o transporte unidimensional de água e soluto no solo, sob condições de escoamento não-permanente. As equações de transporte de água e de solutos, são resolvidas numericamente pelo método de diferenças finitas. O modelo permite, entre outras características, obter-se a distribuição de umidade e de solutos no solo, a utilização de condições de contorno do tipo potencial constante e do tipo fluxo constante, e o uso de duas funções, através das quais se estima a condutividade hidráulica do solo não-saturado. A avaliação do desempenho do SIMASS em simular, sob condições de solo saturado, as curvas de efluentes e os perfis de distribuição de nitrato em colunas de solo, foi realizada comparando-se as simulações realizadas por este com aquelas simuladas, usando-se o modelo CXTFIT, versão 1.0. A sensibilidade do modelo aos valores de Δz (distância entre os pontos simulados e Δt (intervalo de tempo entre duas simulações foi analisada e os resultados mostraram desempenho adequado do SIMASS na simulação de curvas de efluente e perfis de distribuição de concentração de nitrato, quando comparado ao CXTFIT. O SIMASS apresenta maior sensibilidade ao valor de Δz na simulação de curvas de efluente e ao valor de Δt na simulação de perfis de distribuição de concentração.

  8. Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago.

  9. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Payload Transport Rail System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sam; Homan, Jonathan; Speed, John

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the "Great Observatories", scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describe the challenges of developing, integrating and modifying new payload rails capable of transporting payloads within the thermal vacuum chamber up to 65,000 pounds. Ambient and Cryogenic Operations required to configure for testing will be explained. Lastly review historical payload configurations stretching from the Apollo program era to current James Webb Space Telescope testing.

  10. Balancing the costs of carbon gain and water transport: testing a new theoretical framework for plant functional ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, I Colin; Dong, Ning; Gleason, Sean M; Maire, Vincent; Wright, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    A novel framework is presented for the analysis of ecophysiological field measurements and modelling. The hypothesis 'leaves minimise the summed unit costs of transpiration and carboxylation' predicts leaf-internal/ambient CO2 ratios (ci /ca ) and slopes of maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax ) or leaf nitrogen (Narea ) vs. stomatal conductance. Analysis of data on woody species from contrasting climates (cold-hot, dry-wet) yielded steeper slopes and lower mean ci /ca ratios at the dry or cold sites than at the wet or hot sites. High atmospheric vapour pressure deficit implies low ci /ca in dry climates. High water viscosity (more costly transport) and low photorespiration (less costly photosynthesis) imply low ci /ca in cold climates. Observed site-mean ci /ca shifts are predicted quantitatively for temperature contrasts (by photorespiration plus viscosity effects) and approximately for aridity contrasts. The theory explains the dependency of ci /ca ratios on temperature and vapour pressure deficit, and observed relationships of leaf δ(13) C and Narea to aridity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Automatically stable discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin methods for stationary transport problems: Quasi-optimal test space norm

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti H.; Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the application of the discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) finite element framework to stationary convection-diffusion problems. In particular, we demonstrate how the quasi-optimal test space norm improves the robustness of the DPG method with respect to vanishing diffusion. We numerically compare coarse-mesh accuracy of the approximation when using the quasi-optimal norm, the standard norm, and the weighted norm. Our results show that the quasi-optimal norm leads to more accurate results on three benchmark problems in two spatial dimensions. We address the problems associated to the resolution of the optimal test functions with respect to the quasi-optimal norm by studying their convergence numerically. In order to facilitate understanding of the method, we also include a detailed explanation of the methodology from the algorithmic point of view. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radionuclide transport in the "sediments - water - plants" system of the water bodies at the Semipalatinsk test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidarkhanova, A K; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Polevik, V V

    2018-04-01

    This paper provides research data on levels and character of radionuclide contamination distribution in the «sediments- water - plants » system of objects of the Semipalatinsk test site (STS). As the research objects there were chosen water bodies of man-made origin which located at the territory of "Experimental Field", "Balapan", "Telkem" and "Sary-Uzen" testing sites. For research the sampling of bottom sediments, water, lakeside and water plants was taken. Collected samples were used to determine concentration of anthropogenic radionuclides 90 Sr, 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, 137 Cs. The distribution coefficient (K d ) was calculated as the ratio of the content of radionuclides in the sediments to the content in water, and the concentration ratio (F V ) was calculated as the ratio of radionuclide content in plants to the content in sediments or soil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Automatically stable discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin methods for stationary transport problems: Quasi-optimal test space norm

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti H.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the application of the discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) finite element framework to stationary convection-diffusion problems. In particular, we demonstrate how the quasi-optimal test space norm improves the robustness of the DPG method with respect to vanishing diffusion. We numerically compare coarse-mesh accuracy of the approximation when using the quasi-optimal norm, the standard norm, and the weighted norm. Our results show that the quasi-optimal norm leads to more accurate results on three benchmark problems in two spatial dimensions. We address the problems associated to the resolution of the optimal test functions with respect to the quasi-optimal norm by studying their convergence numerically. In order to facilitate understanding of the method, we also include a detailed explanation of the methodology from the algorithmic point of view. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical devices for proximity operations study and test report. [intensifying images for visual observation during space transportation system activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Operational and physical requirements were investigated for a low-light-level viewing device to be used as a window-mounted optical sight for crew use in the pointing, navigating, stationkeeping, and docking of space vehicles to support space station operations and the assembly of large structures in space. A suitable prototype, obtained from a commercial vendor, was subjected to limited tests to determine the potential effectiveness of a proximity optical device in spacecraft operations. The constructional features of the device are discussed as well as concepts for its use. Tests results show that a proximity optical device is capable of performing low-light-level viewing services and will enhance manned spacecraft operations.

  15. The Development of Two Composite Energy Absorbers for Use in a Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45deg/-45deg/-45deg/+45deg] with respect to the vertical direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soft soil. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  16. Multitracer test for the determination of transport and in-situ degradation of organic micro-contaminants in karst aquifers on the example of caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, O.; Nödler, K.; Licha, T.; Geyer, T.

    2012-04-01

    The application of organic micro-contaminants as indicators for contamination sources in aquifers and surface-water bodies has been increasingly discussed in the literature over the last years. One of the proposed substances was caffeine. It served as indicator for wastewater-leakage to various systems. As well, wastewater volumes could be estimated from caffeine concentrations. Although caffeine is known to be degradable, the degradation rates are normally only determined from mass balances or laboratory experiments. Degradation rates obtained from mass balances are relatively uncertain, as the input-function is difficult to be assessed. Laboratory experiments are hardly capable to consider the full complexity of natural systems and can rarely be transferred to those. To solve this problem, in-situ degradation rates of reactive indicators have to be determined. Especially multitracer tests can be used to access compound-specific transport parameters and degradation rates, relative to conservative tracers. A multitracer test with caffeine and uranine has been performed in a karst system (catchment of the Gallusquelle spring, SW Germany). From the breakthrough curves of the tracers, the transport behavior and the in-situ degradation rate of caffeine could be deduced. The tracers were injected into a sinkhole with a linear distance of 3000 m to the spring. The mean residence time of the tracers was found to be 84 h at a flow velocity of 35 m/h. Throughout the whole experiment, the spring discharge was constant at 187 L/s. Uranine served as conservative reference-tracer for the calibration of a one-dimensional transport model with respect to solute-unspecific parameters. Relative to that, the tracer breakthrough curve of caffeine was interpreted. As solute-specific parameters the retardation coefficient as well as degradation rate of caffeine in the investigated karst aquifer could be determined. The results indicate, that caffeine is slightly retarded in the

  17. MODELING OF FLOW AND TRANSPORT INDUCED BY PRODUCTION OF HYDROFRACTURE-STIMULATED GAS WELLS NEAR THE RULISON NUCLEAR TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Rex A. [Navarro Research and Engineering; Cooper, Clay [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Falta, Ronald [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2012-09-17

    The Piceance Basin in western Colorado contains significant reserves of natural gas in poorly connected, low-permeability (tight) sandstone lenses of the Mesaverde Group. The ability to enhance the production of natural gas in this area has long been a goal of the oil and gas industry. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, participated in three tests using nuclear detonations to fracture tight formations in an effort to enhance gas production. The tests were conducted under Project Plowshare, a program designed to identify peaceful, beneficial uses for nuclear devices. The first, Project Gasbuggy, was conducted in 1967 in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The two subsequent tests, Project Rulison in 1969 and Project Rio Blanco in 1973, were in the Piceance Basin. The ability to enhance natural gas production from tight sands has become practical through advances in hydraulic fracturing technology (hydrofracturing). This technology has led to an increase in drilling activity near the Rulison site, raising concerns that contamination currently contained in the subsurface could be released through a gas well drilled too close to the site. As wells are drilled nearer the site, the DOE Office of Legacy Management has taken the approach outlined in the June 2010 Rulison Path Forward document (DOE 2010), which recommends a conservative, staged approach to gas development. Drillers are encouraged to drill wells in areas with a low likelihood of encountering contamination (both distance and direction from the detonation zone are factors) and to collect data from these wells prior to drilling nearer the site’s 40 acre institutional control boundary (Lot 11). Previous modeling results indicate that contamination has been contained within Lot 11 (Figure 1). The Path Forward document couples the model predictions with the monitoring of gas and produced water from the gas wells

  18. Use of tracer tests to investigate changes in flow and transport properties due to bioclogging of porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Dorte; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2007-01-01

    by up to three orders of magnitude. The hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity parameters were almost recovered after disinfection of the columns. Different models relating the changes of the hydraulic conductivity to the changes in the mobile porosity due to bioclogging were reviewed......Tracer tests were conducted in three laboratory columns to study changes in the hydraulic properties of a porous medium due to bioclogging. About 30 breakthrough curves (BTCs) for each column were obtained. The BTCs were analyzed using analytical equilibrium and dual-porosity models, and estimates...

  19. Validation of transport models for use in repository performance assessments: a view illustrated for INTRAVAL test case 1b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.P.; Lever, D.A.; Sumner, P.J.

    1991-03-01

    We present our views on validation. We consider that validation is slightly different for general models and specific models. We stress the importance of presenting for review the case for (or against) a model. We outline a formal framework for validation, which helps to ensure that all the issues are addressed. Our framework includes calibration, testing predictions, comparison with alternative models, which we consider particularly important, analysis of discrepancies, presentation, consideration of implications and suggested improved experiments. We illustrate the approach by application to an INTRAVAL test case based on laboratory experiments. Three models were considered: a simple model that included the effects of advection, dispersion and equilibrium sorption, a model that also included the effects of rock-matrix diffusion, and a model with kinetic sorption. We show that the model with rock-matrix diffusion is the only one to provide a good description of the data. We stress the implications of extrapolating to larger length and time scales for repository performance assessments. (author)

  20. Direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel. Simulation of shaft transport. Tests for removing operating failures (TA 6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, W.; Heda, M.; Neydek, J.

    1994-03-01

    Probable operating failures were analysed and appropriate means for recovery were planned. Based on the analysis of probable failures, three major countermeasures were defined and planned in detail for subsequent demonstration tests: recovery of a fully functioning plateau car, recovery of a plateau car that got stuck, and recovery of a plateau car that ran off the rails. All failures investigated can be repaired by one countermeasure, or a combination of the measures provided for. Trained personnel will be able to restore full service of a loaded POLLUX plateau car that ran off the track and is damaged within approx. 50 minutes. Dose calculations on a conservative basis indicate personal doses resulting from recovery and repair work to be between 200 μSv (20 mrem) and 52 μSv (5.2 mrem). The collective dose is calculated to be approx. 250 μSv (25 mrem). (orig./HP) [de

  1. Neighborhood electric vehicle market test development project: Sacramento electric transportation consortium Ra 93-23 program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warf, W.R.

    1997-02-01

    The neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) niche is the object of this market and product test project. The project availed itself of a limited production three wheel, single passenger low performance NEV designed and produced in Denmark to determine the acceptability of the design for production and use in North America. This vehicle, as well as a prototype four wheel vehicle designed and constructed through this project, are entirely reinforced plastic chassis and body. Pacific Electric Vehicles was the primary participant in the Project. Included are the evaluation of drive system components, battery charging schemes, body and chassis and glazing material suitability. The project determined and/or verified many of the realities of motor vehicle development and usage in the U.S., which remain more restrictive than elsewhere. Statistical usage data, maintenance requirements, and user experiences are reported and analyzed.

  2. Lay out and materials for in pile tritium transport testing of breeder-inside-tube pin assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.; Mancini, M.R.; Nannetti, C.A.; Avon, J.; Ravel, S.; Pruzzo, G.; Terrosi; Roux, N.; Terlain, A.; and others.

    1994-01-01

    An irradiation experiment (90 FPD in SILOE reactor) has been designed in order to evaluate the in-situ effect of red-ox power of sweeping gas (helium with 100 vpm of H 2 /H 2 O with relative concentrations varying from pure H 2 to pure H 2 O ) on tritium removal from LiAlO 2 and Li 2 ZrO 3 ; and tritium permeation through AlSl-316L SS tubes with bare and coated surfaces. The conditions and materials explored were selected in order to test possible improvements with respect to critical issues for the 'Breeder Inside Tube' (BIT) blanket concept development. (author) 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Department of Physics' Involvement of the Impact Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonMeerwall, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    The project involved the impact testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the impacting projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.

  4. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  5. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  6. Effects of a glycine transporter-1 inhibitor and D-serine on MK-801-induced immobility in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Koike, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kohnosuke; Kambe, Daiji; Kaku, Ayaka; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2015-02-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction, particularly the hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The positive modulation of the glycine site on the NMDA receptor has been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for schizophrenia. However, its efficacy against negative symptoms, which are poorly managed by current medications, has not been fully addressed. In the present study, the effects of the positive modulation of the glycine site on the NMDA receptor were investigated in an animal model of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The subchronic administration of MK-801 increased immobility in the forced swimming test in rats without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity. The increased immobility induced by MK-801 was attenuated by the atypical antipsychotic clozapine but not by either the typical antipsychotic haloperidol or the antidepressant imipramine, indicating that the increased immobility induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 in the forced swimming test may represent a negative symptom of schizophrenia. Likewise, positive modulation of the glycine sites on the NMDA receptor using an agonist for the glycine site, D-serine, and a glycine transporter-1 inhibitor, N-[(3R)-3-([1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine hydrochloride (NFPS), significantly reversed the increase in immobility in MK-801-treated rats without reducing the immobility time in vehicle-treated rats. The present results show that the stimulation of the NMDA receptor through the glycine site on the receptor either directly with D-serine or by blocking glycine transporter-1 attenuates the immobility elicited by the subchronic administration of MK-801 and may be potentially useful for the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Evaluation of the Cobas4800 HPV Test on Cervico-Vaginal Specimens in Liquid versus Solid Transport Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxue Luo

    Full Text Available Determine the ability of the Cobas 4800 assay to detect high-risk human papillomavirus (HrHPV and high-grade cervical lesions when using cervico-vaginal samples applied to liquid medium and solid media cards compared to a direct cervical sample.Two cervico-vaginal specimens (pseudo self-collected were obtained from 319 women. One was applied to an iFTA Card (FTA then the brush placed in liquid-based medium (LSELF; the other was applied to a new solid media: POI card (POI. The clinical performance of Cobas4800 assay using the three aforementioned specimens was compared to direct collected endocervical specimens in liquid media (LDOC.The overall agreements of HrHPV detection were 84.2% (LSELF vs. LDOC, 81.0% (FTA vs. LDOC, and 82.3% (POI vs. LDOC. LSELF, FTA and POI identified 98.0%, 79.6%, and 97.5% positive cases of LDOC. Sensitivity to identify CIN2+ were 98.4% (LSELF, 73.8% (FTA, 95.1% (POI, and 93.4% (LDOC respectively. FTA had 78.1% and 90.4% agreement with the LSELF samples for all HrHPV and HPV16/18 detection respectively, while POI had 91.6% for both.Cobas4800 HPV test combined with cervico-vaginal specimens applied to both liquid media and POI solid card are accurate to detect HrHPV infection and high-grade cervical lesions as compared with direct endocervical samples in liquid media.

  8. An Evaluation of the Cobas4800 HPV Test on Cervico-Vaginal Specimens in Liquid versus Solid Transport Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongxue; Du, Hui; Maurer, Kathryn; Belinson, Jerome L; Wang, Guixiang; Liu, Zhihong; Zhang, Lijie; Zhou, Yanqiu; Wang, Chun; Tang, Jinlong; Qu, Xinfeng; Wu, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    Determine the ability of the Cobas 4800 assay to detect high-risk human papillomavirus (HrHPV) and high-grade cervical lesions when using cervico-vaginal samples applied to liquid medium and solid media cards compared to a direct cervical sample. Two cervico-vaginal specimens (pseudo self-collected) were obtained from 319 women. One was applied to an iFTA Card (FTA) then the brush placed in liquid-based medium (LSELF); the other was applied to a new solid media: POI card (POI). The clinical performance of Cobas4800 assay using the three aforementioned specimens was compared to direct collected endocervical specimens in liquid media (LDOC). The overall agreements of HrHPV detection were 84.2% (LSELF vs. LDOC), 81.0% (FTA vs. LDOC), and 82.3% (POI vs. LDOC). LSELF, FTA and POI identified 98.0%, 79.6%, and 97.5% positive cases of LDOC. Sensitivity to identify CIN2+ were 98.4% (LSELF), 73.8% (FTA), 95.1% (POI), and 93.4% (LDOC) respectively. FTA had 78.1% and 90.4% agreement with the LSELF samples for all HrHPV and HPV16/18 detection respectively, while POI had 91.6% for both. Cobas4800 HPV test combined with cervico-vaginal specimens applied to both liquid media and POI solid card are accurate to detect HrHPV infection and high-grade cervical lesions as compared with direct endocervical samples in liquid media.

  9. Interzonal air and moisture transport through large horizontal openings in a full-scale two-story test-hut: Part 2 - CFD study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, S. [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Construction Engineering and Management, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, San Agustin building, 3rd floor, Campus San Joaquin, Macul, Santiago 6904411 (Chile); Fazio, P.; Rao, J. [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the air and moisture transport through a large horizontal opening in a full-scale two-story test-hut with mixed ventilation by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. CFD allows extending the experimental study presented in the companion paper and overcoming some limitations of experimental data. More than 80 cases were simulated for conditions similar to those tested experimentally and for additional ventilation rates and temperature difference between the two rooms. CFD simulations were performed in Airpak and the indoor zero-equation turbulence model was used. The CFD model was extensively validated with the distributions of air speed, temperature and humidity ratio measured across the two rooms, as well as with the measured interzonal mass airflows through the horizontal opening. CFD simulation results show that temperature difference between the two rooms and ventilation rate strongly influence the interzonal mass airflows through the opening when the upper room is colder than the lower room, while warm convective air currents from the baseboard heater and from the moisture source placed in the lower room cause upward mass airflows when the upper room is warmer than the lower room. Finally, empirical relationships between the upward mass airflow and the temperature difference between the two rooms are developed. (author)

  10. Piloted Simulation Tests of Propulsion Control as Backup to Loss of Primary Flight Controls for a B747-400 Jet Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, John; Mah, Robert; Hardy, Gordon; Sullivan, Barry; Jones, Jerry; Williams, Diane; Soukup, Paul; Winters, Jose

    1997-01-01

    Partial failures of aircraft primary flight control systems and structural damages to aircraft during flight have led to catastrophic accidents with subsequent loss of lives (e.g. DC-10, B-747, C-5, B-52, and others). Following the DC-10 accident at Sioux City, Iowa in 1989, the National Transportation Safety Board recommended 'Encourage research and development of backup flight control systems for newly certified wide-body airplanes that utilize an alternate source of motive power separate from that source used for the conventional control system.' This report describes the concept of a propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA), discusses pilot controls, displays, and procedures; and presents the results of a PCA piloted simulation test and evaluation of the B747-400 airplane conducted at NASA Ames Research Center in December, 1996. The purpose of the test was to develop and evaluate propulsion control throughout the full flight envelope of the B747-400 including worst case scenarios of engine failures and out of trim moments. Pilot ratings of PCA performance ranged from adequate to satisfactory. PCA performed well in unusual attitude recoveries at 35,000 ft altitude, performed well in fully coupled ILS approaches, performed well in single engine failures, and performed well at aft cg. PCA performance was primarily limited by out-of-trim moments.

  11. Antidepressant-like drug effects in juvenile and adolescent mice in the tail suspension test: Relationship with hippocampal serotonin and norepinephrine transporter expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Mitchell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health problem for which most patients are not effectively treated. This problem is further compounded in children and adolescents where only two antidepressants [both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs] are currently approved for clinical use. Mouse models provide tools to identify mechanisms that might account for poor treatment response to antidepressants. However, there are few studies in adolescent mice and none in juvenile mice. The tail suspension test (TST is commonly used to assay for antidepressant-like effects of drugs in adult mice. Here we show that the TST can also be used to assay antidepressant-like effects of drugs in C57Bl/6 mice aged 21 (juvenile and 28 (adolescent days post-partum (P. We found that the magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram was less in P21 mice than in P28 or adult mice. The smaller antidepressant response of juveniles was not related to either maximal binding (Bmax or affinity (Kd for [3H]citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT in hippocampus, which did not vary significantly among ages. Magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the tricyclic desipramine was similar among ages, as were Bmax and Kd values for [3H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter (NET in hippocampus. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile mice are less responsive to the antidepressant-like effects of escitalopram than adults, but that this effect is not due to delayed maturation of SERT in hippocampus. Showing that the TST is a relevant behavioral assay of antidepressant-like activity in juvenile and adolescent mice sets the stage for future studies of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response in these young populations.

  12. Solute transport in crystalline rocks at Äspö — II: Blind predictions, inverse modelling and lessons learnt from test STT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Andreas; Mazurek, Martin; Heer, Walter

    2003-03-01

    Based on the results from detailed structural and petrological characterisation and on up-scaled laboratory values for sorption and diffusion, blind predictions were made for the STT1 dipole tracer test performed in the Swedish Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. The tracers used were nonsorbing, such as uranine and tritiated water, weakly sorbing 22Na +, 85Sr 2+, 47Ca 2+and more strongly sorbing 86Rb +, 133Ba 2+, 137Cs +. Our model consists of two parts: (1) a flow part based on a 2D-streamtube formalism accounting for the natural background flow field and with an underlying homogeneous and isotropic transmissivity field and (2) a transport part in terms of the dual porosity medium approach which is linked to the flow part by the flow porosity. The calibration of the model was done using the data from one single uranine breakthrough (PDT3). The study clearly showed that matrix diffusion into a highly porous material, fault gouge, had to be included in our model evidenced by the characteristic shape of the breakthrough curve and in line with geological observations. After the disclosure of the measurements, it turned out that, in spite of the simplicity of our model, the prediction for the nonsorbing and weakly sorbing tracers was fairly good. The blind prediction for the more strongly sorbing tracers was in general less accurate. The reason for the good predictions is deemed to be the result of the choice of a model structure strongly based on geological observation. The breakthrough curves were inversely modelled to determine in situ values for the transport parameters and to draw consequences on the model structure applied. For good fits, only one additional fracture family in contact with cataclasite had to be taken into account, but no new transport mechanisms had to be invoked. The in situ values for the effective diffusion coefficient for fault gouge are a factor of 2-15 larger than the laboratory data. For cataclasite, both data sets have values comparable to

  13. Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan Bryant

    2008-05-01

    This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

  14. Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John McCord

    2007-01-01

    This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: (1) Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters

  15. Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2007-09-01

    This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: • Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. • Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. • Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters.

  16. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  17. Testing the effects of in-stream sediment sources and sinks on simulated watershed sediment yield using the coupled U.S. Army Corps of Engineers GSSHA Model and SEDLIB Sediment Transport Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, I. E.; Downer, C. W.; Brown, G.; Pradhan, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model is the US Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE)'s only fully coupled overland/in-stream sediment transport model. While the overland sediment transport formulation in GSSHA is considered state of the art, the existing in-stream sediment transport formulation is less robust. A major omission in the formulation of the existing GSSHA in-stream model is the lack of in-stream sources of fine materials. In this effort, we enhanced the in-stream sediment transport capacity of GSSHA by linking GSSHA to the SEDLIB sediment transport library. SEDLIB was developed at the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) under the System Wide Water Resources Program (SWWRP) and Flood and Coastal (F&C) research program. It is designed to provide a library of sediment flux formulations for hydraulic and hydrologic models, such as GSSHA. This new version of GSSHA, with the updated in-stream sediment transport simulation capability afforded by the linkage to SEDLIB, was tested in against observations in an experimental watershed that had previously been used as a test bed for GSSHA. The results show a significant improvement in the ability to model in-stream sources of fine sediment. This improved capability will broaden the applicability of GSSHA to larger watersheds and watersheds with complex sediment dynamics, such as those subjected to fire hydrology.

  18. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  19. Transportation-Related Consumer Preference Data | Transportation Research |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Transportation-Related Consumer Preference Data Transportation-Related Consumer Preference Data Photo of reporters test driving Toyota prototype electric and fuel cell vehicles. Consumer for the development and implementation of these technologies. NREL collects, analyzes, and reports on

  20. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  1. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  2. Reactive transport modelling of groundwater-bentonite interaction: Effects on exchangeable cations in an alternative buffer material in-situ test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, I.; Idiart, A.; Dohrmann, R.; Post, V.

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite clays are regarded a promising material for engineered barrier systems for the encapsulation of hazardous wastes because of their low hydraulic permeability, swelling potential, ability to self-seal cracks in contact with water and their high sorption potential. SKB (Svensk Kärnbränslehantering) has been conducting long term field scale experiments on potential buffer materials at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory for radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) test examined buffer properties of eleven different clay materials under the influence of groundwater and at temperatures reaching up to 135 °C, replicating the heat pulse after waste emplacement. Clay materials were emplaced into holes drilled in fractured granite as compacted rings around a central heater element and subsequently brought into contact with groundwater for 880 days. After test termination, and against expectations, all clay materials were found to have undergone large scale alterations in the cation exchange population. A reactive-diffusive transport model was developed to aid the interpretation of the observed large-scale porewater chemistry changes. It was found, that the interaction between Äspö groundwater and the clay blocks, together with the geochemical nature of the clays (Na vs Ca-dominated clays) exerted the strongest control on the porewater chemistry. A pronounced exchange of Na by Ca was observed and simulated, driven by large Ca concentrations in the contacting groundwater. The model was able to link the porewater alterations to the fracture network in the deposition hole. The speed of alterations was in turn linked to high diffusion coefficients under the applied temperatures, which facilitated the propagation of hydrochemical changes into the clays. With diffusion coefficients increased by up to one order of magnitude at the maximum temperatures, the study was able to demonstrate the importance of considering temperature

  3. Macropores and macropore transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Lamandé, Mathieu; Torp, Søren Bent

    2012-01-01

    Preferential transport of water through soil macropores is a governing process in the facilitated transport of strongly sorbing compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between macropore density and the hydraulic conductivity of the soil and to test the sampling...

  4. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero Huguet, J

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  5. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero Huguet, J.

    2001-06-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  6. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study for transport behavior of CsI in heating test simulating a BWR severe accident condition: Chemical effects of boron vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okane, T., E-mail: okanet@spring8.or.jp [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Kobata, M. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Sato, I. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Kobayashi, K. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Osaka, M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Yamagami, H. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto, 603-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We have clarified the temperature-dependent chemical forms of Cs/I products. • We have examined the CsI-decomposing effects of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} vapor. • The possibility of Cs re-evaporation from CsI-deposited surface is suggested. • We have demonstrated the usefulness of HAXPES on FP chemistry. - Abstract: Transport behavior of CsI in the heating test, which simulated a BWR severe accident, was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with an emphasis on the chemical effect of boron vapors. CsI deposited on metal tube at temperatures ranging from 150 °C to 750 °C was reacted with vapor/aerosol B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the chemical form of reaction products on the sample surface was examined from the HAXPES spectra of core levels, e.g., Ni 2p, Cs 3d and I 3d levels, and valence band. For the samples at ∼300 °C, while the chemical form of major product on the sample surface without an exposure to B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was suggested to be CsI from the HAXPES spectra, an intensity ratio of Cs/I was dramatically reduced at the sample surface after the reaction with B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The results suggest the possibility of significant decomposition of deposited CsI induced by the chemical reaction with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} at specific temperatures.

  7. The design, manufacture, and testing of a new generation of ISO freight container for certification as an IP-2 package in compliance with the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 1985 edition (as amended 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) which arises at nuclear power stations and other nuclear facilities in the UK, is routinely transported to British Nuclear Fuels' site at Drigg in Cumbria for disposal. A requirement was identified for the use of a refurbished ISO freight container of the full-height design, to transport drummed LLW to the site of a supercompaction facility prior to disposal at Drigg. This paper describes the reasoned technical justification employed for certifying the refurbished ISO freight container, Design No. 2912B, as an IP-2 package under Paragraph 523 of the IAEA Transport Regulations and the development of a new generation of ISO Freight container, Design No. 2044. It was recognised that the use of a refurbished container was only an interim measure and because of significant changes in the acceptance criteria for disposal, the increased use of high force compaction techniques and the proposed amendments to the IAEA Transport Regulations, Nuclear Electric embarked upon the development of a new generation of ISO freight containers. The new container design (Design No. 2044) incorporates a readily decontaminable stainless steel interior, a comprehensive load restraint system designed for the transport of single and multiple packages, and is lined with a polyurethane foam between the inner and outer skins. It is designed to transport 70 off, 200 litre drums of LLW (stacked in two layers) and other payloads of size not greater than 4 m long x 2 m wide and 20 tonnes in weight. The container was subjected to a range of tests to prove compliance with the ISO standard and the IAEA Transport Regulations. Following the preparation of the required documentation, in particular a Safety Case and comprehensive Operating and Maintenance Instructions, a Certificate of Regulatory Compliance was issued by the appropriate authority certifying the container as an Industrial Package Type 2 (IP-2) suitable for the transport of drummed LLW and other

  8. Cooperative Transport Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutt, J.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    To test and compare different forms of cooperative planning algorithms developed in the CABS project we use a generic simulator called MARS. Examples in the transportation sector are implemented in this simulator.

  9. CHARTB multigroup transport package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L.

    1979-03-01

    The physics and numerical implementation of the radiation transport routine used in the CHARTB MHD code are discussed. It is a one-dimensional (Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical symmetry), multigroup,, diffusion approximation. Tests and applications will be discussed as well

  10. Energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of primary interaction cross sections and the incorporation of these data into Monte Carlo calculations provide detailed information about the initial spatial distribution of absorbed dose. Our theoretical energy transport studies have focused on the use of this information to predict the evolution of chemical species formed as a result of the energy deposition. This effort has led to a stochastic approach to diffusion kinetics that can account for the influence of track structure on the yield of free radicals in the radiolysis of water. Fluorescence studies with pulsed alpha particle and proton beams provided the first experimental test of our stochastic model of tract structure effects. Our experimental studies use time-resolved emission spectroscopy to investigate the mechanism of energy transport in nonpolar liquids. Studies of the concentration dependence of time-resolved emission from solutions of benzene in cyclohexane also show the importance of using low benzene concentrations to minimize the influence of benzene dimers on the emission kinetics

  11. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Svensson, Haakan [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  12. Testing Testing Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Craig; O'Neill, Thomas; Wright, Benjamin D.; Woodcock, Richard W.; Munoz-Sandoval, Ana; Gershon, Richard C.; Bergstrom, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Articles in this special section consider (1) flow in test taking (Craig Deville); (2) testwiseness (Thomas O'Neill); (3) test length (Benjamin Wright); (4) cross-language test equating (Richard W. Woodcock and Ana Munoz-Sandoval); (5) computer-assisted testing and testwiseness (Richard Gershon and Betty Bergstrom); and (6) Web-enhanced testing…

  13. Transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirczenow, G.; Marro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Some simple remarks on the basis of transport theory. - Entropy, dynamics and scattering theory. - Response, relaxation and fluctuation. - Fluctuating hydrodynamics and renormalization of susceptibilities and transport coefficients. - Irreversibility of the transport equations. - Ergodic theory and statistical mechanics. - Correlation functions in Heisenberg magnets. - On the Enskog hard-sphere kinetic eqquation and the transport phenomena of dense simple gases. - What can one learn from Lorentz models. - Conductivity in a magnetic field. - Transport properties in gases in presence of external fields. - Transport properties of dilute gases with internal structure. (orig.) [de

  14. Transport infrastructure monitoring: A ground based optical displacement monitoring system, field tests on a bridge, the Musmeci's bridge in Potenza, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagene, J. K.

    2012-04-01

    A gound based optical displacement monitoring system, "NIODIM", is being developed by Norsk Elektro Optikk in the framework of the activities of the European project "Integrated System for Transport Infrastructure surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing" (ISTIMES), funded in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013). The optical displacement monitoring system has now participated in two real life field campaigns one in Switzerland and one in Italy. The latter, the tests in Potenza, Italy, will be presented in the following. The NIODIM system has undergone some development during the last year to adopt it for use in a somewhat higher frequency domain by changing the camera sensor part. This to make it more useful for monitoring of structures with oscillation frequencies tens of Hz. The original system was intended to a large extent to monitor land slides, quick clay and rock slides and similar phenomena typically having a relatively slow time response. The system has been significantly speeded up from the original 12 Hz. Current tests have been performed at a frame rate of 64 Hz i.e., the camera part and data processing unit have been running on 64Hz. In connection with the tests in Italy the data processing has been upgraded to include sub-pixel resolution i.e., the measurement results are no longer limited by pixel borders or single pixels. The main part of the NIODIM system is a camera capable of operating at a sufficiently high frame rate. This camera will typically be mounted on firm ground and will depict and monitor a reference point, typically a light emitting diode, LED, which will be mounted on the object susceptible to move. A processing unit will acquire the images from the camera part and find the position of the LED in the image and compare that to threshold values and if required raise a warning or an alarm. The NIODIM system can either be a standalone system or be an integrated part of the overall ISTIMES system, the ISTIMES system

  15. Transportation of irradiated fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A critique is presented of current methods of transporting spent nuclear fuel and the inadequacies of the associated contingency plans, with particular reference to the transportation of irradiated fuel through London. Anti-nuclear and pro-nuclear arguments are presented on a number of factors, including tests on flasks, levels of radiation exposure, routine transport arrangements and contingency arrangements. (U.K.)

  16. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  17. Adipose tissue insulin receptor and glucose transporter 4 expression, and blood glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance tests in transition Holstein cows with different body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakson, H; Karis, P; Ling, K; Ilves-Luht, A; Samarütel, J; Henno, M; Jõudu, I; Waldmann, A; Reimann, E; Pärn, P; Bruckmaier, R M; Gross, J J; Kaart, T; Kass, M; Ots, M

    2018-01-01

    Glucose uptake in tissues is mediated by insulin receptor (INSR) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of body condition during the dry period on adipose tissue mRNA and protein expression of INSR and GLUT4, and on the dynamics of glucose and insulin following the i.v. glucose tolerance test in Holstein cows 21 d before (d -21) and after (d 21) calving. Cows were grouped as body condition score (BCS) ≤3.0 (thin, T; n = 14), BCS = 3.25 to 3.5 (optimal, O; n = 14), and BCS ≥3.75 (overconditioned, OC; n = 14). Blood was analyzed for glucose, insulin, fatty acids, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Adipose tissue was analyzed for INSR and GLUT4 mRNA and protein concentrations. During the glucose tolerance test 0.15 g/kg of body weight glucose was infused; blood was collected at -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min, and analyzed for glucose and insulin. On d -21 the area under the curve (AUC) of glucose was smallest in group T (1,512 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min) and largest in group OC (1,783 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min), and different between all groups. Basal insulin on d -21 was lowest in group T (13.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL), which was different from group OC (24.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL. On d -21 the smallest AUC 5-60 of insulin in group T (5,308 ± 1,214 µU/mL × min) differed from the largest AUC in group OC (10,867 ± 1,215 µU/mL × min). Time to reach basal concentration of insulin in group OC (113 ± 14.1 min) was longer compared with group T (45 ± 14.1). The INSR mRNA abundance on d 21 was higher compared with d -21 in groups T (d -21: 3.3 ± 0.44; d 21: 5.9 ± 0.44) and O (d -21: 3.7 ± 0.45; d 21: 4.7 ± 0.45). The extent of INSR protein expression on d -21 was highest in group T (7.3 ± 0.74 ng/mL), differing from group O (4.6 ± 0.73 ng/mL), which had the lowest expression. The amount of GLUT4 protein on d -21 was lowest in group OC (1.2 ± 0.14 ng/mL), different from group O (1.8 ± 0.14 ng/mL), which had the highest amount

  18. Pressure distribution data from tests of 2.29 M (7.5 feet) span EET high-lift transport aircraft model in the Ames 12-foot pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelgaard, S. O.; Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A high-lift transport aircraft model equipped with full-span leading-edge slat and part-span double-slotted trailing-edge flap was tested in the Ames 12-ft pressure tunnel to determine the low-speed performance characteristics of a representative high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing. These tests were performed in support of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) program which is one element of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) project. Static longitudinal forces and moments and chordwise pressure distributions at three spanwise stations were measured for cruise, climb, two take-off flap, and two landing flap wing configurations. The tabulated and plotted pressure distribution data is presented without analysis or discussion.

  19. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8. Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue - Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra (Australia). Progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd H; Hassanizadeh SM; Richardson-van der Poel MA; LBG

    1993-01-01

    A study of uranium transport in the Koongarra site of Alligator Rivers Uranium deposit (Australia) is carried out. The analysis of the solid phase uranium concentration measured at various depths provides a useful picture of the dispersion process. Results of this analysis seem to support the

  20. InfoRio, focus group sessions to test potential for a personal real time travel information concept for public transport, (no 03071, 23 p.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, W.G.; Vonk, Warner; Nijenhuis, Guido; van Berkum, Eric C.; Bodmer, Milena; Hulleman, Robert; Hulleman, R.; Viegas, J.M.; Macario, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a market research method in order to establish the potential demand for a Personal Real Time Travel Information (PRTTI) concept applied to public transport (PT) in Rio de Janeiro, called InfoRio. In order to receive personal travel information on PT services

  1. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transportation system is the backbone of economic and social progress and the means by which humans access goods and services and connect with one another. Yet, as the scale of transportation activities has grown worldwide, so too have the negative environmental, social, and economic impacts...... that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...... sector’s significant contribution to global challenges such as climate change, it is often said that sustainable development cannot be achieved without sustainable transportation....

  2. Grate Pallet 8232 (GP-8232) Vehicle Pallet, Evaluation Tests MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" and TP-94-01 (REV 1), "Transportability Testing Procedures"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barickman, Philip

    2003-01-01

    .... The testing was conducted for informational purposes only. The GP-8232 Vehicle Pallet was evaluated by the testing procedures set forth in MIL-STD-1660 and TP-94-01 (Rev. 1) testing procedures...

  3. GROUND TRANSPORTATION OF NUCLEAR PROPULSION STAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjon, P. L.

    1963-08-15

    The results of studies on transportation problems associated with the development and testing of nuclear rocket powered space vehicles at the static test size are presented. Factors involved in selecting a transport mode are discussed. Radiation shutdown considerations and a conceptual transporter capable of handling test articles of foreseeable size are examined. (D.C.W.)

  4. Use of Cad Systems in Testing the Collision of Underground Transportation Means / Zastosowanie systemów Cad w badaniach kolizyjności środków transportu podziemnego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Marek

    2013-06-01

    A concept of use of CAD systems in testing collision of underground transportation means is presented. Reasons for undertaking this problem are given with end users identified. The concept of the system for collision analyses of transported loads is described. Examples of collision analysis during transportation of powered roof support are given. Presented system is designed to aid planning, organizational and training activities undertaken in management of transportation safety in mines. It will be also possible to use software resources, developed within the system as the didactic material as regards safe transportation process, which include hazards to the employees working in the area of transportation operations. Developed prototype of a system for testing the collision of underground transportation means was positively assessed by employees of the Coal Company, JSC - industrial partner of KOMAG. This prototype is continuously improved and adapted for commercial implementation in the selected coal mines. W pracy przedstawiono koncepcję zastosowania systemów CAD w badaniach kolizyjności środków transportu podziemnego. Określono przyczyny podjęcia tematu oraz zidentyfikowano końcowych użytkowników. Zaprezentowano koncepcję systemu do analiz kolizyjności transportowanych ładunków. Pokazano przykłady analizy kolizyjności podczas transportu sekcji obudowy zmechanizowanej. Przedstawiony system przeznaczony jest do wspomagania działań planistycznych, organizacyjnych i szkoleniowych podejmowanych w zarządzaniu bezpieczeństwem transportu w zakładach górniczych. Opracowane w ramach systemu zasoby programowe będzie można również wykorzystać jako materiał dydaktyczny z zakresu bezpieczeństwa pracy w transporcie, uwzględniający zagrożenia dla pracowników pracujących w bezpośredniej strefie prac transportowych. Opracowany prototyp systemu do badania kolizyjności środków transportu podziemnego został pozytywnie oceniony przez pracownik

  5. A simulation of the transport and fate of radon-220 derived from thorium-232 low-level waste in the near-surface zone of the Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1992-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE, 1988) requires performance assessment of all new and existing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites. An integral part of performance assessment is estimating the fluxes of radioactive gases such as radon-220 and radon-222. Mathematical models, which point out data needs and therefore drive site characterization, provide a logical means of performing the required flux estimations. Thorium-232 Waste, consisting largely of thorium hydroxide and thorium oxides, has been approved for disposal in shallow trenches and pits at the LLW Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site. A sophisticated gas transport model, CASCADR8 (Lindstrom et al., 1992), was used to simulate the transport and fate of radon-220 from its source of origin nine feet below a closure cap of native soil, through the dry alluvial earth, to its point of release to the atmosphere. CASCADR8 is an M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. It has been tailored to the site-specific needs of the dry desert environment of southern Nevada. It is based on the mass balance principle for each radionuclide and uses gas-phase diffusion as well as barometric pressure-induced advection as its main modes of transport

  6. Laboratory research program to aid in developing and testing the validity of conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project, a laboratory research program is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories that will integrate fundamental physical experimentation with conceptual model formulation and mathematical modeling and aid in subsequent model validation for unsaturated zone water and contaminant transport. Experimental systems are being developed to explore flow and transport processes and assumptions of fundamental importance to various conceptual models. Experimentation will run concurrently in two types of systems: fractured and nonfractured tuffaceous systems; and analogue systems having specific characteristics of the tuff systems but designed to maximize experimental control and resolution of data measurement. Areas in which experimentation currently is directed include infiltration flow instability, water and solute movement in unsaturated fractures, fracture-matrix interaction, and scaling laws to define effective large-scale properties for heterogeneous, fractured media. 16 refs

  7. Investigation on cause of outage of Wide Range Monitor (WRM) in High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Transport operation toward investigation for cause of outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masanori; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Taiki; Saito, Kenji; Takada, Shoji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Isozaki, Ryosuke; Katsuyama, Kozo; Motegi, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    An event, in which one of WRMs were disabled to detect the neutron flux in the reactor core, occurred during the period of reactor shut down of HTTR in March, 2010. The actual life time of WRM was unexpectedly shorter than the past developed life time. Investigation of the cause of the outage of WRM toward the recovery of the life time up to the developed life is one of the issues to develop the technology basis of High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Then, a post irradiation examination was planned to specify the damaged part causing the event in the WRM was also planned. For the investigation, the X-ray computed tomography scanner in Fuels Monitoring Facility (FMF). This report describes the preliminary investigation on the cause of outage of the WRM. The results of study for transportation method of the irradiated WRM from HTTR to FMF is also reported with the record to complete the transport operation. (author)

  8. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee H. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dobeck, Laura M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Repasky, Kevin S. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Nehrir, Amin R. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Humphries, Seth D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Barr, Jamie L. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Keith, Charlie J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Shaw, Joseph A. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Rouse, Joshua H. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Cunningham, Alfred B. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Benson, Sally M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Global Climate and Energy Project; Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Lewicki, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Wells, Arthur W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Diehl, J. Rodney [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Strazisar, Brian R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Fessenden, Julianna E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Div. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Rahn, Thom A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Div. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Amonette, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barr, Jon L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pickles, William L. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Jacobson, James D. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Silver, Eli A. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Male, Erin J. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Rauch, Henry W. [Univ. of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography; Gullickson, Kadie S. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Trautz, Robert [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kharaka, Yousif [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Wielopolski, Lucien [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2010-03-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U. S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  9. Laboratory research program to aid in developing and testing the validity of conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project, a laboratory research program is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories that will integrate fundamental physical experimentation with conceptual formulation and mathematical modeling and aid in subsequent model validation for unsaturated zone water and contaminant transport. Experimental systems are being developed to explore flow and transport processes and assumptions of fundamental importance to various conceptual models. Experimentation will run concurrently in two types of systems: fractured and nonfractured tuffaceous systems; and analogue systems having specific characteristics of the tuff systems but designed to maximize experimental control and resolution of data measurement. Questions to which experimentation currently is directed include infiltration flow instability, water and solute movement in unsaturated fractures, fracture-matrix interaction, and the definition of effective large-scale properties for heterogeneous, fractured media. 16 refs

  10. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    During january and february 2003, a unique event concerning nuclear transport was reported and rated 1 on the INES scale. This event concerns the absence of a maintenance operation on a shipping cask. This shipping cask was used for several years for nuclear transport inside La-hague site before being re-assigned to transport on public thoroughfare. The re-assignment of the cask should have been preceded and conditioned by a maintenance operation whose purpose is to check the efficiency of its radiation shield. During this period 2 on-site inspections concerning the transport of nuclear materials were performed. (A.C.)

  11. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... This analysis starts with a review of ocean transportation demand and supply including projections of ship capacity demand and world shipbuilding capacity under various economic and political assumptions...

  12. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging and dipole tests with conservative tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4C and 4D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elert, M.

    1999-05-01

    The 'Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes' is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4C and 4D is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the radially converging tracer tests and dipole tracer tests performed within the TRUE-1 tests using non-sorbing tracers. The tests were performed between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). These tests are to a great extent preparatory steps for the subsequent tests with sorbing radioactive tracers. In Tasks 4E and 4F of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force predictive modelling of the sorbing tracer tests is performed. Eight modelling teams representing seven organisations have performed predictive modelling using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation and data on the experimental set-up of the tracer tests. Based on this information model predictions were performed of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. The performed predictions shows that the concept of Feature A as a singular well-connected feature with limited connectivity to its surroundings is quite adequate for predictions of drawdown in boreholes and conservative tracer breakthrough. Reasonable estimates were obtained using relatively simple models. However, more elaborate models with calibration or conditioning of transmissivities and transport apertures are required for more accurate predictions. The general flow and transport processes are well understood, but the methodology to derive the

  13. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging and dipole tests with conservative tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4C and 4D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-05-01

    The `Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes` is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4C and 4D is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the radially converging tracer tests and dipole tracer tests performed within the TRUE-1 tests using non-sorbing tracers. The tests were performed between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). These tests are to a great extent preparatory steps for the subsequent tests with sorbing radioactive tracers. In Tasks 4E and 4F of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force predictive modelling of the sorbing tracer tests is performed. Eight modelling teams representing seven organisations have performed predictive modelling using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation and data on the experimental set-up of the tracer tests. Based on this information model predictions were performed of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. The performed predictions shows that the concept of Feature A as a singular well-connected feature with limited connectivity to its surroundings is quite adequate for predictions of drawdown in boreholes and conservative tracer breakthrough. Reasonable estimates were obtained using relatively simple models. However, more elaborate models with calibration or conditioning of transmissivities and transport apertures are required for more accurate predictions. The general flow and transport processes are well understood, but the methodology to derive the

  14. Shock resistance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouard, M.

    1984-03-01

    In the framework of mechanical tests and to answer the different requests for tests, the T.C.R (Transport Conditionnement et Retraitement) laboratory got test facilities. These installations allow to carry out tests of resistance to shocks, mainly at the safety level of components of nuclear power plants, mockups of transport casks for fuel elements and transport containers for radioactive materials. They include a tower and a catapult. This paper give a decription of the facilities and explain their operation way [fr

  15. Coupling and Testing the Fate and Transport of Heavy Metals and Other Ionic Species in a Groundwater Setting at Oak Ridge, TN - 13498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noosai, Nantaporn; Fuentes, Hector R. [CEE Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Historical data show that heavy metals (including mercury) were released from Y -12 National Security Complex (NSC) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to the surrounding environments during its operation in 1950's. Studies have also shown that metals accumulated in the soil, rock, and groundwater, and are, at the present time, sources of contamination to nearby rivers and creeks (e.g., East Fork Poplar Creek, Bear Creek). For instance, mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) have been found and reported on the site groundwater. The groundwater type at the site is Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3}. This paper presents a modeling application of PHREEQC, a model that simulates geochemical processes and couples them to flow and transport settings. The objective was to assess the capability of PHREEQC to simulate the transport of ionic species in groundwater at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; data were available from core holes and monitoring wells over a 736-m distance, within 60-300 m depths. First, predictions of the transport of major ionic species (i.e., Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}) in the water were made between monitoring wells and for GW-131. Second, the model was used to assess hypotheses under two scenarios of transport for Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg, in Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} water, as influenced by the following solid-liquid interactions: a) the role of ion exchange and b) the role of both ion exchange and sorption, the latter via surface complexation with Fe(OH){sub 3}. The transport scenario with ion exchange suggests that significant ion exchange is expected to occur for Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations, with no significant impact on Hg, within the first 100 m. Predictions match the expected values of the exchange coefficients relative to Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} (e.g., K{sub Ca/Zn} = K{sub Ca/Cd} > K{sub Ca/Pb} > K{sub Ca/Hg}). The scenario with both ion exchange and sorption does affect the concentrations of Zn and Cd to a small extent within the first 100 m, but does more meaningfully reduce

  16. Design, calculation and testing on mock-up of B(U) f type LR 56 packaging for radioactive liquid effluent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaud; Leconnetable; Daspet; Tombini; Tanguy

    1986-06-01

    Transport of radioactive acid liquid effluents are effected on tank truck inside nuclear center of the CEA. The cylindrical packaging type B(U) f has a capacity of 4,000l, a maximum permissible activity of 110 T Bq (3x10 4 Ci) and comprises a central element for liquid effluent containment to prevent contamination of environment and peripheral elements for mechanical, biological and thermal protection. This packaging is fixed on a trailer associated with a control box. Design and equipment of the packaging are studied for a maximum safety and in accordance with regulations [fr

  17. Neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille; M'Backe Diop, Cheikh; Nicolas, Anne; Andrieux, Catherine; Archier, Pascal; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Bernard, David; Biaise, Patrick; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Bonin, Bernard; Bouland, Olivier; Bourganel, Stephane; Calvin, Christophe; Chiron, Maurice; Damian, Frederic; Dumonteil, Eric; Fausser, Clement; Fougeras, Philippe; Gabriel, Franck; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Gallo, Daniele; Hudelot, Jean-Pascal; Hugot, Francois-Xavier; Dat Huynh, Tan; Jouanne, Cedric; Lautard, Jean-Jacques; Laye, Frederic; Lee, Yi-Kang; Lenain, Richard; Leray, Sylvie; Litaize, Olivier; Magnaud, Christine; Malvagi, Fausto; Mijuin, Dominique; Mounier, Claude; Naury, Sylvie; Nicolas, Anne; Noguere, Gilles; Palau, Jean-Marc; Le Pallec, Jean-Charles; Peneliau, Yannick; Petit, Odile; Poinot-Salanon, Christine; Raepsaet, Xavier; Reuss, Paul; Richebois, Edwige; Roque, Benedicte; Royer, Eric; Saint-Jean, Cyrille de; Santamarina, Alain; Serot, Olivier; Soldevila, Michel; Tommasi, Jean; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Tsilanizara, Aime; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  18. The transport of civil plutonium by air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the review entitled ''The Transport of Civil Plutonium by Air'' reported by the Advisory Committee on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (ACTRAM) 1988. The contents contain chapters on the following topics:- the reasons for air transport, the various regulations, packagings for plutonium transport, testing of the packagings, accidents, the consequences of a release, and emergency arrangements. (U.K.)

  19. 49 CFR 665.25 - Transportation of vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation of vehicle. 665.25 Section 665.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUS TESTING Operations § 665.25 Transportation of vehicle. A manufacturer shall...

  20. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  1. Multi-wall cask advantages with quarter-scale model drop test results for the NAC-STC Storable Transport Cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danner, T.A.; Thompson, T.C.; Yaksh, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Physical drop test results for a quarter-scale model multi-wall cask are presented for the 9 meter end, side and oblique drops with impact limiters, and for the 1 meter side and closure lid pin puncture drops. Lessons learned and final cask test qualification are presented. (J.P.N.)

  2. Transport properties in mixtures involving carbon dioxide at low and moderate density: test of several intermolecular potential energies and comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Jalil; Yousefi, Fakhri; Papari, Mohammad Mehdi; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mohsenipour, Ali Asghar

    2009-09-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to extract unlike intermolecular potential energies of five carbon dioxide-based binary gas mixtures including CO2-He, CO2-Ne, CO2-Ar, CO2-Kr, and CO2-Xe from viscosity data and compare the calculated potentials with other models potential energy reported in literature. Then, dilute transport properties consisting of viscosity, diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion factor, and thermal conductivity of aforementioned mixtures are calculated from the calculated potential energies and compared with literature data. Rather accurate correlations for the viscosity coefficient of afore-cited mixtures embracing the temperature range 200 K < T < 3273.15 K is reproduced from the present unlike intermolecular potentials energy. Our estimated accuracies for the viscosity are to within ±2%. In addition, the calculated potential energies are used to present smooth correlations for other transport properties. The accuracies of the binary diffusion coefficients are of the order of ±3%. Finally, the unlike interaction energy and the calculated low density viscosity have been employed to calculate high density viscosities using Vesovic-Wakeham method.

  3. Transport properties in mixtures involving carbon dioxide at low and moderate density: test of several intermolecular potential energies and comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghadasi, Jalil; Yousefi, Fakhri [Shiraz University, Department of Chemistry, Shiraz (Iran); Papari, Mohammad Mehdi; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali [Shiraz University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Shiraz (Iran); Mohsenipour, Ali Asghar [University of Waterloo, Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    It is the purpose of this paper to extract unlike intermolecular potential energies of five carbon dioxide-based binary gas mixtures including CO{sub 2}-He, CO{sub 2}-Ne, CO{sub 2}-Ar, CO{sub 2}-Kr, and CO{sub 2}-Xe from viscosity data and compare the calculated potentials with other models potential energy reported in literature. Then, dilute transport properties consisting of viscosity, diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion factor, and thermal conductivity of aforementioned mixtures are calculated from the calculated potential energies and compared with literature data. Rather accurate correlations for the viscosity coefficient of afore-cited mixtures embracing the temperature range 200 Ktransport properties. The accuracies of the binary diffusion coefficients are of the order of {+-}3%. Finally, the unlike interaction energy and the calculated low density viscosity have been employed to calculate high density viscosities using Vesovic-Wakeham method. (orig.)

  4. Influence of boron vapor on transport behavior of deposited CsI during heating test simulating a BWR severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Isamu, E-mail: sato.isamu@jaea.go.jp; Onishi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kosuke; Iwasaki, Maho; Koyama, Shin-ichi

    2015-06-15

    In order to evaluate influence of B on the release and transport of Cs and I during severe accidents, basic experiments have been performed on the interaction between deposited Cs/I compounds and vapor/aerosol B compounds. CsI and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were utilized as a Cs/I compound and a B compound, respectively. Deposited CsI on the thermal gradient tube (TGT) at temperatures ranging from 423 K to 1023 K was reacted with vapor/aerosol B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and then observed how it changed Cs/I deposition profiles. As a result, vapor/aerosol B{sub 2}O{sub 3} stripped a portion of deposited CsI within a temperature range from 830 K to 920 K to make gaseous CsBO{sub 2} and I{sub 2}. In addition, gaseous I{sub 2} was re-deposited at a temperature range from 530 K to 740 K, while CsBO{sub 2} travelled through the sampling tubes and filters without deposition. It is evident that B enables Cs compounds such as CsBO{sub 2} to transport Cs to the colder regions.

  5. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  6. Transportation of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brobst, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty years of almost accident-free transport of nuclear materials is pointed to as evidence of a fundamentally correct approach to the problems involved. The increased volume and new technical problems in the future will require extension of these good practices in both regulations and packaging. The general principles of safety in the transport of radioactive materials are discussed first, followed by the transport of spent fuel and of radioactive waste. The security and physical protection of nuclear shipments is then treated. In discussing future problems, the question of public understanding and acceptance is taken first, thereafter transport safeguards and the technical bases for the safety regulations. There is also said to be a need for a new technology for spent fuel casks, while a re-examination of the IAEA transport standards for radiation doses is recommended. The IAEA regulations regarding quality assurance are said to be incomplete, and more information is required on correlations between engineering analysis, scale model testing and full scale crash testing. Transport stresses on contents need to be considered while administrative controls have been neglected. (JIW)

  7. Animal Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ludrovcová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The research is aimed to the animal transports issue, from two points of view – first is the animal cruelty and second is the policy and economic consideration. The goal is to acquaint the readers with the transports risks and its cruelty and evaluation of the economic, political aspects for he involved countries. The study is oriented on more points of view, what is rare in works with a similar theme. Method: This paper examines many issues and examinations from different authors and subsequently summarized the findings with authors own knowledge to one expanded unit. Results: Results proves, that livestock transports have negative impact on animal´s health, environment. Number of transported animals is rising every year. Society: Research familiarize the society with the animal transports, cruelty against animals during them, and influence of transports on some countries, their economy, policy. People get better informed and can form their own opinion on this topic. They may start acting, undertaking some steps to improve the present situation, what could help a lot to animals and environment. Limitations / further research: Future research could show progress and improvement of transports, quality of food supply and economics.

  8. The design and testing of a CSTR system for U(VI) treatment which couples surface chemistry, reaction kinectics and mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, J.J.; Figueroa, L.A.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a remediation technique for removing uranium (VI) from complex contaminated groundwater using chitin as a biosorbent in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. This system is unique in that the removal efficiency can be predicted using a reactor model which integrates surface complexation models, mass-transport limitations sorption kinetics. The integration of surface complexation models allow the reactor model to predict removal efficiencies for complex groundwater with variable concentrations tuents, thus eliminating the need for a treatability study. The authors have successfully validated our treatment system and model using laboratory-derived kinetic data involving the sorption of uranium (VI) to chitin in a batch system and data from bench-scale CSTR system using simulated contaminated groundwater based on data from the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant

  9. Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Huerta, M.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs

  10. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... The discussion of technology considers the ocean transportation system as a whole, and the composite subsystems such as hull, outfit, propulsion, cargo handling, automation, and control and interface technology...

  11. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... In ocean transportation economics we present investment and operating costs as well as the results of a study of financing of shipping. Similarly, a discussion of government aid to shipping is presented.

  12. Nicaragua - Transportation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation examines impacts of the Transportation Project in three ways. First, we calculate economic rates of return associated with reduced user costs for each...

  13. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  14. Public transport

    OpenAIRE

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Public transport plays an essential role in enabling people from low income and other disadvantaged groups to access employment and services. It also contributes to the development of social networks and social capital, by helping people to visit friends and relatives and take part in community and other social activities. Public policy makers have begun to recognise that adequate public transport provision can play an important role in reducing social exclusion. [Taken from introductory para...

  15. A simulation of the transport and fate of radon-222 derived from thorium-230 low-level waste in the near-surface zone of the Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Donahue, M.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-12-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE, 1988) requires performance assessments on all new and existing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites. An integral part of performance assessment is estimating the fluxes of radioactive gases such as radon-220 and radon-222. Data needs pointed out by mathematical models drive site characterization. They provide a logical means of performing the required flux estimations. Thorium-230 waste, consisting largely of thorium hydroxide and thorium oxides, has been approved for disposal in shallow trenches and pits at the LLW Radioactive Waste Management Site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site. A sophisticated gas transport model, CASCADR8 (Lindstrom et al., 1992b), was used to simulate the transport and fate of radon-222 from its source of origin, nine feet below a closure cap of native soil, through the dry alluvial earth, to its point of release into the atmosphere. CASCADR8 is an M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. It has been tailored to the site-specific needs of the dry desert environment of southern Nevada. It is based on the mass balance principle for each radionuclide and uses gas-phase diffusion as well as barometric pressure-induced advection as its main modes of transport. CASCADR8 uses both reversible and irreversible sorption kinetic rules as well as the usual classical Bateman (1910) M-chain decay rules for its kinetic processes. Worst case radon-222 gas-phase concentrations, as well as surface fluxes, were estimated over 40 days. The maximum flux was then used in an exposure assessment model to estimate the total annual dose equivalent received by a person residing in a standard 2500-square-foot house with 10-foot walls. Results are described

  16. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Convergence and Testing; Calculo Numerico del Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Convergencia y Comprobaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-12-11

    This report is the third of a series [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165 y 1172] devoted to the development of a new numerical code to solve the guiding center equation for electrons and ions in toroidal plasmas. Two calculation meshes corresponding to axisymmetric tokamaks are now prepared and the kinetic equation is expanded so the standard terms of neoclassical theory --fi rst order terms in the Larmor radius expansion-- can be identified, restricting the calculations correspondingly. Using model density and temperature profiles for the plasma, several convergence test are performed depending on the calculation meshes and the expansions of the distribution function; then the results are compared with the theory [Hinton and Hazeltine, Rev. Mod. Phys. (1976)]. (Author) 18 refs.

  17. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems: X2000 US demonstration vehicle dynamics trials, preliminary test report. Report for October 1992-January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitten, B.T.; Kesler, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    The report documents the procedures, events, and results of vehicle dynamic tests carried out on the ASEA-Brown Boveri (ABB) X2000 tilt body trainset in the US between October 1992 and January 1993. These tests, sponsored by Amtrak and supported by the FRA, were conducted to assess the suitability of the X2000 trainset for safe operation at elevated cant deficiencies and speeds in Amtrak's Northeast Corridor under existing track conditions in a revenue service demonstration. The report describes the safety criteria against which the performance of the X2000 test train was examined, the instrumentation used, the test locations, and the track conditions. Preliminary results are presented from tests conducted on Amtrak lines between Philadelphia and Harrisburg, PA, and between Washington DC and New York NY, in which cant deficiencies of 12.5 inches and speeds of 154 mph were reached in a safe and controlled manner. The significance of the results is discussed, and preliminary conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  18. Experimental terrestrial soil-core microcosm test protocol. A method for measuring the potential ecological effects, fate, and transport of chemicals in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Voris, P.; Tolle, D.A.; Arthur, M.F.

    1985-06-01

    In order to protect the environment properly and have a realistic appraisal of how a chemical will act in the environment, tests of ecological effects and chemical fate must be performed on complex assemblages of biotic and abiotic components (i.e., microcosms) as well as single species. This protocol is one which could be added to a series of tests recently developed as guidelines for Section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (P.L. 94-469; U.S.C., Section 2601-2629). The terrestrial soil-core microcosm is designed to supply site-specific and possibly regional information on the probable chemical fate and ecological effects resulting from release of a chemical substance to a terrestrial ecosystem. The EPA will use the data resulting from this test system to compare the potential hazards of a chemical with others that have been previously evaluated.

  19. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  20. The transportation institutional plan: Cooperative planning for NWPA transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, S.H.; Livingston-Behan, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Transportation Institutional Plan, published in 1986 by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), defines a process for effective interaction among those who may be affected by transportation activities conducted under provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). The Plan describes formal mechanisms for identifying, addressing, and resolving specific transportation issues. An appendix to the Plan includes detailed discussion of the following transportation issues: (1) the transportation of defense waste; (2) prenotification; (3) physical and rail shipments; (4) highway routing; (5) rail routing; (6) inspection and enforcement for highway and rail shipments; (7) emergency response; (8) liability coverage for transportation to NWPA facilities; (9) cask design and testing; (10) overweight truck shipments; (11) rail service analysis; (12) mixture of transportation modes; (13) transportation infrastructure improvements; (14) OCRWM training standards; (15) transportation operational procedures; and (16) State, Tribal, and local regulation of transportation. The OCRWM's intent is to provide an open accounting of planning, to identify opportunities for public involvement in program activities, and to foster communication and negotiation in the cooperative development of a safe, efficient, and cost-effective NWPA transportation program

  1. HYDROCOIN [HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison] Level 1: Benchmarking and verification test results with CFEST [Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport] code: Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Cole, C.; Monti, A.M.; Gupta, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Part of the safety analysis is evaluating groundwater flow through the repository and the host rock to the accessible environment by developing mathematical or analytical models and numerical computer codes describing the flow mechanisms. This need led to the establishment of an international project called HYDROCOIN (HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison) organized by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, a forum for discussing techniques and strategies in subsurface hydrologic modeling. The major objective of the present effort, HYDROCOIN Level 1, is determining the numerical accuracy of the computer codes. The definition of each case includes the input parameters, the governing equations, the output specifications, and the format. The Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code was applied to solve cases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; the Finite Element Three-Dimensional Groundwater (FE3DGW) Flow Model was used to solve case 6. Case 3 has been ignored because unsaturated flow is not pertinent to SRP. This report presents the Level 1 results furnished by the project teams. The numerical accuracy of the codes is determined by (1) comparing the computational results with analytical solutions for cases that have analytical solutions (namely cases 1 and 4), and (2) intercomparing results from codes for cases which do not have analytical solutions (cases 2, 5, 6, and 7). Cases 1, 2, 6, and 7 relate to flow analyses, whereas cases 4 and 5 require nonlinear solutions. 7 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling

  3. Radioactive material transporting container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Yukio.

    1990-01-01

    As a supporting member of a sealing container for containing spent fuels, etc., a straight pipe or a cylinder has been used. However, upon dropping test, the supporting member is buckled toward the central axis of a transporting container and a shock absorber is crushed in the axial direction to prevent its pushing force to the outer side, which may possibly hinder normal shock moderating function. Then, at least more than one-half of the supporting member is protruded radially to the outer side of the sealing container beyond the fixed portion with the sealed container, so that the member has a portion extended in the radial outside of the transporting container with an angle greater than the angle formed between a line connecting the outer circumference at the bottom of an outer cylinder with the gravitational center of the transporting container and the central axis of the transporting container. As a result, buckling of the supporting member toward the central axis of the transporting container upon dropping test can be prevented and the deformation of the shock absorber is neither not prevented to exhibit normal shock absorbing effect. This can improve the reliability and reduce the amount of shock absorbers. (N.H.)

  4. Spent fuel transportation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'ev, A.N.; Kosarev, Yu.A.; Yulikov, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, problems of transportation of nuclear spent fuel to reprocessing plants are discussed. The solutions proposed are directed toward the achievement of the transportation as economic and safe as possible. The increase of the nuclear power plants number in the USSR and the great distances between these plants and the reprocessing plants involve an intensification of the spent fuel transportation. Higher burnup and holdup time reduction cause the necessity of more bulky casks. In this connection, the economic problems become still more important. One of the ways of the problem solution is the development of rational and cheap cask designs. Also, the enforcement in the world of the environmental and personnel health protection requires to increase the transportation reliability and safety. The paper summarizes safe transportation rules with clarifying the following questions: the increase of the transport unit quantity of the spent fuel; rational shipment organization that minimizes vehicle turnover cycle duration; development of the reliable calculation methods to determine strength, thermal conditions and nuclear safety of transport packaging as applied to the vehicles of high capacity; maximum unification of vehicles, calculation methods and documents; and cask testing on models and in pilot scale on specific test rigs to assure that they meet the international safe fuel shipment rules. Besides, some considerations on the choice and use of structural materials for casks are given, and problems of manufacturing such casks from uranium and lead are considered, as well as problems of the development of fireproof shells, control instrumentation, vehicles decontamination, etc. All the problems are considered from the point of view of normal and accidental shipment conditions. Conclusions are presented [ru

  5. Orbital transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  6. Modeling soil CO2 production and transport with dynamic source and diffusion terms: testing the steady-state assumption using DETECT v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Edmund M.; Ogle, Kiona; Kropp, Heather; Samuels-Crow, Kimberly E.; Carrillo, Yolima; Pendall, Elise

    2018-05-01

    The flux of CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere (soil respiration, Rsoil) is a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Methods to measure and model Rsoil, or partition it into different components, often rely on the assumption that soil CO2 concentrations and fluxes are in steady state, implying that Rsoil is equal to the rate at which CO2 is produced by soil microbial and root respiration. Recent research, however, questions the validity of this assumption. Thus, the aim of this work was two-fold: (1) to describe a non-steady state (NSS) soil CO2 transport and production model, DETECT, and (2) to use this model to evaluate the environmental conditions under which Rsoil and CO2 production are likely in NSS. The backbone of DETECT is a non-homogeneous, partial differential equation (PDE) that describes production and transport of soil CO2, which we solve numerically at fine spatial and temporal resolution (e.g., 0.01 m increments down to 1 m, every 6 h). Production of soil CO2 is simulated for every depth and time increment as the sum of root respiration and microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Both of these factors can be driven by current and antecedent soil water content and temperature, which can also vary by time and depth. We also analytically solved the ordinary differential equation (ODE) corresponding to the steady-state (SS) solution to the PDE model. We applied the DETECT NSS and SS models to the six-month growing season period representative of a native grassland in Wyoming. Simulation experiments were conducted with both model versions to evaluate factors that could affect departure from SS, such as (1) varying soil texture; (2) shifting the timing or frequency of precipitation; and (3) with and without the environmental antecedent drivers. For a coarse-textured soil, Rsoil from the SS model closely matched that of the NSS model. However, in a fine-textured (clay) soil, growing season Rsoil was ˜ 3 % higher under the assumption of

  7. Inspection, testing, and operating requiremens for the packaging and shipping of uranium trioxide in 55-gallon Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 6M shipping packagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomer, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    This document identifies the inspection, testing and operating requirements for the packaging, loading, and shipping of uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) in 55-gallon DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Compliance with this document assures established controls for the purchasing, packaging, loading, and shipping of DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings are maintained in strict accordance with applicable Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Test particles dynamics in the JOREK 3D non-linear MHD code and application to electron transport in a disruption simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, C.; Nardon, E.; Beyer, P.; Hoelzl, M.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; van Vugt, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    In order to contribute to the understanding of runaway electron generation mechanisms during tokamak disruptions, a test particle tracker is introduced in the JOREK 3D non-linear MHD code, able to compute both full and guiding center relativistic orbits. Tests of the module show good conservation of the invariants of motion and consistency between full orbit and guiding center solutions. A first application is presented where test electron confinement properties are investigated in a massive gas injection-triggered disruption simulation in JET-like geometry. It is found that electron populations initialised before the thermal quench (TQ) are typically not fully deconfined in spite of the global stochasticity of the magnetic field during the TQ. The fraction of ‘survivors’ decreases from a few tens down to a few tenths of percent as the electron energy varies from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The underlying mechanism for electron ‘survival’ is the prompt reformation of closed magnetic surfaces at the plasma core and, to a smaller extent, the subsequent reappearance of a magnetic surface at the edge. It is also found that electrons are less deconfined at 10 MeV than at 1 MeV, which appears consistent with a phase averaging effect due to orbit shifts at high energy.

  9. Preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment: an in-reactor test of fuel behaviour and fission-product release and transport under LOCA/LOECC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, L W; Elder, P H; Devaal, J W; Irish, J D; Yamazaki, A R [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The BTF-104 experiment is one of a series of in-reactor tests being performed to measure fuel behaviour and fission-product release from nuclear fuel subjected to accident conditions. The primary objective of the BTF-104 experiment was to measure fission-product releases from a CANDU-sized fuel element under combined Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Loss-of-Emergency-Core-Cooling (LOECC) conditions at an average fuel temperature of about 1550 deg C. The preliminary results of the BTF-104 experiment are presented in this paper. (author). 6 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Evaluation of two transport aircraft and several ground test vehicle friction measurements obtained for various runway surface types and conditions. A summary of test results from joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Tests with specially instrumented NASA Boeing 737 and 727 aircraft together with several different ground friction measuring devices were conducted for a variety of runway surface types and conditions. These tests are part of joint FAA/NASA Aircraft/Ground Vehicle Runway Friction Program aimed at obtaining a better understanding of aircraft ground handling performance under adverse weather conditions and defining relationships between aircraft and ground vehicle tire friction measurements. Aircraft braking performance on dry, wet, snow and ice-covered runway conditions is discussed as well as ground vehicle friction data obtained under similar runway conditions. For a given contaminated runway surface condition, the correlation between ground vehicles and aircraft friction data is identified. The influence of major test parameters on friction measurements such as speed, test tire characteristics, type and amount of surface contaminant, and ambient temperature are discussed. The effect of surface type on wet friction levels is also evaluated from comparative data collected on grooved and ungrooved concrete and asphalt surfaces.

  11. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  12. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  13. Optimal transport

    CERN Document Server

    Eckmann, B

    2008-01-01

    At the close of the 1980s, the independent contributions of Yann Brenier, Mike Cullen and John Mather launched a revolution in the venerable field of optimal transport founded by G Monge in the 18th century, which has made breathtaking forays into various other domains of mathematics ever since. The author presents a broad overview of this area.

  14. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2001/1199) of the 10. of december 2001 relative to the passing of safety rules concerning the maritime transport of spent fuels, plutonium and high-level radioactive wastes contained in packages. (O.M.)

  15. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  16. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Convergence and Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the third of a series [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165 y 1172] devoted to the development of a new numerical code to solve the guiding center equation for electrons and ions in toroidal plasmas. Two calculation meshes corresponding to axisymmetric tokamaks are now prepared and the kinetic equation is expanded so the standard terms of neoclassical theory --fi rst order terms in the Larmor radius expansion-- can be identified, restricting the calculations correspondingly. Using model density and temperature profiles for the plasma, several convergence test are performed depending on the calculation meshes and the expansions of the distribution function; then the results are compared with the theory [Hinton and Hazeltine, Rev. Mod. Phys. (1976)]. (Author) 18 refs

  17. Osmotic water transport in aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Beitz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract  We test a novel, stochastic model of osmotic water transport in aquaporins. A solute molecule present at the pore mouth can either be reflected or permeate the pore. We assume that only reflected solute molecules induce osmotic transport of water through the pore, while permeating solute...... molecules give rise to no water transport. Accordingly, the rate of water transport is proportional to the reflection coefficient σ, while the solute permeability, P(S), is proportional to 1 - σ. The model was tested in aquaporins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. A variety of aquaporin channel...... sizes and geometries were obtained with the two aquaporins AQP1 and AQP9 and mutant versions of these. Osmotic water transport was generated by adding 20 mM of a range of different-sized osmolytes to the outer solution. The osmotic water permeability and the reflection coefficient were measured...

  18. Application-oriented testing and advancement of numerical models for the simulation of flow and transport processes granite rocks; Anwendungsorientierte Erprobung und Weiterentwicklung numerischer Modelle zur Simulation von Stroemungs- und Transportprozessen in granitoiden Gesteinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrenholz, Christine

    2011-07-01

    The presented study has been carried out against the background of problems and questions, which are discussed within long-term safety analysis with regard to the deposition of radionuclide waste within a deep repository in fractured rock. The main research consists in the analysis of - general transport processes within a fractured aquifer by means of 2d and 3d model calculations of different scales, with the objective of determining sensitive parameters, - the influence of heat-fields, with regard to groundwater flow and mass transport within an fractured aquifer, - the new modules of the FEFLOW 5.2 program version, called ''Multi- Species Transport'' and ''Discrete Feature Elements'' for the implementation of radionuclide decay chains, as well as the implementation of explicit fractures in local and regional scale. Additionally it should be asked whether and to what extent the hydrogeological programme FEFLOW provides an opportunity to deliver additional information to the one-dimensional far-field CHETMAD module of the EMOS programme. The models have been tested with increasing complexity as far as possible by using field data from the Itatskij investigation area in the Nishnekanskij Granitoidmassif, near the city of Krasnojarsk in Siberia. The model results show that it is possible to demonstrate the general behaviour of flow and transport processes for different scales and dimensions by using the FEFLOW programme and to detect the essential parameters on the basis of simplified fracture systems. In addition to the Darcy velocity of the solid stone matrix, the various fractures and their characteristics, such as aperture, amount, connectivity and orientation, with regard to the flow-field, are the most important factors. The radionuclide transport also depends to a high degree on the solubility and sorption coefficients of radionuclides on the different rock components. In addition it becomes obvious, that the heat

  19. Safe transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-31

    The film shows the widespread use of radioactive materials in industry, medicine and research and explains the need for transporting nuclear material from producer to user. It shows the way in which packages containing radioactive materials are handled during transport and explains the most important provisions of the IAEA transport regulations, safety series no. 6, such as packaging design criteria and testing requirements, illustrated by various tests carried out, specimen packages and package and freight container labelling. Also illustrated are practical measures to be taken in case of an accident

  20. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Picke