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Sample records for bed slope effects

  1. Experimental study and large eddy simulation of effect of terrain slope on marginal burning in shrub fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David Weise

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined study of laboratory scale fire spread experiments and a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior in live chaparral shrub fuel beds. Line fire was initiated in single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient...

  2. Effects of check dams on bed-load transport and steep-slope stream morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2017-08-01

    Check dams are transversal structures built across morphologically-active streams in mountainous regions. These structures have been used widely in torrent-hazard mitigation for over 150 years. Thousands of them are regularly maintained by stream managers and torrent-control services. The stabilization role of these structures is well known, i.e. they durably constrain the stream-bed through the creation of vertical and planar fixed points. What is not yet clear is to what extent check dams influence bed-load transport: How do peak solid discharge or flood-transported volume change when check dams are added to a reach? To address these questions, long-lasting small-scale experiments were conducted in a 4.8-m-long flume with either one, three or no structures. The results show that the addition of structures creates independent compartments in the bed level, which have a strong influence on bed surface armouring and stream morphodynamics: the consequence is that instantaneous transport intensities are unchanged, but peak solid discharge occur more often and for shorter duration. This results in the same total transported volume over the long term, but reduced volume for a single transport event. It reaffirms the observation of pioneering authors of the mid-19th and early 20th century who conceptualized the possible sediment transport regulation function of check dams: in addition to stabilizing the stream-bed, check dams influence bed-load transport through a buffering effect, releasing frequently and in small doses what, in their absence, would be transported abruptly en masse during rare extreme events.

  3. Effect of buried plates on scour profiles downstream of hydraulic jump in open channels with horizontal and reverse bed slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abbaspour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of sluice gates in erosive beds is one of the main concerns of hydraulic engineers because it can cause considerable damage to structures. Many researchers have conducted various studies to predict the maximum depth and length of scour holes and to develop new methods to control this phenomenon. In the methods that have recently been examined, embedded buried plates are used to control the scour in the erosive beds. In this study, using a physical model, the effect of buried plates in erosive beds on the depth of scour downstream of a hydraulic jump was studied. Several experiments were performed in which plates were buried at 50° and 90° angles at different distances from the apron in open channels with horizontal and reverse bed slopes. The results of experiments in which the scour profiles were drawn in dimensionless forms show that the angle and position of the plates are important to controlling and reducing scour depth. In fact, by reducing the angle of buried plates, the maximum depth of scour is also reduced. Also, comparison of the results of a single buried plate and double buried plates shows that using two buried plates at the distances of 30 and 45 cm from the non-erodible bed is more effective in reducing the scour depth. The best distances of the buried plates with angles of 90° and 50° from the non-erodible bed are 45 cm and 30 cm, respectively, in the condition with a single buried plate.

  4. Slope effects on the fluid dynamics of a fire spreading across a fuel bed: PIV measurements and OH* chemiluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, F.; Silvani, X.; Honoré, D.; Boutin, G.; Susset, A.; Vernet, R.

    2014-08-01

    Slope is among the most influencing factor affecting the spread of wildfires. A contribution to the understanding of the fluid dynamics of a fire spreading in these terrain conditions is provided in the present paper. Coupled optical diagnostics are used to study the slope effects on the flow induced by a fire at laboratory scale. Optical diagnostics consist of particle image velocimetry, for investigating the 2D (vertical) velocity field of the reacting flow and chemiluminescence imaging, for visualizing the region of spontaneous emission of OH radical occurring during gaseous combustion processes. The coupling of these two techniques allows locating accurately the contour of the reaction zone within the computed velocity field. The series of experiments are performed across a bed of vegetative fuel, under both no-slope and 30° upslope conditions. The increase in the rate of fire spread with increasing slope is attributed to a significant change in fluid dynamics surrounding the flame. For horizontal fire spread, flame fronts exhibit quasi-vertical plume resulting in the buoyancy forces generated by the fire. These buoyancy effects induce an influx of ambient fresh air which is entrained laterally into the fire, equitably from both sides. For upward flame spread, the induced flow is strongly influenced by air entrainment on the burnt side of the fire and fire plume is tilted toward unburned vegetation. A particular attention is paid to the induced air flow ahead of the spreading flame. With increasing the slope angle beyond a threshold, highly dangerous conditions arise because this configuration induces wind blows away from the fire rather than toward it, suggesting the presence of convective heat transfers ahead of the fire front.

  5. Full-wave algorithm to model effects of bedding slopes on the response of subsurface electromagnetic geophysical sensors near unconformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions (including arbitrary azimuth orientation of each junction). The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to loss and anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each ;flattened; (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, user-defined orientation. Moreover, since the coating layers are homogeneous rather than exhibiting continuous material variation, a minimal number of these layers must be inserted and hence reduces added simulation time and computational expense. As said coating layers are not reflectionless however, they do induce artificial field scattering that corrupts legitimate field signatures due to the (effective) interface tilting. Numerical results, for two half-spaces separated by a tilted interface, quantify error trends versus effective interface tilting, material properties, transmitter/receiver spacing, sensor position, coating slab thickness, and transmitter and receiver orientation, helping understand the spurious scattering's effect on reliable (effective) tilting this algorithm can model. Under the effective tilting constraints suggested by the results of said error study, we finally exhibit responses of sensors

  6. Air quality in bedded mono-slope beef barns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedded mono-slope barns are becoming more common in the upper Midwest. Because these are new facilities, little research has been published regarding environmental quality, building management and animal performance in these facilities. A team of researchers from South Dakota State University, USDA ...

  7. Synergism Analysis of Bedding Slope with Piles and Anchor Cable Support under Sine Wave Vehicle Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Slope instability under dynamic load is the technical difficulty in the engineering; the evaluation of slope stability under dynamic load and the control of dynamic load is particularly important. In this paper, taking the right side slope of K27+140 m~380 m typical section (K27 slope for short in Chongqing Fuling-Fengdu-Shizhu expresses highway as an example to calculate and analyze. The K27 slope is under sinusoidal vehicle load and supported by anchor cable and antislide pile to resist downslide strength; at the same time, the combined effect of them is studied. Three-dimensional finite element methodology (FEM is used to simulate the bedding slope with piles and anchor cable support; furthermore, the eigenvalue can be obtained. In order to reduce error of the elastic boundary conditions caused by the reflection effect of wavelengths, the combination of Lysmer surface viscous boundary and traditional ground support boundaries is utilized to analyze and calculate the time-histories during bedding slope under dynamic load. The dynamic response of pile anchor support to resist sliding force is obtained. The concept of the pile anchor supporting coordinate interval is put forward. Furthermore, it is verified that the pile anchor supporting coordinate interval can be used to evaluate the stability of the slope under dynamic load and provide a new method for the control of the dynamic load.

  8. Wave interaction with large roughness elements on an impermeable sloping bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    The present paper presents the results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the flow between large roughness elements on a steep sloping impermeable bed during wave action. The setup is designed to resemble a breakwater structure. The work is part of a study where the focus is on the......The present paper presents the results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the flow between large roughness elements on a steep sloping impermeable bed during wave action. The setup is designed to resemble a breakwater structure. The work is part of a study where the focus...... and successively repeated with a porous bed. In this paper the focus is on the impermeable bed. Results are obtained experimentally for flow and turbulence between the roughness elements on the sloping bed. Numerical simulations have reproduced the experimental results with good agreements and can hereby add more...

  9. Sediment transport capacity of concentrated flows on steep loessial slope with erodible beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai; Liu, Gang; Liu, Puling; Zheng, Fenli; Zhang, Jiaqiong; Hu, Feinan

    2017-05-24

    Previous research on sediment transport capacity has been inadequate and incomplete in describing the detachment and transport process of concentrated flows on slope farmlands during rill development. An indoor concentrated flow scouring experiment was carried out on steep loessial soil slope with erodible bed to investigate the sediment transport capacity under different flow rates and slope gradients. The results indicated that the sediment transport capacity increases with increasing flow rate and slope gradient, and these relationships can be described by power functions and exponential functions, respectively. Multivariate, nonlinear regression analysis showed that sediment transport capacity was more sensitive to slope gradient than to flow rate, and it was more sensitive to unit discharge per unit width than to slope gradient for sediment transport capacity in this study. When similar soil was used, the results were similar to those of previous research conducted under both erodible and non-erodible bed conditions. However, the equation derived from previous research under non-erodible bed conditions with for river bed sand tends to overestimate sediment transport capacity in our experiment.

  10. A review of hydraulic jump properties on both smooth and rough beds in sloping and adverse channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palermo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic jump is a phenomenon which has received significant attention in recent years and it is still studied because of its capacity to dissipate a considerable amount of the flow energy. Nevertheless, the importance of the topic still requires significant efforts from the scientific community. Namely, the prediction of the main lengths of the hydraulic jump are still an open question, as the actual knowledge on the topic does not cover all the possible configurations and boundary conditions which can usually be found in practical applications. In particular, the effects of bed roughness, bed slope, channel geometry, and air concentration on the conjugate depths ratio are still not fully understood. The present paper aims to furnish a synthetic picture of the state of art regarding the hydraulic jump properties in a wide range of both boundary conditions and geometric configurations. In particular, the analysis will be focused on the effect of both relative roughness and bed slope on the conjugate depth ratio, including the effect of air entrainment on the estimation of the effective depth. Furthermore, some predicting relationships proposed by different authors will be compared and discussed.

  11. An assessment of biological processes close to the sea bed in a slope region and its significance to the assessment of sea bed disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargreaves, P.M.; Ellis, C.J.; Angel, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Vertical profiles of planktonic and micronektonic biomass observed close to the sea bed along a transect running up the continental slope on the southern flank of the Porcupine Seabight (to the southwest of Ireland) showed that a doubling in biomass concentration occurs from 100 to 10m above the sea bed. Comparison with biomass concentrations at two deep water stations, one in the Seabight and the other in the Rockall Trough, showed that there was a consistent increase in standing crop close to the sea bed over the slope. Supplementary data were collected on the northern flank of the Seabight. Analysis of both taxonomic groups and individual species showed that some taxa were more abundant near the sea floor and extended their vertical ranges to greater depths over the slope than over deep water, other taxa were unaffected. The implications to the problem of assessing the safety of sea bed disposal of high level radioactive waste are summarised. (author)

  12. Experimental Modeling of the Effect of Terrain Slope on Marginal Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; S. Mahalingam; D. Weise

    2005-01-01

    A series of laboratory fire spread experiments were completed to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior of live chaparral shrub fuels that grow in the mountains of southern California. We attempted to burn single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient conditions. Seventy-three (or 42...

  13. Steep reverse bed slope at the grounding line of the Weddell Sea sector in West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Neil; Bingham, Robert G.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom A.; Le Brocq, Anne; Rippin, David M.; Young, Duncan; Blankenship, Donald D.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2012-06-01

    The bed of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is, in places, more than 1.5km below sea level. It has been suggested that a positive ice-loss feedback may occur when an ice sheet's grounding line retreats across a deepening bed. Applied to the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, this process could potentially raise global sea level by more than 3m. Hitherto, attention has focussed on changes at the Siple Coast and Amundsen Sea embayment sectors of West Antarctica. Here, we present radio-echo sounding information from the ice sheet's third sector, the Weddell Sea embayment, that reveals a large subglacial basin immediately upstream of the grounding line. The reverse bed slope is steep, with about 400 m of decline over 40km. The basin floor is smooth and flat, with little small-scale topography that would delay retreat, indicating that it has been covered with marine sediment and was previously deglaciated. Upstream of the basin, well-defined glacially carved fjords with bars at their mouths testify to the position of a former ice margin about 200km inland from the present margin. Evidence so far suggests that the Weddell Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been stable, but in the light of our data we propose that the region could be near a physical threshold of substantial change.

  14. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119 , 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  15. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119, 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  16. A numerical study of slope and fuel structure effects on coupled wildfire behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman R. Linn; Judith L. Winterkamp; David R. Weise; Carleton Edminster

    2010-01-01

    Slope and fuel structure are commonly accepted as major factors affecting theway wildfires behave. However, it is possible that slope affects fire differently depending on the fuel bed. Six FIRETEC simulations using three different fuel beds on flat and upslope topography were used to examine this possibility. Fuel beds resembling grass, chaparral, and ponderosa pine...

  17. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  18. Check dams effects on sediment transport in steep slope flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Depending on many influences (geology, relief, hydrology, land use, etc.) some mountainous watershed are prone to cause casualties and facilities damages. Large amounts of sediments episodically released by torrents are often the biggest problem in torrent related hazard mitigation. Series of transversal structures as check dams and ground sills are often used in the panel of risk mitigation technics. A large literature exits on check dams and it mainly concerns engineering design, e.g. toe scouring, stability stress diagram, changes in upper and lower reaches equilibrium slopes. Check dams in steep slope rivers constitute fixed points in the bed profile and prevent general bed incision. However their influence on sediment transport once they are filled is not yet clear. Two flume test campaigns, synthetize in Table 1, were performed to investigate this question: Table 1 : experiment plan Run (duration) Ref1 (50h)CD1a (30h)CD1b (30h)Ref2 (92h)CD2 (18h) Solid feeding discharge (g.s^-1) 44 44 44 60 60 Number of check dams none 1 3 none 2 A nearly 5-m-long, 10-cm-wide and 12%-steep flume was used. The water discharge was set to 0,55 l/s in all runs. A mixture of poorly sorted natural sediments with diameters between 0.8 and 40 mm was used. An open solid-discharge-feeding circuit kept the inlet sediment flux constant during all experiments. As both feeding rates did not present variation, changes in outlet solid discharge were assumed to be due to bed variations in the bed storage. We observed strong fluctuations of solid flux and slope in each reaches of all runs between: (i) steep aggradating armoured bed and (ii) less steep and finer bed releasing bedload sheets during erosion events and inducing bedload pulses. All experiments showed consistent results: transported volume associated with erosion event decreased with the length between two subsequent check dams. Solid transversal structures shorten the upstream erosion-propagation and avoid downstream change in the

  19. The effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides: Field observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haijun; Cui, Peng; Regmi, Amar Deep; Hu, Sheng; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we characterize and consider the effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides. To carry out this study, we employ data on 275 loess slides within Zhidan County, Central Loess Plateau, China. These data were collected in the field and supplemented by the interpretation of remote sensing images. Both the field observations and slope stability analysis show that loess slide size increases with the slope length. Slide sizes is significantly correlated with slope length, showing a power law relationship in both cases. However, the simulation results show that slope gradient is not associated with loess slide size. The main part of the link between slope gradient and slide size seen in the observations is only apparent, as indicated by the strong connection between slope gradient and length. Statistical analysis of the field observations reveals that slope gradient decreases with increasing slope length, and this correlation interferes with the potential relationship between landslide sizes and slope gradient seen in the field observations. In addition, the probability densities of the areas of loess slides occurring on slopes of different slope lengths are determined using kernel density estimation. This analysis shows that slope length controls the rollover of the frequency-size distribution of loess slides. The scaling exponent increases with slope length.

  20. Effects of surface slope on erosion rates of quartz particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge, Phillip.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling sediment erosion is important in a wide range of environmental problems. The effects of various environmental factors on erosion rates have been studied, but the effects of surface slope on erosion rates of a wide range of sediments have not been quantified. The effects of surface slope, both in the direction of flow (pitch) and perpendicular to the flow (roll), on erosion rates of quartz particles were investigated using the Sediment Erosion at Depth Flume (Sedflume). US Navy (US...

  1. Effects Of Exercise During Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, Edmund M.

    1993-01-01

    Pair of reports adds to growing body of knowledge of physical deconditioning caused by prolonged bed rest and effectiveness of various exercise regimens in preserving or restoring fitness. Major objective to determine what regimens to prescribe to astronauts before flight, during prolonged weightlessness, and immediately before returning to Earth. Knowledge also benefits patients confined by illness or injury. First report discusses experiment on effects of two types of periodic, intense, short-duration exercise during bed rest. Experiment also discussed in documents "Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest" (ARC-12190), and "Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest" (ARC-12180). Second report reviews knowledge acquired with view toward development of protocols for exercise regimens.

  2. The Role of Bed Roughness in Wave Transformation Across Sloping Rock Shore Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poate, Tim; Masselink, Gerd; Austin, Martin J.; Dickson, Mark; McCall, Robert

    2018-01-01

    We present for the first time observations and model simulations of wave transformation across sloping (Type A) rock shore platforms. Pressure measurements of the water surface elevation using up to 15 sensors across five rock platforms with contrasting roughness, gradient, and wave climate represent the most extensive collected, both in terms of the range of environmental conditions, and the temporal and spatial resolution. Platforms are shown to dissipate both incident and infragravity wave energy as skewness and asymmetry develop and, in line with previous studies, surf zone wave heights are saturated and strongly tidally modulated. Overall, the observed properties of the waves and formulations derived from sandy beaches do not highlight any systematic interplatform variation, in spite of significant differences in platform roughness, suggesting that friction can be neglected when studying short wave transformation. Optimization of a numerical wave transformation model shows that the wave breaker criterion falls between the range of values reported for flat sandy beaches and those of steep coral fore reefs. However, the optimized drag coefficient shows significant scatter for the roughest sites and an alternative empirical drag model, based on the platform roughness, does not improve model performance. Thus, model results indicate that the parameterization of frictional drag using the bottom roughness length-scale may be inappropriate for the roughest platforms. Based on these results, we examine the balance of wave breaking to frictional dissipation for rock platforms and find that friction is only significant for very rough, flat platforms during small wave conditions outside the surf zone.

  3. Effects of slope gradient on hydro-erosional processes on an aeolian sand-covered loess slope under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, B. B.; Li, Z. B.; Shi, W. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The aeolian sand-covered loess slope of the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the Loess Plateau in China may play a key role in contributing excessive sediment to the Yellow River. Understanding its hydro-erosional processes is crucial to assessing, controlling and predicting soil and water losses in this region and maintaining the ecological sustainability of the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was used to investigate the runoff and soil loss from loess slopes with different slope gradients (18%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%) and overlying sand layer thicknesses (0, 5 and 10 cm). As compared with uncovered loess slopes, an overlying sand layer delayed runoff production, reduced cumulative runoff and increased cumulative soil loss, as well as enhancing variations among slope gradients. Cumulative runoff and soil loss from the sand-covered loess slopes increased with increasing slope gradients and then slightly decreased, with a peak at about 47% gradient; they both were greater from the 10-cm sand-covered loess slope than from the 5-cm except for with 18% slope gradient. In general, differences in cumulative runoff between sand layer thicknesses became smaller, while those in cumulative soil loss became larger, with increasing slope gradient. Runoff and soil loss rates on the sand-covered loess slopes exhibited unimodal distributions during the rainstorms. Maximum values tended to occur at the same rain duration, and increased considerably with increasing slope gradient and sand layer thickness on slopes that were less than 47%. Liquefaction process might occur on the lower loess slopes covered with thinner sand layers but failures similar to shallow landslides might occur when the sand layer was thicker on steeper slopes. The presence of an overlying sand layer changed the relationship between runoff and soil loss rates during intense rainstorms and this change varied with different slope gradients. Our results demonstrated that the effects

  4. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°, five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay, two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations. “Score” was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01. Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05 scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01. Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was

  5. Effects of Bed Forms and Large Protruding Grains on Near-Bed Flow Hydraulics in Low Relative Submergence Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, Angel; Yager, Elowyn M.; Schmeeckle, Mark W.

    2017-10-01

    In mountain rivers, bed forms, large relatively immobile grains, and bed texture and topographic variability can significantly alter local and reach-averaged flow characteristics. The low relative submergence of large immobile grains causes highly three-dimensional flow fields that may not be represented by traditional shear stress, flow velocity, and turbulence intensity equations. To explore the influence of large protruding grains and bed forms on flow properties, we conducted a set of experiments in which we varied the relative submergence while holding the sediment transport capacity and upstream sediment supply constant. Flow and bed measurements were conducted at the beginning and end of each experiment to account for the absence or presence of bed forms, respectively. Detailed information on the flow was obtained by combining our measurements with a 3-D numerical model. Commonly used velocity profile equations only performed well at the reach scale when shallow flow effects and the roughness length of the relatively mobile sediment were considered. However, at the local scale large deviations from these profiles were observed and simple methods to estimate the spatial distribution of near-bed shear stresses are likely to be inaccurate. Zones of high turbulent kinetic energy occurred near the water surface and were largely controlled by the immobile grains and plunging flow. The reach-averaged shear stress did not correlate to depth or slope, as commonly assumed, but instead was controlled by the relative boulder submergence and degree of plunging flow. For accurate flow predictions in mountain rivers, the effects of bed forms and large boulders must be considered.

  6. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of anisotropy of shear strength parameter on the stability of a sandy slope by performing the limit equilibrium analysis. Because of scarcity of mathematical equation for anisotropic friction angle of sand, at first, all results of principal stress rotation tests are processed by artificial neural ...

  7. Study on the response of unsaturated soil slope based on the effects of rainfall intensity and slope angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Ashraf Mohamad; Hamzah, Nur Hasliza

    2017-07-01

    Rainfall has been considered as the major cause of the slope failure. The mechanism leading to slope failures included the infiltration process, surface runoff, volumetric water content and pore-water pressure of the soil. This paper describes a study in which simulated rainfall events were used with 2-dimensional soil column to study the response of unsaturated soil behavior based on different slope angle. The 2-dimensional soil column is used in order to demonstrate the mechanism of the slope failure. These unsaturated soil were tested with four different slope (15°, 25°, 35° and 45°) and subjected to three different rainfall intensities (maximum, mean and minimum). The following key results were obtained: (1) the stability of unsaturated soil decrease as the rainwater infiltrates into the soil. Soil that initially in unsaturated state will start to reach saturated state when rainwater seeps into the soil. Infiltration of rainwater will reduce the matric suction in the soil. Matric suction acts in controlling soil shear strength. Reduction in matric suction affects the decrease in effective normal stress, which in turn diminishes the available shear strength to a point where equilibrium can no longer be sustained in the slope. (2) The infiltration rate of rainwater decreases while surface runoff increase when the soil nearly achieve saturated state. These situations cause the soil erosion and lead to slope failure. (3) The steepness of the soil is not a major factor but also contribute to slope failures. For steep slopes, rainwater that fall on the soil surface will become surface runoff within a short time compare to the water that infiltrate into the soil. While for gentle slopes, water that becomes surface runoff will move slowly and these increase the water that infiltrate into the soil.

  8. Source and depositional processes of coarse-grained limestone event beds in Frasnian slope deposits (Kostomłoty-Mogiłki quarry, Holy Cross Mountains, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierek, Aleksandra

    2010-10-01

    The Kostomłoty-Mogiłki succession is situated in the Kostomłoty transitional zone between the shallow-water Kielce stromatoporoid-coral platform and the deeper Łysogóry basin. In the Kostomłoty-Mogiłki quarry, the upper part of the Szydłówek Beds and Kostomłoty Beds are exposed. The Middle-Upper Frasnian Kostomłoty Beds are composed of shales, micritic and nodular limestones with abundant intercalations of detrital limestones. The dark shales and the micritic and nodular limestones record background sedimentation. The interbedded laminated and detrital limestones reflect high-energy deposition (= event beds). These event beds comprise laminated calcisiltites, fine-grained calcarenites, coarse-grained grain-supported calcirudites fabrics, and matrix-supported calcirudites. The material of these event beds was supplied by both erosion of the carbonate-platform margin and cannibalistic erosion of penecontemporaneous detrital limestones building the slope of this platform. Storms and the tectonic activity were likely the main causes of erosion. Combined and gravity flows were the transporting mechanisms involved in the reworking and redeposition.

  9. Effect of slope height and horizontal forces on the bearing capacity of strip footings near slopes in cohesionless soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    The problem of determining the bearing capacity of a strip foundation located near a slope of infinite height has been dealt with by several authors. Very often in practical problems the slope is of limited height, and furthermore the resulting load may be inclined at an angle to the horizontal......, and in such cases the bearing capacity of the footing cannot be found using the existing methods. The present work comprises finite element based upper- and lower-bound calculations, using the geotechnical software OptumG2 to investigate the effect of the slope height and horizontal forces on the total bearing...

  10. Effect of bed configuration on pebble flow uniformity and stagnation in the pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083 (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: jiangshy@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for HTR-PM. • Arc- and brachistochrone-shaped configuration effects are studied by DEM simulation. • Best bed configurations with uniform flow and no stagnated pebbles are suggested. • Detailed quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects are shown for explanation. - Abstract: Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for the design of pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Pebble flows inside some specifically designed contraction configurations of pebble bed are studied by discrete element method. The results show the characteristics of stagnation rates, recycling rates, radial distribution of pebble velocity and residence time. It is demonstrated clearly that the bed with a brachistochrone-shaped configuration achieves optimum levels of flow uniformity and recycling rate concentration, and almost no pebbles are stagnated in the bed. Moreover, the optimum choice among the arc-shaped bed configurations is demonstrated too. Detailed information shows the quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects on flow uniformity. In addition, a good design of the pebble bed configuration is suggested.

  11. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s-1, amplitude (0 mm-1 mm, bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups. The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within ±15%, was proposed.

  12. Effects of bed-load movement on flow resistance over bed forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of bed-load transport on flow resistance of alluvial channels with undulated bed was experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in a tilting flume 250mm wide and 12·5m long with glass-sides of rectan- gular cross-section and artificial dune shaped floor that was made from Plexi-glass.

  13. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  14. Effects of slope position and fertilization on the performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FARO 45 (ITA 257) early maturing upland variety of rice was used as the test crop at each slope level. The experiment was a 3 x 2 factorial combination of three slopes (upper, middle and hydromorphic fringe) and two fertilizations (without fertilizer and with fertilizer) in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD), ...

  15. Variance-in-Mean Effects of the Long Forward-Rate Slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper contains an empirical analysis of the dependence of the long forward-rate slope on the long-rate variance. The long forward-rate slope and the long rate are described by a bivariate GARCH-in-mean model. In accordance with theory, a negative long-rate variance-in-mean effect for the long...... forward-rate slope is documented. Thus, the greater the long-rate variance, the steeper the long forward-rate curve slopes downward (the long forward-rate slope is negative). The variance-in-mean effect is both statistically and economically significant....

  16. Improved lignin pyrolysis for phenolics production in a bubbling bed reactor--Effect of bed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor equipped with a fractional condensation train, using nitrogen as the fluidization gas. The effect of different bed materials (silica sand, lignin char, activated lignin char, birch bark char, and foamed glass beads) on bio-oil yield and quality was investigated for a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C. Results how that a bed of activated lignin char is preferable to the commonly used silica sand: pyrolysis of Kraft lignin with a bed of activated lignin char not only provides a pure char product, but also a higher dry bio-oil yield (with a relative increase of 43%), lower pyrolytic water production, and better bio-oil quality. The bio-oil obtained from Kraft lignin pyrolysis with a bed of activated lignin char has a lower average molecular weight, less tar, more phenolics, and less acidity than when sand is used as bed material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Huang

    Full Text Available Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  18. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  19. Effects of slope smoothing in river channel modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Liu, Frank; Hodges, Ben R.

    2017-04-01

    In extending dynamic river modeling with the 1D Saint-Venant equations from a single reach to a large watershed there are critical questions as to how much bathymetric knowledge is necessary and how it should be represented parsimoniously. The ideal model will include the detail necessary to provide realism, but not include extraneous detail that should not exert a control on a 1D (cross-section averaged) solution. In a Saint-Venant model, the overall complexity of the river channel morphometry is typically abstracted into metrics for the channel slope, cross-sectional area, hydraulic radius, and roughness. In stream segments where cross-section surveys are closely spaced, it is not uncommon to have sharp changes in slope or even negative values (where a positive slope is the downstream direction). However, solving river flow with the Saint-Venant equations requires a degree of smoothness in the equation parameters or the equation set with the directly measured channel slopes may not be Lipschitz continuous. The results of non-smoothness are typically extended computational time to converge solutions (or complete failure to converge) and/or numerical instabilities under transient conditions. We have investigated using cubic splines to smooth the bottom slope and ensure always positive reference slopes within a 1D model. This method has been implemented in the Simulation Program for River Networks (SPRNT) and is compared to the standard HEC-RAS river solver. It is shown that the reformulation of the reference slope is both in keeping with the underlying derivation of the Saint-Venant equations and provides practical numerical stability without altering the realism of the simulation. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant number CCF-1331610.

  20. The effect of hospital bed reduction on the use of beds: a comparative study of 10 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Siegers, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In Europe, the reduction of acute care hospital beds has been one of the measures implemented to restrict hospital expenditure. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effect bed reductions have on the use of the remaining beds within different healthcare systems. We concentrated on two

  1. The lumping of heat transfer parameters in cooled packed beds: effect of the bed entry

    OpenAIRE

    Westerink, E.J.; Gerner, J.W.; Gerner, J.W.; Westerterp, K.R.; van der Wal, S.

    1993-01-01

    The lumping of the heat transfer parameters of the one- and the two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a cooled fixed bed were compared. It appeared that the lumping of the two-dimensional parameters, being the effective radial conductivity h-eff and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall (alpha)w, into the one-dimensional overall heat transfer coefficient U results in a length dependence of U. It is shown that the ratio (alpha)w/U develops from unity at the bed inlet to a final value...

  2. The lumping of heat transfer parameters in cooled packed beds: effect of the bed entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, E.J.; Gerner, J.W.; Gerner, J.W.; Westerterp, K.R.; van der Wal, S.

    1993-01-01

    The lumping of the heat transfer parameters of the one- and the two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a cooled fixed bed were compared. It appeared that the lumping of the two-dimensional parameters, being the effective radial conductivity h-eff and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall

  3. The Effect of Bedding Structure on Mechanical Property of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical property of coal, influencing mining activity considerably, is significantly determined by the natural fracture distributed within coal mass. In order to study the effecting mechanism of bedding structure on mechanical property of coal, a series of uniaxial compression tests and mesoscopic tests have been conducted. The experimental results show that the distribution characteristic of calcite particles, which significantly influences the growth of cracks and the macroscopic mechanical properties of coal, is obviously affected by the bedding structure. Specifically, the uniaxial compression strength of coal sample is mainly controlled by bedding structure, and the average peak stress of specimens with axes perpendicular to the bedding planes is 20.00 MPa, which is 2.88 times the average amount of parallel ones. The test results also show a close relationship between the bedding structure and the whole deformation process under uniaxial loading.

  4. Effect of Angle of Attack on Slope Climbing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Colin M.; Jones, Lucas; Smith, Lauren M.

    2017-01-01

    Ascending steep slopes is often a very difficult challenge for off-road vehicles, whether on Earth or on extraterrestrial bodies. This challenge is even greater if the surface consists of loose granular soil that does not provide much shear strength. This study investigated how the path at which a vehicle traverses a slope, specifically the angle that it is commanded to drive relative to the base of the hill (the angle of attack), can affect its performance. A vehicle was driven in loose sand at slope angles up to 15 degrees and angles of attack ranging from 10 to 90 degrees. A novel photogrammetry technique was implemented to both track vehicle motion and create a three-dimensional profile of the terrain. This allowed for true wheel sinkage measurements. The study showed that though low angles of attack result in lower wheel slip and sinkage, the efficiency of the vehicles uphill motion increased at higher angles of attack. For slopes up to 15 degrees, a 90 degree angle of attack provided the greatest likelihood of successful ascent.

  5. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Engineering, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, ... 2School of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, ..... material. 4.3 Stability analysis result. For each analysis case with specified geometrical configuration for slope, a wide range of slip surfaces are considered by establishing a grid of ...

  6. The Dynamic Evaluation of Rock Slope Stability Considering the Effects of Microseismic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, N. W.; Dai, F.; Liang, Z. Z.; Zhou, Z.; Sha, C.; Tang, C. A.

    2014-03-01

    A state-of-the-art microseismic monitoring system has been implemented at the left bank slope of the Jinping first stage hydropower station since June 2009. The main objectives are to ensure slope safety under continuous excavation at the left slope, and, very recently, the safety of the concrete arch dam. The safety of the excavated slope is investigated through the development of fast and accurate real-time event location techniques aimed at assessing the evolution and migration of the seismic activity, as well as through the development of prediction capabilities for rock slope instability. Myriads of seismic events at the slope have been recorded by the microseismic monitoring system. Regions of damaged rock mass have been identified and delineated on the basis of the tempo-spatial distribution analysis of microseismic activity during the periods of excavation and consolidation grouting. However, how to effectively utilize the abundant microseismic data in order to quantify the stability of the slope remains a challenge. In this paper, a rock mass damage evolutional model based on microseismic data is proposed, combined with a 3D finite element method (FEM) model for feedback analysis of the left bank slope stability. The model elements with microseismic damage are interrogated and the deteriorated mechanical parameters determined accordingly. The relationship between microseismic activities induced by rock mass damage during slope instability, strength degradation, and dynamic instability of the slope are explored, and the slope stability is quantitatively evaluated. The results indicate that a constitutive relation considering microseismic damage is concordant with the simulation results and the influence of rock mass damage can be allowed for its feedback analysis of 3D slope stability. In addition, the safety coefficient of the rock slope considering microseismic damage is reduced by a value of 0.11, in comparison to the virgin rock slope model. Our results

  7. The effect of bed non-uniformities and porosity of particles on dryout in boiling particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Mogford, D.J.; Willshire, S.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report relates to an on-going experimental programme concerned with the coolability of beds of reactor core debris or rubble immersed in a liquid coolant, as might occur in an accident situation. The objectives are to develop experimental techniques, improve the understanding of bed cooling mechanisms, determine dry-out limitations of various bed configurations and particle shapes and sizes and devise ways of improving bed coolability. The report concentrates on a recently discovered effect on bed coolability of particle porosity, such as exists in fragmented UO 2 fuel pellets. It is shown that porosity can lower bed dry-out powers by a factor of 4 or 5. A mechanism which explains the effect is presented. The report also gives results of bed non-uniformities obtained by mixing glass particles with the dielectrically heated 'ferrite' particles used in the experiments. (author)

  8. Effects of rye grass coverage on soil loss from loess slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuequn Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative coverage is commonly used to reduce urban slope soil erosion. Laboratory experimental study on soil erosion under grass covered slopes is conventionally time and space consuming. In this study, a new method is suggested to study the influences of vegetation coverage on soil erosion from a sloped loess surface under three slope gradients of 5°, 15°, and 25°; four rye grass coverages of 0%, 25%, 50%, and 75%; and three rainfall intensities of 60, 90, and 120 mm/h with a silt-loamy loess soil. Rye grasses were planted in the field with the studied soil before being transplanted into a laboratory flume. Grass was allowed to resume growth for a period before the rain simulation experiment. Results showed that the grass cover reduced soil erosion by 63.90% to 92.75% and sediment transport rate by 80.59% to 96.17% under different slope gradients and rainfall intensities. The sediment concentration/sediment transport rate from bare slope was significantly higher than from a grass-covered slope. The sediment concentration/transport rate from grass-covered slopes decreased linearly with grass coverage and increased with rainfall intensity. The sediment concentration/transport rate from the bare slope increased as a power function of slope and reached the maximum value at the gradient of about 25°, whereas that from grass-covered slope increased linearly and at much lower levels. The results of this study can be used to estimate the effect of vegetation on soil erosion from loess slopes.

  9. Short-term vegetation recovery after a spring grassland fire in Lithuania. Effect of time and slope position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is study the effects of a grassland fire in vegetation recuperation according to fire severity, slope exposition and position. We designed two experimental plots, one located in an east faced slope (Slope A and other in a west faced (Slope B. Vegetation recuperation was assessed 10, 17, 31 and 46 days after the fire. The results showed that fire severity was higher in slope B, than in slope A. In both slopes vegetation recuperation was different according position. Bottom positions recovered faster than slope and upslope positions, that it is attributed to fire severity (higher in slope and upslope areas and ash and soil transport and deposition in bottom areas. The vegetation recuperated faster in slope B and 46 days after the fire, 100% of the plot was covered. This was attributed to higher severity, more complex topography, and inclination of Slope A, that delayed the vegetation recover.

  10. Granular Leidenfrost effect in vibrated beds with bumpy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, E W C

    2010-08-01

    The effects of subjecting a bed of granular materials to horizontal vibrations by a bumpy oscillating surface have been investigated computationally in this study. The behaviour of the granular bed is determined by the vibration conditions applied which include the vibrating frequency and amplitude as well as the bumpiness of the oscillating surface. Under sufficiently vigorous vibration conditions, the granular Leidenfrost effect whereby the entire granular bed is levitated above the vibrating base by a layer of highly energetic particles may be observed. Granular temperature profiles of systems that exhibit the granular Leidenfrost effect indicate an unequal distribution of energy between particles near the vibrating base and those in the bulk. A bumpy oscillating surface was also observed to be more effective at introducing perturbations and transferring energy into a granular bed. The granular Leidenfrost effect can be induced by the application of larger grain sizes of particles constituting the bumpy vibrating base under vibration conditions that are normally insufficient for the onset of the effect. Lastly, a phase diagram which can be utilized for predicting the behaviours of granular beds that are subjected to oscillations by various types of bumpy surfaces has been constructed based on the simulation results obtained.

  11. Effect of slope height and horizontal forces on the bearing capacity of strip footings near slopes in cohesionless soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    The problem of determining the bearing capacity of a strip foundation located near a slope of infinite height has been dealt with by several authors. Very often in practical problems the slope is of limited height, and furthermore the resulting load may be inclined at an angle to the horizontal, ...

  12. The Effect of Rainfall Patterns on the Mechanisms of Shallow Slope Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Suradi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how rainfall patterns affect the mechanisms of shallow slope failure. Numerical modelling, utilising the commercial software SVFlux and SVSlope, was carried out for a coupled analysis of rainfall-induced slope seepage and instability, with reference to a shallow landslide took place in Jabiru, Northern Territory (NT Australia in 2007. Rainfall events were varied in terms of pattern in this analysis. The results revealed that slopes are sensitive to rainfall pattern when the rainfall intensity has a high degree of fluctuation at around the same value as that of saturated hydraulic conductivity. Average rainfall intensity at the beginning of a rainfall period plays a primary role in determining the rate of decrease in initial factor of safety (Fi towards minimum factor of safety (Fmin. The effect of rainfall events on the slope instability is attributed to the amount of rainwater infiltration into slope associated with rainfall pattern.

  13. Effect of cement injection on sandy soil slope stability, case study: slope in Petang district, Badung regency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, I. W.; Wiraga, I. W.; GAG Suryanegara, I.

    2018-01-01

    Slope is a part of soil topography formed due to elevation difference from two soil surface. Landslides is frequently occur in natural slope, it is because shear force is greater than shear strength in the soil. There are some factor that influence slope stability such as: rain dissipation, vibration from earthquake, construction and crack in the soil. Slope instability can cause risk in human activity or even threaten human lives. Every years in rainy season, landslides always occur in Indonesia. In 2016, there was some landslide occurred in Bali. One of the most damaging is landslide in Petang district, Badung regency. This landslide caused main road closed entirely. In order to overcome and prevent landslide, a lot of method have been practiced and still looking for more sophisticated method for forecasting slope stability. One of the method to strengthen soil stability is filling the soil pores with some certain material. Cement is one of the material that can be used to fill the soil pores because when it is in liquid form, it can infiltrate into soil pores and fill the gap between soil particles. And after it dry, it can formed a bond with soil particle so that soil become stronger and the slope as well. In this study, it will use experimental method, slope model in laboratory to simulate a real slope behavior in the field. The first model is the slope without any addition of cement. This model will be become a benchmark for the other models. The second model is a slope with improved soil that injects the slope with cement. Injection of cement is done with varying interval distance of injection point is 5 cm and 10 cm. Each slope model will be given a load until the slope collapses. The slope model will also be analyzed with slope stability program. The test results on the improved slope models will be compared with unimproved slope. In the initial test will consist of 3 model. First model is soil without improvement or cement injection, second model is soil

  14. The effect of shearing rate and slope angle on the simple shear response of marine clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscontin, G.; Rutherford, C.

    2010-12-01

    The response of submarine slopes to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and local tsunami hazard. Evaluation of submarine slope stability requires characterization of soil behavior and relies on the selection of appropriate parameter values. Although the traditional simple shear device has been used to investigate cyclic loading effects on marine clay, it does not allow for complex loading conditions which often contribute to the failure on submarine slopes. Understanding the interaction between the initial shear stress, the slope angle, and the multi-directional shaking due to earthquakes or storm loading is an important aspect to understanding the failure mechanisms of submarine slope failures. The initial static driving force on the slope is combined with the dynamic loading by storms and earthquakes to create complex loading paths. Therefore, the ability to apply complex stress or strain paths is important to fully study the shear response of marine clays on submarine slopes. A new multi-directional simple shear device developed at Texas A&M University allows loading along three independent axes, two perpendicular horizontal directions to allow any stress or strain paths in the horizontal plane, and a third in the vertical direction. This device is used to investigate the response of Gulf of Mexico marine deposits to different loading conditions. To study the effect of slope angle on the shear response of the soil, samples are subjected to a shear stress during consolidation, Kα consolidation. One-dimensional monotonic and cyclic shearing of Ko consolidated specimens is used to simulate level ground conditions, whereas sloping surfaces were simulated using Kα consolidation for both monotonic and cyclic tests. The effects of shearing rate on the soil response are investigated using strain controlled tests at varying frequencies.

  15. Comparison of the Effects of the Different Methods for Computing the Slope Length Factor at a Watershed Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Suhua

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The slope length factor is one of the parameters of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE and is sometimes calculated based on a digital elevation model (DEM. The methods for calculating the slope length factor are important because the values obtained may depend on the methods used for calculation. The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in spatial distribution of the slope length factor between the different methods at a watershed scale. One method used the uniform slope length factor equation (USLFE where the effects of slope irregularities (such as slope gradient, etc. on soil erosion by water were not considered. The other method used segmented slope length factor equation(SSLFE which considered the effects of slope irregularities on soil erosion by water. The Arc Macro Language (AML Version 4 program for the revised universal soil loss equation(RUSLE.which uses the USLFE, was chosen to calculate the slope length factor. In a parallel analysis, the AML code of RUSLE Version 4 was modified according to the SSLFE to calculate the slope length factor. Two watersheds with different slope and gully densities were chosen. The results show that the slope length factor and soil loss using the USLFE method were lower than those using the SSLFE method, especially on downslopes watershed with more frequent steep slopes and higher gully densities. In addition, the slope length factor and soil loss calculated by the USLFE showed less spatial variation.

  16. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China: Effect on Rural Households’ Livelihood Diversification

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Liu

    2014-01-01

    By overcoming the barriers that limit access to financial liquidity and human resource, the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) can promote rural livelihood diversification. This paper examines this effect using a household survey data set spanning the 1999 implementation of the Sloping land conversion program. Our results show that SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention on rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that there exist heterogeneous ef...

  17. Effects of lava heating on volatile-rich slopes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The upper crust of Io may be very rich in volatile sulfur and SO2. The surface is also highly volcanically active, and slopes may be warmed by radiant heat from the lava. This is particularly the case in paterae, which commonly host volcanic eruptions and long-lived lava lakes. Paterae slopes are highly variable, but some are greater than 70°. I model the heating of a volatile slope for two end-member cases: instantaneous emplacement of a large sheet flow, and persistent heating by a long-lived lava lake. In general, single flows can briefly raise sulfur to the melting temperature, or drive a modest amount of sublimation of SO2. Persistently lava-covered surfaces will drive much more significant geomorphic effects, with potentially significant sublimation and slope retreat. In addition to the direct effects, heating is likely to weaken slope materials and may trigger mass wasting. Thus, if the upper crust of Io is rich in these volatile species, future missions with high-resolution imaging are likely to observe actively retreating slopes around lava lakes and other locations of frequent eruptions.

  18. 1 The Effect of Camber Bed Drainage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Strip cropping: a potential IPM tool for reducing whitefly. 109. Introduction. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an ... to controlling this disease have been considered but have not been fully evaluated to examine ... an effective trap crop in this system as they were more attractive to Lygus spp. and spider mites than the ...

  19. The 137Cs technique applied to steep Mediterranean slopes (Part I): the effects of lithology, slope morphology and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J.M.; Boix Fayos, C.; Meijer, de R.J.; Graaff, van der E.R.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations in the soil of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides have been investigated in order to assess the applicability of the Cs-137 technique in an area of typical Mediterranean steep slopes. This technique can be used to estimate net soil redistribution rates but its potential in areas

  20. The Cs-137 technique applied to steep Mediterranean slopes (Part I) : the effects of lithology, slope morphology and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations in the soil of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides have been investigated in order to assess the applicability of the Cs-137 technique in an area of typical Mediterranean steep slopes. This technique can be used to estimate net soil redistribution rates but its potential in areas

  1. 1 The Effect of Camber Bed Drainage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    1.47. 0.14. 15–30. 7.4. 1.68. 0.081. 1.21. 0.13. 30–45. 7.5. 1.65. 0.077. 1.37. 0.13. LSD (P = 0.05) ns ns ns ns ns. TABLE 3. Interactive effect of landform and crop row on soil nutrient properties of the Vertisols of the Accra Plains. Landform. Crop row. pH. OM (g kg-1). N (%). Available P. Available K. (mg kg-1). (cmol kg-1). Flat.

  2. Rheological Characteristics of Weak Rock Mass and Effects on the Long-Term Stability of Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianhong; Xu, Tao; Liu, Hongyuan; Zhang, Chunming; Wang, Shanyong; Rui, Yongqin; Shen, Li

    2014-11-01

    The creep deformation behavior of the northern slope of an open-pit mine is introduced. Direct shear creep tests are then conducted for the samples taken from the northern slope to study the rheological characteristics of the rock mass. The experimental results are analyzed afterwards using an empirical method to develop a rheological model for the rock mass. The proposed rheological model is finally applied to understand the creep behavior of the northern slope, predict the long-term stability, and guide appropriate measures to be taken at suitable times to increase the factor of safety to ensure stability. Through this study, a failure criterion is proposed to predict the long-term stability of the slope based on the rheological characteristics of the rock mass and a critical deformation rate is adopted to determine when appropriate measures should be taken to ensure slope stability. The method has been successfully applied for stability analysis and engineering management of the toppling and slippage of the northern slope of the open-pit mine. This success in application indicates that it is theoretically accurate, practically feasible, and highly cost-effective.

  3. Effect of variations in rainfall intensity on slope stability in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Kristo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous scientific evidence has given credence to the true existence and deleterious impacts of climate change. One aspect of climate change is the variations in rainfall patterns, which affect the flux boundary condition across ground surface. A possible disastrous consequence of this change is the occurrence of rainfall-induced slope failures. This paper aims to investigate the variations in rainfall patterns in Singapore and its effect on slope stability. Singapore's historical rainfall data from Seletar and Paya Lebar weather stations for the period of 1985–2009 were obtained and analysed by duration using linear regression. A general increasing trend was observed in both weather stations, with a possible shift to longer duration rainfall events, despite being statistically insignificant according to the Mann-Kendall test. Using the derived trends, projected rainfall intensities in 2050 and 2100 were used in the seepage and slope stability analyses performed on a typical residual soil slope in Singapore. A significant reduction in factor of safety was observed in the next 50 years, with only a marginal decrease in factor of safety in the subsequent 50 years. This indicates a possible detrimental effect of variations in rainfall patterns on slope stability in Singapore, especially in the next 50 years. The statistical analyses on rainfall data from Seletar and Paya Lebar weather stations for the period of 1985–2009 indicated that rainfall intensity tend to increase over the years, with a possible shift to longer duration rainfall events in the future. The stability analyses showed a significant decrease in factor of safety from 2003 to 2050 due to increase in rainfall intensity, suggesting that a climate change might have existed beyond 2009 with possibly detrimental effects to slope stability. Keywords: Climate change, Rainfall, Seepage, Slope stability

  4. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studying the role of anisotropy in response to geotechnical structure requires the constitutive model which comprehensively accounts the effect of anisotropy on the mechanical behavior of soil. Casagrande & Carillo (1944) have presented a closed-form equation for relating between the soil cohesion in Mohr–Columb ...

  5. Distributor effects near the bottom region of turbulent fluidized beds

    OpenAIRE

    Sobrino Fernández, Celia; Ellis, Noko; Vega Blázquez, Mercedes de

    2009-01-01

    The distributor plate effects on the hydrodynamic characteristics of turbulent fluidized beds are investigated by obtaining measurements of pressure and radial voidage profiles in a column diameter of 0.29 m with Group A particles using bubble bubble-cap or perforated plate distributors. Distributor pressure drop measurements between the two distributors are compared with the theoretical estimations while the influence of the mass inventory is studied. Comparison is established fo...

  6. An investigation of the effect of funding on the slope of the yield curve

    OpenAIRE

    D M Egginton; S G Hall

    1993-01-01

    Market practitioners often have a firm view that funding operations have clearly observable effects on the slope of the yield curve. The standard theory of the expectations model of the yield curve, however, suggests that the sole determinant of the slope of the yield curve is expectations of future short-rates and so funding policy, ceteris paribus, should have no effect. This paper develops a high frequency set of data for the UK yield curve. Principal components are used to decompose the y...

  7. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion.

  8. The effect of plant root system on the stability of road cutting slope in seasonal frozen regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, W.; Guo, Y.

    2009-04-01

    When highway is built in seasonally frozen regions of Northeast China, it is inevitable to excavate the mountain slope in order to meet the route requirement. During highway construction, a mass of extraction damage the surface vegetation and cut off the runoff passage of groundwater, cause the outcrop of underground water on the cutting slope and affect the intrinsic ground stress equilibrium of the slope body, lead to the redistribution of ground stress and the heat balance change in near-surface of the cutting slope. Under influence of rainfall in autumn and the cold climate in winter, the moisture transfer to frozen zone of cutting slope and lead to the frost heave in shallow depth of the slope. During the thawing period in spring, with effect of integrated factors including rainfall and increasing temperature, ice kernels both on the surface and near the surface of cut slope thaw quickly. The water melting from frozen soil, will hampered by frozen layer in process of infiltration. As a result, the water content of the intersection between the freezing and melting layer is high enough to be saturation or even over-saturation, and accordingly cause the intrinsic effective stress on the slope body decreased. Under the function of gravity, near-surface slope collapses partially or entirely. Adopted the method combined field test and lab test, this article analyzed the mechanism of slope landslide, studied quantitatively the effect of root system of slope plant on the slope stability. The results showed that the mechanical indicators of the soil changed obviously after the first freeze-thaw cycle, but changed little in later freeze-thaw cycles. The shear strength of root-soil systems is 2 times of soil system. Compared with masonry body, protecting the slope by the plant, such as Amorpha, Lespedeza could reduce the slope load and was more stability. Key words: road slope, seasonal frozen regions, plant protection, stability, landslide

  9. Effect of slope and depth on soil chemical properties of a typical alfisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnenne Bassey Anwanane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management options proffered with respect to the chemical properties along a toposequence are a key to sustainable crop and soil productivity since nutrient status and soil properties are related to topography of the land area. A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of slope and depth on selected soil chemical properties at the University of Ilorin Teaching and Research Farm in 2013. Three points: upper, middle and bottom slope, along a toposequence with an average distance of 200 m apart were delineated and sampled for soil analysis at depths of 0–30 cm, 30–60 cm and 60–90 cm using core sampler and auger. Soil chemical properties which included pH in water, pH in KCl, electrical conductivity, organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, exchangeable bases (Ca, Mg, K, Na, exchangeable acidity, effective cation exchange capacity, base saturation, exchangeable sodium percentage and sodium adsorption ratio were determined in the laboratory/ computed afterwards. Data from the analysis were subjected to ANOVA using 2x3 factorial combinations of factors slope and depth - in randomized complete block design (RCBD with five replicates. Results on the effects of slope and soil depth on soil chemical properties showed that soil depth affected all the measured soil chemical properties except exchangeable sodium. The pH (both in water and KCl, electrical conductivity, available phosphorus and exchangeable potassium were not affected by slope. Also, pH, exchangeable magnesium and sodium were not affected by the interaction between the effect of slope and soil depth.

  10. The effect of tapering on a magnetocaloric regenerator bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallolio, Stefano; Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    To design a high efficiency magnetocaloric heat pump for the residential sector, we focused on the improvement of the performance of the regenerator bed. In particular, placing the regenerators circumferentially on a plane, we decided to use tapered regenerators instead of the straight channel ones....... Therefore, this paper investigates the effect of the tapering of the regenerators, which exhibit better air-gap utilization. Several simulations using a 1D AMR model were run to study the performance of the tapered regenerator, and the results were compared to the case of the straight regenerator bed....... Moreover, the temperature span was held fixed at 25 K, and the working temperature of the regenerator was shifted to study the sensitivity to the variation of the working conditions. This paper considers a 10-layer regenerator, with Curie temperature (TC) spacing of 2.5 K....

  11. On the effect of segregation on intense bimodal bed load

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    Zrostlík Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-channel two-phase flow above a granular mobile bed is studied experimentally and theoretically. In the two-phase flow, water serves as a carrying liquid for plastic grains transported as collisional contact load in the upper-stage plane bed regime. The investigation evaluates friction- and transport characteristics of the flow under the condition of intense collisional transport of grains and links them with the internal structure of the two-phase flow. The paper focusses on the effect of bimodal solids (mixed two fractions of grains of similar density and different size and shape on the flow characteristics and internal structure. Hence, experimental results obtained for the bimodal mixture are compared with results for individual grain fractions. The experiments show that the bimodal character of the transported solids affects the layered internal structure of the flow as a result of fraction segregation due primarily to gravity (kinetic sieving during transport. The segregation also affects the friction- and transport characteristics of intense bed load. In the paper, the effects are described and quantified.

  12. On the effect of segregation on intense bimodal bed load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrostlík, Štěpán; Matoušek, Václav

    Open-channel two-phase flow above a granular mobile bed is studied experimentally and theoretically. In the two-phase flow, water serves as a carrying liquid for plastic grains transported as collisional contact load in the upper-stage plane bed regime. The investigation evaluates friction- and transport characteristics of the flow under the condition of intense collisional transport of grains and links them with the internal structure of the two-phase flow. The paper focusses on the effect of bimodal solids (mixed two fractions of grains of similar density and different size and shape) on the flow characteristics and internal structure. Hence, experimental results obtained for the bimodal mixture are compared with results for individual grain fractions. The experiments show that the bimodal character of the transported solids affects the layered internal structure of the flow as a result of fraction segregation due primarily to gravity (kinetic) sieving during transport. The segregation also affects the friction- and transport characteristics of intense bed load. In the paper, the effects are described and quantified.

  13. The effect of transverse bed slope and sediment mobility on bend sorting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisscher, S.A.H.; Baar, A.W.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.; Kleinhans, MG; Hoitink, A.J.F.; de Ruijsscher, T.V.; Geertsema, T.J.; Makaske, B.; Wallinga, J.; Candel, J.H.J.; Poelman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Lateral sorting (= bend sorting) is observed in  natural meanders, where the inner and outer  bend are fairly fine and coarse, respectively  (e.g. Julien and Anthony, 2002; Clayton and  Pitlick, 2007). This is caused by the mass  differences between grains on a

  14. Effect of rainfall infiltration on the hydraulic response and failure mechanisms of sandy slope models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Montoya-Domínguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results obtained from silty sand slope models subjected to an artificial rainfall. Four models were constructed to evaluate the effect of initial water content and rainfall intensity on the hydraulic behavior and failure mechanisms of the slopes. The models were instrumented with volumetric water content sensors to monitor the advance of the water front, and inclinometers to measure lateral movements of the slope. The models were subjected to rainfall intensities ranging from 25 to 50 mm/h, and durations from 19 to 152 minutes. The influence of low intensity rainfall events before a high intensity rainfall is discussed herein. The results showed that the time the slope models required to reach failure was influenced by the soil initial water content, being shorter at high initial water contents. These results are useful to understand the behavior of unsaturated natural slopes and embankments exposed to rainfall infiltration, and to complement the existing laboratory database existing in this subject.

  15. Effects of heavy metal pollution on enzyme activities in railway cut slope soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaoyi; Ai, Yingwei; Li, Ruirui; Zhang, Wenjuan

    2018-03-07

    Railway transportation is an important transportation mode. However, railway transportation causes heavy metal pollution in surrounding soils. Heavy metal pollution has a serious negative impact on the natural environment, including a decrease of enzyme activities in soil and degradation of sensitive ecosystems. Some studies investigated the heavy metal pollution at railway stations or certain transportation hubs. However, the pollution accumulated in artificial cut slope soil all along the rails is still questioned. The interest on non-point source pollution from railways is increasing in an effort to protect the soil quality along the line. In this study, we studied spatial distributions of heavy metals and five enzyme activities, i.e., urease (UA), saccharase (SAC), protease (PRO), catalase (CAT), and polyphenol oxidase (POA) in the soil, and the correlation among them beside three different railways in Sichuan Province, China, as well. Soil samples were respectively collected from 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 150 m away from the rails (depth of 0-8 cm). Results showed that Mn, Cd, Cu, and Zn were influenced by railway transportation in different degrees while Pb was not. Heavy metal pollution was due to the abrasion of the gravel bed as well as the tracks and freight transportation which caused more heavy metal pollution than passenger transportation. Enzymatic activities were significantly negatively correlated with heavy metals in soils, especially Zn and Cu. Finally, it is proposed that combined use of PRO and POA activities could be an indicator of the heavy metal pollution in cut slope soils. The protective measures aimed at heavy metal pollution caused by railway transportation in cut slope soils are urgent.

  16. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  17. The effect of 8 days of strict bed rest on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Harder-Lauridsen, Nina Majlund; Benatti, Fabiana Braga

    2016-01-01

    in the levels of GLP-1 and Glucagon. Bed rest led to a mean loss of 2.4 kg of fat-free mass, and induced insulin resistance evaluated by the Matsuda index, but did not affect the incretin effect (P = 0.6). In conclusion, 8 days of bed rest induces insulin resistance, but we did not see evidence of an associated......Bed rest and physical inactivity are the consequences of hospital admission for many patients. Physical inactivity induces changes in glucose metabolism, but its effect on the incretin effect, which is reduced in, e.g., Type 2 diabetes, is unknown. To investigate how 8 days of strict bed rest...... affects the incretin effect, 10 healthy nonobese male volunteers underwent 8 days of strict bed rest. Before and after the intervention, all volunteers underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by an intravenous glucose infusion (IVGI) on the following day to mimic the blood glucose profile...

  18. Slow sedimentary processes on-a-chip: experiments on porous flow effects on granular bed creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssais, M.; Maldarelli, C.; Shattuck, M.; Morris, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Steep soils dynamics is hard to catch. they exhibit very slow granular creep most of the time, and sometimes, mostly under or after rain, turn into a landslide, a very fast avalanche flow.The conditions of transition from soil creep to avalanching remains a lot non-understood, and Safe Factor law (empirical criteria, function of rain intensity and duration). On another side, in marine fast deposition environments, compaction drives vertical porous flow, which makes bed shear resistance change, and form over time bed size patterns (pipes, dishes) or mechanical heterogeneities.Capturing how the slow creep dynamics depends on the porous flow would allow for much more accurate landscape evolution modeling.We present here preliminary results of an experimental investigation of one the major triggering condition for soils destabilization: rain infiltration, and more generally porous flow through a tilted granular bed. In a quasi-2D microfluidics channel, a flat sediment bed made of spherical particles is prepared, in fully submerged condition. It is thereafter tilted (at slope under critical slope of avalanching) and simultaneously put under vertical weak porous flow (well under the critical flow of liquefaction regarding positive pressure gradients). The two control parameters are varied, and local particles concentration and motion are measured. Interestingly, although staying in the sub-critical creeping regime, we observe an acceleration of the bed deformation downward, as the porous flow and the bed slope are increased, until the criteria for avalanching is reached. Those results appear to present similitudes with the case of tilted dry sediment bed under controlled vibrations. Consequently it opens the discussion about a potential universal model of landslides triggering due to frequent seismological and rainstorm events.

  19. Nonhydrostatic simulation of hyperpycnal river plumes on sloping continental shelves: Flow structures and nonhydrostatic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chien-Yung; Chou, Yi-Ju

    2018-04-01

    A three-dimensional nonhydrostatic coastal model SUNTANS is used to study hyperpycnal plumes on sloping continental shelves with idealized domain setup. The study aims to examine the nonhydrostatic effect of the plunging hyperpycnal plume and the associated flow structures on different shelf slopes. The unstructured triangular grid in SUNTANS allows for local refinement of the grid size for regions in which the flow varies abruptly, while retaining low-cost computation using the coarse grid resolution for regions in which the flow is more uniform. These nonhydrostatic simulations reveal detailed three-dimensional flow structures in both transient and steady states. Via comparison with the hydrostatic simulation, we show that the nonhydrostatic effect is particularly important before plunging, when the plume is subject to significant changes in both the along-shore and vertical directions. After plunging, where the plume becomes an undercurrent that is more spatially uniform, little difference is found between the hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic simulations in the present gentle- and mild-slope cases. A grid-dependence study shows that the nonhydrostatic effect can be seen only when the grid resolution is sufficiently fine that the calculation is not overly diffusive. A depth-integrated momentum budget analysis is then conducted to show that the flow convergence due to plunging is an important factor in the three-dimensional flow structures. Moreover, it shows that the nonhydrostatic effect becomes more important as the slope increases, and in the steep-slope case, neglect of transport of the vertical momentum during plunging in the hydrostatic case further leads to an erroneous prediction for the undercurrent.

  20. Effects of lateral confinement in natural and leveed reaches of a gravel-bed river: Snake River, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Christina M.; Legleiter, Carl; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of natural and anthropogenic changes in confining margin width by applying remote sensing techniques – fusing LiDAR topography with image-derived bathymetry – over a large spatial extent: 58 km of the Snake River, Wyoming, USA. Fused digital elevation models from 2007 and 2012 were differenced to quantify changes in the volume of stored sediment, develop morphological sediment budgets, and infer spatial gradients in bed material transport. Our study spanned two similar reaches that were subject to different controls on confining margin width: natural terraces versus artificial levees. Channel planform in reaches with similar slope and confining margin width differed depending on whether the margins were natural or anthropogenic. The effects of tributaries also differed between the two reaches. Generally, the natural reach featured greater confining margin widths and was depositional, whereas artificial lateral constriction in the leveed reach produced a sediment budget that was closer to balanced. Although our remote sensing methods provided topographic data over a large area, net volumetric changes were not statistically significant due to the uncertainty associated with bed elevation estimates. We therefore focused on along-channel spatial differences in bed material transport rather than absolute volumes of sediment. To complement indirect estimates of sediment transport derived by morphological sediment budgeting, we collected field data on bed mobility through a tracer study. Surface and subsurface grain size measurements were combined with bed mobility observations to calculate armoring and dimensionless sediment transport ratios, which indicated that sediment supply exceeded transport capacity in the natural reach and vice versa in the leveed reach. We hypothesize that constriction by levees induced an initial phase of incision and bed armoring. Because levees prevented bank erosion, the channel excavated sediment by

  1. An experimental study of the effect of collision properties on spout fluidized bed dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buijtenen, M.S.; Börner, Matthias; Deen, N.G.; Heinrich, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally study the effect of collision properties of different particle systems on the bed dynamics of a spout fluidized bed. This is done in different flow regimes: the spout-fluidization regime (case A), the jet-in-fluidized-bed regime (case B) and the spouting-with-aeration

  2. Effect of continental slope on N-wave type tsunami run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moode Siva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Frequent tsunamis across the globe have devastated the coasts and led to significant loss of life and property. This calls for a better understanding and estimation of the tsunami characteristics. Considering the scale of the problem, numerical modelling is the most suitable method for tsunami simulation and understanding. Most tsunamis are long-period wave and governed by shallow water equations. Although tsunami is expected to initiate in the deeper waters with very less height, it may have significant amplification while traversing over the slopes. In this study, an attempt is made to understand the effect of continental slope on the transmission, propagation and run-up of tsunami. This study provides better understanding of the physical process through computation of tsunami run-up height and arrival time. To carry out this investigation and to get a preliminary understanding, a one-dimensional numerical model study is carried out using shallow water equations. These equations are solved using Crank–Nicolson finite difference approximation method on a staggered grid. This study is carried out by considering N-wave-type tsunami profile with leading depression (trough. In this study, various continental slope profiles available along the Indian coast were considered. The amplification or attenuation of the tsunami characteristics over these cross-sections was studied. Significant change in the tsunami run-up is observed for different continental slope and water depth on continental shelf.

  3. Thermofluid effect on energy storage in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Nadjiba; El Ganaoui, Mohammed; Moummi, Abdelhafid

    2016-05-01

    The development of innovative systems of heat storage is imperative to improve the efficiency of the existing systems used in the thermal solar energy applications. Several techniques were developed and realized in this context. The technology of the sand fluidized bed (sandTES) offers a promising alternative to the current state-of-the-art of the heat storage systems, such as fixed bed using a storage materials, as sand, ceramic, and stones, etc. Indeed, the use of the fluidization technique allows an effective heat transfer to the solid particles. With the sand, an important capacity of storage is obtained by an economic and ecological material [N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, Appl. Mech. Mater. 621, 214 (2014); N. Mahfoudi, A. Khachkouch, A. Moummi B. Benhaoua, M. El Ganaoui, Mech. Ind. 16, 411 (2015); N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, F. Mnasri, K.M. Aboudou, 3e Colloque internationale Francophone d"énergétique et mécanique, Comores, 2014, p. 91]. This paper presents a CFD simulation of the hydrodynamics and the thermal transient behavior of a fluidized bed reactor of sand, to determine the characteristics of storage. The simulation shows a symmetry breaking that occurs and gave way to chaotic transient generation of bubble formation after 3 s. Furthermore, the predicted average temperature of the solid phase (sand) increases gradually versus the time with a gain of 1 °C in an interval of 10 s. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  4. Biofilm effect on flow structure over a permeable bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Aybar, Marcelo; Perez-Calleja, Patricia; Nerenberg, Robert; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Best, James; Sambrook Smith, Gregory; Christensen, Kenneth

    2017-11-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the fluid-solid interfaces in natural and industrial settings, such as water distribution systems and riverbeds among others. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of biofilms can influence mass and momentum transport between the subsurface and freestream. However, this interaction is not fully understood, in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. In this work, the effect of biofilm on flow structure over a permeable bed is studied. Experiments are conducted in a closed water channel equipped with an idealized two-dimensional permeable bed. Prior to conducting flow experiments, the models are placed within an independent recirculating reactor for biofilm growth. Once a targeted biofilm growth stage is achieved, the models are transferred to the water channel and subjected to transitional and turbulent flows. Long-distance microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements are performed to quantify the effect of biofilm on the turbulence structure of the free flow as well as the freestream-subsurface flow interaction. Funded by UK Natural Environment Research Council.

  5. The effect of tibial slope in acute ACL-insufficient patients on concurrent meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Isabelle; Zantop, Thore; Zeman, Florian; Seitz, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the medial and lateral posterior tibial slope (MPTS, LPTS) in patients with acutely ruptured ACL on the menisci. It was hypothesized that medial and lateral meniscus lesions are seen more often with high PTS (posterior tibial slope). We hypothesized that in case of a high tibial slope a possible meniscus lesion is more often located in the posterior horn of the meniscus than in knees with a low tibial slope. We identified 537 patients with ACL insufficiency between 2012 and 2013. Of these, 71 patients were eligible for the study according to the study's criteria. PTS was measured via MRI and classified into two groups: >10° for high tibial slope and ≤10° for low tibial slope. Any meniscal lesion was documented during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction and evaluated regarding meniscal lesion patterns with high and low PTS, taking into account the type and the location of the tear (anterior horn, intermediate part and posterior horn). Statistical analysis for differences in meniscal lesion was performed using Chi-square tests and McNemar tests for dependent variables. The level of significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. High PTS (MPTS and LPTS) was associated with a higher incidence of meniscal lesions with an odds ratio of 2.11, respectively, 3.44; however, no statistical significance was found. Among the total number of ACL-insufficient knees studied, the meniscal lesion spread more often to the posterior part in the group with a low PTS. In contrast, less damage of the posterior horn of the meniscus could be found in the group with a high PTS. High PTS seems to predetermine for meniscal lesion in an acute ACL-insufficient knee. More damage to the posterior part of the menisci could generally be seen but was not associated with a high PTS. There was no statistical significance to support the initial hypothesis. Further research is needed to find out if factors other than tibial slope are risk factors for meniscal

  6. The effect of pile parameters on the factor of safety of piled-slopes using 3D numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelaziz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Slope stability can be achieved using different methods. Piles are commonly used to stabilize slopes or to improve slope stability. Stabilized slopes with piles are numerically studied in the current paper. A 3 dimensional (3D finite element study is carried out to investigate the effect of different parameters on the stability of slopes stabilized with piles. A 3D finite element model was developed using the finite element program PLAXIS. The 3D model was verified using experimental data from the literature for a stabilized silty sand slope in a large-scale physical model. A parametric study was undertaken to study the effect of pile position, pile inclination, pile length and pile diameter on the factor of safety of the piled-slopes. The findings of the research were compared to other findings from the literature. The results show that using the 3D aspect gives more insight into the complicated slope stability problem. The study determines the optimum location of the pile and its optimum inclination to achieve the maximum stability. It shows that after a certain length of the pile, increasing the pile length becomes unnecessary and that the diameter of the pile has a relatively minor effect on the factor of safety of piled-slopes.

  7. [Effects of gravel mulch technology on soil erosion resistance and plant growth of river flinty slope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xie, San-Tao; Ruan, Ai-Dong; Bian, Xun-Wen

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the technical difficulties such as the stability and water balance in the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope, a gravel mulch technology was proposed, with the effects of different gravel mulch treatments on the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property, and plant growth investigated by anti-erosion and pot experiments. The results showed that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size could obviously enhance the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property and plant biomass, but no obvious differences were observed between the mulch thickness of 5 cm and 8 cm. It was indicated that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size and 5 cm in thickness was an effective and economical technology for the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope.

  8. Lithological effects in soil formation and soil slips on weathering-limited slopes underlain by granitic bedrocks in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Wakatsuki, Tsuyoshi; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2008-01-01

    Soil slips occur every few years due to heavy rains on biotite granite (Gb) and hornblende biotite granite (Ghb) slopes in the Taga Mountains, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. The occurrence density of soil slips per unit area is 2.7 times greater in the Gb slopes than that in Ghb slopes. We examined the chemical, mineral, physical, and mechanical properties of two soil profiles on soil-slip scars in these slopes to study the effect of bedrock mineral composition on the density of soil slips. For a...

  9. The Influence of Flow and Bed Slope on Gas Transfer in Steep Streams and Their Implications for Evasion of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, L.; Rawlins, B. G.; Farr, G.; Bell, R.; Gooddy, D. C.

    2017-11-01

    The evasion of greenhouse gases (including CO2, CH4, and N2O) from streams and rivers to the atmosphere is an important process in global biogeochemical cycles, but our understanding of gas transfer in steep (>10%) streams, and under varying flows, is limited. We investigated gas transfer using combined tracer injections of SF6 and salt. We used a novel experimental design in which we compared four very steep (18.4-29.4%) and four moderately steep (3.7-7.6%) streams and conducted tests in each stream under low flow conditions and during a high-discharge event. Most dissolved gas evaded over short distances ( 100 and 200-400 m, respectively), so accurate estimates of evasion fluxes will require sampling of dissolved gases at these scales to account for local sources. We calculated CO2 gas transfer coefficients (KCO2) and found statistically significant differences between larger KCO2 values for steeper (mean 0.465 min-1) streams compared to those with shallower slopes (mean 0.109 min-1). Variations in flow had an even greater influence. KCO2 was substantially larger under high (mean 0.497 min-1) compared to low flow conditions (mean 0.077 min-1). We developed a statistical model to predict KCO2 using values of streambed slope × discharge which accounted for 94% of the variation. We show that two models using slope and velocity developed by Raymond et al. (2012) for streams and rivers with shallower slopes also provide reasonable estimates of our CO2 gas transfer velocities (kCO2; m d-1). We developed a robust field protocol which could be applied in future studies.

  10. Effect of stone content on water flow velocity over Loess slope: non-frozen soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Lei, Tingwu; Gao, Yuan; Qu, Liqin

    2017-06-01

    Stony soils are commonly found worldwide and are considerably studied for their hydrological characteristics and effect on soil erosion. Water flow velocity is an important parameter in understanding the effect of stone content on hydrodynamics and soil erosion. In this study, laboratory experiments were used to measure rill flow velocity by using electrolyte tracer method under different hydraulic conditions: flow rates of 1, 2, 4, and 8 L/min, slope gradients of 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°, and stone mass contents amounting to 0%, 10%, 20% and 50%. Nine sensors, which were 1 m apart along the 8 m long rill, were used to measure flow velocity by tracing solute transport. Measured flow velocity increased with slope gradient and flow rate. The highest increase in flow velocity was measured from 15° to 20° which were also affected by flow rate. Effects of discharge rate on flow velocity presented the largest difference when flow rate increased from 2 L/min to 8 L/min at slope gradients higher than 5°. The effects of different factors were quantified by a regression model with high accuracy of 0.99. Maximum flow velocity of water was predicted at 15.23% of stone content. Flow velocity increased with 0-15.23% of stone content but decreased at higher values. This study aims at further understanding the hydrodynamics of soil erosion and sediment transport behaviors in hillslopes with different stone contents to obtain information for quantifying soil erosion on stony slopes.

  11. Effect of various drying bed on thermodynamic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Motevali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study thermodynamic parameter and energy consumption in drying of two plant dill and mint in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid with using a hot air drying was investigated. Experimental was conducted in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid and four levels temperature (30, 40, 50 and 60 °C. Maximum energy consumption in dill drying at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 16.41 MJ and minimum energy consumption at 30 °C and fix bed to be 2.77 MJ. Also minimum energy consumption in mint drying at 60 °C and fix bed to be 3.64 MJ and maximum energy consumption at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 28.65 MJ. The highest energy, drying and thermal efficiency for both mint and dill was achieved at 60 °C on the fixed bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 40 °C and on the fluidized bed. Also the highest power and specific heat consumption for both mint and dill was achieved at 40 °C on the fluid bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 30 °C and on the fluidized bed.

  12. Effect of cold cap boundary conditions on Joule-heating flow in the sloping bottom cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jiaju; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tsuzuki, Nobuyoshi; Kikura, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    Flow behavior in a sloping bottom cavity is observed to study the effect of cavity shape on flow behavior for Joule-heating flow. In the former study, a simple cubic cavity is applied to study the chaotic flow behavior of Joule-heating convection due to simplification as the real melter case is complicated. In this study, a sloping bottom cavity of the dimension one-fifth of the actual melter is applied to study the detail flow behavior. Carbon electrodes and top cooling surface are placed to make Joule-heating and the chaotic flow behavior. The working fluid is 80%wt Glycerol-water solution with LiCl as electrolyte. To observe the chaotic flow behavior spatio-temporally, Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) is applied in this experiment to obtain the one-dimensional continuous velocity profiles in the center line of cavity. Particle Image Velocity (PIV) method is also applied to observe the two-dimensional flow behavior and to examine the cross-check between UVP and PIV for the chaotic flow behavior with temperature distribution. The flow profiles of the former cubic cavity and the sloping bottom cavity are compared changing voltage magnitude and cooling temperature of the electrodes side to analyze the effect of cavity shape under Joule-heating condition. The flow behavior in the upper part of the sloping bottom cavity is similar to that in the cubic cavity in the experiment in whole cavity, the range down-flow achieved is larger than the cubic cavity. (author)

  13. Effect of combined ecological floating bed for eutrophic lake remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liguo; Wang, Haiping

    2017-05-01

    A novel combined ecological floating bed(CEFB) integrated high-density hydrophyte and aquatic animals, the wave-making equipments, water cycling automatic aerators and fluorescence inducing equipments. The water quality of a eutrophic lake was improved significantly after three months remediation of CEFB. Compared with the background value, the results showed that the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN), ammonia(NH3-N), total phosphorous(TP) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the water reached 31.5%, 33%, 30.5% and 53%, respectively. CEFB could manipulate biotic interactions in the aquatic ecosystem, and then absorb eutrophic material efficiently by the co-effect of floating the sediment slowly, refreshing the static eutrophic water body, changing the photosynthetic and biochemical environment of the eutrophic water body and inducing plankton directional movement. At the same time, plants and fish grew good in CEFB,which can bring economic income to some extent.

  14. Effects of topographic data quality on estimates of shallow slope stability using different regolith depth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.

    2017-01-01

    Thickness of colluvium or regolith overlying bedrock or other consolidated materials is a major factor in determining stability of unconsolidated earth materials on steep slopes. Many efforts to model spatially distributed slope stability, for example to assess susceptibility to shallow landslides, have relied on estimates of constant thickness, constant depth, or simple models of thickness (or depth) based on slope and other topographic variables. Assumptions of constant depth or thickness rarely give satisfactory results. Geomorphologists have devised a number of different models to represent the spatial variability of regolith depth and applied them to various settings. I have applied some of these models that can be implemented numerically to different study areas with different types of terrain and tested the results against available depth measurements and landslide inventories. The areas include crystalline rocks of the Colorado Front Range, and gently dipping sedimentary rocks of the Oregon Coast Range. Model performance varies with model, terrain type, and with quality of the input topographic data. Steps in contour-derived 10-m digital elevation models (DEMs) introduce significant errors into the predicted distribution of regolith and landslides. Scan lines, facets, and other artifacts further degrade DEMs and model predictions. Resampling to a lower grid-cell resolution can mitigate effects of facets in lidar DEMs of areas where dense forest severely limits ground returns. Due to its higher accuracy and ability to penetrate vegetation, lidar-derived topography produces more realistic distributions of cover and potential landslides than conventional photogrammetrically derived topographic data.

  15. The Effect of Increased Electrical Field Strength of 950 MHz Waves on the EPSP Slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Firoozabadi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the last decade, exposure to electromagnetic waves due to base station antennas has increased. This study was planned to evaluate the effects of different electrical field strengths with 950 MHz waves of the GSM mobile phone system on the excitatory postsynaptic potentiation (EPSP slope of the dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP. Material and Methods: Twenty four naive male Wistar rats (3 months old, weighing 220 + 15 g were randomly divided into three groups (sham–exposed, GSM with 50.4 V/m and GSM with 60 V/m electrical field strength. The exposure program was carried out for 10 sessions during 3 days. The animals were exposed to the electromagnetic field for 45 minutes in a plastic chamber. Immediately after the exposure, anesthesia was induced for LTP induction and the field potentials were recorded for 60 minutes, then the EPSP slope and maintenance were analyzed. Results: Our data showed that whole-body exposure to 950 MHz waves of the GSM mobile phone system with 60 V/m electrical field strength could change the EPSP slope in rat brain hippocampus. Discussion and Conclusion: Increasing the electrical field strength could change synaptic plasticity and LTP characteristics in rat brain hippocampus.

  16. Green roof stormwater retention: effects of roof surface, slope, and media depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWoert, Nicholaus D; Rowe, D Bradley; Andresen, Jeffrey A; Rugh, Clayton L; Fernandez, R Thomas; Xiao, Lan

    2005-01-01

    Urban areas generate considerably more stormwater runoff than natural areas of the same size due to a greater percentage of impervious surfaces that impede water infiltration. Roof surfaces account for a large portion of this impervious cover. Establishing vegetation on rooftops, known as green roofs, is one method of recovering lost green space that can aid in mitigating stormwater runoff. Two studies were performed using several roof platforms to quantify the effects of various treatments on stormwater retention. The first study used three different roof surface treatments to quantify differences in stormwater retention of a standard commercial roof with gravel ballast, an extensive green roof system without vegetation, and a typical extensive green roof with vegetation. Overall, mean percent rainfall retention ranged from 48.7% (gravel) to 82.8% (vegetated). The second study tested the influence of roof slope (2 and 6.5%) and green roof media depth (2.5, 4.0, and 6.0 cm) on stormwater retention. For all combined rain events, platforms at 2% slope with a 4-cm media depth had the greatest mean retention, 87%, although the difference from the other treatments was minimal. The combination of reduced slope and deeper media clearly reduced the total quantity of runoff. For both studies, vegetated green roof systems not only reduced the amount of stormwater runoff, they also extended its duration over a period of time beyond the actual rain event.

  17. Use of Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry Technique to model Danxia red bed landform slope stability by discrete element modeling - case study at Mt. Langshan, Hunan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Scott; Hua, Peng; Luobin, Yan; Zhi, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Important to the evolution of Danxia landforms is how the rock cliffs are in large part shaped by rock collapse events, ranging from small break offs to large collapses. Quantitative research of Danxia landform evolution is still relatively young. In 2013-2014, Chinese and Slovak researchers conducted joint research to measure deformation of two large rock walls. In situ measurements of one rock wall found it to be stable, and Ps-InSAR measurements of the other were too few to be validated. Research conducted this year by Chinese researchers modeled the stress states of a stone pillar at Mt. Langshan, in Hunan Province, that toppled over in 2009. The model was able to demonstrate how stress states within the pillar changed as the soft basal layer retreated, but was not able to show the stress states at the point of complete collapse. According to field observations, the back side of the pillar fell away from the entire cliff mass before the complete collapse, and no models have been able to demonstrate the mechanisms behind this behavior. A further understanding of the mechanisms controlling rockfall events in Danxia landforms is extremely important because these stunning sceneries draw millions of tourists each year. Protecting the tourists and the infrastructure constructed to accommodate tourism is of utmost concern. This research will employ a UAV to as universally as possible photograph a stone pillar at Mt. Langshan that stands next to where the stone pillar collapsed in 2009. Using the recently developed structure-from-motion technique, a 3D model of the pillar will be constructed in order to extract geometrical data of the entire slope and its structural fabric. Also in situ measurements will be taken of the slope's toe during the field work exercises. These data are essential to constructing a realistic discrete element model using the 3DEC code and perform a kinematic analysis of the rock mass. Intact rock behavior will be based on the Mohr Coulomb

  18. The effect of bed particle size and deposit morphology on the filtration of magnetite through granular graphite beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.R.; Bercovich, E.J.; Liberman, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite filters are of great interest for water purification in nuclear power reactors' primary systems due to their possible operation at high temperature. The influence of the bed particle size on the retention of magnetite from aqueous suspensions at room temperature was studied. The filtration coefficient changes from 0.0 to 0.18 as the mean graphite particle diameter decreases from 1.2 to 0. mm. As the retention increases, there is also an increase in the differential pressure across the bed, so both effects must be considered in order to optimize filter's operation. The specific effective volume of the deposit was calculated with the Blake-Kozeny equation and the experimental specific volumes. These are much larger than the specific volume of solid magnetite. From the results, information regarding the morphology of the deposit in the filter is obtained. (M.E.L) [es

  19. The effect of posterior tibial slope on simulated laxity tests in cruciate-retaining TKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco A.; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan; Janssen, Dennis; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tibial slope can affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More posterior slope potentially helps releasing a too tight flexion gap and it is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However, the mechanism by which tibial slope affects the

  20. Power Peaking Effect of OTTO Fuel Scheme Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadipura, T.; Suwoto; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) type of Hight Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a very interesting nuclear reactor design to fulfill the growing electricity and heat demand with a superior passive safety features. Effort to introduce the PBR design to the market can be strengthen by simplifying its system with the Once-through-then-out (OTTO) cycle PBR in which the pebble fuel only pass the core once. Important challenge in the OTTO fuel scheme is the power peaking effect which limit the maximum nominal power or burnup of the design. Parametric survey is perform in this study to investigate the contribution of different design parameters to power peaking effect of OTTO cycle PBR. PEBBED code is utilized in this study to perform the equilibrium PBR core analysis for different design parameter and fuel scheme. The parameters include its core diameter, height-per-diameter (H/D), power density, and core nominal power. Results of this study show that diameter and H/D effectsare stronger compare to the power density and nominal core power. Results of this study might become an importance guidance for design optimization of OTTO fuel scheme PBR.

  1. A comparative study on the effective thermal conductivity of a single size beryllium pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Sena, A.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2004-01-01

    Solid breeder blankets generally use beryllium-helium pebble beds to ensure sufficient tritium breeding. The data of the effective thermal conductivity, k eff , of beryllium pebble beds is important to the design of fusion blankets. It serves as a database for benchmarking the models of pebble beds. The objective of this paper is to review and compare the available data (obtained by several studies) of the effective thermal conductivity of beryllium pebble beds in order to address the current status of these data. Two comparisons are presented: one for the data of k eff versus bed mean temperature and the second one for the data of k eff versus external applied pressures. The data (k eff versus bed temperature) reported by Enoeda et al., Dalle Donne et al., and UCLA, have a similar particle size and packing fraction. Despite their similarity, the standard deviation values of their data are around 32%. Also, the data of the effective thermal conductivity as a function of mechanical pressure have standard deviation values of ∼50%. From the presented comparisons, significant discrepancies among the available data of k eff of the beryllium pebble beds were observed. These discrepancies may be attributed to the apparent differences among available studies, such as experiment technique, packing fraction, particle characteristics, bed dimensions, and temperature range and gradient across the bed. (author)

  2. Effects of Fourteen-Day Bed Rest on Trunk Stabilizing Functions in Aging Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed rest has been shown to have detrimental effects on structural and functional characteristics of the trunk muscles, possibly affecting trunk and spinal stability. This is especially important in populations such as aging adults with often altered trunk stabilizing functions. This study examined the effects of a fourteen-day bed rest on anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex responses of the abdominal wall and back muscles in sixteen adult men. Postural activation of trunk muscles was measured using voluntary quick arm movement and sudden arm loading paradigm. Measurements were conducted prior to the bed rest, immediately after, and fourteen days after the bed rest. Immediately after the bed rest, latencies of anticipatory postural adjustments showed significant shortening, especially for the obliquus internus and externus muscles. After a fourteen-day recuperation period, anticipatory postural adjustments reached a near to complete recovery. On the contrary, reactive response latencies increased from pre-bed-rest to both post-bed-rest measurement sessions. Results indicate an important effect of bed rest on stabilizing functions of the trunk muscles in elderly adults. Moreover, there proved to be a significant deterioration of postural reactive responses that outlasted the 14-day post-bed-rest rehabilitation.

  3. Effects of weir height and reservoir widening on sediment continuity at run-of-river hydropower plants in gravel bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Christine; Schobesberger, Johannes; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-08-01

    This study conducted scaled physical model tests of a run-of-river hydropower plant (RoR). The physical model represented an idealized gravel bed river with a width of 20 m, a slope of 0.005, a mean annual flow of 15 m3 s- 1 and a 1-year flood flow of 80 m3 s- 1. Substrate and bed load had a characteristic grain size dm of 56 mm. The model scale was 1:20. The study was designed to test the effects of weir height and reservoir widening on sediment continuity and flushing efficiency at low-head RoR plants. Three different weir heights and two reservoir widths were investigated to assess and quantify their influence. As long as equilibrium conditions had not been established in the reservoir the flushing efficiency was low and thus the sediment continuity was not met. The experiments revealed that both parameters had a significant effect regarding the time needed to reach equilibrium conditions. The equilibrium slope that established was independent of weir height. Weir height, however, determined the starting point from where the equilibrium slope was built up. Accordingly, an increase in weir height will increase the reservoir bed levels by the same amount. A large weir height leads to huge sedimentation volumes and thus to a lack of sediments and to river bed erosion downstream of the hydropower plant. It could also considerably increase the flood risk at the head of the reservoir. This calls for regular maintenance work to re-establish flood safety. The experimental results suggest new concepts of low weir heights and cross sectional reservoir widths in the design of low-head RoR plants to facilitate frequent and efficient flushings, to enhance sediment continuity, and to reduce maintenance and operational costs.

  4. Scenario Studies on Effects of Soil Infiltration Rates, Land Slope, and Furrow Irrigation Characteristics on Furrow Irrigation-Induced Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibal, Jibrin M; Ramalan, A A; Mudiare, O J; Igbadun, H E

    2014-01-01

    Furrow irrigation proceeds under several soil-water-furrow hydraulics interaction dynamics. The soil erosion consequences from such interactions in furrow irrigation in Samaru had remained uncertain. A furrow irrigation-induced erosion (FIIE) model was used to simulate the potential severity of soil erosion in irrigated furrows due to interactive effects of infiltration rates, land slope, and some furrow irrigation characteristics under different scenarios. The furrow irrigation characteristics considered were furrow lengths, widths, and stream sizes. The model itself was developed using the dimensional analysis approach. The scenarios studied were the interactive effects of furrow lengths, furrow widths, and slopes steepness; infiltration rates and furrow lengths; and stream sizes, furrow lengths, and slopes steepness on potential furrow irrigation-induced erosion, respectively. The severity of FIIE was found to relate somewhat linearly with slope and stream size, and inversely with furrow lengths and furrow width. The worst soil erosion (378.05 t/ha/yr) was found as a result of the interactive effects of 0.65 m furrow width, 50 m furrow length, and 0.25% slope steepness; and the least soil erosion (0.013 t/ha/yr) was induced by the combined effects of 0.5 l/s, 200 m furrow length, and 0.05% slope steepness. Evidently considering longer furrows in furrow irrigation designs would be a better alternative of averting excessive FIIE.

  5. Effects and control of humidity and particle mixing in fluid-bed granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, SH; Kossen, NWF; Mos, MT; Blauw, L; Hoffmann, AC

    The novel technique of spraying binder liquid in pulses of short duration on a bubbling fluidized bed was used to study the effect liquid distribution, mixing, and relative humidity has on granule growth. Two important mixing zones in the fluid-bed granulation process are identified. First, the

  6. Effect of stone content on water flow velocity over Loess slope: Frozen soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Lei, Tingwu; Feng, Ren; Qian, Dengfeng

    2017-11-01

    Soils in high-altitude or -latitude regions are commonly rich in stone fragments, which are frequently frozen. The hydrodynamics of water flow over frozen, stony slopes must be investigated to understand soil erosion and sediment transportation. The objective of this laboratory experiments was to measure water flow velocity over frozen slopes with different stone contents by using electrolyte trace method. The experiments were performed under slope gradients of 5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°; flow discharge rates of 1, 2, 4, and 8 L/min; and stone contents of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 50% on mass basis. Nine equidistant sensors were used to measure flow velocity along flume from the top of the slope. Results indicated that stone content significantly affected flow velocity under increasing slope gradient. The increase in stone content rapidly reduced the flow velocity. The flow velocities over frozen slopes were 1.21 to 1.30 times of those over non-frozen slopes under different slope gradients and flow rates. When the stone content increased from 0% to 20%, proportions gradually decreased from 52% to 25% and 13%. Additionally, flow velocities over frozen and non-frozen soil slopes became gradually similar with increasing stone content. This study will help elucidate the hydrodynamics, soil erosion, and sediment transport behaviors of frozen or partially unfrozen hillslopes with different stone contents.

  7. Effects of Rainfall Intensity and Slope Gradient on Runoff and Soil Moisture Content on Different Growing Stages of Spring Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Mu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The rainfall-runoff process (RRP is an important part of hydrologic process. There is an effective measure to study RRP through artificial rainfall simulation. This paper describes a study on three growing stages (jointing stage, tasseling stage, and mature stage of spring maize in which simulated rainfall events were used to study the effects of various factors (rainfall intensity and slope gradient on the RRP. The RRP was tested with three different rainfall intensities (0.67, 1.00, and 1.67 mm/min and subjected to three different slopes (5°, 15°, and 20° so as to study RRP characteristics in semiarid regions. Regression analysis was used to study the results of this test. The following key results were obtained: (1 With the increase in rainfall intensity and slope, the increasing relationship with rainfall duration, overland flow, and cumulative runoff, respectively, complied with logarithmic and quadratic functions before reaching stable runoff in each growing stage of spring maize; (2 The runoff coefficient increased with the increase in rainfall intensity and slope in each growing stages of spring maize. The relationship between runoff coefficient, slope, rainfall intensity, rainfall duration, antecedent soil moisture, and vegetation coverage was multivariate and nonlinear; (3 The runoff lag time decreased with the increase in rainfall intensity and slope within the same growing stage. In addition, the relationship between runoff lag time, slope, rainfall intensity, antecedent soil moisture, and vegetation coverage could also be expressed by a multivariate nonlinear equation; (4 The descent rate of soil infiltration rate curve increased with the increased rainfall intensity and slope in the same growing stage. Furthermore, by comparing the Kostiakov, Horton, and Philip models, it was found that the Horton infiltration model was the best for estimating soil infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration under the condition of test.

  8. Nonequilibrium effects in fixed-bed interstitial fluid dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronberg, Alexandre E.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Continuum models for the role of the interstitial fluid with respect to mass and heat dispersion in a fixed bed are discussed. It is argued that the departures from local equilibrium and not the concentration and temperature gradients as such should be considered as the driving forces for mass and

  9. The Effect of Camber Bed Drainage Landforms on Soil Nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Vertisols of the Accra Plains of Ghana are water logged after significant rainfall due to the low-lying topography (0.1-1 %). Camber bed (Cb) drainage landforms have been developed at the Agricultural Research Centre, Kpong, for draining off excess water. Field experiments were conducted to verify if maize growth and ...

  10. Tile Effect of P reconsolidation on the Thermal Conductivity of Particulate Beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenfeld, G.

    2001-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of particulate beds is an important property for many industrial handling processes as well as storage of particulate materials. This property can be affected by a few conditions, such as, temperature and external axial pressure. In the first part of this work, a background for the thermal conductivity of particulate bed is given. This includes a review of experimental and theoretical studies on the thermal conductivity of particulate beds. It is also a reviewed parameters that influence the thermal conductivity of particulate beds, such as, temperature. This study presents a new experimental apparatus that enables to measure the thermal conductivity in steady-state while the particulate bed is under axial consolidation stresses. The experimental apparatus was analyzed and characterized experimentally and by numerical simulations. An analytical model, that predicts the thermal conductivity of particulate beds under axial consolidation stress was developed. The model results were compared to the experimental results for 0.5 and 1 mm steel spheres and showed a good agreement. The experimental results showed a significant effect of the compression state on the bed and its pre-consolidation for 0.5 and 1 mm steel spheres. The effect of the compression state on the bed and its pre-consolidation was even more significant for limestone powder

  11. [Effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Xing; He, Bing-Hui; Mei, Xue-Mei; Liang, Yan-Ling; Xiong, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Taking bare land as the control, this paper studied the effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area. For the test six planting modes, the soil permeability was in the order of Eriobotrya japonica > Citrus limon > Vetiveria zizanioides hedgerows +corn >Leucaena leucocephala hedgerows + corn> Hemerocallis fulva > corn> bare land, and decreased with increasing depth. The eigenvalues of soil infiltration were in the order of initial infiltration rate> average infiltration rate> stable infiltration rate. The soil permeability had significant positive linear correlations with soil total porosity, non-capillary porosity, initial moisture content, water holding capacity, and organic matter content, and significant negative linear correlation with soil bulk density. The common empirical infiltration model could well fit the soil moisture infiltration processes under the six planting modes, while the Kostiakov equation could not.

  12. Negative Priming Effect on Organic Matter Mineralisation in NE Atlantic Slope Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontikaki, Evangelia; Thornton, Barry; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Witte, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    The priming effect (PE) is a complex phenomenon which describes a modification (acceleration or retardation) in the mineralisation rate of refractory organic matter (OM) following inputs of labile material. PEs are well-studied in terrestrial ecosystems owing to their potential importance in the evolution of soil carbon stocks but have been largely ignored in aquatic systems despite the fact that the prerequisite for their occurrence, i.e. the co-existence of labile and refractory OM, is also true for sediments. We conducted stable isotope tracer experiments in continental margin sediments from the NE Atlantic (550–950 m) to study PE occurrence and intensity in relation to labile OM input. Sediment slurries were treated with increasing quantities of the 13C-labelled diatom Thalassiosira rotula and PE was quantified after 7, 14 and 21 days. There was a stepwise effect of diatom quantity on its mineralisation although mineralisation efficiency dropped with increasing substrate amounts. The addition of diatomaceous OM yielded a negative PE (i.e. retardation of existing sediment OM mineralisation) at the end of the experiment regardless of diatom quantity. Negative PE is often the result of preferential utilisation of the newly deposited labile material by the microbial community (“preferential substrate utilization”, PSU) which is usually observed at excessive substrate additions. The fact that PSU and the associated negative PE occurred even at low substrate levels in this study could be attributed to limited amounts of OM subject to priming in our study area (∼0.2% organic carbon [OC]) which seems to be an exception among continental slopes (typically >0.5%OC). We postulate that PEs will normally be positive in continental slope sediments and that their intensity will be a direct function of sediment OC content. More experiments with varying supply of substrate targeting C-poor vs. C-rich sediments are needed to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:23840766

  13. The effects of rehabilitation on the muscles of the trunk following prolonged bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, Julie A; Lambrecht, Gunda; Richardson, Carolyn A; Stanton, Warren R; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Pruett, Casey; Damann, Volker; Felsenberg, Dieter; Belavý, Daniel L

    2011-05-01

    Microgravity and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest have been shown to result in atrophy of spinal extensor muscles such as the multifidus, and either no atrophy or hypertrophy of flexor muscles such as the abdominal group and psoas muscle. These effects are long-lasting after bed rest and the potential effects of rehabilitation are unknown. This two-group intervention study aimed to investigate the effects of two rehabilitation programs on the recovery of lumbo-pelvic musculature following prolonged bed rest. 24 subjects underwent 60 days of head down tilt bed rest as part of the 2nd Berlin BedRest Study (BBR2-2). After bed rest, they underwent one of two exercise programs, trunk flexor and general strength (TFS) training or specific motor control (SMC) training. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbo-pelvic region was conducted at the start and end of bed rest and during the recovery period (14 and 90 days after re-ambulation). Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the multifidus, psoas, lumbar erector spinae and quadratus lumborum muscles were measured from L1 to L5. Morphological changes including disc volume, spinal length, lordosis angle and disc height were also measured. Both exercise programs restored the multifidus muscle to pre-bed-rest size, but further increases in psoas muscle size were seen in the TFS group up to 14 days after bed rest. There was no significant difference in the number of low back pain reports for the two rehabilitation groups (p=.59). The TFS program resulted in greater decreases in disc volume and anterior disc height. The SMC training program may be preferable to TFS training after bed rest as it restored the CSA of the multifidus muscle without generating potentially harmful compressive forces through the spine.

  14. Numerical modeling of the effect of preferential flow on hillslope hydrology and slope stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, W.

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the quantification of the influence of preferential flow on landslide-triggering in potentially unstable slopes. Preferential flow paths (e.g., cracks, macropores, fissures, pipes, etc.) commonly exists in slopes. Flow velocities in preferential flow paths can be

  15. Effect of referencing technique for the tibial slope in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Wymenga, A.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tibial slope was shown to majorly affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More slope of the tibial component could help releasing a too tight flexion gap in cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA and is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However,

  16. Slope Gradient and Vegetation Cover Effects on The Runoff and Sediment Yield in Hillslope Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaid ur Rehman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of field crops is a challenge and risky business in sloping areas. A study was conducted as a demonstration model for the sloppy lands of Fateh Jang, Pakistan. The objectives of this study were to monitor the runoff water and soil sediment loss under different vegetative covers and slope gradients in comparison with bare fallow on each slope gradient. Three artificial slope gradients i.e., 1%, 5% and 10% were established and three crops i.e., Wheat, Gram and Lentil were cultivated on each slope gradient. Soil and water losses were quantified against each slope gradient and every cover crop for the period of 4 years. Total soil sediment losses during this study were 51% in Lentil, 30% in Gram and 25% in Wheat were lesser compared with bare soil whereas, water losses from Lentil, Gram and Wheat were 69%, 75% and 73% lesser respectively while compared with bare plots. The highest soil and water losses were monitored at 10% slope gradient following 5% and then 1% slope gradients respectively.

  17. Effect of Slope Positions on Physicochemical Properties of Soils Located on a Toposequence in Deilaman Area of Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mohajeri

    2016-10-01

    and toe slope, aggregate stability, cation exchange capacity, available phosphorous and total nitrogen were maximum in these positions, whereas, bulk density had a reverse trend and was higher in the upper slope positions than the lower slope positions. The high content of organic carbon, phosphorus and total nitrogen in the soil of foot and toe slope positions, can be attributed to soil erosion and transferred from top of the slope and their accumulation in these situations. The results also revealed that, with increasing depth, aggregate stability, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, available phosphorous and total nitrogen content of soils decreased, whereas, clay content and bulk density had a reverse trend and increased with increasing the depth. Reducing the amount of organic carbon with increasing depth was because of the remains of plants and roots in the surface horizons and the presence of more organic carbon. Since phosphorus and nitrogen in the soils are highly dependent on organic matter, Thus, changes in these indicators are mainly obeys from this materials. Conclusion: In general, it became appears from this study, that the topography factor had important effect on studied soil properties. The changes observed in the quality of soils located on different slope positions can be attributed to the differences of the soil in erosion rate and moisture content and different sediment receptions in different positions of toposequence as affected by the amount and distribution of rainfall. Considering the effect of the position of the landscape on the physical and chemical properties of soil, recommended analysis of the landscape is better to be done in the sustainable land management and also for soil and water conservation programs. Because of the different management practices in different parts of landscape is difficult and perhaps impossible, in order to maintain soil, conservation management must be done based on soil quality in areas with

  18. Discharge Fluctuation Effect on Meandering River Bed Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntjoro; Saud, Ismail; Harijanto, Didik

    2017-11-01

    This research was based on some considerations: first discharge fluctuation argued that none rivers with constant discharge and second meandering river bed evolution with considering that none of rivers in a steady state without bed change. This research developed to get formulation the relationship between fluctuations discharge with the evolution of the bottom of river considering discharge, parameter rivers and parameter sediment. In the span of daily discharge data 1997-2011 and cross section monitoring annual results 1997-2011 evolution of bottom of a river subjects obtained: Formula 1 is the relationship between discharge fluctuations with rate of sedimentation (S) and Formula 2 is the relationship between discharge fluctuations with rate of erosion (E). Thus formula have higher prediction accuracy than other published formulas and it is applicable to predict Brantas River bed evolution approximate with the real conditions. Further analysis from the output KUN-QArSHOV formula produces: Erosion equation ΔS = 25,167e0,0034 ΔQ , on constant discharge, sedimentation value occur is 25.167.10-5 meter. Sedimentation equation ΔE = 8,3455e0,0075 ΔQ , on constant discharge, erosion value occure is 8.3455.10-5 meter. Critical point between sedimentation and erosion happened on discharge between 269 m3/second and 270 m3/second

  19. Effects of strict prolonged bed rest on cardiorespiratory fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Aarts, Hugo M; Joyner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    with larger declines in V̇o2max). Furthermore, the systematic review revealed a gap in the knowledge about the cardiovascular response to extreme physical inactivity, particularly in older subjects and women of any age group. In addition to its relevance to spaceflight, this lack of data has significant....... Since 1949, 80 studies with a total of 949 participants (>90% men) have been published with data on strict bed rest and V̇o2max The studies were conducted mainly in young participants [median age (interquartile range) 24.5 (22.4-34.0) yr]. The duration of bed rest ranged from 1 to 90 days. V̇o2max...... declined linearly across bed rest duration. No statistical difference in the decline among studies reporting V̇o2max as l/min (-0.3% per day) compared with studies reporting V̇o2max normalized to body weight (ml·kg-1·min-1; -0.43% per day) was observed. Although both total body weight and lean body mass...

  20. Internal-wave reflection from uniform slopes: higher harmonics and Coriolis effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gerkema

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Weakly nonlinear reflection of internal waves from uniform slopes produces higher harmonics and mean fields; the expressions are here derived for constant stratification and with Coriolis effects fully included, i.e. the horizontal component of the earth rotation vector (referred to as 'non-traditional'' is taken into account. Uniformity in one of the horizontal directions is assumed. It is shown that solutions can be as readily derived with as without ; hence there is no need to make the so-called Traditional Approximation. Examples of reflecting internal-wave beams are presented for super-inertial, inertial and sub-inertial frequencies. The problem of resonant and non-resonant forcing of the second harmonic is studied for single plane waves; unlike under the Traditional Approximation, the problem of reflection from a horizontal bottom no longer forms a singular case. Non-traditional effects are favourable to resonant forcing at near-tidal rather than near-inertial frequencies, and generally increase the intensity of the second harmonic. Strong stratification tends to suppress non-traditional effects, but a near-total suppression is only attained for high values of stratification that are characteristic of the seasonal thermocline; in most parts of the ocean, non-traditional effects can therefore be expected to be important.

  1. Beyond the bed: Effects of metal contamination on recruitment to bedded sediments and overlying substrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Nicole A.; Simpson, Stuart L.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2013-01-01

    Metal-contaminated sediments pose a recognised threat to sediment-dwelling fauna. Re-mobilisation of contaminated sediments however, may impact more broadly on benthic ecosystems, including on diverse assemblages living on hard substrata patches immediately above sediments. We used manipulative field experiments to simultaneously test for the effects of metal contamination on recruitment to marine sediments and overlying hard substrata. Recruitment to sediments was strongly and negatively affected by metal contamination. However, while assemblage-level effects on hard-substratum fauna and flora were observed, most functional groups were unaffected or slightly enhanced by exposure to contaminated sediments. Diversity of hard-substratum fauna was also enhanced by metal contamination at one site. Metal-contaminated sediments appear to pose less of a hazard to hard-substratum than sediment-dwelling assemblages, perhaps due to a lower direct contaminant exposure or to indirect effects mediated by contaminant impacts on sediment fauna. Our results indicate that current sediment quality guidelines are protective of hard-substrata organisms. - Highlights: ► Potential for contaminated sediments to exert impacts beyond the sediment communities. ► We examine effects on recruitment to sediments and overlying hard substrata simultaneously. ► Metal-contaminated sediments had a strong negative impact on sediment fauna. ► Metal-contaminated sediments pose less of a hazard to hard-substratum fauna. ► Sediment quality guidelines are likely protective of hard-substrata organisms. - Under natural disturbance regimes, metal-contaminated sediments pose less of a direct risk to hard-substratum fauna than to sediment-dwelling fauna and SQG appear appropriate.

  2. Effects of lipo-prostaglandin E1 on wound bed microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, H; Ichioka, S

    2015-07-01

    Lipo-prostaglandin E1 (lipo-PGE1) is a well-known potent vasodilator that increases peripheral blood flow. However, the effects of this agent on wound bed microcirculation still remain unclear. The present study aims to improve the experimental model which our group developed to visualise wound bed microcirculation and to evaluate acute stimulation by lipo-PGE1. The superficial stratum of the Wistar rat's ear skin was microsurgically excised preserving the subdermal vascular plexus. The preserved vessels, the wound bed microcirculation, were visualised under an intravital microscope-video-computer system. Animals were divided into three groups, a control group in which animals received vehicle control, a medium-dose group (6 μg/2 ml/kg lipo-PGE1) and a high-dose group (10 μg/2 ml/kg lipo-PGE1). The blood velocity and diameter of individual venules were measured from the recorded microcirculatory images, and the blood flow of the venule in the wound bed was evaluated. A significant increase in the wound bed blood flow was seen 10 minutes after lipo-PGE1 injection (p<0.05). This was approximately fourfold the baseline values. The increase was greatest in the medium-dose group. Extravasation and accumulation of lipo-PGE1 in the wound bed was observed. Lipo-PGE1 effectively increased wound bed microcirculation blood flow at the optimal dose. There is no conflict of interest.

  3. Effects of five days of bed rest with intermittent centrifugation on neurovestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, G; Bareille, M P; Goel, R; Linnarsson, D; Mulder, E; Paloski, W H; Rittweger, J; Wuyts, F L; Zange, J

    2015-03-01

    We tested whether intermittent short-radius centrifugation was effective for mitigating alteration in balance and gait following bed rest. Ten male subjects were exposed to 5 days of 6° head-down tilt bed rest with: (a) no countermeasure; (b) daily 1-g centrifugation for a continuous 30-min period; and (c) daily 1-g centrifugation for six periods of 5 min. During and after the bed rest, subjects were asked to scale the severity of neurovestibular symptoms that followed centrifugation or 80° head-up tilt. Following the bed rest, equilibrium scores were derived from anterior-posterior sway while standing on a foam pad with the eyes open or closed while making pitch head movements, and gait was evaluated by grading subjects' performance during various locomotion tasks. At the beginning of bed rest, one single 30-min period of centrifugation induced more severe neurovestibular symptoms than six periods of 5-min centrifugation. After bed rest, although equilibrium scores and gait performance were not significantly altered, subjects felt less neurovestibular dysfunction with orthostatic stress when centrifugation was used. Centrifugation was effective at reducing the severity of neurovestibular symptoms after bed rest, but this decrease was not different between one or multiple daily sessions.

  4. Success-slope effects on the illusion of control and on remembered success-frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Ejova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The illusion of control refers to the inference of action-outcome contingency in situations where outcomes are in fact random. The strength of this illusion has been found to be affected by whether the frequency of successes increases or decreases over repeated trials, in what can be termed a ``success-slope'' effect. Previous studies have generated inconsistent findings regarding the nature of this effect. In this paper we present an experiment (N = 334 that overcomes several methodological limitations within this literature, employing a wider range of dependent measures (measures of two different types of illusory control, primary (by self and secondary (by luck, as well as measures of remembered success-frequency. Results indicate that different dependent measures lead to different effects. On measures of (primary, but not secondary control over the task, scores were highest when the rate of success increased over time. Meanwhile, estimates of success-frequency in the task did not vary across conditions and showed trends consistent with the broader literature on human memory.

  5. Performance optimization of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system considering effects of circumsolar radiation and slope error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chee-Woon; Chong, Kok-Keong; Tan, Ming-Hui

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents an approach to optimize the electrical performance of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system comprised of non-imaging dish concentrator by considering the circumsolar radiation and slope error effects. Based on the simulated flux distribution, a systematic methodology to optimize the layout configuration of solar cells interconnection circuit in dense array concentrator photovoltaic module has been proposed by minimizing the current mismatch caused by non-uniformity of concentrated sunlight. An optimized layout of interconnection solar cells circuit with minimum electrical power loss of 6.5% can be achieved by minimizing the effects of both circumsolar radiation and slope error.

  6. Slope stability of bioreactor landfills during leachate injection: effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic municipal solid waste conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Rajiv K; Reddy, Krishna R

    2014-03-01

    In bioreactor landfills, leachate recirculation can significantly affect the stability of landfill slope due to generation and distribution of excessive pore fluid pressures near side slope. The current design and operation of leachate recirculation systems do not consider the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the increased pore gas pressures in landfilled waste caused due to leachate recirculation on the physical stability of landfill slope. In this study, a numerical two-phase flow model (landfill leachate and gas as immiscible phases) was used to investigate the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of MSW on moisture distribution and pore-water and capillary pressures and their resulting impacts on the stability of a simplified bioreactor landfill during leachate recirculation using horizontal trench system. The unsaturated hydraulic properties of MSW were considered based on the van Genuchten model. The strength reduction technique was used for slope stability analyses as it takes into account of the transient and spatially varying pore-water and gas pressures. It was concluded that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW with varied unit weight and saturated hydraulic conductivity significantly influenced the moisture distribution and generation and distribution of pore fluid pressures in landfill and considerably reduced the stability of bioreactor landfill slope. It is recommended that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW must be considered as it provides a more reliable approach for the design and leachate operations in bioreactor landfills.

  7. Application of a model to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of randomly packed fusion pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In our precious study, a prediction model, which calculates the effective thermal conductivity k{sub eff} of mono-sized pebble beds, has been developed and validated. Based on this model, here the effects of these influencing factors such as pebble size, thermal radiation, contact area, filling gas, gas flow, gas pressure, etc. on the k{sub eff} of randomly packed fusion pebble beds are studied and analyzed. The pebble beds investigated include Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, Be and BeO pebble beds. In the current study, many important and meaningful conclusions are derived and some of them are similar to the existing research results. Particularly, some critters that under which conditions the effect of some influencing factors can be neglected or should be considered are also presented.

  8. High field Q slope and the effect of low-temperature baking at 3 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G.; Eremeev, G.; Hannon, F.

    2018-01-01

    A strong degradation of the unloaded quality factor with field, called high field Q slope, is commonly observed above Bp ≅100 mT in elliptical superconducting niobium cavities at 1.3 and 1.5 GHz. In the present experiments several 3 GHz niobium cavities were measured up to and above Bp ≅100 mT . The measurements show that a high field Q slope phenomenon limits the field reach at this frequency, that the high field Q slope onset field depends weakly on the frequency, and that the high field Q slope can be removed by the typical empirical solution of electropolishing followed by heating to 120°C for 48 hrs. In addition, one of the cavities reached a quench field of 174 mT and its field dependence of the quality factor was compared against global heating predicted by a thermal feedback model.

  9. Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ''Saltstone.'' The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ''tracer'' contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault

  10. Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Wang, Zuwei; Huntoon, Carolyn L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited data suggest that testosterone is decreased during space flight, which could contribute to bone and muscle loss. Objective: The main objective was to assess testosterone and hormone status in long- and short-duration space flight and bed rest environments and to determine relationships with other physiological systems, including bone and muscle. Design: Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after long-duration space flight. Samples were also collected before and after 12- to 14-d missions and from participants in 30- to 90-d bed rest studies. Setting: Space flight studies were conducted on the International Space Station and before and after Space Shuttle missions. Bed rest studies were conducted in a clinical research center setting. Data from Skylab missions are also presented. Participants: All of the participants were male, and they included 15 long-duration and nine short-duration mission crew members and 30 bed rest subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Serum total, free, and bioavailable testosterone were measured along with serum and urinary cortisol, serum dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG. Results: Total, free, and bioavailable testosterone was not changed during long-duration space flight but were decreased (P space flight. There were no changes in other hormones measured. Testosterone concentrations dropped before and soon after bed rest, but bed rest itself had no effect on testosterone. Conclusions: There was no evidence for decrements in testosterone during long-duration space flight or bed rest. PMID:22049169

  11. Effects of Rainfall Characteristics on the Stability of Tropical Residual Soil Slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahardjo Harianto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change has a significant impact on rainfall characteristics, sea water level and groundwater table. Changes in rainfall characteristics may affect stability of slopes and have severe impacts on sustainable urban living. Information on the intensity, frequency and duration of rainfall is often required by geotechnical engineers for performing slope stability analyses. Many seepage analyses are commonly performed using the most extreme rainfall possible which is uneconomical in designing a slope repair or slope failure preventive measure. In this study, the historical rainfall data were analyzed and investigated to understand the characteristics of rainfall in Singapore. The frequency distribution method was used to estimate future rainfall characteristics in Singapore. New intensity-duration-frequency (IDF curves for rainfall in Singapore were developed for six different durations (10, 20, 30 min and 1, 2 and 24 h and six frequencies (2, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 years. The new IDF curves were used in the seepage and slope stability analyses to determine the variation of factor of safety of residual soil slopes under different rainfall intensities in Singapore.

  12. Exercise Effects on the Course of Gray Matter Changes Over 70 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, V.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight affects posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes through direct effects on peripheral changes that result from reduced vestibular stimulation and body unloading. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on earth using bed rest studies. Long duration bed rest serves as a space-flight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. It has been hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that has been observed in microgravity could potentially affect central nervous system function and structure, and thereby indirectly affect sensorimotor or cognitive functioning. Preliminary results of one of our ongoing studies indeed showed that 70 days of long duration head down-tilt bed rest results in focal changes in gray matter volume from pre-bed rest to various time points during bed rest. These gray matter changes that could reflect fluid shifts as well as neuroplasticity were related to decrements in motor skills such as maintenance of equilibrium. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both inand post-flight we are currently conducting a study that investigates the potential preventive effects of exercise on gray matter and motor performance changes that we observed over the course of bed rest. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain structure and cognitive performance in healthy and demented subjects over a large age range. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention in bed rest could potentially mitigate or prevent the effects of bed rest on the central nervous system. Here we present preliminary outcomes of our study.

  13. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Brain Functional Connectivity and Sensorimotor Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Castenada, R. Riascos; Kofman, I.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor functioning. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt (HDT) position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with behavior is largely unknown, but of importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. In the present study, we investigate the effects of prolonged exposure to HDT bed rest on resting state brain functional connectivity and its association with behavioral changes in 17 male participants. To validate that our findings were not due to confounding factors such as time or task practice, we also acquired resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and behavioral measurements from 14 normative control participants at four time points. Bed rest participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Rs-fMRI and behavioral data were obtained at seven time points averaging around: 12 and 8 days prior to bed rest; 7, 50, and 70 days during bed rest; and 8 and 12 days after bed rest. 70 days of HDT bed rest resulted in significant increases in functional connectivity during bed rest followed by a reversal of changes in the post bed rest recovery period between motor cortical and somatosensory areas of the brain. In contrast, decreases in connectivity were observed between temporoparietal regions. Furthermore, post-hoc correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between motor-somatosensory network connectivity and standing balance performance changes; participants that exhibited the greatest increases in connectivity strength showed the least deterioration in postural

  14. Effects of Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Interaction on the Stability of a Clay Slope: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedone Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and slow landslide processes are frequently observed in clay slopes located along the Southern Apennines (Italy. A case study representative of these processes, named Pisciolo case study, is discussed in the paper. The geo-hydro-mechanical characteristics of the materials involved in the instability phenomena are initially discussed. Pluviometric, piezometric, inclinometric and GPS monitoring data are subsequently presented, suggesting that rainfall infiltration constitutes the main factor inducing slope movements. The connection between formation of landslide bodies and slope-atmosphere interaction has been demonstrated through a hydro-mechanical finite element analysis, whose results are finally reported in the work. This analysis has been conducted employing a constitutive model that is capable of simulating both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviour, as well as a boundary condition able to simulate the effects of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interaction.

  15. Development of Bed Ridges in Open Channels and their Effects on Secondary Currents and Wall Shear

    OpenAIRE

    Kamran Ansari; Ashfaque Ahmed Memon; Naeem Aziz Memon

    2012-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the ridges on the bed of wide, open channels and their effects on the distribution of secondary currents and wall shear is undertaken using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). The presence of the lines of boil, consisting of low speed streaks, periodically in the transverse direction, is reported in the literature due to the presence of the ridges. In the present work, simulations are run on channel sections with varying the number of ridges on the bed and ...

  16. Heat- and mass-transfer effect in slurry-bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, H.; Bell, A. T.; Stern, D. A.

    1982-02-01

    One of the advantages claimed for slurry bed reactors is the ability to operate at lower hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios than either the fixed bed or fluid bed. Reasons for this difference were not previously fully established. Two factors may contribute to the ability of the slurry reactor to tolerate lower hydrogen/CO ratios. These are greater isothermicity, and mass transfer effects on the gas liquid interface in the slurry reactor. Work with small diameter fixed bed reactors has shown that there is a critical temperature at which plugging of the reactors using an iron catalyst will occur. The exact temperature is a function of both the hydrogen/CO ratio and the space velocity. A difference of 10 to 15 C separates operability from non-operability. It is therefore likely that in the critical temperature range around 300 C hot spots on the catalysts may be the cause of plugging and deactivation at low hydrogen/CO ratios.

  17. The Q-Slope Method for Rock Slope Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Neil; Barton, Nick

    2017-12-01

    Q-slope is an empirical rock slope engineering method for assessing the stability of excavated rock slopes in the field. Intended for use in reinforcement-free road or railway cuttings or in opencast mines, Q-slope allows geotechnical engineers to make potential adjustments to slope angles as rock mass conditions become apparent during construction. Through case studies across Asia, Australia, Central America, and Europe, a simple correlation between Q-slope and long-term stable slopes was established. Q-slope is designed such that it suggests stable, maintenance-free bench-face slope angles of, for instance, 40°-45°, 60°-65°, and 80°-85° with respective Q-slope values of approximately 0.1, 1.0, and 10. Q-slope was developed by supplementing the Q-system which has been extensively used for characterizing rock exposures, drill-core, and tunnels under construction for the last 40 years. The Q' parameters (RQD, J n, J a, and J r) remain unchanged in Q-slope. However, a new method for applying J r/ J a ratios to both sides of potential wedges is used, with relative orientation weightings for each side. The term J w, which is now termed J wice, takes into account long-term exposure to various climatic and environmental conditions such as intense erosive rainfall and ice-wedging effects. Slope-relevant SRF categories for slope surface conditions, stress-strength ratios, and major discontinuities such as faults, weakness zones, or joint swarms have also been incorporated. This paper discusses the applicability of the Q-slope method to slopes ranging from less than 5 m to more than 250 m in height in both civil and mining engineering projects.

  18. Electrocatalysts based on Ru nanoparticles : effect of methanol on the ORR Tafel slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duron-Torres, S.M.; Leyva-Noyola, F.; Galvan-Valencia, M. [Univ. Autonoma de Zacatecas, Guadalupe, Zacatecas (Mexico). U.A. de Ciencias Quimicas; Solorza-Feria, O. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Col. San Pedro Zacatenco (Mexico). Depto. de Quimica

    2008-04-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) are promising candidates in systems that require small-sized power sources such as non-stationary electronic equipment and transportation. However, the scientific and technical challenges of PEMFC which include diminution of catalytic charges, catalyst substitution, membrane development, optimization of bipolar plates and a global cost decrease require further study. A strategic approach that will help with the diffusion and assimilation of the PEMFC technology involves the use of fuel other than hydrogen in cells such as methanol. However, the use of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) presents further challenges including slow kinetics in both anodic and cathodic reactions, and fuel crossover due to exchange membrane alcohol permeability, meaning a lower global efficiency of DMFC as compared with the hydrogen fuel cell. This article provided a contribution to the synthesis and characterization of novel catalytic materials research for DMFC. A series of materials based on ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles were produced and catalytically studied in a multielectron charge transfer process. These materials are electroactive for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid medium and methanol tolerant as well. The Ru nanoparticles and some binary and ternary mixtures with platinum (Pt) and cobalt (Co) were obtained by a pyrolysis procedure of solid precursors at 190 degrees Celsius. Physiochemical characterization was conducted by using a scanning electronic microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy mapping. Kinetic parameters of the cathodic reaction in a 0.5M sulfuric acid solution at different methanol concentrations were compared using electrochemical characterization with cyclic voltammetry and rotating disc electrodes. It was concluded that methanol has a major effect on the ORR electrocatalytic activity on binary Ru-Pt materials with a higher Pt proportion. In addition, the methanol effect on the Tafel slope

  19. Stabilizing Effects of Bacterial Biofilms: EPS Penetration and Redistribution of Bed Stability Down the Sediment Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. D.; Zhang, C. K.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Z.; Zhou, J. J.; Tao, J. F.; Paterson, D. M.; Feng, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms, consisting of microorganisms and their secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), serve as "ecosystem engineers" stabilizing sedimentary environments. Natural sediment bed provides an excellent substratum for biofilm growth. The porous structure and rich nutrients allow the EPS matrix to spread deeper into the bed. A series of laboratory-controlled experiments were conducted to investigate sediment colonization of Bacillus subtilis and the penetration of EPS into the sediment bed with incubation time. In addition to EPS accumulation on the bed surface, EPS also penetrated downward. However, EPS distribution developed strong vertical heterogeneity with a much higher content in the surface layer than in the bottom layer. Scanning electron microscope images of vertical layers also displayed different micromorphological properties of sediment-EPS matrix. In addition, colloidal and bound EPSs exhibited distinctive distribution patterns. After the full incubation, the biosedimentary beds were eroded to test the variation of bed stability induced by biological effects. This research provides an important reference for the prediction of sediment transport and hence deepens the understanding of the biologically mediated sediment system and broadens the scope of the burgeoning research field of "biomorphodynamics."

  20. effects of rainfall intensity and slope angle on splash erosion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Geoderma (69): 85-103. Valmis, S. Dimoyiannis, D and Danalatas, N. G., 2005. Assessing Interrill Erosion rate from Soil. Aggregate Instability Indus, Rainfall Intensity ad. Slope Angle on Cultivated Soils in Central. Greece; Soil and Tillage Research. 80, 139-147. Van Dijk., A. I. J. M., 2002. Water & Sediment Dynamics.

  1. Effects of Freezing and Thawing Cycle on Mechanical Properties and Stability of Soft Rock Slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the variation laws of mechanical parameters of soft rock and the formed slope stability, an experiment was carried out with collected soft rock material specimens and freezing and thawing cycle was designed. Meanwhile, a computational simulation analysis of the freezing-thawing slope stability was implemented. Key factors that influence the strength of frozen rock specimens were analyzed. Results showed that moisture content and the number of freezing-thawing cycles influenced mechanical parameters of soft rock significantly. With the increase of moisture content, cohesion of frozen soft rock specimens presents a quadratic function decrease and the internal friction angle shows a negative exponential decrease. The stability coefficient of soft rock material slope in seasonal freeze soil area declines continuously. With the increase of freezing and thawing cycle, both cohesion and internal friction angle of soft rock decrease exponentially. The higher the moisture content, the quicker the reduction. Such stability coefficient presents a negative exponential reduction. After three freezing and thawing cycles, the slope stability coefficient only changes slightly. Findings were finally verified by the filed database.

  2. Cost-effective design of long spatially variable soil slopes using conditional simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hicks, M.A.; Vardon, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The three dimensional nature of soil spatial variability implies the need for 3D analysis of geotechnical structures. This paper presents the probabilistic analysis of long slopes such as levees and highway embankments, which are usually analysed unrealistically in plane strain, thereby ignoring the

  3. Effect of minimal shoes and slope on vertical and leg stiffness during running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lussiana

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that kvert and kleg during running respond differently to change in footwear and/or slope. These two stiffness measures can hence provide a unique insight on the biomechanical adaptations of running under varying conditions and their respective quantification may assist in furthering our understanding of training, performance, and/or injury in this sport.

  4. Effects of Rainfall Intensity and Slope Angle on Splash Erosion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... Soil erosion is a critical global environmental problem, especially in the developing countries including Nigeria. In the humid and ... Factors of slope angle, rainfall amount, and intensity, and total kinetic energy were regressed against directional components of splash.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Slopes Stability and Shallow Foundations Behavior at Crest under Real Seismic Loading - Reinforcement Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekdash, H.; Hage Chehade, F.; Sadek, M.; Abdel Massih, D.; El Hachem, E.; Youssef, E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the slopes stability under seismic loading using a global numerical dynamic approach. This approach allows important parameters that are generally ignored by traditional engineering methods such as the soil deformability, the dynamic amplification, non linear soil behavior, the spatial and temporal variability of the seismic loading and the reinforcement element. The present study is conducted by using measures recorded during real earthquakes (Turkey, 1999) and (Lebanon, 2008). Elastoplastic soil behavior analysis leads to monitor the evolution of the slope state after an earthquake and to clarify the most probable failure circles. A parametric study according to the reinforcement length, position, inclination and the number of elements has been studied in order to define the optimal reinforcement scheme for slopes under seismic loading. This study contains also the stability analysis of an existing foundation near the slope's crest. It will focus on the reinforcement in order to give recommendation for the most appropriate scheme that minimize the settlement of the foundation due to earthquake effect. (author)

  6. Measurement of effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients for powder beds used in heterogeneous uptake experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulter, James E; Marschall, Jochen

    2006-09-07

    The effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients for characteristic oxide powder beds used in heterogeneous uptake experiments have been measured using countercurrent diffusion and transient pressure drop techniques. Room-temperature thermal-velocity-normalized effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients are found to lie in the 0.15 to 0.35 microm range for magnesium silicate, aluminum oxide, and iron oxide powder beds. Measured values are compared with theoretical estimates and are consistent with low bed tortuosities (below 3) expected for media with open porosity above 0.5. The impact of uncertainties in effective diffusion coefficients on corrections of measured uptake coefficients is discussed. The value of careful uptake measurements in both the low and high sample mass limits is reinforced, as this allows uptake corrections independent of explicitly measured or estimated diffusion coefficient values. It is suggested that correction procedures requiring tortuosity values greater than 3 are suspect.

  7. Slippery Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The wheel tracks in this image are an artifact of the difficult terrain faced recently by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity deep inside 'Endurance Crater.' Opportunity took the picture with its navigation camera on the rover's 205th martian day, or sol (Aug. 21, 2004). On the preceding sol, to avoid a potentially hazardous rock target, the rover team changed routes. Steep slopes and lack of traction when driving in this terrain caused the rover to experience up to 50 percent slip during parts of its traverse. Opportunity ended up more than 50 centimeters (about 20 inches) downslope from the planned final position. Another shift in objective on sol 205 had Opportunity on the move again toward safer terrain. Analysis of the final drive showed the rover's traction increasing during its latest moves.

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Particle Shape on Frictional Pressure drop in Particulate Debris Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed which is governed by pressure drop in porous media. For this reason, it is necessary to understand pressure drop mechanisms in porous bed to verify the feasibility of water penetration into particulate debris bed. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) experiments, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of irregular shape particles. Therefore, empirical or semiempirical models based on the Ergun equation (Ergun, 1952) for single-phase flow in porous media composed of single sized spherical particle were developed to consider the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop by means of adding a shape factor or modifying the Ergun constants etc. (Leva, 1959, Handley and Heggs, 1968, Macdonald, 1979, Foumeny et al., 1996). An experimental investigate on single-phase frictional pressure drop of water in packed bed was conducted in the transparent cylindrical test section with the inner diameter of 100 mm and the height of 700 mm to study the effect of particle shape on frictional pressure drop in porous media. This paper reports the experimental data for spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm and cylindrical particles with ED of 2 mm and 5 mm. And also, the experimental data compared with the models to predict frictional pressure drop in particulate bed. The conclusions are summarized as follows. As a result of the experiment to measure frictional pressure drop in particulate bed composed of cylindrical particles the models predict the experimental data well within 22.11 % except the Handley and Heggs model when ED is applied to the models

  9. Entomological determinants of insecticide-treated bed net effectiveness in Western Myanmar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smithuis, Frank M.; Kyaw, Moe Kyaw; Phe, U. Ohn; van der Broek, Ingrid; Katterman, Nina; Rogers, Colin; Almeida, Patrick; Kager, Piet A.; Stepniewska, Kasia; Lubell, Yoel; Simpson, Julie A.; White, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    In a large cluster randomized control trial of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) in Western Myanmar the malaria protective effect of ITN was found to be highly variable and, in aggregate, the effect was not statistically significant. A coincident entomological investigation measured malaria vector

  10. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3083, VIC (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: shengyaojiang@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  11. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  12. Development of Bed Ridges in Open Channels and their Effects on Secondary Currents and Wall Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ansari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of the ridges on the bed of wide, open channels and their effects on the distribution of secondary currents and wall shear is undertaken using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics. The presence of the lines of boil, consisting of low speed streaks, periodically in the transverse direction, is reported in the literature due to the presence of the ridges. In the present work, simulations are run on channel sections with varying the number of ridges on the bed and the size of these ridges. The effect of these variations on the flow structures and shear stress distribution in wide open channels is reported. The results offer an interesting insight into the 3D (Three-Dimensional flow structures involved and the link between flow structures and bed morpho-dynamics in prismatic channels.

  13. The effects of China's Sloping Land Conversion Program on agricultural households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen; Henningsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1990s, China aimed to mitigate environmental degradation from agricultural production activities by introducing the world's largest "Payments for Environmental Services" program: the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP). We develop a microeconomic Agricultural Household Model, which...... can model the production, consumption, and nonfarm labor supply decisions of agricultural households in rural China in a theoretically consistent fashion. Based on this theoretical model, we derive an empirical specification, which we econometrically estimate using the Hausman-Taylor method...

  14. Effect of changing slope of grain on ash, maple, and yellow birch in bending strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Kretschmann; James J. Bridwell; Timothy C. Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The presence of slope of grain (SoG) in wood can severely reduce the bending strength in wood. Failure to recognize the degree to which SoG can reduce strength can be catastrophic if wood is in single member use. In the United States, a growing concern in the sport of baseball relates to the high frequency of multi-piece broken wood bats. It was observed that hard...

  15. Effect of slope and plant cover on run-off, soil loss and water use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An average of 6,2t/ha soil loss and 80,6% run-off of the amount of water applied occurred from the pioneer veld (0,7% basal cover) on the steepest slope. In all the successional stages more run-off and less soil loss occurred from wet soil than from dry soil. Significant (P<0,01) relationships between basal and canopy cover ...

  16. Forest fire effects on slopes formed in ice-rich permafrost soils: Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savigny, W. [Bruce Geotechnical Consultants Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Logue, C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences; MacInnes, K. [Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Yellowknife, NT (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The impact of fires on the ground thermal regime and the related development of thaw generated excess pore pressures in the degrading permafrost, some in the immediate vicinity of the interprovincial pipeline in the Northwest Territories, were modeled in an attempt to demonstrate that the observed slope instability was a predictable consequence of sudden and severe ground surface disturbance. A one-dimensional finite model was used to simulate ground temperatures both before and after the fires. Excess pore pressures related to the rate of thaw were determined and used in a limit equilibrium analysis. Results indicated that a critical factor of safety for shallow planar instability in fine-grained ice-rich permafrost soils comprising natural slopes developed within a few weeks after the fires. Instability was predicted to occur on slopes as low as 10 degrees, although field observations suggested the extent of instability would be naturally limited by stratigraphic variations. It was suggested that this method of rapid identification of `values at risk` was an attractive technique in managing forests in areas exposed to fire hazards, especially in the face of dwindling fire-fighting resources. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  17. Hydrodynamic modeling of juvenile mussel dispersal in a large river: The potential effects of bed shear stress and other parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daraio, J.A.; Weber, L.J.; Newton, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Because unionid mussels have a parasitic larval stage, they are able to disperse upstream and downstream as larvae while attached to their host fish and with flow as juveniles after excystment from the host. Understanding unionid population ecology requires knowledge of the processes that affect juvenile dispersal prior to establishment. We examined presettlement (transport and dispersion with flow) and early postsettlement (bed shear stress) hydraulic processes as negative censoring mechanisms. Our approach was to model dispersal using particle tracking through a 3-dimensional flow field output from hydrodynamic models of a reach of the Upper Mississippi River. We tested the potential effects of bed shear stress (??b) at 5 flow rates on juvenile mussel dispersal and quantified the magnitude of these effects as a function of flow rate. We explored the reach-scale relationships of Froude number (Fr), water depth (H), local bed slope (S), and unit stream power (QS) with the likelihood of juvenile settling (??). We ran multiple dispersal simulations at each flow rate to estimate ??, the parameter of a Poisson distribution, from the number of juveniles settling in each grid cell, and calculated dispersal distances. Virtual juveniles that settled in areas of the river where b > critical shear stress (c) were resuspended in the flow and transported further downstream, so we ran simulations at 3 different conditions for ??c (??c = ??? no resuspension, 0.1, and 0.05 N/m2). Differences in virtual juvenile dispersal distance were significantly dependent upon c and flow rate, and effects of b on settling distribution were dependent upon c. Most simulations resulted in positive correlations between ?? and ??b, results suggesting that during early postsettlement, ??b might be the primary determinant of juvenile settling distribution. Negative correlations between ?? and ??b occurred in some simulations, a result suggesting that physical or biological presettlement processes

  18. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  19. Effectiveness of two different HDR brachytherapy regimens with the same BED value in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vashistha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of biologically effective dose (BED in two different regimens of HDR brachytherapy keeping the same total BED to point A and to compare the relationship of overall treatment time in terms of local control and bladder and rectal complications.Material and methods: The study included two groups comprising a total of 90 cervical cancer patients who underwent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT followed by HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. EBRT treatment was delivered by a Co-60 teletherapy unit to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction in 25 fractions over a period of five weeks. Parallel opposed anterior–posterior (AP/PA fields with no central shielding were used, followed by the HDR ICBT dose, to point A, of either two fractions of 9.5 Gy with a gap of 10 days, or three fractions of 7.5 Gy with a gap of 7 days between the fractions. Gemcitabine (dose of 150 mg/m2 was given weekly to all the patients as a radiosensitizer. The calculate BED3 to point A was almost the same in both groups to keep the same late complication rates. The doses, and BED10 and BED3, were calculated at different bladder and rectal point as well as at the lymphatictrapezoid points. During and after treatment patients were evaluated for local control and complications for 24 months.Results and Conclusions: Doses and BEDs at different bladder, rectal and lymphatic trapezoid points, local control, and complications in both HDR ICBT groups did not have statistically significant differences (p > 0.05. Both HDR ICBT schedules are well tolerable and equally effective.

  20. An overview of the issues: physiological effects of bed rest and restricted physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity with confinement to bed rest is well recognized. Underlying physiological mechanisms include dramatic reductions in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake. However, bed rest by itself does not appear to contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Increased muscle fatigue is associated with reduced muscle blood flow, red cell volume, capillarization and oxidative enzymes. Loss of muscle mass and bone density may be reflected by reduced muscle strength and higher risk for injury to bones and joints. The resultant deconditioning caused by bed rest can be independent of the primary disease and physically debilitating in patients who attempt to reambulate to normal active living and working. A challenge to clinicians and health care specialists has been the identification of appropriate and effective methods to restore physical capacity of patients during or after restricted physical activity associated with prolonged bed rest. The examination of physiological responses to bed rest deconditioning and exercise training in healthy subjects has provided significant information to develop effective rehabilitation treatments. The successful application of acute exercise to enhance orthostatic stability, daily endurance exercise to maintain aerobic capacity, or specific resistance exercises to maintain musculoskeletal integrity rather than the use of surgical, pharmacological, and other medical treatments for clinical conditions has been enhanced by investigation and understanding of underlying mechanisms that distinguish physical deconditioning from the disease. This symposium presents an overview of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with reduced physical work capacity following prolonged bed rest and exercise training regimens that have proven successful in ameliorating or reversing these adverse effects.

  1. Hydrodynamic effects in trickle bed laboratory reactors for hydrodesulphurization and hydrodemetallization of heavy feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, W.; Pazos, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Trickle bed reactors are extensively used in the oil industry for hydrotreatment (HDT) of petroleum distillates, removal of impurities, such as sulphur and nitrogen, and hydrocracking. These reactors are also being used for HDT of residua, where hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) are the key reactions. The purpose of this paper is to study the performance of small trickle bed reactors, at real space velocities used for HDS and HDM of heavy feeds. Particular attention is given to evaluate the effect of the mean particle diameter on reactor behaviour. The final objective is to obtain an empirical model, which considers the influence of the flow conditions and packing properties on reactor performance.

  2. Tunnel field-effect transistor charge-trapping memory with steep subthreshold slope and large memory window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2018-04-01

    Charge-trapping memory requires the increase of bit density per cell and a larger memory window for lower-power operation. A tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) can achieve to increase the bit density per cell owing to its steep subthreshold slope. In addition, a TFET structure has an asymmetric structure, which is promising for achieving a larger memory window. A TFET with the N-type gate shows a higher electric field between the P-type source and the N-type gate edge than the conventional FET structure. This high electric field enables large amounts of charges to be injected into the charge storage layer. In this study, we fabricated silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (SONOS) memory devices with the TFET structure and observed a steep subthreshold slope and a larger memory window.

  3. Simulating run-up on steep slopes with operational Boussinesq models; capabilities, spurious effects and instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Løvholt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsunamis induced by rock slides plunging into fjords constitute a severe threat to local coastal communities. The rock slide impact may give rise to highly non-linear waves in the near field, and because the wave lengths are relatively short, frequency dispersion comes into play. Fjord systems are rugged with steep slopes, and modeling non-linear dispersive waves in this environment with simultaneous run-up is demanding. We have run an operational Boussinesq-type TVD (total variation diminishing model using different run-up formulations. Two different tests are considered, inundation on steep slopes and propagation in a trapezoidal channel. In addition, a set of Lagrangian models serves as reference models. Demanding test cases with solitary waves with amplitudes ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 were applied, and slopes were ranging from 10 to 50°. Different run-up formulations yielded clearly different accuracy and stability, and only some provided similar accuracy as the reference models. The test cases revealed that the model was prone to instabilities for large non-linearity and fine resolution. Some of the instabilities were linked with false breaking during the first positive inundation, which was not observed for the reference models. None of the models were able to handle the bore forming during drawdown, however. The instabilities are linked to short-crested undulations on the grid scale, and appear on fine resolution during inundation. As a consequence, convergence was not always obtained. It is reason to believe that the instability may be a general problem for Boussinesq models in fjords.

  4. The effect of speleothem surface slope on the remanent magnetic inclination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, J. M.; Font, E.; Veiga-Pires, C.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Ghaleb, B.

    2017-06-01

    Speleothems are of interest for high-resolution reconstruction of the Earth's magnetic field. However, little is known about the influence of speleothem morphologies on their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) record. Here we report on a high-resolution paleomagnetic study of a dome-shaped speleothem of middle Holocene age from southern Portugal, with special attention to the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). To assess the potential influence of the slope of the speleothem surface on the recorded remanent magnetization, we compare magnetic directions and AMS and AARM fabrics from subhorizontal to gradually subvertical calcite growth layers collected in a transversal cross section of the speleothem. A linear correlation is observed between magnetic inclinations, calcite laminae slope, and AARM k1 inclination. The AMS fabric is mostly controlled by calcite crystals, with direction of the minimum axes (k3) perpendicular to laminae growth. Magnetic inclinations recorded in inclined and vertical calcite growth layers are underestimated when compared to a global paleosecular variation (PSV) model. After extrapolating magnetic inclinations to the horizontal, the corrected data better fit the PSV model but are still lower than the predicted magnetic inclinations, suggesting that inclination shallowing affects the entire speleothem. We suggest that speleothem morphology exerts a critical role on the magnetic inclination recording, which is controlled by the Earth's magnetic field but also influenced by particle rolling along the sloping surfaces. These observations open new avenues for reconstructing high-resolution paleomagnetic secular variation records from speleothems and provide new insights into their NRM acquisition mechanisms.

  5. [Effects of forest vegetation on runoff and sediment production on sloping lands of Loess area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Yu, Xinxiao; Wu, Sihong; Wei, Tianxing; Zhang, Xuepei

    2005-09-01

    Based on the 1985 - 2003 fixed-position data in 9 runoff plots of Caijiachuan watershed in the Jixian county of Shanxi Province in loess area, this paper discussed the relationships between vegetation and runoff and sediment production on sloping lands of loess area. The results showed that natural-secondary forest had better function in soil and water conservation than artifical Robinia pseudoacacia forest, with runoff and sediment produced 65% - 82% and 23% - 92%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis indicated that runoff and sediment production had a significant correlation with rainfall and its intensity, but this relationship was decreased gradually with increasing canopy density. Different land-use type had different runoff and sediment production, e. g., Ostryopsis davidiana and natural-secondary forests had the least runoff and sediment production, artificial Robinia pseudoacacia and Pinus tabulaeformis forests had 5 folds of it as much as Ostryopsis davidiana forest, mixed apple trees and crops had 17.14 and 3.96 folds of it than Ostryopsis davidiana forest, respectively, while high-standard soil preparation could decrease the production obviously. Gray correlation analysis suggested that the stand canopy density and the biomass of herb and litter were the most important factors affecting the runoff and sediment production on sloping land, whose gray correlation degrees all exceeded 0.6. Mixed forest with multi-layer stand structure and shrub forest should be developed in vegetation re-construction of loess area, which could help to increase the coverage and litter thickness to dramatically decrease the runoff and sediment production on sloping land.

  6. The effect of the mineral dissolution and deformation of slope stability on nature terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Chae, B.

    2012-12-01

    A landslide on nature terrane is mainly occurred by rainfall, snowmelt, earthquakes and rock/soil weathering process. Especially, the role of rainfall and rock/soil weathering in slope stability is very important because it causes decreased in shear strength by reducing the soil cohesion. Quartz is the most abundant crust-forming mineral on earth. This mineral contributes to the formation of crystalline rocks such as granite, gneiss, and sandstone. Therefore, in case of the slope consisted by granite, gneiss, and sandstone, the slope stability can be affected by the mineral weathering process such as mineral dissolution and deformation because the shear strength, one of the key factors to calculate the slope stability, can be reduced by mineral weathering. That is, mineral weathering including dissolution and deformation between the minerals can reduce the soil cohesion on nature terrane. Many studies have found that quartz exhibits a notably slow rate of dissolution at room temperature. Therefore, to achieve rapid dissolution at room temperature, other methods should be considered, including 1) expanding the surface area of quartz to increase the reaction area and 2) applying high pressure to the contact area of crystals to increase the dissolution rate. However, dissolution of the surface of quartz is difficult to observe when using powdered quartz to maximize the surface area. Therefore, we used beads and single quartz crystals to observe and analyze the dissolution of the surface. The former can be used to maximize the surface area of quartz, and high-pressure conditions can be applied to the latter. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was subsequently used to observe the dissolution patterns on the quartz surface. Numerical analyses using the finite element method (FEM) were also performed to quantify the deformation of the contact area. Quartz dissolution was observed in both experiments. This deformation was due to a concentrated compressive stress

  7. Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szupiany, R. N.; Amsler, M. L.; Hernandez, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Fornari, E.; Trento, A.

    2012-11-01

    Channel bifurcations associated with bars and islands are important nodes in braided rivers and may control flow partitioning and thus affect downstream confluences, as well as the formation and dynamics of bars. However, the morphodynamic processes associated with bar formation are poorly understood, and previous studies have largely concerned laboratory experiments, small natural streams, or numerical analyses with large Froude numbers, high slopes, and low Shields stresses. In these cases, the morphologic changes at bifurcations are relatively rapid, with predominant bed load transport and the suspended load playing a minor role. In this paper, the evolution of the flow structure and suspended bed sediment transport along four expansion-diffluence units in the Rio Paraná, Argentina, are described. The Rio Paraná is a large multichannel river with a bed composed of medium and fine sands and possesses low Froude numbers and high suspended bed material transport. Primary and secondary flow velocity components were measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) along the expansion-diffluence units, and the backscatter signal of the ADCP was calibrated to allow simultaneous measurements of suspended bed sediment concentrations. The interactions between these variables show that the cores of primary flow velocity and suspended bed sediment concentration do not necessarily follow the thalweg at the bifurcation and that inertial effects on the suspended bed sediment may influence the morphodynamics of bar formation. It is suggested that changes in flow stage, as well as the presence of vegetation, may further increase the deposition of suspended bed sediment at the bar head. This study suggests that the ratio of suspended bed material to bed load is an important factor controlling the morphodynamics of bifurcations in large sand bed braided rivers.

  8. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope, in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  9. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  10. Uncertainty of the Soil–Water Characteristic Curve and Its Effects on Slope Seepage and Stability Analysis under Conditions of Rainfall Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is important to determine the soil–water characteristic curve (SWCC for analyzing slope seepage and stability under the conditions of rainfall. However, SWCCs exhibit high uncertainty because of complex influencing factors, which has not been previously considered in slope seepage and stability analysis under conditions of rainfall. This study aimed to evaluate the uncertainty of the SWCC and its effects on the seepage and stability analysis of an unsaturated soil slope under conditions of rainfall. The SWCC model parameters were treated as random variables. An uncertainty evaluation of the parameters was conducted based on the Bayesian approach and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. Observed data from granite residual soil were used to test the uncertainty of the SWCC. Then, different confidence intervals for the model parameters of the SWCC were constructed. The slope seepage and stability analysis under conditions of rainfall with the SWCC of different confidence intervals was investigated using finite element software (SEEP/W and SLOPE/W. The results demonstrated that SWCC uncertainty had significant effects on slope seepage and stability. In general, the larger the percentile value, the greater the reduction of negative pore-water pressure in the soil layer and the lower the safety factor of the slope. Uncertainties in the model parameters of the SWCC can lead to obvious errors in predicted pore-water pressure profiles and the estimated safety factor of the slope under conditions of rainfall.

  11. Effects of HDT Bed Rest on Excitability of the Sarcolemma in Postural Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushakov, V.; Grunewald, M.; Maassen, N.; Zange, J.

    2013-02-01

    Prolonged decrease in physical activity level during bed rest leads to a decrease in muscle mass and force. A decrease in protein synthesis should be one of the main causes for the muscle atrophy and weakness. Additionally, a decrease in the sarcolemmal excitability may also contribute to the muscle weakness. After 21-day head tilt down (HDT) bed rest (BR) we have found that markedly decreased force in knee extensors and plantar flexors was accompanied by significant prolongation of the compound muscle action potential (m-wave) in m. vastus lateralis (VL) (+3.5%) and in m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (+8.1%). In this study, we studied effects of the 5-days HDT BR in the same muscles. 10 subjects were tested before, after, and 5 days after the bed rest. In contrast to the 21-days BR, the 5-days BR did not lead to changes in m-waves parameters. These findings show that effects of the HDT bed rest on the sarcolemmal excitability depend on its duration and are not directly associated with the fluid shift in lower extremities.

  12. Effect of Slope, Rainfall Intensity and Mulch on Erosion and Infiltration under Simulated Rain on Purple Soil of South-Western Sichuan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naeem Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purple soil is widely distributed in the hilly areas of the Sichuan basin, southwest China, and is highly susceptible to water erosion. The triggering of this process is related to slope, rainfall intensity and surface cover. Therefore, this study assesses the effects of different simulated rainfall intensities with different slopes on hydrological and erosional processes in un-mulched and mulched purple soils. Results show that the sediment and water losses increased with an increase of rainfall intensity and slope steepness. Generally, the slope contribution (Sc on water and sediment losses decreased with increasing rainfall intensity and slope steepness under both un-mulched and mulched soil. In un-mulched conditions, water losses were independent of slope steepness (Sc < 50% during the highest rainfall intensity. However, in mulched soil, the higher contributions of slope (Sc and rainfall (Rc were found for water and sediment losses, respectively, i.e., >50%, except during the increase in slope steepness from 15° to 25° under the highest rainfall intensity (120 mm·h−1. The effectiveness of mulch was more pronounced in reducing sediment losses (81%–100% compared with water losses (14%–100%. The conservation effectiveness of mulch both decreased and increased with slope steepness for water and sediment losses, respectively, under higher rainfall intensities. Water infiltration and recharge coefficient (RC decreased with an increase of slope steepness, while with an increase in rainfall intensity, the water infiltration and RC were increased and decreased, respectively, in both un-mulched and mulched soil. On the other hand, mulched soil maintained a significantly (α = 0.05 higher infiltration capacity and RC compared to that of the un-mulched soil.

  13. EFFECT OF GROUND VIBRATION TO SLOPE STABILITY, CASE STUDY LANDSLIDE ON THE MOUTH OF RAILWAY TUNNEL, GUNUNG GAJAH VILLAGE, LAHAT DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamar Aprilian Ghadafi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Slope stability around railway tunnel in Gunung Gajah Village, Lahat District needs to be analysed due to landslide which occurred on January, 23th 2016. That analysis needs to be done so that the railway transportation system can run safely. The purposes of this research are: to find out the factors that cause slope instability, to find out peak acceleration caused by railway traffic and earthquakes and its effects to the safety factor of slope, and determine stabilization method in order to prevent the occurrence of further landslide. The research activities include surveying, sampling, laboratory testing and analyzing slope stability using pseudo-static approach. Based on research result, the main factors that cause slope instability are morphology, structural geology, and ground vibration caused by earthquakes. Ground vibration are correlated to the slope instability. It shows that the higher of peak acceleration the lower of safety factor of slope. To prevent the occurrence of further landslide around research area, stabilization method should be applied in accordance with the conditions in that area such as building a retaining wall to increase safety factor of slope, building draining channels to reduce run off and performing shotcrete in the wall of landslide in order to avoid weathering.

  14. Effects of disking, bedding, and subsoiling on survival and growth of three oak species in central Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Paul Jeffreys; Emily B. Schultz; Thomas G. Matney; W. Cade Booth; Jason M. Morris

    2010-01-01

    A replicated split-plot design experiment to evaluate the effects of three site preparation methods (disking, bedding, and subsoiling plus bedding) on survival and growth of three oak species (cherrybark, Quercus pagoda Raf.; Shumard, Quercus shumardii Buckl.; and Nuttall, Quercus texana Buckl.) was established...

  15. Effectiveness of Mutual Learning Approach in the Academic Achievement of B.Ed Students in Learning Optional II English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at finding out the effectiveness of Mutual learning approach over the conventional method in learning English optional II among B.Ed students. The randomized pre-test, post test, control group and experimental group design was employed. The B.Ed students of the same college formed the control and experimental groups. Each…

  16. The effect of tibial slope on the biomechanics of cruciate-retaining TKA : a musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco A.; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Verdonschot, Nico J.J.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tibial slope can affect the outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). More posterior slope potentially helps releasing a too tight flexion gap and it is generally associated with a wider range of post-operative knee flexion. However, the mechanism by which tibial slope affects the

  17. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species.

  18. Effects of induced inter-bedded shale breakage on SAGD performance in the Orinoco belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashbush, J.L.; Fernandez, E.; Rodriguez, A.; Pina, J.A.; Ruiz, J. [Schlumberger, Piso (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Venezuela's Orinoco oil belt (Faja) which covers an area of 13 MM acres is being developed using primary recovery techniques that render recovery factors below 6 per cent. The national oil and gas company Petroleos de Venezuela SA is seeking to increase recovery factors to at least 20 per cent. Sandshale sequences in the oil belt vary from a few feet thick to hydrocarbon impregnated sand packages of 100 feet or more. Shales act as barriers to vertical flow and have to be considered when selecting an enhanced recovery mechanism to increase the recovery factor. This study assessed the effect of having inter-bedded shales in 2 possible scenarios for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), namely as permanent barriers or as temporary barriers amenable to be breakage as a function of temperature and thickness; and comparing steam chamber generation/propagation and its impact on production in the model before and after a potentially induced shale bed breach as a response to the thermal stresses during a SAGD process. Steam condensation will generate fresh water which can produce shale swelling and a change in permeability of the shales. This paper presented a numerical simulation study analyzing the behavior of a series of shale beds lamination schemes in a 100-foot reservoir. Recovery was compared by considering the shales as permanent barriers to vertical flow and the potential generation of flow paths of varying conductivities through the thinner shale beds as a function of thermal stress, length of exposure to steam and its condensate and pressure differentials. The study showed that breaching the vertical seals to allow flow through inter-bedded shales and shale stringers will increase the oil production rates and the recovery factors for the Faja type reservoir. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs.

  19. Characteristics and associated factors in patient falls, and effectiveness of the lower height of beds for the prevention of bed falls in an acute geriatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M D; Alonso, J; Miñana, J C; Arche, J M; Díaz, J M; Vazquez, F

    2013-01-01

    Whereas several studies about patient falls have provided data for long-term healthcare institutions, less information is available for acute care centres. The objective was to analyze the characteristics of the patient falls and associated factors, and the effectiveness of the lower beds' height to reduce the frequency and the harms of the patient falls in an acute geriatric hospital. A descriptive and retrospective study using a mandatory safety incident report, the IHI Global Trigger Tool, and the claims related to patient falls between 2007 and 2011 in a 200-bed university-associated geriatric hospital. The falls rate was 5.4 falls per 1000 patient days (1.3% of falls led to fractures) and there was exitus in 6 patients (0.6%). Nearly half of the falls ocurred during the night shift (42.4%). By wards, falls were more frequent in acute geriatric wards (42.9%). A 7.5% of patients had a fall before admission. 3 (0.2%) claims due to possible clinical negligence were found. A reduction (28.3%) of bed falls with the lower height of the bed and a 1.88 times less falls with harm (RR 0.53; CI 95% 0.83-0.34) (p=0.006) was observed. The prevention of patient falls is an important task in geriatric units with a potential reduction of harms and costs, some measures such as the lower height of the bed showed a significant reduction of the falls. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Vibration upon Elastic and Cohesive Properties of Beds of Wet Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alsop

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of sinusoidal vibrations through beds of cohesive particulate solids was measured. Results were interpreted in terms of a critical state model to predict the elastic swelling constant k, and the cohesive stress C. Factorial experimental design was used to identify significant parameters. Factors that affect k include percent moisture, bulk density, sample size, sample shape, the presence of a supporting membrane, and loading order. Factors that affect C include percent moisture and particle size distribution. Factors affecting k were interpreted in terms of their effects upon bed structure and factors affecting C in terms of an equivalent pore water pressure due to capillary and liquid bridge effects. The critical state model was modified to incorporate general relationships between axial and radial strains.

  1. Effects of Hydraulic Soil Properties on Vegetation Pattern Formation in Sloping Landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Gerardo; Giannino, Francesco; Cartení, Fabrizio; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2017-12-01

    Current models of vegetation pattern formation rely on a system of weakly nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations that are coupled by their source terms. While these equations, which are used to describe a spatiotemporal planar evolution of biomass and soil water, qualitatively capture the emergence of various types of vegetation patterns in arid environments, they are phenomenological and have a limited predictive power. We ameliorate these limitations by deriving the vertically averaged Richards' equation to describe flow (as opposed to "diffusion") of water in partially saturated soils. This establishes conditions under which this nonlinear equation reduces to its weakly nonlinear reaction-diffusion counterpart used in the previous models, thus relating their unphysical parameters (e.g., diffusion coefficient) to the measurable soil properties (e.g., hydraulic conductivity) used to parameterize the Richards equation. Our model is valid for both flat and sloping landscapes and can handle arbitrary topography and boundary conditions. The result is a model that relates the environmental conditions (e.g., precipitation rate, runoff and soil properties) to formation of multiple patterns observed in nature (such as stripes, labyrinth and spots).

  2. A Numerical Model for Thermal Effects in a Microwave Irradiated Catalyst Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Lanz, Jason E.

    1998-01-01

    Electromagnetic and heat transfer analysis is used to determine possibility of selective heating of nanometer-sized, metallic catalyst particles attached to a ceramic support through microwave irradiation. This analysis is incorporated into a macroscopic heat transfer model of a packed and fluidized catalyst bed heated by a microwave field to predict thermal effects associated with selective heating of the catalyst sites. The model shows a dependence on particle size and microwave frequency...

  3. Wall roughness effects on flow and scouring in curved channels with gravel bed

    OpenAIRE

    Hersberger, Daniel S.

    2002-01-01

    Wall roughness effects on flow and scouring in curved channels with gravel bed In the narrow valleys in Alpine regions, rivers frequently flow across constructed zones, passing through villages and cities. Due to limited space, the protection from high floods often needs to be ensured by protection walls. During floods, these protection walls may be endangered by scour phenomena, especially if they are located in bends. In the past, the potential danger of underscoured structures was reduced ...

  4. Fundamental changes of granular flows dynamics, deposition and erosion processes at high slope angles: insights from laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Roche, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical granular flows commonly interact with their substrate in various ways depending on the mechanical properties of the underlying material. Granular substrates, resulting from deposition of earlier flows or various geological events, are often eroded by avalanches [see Hungr and Evans, 2004 for review]. The entrainment of underlying debris by the flow is suspected to affect flow dynamics because qualitative and quantitative field observations suggest that it can increase the flow velocity and deposit extent, depending on the geological setting and flow type [Sovilla et al., 2006; Iverson et al., 2011]. Direct measurement of material entrainment in nature, however, is very difficult. We conducted laboratory experiments on granular column collapse over an inclined channel with and without an erodible bed of granular material. The controlling parameters were the channel slope angle, the granular column volume and its aspect ratio (i.e. height over length), the inclination of the column with respect to the channel base, the channel width, and the thickness and compaction of the erodible bed. For slope angles below a critical value θc, between 10° and 16°, the runout distance rf is proportional to the initial column height h0 and is unaffected by the presence of an erodible bed. On steeper slopes, the flow dynamics change fundamentally since a last phase of slow propagation develops at the end of the flow front deceleration, and prolongates significantly the flow duration. This phase has similar characteristics that steady, uniform flows. The slow propagation phase lasts longer for increasing slope angle, column volume, column inclination with respect to the slope, and channel width, and for decreasing column aspect ratio. It is however independent of the maximum front velocity and, on an erodible bed, of the maximum depth of excavation within the bed. Both on rigid and erodible beds, the increase of the slow propagation phase duration has a crucial effect

  5. Effects of turning on skin-bed interface pressures in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew J; Schwab, Wilhelm; van Oostrom, Johannes H; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Caruso, Lawrence J

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the effects of lateral turning on skin-bed interface pressures in the sacral, trochanteric and buttock regions, and its effectiveness in unloading at-risk tissue. Minimizing skin-support surface interface pressure is important in pressure ulcer prevention, but the effect of standard patient repositioning on skin interface pressure has not been objectively established. Data were collected from 15 healthy adults from a university-affiliated hospital. Mapped 24-inch x 24-inch (2304 half-inch sensors) interface pressure profiles were obtained in the supine position, followed by lateral turning with pillow or wedge support and subsequent head-of-bed elevation to 30 degrees . Raising the head-of-bed to 30 degrees in the lateral position statistically significantly increased peak interface pressures and total area > or = 32 mmHg. Comparing areas > or = 32 mmHg from all positions, 93% of participants had skin areas with interface pressures > or = 32 mmHg throughout all positions (60 +/- 54 cm(2)), termed 'triple jeopardy areas'. The triple jeopardy area increased statistically significantly with wedges as compared to pillows (153 +/- 99 cm(2) vs. 48 +/- 47 cm(2), P turning by experienced intensive care unit nurses does not reliably unload all areas of high skin-bed interface pressures. These areas remain at risk for skin breakdown, and help to explain why pressure ulcers occur despite the implementation of standard preventive measures. Support materials for maintaining lateral turned positions can also influence tissue unloading and triple jeopardy areas.

  6. Effect of Wetting and Contamination of Granular Beds During Sphere Impact

    KAUST Repository

    Kouraytem, Nadia

    2013-03-01

    This thesis presents results from an experimental study of the impact of dense solid spheres onto granular beds. The overall aim is to further our understanding of the dynamical response of granular materials to impact. In order to do this, we will study both the initial penetration stages and peak acceleration exerted on the sphere by using high-speed imaging. Another critical part is to measure the penetration depth of the sphere and calculate the corresponding depth-averaged stopping force. Both of these main focal points will be assessed for not only dry, but wet and “contaminated” grains, whereby the granular bed will be comprised of two distinct size ranges of base grains. In doing so, we aim to broadly determine whether contaminated grains or wet grains are more effective at increasing the tensile strength of granular materials.

  7. Physiological Effects of Aquatic Exercise in Pregnant Women on Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechrist, Dawndra M; Tiongco, Cynthia Gorter; Whisner, Sandra M; Geddie, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effectiveness of an Aquatic Exercise Program (AEP) provided by an occupational therapist for pregnant women on hospitalized bed rest. Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of hospitalized pregnant women comparing those who attended an AEP (n = 19) to a control group who received no AEP (n = 12). Statistical tests were used to assess evidence of differences in length of gestation as well as blood pressure and amniotic fluid index (AFI) at discharge. Women who received an AEP had increased AFI and length of gestation compared to the control group. This study supports the use of an AEP as an intervention for pregnant women on prescribed bed rest. Further research is recommended to validate these findings with a larger sample.

  8. Tailored Voltage Waveforms in an SF6 /O2 discharge: slope asymmetry and its effect on surface nanotexturing of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Drahi, E.; Poulain, G.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The nanotexturing of the surface of a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer for improved photovoltaic performance can be achieved through the use of a SF6 /O2 capacitively coupled reactive ion etching plasma. In this study, we attempt to modify the texturing conditions by taking advantage of slope asymmetries of Tailored Voltage Waveform (TVW) excitation. We show that TVW shapes resembling ``sawtooths'', presenting a large slope asymmetry, induce high ionization asymmetries in the discharge, and that the dominance of this effect strongly depends on both gas mixture and pressure. These asymmetries have been previously observed in other electronegative gas and are due to differing plasma sheath dynamics at powered and grounded electrode in a discharge operating in drift-ambipolar mode. The texturing of c-Si in SF6 /O2 occurs through competing mechanisms, including etching by fluorine radicals and in-situ deposition of micro-masking species. The relative fluxes of etching and passivating species are expected to be strongly varied due to the plasma asymmetry. Morphological and optical characterization of textured c-Si surfaces will give more insight into both the plasma properties and the mechanisms involved in dry nanotexturing. This project has been supported by the French Government in the frame of the program of investment for the future (Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir - ANR-IEED-002-01).

  9. Measurements and theoretical modeling of effective thermal conductivity of particle beds under compression in air and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Mo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective thermal conductivity experiments were carried out with spherical particle beds under low and high compressive pressure loading in vacuum and air. A theoretical model was proposed for the effective thermal conductivity of particle beds based on the experimental results. The model incorporates heat conduction by particles including contact thermal resistance between particles, conduction through the gas in between particles, and radiation between particles, and includes two fitting parameters, namely the coefficient of heat conducted through the fluid, and the macro-contact thermal resistance. The predictions from the theoretical model satisfactorily match the experimental data for the bed effective thermal conductivity over the range of applied loading pressures on particles with different Young's modulus and the gas environment. The model can be used generally to describe the effect of compression stress or pressure on effective thermal conductivity of particle beds.

  10. The interaction of a vortex ring with a sloped sediment layer: Critical criteria for incipient grain motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, R. J.

    2012-02-01

    Experiments were performed to analyse the interaction between a vortex ring and a sloped sediment layer. Attention focussed on interactions under "critical" conditions, in which sediment motion was only just induced by the ring's flow field. Both hydraulically smooth and hydraulically rough bedforms were analysed, using near-spherical monodisperse sediments with relative densities of 1.2 and 2.5 and mean diameters (dp) ranging between 80 and 1087 μm. Measurements of the vortex-ring flow field were obtained, during the interaction, using two-dimensional particle imaging velocimetry. The threshold conditions for incipient sediment motion were analysed in terms of the critical Shields parameter (Nc), defined in terms of the peak tangential velocity measured adjacent to the bed surface. Bed-slope effects were investigated by tilting the sediment layer at various angles between the horizontal and the repose limit for the sediment. In all cases, the propagation axis of the vortex ring was aligned normal to the bed surface. The measured values of Nc were compared with a force-balance model based on the conditions for incipient grain motion on a sloping bed. For hydraulically smooth bedforms, where the bed roughness is small compared to the boundary-layer depth, the model was derived to account for how viscous stresses affect the drag and lift forces acting on the near surface sediment. For hydraulically rough bedforms, where this viscous-damping effect is not present, the model assumes the drag and lift forces scale with the square of the near-bed (inviscid) velocity scale. In both cases, the model predicts that bedforms become more mobile as the bed slope is increased. However, the damping effect of the viscous sublayer acts as a stabilizing influence for hydraulically smooth bedforms, to reduce the rate at which the bed mobility increases with bed slope. The measured values of Nc were in agreement with the trends predicted by this model, and exhibit a transition in

  11. A Bayesian procedure for estimating the causal effects of nursing home bed-hold policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Roee; Intrator, Orna; Lancaster, Tony

    2017-10-03

    Nursing home bed-hold policies provide continuity of care for Medicaid beneficiaries by paying nursing homes to reserve beds so residents can return to their facility of occupancy following an acute hospitalization. In 2001, Michigan implemented bed-hold policies in nursing homes. We investigated the impact of these policies on mortality and hospitalizations using 1999-2004 quarterly data from nursing homes in Michigan and nursing homes in 11 states that did not implement such policies. Synthetic Control has been used to estimate the effects of policies by accounting for changes over time unrelated to the intervention. Synthetic Control is intended for scalar continuous outcome at each period, and assumes a single treated unit and multiple control units. We propose a Bayesian procedure to overcome these limitations. It imputes the outcomes of nursing homes in Michigan if they were not exposed to the policy by matching to non-exposed nursing homes that are associated with the exposed ones in the pre-policy period. Because sampling from a Bayesian model is computationally challenging, we describe an approximation procedure that can be implemented using existing software. Our approach can be applied to other studies that examine the impact of policies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Manual for computing bed load transport using BAGS (Bedload Assessment for Gravel-bed Streams) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Pitlick; Yantao Cui; Peter Wilcock

    2009-01-01

    This manual provides background information and instructions on the use of a spreadsheet-based program for Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bed Streams (BAGS). The program implements six bed load transport equations developed specifically for gravel-bed rivers. Transport capacities are calculated on the basis of field measurements of channel geometry, reach-average slope,...

  13. Exercise Effects on the Brain and Sensorimotor Function in Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; De Dios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, R. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight microgravity results in cephalad fluid shifts and deficits in posture control and locomotion. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on Earth using head down tilt bed rest (HDBR). HDBR serves as a spaceflight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. Preliminary results from our prior 70 days HDBR studies showed that HDBR is associated with focal gray matter (GM) changes and gait and balance deficits, as well as changes in brain functional connectivity. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers we investigated whether exercise reduces the effects of HDBR on GM, functional connectivity, and motor performance. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on brain health. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention during HDBR could potentially mitigate the effects of HDBR on the central nervous system. Eighteen subjects were assessed before (12 and 7 days), during (7, 30, and 70 days) and after (8 and 12 days) 70 days of 6-degrees HDBR at the NASA HDBR facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, US. Each subject was randomly assigned to a control group or one of two exercise groups. Exercise consisted of daily supine exercise which started 20 days before the start of HDBR. The exercise subjects participated either in regular aerobic and resistance exercise (e.g. squat, heel raise, leg press, cycling and treadmill running), or aerobic and resistance exercise using a flywheel apparatus (rowing). Aerobic and resistance exercise intensity in both groups was similar, which is why we collapsed the two exercise groups for the current experiment. During each time point T1-weighted MRI scans and resting state functional connectivity scans were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in GM density were assessed using voxel based morphometry (VBM8) under SPM. Changes in resting state functional connectivity was assessed

  14. Field evidence of groundwater ridging in a slope of a granite watershed without the capillary fringe effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Shin'ya; Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Yamakawa, Yosuke; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2014-04-01

    The controls on the rapid mobilization and runoff of pre-event water are an important issue in hillslope hydrology. One of the mechanisms involved is groundwater ridging, based on the capillary fringe effect. The typical conditions for groundwater ridging to occur are as follows: (1) the slope consists of fine- to medium-textured materials with a large extent of the tension-saturated zone, (2) the slope gradient is low, and (3) the initial groundwater level is high. Where these three conditions are met, a further condition, (4) a small amount of rainwater, would then be enough to trigger groundwater ridging. In this study, we detail groundwater ridge formation in the bedrock layers of Akakabe Watershed (Japan) as recorded by detailed field observations using tensiometers and bedrock boreholes under conditions violating the above. The study site consisted of materials showing almost no tension-saturated zone and had a relatively high gradient (22°). Moreover, the initially high groundwater level did not always generate a groundwater ridge, and a large total rainfall (>160 mm) was required to trigger groundwater ridging. Hence the conventional mechanism cannot explain the groundwater ridging at the field site studied here. It seems that the smaller distance from the groundwater table to the ground surface and the higher hydraulic conductivity in the downslope areas compared to the upslope areas caused a more rapid and larger groundwater level rise in the downslope areas, which accounted for the observed groundwater ridging. This study demonstrated that a groundwater ridge can be formed in the absence of the capillary fringe effect and that bedrock groundwater can contribute to storm runoff generation in headwater catchments under the influence of groundwater ridging.

  15. Effect measure modification of blood lead-air lead slope factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Meng, Qingyu; Cohen, Jonathan; Davis, J Allen; Svendsgaard, David; Brown, James S; Tuttle, Lauren; Hubbard, Heidi; Rice, Joann; Kirrane, Ellen; Vinikoor-Imler, Lisa; Kotchmar, Dennis; Hines, Erin; Ross, Mary

    2015-01-01

    There is abundant literature finding that susceptibility factors, including race and ethnicity, age, and housing, directly influence blood lead levels. No study has explored how susceptibility factors influence the blood lead-air lead relationship nationally. The objective is to evaluate whether susceptibility factors act as effect measure modifiers on the blood lead-air lead relationship. Participant level blood lead data from the 1999 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were merged with air lead data from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Linear mixed effects models were run with and without an air lead interaction term for age group, sex, housing age, or race/ethnicity to determine whether these factors are effect measure modifiers for all ages combined and for five age brackets. Age group and race/ethnicity were determined to be effect measure modifiers in the all-age model and for some age groups. Being a child (1-5, 6-11, and 12-19 years) or of Mexican-American ethnicity increased the effect estimate. Living in older housing (built before 1950) decreased the effect estimate for all models except for the 1-5-year group, where older housing was an effect measure modifier. These results are consistent with the peer-reviewed literature of time-activity patterns, ventilation, and toxicokinetics.

  16. Effects of continuous vs interval exercise training on oxygen uptake efficiency slope in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, D M L; Rocco, E A; Silva, A G; Rocco, D F; Pacheco, M T; Silva, P F; Furlan, V

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a submaximal index incorporating cardiovascular, peripheral, and pulmonary factors that determine the ventilatory response to exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous exercise training and interval exercise training on the OUES in patients with coronary artery disease. Thirty-five patients (59.3±1.8 years old; 28 men, 7 women) with coronary artery disease were randomly divided into two groups: continuous exercise training (n=18) and interval exercise training (n=17). All patients performed graded exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis before and 3 months after the exercise-training program to determine ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT), respiratory compensation point, and peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2). The OUES was assessed based on data from the second minute of exercise until exhaustion by calculating the slope of the linear relation between oxygen uptake and the logarithm of total ventilation. After the interventions, both groups showed increased aerobic fitness (Pexercise and interval exercise training groups demonstrated an increase in OUES (Pexercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.57; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.57); 2) interval exercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.80; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.67). Continuous and interval exercise training resulted in a similar increase in OUES among patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that improvements in OUES among CAD patients after aerobic exercise training may be dependent on peripheral and central mechanisms.

  17. Numerical modelling for the effective thermal conductivity of lithium meta titanate pebble bed with different packing structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, Maulik, E-mail: maulikpanchal@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Chaudhuri, Paritosh [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Van Lew, Jon T; Ying, Alice [UCLA, MAE Department, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of lithium meta-titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds is an important parameter for the design and analysis of TBM in ITER. • The k{sub eff} of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds under stagnant helium gas have been determined numerically using different uniform packing structures and random close packing (RCP) structures. • k{sub eff} of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds with different packing fractions have been reported as function of temperature; k{sub eff} of the RCP Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble bed is compared with reported experimental results. • The numerically-determined k{sub eff} of the RCP Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble bed agrees reasonably well with the experimental data and Zehner-Schlunder correlation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of lithium meta-titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds is an important parameter for the design and analysis of IN LLCB TBM (Indian Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module). The k{sub eff} of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds under stagnant helium gas have been determined numerically using different uniform packing structures and random close packing (RCP) structures. The uniform packing structures of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble bed are modelled by using the simple cubic, body centered cubic and face centered cubic arrangement. The packing structure of the RCP bed of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles is generated with the discrete element method (DEM) code. k{sub eff} of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds with different packing fractions have been reported as function of temperature; k{sub eff} of the RCP Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble bed is compared with reported experimental results from literature. The numerically determined k{sub eff} of the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble bed agrees reasonably well with the experimental data.

  18. Effect of packing fraction variations on reactivity in pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2004-01-01

    The pebble-bed reactor (PBR) core consists of large number of randomly packed spherical fuel elements. The effect of fuel element packing density variations on multiplication factor in a typical PBR is studied using WIMS code. It is observed that at normal conditions the k-eff increases with packing fraction. Effects of secondary coolant ingress (water or molten lead) in the core at accidental conditions are studied at various packing densities. The effect of water ingress on reactivity depends strongly on water density and packing fraction and is prevailingly positive, while the lead ingress reduces multiplication factor regardless of lead effective density and packing fraction. Both effects are stronger at lower packing fractions. (author)

  19. Effect of feed atomization and vessel configuration of fines formation and entrainment from fluidized-bed calciners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonder, S.S.

    1978-11-01

    Fines and granules are produced during fluidized-bed calcination of liquid radioactive wastes. Fines are generated by attrition of larger bed particles and spray drying of atomized feed droplets. Some of the fines have sufficient residence time in the bed to provide seed particles for the particle growth; the remainder are elutriated from the bed or withdrawn with the product. Methods which were tested to reduce the generation and entrainment of fines during the calcination process are discussed. A pneumatic, flat-faced, feed atomizing nozzle has proven adequate for feed introduction, bed particle size control, and seed particle generation. Other pneumatic nozzle types (the extended divergent, long extended convergent, and short extended convergent) did not control bed particle size. Testing of a single-fluid pressure nozzle and the combination nozzle and cyclone fines return jet was discontinued before completion. However, no further testing to improve nozzle operating characteristics is presently justifiable, as the flat-faced nozzle has proven adequate. Limited tests confirmed that a cylindrical fluid bed with an expanded vapor space results in lower entrainment rates than a conventional cylindrical fluid bed. A reduction of the superficial gas velocity in the expanded vapor space by a factor of 3.2 reduced entrainment by a factor of 8. Double ''venetian blind'' baffles in the calciner vapor space were 20% more effective in suppressing fines entrainment than single ''venetian blind'' and fan baffles. Submerged baffles increased bed particle attrition and subsequent fines entrainment. The New Waste Calcining Facility will have a cylindrical calciner vessel with an expanded vapor space containing a double ''venetian blind'' baffle

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  1. Firefighter Safety Zone: The effect of terrain slope of separation distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret Butler; Jason Forthofer

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most critical decisions made on wildland fires is the identification of suitable safety zones for firefighters during daily fire management operations. To be effective (timely, repeatable, and accurate), these decisions rely on good training and good judgement. The current safety zone guidelines used in the US (see fig. 1) and published in the...

  2. Slope stability effects of fuel management strategies – inferences from Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice; R. R. Ziemer; S. C. Hankin

    1982-01-01

    A simple Monte Carlo simulation evaluated the effect of several fire management strategies on soil slip erosion and wildfires. The current condition was compared to (1) a very intensive fuelbreak system without prescribed fires, and (2) prescribed fire at four time intervals with (a) current fuelbreaks and (b) intensive fuel-breaks. The intensive fuelbreak system...

  3. Effects of DTM resolution on slope steepness and soil loss prediction on hillslope profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder Paulo Moreira; William J. Elliot; Andrew T. Hudak

    2011-01-01

    Topographic attributes play a critical role in predicting erosion in models such as the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP). The effects of four different high resolution hillslope profiles were studied using four different DTM resolutions: 1-m, 3-m, 5-m and 10-m. The WEPP model used a common scenario encountered in the forest environment and the selected hillslope...

  4. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S.

    2013-08-01

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  5. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  6. Slope position and Soil Lithological Effects on Live Leaf Nitrogen Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szink, I.; Adams, T. S.; Orr, A. S.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Soil lithology has been shown to have an effect on plant physiology from the roots to the leaves. Soils at ridgetop positions are typically more shallow and drier than soils at valley floor positions. Additionally, sandy soils tend to have a much lower water holding capacity and can be much harder for plants to draw nutrients from. We hypothesized that leaves from trees in shale derived soil at ridgetop positions will have lower nitrogen concentration than those in valley floor positions, and that this difference will be more pronounced in sandstone derived soils. This is due to the movement of nitrogen through the soil in a catchment, and the holding and exchange capacities of shale and sandstone lithologies. To test this, we collected live leaves using shotgun sampling from two locations in Central Pennsylvania from the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO); one location where soils are underlain by the Rose Hill Shale, and one from where soils are underlain by the Tuscarora Sandstone formation. We then measured, dried, and massed in order to determine specific leaf area (SLA). Afterwards, we powderized the leaves to determined their C:N ratio using a CE Instruments EA 1110 CHNS-O elemental Analyzer based on the "Dumas Method". We found that live leaves of the same species at higher elevations had lower nitrogen concentrations than those at lower elevations, which is consistent with our hypothesis. However, the comparison of leaves from all species in the catchment is not as strong, suggesting that there is a species specific effect on nitrogen concentration within leaves. We are currently processing additional leaves from other shale and sandstone sites. These results highlight the effect of abiotic environments on leaf nutrient concentrations, and the connection between belowground and aboveground tree physiology.

  7. Standard metabolic rate of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius: effects of temperature, mass, and life stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic rates provide important information about the biology of organisms. For ectothermic species such as insects, factors such as temperature and mass heavily influence metabolism, but these effects differ considerably between species. In this study we examined the standard metabolic rate of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. We used closed system respirometry and measured both O2 consumption and CO2 production across a range of temperatures (10, 20, 25, 30, 35°C) and life stages, while also accounting for activity. Temperature had a stronger effect on the mass specific .VO2 (mlg(-1)h(-1)) of mated males (Q10=3.29), mated females (Q10=3.19), unmated males (Q10=3.09), and nymphs that hatched (first instars, Q10=3.05) than on unmated females (Q10=2.77) and nymphs that molted (second through fifth instars, Q10=2.78). First instars had significantly lower respiratory quotients (RQ) than all other life stages. RQ of all stages was not affected by temperature. .VO2 (mlh(-1)) scaled more with mass than values previously reported for other arthropods or that would be predicted by the 3/4-power law. The results are used to understand the biology and ecology of the bed bug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing a cost effective rock bed thermal energy storage system: Design and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubscher, Hendrik Frederik; von Backström, Theodor Willem; Dinter, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Thermal energy storage is an integral part of the drive for low cost of concentrated solar power (CSP). Storage of thermal energy enables CSP plants to provide base load power. Alternative, cheaper concepts for storing thermal energy have been conceptually proposed in previous studies. Using rocks as a storage medium and air as a heat transfer fluid, the proposed concept offers the potential of lower cost storage because of the abundance and affordability of rocks. A packed rock bed thermal energy storage (TES) concept is investigated and a design for an experimental rig is done. This paper describes the design and modelling of an experimental test facility for a cost effective packed rock bed thermal energy storage system. Cost effective, simplified designs for the different subsystems of an experimental setup are developed based on the availability of materials and equipment. Modelling of this design to predict the thermal performance of the TES system is covered in this study. If the concept under consideration proves to be successful, a design that is scalable and commercially viable can be proposed for further development of an industrial thermal energy storage system.

  9. The effect of certificate-of-need laws on hospital beds and healthcare expenditures: an empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the effect of certificate-of-need legislation on hospital bed supply and healthcare expenditures. This study uses state data on several variables, including healthcare expenditures, hospital bed supply, and the existence of a certificate-of-need program, from 4 periods (1985, 1990, 1995, and 2000). We estimate 2 multivariate regression equations. In the first equation, hospital bed supply is the dependent variable, and certificate of need is included as an independent variable. In the second equation, healthcare expenditures is the dependent variable, and hospital bed supply and certificate of need are included as independent variables. Certificate-of-need laws have reduced the number of hospital beds by about 10% and have reduced healthcare expenditures by almost 2%. Certificate-of-need programs did not have a direct effect on healthcare expenditures. Certificate-of-need programs have limited the growth in the supply of hospital beds, and this has led to a slight reduction in the growth of healthcare expenditures.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF PROLONGED PHYSICAL INACTIVITY INDUCED BY BED REST ON COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING IN HEALTHY MALE PARTICIPANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Dolenc

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that physical activity beneficially influences cognitive functioning. Less thoroughly investigated are the cognitive outcomes of reduced physical activity levels. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of prolonged physical inactivity induced by bed rest on the participant’s cognitive functioning. Bed rest is a well-accepted method by which an acute stage of human adaptation to weightlessness in space flights is simulated, as well as an important model to study the consequences of extreme physical inactivity in humans. The subjects participating in the study consisted of fifteen healthy males aged between 19 and 65 years who were exposed to 14-day horizontal bed rest in a strict hospital environment. To assess the cognitive functions of the participants, a neuropsychological test battery was administered before and after the bed rest experiment. There was no significant impairment in cognitive performance after the 14-day bed rest on all tests, except in the measurements of delayed recall in the group of older adults. The results suggest that cognitive functions remained relatively stable during the period of physical immobilization. The obtained results have been discussed taking the possible contributing factors into account such as the practice effect, the relatively short duration of bed rest, and the choice of the cognitive measures administered. The study also provides evidence that favourable living and psychosocial conditions can protect one against cognitive decline in the case of extreme physical inactivity.

  11. Maternal and individual effects in selection of bed sites and their consequences for fawn survival at different spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moorter, Bram; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; McLoughlin, Philip D; Delorme, Daniel; Klein, François; Boyce, Mark S

    2009-03-01

    We examined the relationship between survival of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) fawns at Trois Fontaines, Champagne-Ardennes, France, and factors related to bed-site selection (predator avoidance and thermoregulation) and maternal food resources (forage availability in the maternal home range). Previous studies have demonstrated that at small scales, the young of large herbivores select bed sites independently from their mothers, although this selection takes place within the limits of their mother's home range. Fawn survival was influenced largely by the availability of good bed sites within the maternal home range, not by the fawn's selection of bed sites; however, selection for thermal cover when selecting bed sites positively influenced survival of young fawns. Typical features of a good home range included close proximity to habitat edges, which is related to forage accessibility for roe deer. The availability of bed sites changed as fawns aged, probably due to an increased mobility of the fawn or a different use of the home range by the mother; sites offering high concealment and thermal protection became less available in favor of areas with higher forage accessibility. Despite the minor influence of bed-site selection on survival, roe deer fawns strongly selected their bed sites according to several environmental factors linked to predator avoidance and thermoregulation. Fawns selected for sites providing concealment, light penetration, and avoided signs of wild boar (Sus scrofa) activity. Avoidance of sites with high light penetration by young fawns positively affected their survival, confirming a negative effect on thermoregulation due to reduced thermal cover. Selection for light penetration by older fawns was less clear. We discuss these results in the context of cross-generational effects in habitat selection across multiple scales, and the potential influence of the 'ghost of predation past'.

  12. Effect of rainfall intensity and slope steepness on the development of soil erosion in the Southern Cis-Ural region (A model experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, N. V.; Gabbasova, I. M.; Komissarov, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of rainfall intensity on the erosion of residual calcareous agrogray soils and clay-illuvial agrochernozems in the Southern Cis-Ural region on slopes of different inclination and vegetation type has been studied by simulating with a small-size sprinkler. It has been shown that soil loss linearly depends on rainfall intensity (2, 4, and 6 mm/min) and slope inclination (3° and 7°). When the rainfall intensity and duration, and the slope inclination increase, soil loss by erosion from agrogray soils increases higher than from agrochernozems. On the plowland with a slope of 3°, runoff begins 12, 10, and 5 min, on the average, after the beginning of rains at these intensities. When the slope increases to 7°, runoff begins earlier by 7, 6, and 4 min, respectively. After the beginning of runoff and with its increase by 1 mm, the soil loss from slopes of 3° and 7° reaches 4.2 and 25.7 t/ha on agrogray soils and 1.4 and 4.7 t/ha on agrochernozems, respectively. Fallow soils have higher erosion resistance, and the soil loss little depends on the slope gradient: it gradually increases to 0.3-1.0 t/ha per 1 mm of runoff with increasing rainfall intensity and duration. The content of physical clay in eroded material is higher than in the original soils. Fine fractions prevail in this material, which increases their humus content. The increase in rainfall intensity and duration to 4 and 6 mm/min results in the entrapment of coarse silt and sand by runoff.

  13. Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of marginal burning in live chaparral fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; D.R. Weise; S Mahalingam

    2005-01-01

    An extensive experimental and numerical study was completed to analyze the marginal burning behavior of live chaparral shrub fuels that grow in the mountains of southern California. Laboratory fire spread experiments were carried out to determine the effects of wind, slope, moisture content, and fuel characteristics on marginal burning in fuel beds of common...

  14. Low-Voltage Organic Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistor with Steep Subthreshold Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangxu; Sun, Lingjie; Han, Jiangli; Li, Baili; Yu, Xi; Zhang, Xiaotao; Ren, Xiaochen; Hu, Wenping

    2018-03-06

    Anodization is a promising technique to form high- k dielectrics for low-power organic field-effect transistor (OFET) applications. However, the surface quality of the dielectric, which is mainly inherited from the metal electrode, can be improved further than other fabrication techniques, such as sol-gel. In this study, we applied the template stripping method to fabricate a low-power single-crystalline OFET based on the anodized AlO x dielectric. We found that the template stripping method largely improves the surface roughness of the deposited Al and allows for the formation of a high-quality AlO x high- k dielectric by anodization. The ultraflat AlO x /SAM dielectric combined with a single-crystal 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA) semiconductor produced a nearly defect-free interface with a steep subthreshold swing (SS) of 66 mV/decade. The current device is a promising candidate for future ultralow-power applications. Other than metal deposition, template stripping could provide a general approach to improve thin-film quality for many other types of materials and processes.

  15. Optimizing landslide susceptibility zonation: Effects of DEM spatial resolution and slope unit delineation on logistic regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögel, R.; Marchesini, I.; Alvioli, M.; Reichenbach, P.; Rossi, M.; Malet, J.-P.

    2018-01-01

    We perform landslide susceptibility zonation with slope units using three digital elevation models (DEMs) of varying spatial resolution of the Ubaye Valley (South French Alps). In so doing, we applied a recently developed algorithm automating slope unit delineation, given a number of parameters, in order to optimize simultaneously the partitioning of the terrain and the performance of a logistic regression susceptibility model. The method allowed us to obtain optimal slope units for each available DEM spatial resolution. For each resolution, we studied the susceptibility model performance by analyzing in detail the relevance of the conditioning variables. The analysis is based on landslide morphology data, considering either the whole landslide or only the source area outline as inputs. The procedure allowed us to select the most useful information, in terms of DEM spatial resolution, thematic variables and landslide inventory, in order to obtain the most reliable slope unit-based landslide susceptibility assessment.

  16. Effect of particle size and humidity on sugarcane bagasse combustion in a fixed bed furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamir Sánchez Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The panela industry is one of the most important Agro Industries in Colombia, making it the largest per- capita consumer and the second largest producer worldwide. The fuel used in this process is traditionally the sugarcane bagasse (SB which is a byproduct of milling. However, due to the low efficiency of panela furnaces additional fuel is required such as wood, used rubber tires and coal. The fixed-bed furnaces inefficiency is mainly due to incomplete combustion of SB caused by the influence of process variables. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the influence of particle size (PS and moisture content (MC over the combustion stages of SB in fixed-bed furnaces. A three-level factorial design was proposed for PS and MC of SB where the temperature and gas concentration were considered as response variables to evaluate the furnace performance. The results obtained in this work show that if the MC increases then the SB yield in the combustion is decreased. On the other hand, the increasing PS can counteract the effect of the MC of SB.

  17. Effects of Daily Centrifugation on Segmental Fluid Distribution in Bed-rested Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Andre; Moore, S. T.; Stenger, M.; Arya, T. M.; Newby, N.; Tucker, J. M.; Milstead, L.; Acock, K.; Knapp, C.; Jevans, J.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The effect of daily centrifugation on segmental fluid distribution have been studied during 21 days of 6 degree head down bedrest. One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of artificial gravity (AG) training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Fluid shifts of thoracic(VTO), abdominal (VAB), thigh (VTH), and calf (VCA) regions were measured by the tetrapolar segmental body impedance technique. Untrained subjects reduced their total volume from 18.9 plus or minus 0.5L to 17.9 plus or minus 0.9L (MN plus or minus SE, P less than 0.05) while trained subjects maintained their total volume. In untrained, control, subjects after bed rest, there was a trend toward reduced volume in all segments, with significant reductions in thigh and calf (fig, P less than 0.05). Trained subjects maintained volume in all segments. Our data indicate that artificial gravity treatment counteracts bed rest-induced hypovolemia.

  18. Effectiveness of a Reduced-Risk Insecticide Based Bed Bug Management Program in Low-Income Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinderpal Singh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. infestations are becoming increasingly common in low-income communities. Once they are introduced, elimination is very difficult. As part of the efforts to develop effective and safe bed bug management programs, we conducted a laboratory study evaluating the efficacy of a reduced-risk insecticide—Alpine aerosol (0.5% dinotefuran. We then conducted a field evaluation of a reduced-risk insecticide based integrated pest management (IPM program in low-income family apartments with young children. In laboratory evaluations, direct spray and 5 min exposure to dry Alpine aerosol residue caused 100.0 ± 0.0 and 91.7 ± 8.3% mortality to bed bug nymphs, respectively. Direct Alpine aerosol spray killed 91.3 ± 4.3% of the eggs. The IPM program included education, steam, bagging infested linens, placing intercepting devices under furniture legs and corners of rooms, applying Alpine aerosol and Alpine dust (0.25% dinotefuran, 95% diatomaceous earth dust, and regularly scheduled monitoring and re-treatment. Nine apartments ranging from 1–1,428 (median: 29 bed bugs based on visual inspection and Climbup interceptor counts were included. Over a 6-month period, an average 172 g insecticide (Alpine aerosol + Alpine dust was used in each apartment, a 96% reduction in pesticide usage compared to chemical only treatment reported in a similar environment. The IPM program resulted in an average of 96.8 ± 2.2% reduction in the number of bed bugs. However, elimination of bed bugs was only achieved in three lightly infested apartments (<30 bed bugs at the beginning. Elimination success was closely correlated with the level of bed bug populations.

  19. Effect of vortex orifice air distributor on granule growth in conical fluidized bed granulation with bottom entry spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, Y.; Sekiguchi, I. [Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering

    2000-02-01

    This investigation is undertaken to obtain information on the effect of vortex orifice air distributors on the granule growth in conical fluidized bed granulation with a bottom entry spray. The five types of vortex orifice distributors suitable for a strong swirling air supply at the base of the conical bed were prepared. Although all these orifices consisted of four tangential injection nozzles with the same opening, the opening size of the air injection nozzle in each of the orifices was different. Intensity of the air injection nozzle torque within the vortex orifice was measured by a torque balance method. The granule formation of fluidising lactose particles in the process of size-enlargement was carried out by spraying an aqueous HPC solution into the bed where the moisture content of granules was maintained at or below 0.30 wt %. As a result, granule growth in the bed could be precisely controlled by changes in the air injection nozzle torques arising from the vortex orifice distributor. The extent of granule growth, namely the granule growth conversion increasing with accumulated content of HPC in the bed particles during the operating time decreased according to the air injection nozzle torque within the vortex orifice. Using these process variables, granule growth conversion could be arranged experimentally. It is finally found that one of the features of the proposed air distributor is useful for size-control of granule products in the conical fluidized bed granulation with a bottom entry spray. (author)

  20. Slope and Land Use Changing Effects on Soil Properties and Magnetic Susceptibility in Hilly Lands, Yasouj Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouhollaah vafaeezadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Land use changes are the most reasons which affect natural ecosystem protection. Forest soils have high organic matter and suitable structure, but their land use management change usually affects soil properties and decreases soil quality. There are several outcomes of such land use changes and intensification: accelerated soil erosion and decline of soil nutrient conditions, change of hydrological regimes and sedimentation and loss of primary forests and their biodiversity. Establishing effects of land use and land cover changes on soil properties have implications for devising management strategies for sustainable use. Forest land use change in Yasouj caused soil losses and decreased soil quality. The objectives of this study were to assess some soil physical and chemical properties and soil magnetic susceptibility changes in different land uses and slope position. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were taken from natural forest, degraded forest and dryland farm from different slops (0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 percent in sout east of Yasouj. They were from 0–10 cm depth in a completely randomized design with five replications. Soil moisture and temperature regimes in the study area are xeric and mesic, respectively. Particle size distribution was determined by the hydrometer method and soil organic matter, CaCO3 equivalent and bulk density was determined using standard procedures described in Methods of Soil Analysis book. Magnetic susceptibility was measured at low and high frequency of 0.46 kHz (χlf and 4.6 kHz (χHf respectively with a Bartington MS2D meter using approximately 20 g of soil held in a four-dram clear plastic vial. Frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd is expressed as the difference between the high and the low frequency measurements as a percentage of χ at low frequency. Results and Discussion: Soil texture was affected by land use change from silty clay loam in forest to silty loam in dry land farm

  1. Effect of fuel particles' size variations on multiplication factor in pebble-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    The pebble-bed reactor (Pbr) spherical fuel element consists of two radial zones: the inner zone, in which the fissile material in form of the so-called TRISO particles is uniformly dispersed in graphite matrix and the outer zone, a shell of pure graphite. A TRISO particle is composed of a fissile kernel (UO 2 ) and several layers of carbon composites. The effect of TRISO particles' size variations and distance between them on PBR multiplication factor is studied using MCNP code. Fuel element is modelled in approximation of a cubical unit cell with periodic boundary condition. The multiplication factor of the fuel element depends on the size of the TRISO particles due to resonance self-shielding effect and on the inter-particle distance due to inter-kernel shadowing. (author)

  2. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  3. Effect of substrate morphology slope distributions on light scattering, nc-Si:H film growth, and solar cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Jäger, Klaus; Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Topič, Marko; Hänni, Simon; Zhang, Chao; Heidt, Anna; Meier, Matthias; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2014-12-24

    Thin-film silicon solar cells are often deposited on textured ZnO substrates. The solar-cell performance is strongly correlated to the substrate morphology, as this morphology determines light scattering, defective-region formation, and crystalline growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H). Our objective is to gain deeper insight in these correlations using the slope distribution, rms roughness (σ(rms)) and correlation length (lc) of textured substrates. A wide range of surface morphologies was obtained by Ar plasma treatment and wet etching of textured and flat-as-deposited ZnO substrates. The σ(rms), lc and slope distribution were deduced from AFM scans. Especially, the slope distribution of substrates was represented in an efficient way that light scattering and film growth direction can be more directly estimated at the same time. We observed that besides a high σ(rms), a high slope angle is beneficial to obtain high haze and scattering of light at larger angles, resulting in higher short-circuit current density of nc-Si:H solar cells. However, a high slope angle can also promote the creation of defective regions in nc-Si:H films grown on the substrate. It is also found that the crystalline fraction of nc-Si:H solar cells has a stronger correlation with the slope distributions than with σ(rms) of substrates. In this study, we successfully correlate all these observations with the solar-cell performance by using the slope distribution of substrates.

  4. Edge effects are important in supporting beetle biodiversity in a gravel-bed river floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Simone D; Tockner, Klement

    2014-01-01

    Understanding complex, dynamic, and diverse ecosystems is essential for developing sound management and conservation strategies. Gravel-bed river floodplains are composed of an interlinked mosaic of aquatic and terrestrial habitats hosting a diverse, specialized, and endangered fauna. Therefore, they serve as excellent models to investigate the biodiversity of multiple ecotones and related edge effects. In this study, we investigated the abundance, composition, richness, and conservation status of beetle assemblages at varying sediment depth (0, 0.1, 0.6 and 1.1 m), distance from the channel (1, 5, 20, and 60-100 m, and 5 m within the riparian forest), and time of the year (February-November) across a 200 m-wide gravel bar at the near-natural Tagliamento River (Italy), to detect edge effects in four floodplain ecotones: aquatic-terrestrial, forest-active floodplain, sediment-air, and sediment-groundwater. We used conventional pitfall traps and novel tube traps to sample beetles comparably on the sediment surface and within the unsaturated sediments. We found a total of 308 beetle species (including 87 of conservation concern) that showed multiple, significant positive edge effects across the floodplain ecotones, mainly driven by spatial heterogeneity: Total and red list beetle abundance and richness peaked on the sediment surface, at channel margins, and at the edge of the riparian forest. All ecotones possessed edge/habitat specialists. Most red list species occurred on the sediment surface, including five species previously considered extinct--yet two of these species occurred in higher densities in the unsaturated sediments. Conservation and management efforts along gravel-bed rivers must therefore promote a dynamic flow and sediment regime to create and maintain habitat heterogeneity and ecotone diversity, which support a unique and high biodiversity.

  5. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator effects of eugenol in the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, David Neil; Madeira, Socorro Vanesca Frota; Soares de Moura, Roberto

    2003-03-01

    The possible involvement of the endothelium in the vasodilator action of eugenol was investigated in the mesenteric vascular bed (MVB) of the rat. Bolus injections of eugenol (0.2, 2 and 20 micromol) and acetylcholine (ACh; 10, 30 and 100 pmol) induced dose-dependent vasodilator responses in noradrenaline-precontracted beds that were partially inhibited by pretreatment of the MVB with deoxycholate (1 mg mL(-1)) to remove the endothelium (approximately 14% and approximately 30% of the control response remaining at the lowest doses of ACh and eugenol, respectively). The vasodilator effect of glyceryl trinitrate (1 micromol) was unaltered by deoxycholate. In the presence of either N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (300 microM) or tetraethylammonium (1 mM)the response to ACh was partially reduced, whereas eugenol-induced vasodilation was unaffected. Similarly the vasodilator effect of eugenol was not inhibited by indometacin (3 microM). Under calcium-free conditions the vasoconstrictor response elicited by bolus injections of noradrenaline (10 nmol) was dose-dependently and completely inhibited by eugenol (0.1-1 mM). Additionally, the pressor effects of bolus injections of calcium chloride in potassium-depolarized MVBs were greatly reduced in the presence of eugenol (0.1 mM), with a maximal reduction of approximately 71% of the control response. Our data showed that eugenol induced dose-dependent, reversible vasodilator responses in the rat MVB, that were partially dependent on the endothelium, although apparently independent of nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor or prostacyclin. Furthermore, an endothelium-independent intracellular site of action seemed likely to participate in its smooth muscle relaxant properties.

  6. Zebra mussel beds: an effective feeding ground for Ponto-Caspian gobies or suitable shelter for their prey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Kobak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggregations of the Ponto-Caspian invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha constitute a suitable habitat for macroinvertebrates, considerably increasing their abundance and providing effective antipredator protection. Thus, the overall effect of a mussel bed on particular predator species may vary from positive to negative, depending on both prey density increase and predator ability to prey in a structurally complex habitat. Alien Ponto-Caspian goby fish are likely to be facilitated when introduced into new areas by zebra mussels, provided that they are capable of utilizing mussel beds as habitat and feeding grounds. We ran laboratory experiments to find which prey (chironomid larvae densities (from ca. 500 to 2,000 individuals m−2 in a mussel bed make it a more beneficial feeding ground for the racer goby Babka gymnotrachelus (RG and western tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris (WTG compared to sandy and stone substrata (containing the basic prey density of 500 ind. m−2. Moreover, we checked how food availability affects habitat selection by fish. Mussel beds became more suitable for fish than alternative mineral substrata when food abundance was at least two times higher (1,000 vs. 500 ind. m−2, regardless of fish size and species. WTG was associated with mussel beds regardless of its size and prey density, whereas RG switched to this habitat when it became a better feeding ground than alternative substrata. Larger RG exhibited a stronger affinity for mussels than small individuals. WTG fed more efficiently from a mussel bed at high food abundances than RG. A literature review has shown that increasing chironomid density, which in our study was sufficient to make a mussel habitat an attractive feeding ground for the gobies, is commonly observed in mussel beds in the field. Therefore, we conclude that zebra mussels may positively affect the alien goby species and are likely to facilitate their establishment in novel areas

  7. Effects of deep-bedded finishing system on market pig performance, composition and pork quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B S; Huff-Lonergan, E; Honeyman, M S; Crouse, J D; Kerr, B J; Lonergan, S M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effects of finishing environment on growth performance, pork quality and lipid composition of pork. Environments compared were standard confinement (CON) and deep-bedded semi-outdoor systems. The deep-bedded method employed in the current study was the use of hoop structures. Hoops are large, tent-like shelters with cornstalks or straw for bedding. Gilts ranging in weight from 59 to 71 kg were randomly assigned to treatments of Hoop (n = 50) and CON (n = 18) environments. Gilts were fed a two-phase dietary sequence, ad libitum for 45 days. Six gilts per treatment were selected for carcass composition and quality evaluation. The experiment was replicated a total of five times. Pigs raised in the Hoop environment gained significantly less and required significantly more feed for growth than pigs raised in the CON environment. Carcasses from CON-finished pigs were significantly fatter at the 10th rib, which lowered carcass percentage fat-free lean(FFL) and they also had greater loin marbling scores compared with carcasses from Hoop-finished pigs (P < 0.05). Significant replication effects were noted on beginning weight, live weight, carcass weight, percentage FFL, backfat, lipid content and adipose firmness. Carcasses from Hoop pigs had lower proportions of palmitic acid (P < 0.05), and higher proportions of oleic and linoleic acid (P < 0.05) in the inner layer of adipose tissue. The proportion of saturated fatty acid was lower, and that of mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acid was higher in the inner layer of the adipose tissue of Hoop pigs. Variations in fatty acid composition and lipid deposition may have been caused by environmental temperature, since decreases in environmental temperature accompanied compositional variation of the adipose, leading to higher proportions of monounsaturated fatty acid and lower proportions of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid in adipose tissue, regardless of treatment. Volatile profile

  8. Biomass gasification with air in a fluidized bed: Effect of the in-bed use of dolomite under different operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, J.; Caballero, M.A.; Martin, J.A.; Aznar, M.P.; Corella, J.

    1999-11-01

    The performance of a biomass gasifier, fluidized-bed type, is improved by in-bed use of calcined dolomite. Tar contents in the raw flue gas below 1 g/m{sub n}{sup 3} are obtained by using a bed with a percentage between 15 and 30 wt% of dolomite (the rest being silica sand). The work is carried out at small pilot-plant scale (10 kg of biomass/h) with equivalence ratios (ER) between 0.20 and 0.35 and temperatures of 800--840 C in the gasifier bed. To replace the eroded and elutriated dolomite (from the gasifier bed), an amount of dolomite (0.40--0.63 mm) is continuously fed, mixed with the biomass at 3 wt%. When the results obtained with in-bed dolomite are compared to the ones gained in a gasifier bed without dolomite, change of the following variables is reported: gas composition and its corresponding heating value, gas and char yields, apparent thermal efficiency, and tar contents. Once the usefulness of the in-bed use of dolomite is established, three main operation variables (ER and temperature of the gasifier bed and freeboard) are studied in the improved gasifier. Carryover of solids from the gasifier also increases when calcined dolomite is used because of its softness. Elutriation rate constants are calculated for several operational parameters.

  9. Effects of rainfall intensity and slope gradient on runoff and sediment yield characteristics of bare loess soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Peng, Mengling; Qiao, Shanshan; Ma, Xiao-Yi

    2018-02-01

    Soil erosion is a universal phenomenon on the Loess Plateau but it exhibits complex and typical mechanism which makes it difficult to understand soil loss laws on slopes. We design artificial simulated rainfall experiments including six rainfall intensities (45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 mm/h) and five slopes (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°) to reveal the fundamental changing trends of runoff and sediment yield on bare loess soil. Here, we show that the runoff yield within the initial 15 min increased rapidly and its trend gradually became stable. Trends of sediment yield under different rainfall intensities are various. The linear correlation between runoff and rainfall intensity is obvious for different slopes, but the correlations between sediment yield and rainfall intensity are weak. Runoff and sediment yield on the slope surface both presents an increasing trend when the rainfall intensity increases from 45 mm/h to 120 mm/h, but the increasing trend of runoff yield is higher than that of sediment yield. The sediment yield also has an overall increasing trend when the slope changes from 5° to 25°, but the trend of runoff yield is not obvious. Our results may provide data support and underlying insights needed to guide the management of soil conservation planning on the Loess Plateau.

  10. Effects of applied sewage sludge compost and fluidized bed material on apple seedling growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korcak, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Two waste products, composted sewage sludge and fluidized bed material (FBM, a coal/limestone combustion byproduct) were used as soil amendments for apple seedlings (Malus domestica) grown in the greenhouse. Compost was applied at rates equivalent to 0, 25 and 50 dry metric tons/ha and FBM was applied at levels of 1 and 2 times the soil lime requirement on a weight basis (12.5 and 25.0 metric tons/ha). Plant growth was significantly increased by compost or FBM additions. Tissue Ca was increased by both waste, reflecting the high Ca inputs to the low fertility Arendtsville soil. Potentially high soil Mn levels were reduced by both wastes due to their neutralizing effect on soil pH. Root Cd levels were increased by compost additions even though soil pH was maintained above 6.3. Tissue Zn, Cu and Ni were not consistently affected by waste additions.

  11. The effects of trait and state affect on diurnal cortisol slope among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zilioli, Samuele; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang; Lin, Danhua

    2017-08-01

    Affect is believed to be one of the most prominent proximal psychological pathway through which more distal psychosocial factors influence physiology and ultimately health. The current study examines the relative contributions of trait affect and state affect to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, with particular focus on cortisol slope, in children affected by parental HIV/AIDS. A sample of 645 children (8-15 years old) affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China completed a multiple-day naturalistic salivary cortisol protocol. Trait and state affect, demographics, and psychosocial covariates were assessed via self-report. Hierarchical linear modeling was used for estimating the effects of trait affect and state affect on cortisol slope. Confidence intervals for indirect effects were estimated using the Monte Carlo method. Our results indicated that both trait and state negative affect (NA) predicted flatter (less "healthy") diurnal cortisol slopes. Subsequent analyses revealed that children's state NA mediated the effect of their trait NA on diurnal cortisol slope. The same relationships did not emerge for trait and state positive affect. These findings provide a rationale for future interventions that target NA as a modifiable antecedent of compromised health-related endocrine processes among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS.

  12. Paraglacial slope adjustment since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum and its long-lasting effects on secondary mass wasting processes: Hauser Kaibling, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Proske, Herwig; Strasser, Volker

    2010-08-01

    This study indicates the possible long-lasting impacts of deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DGSD) on erosional and mass movement processes. DGSD-features are common large-scale landforms in the crystalline basement rocks of the Central Alps of Austria. Inactive forms are related to paraglacial (nonglacial processes directly conditioned by former glaciation and deglaciation) rock slope adjustment processes acting after glacier retreat towards the end of the Late Glacial period. The near-surface metamorphic bedrock of DGSD-features is generally disintegrated. Such rock type favours erosion and the formation of small landslides. Field data, laboratory analyses, aerial photographs, and GIS-based terrain analyses are used to describe the different geomorphic effects of an extremely disintegrated rock slope. The studied DGSD Hauser Kaibling (13.6 km 2) is located in central Austria. During the Last Glacial Maximum the adjacent valley glacier reached an altitude of approximately 1900 m a.s.l. Glacier retreat in combination with the unfavourable tectono-metamorphic setting caused gravity-induced stresses to act. Subsequent sediment build-up in the main valley restabilised the slope. Linear erosion cut a number of gullies into the lower part of the DGSD. Calculated mean erosional denudation rates at incised valley sections range from 0.5 to 2.6 mm a - 1 since deglaciation. Smaller active landslides on the sides of the steep gullies draining the DGSD contribute to high denudation rates. Active landsliding is favoured by: (i) fragmented rock, (ii) steep slopes, (iii) supply of surface and subsurface water by rain and snowmelt, and (iv) human impact. Debris flows and debris-charged flood events occurred frequently in the past. During such events, material was transported from the unstable slopes to the populated alluvial fans. Thus, knowledge about the spatial distribution and the stage of development of DGSDs (active and currently inactive) provides an important

  13. Effectiveness of Mathematics Teaching and Learning Experiences through Wireless Technology as Recent Style to Enhance B.Ed. Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of learning through Wireless technologies and the traditional method in teaching and learning Mathematics. The investigator adopted experimental research to find the effectiveness of implementing Wireless technologies in the population of B.Ed. trainees. The investigator selected 32 B.Ed.…

  14. Physiological effects of acute and ordinary bed rest conditions on endurance trained volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Y. G.; Ivanov, A. A.; Madvedev, S. N.; Kakurin, A. G.

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a comparative study of water balance and water protein composition of the blood during exposure to acute (abrupt restriction of motor activity) and ordinary rigorous bed rest of 7 days. The studies were performed on 30 long distance runners aged 22-25 years old who had a VO 2 max of 66 ml kg -1·min -1 on the average. The volunteers were divided into three equal groups: the volunteers in the 1st group were under a normal ambulatory life conditions (control subjects), the volunteers of the 2nd group subjected to an acute bed rest (abrupt restriction of motor activity) regime (acute bed rested subjects) and the volunteers of the 3rd group were submitted to ordinary and rigorous bed rest (rigorous bed rested subjects). All volunteers were on an average of 13.8 km/day before taking part in this investigation. The 2nd and 3rd groups of volunteers were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 7 days. During the prebed rest period and actual bed rest period plasma volume (PV), total protein and protein fractions (albumins and globulins) and hematocrit were measured. Exposure to acute bed rest conditions induced a significant increase in hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, protein fractions and marked decrease in (PV) and water balance which were significantly more pronounced than during exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest. It was concluded that exposure to acute bed rest conditions induces significantly greater changes in water balance and water-protein concentration of the blood of endurance trained volunteers than exposure to ordinary rigorous bed rest conditions.

  15. The effectiveness of a simulated scenario to teach nursing students how to perform a bed bath: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Renata Pinto Ribeiro; de Cássia Lopes Chaves, Érika; Silva Lima, Rogério; Braga, Cristiane Giffoni; Simões, Ivandira Anselmo Ribeiro; Fava, Silvana Maria Coelho Leite; Iunes, Denise Hollanda

    2017-10-01

    Simulation allows students to develop several skills during a bed bath that are difficult to teach only in traditional classroom lectures, such as problem-solving, student interactions with the simulator (patient), reasoning in clinical evaluations, evaluation of responses to interventions, teamwork, communication, security and privacy. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simulated bed bath scenario on improving cognitive knowledge, practical performance and satisfaction among nursing students. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Nursing students that were in the fifth period from two educational institutions in Brazil. Nursing students (n=58). The data were collected using the assessments of cognitive knowledge, practical performance and satisfaction were made through a written test about bed baths, an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and a satisfaction questionnaire. We identified that the acquisition and assimilation of cognitive knowledge was significantly higher in the simulation group (p=0.001). The performance was similar in both groups regardless of the teaching strategy (p=0.435). At follow-up, the simulation group had significantly more satisfaction with the teaching method than the control group (p=0.007). The teaching strategy based on a simulated scenario of a bed bath proved to be effective for the acquisition of cognitive knowledge regarding bed baths in clinical practice and improved student satisfaction with the teaching process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of rainfall patterns and land cover on the subsurface flow generation of sloping Ferralsols in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Duan

    Full Text Available Rainfall patterns and land cover are two important factors that affect the runoff generation process. To determine the surface and subsurface flows associated with different rainfall patterns on sloping Ferralsols under different land cover types, observational data related to surface and subsurface flows from 5 m × 15 m plots were collected from 2010 to 2012. The experiment was conducted to assess three land cover types (grass, litter cover and bare land in the Jiangxi Provincial Soil and Water Conservation Ecological Park. During the study period, 114 natural rainfall events produced subsurface flow and were divided into four groups using k-means clustering according to rainfall duration, rainfall depth and maximum 30-min rainfall intensity. The results showed that the total runoff and surface flow values were highest for bare land under all four rainfall patterns and lowest for the covered plots. However, covered plots generated higher subsurface flow values than bare land. Moreover, the surface and subsurface flows associated with the three land cover types differed significantly under different rainfall patterns. Rainfall patterns with low intensities and long durations created more subsurface flow in the grass and litter cover types, whereas rainfall patterns with high intensities and short durations resulted in greater surface flow over bare land. Rainfall pattern I had the highest surface and subsurface flow values for the grass cover and litter cover types. The highest surface flow value and lowest subsurface flow value for bare land occurred under rainfall pattern IV. Rainfall pattern II generated the highest subsurface flow value for bare land. Therefore, grass or litter cover are able to convert more surface flow into subsurface flow under different rainfall patterns. The rainfall patterns studied had greater effects on subsurface flow than on total runoff and surface flow for covered surfaces, as well as a greater effect on surface

  17. Effects of rainfall patterns and land cover on the subsurface flow generation of sloping Ferralsols in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Chongjun; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Yaojun; Wang, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall patterns and land cover are two important factors that affect the runoff generation process. To determine the surface and subsurface flows associated with different rainfall patterns on sloping Ferralsols under different land cover types, observational data related to surface and subsurface flows from 5 m × 15 m plots were collected from 2010 to 2012. The experiment was conducted to assess three land cover types (grass, litter cover and bare land) in the Jiangxi Provincial Soil and Water Conservation Ecological Park. During the study period, 114 natural rainfall events produced subsurface flow and were divided into four groups using k-means clustering according to rainfall duration, rainfall depth and maximum 30-min rainfall intensity. The results showed that the total runoff and surface flow values were highest for bare land under all four rainfall patterns and lowest for the covered plots. However, covered plots generated higher subsurface flow values than bare land. Moreover, the surface and subsurface flows associated with the three land cover types differed significantly under different rainfall patterns. Rainfall patterns with low intensities and long durations created more subsurface flow in the grass and litter cover types, whereas rainfall patterns with high intensities and short durations resulted in greater surface flow over bare land. Rainfall pattern I had the highest surface and subsurface flow values for the grass cover and litter cover types. The highest surface flow value and lowest subsurface flow value for bare land occurred under rainfall pattern IV. Rainfall pattern II generated the highest subsurface flow value for bare land. Therefore, grass or litter cover are able to convert more surface flow into subsurface flow under different rainfall patterns. The rainfall patterns studied had greater effects on subsurface flow than on total runoff and surface flow for covered surfaces, as well as a greater effect on surface flows associated

  18. Effect of Climatic Conditions on Differences in Thermo-Technical Properties of Organic Bedding in Laboratory Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendelová Jana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to analyse the influence of climatic factors on the thermal performance of separated liquid manure. The samples of organic bedding were collected from the lying area of dairy housing and preparatory store. The measurement of properties of recycled manure solids (RMS was carried out in laboratory conditions. Samples were examined with determining the temperature effect on the thermal conductivity λ of ’dry‘ separated liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 60% and ’wet‘ liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 26%, in air temperatures ranging from 0 °C to 40 °C. Subsequently, the thermal resistance of three selected types of cows lying structures was calculated for winter and summer boundary values. Based on the results of thermal conductivity and thermal resistance, it was observed that dry separated liquid manure as an alternative bedding has, in low temperature (up to 5 °C, the most suitable thermal performance if it is maintained in a dry condition (with a dry matter content of 60%. With increasing temperature (above 20 °C and increasing humidity of bedding (below 26%, thermo-technical properties get worse; however, when comparing the thermal resistance of the cow bed structure with sandwich mattresses with a 50 mm layer of organic bedding and the deep cubicle filled with 200 mm of organic bedding, the thermal resistance of floor structure decreases by 7.6% or 18.4%, respectively. With a proper handling of the recycled organic bedding, it is possible to use its economic advantages.

  19. Numerical study of propagation effects in a wireless mesh test bed

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present layout of the indoor wireless mesh network test-bed build at the Meraka Institute is introduced. This is followed by a description of a numerical electromagnetic model for the complete test-bed, including the coupling and diffraction...

  20. Coal-bed methane water: effects on soil properties and camelina productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every year the production of coal-bed natural gas in the Powder River Basin results in the discharge of large amounts of coal-bed methane water (CBMW) in Wyoming; however, no sustainable disposal methods for CBMW are currently available. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential to ...

  1. THE 05.06.2012 SLOPE FLOOD RUNOFF IN THE LOWER BASIN OF ILIŞUA RIVER – CAUSES, EFFECTS AND FUTURE MEASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Şerban

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the Code Yellow for rainfalls and storms, issued by National Administration of Meteorology (NAM, a downpoor occurred on the 5th of June 2012 in the afternoon, between 16.00 and 16.30 hours, with maximum intensity in the area of the Dobric – Dobricel – Spermezeu – Păltineasa – Dumbrăviţa – Căianu Mare – Căianu Mic localities. The extreme meteorological event has caused a severe slope runoff. Fortunately, the effects did not include any victims, although they were very severe, judging by the blocking of tens of kilometres of road, the flooding of almost 200 households and several hundreds of hectares of agricultural land. The risk map showing the occurrence distribution of slope flood runoff and associate meteorological events reveals the need of implementing strict measures consisting in: partial afforestation of the two thirds of the cleared slopes, management and diversion of floods that discharge their liquid and alluvial material over the human settlements located in the closest proximity of the slopes, resizing of the access infrastructure (bridges, footbridges and flood defence infrastructure (dams, runoff drainage system, scenario-based training of population to react promptly to the development of the extreme hydrometeorological events. On the contrary, the questionnaires applied in the study area reveal a lower preparedness level of the population for an efficient, optimum reaction, in order to significantly reduce the effects of these phenomena.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of land consolidation in the Latyczyn village in terms of land protection against erosion on the slope scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybicki Roman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion by water is an important economical issue strongly deteriorating environment and requiring remedial actions. The study was designed to evaluate antierosion effect of changes in the layout of plots from along to across slope as an effect of land consolidation. Moreover, rightness of leaving newly set out boundaries of plots without any protection (i.e. sodding was evaluated. For this purpose simulations of use of additional anti-erosive measures were done. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP model was used. Studies have shown that in addition to the design of transverse layout of parcels during consolidation, further antierosion measures may be necessary to reduce soil loss and sediment yield. In order to minimize soil losses outside the slope, boundaries between the newly designed fields should be sodded already in the post consolidation management. Limitation the amount of erosion over the entire slope requires use of additional protection measures in the upper part of slopes e.g. shelterbelts and antierosion crop rotations. WEPP model can be recommended for Provincial Bureaus of Surveying as a tool to support the development of assumptions for consolidation projects of lands threatened by erosion.

  3. An aerated and fluidized bed membrane bioreactor for effective wastewater treatment with low membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli

    2016-09-24

    Anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors (AFMBRs) use granular activated carbon (GAC) particles suspended by recirculation to effectively treat low strength wastewaters (∼100–200 mg L−1, chemical oxygen demand, COD), but the effluent can contain dissolved methane. An aerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AOFMBR) was developed to avoid methane production and the need for wastewater recirculation by using rising air bubbles to suspend GAC particles. The performance of the AOFMBR was compared to an AFMBR and a conventional aerobic membrane bioreactor (AeMBR) for domestic wastewater treatment over 130 d at ambient temperatures (fixed hydraulic retention time of 1.3 h). The effluent of the AOFMBR had a COD of 20 ± 8 mg L−1, and a turbidity of <0.2 NTU, for low-COD influent (153 ± 19 and 214 ± 27 mg L−1), similar to the AeMBR and AFMBR. For the high-COD influent (299 ± 24 mg L−1), higher effluent CODs were obtained for the AeMBR (38 ± 9 mg L−1) and AFMBR (51 ± 11 mg L−1) than the AOFMBR (26 ± 6 mg L−1). Transmembrane pressure of the AOFMBR increased at 0.04 kPa d−1, which was 20% less than the AeMBR and 57% less than the AFMBR, at the low influent COD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated a more uniform biofilm on the membrane in AOFMBR than that from the AeMBR biofilm, and no evidence of membrane damage. High similarity was found between communities in the suspended sludge in the AOFMBR and AeMBR (square-root transformed Bray–Curtis similarity, SRBCS, 0.69). Communities on the GAC and suspended sludge were dissimilar in the AOFMBR (SRBCS, 0.52), but clustered in the AFMBR (SRBCS, 0.63).

  4. [Effects of planting system on soil and water conservation and crop output value in a sloping land of Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Da-Bing; Yong, Tai-Wen; Yang, Wen-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Guo, Kai

    2010-06-01

    A three-year experiment was conducted to study the effects of wheat/maize/soybean with total no-tillage and mulching (NTM), wheat/maize/soybean with part no-tillage and part mulching (PTM), wheat/maize/soybean with total tillage without mulching (TWM), and wheat/maize/ sweet potato with total tillage without mulching (TWMS) on the soil and water conservation, soil fertility, and crop output value in a sloping land of Southwest China. The average soil erosion amount and surface runoff of NTM were significantly lower than those of the other three planting systems, being 1189 kg x hm(-2) and 215 m3 x hm(-2), and 10.6% and 84.7% lower than those of TWMS, respectively. The soil organic matter, total N, available K and available N contents of NTM were increased by 15.7%, 18.2%, 55.2%, and 25.9%, respectively, being the highest among the test planting systems. PTM and TWM took the second place, and TWMS pattern had the least. NTM had the highest annual crop output value (18809 yuan x hm(-2)) and net income (12619 yuan x hm(-2)) in three years, being 2.2% -20.6% and 3.8% -32.9% higher than other three planting systems, respectively. In a word, the planting system wheat/maize/soybean was more beneficial to the water and soil conservation and the improvement of soil fertility and crop output value, compared with the traditional planting system wheat/maize/sweet potato.

  5. High field Q slope and the effect of low-temperature baking at 3 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A strong degradation of the unloaded quality factor with field, called high field Q slope, is commonly observed above B_{p}≅100  mT in elliptical superconducting niobium cavities at 1.3 and 1.5 GHz. In the present experiments several 3 GHz niobium cavities were measured up to and above B_{p}≅100  mT. The measurements show that a high field Q slope phenomenon limits the field reach at this frequency, that the high field Q slope onset field depends weakly on the frequency, and that the high field Q slope can be removed by the typical empirical solution of electropolishing followed by heating to 120°C for 48 hrs. In addition, one of the cavities reached a quench field of 174 mT and its field dependence of the quality factor was compared against global heating predicted by a thermal feedback model.

  6. The effect of tibial slope on the biomechanics of cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty : A musculoskeletal simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Marco Antonio; Strzelczak, Marta; Heesterbeek, Petra J.C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A.W.; Janssen, Dennis W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Wymenga, A.B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Aim: More posterior tibial slope (PTS) can prevent flexion gap tightness in cruciate-retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) and help achieving better knee function. However, the influence of PTS on knee function during activities of daily living (ADLs) is scarcely documented. The aim

  7. Biomass-Ash-Induced Agglomeration in a Fluidized Bed. Part 1: Experimental Study on the Effects of a Gas Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Fluidized beds have been widely applied to gasification and combustion of biomass. During gasification, a high temperature is preferable to increase the carbon conversion and to reduce the undesirable tar. However, the high temperature may lead to a severe agglomeration problem in a fluidized bed....... Understanding of the agglomeration in various atmospheres is crucial to optimize the design and operation conditions. This study focuses on the effects of gases on agglomeration tendency with different types of biomass, including corn straw, rice straw, and wheat straw. The biomass ash samples are mixed...... with quartz sand and fluidized by the gas mixtures of N2/CO2, N2/H2, and N2/steam or by air. At 550 °C, the bed temperature is increased at the rate of 3 °C/min until defluidization occurs. In this way, the defluidization temperature can be determined, which represents the agglomeration tendency...

  8. Differences in early dynamics and effects of slope aspect between naturally regenerated and planted Pinus sylvestris woodland on inland dunes in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Sewerniak P

    2016-01-01

    There is little knowledge of the effects of landform relief on early growth dynamics and competitive interactions of Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) stands on inland dunes, which could potentially be substantial. The goal of this study was to examine and compare early dynamics (based on growth parameters and properties of the understorey vegetation) and the effects of slope aspect in naturally regenerated and pine-planted woodland on inland dunes in northern Poland. Growth parameters, tree dens...

  9. Effects of heel base size, walking speed, and slope angle on center of pressure trajectory and plantar pressure when wearing high-heeled shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luximon, Yan; Cong, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and a high risk of fall, fracture, and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of heel base size (HBS) on walking stability under different walking speeds and slope angles. The trajectory of the center of pressure (COP), maximal peak pressure, pressure time integral, contact area, and perceived stability were analyzed. The results revealed that a small HBS increased the COP deviations, shifting the COP more medially at the beginning of the gait cycle. The slope angle mainly affected the COP in the anteroposterior direction. An increased slope angle shifted the COP posterior and caused greater pressure and a larger contact area in the midfoot and rearfoot regions, which can provide more support. Subjective measures on perceived stability were consistent with objective measures. The results suggested that high-heeled shoes with a small HBS did not provide stable plantar support, particularly on a small slope angle. The changes in the COP and pressure pattern caused by a small HBS might increase joint torque and muscle activity and induce lower limb problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Surface Slope Effects on Ripple Orientations Observed on Sand Dunes in the Terra Tyrrhena Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Johnson, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has revealed abundant wind ripples on sand dunes across Mars. Ripple orientations have been documented using HiRISE images of sand dunes at 24 widely distributed sites across Mars, in order to identify the last significant wind directions at these locations. Howard (GSAB, 1977) gives a mathematical expression for how surface slopes on a sand dune can affect the orientation of ripples with respect to the formative winds. In order to evaluate this mechanism for measured ripple orientations on Mars, quantitative data for surface slopes on the sand dunes is required. Stereo pairs of HiRISE images are used to generate Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) with postings of one meter. In June 2014 we produced a DTM of sand dunes in the Terra Tyrrhena region of Mars (14.55° S, 97.77° E) using SOCET SET at the Astrogeology Branch, USGS-Flagstaff. Typically it is difficult for feature matching software to work well on sand dunes, but our stereo images (ESP_022609_1655 and ESP_026675_1655) were obtained only six Earth days apart under excellent illumination conditions. The Terra Tyrrhena DTM had remarkably few artifacts on the sand dunes (except at slip faces, where the average slope between slip face crest and base was interpolated) and excellent control from irregular terrain exposed in interdune areas. Slopes on the stoss sides of sand dunes are generally ripple deflection angles should be ripple orientations to account for surface slopes utilizing the DTM data, and so far we do not see major changes to inferred surface wind directions that would be derived directly from the ripple orientations.

  11. The Effectiveness of Community Bed Net Use on Malaria Parasitemia among Children Less Than 5 Years Old in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Rebecca C; Emch, Michael; Meshnick, Steven R

    2018-03-01

    In 2013, the under-5 mortality rate in Liberia was 71 deaths per 1,000 live births, with malaria responsible for 22% of those deaths. One of the primary existing control tools, long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs), is thought to be dually effective, acting as a physical barrier but also decreasing the mosquito population in communities. However, there has been little investigation into the protective effects of community-wide bed net use above and beyond the individual level. Using data from the population-representative 2011 Liberia Malaria Indicator Survey, we estimated the association between proportion of a community using LLINs and malaria in children using multi-level logistic regression. To investigate the potential effect measure modification of the relationship by urbanicity, we included an interaction term and calculated stratum-specific prevalence odds ratios (PORs) for rural and urban communities. We calculated a POR of malaria for an absolute 10% increase in community bed net use of 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91, 1.41) and 0.35 (95% CI: 0.13, 0.92) for rural and urban communities, respectively, indicating a strong, though imprecise, protective effect within urban communities only. Our results indicate that bed net use has an indirect protective effect in urban areas, above and beyond individual use. Little or no such effect of community-wide use is seen in rural areas, likely because of population density factors. Therefore, although all control efforts should be multifaceted, promotion of bed net use in urban areas in particular will likely be a highly effective tool for control.

  12. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Two percent of adolescents and young adults suffer from therapy-resistant enuresis, with considerable negative impact on self-esteem and relationships. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapyresistant group of adolescents with

  13. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis/aims of study Two percent of adolescents and adults suffers from enuresis. In this age group, social problems can arise. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapy-resistant group of adolescents and adults with enuresis, provided by a

  14. Effect of permethrin-treated bed nets on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gimnig, John E.; Kolczak, Margarette S.; Hightower, Allen W.; Vulule, John M.; Schoute, Erik; Kamau, Luna; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Hawley, William A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed nets (ITNs) on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in neighboring villages lacking ITNs was studied during a randomized controlled trial of ITNs in western Kenya. There was a trend of decreased abundance of Anopheles gambiae with decreasing

  15. Perceived stress moderates the effects of a randomized trial of dance movement therapy on diurnal cortisol slopes in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Fong, Ted C T; Yip, Paul S F

    2018-01-01

    Women with breast cancer are at risk of psychosocial distress and may suffer from aberrant diurnal cortisol rhythms. Dance movement therapy (DMT), a movement-based psychotherapy that incorporates exercise and artistic components, has demonstrated stress reduction effects. This study examined the effects of DMT on the diurnal cortisol rhythms of breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment and the role of perceived stress in producing such effects. The study sample comprised 121 Chinese breast cancer patients randomized to the DMT (n=63) and control (n=58) groups. The intervention consisted of six 1.5-h group sessions held twice weekly over the course of radiotherapy. Participants completed validated self-report measures of perceived stress, fatigue, pain, and sleep disturbance and provided five salivary cortisol samples at baseline (Time 1) and post-intervention (Time 2). Moderated mediation analysis was used to evaluate the intervention effect on Time 2 diurnal cortisol slopes. Despite the absence of a significant DMT effect on diurnal cortisol slopes (B=-0.55, 95% CI=-1.20 to 0.08, β=-0.14), baseline perceived stress significantly moderated the intervention effect (B=-0.18, 95% CI=-0.32 to -0.05, β=-0.30). At high levels of baseline perceived stress (1 SD above the mean), the DMT group showed a steeper cortisol slope (M=-7.14) than the control group (M=-5.80) at Time 2. The present findings suggest that DMT might have a beneficial effect on diurnal cortisol slopes in breast cancer patients with high levels of distress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Practical aspects and uncertainty analysis of biological effective dose (BED) regarding its three-dimensional calculation in multiphase radiotherapy treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Bergamo, Angelo; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2014-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the radiation oncology community to use the biological effective dose (BED) rather than the physical dose (PD) in treatment plan evaluation and optimization due to its stronger correlation with radiobiological effects. Radiotherapy patients may receive treatments involving a single only phase or multiple phases (e.g., primary and boost). Since most treatment planning systems cannot calculate the analytical BED distribution in multiphase treatments, an approximate multiphase BED expression, which is based on the total physical dose distribution, has been used. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the mathematical properties of the approximate BED formulation, relative to the true BED. The mathematical properties of the approximate multiphase BED equation are analyzed and evaluated. In order to better understand the accuracy of the approximate multiphase BED equation, the true multiphase BED equation was derived and the mathematical differences between the true and approximate multiphase BED equations were determined. The magnitude of its inaccuracies under common clinical circumstances was also studied. All calculations were performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the three-dimensional dose matrices. Results showed that the approximate multiphase BED equation is accurate only when the dose-per-fractions (DPFs) in both the first and second phases are equal, which occur when the dose distribution does not significantly change between the phases. In the case of heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the inaccuracy of the approximate multiphase BED is greater. These characteristics are usually seen in the dose distributions being delivered to organs at risk rather than to targets. The finding of this study indicates that the true multiphase BED equation should be implemented in the treatment planning systems due to the inconsistent accuracy of

  17. Effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-Day Bed Rest on Postural Control in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Julie; Taylor, Laura C.; Vanya, Robert D.; Dean, S. Lance; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDT) has been used as a safe gr ound-based analog to mimic and develop countermeasures for the physiological effects of spaceflight, including decrements in postural stability. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-day bed rest on postural control in men and women. METHODS Twenty-nine subjects (18M,11F) underwent 13 days of ambula tory acclimatization and were placed in 6? HDT for 30 (n=12), 60 (n=8), or 90 (n=9) days, followed by 14 days of ambulatory recovery. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) was used to assess changes in sensory and motor components of postural control, and recovery after HDT. Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) objectively evaluate one?s ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Stability during the SOTs was assessed using peak-to-peak sway and convergence toward stability limits to derive an equilibrium score. Motor Control Tests (MCTs) evaluate one?s ability to recover from unexpected support surface perturbations, with performance determined by center-of-pressure path length. Whole-body kinematic data were collected to determine body-sway strategy used to maintain stability during each condition. Baselines were determined pre-HDT. Recovery was tracked post-HDT on days 0, 1, 2, and 4. RESULTS Immediately after HDT, subjects showed decreased performance on most SOTs, primarily on sway-referenced support conditions, typically returning to baseline levels within 4 days. MCT performance was not significantly affected. There were no significant gender or duration differences in performance. Kinematic data revealed a tendency to use ankle strategy to maintain an upright stance during most SOT conditions. Interestingly, six subjects (2M,4F) experienced orthostatic intolerance and were unable to complete day 0 testing. CONCLUSION HDT mimics some un loading mechanisms of spaceflight and

  18. Effects of Artificial Gravity and Bed Rest on Spatial Orientation and Balance Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H.; Moore, S. T.; Feiveson, A. H.; Taylor, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    While the vestibular system should be well-adapted to bed rest (a condition it experiences approximately 8/24 hrs each day), questions remain regarding the degree to which repeated exposures to the unusual gravito-inertial force environment of a short-radius centrifuge might affect central processing of vestibular information used in spatial orientation and balance control. Should these functions be impaired by intermittent AG, its feasibility as a counter-measure would be diminished. We, therefore, examined the effects of AG on spatial orientation and balance control in 15 male volunteers before and after 21 days of 6 HDT bed rest (BR). Eight of the subjects were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet; 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls (C). Spatial orientation was assessed by measures of ocular counter-rolling (OCR; rotation of the eye about the line of sight, an otolith-mediated reflex) and subjective visual vertical (SVV; perception of the spatial upright). Both OCR and SVV measurements were made with the subject upright, lying on their left sides, and lying on their right sides. OCR was measured from binocular eye orientation recordings made while the subjects fixated for 10s on a point target directly in front of the face at a distance of 1 m. SVV was assessed by asking subjects (in the dark) to adjust to upright (using a handheld controller) the orientation of a luminous bar randomly perturbed (15) to either side of the vertical meridian. Balance control performance was assessed using a computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol similar to that currently required for all returning crew members. During each session, the subjects completed a combination of trials of sensory organization test (SOT) 2 (eyes closed, fixed platform) and SOT 5 (eyes closed, sway-referenced platform) with and without static and dynamic pitch plane head movements (plus or minus 20 deg., dynamic

  19. Separate Effects Tests to Determine the Pressure Drop over Packed Beds in the PBMR HPTU Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toit, C.G. du; Rousseau, P.G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study experiments were conducted in the PBMR HPTU test facility on a small scale randomly packed cylindrical bed and a specific annular pebble bed in an effort to determine the impact of the wall effects. Tests were also conducted on test sections with structured BCC packings in an attempt to isolate the effect of porosity. The pebbles were mounted on cables and the required porosities were obtained by varying the distance between the pebbles. The required Reynolds numbers ranging between 1000 and 50000 were obtained by varying the system pressure. In the execution of the tests and the data reduction considerable care was taken to obtain good repeatability and to account for the uncertainties due to statistical variance, instrument accuracy and drift. Evaluation of the results has shown that the wall effect is negligible and that the well-known KTA correlation derived for cylindrical beds may thus be used to determine the pressure drop over the annular packed bed. The results have also shown that porosity is not the only characteristic of the packing structure that influences the pressure drop, but that amongst others the type of packing also plays an important role. (author)

  20. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  1. Preliminary Slope Stability Study Using Slope/ W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazran Harun; Mohd Abd Wahab Yusof; Kamarudin Samuding; Mohd Muzamil Mohd Hashim; Nurul Fairuz Diyana Bahrudin

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the stability of earth structures is the oldest type of numerical analysis in geotechnical engineering. Limit equilibrium types of analyses for assessing the stability of earth slopes have been in use in geotechnical engineering for many decades. Modern limit equilibrium software is making it possible to handle ever-increasing complexity within an analysis. It is being considered as the potential method in dealing with complex stratigraphy, highly irregular pore-water pressure conditions, various linear and nonlinear shear strength models and almost any kind of slip surface shape. It allows rapid decision making by providing an early indication of the potential suitability of sites based on slope stability analysis. Hence, a preliminary slope stability study has been developed to improve the capacity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in assessing potential sites for Borehole Disposal for Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources. The results showed that geometry of cross section A-A ' , B-B ' , C-C ' and D-D ' achieved the factor of safety not less than 1.4 and these are deemed acceptable. (author)

  2. Effect of Operating Conditions on Catalytic Gasification of Bamboo in a Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanasit Wongsiriamnuay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic gasification of bamboo in a laboratory-scale, fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of reactor temperature (400, 500, and 600°C, gasifying medium (air and air/steam, and catalyst to biomass ratio (0 : 1, 1 : 1, and 1.5 : 1 on product gas composition, H2/CO ratio, carbon conversion efficiency, heating value, and tar conversion. From the results obtained, it was shown that at 400°C with air/steam gasification, maximum hydrogen content of 16.5% v/v, carbon conversion efficiency of 98.5%, and tar conversion of 80% were obtained. The presence of catalyst was found to promote the tar reforming reaction and resulted in improvement of heating value, carbon conversion efficiency, and gas yield due to increases in H2, CO, and CH4. The presence of steam and dolomite had an effect on the increasing of tar conversion.

  3. [Effects on wound bed of deep burn following eschar excision with different wound management in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, D J; Lin, J H; Chen, J; Huang, W X; Su, G L

    2016-08-09

    To compare the effects on wound bed of deep burn following eschar excision with different wound management in rabbits. Eighteen full-thickness burns models of Japanese white rabbits were established. They were randomly divided into 3 groups of traditional dressing, biological dressing and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) (n=6 each), according to the random number table. Eschar excision was performed three days later. The wound bed was observed and wound tissue was harvested for counting the quantity of bacteria, tissue dry wet ratio, measuring the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, the amount of collagen fibers and the microvessel density instantly and again seven days later. Statistical analyses were performed. The NPWT group was better than other groups by observing the wound bed. The quantity of bacteria of traditional dressing group, biological dressing group and NPWT group at the time point of seven days after escharectomy turned out to be (9.4±1.5)×10(4,) (8.1±2.7)×10(4,) (3.9±0.7)×10(4) cfu/g, the NPWT group was significantly lower than traditional dressing group and biological dressing group (both P0.05). The IL-6 of biological dressing group was higher than that of traditional dressing group at the time point of seven days after the eschar excision was performed[(94±10) vs (76±8) ng/L, P<0.05]. The amount of collagen fibers of three group at the time point of seven days after escharectomy turned out to be (60±9), (55±12), (77±17). The NPWT group was significantly higher than traditional dressing group and biological dressing group (P<0.05), and all higher than that at the time point of the day when escharectomy was performed[(39±6), (39±11), (38±6)](all P<0.05). The microvessel density of three groups at the time point of seven days after escharectomy turned out to be (42±6), (53±4), (82±10). The NPWT group was higher than that of the other two groups, and biological dressing group was

  4. Effect strooiselmateriaal, strooiselhoeveelheid, opvangschoteltjes en waterdruk op resultaten vleeskuikens = Influence of bedding material, bedding amount, drip cup and reduced water pressure on broiler performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harn, van J.; Jong, de I.C.; Veldkamp, T.

    2009-01-01

    Four different bedding materials for broiler houses were compared: white wood shavings, chopped wheat straw, ground rapeseed straw and silage maize. Performance results, carcass yields, litter quality, broiler quality and gait score were measured.

  5. The effects of railway transportation on the enrichment of heavy metals in the artificial soil on railway cut slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoqiong; Wang, KeXiu; Ai, Ying Wei; Li, Wei; Gao, Hongying; Fang, Chen

    2014-02-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the artificial soils on the railway cut slopes may have great influence on the revegetation of the cut slopes. The purpose of this study was to assess the variation of heavy metal contamination levels with railway operation time and analyze their possible resources. A total of 100 soil samples from four cut slopes, which were affected by railway transportation for different years, were analyzed for metal pollution (Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe). The concentrations of Cd, Pb showed increasing trend with increasing operation time of railways, while such trend was not found in Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe. According to the soil quality standard of China, Cd was considered to have considerable contamination, while Pb has less, but Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe have none. Moreover, cadmium exhibited remarkably higher levels rather than those reported in other studies. Enrichment factors and ecological index showed that Cd and Pb showed a moderate enrichment and a considerable ecological risk in most of the soil samples. The results of descriptive statistic, principal component analysis, cluster analysis and correlation analysis were totally consistent with each other. Their results revealed that Cr, Cu, Zn and Fe had common origins, and they may come from natural resources. While Cd and Pb were significantly influenced by railway transportation, leaked cargos, fuel combustion, the use of lubricate oils and sleeper impregnation oils during railway transportation may be their main resources.

  6. The Hydromechanics of Vegetation for Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyono, A.; Subardja, A.; Ekasari, I.; Lailati, M.; Sudirja, R.; Ningrum, W.

    2018-02-01

    Vegetation is one of the alternative technologies in the prevention of shallow landslide prevention that occurs mostly during the rainy season. The application of plant for slope stabilization is known as bioengineering. Knowledge of the vegetative contribution that can be considered in bioengineering was the hydrological and mechanical aspects (hydromechanical). Hydrological effect of the plant on slope stability is to reduce soil water content through transpiration, interception, and evapotranspiration. The mechanical impact of vegetation on slope stability is to stabilize the slope with mechanical reinforcement of soils through roots. Vegetation water consumption varies depending on the age and density, rainfall factors and soil types. Vegetation with high ability to absorb water from the soil and release into the atmosphere through a transpiration process will reduce the pore water stress and increase slope stability, and vegetation with deep root anchoring and strong root binding was potentially more significant to maintain the stability of the slope.

  7. Fundamental change of granular flows dynamics, deposition and erosion processes at sufficiently high slope angles: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical granular flows commonly interact with their substrate in various ways depending on the mechanical properties of the underlying material. Granular substrates, resulting from deposition of earlier flows or various geological events, are often eroded by avalanches [see Hungr and Evans, 2004 for review]. The entrainment of underlying debris by the flow is suspected to affect flow dynamics because qualitative and quantitative field observations suggest that it can increase the flow velocity and deposit extent, depending on the geological setting and flow type [Sovilla et al., 2006; Iverson et al., 2011]. Direct measurement of material entrainment in nature, however, is very difficult. We conducted laboratory experiments on granular column collapse over an inclined channel with and without an erodible bed of granular material. The controlling parameters were the channel slope angle, the granular column volume and its aspect ratio (i.e. height over length), the inclination of the column with respect to the channel base, the channel width, and the thickness and compaction of the erodible bed. For slope angles below a critical value θc, between 10° and 16°, the runout distance rf is proportional to the initial column height h0 and is unaffected by the presence of an erodible bed. On slopes greater than θc, the flow dynamics change fundamentally since a last phase of slow propagation develops at the end of the flow front deceleration, and prolongates significantly the flow duration. This phase has similar characteristics that steady, uniform flows. The slow propagation phase lasts longer for increasing column volume, column inclination with respect to the slope, and channel width, and for decreasing column aspect ratio. It is however independent of the maximum front velocity and, on an erodible bed, of the maximum depth of excavation within the bed. Both on rigid and erodible beds, the increase of the slow propagation phase duration has a crucial effect on

  8. Effects of seagrass bed removal for tourism purposes in a Mauritian bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daby, D

    2003-10-01

    Tourism affects marine environments adversely and these effects may be a major threat to the future of tourism. - Stresses and shocks are increasing on the main natural assets in Mauritius (Western Indian Ocean) by tourism (marine-based) development activities. Seagrasses are removed by hotels in the belief that they are unsightly or harbour organisms causing injury to bathers. Environmental changes (e.g. sediment characteristics and infauna distribution, water quality, seagrass biomass) resulting from clearing of a seagrass bed to create an aesthetically pleasant swimming zone for clients of a hotel were monitored during June 2000-July 2001, and compared to conditions prevailing in an adjacent undisturbed area. Key observations in the disturbed area were: highly turbid water overlying a destabilized lagoon seabed, complete loss of sediment infauna, and dramatic dry weight biomass declines (e.g. 72 and 65% in S. isoetifolium and H. uninervis, respectively). Such disruptions draw-down resilience rendering the marine habitats less robust and more vulnerable to environmental change and extreme events, with higher risks of chaos and ecological collapse, and constitute a major threat to the industry itself.

  9. Changes in plasma volume during bed rest - Effects of menstrual cycle and estrogen administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, S. M.; Beckett, W. S.; Carpenter, A. J.; Davis, J.; Drew, H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of increased blood estrogen concentration, caused either during normal menstrual cycles or by exogenous administration of premarin, on the bed-rest (BR) induced decrease in plasma volume (PV) was investigated. In women who underwent duplicate 11-day BR without estrogen supplementation, the PV was found to decrease significantly, during the first 5 days of BR, to a lower level at which it remained for the rest of the BR period. In women who began BR in the periovulatory stage of the menstrual cycle, the loss of PV was delayed, while women who began BR during other stages of the cycle exhibited the usual trend of the PV decrease during the BR. In women who underwent a single 12-day BR period while taking premarin (1.25 mg/day), PV was found to decrease during the first 4-5 days of BR, but then returned toward the pre-BR level during the remainder of the BR, indicating that estrogens have a role in stabilizing body fluid volume.

  10. Effects of seagrass bed removal for tourism purposes in a Mauritian bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daby, D.

    2003-01-01

    Tourism affects marine environments adversely and these effects may be a major threat to the future of tourism. - Stresses and shocks are increasing on the main natural assets in Mauritius (Western Indian Ocean) by tourism (marine-based) development activities. Seagrasses are removed by hotels in the belief that they are unsightly or harbour organisms causing injury to bathers. Environmental changes (e.g. sediment characteristics and infauna distribution, water quality, seagrass biomass) resulting from clearing of a seagrass bed to create an aesthetically pleasant swimming zone for clients of a hotel were monitored during June 2000-July 2001, and compared to conditions prevailing in an adjacent undisturbed area. Key observations in the disturbed area were: highly turbid water overlying a destabilized lagoon seabed, complete loss of sediment infauna, and dramatic dry weight biomass declines (e.g. 72 and 65% in S. isoetifolium and H. uninervis, respectively). Such disruptions draw-down resilience rendering the marine habitats less robust and more vulnerable to environmental change and extreme events, with higher risks of chaos and ecological collapse, and constitute a major threat to the industry itself

  11. Effects of a malfunctional column on conventional and FeedCol-simulated moving bed chromatography performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Donghoon; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2015-07-17

    The effects of a malfunctional column on the performance of a simulated moving bed (SMB) process were studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental results of conventional four-zone SMB (2-2-2-2 configuration) and FeedCol operation (2-2-2-2 configuration with one feed column) with one malfunctional column were compared with simulation results of the corresponding SMB processes with a normal column configuration. The malfunctional column in SMB processes significantly deteriorated raffinate purity. However, the extract purity was equivalent or slightly improved compared with the corresponding normal SMB operation because the complete separation zone of the malfunctional column moved to a lower flow rate range in zones II and III. With the malfunctional column configuration, FeedCol operation gave better experimental performance (up to 7%) than conventional SMB operation because controlling product purity with FeedCol operation was more flexible through the use of two additional operating variables, injection time and injection length. Thus, compared with conventional SMB separation, extract with equivalent or slightly better purity could be produced from FeedCol operation even with a malfunctional column, while minimizing the decrease in raffinate purity (less than 2%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  13. Evolution of steep Martian slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert John, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties and evolution of steep slopes on the planet Mars are examined. Where martian slopes are steepest and of greatest relief, the slope morphology is distinctive and characterized by regular, alternating spurs and gullies. Previous workers identified these martian gullies as dry debris avalanche chutes, partially because a nonspecific 'dry mass-wasting' explanation seemed compatible, initially, with current surface conditions. An evacuated avalanche chute provides the opportunity to back analyze the stability of the mobile layer of the chute at the time of its failure. For the martian slope problem a new stability back-analysis technique was developed which incorporates the third dimension (chute width) into the back-analysis calculation, allowing unambiguous determination of the average cohesion and angle of internal friction of the mobile layer. A series of trials was performed to investigate the effects of gravitational acceleration, average slope angle, and average mobile layer density, cohesion, and angle of internal friction on the size and shape of the transverse chute cross-section. Results indicate that: (1) variations in density, gravitational acceleration, and cohesion affect the overall size of the cross-section but not its width:depth ratio, and (2) the contrast between average slope angle and angle of internal friction is most influential on the width:depth ratio of the cross-section. The difference between these two parameters is inversely proportional to the width:depth ratio. Application of the three-dimensional back-analysis technique to proposed martian avalanche chutes yields values of cohesion and angle of internal friction of the mobile layers that are similar mechanically (without genetic implications) to those of terrestrial glacial till, a poorly sorted material with moderate inter-grain cohesion, or lunar soils under normal stresses representative of (lunar) depths of between ten and twenty meters. Material of these

  14. Rock Slope Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary : rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, : and siltstones ...

  15. Dark Slope Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 March 2004 Martian slope streaks occur in the regions most heavily mantled by fine, dry dust, particularly Tharsis, Arabia, and the knobby areas between Amazonis and Cerberus. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some examples of dark slope streaks off of buttes, mesas, and massifs in a dust-mantled crater in central Arabia Terra. New slope streaks form from time to time in the modern martian environment; the streaks in this image probably formed within the past decade. To create them, dust slid or avalanched down the slopes in an almost liquid-like manner. The image is located near 6.8oN, 321.7oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  16. Unstable slope management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    This Rapid Response Project gathered information on existing unstable slope management programs, with a : focus on asset management practices in the United States and overseas. On the basis of this study, the research : team summarized and recommende...

  17. Rock slope design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This Manual is intended to provide guidance for the design of rock cut slopes, rockfall catchment, and : rockfall controls. Recommendations presented in this manual are based on research presented in Shakoor : and Admassu (2010) entitled Rock Slop...

  18. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  19. Psychological effects of acute physical inactivty during microgravitiy simulated by bed rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Dolenc

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-duration weightlessness simulated by bed rest represents an important model to study the consequences of physical inactivity and sedentarism on the human body. This study evaluated changes of mood status, psychological well-being, coping strategies and physical self in ten healthy young male subjects during a 35-day horizontal bed rest. Participants were asked to complete psychometrical inventories before and after the bed rest experiment. The preceived satisfaction with life and the physical self-concept did not change during bed rest period and mood states were relatively stable during the experiment according to the Emotional States Questionnaire. The neurotic level was enhanced during the bed rest period according to the Slovenian version of the General Health Questionnaire. However, even after the period of physical immobilization, the expression of these symptoms remains relatively low and does not represent a risk to the mental health of the subjects. The results from Coping Resources Inventory indicated a tendency toward an increase of emotion focused coping and a decrease of problem focused coping strategies. The importance of this research was to provide evidence that the provision of favourable habitability countermeasures can prevent deterioration in the psychological state under conditions of physical immobilisation. Our findings have applied value in the field of health prevention and rehabilitaion.

  20. The good-in-bed effect: college students' tendency to see themselves as better than others as a sex partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggan, James K; Vencill, Jennifer A; Garos, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Self-enhancement refers to the finding that people tend to see themselves as better than others. The present research tested whether people display self-enhancement with regard to beliefs about their competency as sexual partners (the good-in-bed effect). Participants were asked to list good and bad sexually related behaviors more frequently performed by the self or by others. Study 1 demonstrated that people selectively associate themselves with good and others with bad sexual behaviors. In Study 2, independent raters judged bad behaviors associated with the self as less negative than bad behaviors associated with others. Study 3 replicated the good-in-bed effect and also found that when the salience of the comparison between good and bad traits is increased, men are more likely than women to demonstrate the effect. Implications of the results for relationship satisfaction are considered.

  1. Effects of Land Use and Slope Gradient on Soil Erosion in a Red Soil Hilly Watershed of Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyu Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to develop an appropriate plan of land use under suitable slope gradient to control soil erosion from a red soil hilly watershed of southern China by using the GeoWEPP (Geo-spatial Interface for the Water Erosion Prediction Project model. The model was calibrated and validated using monitoring data of the outlet from 2010 to 2012, in which the 2010 and 2012 annual total runoff and sediment yield data were used for calibration, and the 2011 monthly runoff and sediment yield data for validation. The performance of the model in validation period were good with a high coefficient of determination values of 0.98 and 0.93 and Nash-Sutcliffe simulations of 0.96 and 0.91 while low root mean square error values of 6.91 mm and 0.35 t respectively for runoff and sediment yield. Subsequently, the model was used to simulate four typical land use (forest, farm, orchard, and fallow land in the study area to evaluate their impacts on soil erosion production. The results showed that the runoff decreased by 44.7% and 61.1% for forest and orchard land compared to the current land use, as well as the sediment yield decreased by 43.7% and 68.6%. While the runoff and sediment yield increased by 52.2% and 42.6% for farm land, and 48.8% and 29.6% for fallow land. As the same time, soil erosion increased with increasing of the slope gradient of the quadratic regression equation for all land use. The critical slope gradient of 15° for returning the farmland to forest or others is suitable in the red soil region but is not accurate. The result of the study provides good scientific evidence for developing an appropriate plan of land use in the watershed and other similar areas.

  2. Effect of Various Organic Matter stimulates Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Plantations on Eroded Slopes in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha Vaidya, G.; Shrestha, K.; Wallander, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion resulting from landslides is a serious problem in mountainous countries such as Nepal. To restore such sites it is essential to establish plant cover that protects the soil and reduces erosion. Trees and shrubs on the lower hillsides in Nepal form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and these fungi are important for the uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil. In addition, the mycelia formed by these fungi have an important function in stabilizing the soil. The success of plantations of these eroded slopes is therefore highly dependent on the extent of mycorrhizal colonization of the plants. Mycorrhizal fungi growing in symbiosis with plants are essential in this respect because they improve both plant and nutrient uptake and soil structure. We investigated the influence of organic matter and P amendment on recently produced biomass of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in eroded slopes in Nepal. Eroded soil mixed with different types of organic matter was placed in mesh bags which were buried around the trees of Bauhinia purpurea and Leucaena diversifolia .This experiment were done in two seasons ( (the wet and the dry season). Signature fatty acids were used to determine bacterial and AM fungal biomass after the six month intervals. The amount and composition of AM fungal spores were analyzed in the mesh bags from the wet and dry seasons. More microbial biomass was produced during wet season than during dry season. Further more, organic matter addition enhanced the production of AM fungal and bacterial biomass during both seasons. The positive influence of organic matter addition on AM fungi could be an important contribution to plant survival, growth and nutrient composition in the soil in plantations on eroded slopes. Different AM spore communities and bacterial profiles were obtained with different organic amendments and this suggests a possible way of selecting for specific microbial communities in the management of eroded

  3. Do the effective heat conductivity and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall inside a packed bed depend on a chemical reaction? Weaknesses and applicability of current models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many studies have been on the effective heat conductivity (λeff) and the transfer coefficient at the wall (αw) inside packed beds. It has been mentioned that the values of λef and αw are changed when a chemical reaction occurs in the packed bed. We give an explanation for such a phenomenon. The

  4. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    By overcoming the barriers that limit access to financial liquidity and human resource, the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) can promote rural livelihood diversification. This paper examines this effect using a household survey data set spanning the 1999 implementation of the Sloping land c...

  5. Effective Thermal Property Estimation of Unitary Pebble Beds Based on a CFD-DEM Coupled Method for a Fusion Blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Youhua; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ceramic pebble beds have been considered in the solid blanket design for fusion reactors. To characterize the fusion solid blanket thermal performance, studies of the effective thermal properties, i.e. the effective thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, of the pebble beds are necessary. In this paper, a 3D computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM) coupled numerical model was proposed to simulate heat transfer and thereby estimate the effective thermal properties. The DEM was applied to produce a geometric topology of a prototypical blanket pebble bed by directly simulating the contact state of each individual particle using basic interaction laws. Based on this geometric topology, a CFD model was built to analyze the temperature distribution and obtain the effective thermal properties. The current numerical model was shown to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data for effective thermal conductivity available in the literature. supported by National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  6. Characterizing landscape-scale erosion using 10Be in detrital fluvial sediment: Slope-based sampling strategy detects the effect of widespread dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, Lucas J.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Portenga, Eric W.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2017-05-01

    Concentrations of in situ 10Be measured in detrital fluvial sediment are frequently used to estimate long-term erosion rates of drainage basins. In many regions, basin-averaged erosion rates are positively correlated with basin average slope. The slope dependence of erosion allows model-based erosion rate estimation for unsampled basins and basins where human disturbance may have biased cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in sediment. Using samples collected from southeastern North America, we demonstrate an approach that explicitly considers the relationship between average basin slope and erosion rate. Because dams and reservoirs are ubiquitous on larger channels in the field area, we selected 36 undammed headwater subbasins (average area 10.6 km2) from which we collected river sand samples and measured 10Be concentrations. We used these data to train a predictive model that relates average basin slope and 10Be-inferred erosion rate. Applying our model to 28 basins in the same region previously studied with 10Be, we find that the model successfully predicts erosion rates for basins of different sizes if they are undammed or if samples were collected >25 km downstream of dams. For samples collected closer to dams, measured erosion rates exceed modeled erosion rates for two-thirds of the samples. In three of four cases where paired samples were collected upstream of reservoirs and downstream of the impounding dam, 10Be concentrations were lower downstream. This finding has implications for detrital cosmogenic studies, whether or not samples were collected directly downstream of dams, because dams obstruct most major rivers around the world, effectively trapping sediment that originated upstream.

  7. Surface slope effects for ripple orientation on sand dunes in López crater, Terra Tyrrhena region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Johnson, Molly B.

    2017-06-01

    Ripple orientations on small sand dunes (dunes lacking substantial slip faces) at widely distributed sites across Mars have been documented using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images, in an effort to determine the last formative aeolian sediment transport direction experienced at these locations. Howard (1977) used field measurements and first principles to derive an expression for determining how much the surface slope on a sand dune deflects the orientation of sand ripples with respect to the formative wind direction. A Digital Terrain Model derived from stereo HiRISE images was used to assess the potential deflection of ripples on sand dunes on the floor of López crater on Mars. Three-quarters of the area covered by sand dunes within the DTM has a surface slope sand dunes on Mars that lack large slip faces. Sand ripples therefore should be good indicators of the most recent sand-transporting winds that have blown across sand dunes on Mars, as long as areas on or very near to slip faces are avoided.

  8. Microforms in gravel bed rivers: Formation, disintegration, and effects on bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K.; Papanicolaou, A.N.; Evangelopoulos, N.; Odeh, M.

    2004-01-01

    This research aims to advance current knowledge on cluster formation and evolution by tackling some of the aspects associated with cluster microtopography and the effects of clusters on bedload transport. The specific objectives of the study are (1) to identify the bed shear stress range in which clusters form and disintegrate, (2) to quantitatively describe the spacing characteristics and orientation of clusters with respect to flow characteristics, (3) to quantify the effects clusters have on the mean bedload rate, and (4) to assess the effects of clusters on the pulsating nature of bedload. In order to meet the objectives of this study, two main experimental scenarios, namely, Test Series A and B (20 experiments overall) are considered in a laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. Series A tests are performed to address objectives (1) and (2) while Series B is designed to meet objectives (3) and (4). Results show that cluster microforms develop in uniform sediment at 1.25 to 2 times the Shields parameter of an individual particle and start disintegrating at about 2.25 times the Shields parameter. It is found that during an unsteady flow event, effects of clusters on bedload transport rate can be classified in three different phases: a sink phase where clusters absorb incoming sediment, a neutral phase where clusters do not affect bedload, and a source phase where clusters release particles. Clusters also increase the magnitude of the fluctuations in bedload transport rate, showing that clusters amplify the unsteady nature of bedload transport. A fourth-order autoregressive, autoregressive integrated moving average model is employed to describe the time series of bedload and provide a predictive formula for predicting bedload at different periods. Finally, a change-point analysis enhanced with a binary segmentation procedure is performed to identify the abrupt changes in the bedload statistic characteristics due to the effects of clusters and detect the

  9. Effects of erosion in the fate of soil organic carbon and soil aggregation in a burned Mediterranean hill-slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julian; Cammeraat, Erik; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Andreu, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicated a higher degree of confidence that meteorological conditions associated to climate change will be propitious to increasing extreme events manifested, among others, in bigger and more frequent wildfires (IPCC, 2014). Wildfires contribute to shaping the landscape, and also the geomorphological and hydrological processes that operate on soil are affected (Bento-Gonçalves et al., 2012). Whereas, it is well documented that wildfires produce significant changes on erosion processes, the associated fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) has received less attention. This research assesses this gap by studying the loss, redistribution, and stabilization of SOC in a Mediterranean forest hill-slope burned the 28-08-2014, with high severity fire, at the Natural Park of Sierra de Espadán, Spain (39°50'45.11"N, 0°22'20.52"W). To this end, soil was sampled (19-9-2014) in the foot's slope (depositional), middle part (transport) and top (eroding) at two depths (146 drops). Significant differences (ANOVA, pBS) and soil depths (topsoil>subsoil). However, no significant differences were observed among eroding (58.8+20.8 gC kg-1), transport (67.3+34.4 gC kg-1), and depositional zones (62.0+31.3 gC kg-1), which is not in agreement with other SOC redistribution studies (Wang et al., 2014). Significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis, pBS) but not between soil depths or hill-slope positions. In the first post-fire erosive rains occurred in the area (29-11-14), closest pluviometer (Sot de Ferrer: 4.5 km) registered a total daily rain up to 64.2 l m-2. In this event a total of 12.7 kg of sediment were collected (contributing area ≈0.25 ha), with a content of 252.6 gC kg-1 the total SOC transported or stored in the depositional zone can reach up to 3.2 kg. In the second erosive event (23-3-15: 103.2 l m-2), total sediment in the fences was 143.6 kg, with content of 112.2 gC kg-1, made a total SOC eroded of up to 16.1 kg. It is hypothesized

  10. Effects of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Kenji [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan)], E-mail: kenji.sugimoto@kanhokyo.or.jp; Hiraoka, Kiyonori [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan); Ohta, Seiji [Hiroshima Defense Facilities Administration Bureau, 6-30, Kamihattyobori, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0012 (Japan); Niimura, Yoko [National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea, 2-17-5 Maruishi Ohno, Saeki, Hiroshima 739-0452 (Japan); Terawaki, Toshinobu [Fisheries Research Agency, Queen' s Tower-B 15F, Minato-Mirai, West, Yokohama 220-6115 (Japan); Okada, Mitsumasa [Hiroshima University, 1-4-1, Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effect of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of an eelgrass bed by the coast of Iwakuni, Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We monitored eelgrass shoot density and volume of ulvoid accumulation in the study site and evaluated effects of the accumulated ulvoid canopy on the percent survival, seedling density, growth rates, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and carbon contents of eelgrass. Eelgrass shoot density decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid. Also, seedling density decreased by the increase in the ulvoid volumes. Shoot density, seedling density and leaf elongation were negatively correlated with ulvoid volume. Carbon contents in eelgrass decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid (canopy height: 25 cm). These results suggest that accumulation of ulvoid bloom has significant negative impacts on the structure and function of eelgrass bed, i.e. decreases in vegetative shoot density, seedling density, shoot height and growth rate.

  11. Effect of hydraulic parameters on sediment transport capacity in overland flow over erodible beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, M.; Sterk, G.; Seeger, K.M.; Boersema, M.P.; Peters, P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment transport is an important component of the soil erosion process, which depends on several hydraulic parameters like unit discharge, mean flow velocity, and slope gradient. In most of the previous studies, the impact of these hydraulic parameters on transport capacity was studied for

  12. The Effect of Bed Rest and Hypoxic Environment on Postural Balance and Trunk Automatic (ReActions in Young Healthy Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Šarabon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged inactivity, such as bed rest induces several detrimental changes within a short timeframe. Impaired postural balance and responses of trunk muscles to (unexpected perturbations were both shown to be impaired after bed rest. Certain populations (e.g., astronauts are exposed to hypoxic environment in addition to inactivity, similar to bed rest. While the isolated negative effects of hypoxia on postural balance have been observed before, no study to date has examined the combined effects of hypoxia and bed rest on postural balance or trunk muscle responses. In this study, we examined the effects of 21-day exposure to three conditions: (i bed rest in hypoxic environment (HBR, (ii bed rest in normoxic environment (NBR, and (iii ambulatory hypoxic environment (HAMB. Fourteen healthy male subjects crossed over between conditions in a randomized order, with a 4-month break between conditions to ensure full recovery. Most body sway parameters indicated a similar deterioration of postural balance following both HBR and NBR. Similarly, both anticipatory and reactive responses of the trunk muscles (m. erector spinae and m. multifidus were impaired after HBR and NBR to a similar degree and mostly unchanged after HAMB. Certain body sway parameters were impaired after HAMB, confirming that hypoxia alone can undermine postural balance. On the other hand, some trunk responses were improved after HAMB. In conclusion, the results of our study confirmed previous findings on negative effects of bed rest, but showed little or no additional effect of hypoxia during bed rest. Physical activity during bed rest is encouraged to preserve neuromuscular functions of the trunk. While the HBR condition in our study resembled conditions during space missions, our results could be relevant to other populations, such as patients with pulmonary diseases exposed to bed rest.

  13. Effects of Known Determinants on Methylene Bisphenyl Isocyanate (MDI) Concentration During Spray-On Truck Bed-Lining Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Nicholas C; Brazile, William J; Finnie, Katie L; Tiger, James P

    2017-08-01

    Occupational exposure to methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI) presents serious worker health concerns as it may lead to short- and long-term health effects such as asthma, airway irritation, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and irritation of skin and mucous membranes. While studies of worker isocyanate exposures during vehicle painting activities are widespread, few studies have investigated the spray-on truck bed-liner (STBL) industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of several ventilation system variables and process characteristics in controlling MDI concentrations in the STBL industry. A total of 47 personal air samples were collected for MDI during 18 site visits at nine STBL companies in Colorado and Wyoming. Ventilation system and process characteristics that were assessed included: ventilation system face velocity, airflow, air changes per minute (AC/M), capture velocity, percent of MDI in bed-liner product, application temperature, application pressure, paint booth temperature, paint booth relative humidity, paint booth volume, and quantity of bed-liner product applied. Pearson correlation revealed percentage of MDI in bed-liner product (r = 0.557, n = 14, P < 0.05) and process temperature (r = 0.677, n = 14, P < 0.05) had high positive correlation with MDI concentration. Ventilation system face velocity (r = -0.578, n = 14, P < 0.05) and AC/M (r = -0.657, n = 14, P < 0.05) had high negative correlation with MDI concentration while airflow (r = -0.475, n = 14, P < 0.05) and capture velocity (r = -0.415, n = 14, P = 0.07) had moderate negative correlation with MDI concentration. Multiple linear regression revealed process temperature and capture velocity made a statistically significant and unique contribution in estimating MDI concentration (F (2, 11) = 10.99, P < 0.05) with an adjusted R2 of 0.61, explaining 61% of the variability in MDI concentration. This investigation contributed to an understudied STBL industry by targeting

  14. Effects of gas sorption-induced swelling/shrinkage on the cleat compressibility of coal under different bedding directions

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shoujian; Fang, Zhiming; Shen, Jian; Xu, Jiang; Wang, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    The cleat compressibility of coal is a key parameter that is extensively used in modeling the coal reservoir permeability for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) recovery. Cleat compressibility is often determined from the permeability measurement made at different confining pressures but with a constant pore pressure. Hence, this parameter ignores the sorption strain effects on the cleat compressibility. By using the transient pulse decay (TPD) technique, this study presents the results from a laboratory...

  15. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analogue on Resting State Sensorimotor Network Functional Connectivity and Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; Yuan, P.; Cooke, K.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor systems and neurocognitive performance. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with neurocognitive performance is largely unknown, but of potential importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. The aims of the present study are 1) to identify changes in sensorimotor resting state functional connectivity that occur with extended bed rest exposure, and to characterize their recovery time course; 2) to evaluate how these neural changes correlate with neurocognitive performance. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data were collected from 17 male participants. The data were acquired through the NASA bed rest facility, located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. RsfMRI data were obtained at seven time points: 7 and 12 days before bed rest; 7, 50, and 65 days during bed rest; and 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis was performed to measure the connectivity of sensorimotor networks in the brain before, during, and post-bed rest. We found a decrease in left putamen connectivity with the pre- and post-central gyri from pre bed rest to the last day in bed rest. In addition, vestibular cortex connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex decreased from pre to post bed rest. Furthermore, connectivity between cerebellar right superior posterior fissure and other cerebellar regions decreased from

  16. Effects of rehydration on +Gz tolerance after 14-days' bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Van Beaumont, W.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haines, R. F.; Sandler, H.; Staley, R. W.; Young, H. L.; Yusken, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the magnitude of reduction in human tolerance to centrifugation following 2 weeks of bed rest with moderate daily exercise. The degree of hypovolemia associated with these exposures is assessed, and the possibility to improve or to return to control levels the tolerance to acceleration forces acting in the head-to-foot direction through rehydration prior to acceleration is explored.

  17. The effect of insecticide-treated bed net on malarial parasitaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, some field studies have indicated that the efficacy achieved might be due to the high coverage rate achieved during the trial that produced a mass killing of mosquitoes in the communities. Aim: To assess the impact of the use of the insecticide-treated bed net in a programme situation, on malarial parasitaemia, ...

  18. Coal-bed methane water effects on dill and essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic way of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as coal-bed methane water (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In past 25 years, th...

  19. Effects of polyacrylamide on soil erosion and nutrient losses from substrate material in steep rocky slope stabilization projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang; Chen, Wenlu; Li, Chengjun; Pu, Yanpin; Sun, Haifeng

    2016-06-01

    Erosion of denuded steep rocky slopes causes increasing losses of nitrogen and phosphorus, which is a severe problem in rocky slope protection. Thus, it is important to determine the appropriate materials that can reduce the erodibility and losses of nitrogen and phosphorus of the soil. In this paper, twenty-seven simulated rainfall events were carried out in a greenhouse, in which the substrate material was artificial soil; nine types of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) were studied, which consisted of three molecular weight (6, 12, and 18 Mg mol(-1)) and three charge density (10, 20, and 30%) formulations in a 3 by 3 factorial design. The results showed that: (1) Polyacrylamide application reduced total nitrogen losses by 35.3% to 50.0% and total phosphorus losses by 34.9% to 48.0% relative to the control group. (2) The losses of total nitrogen and total phosphorus had significant correlation with the molecular weight. Besides, the losses of total phosphorus, particulate-bound phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen (NH4-N) were significantly correlated with their molecular weight and charge density. However, the losses of dissolved organic nitrogen, inorganic nitrogen (NO3-N), dissolved organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus (PO4-P) were non-significantly correlated with molecular weight and charge density. (3) Particulate-bound nitrogen and phosphorus were responsible for the losses of nitrogen and phosphorus during runoff events, where particulate-bound nitrogen made up 71.7% to 73.2% of total nitrogen losses, and particulate-bound phosphorus made up 82.3% to 85.2% of total phosphorus losses. (4) Polyacrylamide treatments increased water-stable aggregates content by 32.3% to 59.1%, total porosity by 11.3% to 49.0%, final infiltrative rate by 41.3% to 72.5%, and reduced soil erosion by 18.9% to 39.8% compared with the control group. Overall, the results of this study indicated that polyacrylamide application in the steep rocky slope stabilization projects could

  20. Effect of interprofessional student-led beds on emergency department performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Robert; Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Leech, Michelle; Sandry, Kate

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to compare ED performance indicators between patients managed by students in an inter-professional learning (IPL) programme and comparable patients receiving usual ED care. An IPL programme ran for five separate 2 week periods during 2012. Four student-led beds were managed by four final year students (two medical, two nursing). Four control beds were matched for patient acuity. Data were gathered electronically from the ED information system. Comparisons of baseline characteristics and a range of ED performance indicators were made between patients managed in the student-led and control beds. Patient satisfaction with student care was surveyed. Characteristics of the 369 study and 365 control patients were similar. Median times to being seen by a nurse and a doctor were not significantly different between student-led and control beds, at 50 (19-103) versus 45 (20-93) min, and 84 (28-162) versus 91 (41-165) min, respectively. Median time to inpatient referral for admitted patients was significantly longer in student-led compared with control beds, being 142 (65-249) versus 101.5 (48-200) min, respectively. Median lengths of stay were similar between the student-led and control groups, being 263 (201-343) versus 303.5 (204-384) min for discharged patients, and 866 (571-1238) versus 745.5 (487-1168) min for inpatient ward admissions. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with student care. There was little difference in performance indicators between patients managed by student teams as part of an IPL programme and a similar group receiving usual ED care. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  1. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kurten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target

  2. Maintaining continuity of care for nursing home residents: effect of states' Medicaid bed-hold policies and reimbursement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Schleinitz, Mark; Grabowski, David C; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent

    2009-02-01

    Recent public concern in response to states' intended repeal of Medicaid bed-hold policies and report of their association with higher hospitalization rates prompts examination of these policies in ensuring continuity of care within the broader context of Medicaid policies. Minimum Data Set assessments of long-stay nursing home residents in April-June 2000 linked to Medicare claims enabled tracking residents' hospitalizations during the ensuing 5 months and determining hospital discharge destination. Multinomial multilevel models estimated the effect of state policies on discharge destination controlling for resident, hospitalization, nursing home, and market characteristics. Among 77,955 hospitalizations, 5,797 (7.4 percent) were not discharged back to the baseline nursing home. Bed-hold policies were associated with lower odds of transfer to another nursing home (AOR=0.55, 95 percent CI 0.52-0.58) and higher odds of hospitalization (AOR=1.36), translating to 9.5 fewer nursing home transfers and 77.9 more hospitalizations per 1,000 residents annually, and costing Medicaid programs about $201,311. Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates were associated with lower odds of transfer. Bed-hold policies were associated with greater continuity of NH care; however, their high cost compared with their small impact on transfer but large impact on increased hospitalizations suggests that they may not be effective.

  3. THE EFFECT OF THE THICKNESS OF A PACKED BED ON THE DYNAMIC AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A SOLAR DRYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S KHALDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying food in the sun is a safe, easy and economical way to preserve food, especially fruits. Cabinet dryers are the most popular equipment for fruit drying. Because of intermittent nature of solar energy, storage is required for uninterrupted supply in order to match the needs. The main objective of this study is to assess effectiveness of continuous solar dryer integrated with packed bed as thermal storage with natural airflow for drying figs (Ficuscarica. The cabinet dryer were envisaged theoretically (computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The distribution of the velocity and temperature of air within the solar dryer were presented during one day of August and under the climate conditions of Tlemcen (Algeria.  The effects of presence of a packed bed on the distribution of velocity and temperature of airflow and on the temperature of figs were analyzed. The results show that the solar dryer design, incorporating a packed bed enhances the capabilities and performance of the solar dryer, through increasing time of drying.

  4. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Nan; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Benzene was successfully degraded by dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas. • Different electrode geometry has distinct effect on plasmas oxidation performance. • Benzene degradation and energy performance were enhanced when using the coil electrode. • The reaction products were well determined by online FTIR analysis. -- Abstract: In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO 2 , H 2 O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O 3 , N 2 O, N 2 O 5 , and HNO 3 were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants

  5. Biological aspects and ecological effects of a bed of the invasive non-indigenous mussel Brachidontes pharaonis (Fischer P., 1870 in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. BONNICI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available No mussel beds were known to occur in the Maltese Islands previous to 2009, when a single bed of the Lessepsian immigrant Brachidontes pharaonis, first recorded from the islands in 1970, was discovered in Birzebbugia Bay. The population structure of B. pharaonis was investigated to assess its potential to spread and colonise new shores, while the biotic community at the mussel bed was compared to that present on uncolonised substratum to determine the effects of mussel bed establishment on the associated biota. Results indicate a lower species richness and slightly different community structure with greater small-scale heterogeneity at the mussel bed site compared to the adjacent rocky shore where mussels are present but where there is no bed formation. The B. pharaonis population had a peak density of 16550 ± 2051 ind.m-2 within the mussel bed and included recent recruits. These data suggest that the B. pharaonis population has the potential to expand. Establishment of extensive beds by this invasive mussel could change the structure of native rocky shore assemblages around the Maltese Islands and elsewhere in the Mediterranean.

  6. Effects of prolonged bed rest on the total peripheral resistance baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Mukkamala, R.; Sheynberg, N.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exposure to microgravity continues to be a primary concern of the human space program. Reduced autonomic tone has been demonstrated to contribute to this phenomenon, and the heart rate baroreflex, in particular, has been repeatedly shown to be impaired. However, only the works of Yelle et al. have attempted to address the role of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) baroreflex, a potentially more significant contributor to blood pressure regulation. We applied a previously developed method for estimating the static gains of both the arterial and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes to data obtained before and after 16-day bed rest. Reductions in the estimated static gains of the arterial (statistically significant) and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes were found after bed rest. This study supports the works of Yelle et al, which imply that the TPR baroreflex is reduced after spaceflight.

  7. Effect of bone on the pyrolysis product distribution and composition in a fixed bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, M.; Andresen, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Co-pyrolysis of Biomass including Pistachio shell (PS), Pine wood (PW) and Wheat Straw (WS) with Bone matter (BM) have been investigated to determine the effect of bone on the quality of bio-char and bio-oil produced. The aim of this study is to generate stable and nitrogen enriched bio-char that can act as fertilizer while at the same time optimizes the chemical stability of the char to act as a Carbon Capture and Storage system (CCS) and co-produce high quality oils for renewable energy generation. To achieve this, the present study has focused on the influence of bone matter addition from 0wt% to 25wt% to the biomasses in a fixed bed pyrolysis reactor at 3000C. The analysis of the char products shows that the addition of bone to the biomass increased their char yields up to 10wt% addition. Higher addition was found to reduce the overall char yield from the biomass. At 10wt% bone addition, the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen content, and the gross calorific value of the chars were increased by 7wt%, 29wt%, 163wt% and 19Mj/kg, for Wheat straw, 62wt%, 46wt%, 135wt%, 110Mj/kg for Pine wood and 7wt%, 76wt%, 42wt% and 33Mj/kg for Pistachio shells. The oxygen content of the Wheat straw, Pistachio shells and pine wood mixed with 10wt% BM decreased by 28wt%, 21wt%, and 93wt%, respectively. The bio-oil yield increased for the bone addition up to 5%wt% for all the samples, its energy value and concentration of its major chemical components was improved for fuel and pharmaceutical use. Port experiment has shown that plant grown on soil amended with the bio-char produced gave higher yield as compared to that from un-amended soil. Comparison between the three biomasses investigated showed similar pattern of change. Hence it can be concluded that at optimum addition of bone to the biomass, bio-chars and oil yield could be optimized for soil amendment, energy production, while retaining carbon for sequestration.

  8. Effects of Starvation on Deltamethrin Tolerance in Bed Bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary C. DeVries

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are a major pest in the urban environment. Their presence often results in physical, psychological, and financial distress of homeowners and apartment dwellers. Although many insecticide bioassays have been performed on this pest, little attention has been paid to bed bug feeding status, which is closely linked to metabolism, molting, and mass. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of topically applied deltamethrin on insecticide susceptible adult male bed bugs fed 2 d, 9 d, and 21 d prior to testing. When toxicity was evaluated on a “per-bug” basis, there was no difference between 2 d [LD50 = 0.498 (0.316 − 0.692 ng·bug−1] and 9 d [LD50 = 0.572 (0.436 − 0.724 ng·bug−1] starved bugs, while 21 d starved bugs had a significantly lower LD50 [0.221 (0.075 − 0.386 ng·bug−1]. When toxicity was evaluated in terms of body mass, 9 d starved bugs had the highest LD50 values [0.138 (0.102 − 0.176 ng·mg−1], followed by 2 d starved bugs [0.095 (0.060 − 0.134 ng·mg−1], and then 21 d starved bugs [0.058 (0.019–0.102 ng·mg−1]; the LD50 values of 2 d and 9 d starved bugs were significantly different from 21 d starved bugs. These results indicate that feeding status plays an important role in the toxicity of deltamethrin. In addition, the lack of differences between 2 d and 9 d starved bugs indicate that the blood meal itself has little impact on tolerance, but rather it is some physiological change following feeding that confers increased tolerance to bed bugs.

  9. Effects of Starvation on Deltamethrin Tolerance in Bed Bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C.; Reid, William R.; Kells, Stephen A.; Appel, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are a major pest in the urban environment. Their presence often results in physical, psychological, and financial distress of homeowners and apartment dwellers. Although many insecticide bioassays have been performed on this pest, little attention has been paid to bed bug feeding status, which is closely linked to metabolism, molting, and mass. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of topically applied deltamethrin on insecticide susceptible adult male bed bugs fed 2 d, 9 d, and 21 d prior to testing. When toxicity was evaluated on a “per-bug” basis, there was no difference between 2 d [LD50 = 0.498 (0.316 − 0.692) ng·bug−1] and 9 d [LD50 = 0.572 (0.436 − 0.724) ng·bug−1] starved bugs, while 21 d starved bugs had a significantly lower LD50 [0.221 (0.075 − 0.386) ng·bug−1]. When toxicity was evaluated in terms of body mass, 9 d starved bugs had the highest LD50 values [0.138 (0.102 − 0.176) ng·mg−1], followed by 2 d starved bugs [0.095 (0.060 − 0.134) ng·mg−1], and then 21 d starved bugs [0.058 (0.019–0.102) ng·mg−1]; the LD50 values of 2 d and 9 d starved bugs were significantly different from 21 d starved bugs. These results indicate that feeding status plays an important role in the toxicity of deltamethrin. In addition, the lack of differences between 2 d and 9 d starved bugs indicate that the blood meal itself has little impact on tolerance, but rather it is some physiological change following feeding that confers increased tolerance to bed bugs. PMID:26463068

  10. Effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter to hardness and compressive strength of scaffold bovine hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, Joko; Pratama, Aditya; Sukanto, Heru; Nugroho, Yohanes; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter toward compressive strength and hardness bovine bone hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone filler applications. BHA-glycerin mixed with a ratio of 1:1, and keep it for 24 hours. After the homogenization process acquired, bio-Ink with shaped slurry will be used as a material for a 3D printer. The printing process with a temperature variation have performed by setting up heat bed temperature. After printing process was completed, the 3D scaffold was detained on the heat bed for 10 minutes before being picked up. The test results in this study had the lowest hardness value of 9.82±0.62 VHN and the highest number of 24.32±0.99 VHN. The compressive strength testing had the lowest value of 1.62±0.16 MPa with the highest number of 5.67±0.39 MPa. Pore observation using a scanning electron microscope. The result shows that the size of the pores were not much different, that was ±100-200 µm. This observation also indicated that the pore form was square pores.

  11. Perceptions on the effect of small electric fans on comfort inside bed nets in southern Ghana: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Mulako S; Briët, Olivier J T; Keating, Joseph; Ahorlu, Collins K; Yukich, Joshua O; Oppong, Samuel; Nardini, Peter; Pfeiffer, Constanze

    2016-12-01

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are known to be highly effective in reducing malaria transmission, morbidity and mortality. However, among those owning an LLIN, use rates are often suboptimal. A reported barrier to bed net use is discomfort due to heat. This qualitative study was part of a larger evaluation conducted in communities without electricity in rural Ghana to assess whether 0.8 W solar powered net fans can increase net use. Twenty-three key informant interviews with household heads in the study communities in Shai-Osudoku District, southern Ghana, were conducted from July to August 2015. The purpose of the interviews was to obtain insight into perceptions of participants about the net fan system in relation to LLIN use. While all study participants reported using LLINs, with mosquito nuisance prevention as the prime motivation, heat was also mentioned as a key barrier to net use. Respondents appreciated the net fans because they improved comfort inside bed nets. The LED light on the fan stand became the main source of light at night and positively influenced the perception of the intervention as a whole. The general acceptance of the net fan system by the study participants highlights the potential of the intervention to improve comfort inside mosquito nets. This, therefore, has a potential to increase bed net use in areas with low access to electricity.

  12. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO2, H2O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O3, N2O, N2O5, and HNO3 were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct and indirect effects of seastars Asterias rubens on mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis) in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Bettina

    2001-08-01

    Near the island of Sylt in the Wadden Sea (German Bight, North Sea), seastars Asterias rubens (L.) co-occur with their preferred prey, mussels Mytilus edulis (L.), which form extensive beds from the intertidal down to the subtidal zone. Mussel density within these beds is significantly lower in the subtidal than the intertidal zone. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to check if this was due to seastar predation. Feeding experiments did not indicate size refuge of M. edulis from predation by A. rubens, but showed that seastars preferred clean subtidal mussels above barnacle-overgrown intertidal ones. This preference coincided with higher abundances of both large ( arm length >5.5 cm) and smaller seastars in the shallow subtidal, but their abundance was too low to account for the decreased subtidal mussel density in the area studied. However, seastars may indirectly reduce mussel recruitment in the subtidal zone. This is caused by juvenile seastar predation upon the barnacles that grow on mussels, because such epigrowth strongly enhances recruitment in mussels. Such an indirect effect on mussel recruitment may affect mussel density more than adult seastar predation. An exception may be mass invasions of A. rubens on subtidal mussel beds. One such event happened during this study, clearing a large patch of mussels.

  14. Thermal effects of the stone battery depending on the bed volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latala Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search restrictions energy consumption in horticultural production there are in progress continually. They concern on the one hand reduce heat loss and, second, better use of available energy. Greenhouse efect in the greenhouse forced ventilation process especially in the surplus heat. The paper presents the manner of management of excess heat in the stone battery. Its structure included four segments with a volume of 13.1 m3 each. Segments of the battery were fed a stream of air in an independent manner. This enabled the work of individual segments or a few at a time. The battery can work in two stages: charging and discharging. Selecting the stage took place automatically according to the developed algorithm. This decision was dependent on the parameters of air flowing through the bed and the thermal state of the battery. During the process of charging and discharging monitored changes in air enthalpy at the inlet and outlet of the battery, and the temperature and relative humidity of air in the bed of battery. For different bed volumes increases its temperature, heat storage capacity and the ability to absorb water vapoure was determined.

  15. Potential effects of climate change on streamflow, eastern and western slopes of the Sierra Nevada, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeton, A.E.; Dettinger, M.D.; Smith, J. LaRue

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation-runoff models of the East Fork Carson and North Fork American Rivers were developed and calibrated for use in evaluating the sensitivity of streamflow in the north-central Sierra Nevada to climate change. The East Fork Carson River drains part of the rain-shadowed, eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada and is generally higher than the North Fork American River, which drains the wetter, western slope. First, a geographic information system was developed to describe the spatial variability of basin characteristics and to help estimate model parameters. The result was a partitioning of each basin into noncontiguous, but hydrologically uniform, land units. Hydrologic descriptions of these units were developed and the Precipitation- Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to simulate water and energy balances for each unit in response to daily weather conditions. The models were calibrated and verified using historical streamflows over 22-year (Carson River) and 42-year (American River) periods. Simulated annual streamflow errors average plus 10 percent of the observed flow for the East Fork Carson River basin and plus 15 percent for the North Fork American River basin. Interannual variability is well simulated overall, but, at daily scales, wet periods are simulated more accurately than drier periods. The simulated water budgets for the two basins are significantly different in seasonality of streamflow, sublimation, evapotranspiration, and snowmelt. The simulations indicate that differences in snowpack and snowmelt timing can play pervasive roles in determining the sensitivity of water resources to climate change, in terms of both resource availability and amount. The calibrated models were driven by more than 25 hypothetical climate-change scenarios, each 100 years long. The scenarios were synthesized and spatially disaggregated by methods designed to preserve realistic daily, monthly, annual, and spatial statistics. Simulated streamflow timing was not very

  16. Experimental analysis of recruitment patterns of coral reef fishes in seagrass beds: Effects of substrate type, shape, and rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yohei; Kawasaki, Hiroyuki; Sano, Mitsuhiko

    2007-02-01

    Habitat choice of reef fish larvae at settlement is one of the mechanisms proposed to explain spatial patterns in the distribution of fishes and the corresponding spatial structure of communities. Field experiments using Pomacentridae were conducted at Iriomote Island, southern Japan, in order to determine if rare recruitment of coral reef fishes in seagrass beds is due to larval settlement preference. When three types of natural patch treatments (branching coral patch, seagrass patch, and control without patches) were established in cleared seagrass squares in the center of a seagrass bed, four pomacentrid species, Amblyglyphidodon curacao, Dischistodus prosopotaenia, Cheiloprion labiatus, and Dascyllus aruanus, recruited exclusively onto the coral patches, indicating that larvae distributed in the seagrass bed may have preferred a coral rather than seagrass substrate as a settlement habitat. The effects of differences in physical shape (grid structure for branching coral vs. vertical structure for seagrass leaves) and rigidity (rigid substrate for coral vs. flexible substrate for seagrass) between coral and seagrass substrates on such recruitment patterns were investigated using artificial coral and seagrass units. When artificial habitat units with predator exclusion cages were established in the cleared seagrass squares as above, high densities of A. curacao and D. prosopotaenia recruits were observed on the rigid rather than flexible habitat units (both unit types having similar shape), whereas differences in recruit numbers of the two species were unclear in differently shaped units. These results demonstrated that even though pomacentrid larvae are distributed in the seagrass bed, they do not settle on the seagrass substrate owing to their habitat choice being partially based on a preference for substrate rigidity. Moreover, non-recruitment of C. labiatus and D. aruanus on artificial habitat units suggested that the presence of living coral substrates rather

  17. The effects of Herba Andrographitis hedgerows on soil erodibility and fractal features on sloping cropland in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; He, Binghui; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Yun; Xi, Weimin

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate if hedgerows could improve the soil physicochemical properties and enhance the soil anti-scouring and anti-shearing capabilities, the effects of Herba Andrographitis hedgerows on soil erodibility and fractal features on sloping cropland in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area were investigated. Results showed that: (1) the clay particle accumulation around the hedgerows was significantly affected by the hedgerows; (2) the fractal dimension of soil particles was positively correlated with both silt and clay contents and had a negative linear correlation with sand content; (3) fine-grained content significantly influenced fractal dimension of the soil particles; (4) soil erodibility K was significantly and positively correlated with the sand content (correlation coefficient r=0.870), but significantly and negatively correlated with the silt content (r=-0.538), clay content (r=-0.739), organic carbon content (r=-0.603), the aggregation degree (r=-0.486), and soil fractal dimension (r=-0.538); and (5) the contents of organic matter and clay particles in the soil were found to be the effective indicators for soil erodibility at the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The hedgerows may improve soil fractal features and decrease soil erodibility. The effective distance between hedgerows on a slope of 10° was less than 6 m.

  18. A Study on the Generation and Preservation of Shallow Overpressures and the Effects on the Slope Instability in the Ursa Basin, deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, N. T.; Tokunaga, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Sawyer, D. E.; Urgeles, R.; Nakamura, T.; Koizumi, K.; Nakajima, M.; Kubota, M.; Kameya, H.; Taniue, M.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of abnormally high fluid pressures within sedimentary formations is critical for analyzing slope stability and assessing drilling risks. We constructed a numerical model to analyze the change of fluid flow patterns, the development of shallow overpressures, and the resulting slope instability from late Pleistocene to recent sediments in the Ursa basin, deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Our analysis showed that high pore pressure ratios (ratio between differences of pore pressure and hydrostatic pressure and overburden hydrostatic effective stress) existed from the onset of sediment deposition. Lateral fluid flow from the area where overburden is thick toward the area where it is thin have occurred at least since 30 ka. Even though almost continuous sedimentation was assumed in the model, the simulation results show that overconsolidated sediments exist in the area where overburden is thin because of unloading due to lateral flow. Ko (the ratio of horizontal to vertical effective stress) is larger in overconsolidated sediments compared with normally consolidated sediments. Thus, this phenomenon can explain the isotropic stress state reported in the area. Overpressure quickly generated at around 22 ka due to the high sedimentation rate of fine grained sediments. This high overpressure and lower effective stress might have resulted in sediments having shear strengths low enough for gravity sliding to occur. The predicted timing of a failure between the sites U1324 and U1323 below seismic horizon S20 was about 19 ka and was consistent with geological data.

  19. A silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI tunneling field–effect transistor with steep subthreshold slope and high switching state current ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Marjani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a silicon–on–insulator (SOI p–n–p–n tunneling field–effect transistor (TFET with a silicon doped hafnium oxide (Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack is proposed and investigated via 2D device simulation with a calibrated nonlocal band–to–band tunneling model. Utilization of Si:HfO2 instead of conventional perovskite ferroelectrics such as lead zirconium titanate (PbZrTiO3 and strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi2Ta2O9 provides compatibility to the CMOS process as well as improved device scalability. By using Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack, the applied gate voltage is effectively amplified that causes increased electric field at the tunneling junction and reduced tunneling barrier width. Compared with the conventional p–n–p–n SOI TFET, the on–state current and switching state current ratio are appreciably increased; and the average subthreshold slope (SS is effectively reduced. The simulation results of Si:HfO2 ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI TFET show significant improvement in transconductance (∼9.8X enhancement at high overdrive voltage and average subthreshold slope (∼35% enhancement over nine decades of drain current at room temperature, indicating that this device is a promising candidate to strengthen the performance of p–n–p–n and conventional TFET for a switching performance.

  20. Countering Negative Effects of Terrain Slope on Airborne Laser Scanner Data Using Procrustean Transformation and Histogram Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endre Hofstad Hansen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Forest attributes such as tree heights, diameter distribution, volumes, and biomass can be modeled utilizing the relationship between remotely sensed metrics as predictor variables, and measurements of forest attributes on the ground. The quality of the models relies on the actual relationship between the forest attributes and the remotely sensed metrics. The processing of airborne laser scanning (ALS point clouds acquired under heterogeneous terrain conditions introduces a distortion of the three-dimensional shape and structure of the ALS data for tree crowns and thus errors in the derived metrics. In the present study, Procrustean transformation and histogram matching were proposed as a means of countering the distortion of the ALS data. The transformations were tested on a dataset consisting of 192 field plots of 250 m2 in size located on a gradient from gentle to steep terrain slopes in western Norway. Regression models with predictor variables derived from (1 Procrustean transformed- and (2 histogram matched point clouds were compared to models with variables derived from untransformed point clouds. Models for timber volume, basal area, dominant height, Lorey’s mean height, basal area weighted mean diameter, and number of stems were assessed. The results indicate that both (1 Procrustean transformation and (2 histogram matching can be used to counter crown distortion in ALS point clouds. Furthermore, both techniques are simple and can easily be implemented in the traditional processing chain of ALS metrics extraction.

  1. A Preliminary Study of the Effect of Shifts in Packing Fraction on k-effective in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Terry, William Knox

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary examination of the effect of pebble packing changes on the reactivity of a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) is performed. As a first step, using the MCNP code, the modeling of a PBR core as a continuous and homogeneous region is compared to the modeling as a collection of discrete pebbles of equal average fuel density. It is shown that the two modeling approaches give the same trends inasmuch as changes in keff are concerned. It is thus shown that for the purpose of identifying trends in keff changes, the use of a homogeneous model is sufficient. A homogeneous model is then used to assess the effect of pebble packing arrangement changes on the reactivity of a PBR core. It is shown that the changes can be large enough to result in prompt criticality. It is shown that for uranium fueled PBRs, thermal feedback could have the potential to offset the increase in activity, whereas for plutonium fueled systems, thermal feedback may not be sufficient for totally offsetting the packing-increase reactivity insertion and could even exacerbate the initial response. It is thus shown that a full study, including reactor kinetics, thermal feedback, and the dynamics of energy deposition and removal is warranted to fully characterize the potential consequences of packing shifts

  2. Understanding and predicting bed humidity in fluidized bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhui; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-04-01

    Bed humidity is a critical parameter that needs to be controlled in a fluidized bed granulation to ensure reliability. To predict and control the bed humidity during the fluidized bed granulation process, a simple model based on the mass conservation of moisture was developed. The moisture mass balance model quantitatively simulates the effects of spray rate, binder solution concentration, airflow rate, inlet air temperature, and dew point on the bed humidity. The model was validated by a series of granulations performed in different scale granulators including Glatt GPCG-1, GPCG-15, and GPCG-60. Good agreement was observed between the theoretical prediction and the measured loss on drying (LOD). The model developed in the current work enables us to choose the appropriate parameters for the fluidized bed granulation and can be used as a valuable tool in process scaling-up. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  3. Tree- and Stand-Level Thinning Effects on Growth of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on a Northeast- and a Southwest-Facing Slope in Southwest Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Diaconu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anticipated changes in climate and research findings on the drought sensitivity of beech have triggered controversial discussions about the future of European beech. We investigated the growth response of beech on the tree- and stand-level in mature stands to three different thinning intensities (no thinning, strong thinning, very strong thinning on a northeast- and southwest-facing slope in Southwest Germany. Linear mixed-effects models were formulated to describe effects on growth parameters on the tree- and stand-level (diameter, height, basal area, volume. At the stand-level, the stand basal area increment and stand volume increment were lower on the thinned plots. At the tree-level, the basal area increment significantly increased with increasing thinning intensity. The growth of individual trees was also influenced by initial tree size, the size-related rank of the tree within a stand, and by the aspect of the site. Our data indicate that growth of European beech is impaired on the southwest-facing slope with a warmer and drier climate and that a very strong thinning regime applied at advanced age can accelerate growth of European beech trees even on the warmer and drier site. Our findings, therefore, imply that in a warmer climate intensive thinning may also represent an important adaptive forest management measure in European beech stands.

  4. Coal Bed Aquifer Tests: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, E. P.

    2005-12-01

    Coal bed methane development is proceeding at a rapid pace in the USA and in several other countries. Development of coal bed methane requires the simultaneous co-production of water in a manner that maximizes the amount of drawdown while minimizing the amount of water pumped. Determination of optimal well spacing and production rates to achieve such drawdowns requires knowledge of the hydraulic properties of the coal aquifer. Natural closely spaced fractures, termed cleats, develop during coal formation as an orthogonal fracture network that creates anisotropic transmissivity. Water held in the matrix porosity of the coal is released slowly to the cleat system during pumping, resulting in coal beds behaving as dual-porosity aquifers. Knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of the principal axes of the transmissivity tensor, as well as of the late-time dual-porosity storage coefficient, are needed to optimally design well fields for the exploitation of coal bed methane. An aquifer test with three observation wells was conducted to determine these properties for a 7.6- m thick coal bed located in the Powder River Basin, southeast Montana. The test results exhibit all the features that would be expected for a test on an anisotropic dual-porosity medium. However, the test was initially misinterpreted, providing a cautionary tale. The initial interpretation assumed a single-porosity aquifer, and the late-time break in slope was assumed to represent the effects of a hidden boundary. Despite their apparent plausibility, the results of the analysis raised several red flags. An attempt to determine the location of the hidden boundary failed, the indicated specific storage was implausibly small, and the analysis of recovery data provided transmissivity values that were in disagreement with those determined from the drawdown analysis. Reanalysis of the test using type curves developed for a dual-porosity aquifer resulted in a transmissivity value that is about 25% smaller

  5. Combined effects of climate, restoration measures and slope position in change in soil chemical properties and nutrient loss across lands affected by the Wenchuan Earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongming; Deng, Haojun; Du, Kun; Rafay, Loretta; Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Li, Jian; Chen, Can; Wu, Chengzhen; Lin, Han; Yu, Wei; Fan, Hailan; Ge, Yonggang

    2017-10-15

    The MS 8.0Wenchuan Earthquake in 2008 caused huge damage to land cover in the northwest of China's Sichuan province. In order to determine the nutrient loss and short term characteristics of change in soil chemical properties, we established an experiment with three treatments ('undestroyed', 'destroyed and treated', and 'destroyed and untreated'), two climate types (semi-arid hot climate and subtropical monsoon climate), and three slope positions (upslope, mid-slope, and bottom-slope) in 2011. Ten soil properties-including pH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium-were measured in surface soil samples in December 2014. Analyses were performed to compare the characteristics of 3-year change in soil chemical properties in two climate zones. This study revealed that soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, Ca 2+ content, alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium were significantly higher in subtropical monsoon climate zones than in semi-arid hot climate zones. However, subtropical monsoon climate zones had a higher decrease in soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, and alkaline hydrolysable nitrogen in 'destroyed and untreated' sites than in semi-arid hot climate zones. Most soil chemical properties exhibited significant interactions, indicating that they may degrade or develop concomitantly. 'Destroyed and treated' sites in both climate types had lower C:P and N:P ratios than 'destroyed and untreated' sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the first, second, and third principal components explained 76.53% of the variation and might be interpreted as structural integrity, nutrient supply availability, and efficiency of soil; the difference of soil parent material; as well as weathering and leaching effects. Our study indicated that the characteristics of short term

  6. Slope earthquake stability

    CERN Document Server

    Changwei, Yang; Jing, Lian; Wenying, Yu; Jianjing, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    This book begins with the dynamic characteristics of the covering layerbedrock type slope, containing monitoring data of the seismic array, shaking table tests, numerical analysis and theoretical derivation. Then it focuses on the landslide mechanism and assessment method. It also proposes a model that assessing the hazard area based on the field investigations. Many questions, exercises and solutions are given. Researchers and engineers in the field of Geotechnical Engineering and Anti-seismic Engineering can benefit from it.

  7. Factors affecting seismic response of submarine slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biscontin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of submerged slopes on the continental shelf to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and 'local' tsunami hazards worldwide. The geological profile of these slopes typically includes normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated soft cohesive soils with layer thickness ranging from a few meters to hundreds of meters. The factor of safety obtained from pseudo-static analyses is not always a useful measure for evaluating the slope response, since values less than one do not necessarily imply slope failure with large movements of the soil mass. This paper addresses the relative importance of different factors affecting the response of submerged slopes during seismic loading. The analyses use a dynamic finite element code which includes a constitutive law describing the anisotropic stress-strain-strength behavior of normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated clays. The model also incorporates anisotropic hardening to describe the effect of different shear strain and stress histories as well as bounding surface principles to provide realistic descriptions of the accumulation of the plastic strains and excess pore pressure during successive loading cycles. The paper presents results from parametric site response analyses on slope geometry and layering, soil material parameters, and input ground motion characteristics. The predicted maximum shear strains, permanent deformations, displacement time histories and maximum excess pore pressure development provide insight of slope performance during a seismic event.

  8. Effects of gas sorption-induced swelling/shrinkage on the cleat compressibility of coal under different bedding directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shoujian; Fang, Zhiming; Shen, Jian; Xu, Jiang; Wang, Geoff

    2017-10-30

    The cleat compressibility of coal is a key parameter that is extensively used in modeling the coal reservoir permeability for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) recovery. Cleat compressibility is often determined from the permeability measurement made at different confining pressures but with a constant pore pressure. Hence, this parameter ignores the sorption strain effects on the cleat compressibility. By using the transient pulse decay (TPD) technique, this study presents the results from a laboratory characterization program using coal core drilled from different bedding directions to estimate gas permeability and coal cleat compressibility under different pore pressures while maintaining effective stress constant. Cleat compressibility was determined from permeability and sorption strain measurements that are made at different pore pressures under an effective stress constant. Results show that the cleat compressibility of coal increases slightly with the increase of pore pressure. Moreover, the cleat compressibility of Sample P (representing the face cleats in coal) is larger than that of Sample C (representing the butt cleats in coal). This result suggests that cleat compressibility should not be regarded as constant in the modeling of the CBM recovery. Furthermore, the compressibility of face cleats is considerably sensitive to the sorption-induced swelling/shrinkage and offers significant effects on the coal permeability.

  9. Effect of a Reactivation strategy based on partial bio catalyst replacement on the performance of a fungal fluidized bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega-Clemente, A.; Robledo-Narvaez, P.; Barrera-Cortes, J.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mexican pulp and paper industry discharges approximately 12% of the annual industrial discharges and holds a second position in the ranking of main water industrial polluters in Mexico. Their wastewaters are characteristically recalcitrant and toxic. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of two operational strategies on the performance of two fungal fluidized bed reactor (FBR) for the post-treatment of anaerobically weal black liquor systems (AP-WBL) without supplementation of soluble carbohydrates, i. e. Strategy 1 (continuous operation with the same original, fungal bio catalysts and eventual spikes of protease inhibitor and glucose), and Strategy 2 operation with partial exchange of bio catalysts. (Author)

  10. Geologic and physiographic controls on bed-material yield, transport, and channel morphology for alluvial and bedrock rivers, western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, James E.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Anderson, Scott A.; Wallick, J. Rose; Jones, Krista L.; Keith, Mackenzie K.

    2014-01-01

    The rivers of western Oregon have diverse forms and characteristics, with channel substrates ranging from continuous alluvial gravel to bare bedrock. Analysis of several measurable morphologic attributes of 24 valley reaches on 17 rivers provides a basis for comparing nonalluvial and alluvial channels. Key differences are that alluvial reaches have greater bar area, greater migration rates, and show systematic correlation among variables relating grain size to bed-material transport capacity. We relate these differences between channel types to bed-material transport rates as derived from a coupled regional analysis of empirical sediment yield measurements and physical experiments of clast attrition during transport. This sediment supply analysis shows that overall bed-material transport rates for western Oregon are chiefly controlled by (1) lithology and basin slope, which are the key factors for bed-material supply into the stream network, and (2) lithologic control of bed-material attrition from in-transport abrasion and disintegration. This bed-material comminution strongly affects bed-material transport in the study area, reducing transport rates by 50%–90% along the length of the larger rivers in the study area. A comparison of the bed-material transport estimates with the morphologic analyses shows that alluvial gravel-bed channels have systematic and bounding relations between bed-material transport rate and attributes such as bar area and local transport capacity. By contrast, few such relations are evident for nonalluvial rivers with bedrock or mixed-bed substrates, which are apparently more influenced by local controls on channel geometry and sediment supply. At the scale of western Oregon, the physiographic and lithologic controls on the balance between bed-material supply and transport capacity exert far-reaching influence on the distribution of alluvial and nonalluvial channels and their consequently distinctive morphologies and behaviors

  11. Effect of primary air preheating and moisturesugarcane bagasse during fixed bed combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamir Sánchez Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Furnaces used to making jaggery have energ y losses due to incomplete combustion of sugarcane bagasse and sensible heat in the flue gases. During jaggery production process, sugarcane bagasse is used as fuel, with mass fractions of humidity between 30% and 50%, which affect the combustion efficiency of a biomass in a fixed bed. Because the air preheating decreases the drying time, its implementation in many biomass combustion systems increases process efficiency. Therefore, in this investigation we studied the influence of the moisture content and the preheating of the primary air on the combustion of bagasse in a fixed bed furnace, by analyzing the profiles of temperature and concentration of the combustion gas. Results showed that increasing in bagasse moisture reduces the rate of combustion and conversion of carbon to CO2, diminishing the yield of process. When theprimary air is preheated to a temperature of 120 ºC, the combustion rate increased, however, only meant an increase in combustion efficiency to a mass fraction of 30% humidity.

  12. AN EFFECTIVE HYBRID SUPPORT VECTOR REGRESSION WITH CHAOS-EMBEDDED BIOGEOGRAPHY-BASED OPTIMIZATION STRATEGY FOR PREDICTION OF EARTHQUAKE-TRIGGERED SLOPE DEFORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Heidari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake can pose earth-shattering health hazards to the natural slops and land infrastructures. One of the chief consequences of the earthquakes can be land sliding, which is instigated by durable shaking. In this research, an efficient procedure is proposed to assist the prediction of earthquake-originated slope displacements (EIDS. New hybrid SVM-CBBO strategy is implemented to predict the EIDS. For this purpose, first, chaos paradigm is combined with initialization of BBO to enhance the diversification and intensification capacity of the conventional BBO optimizer. Then, chaotic BBO is developed as the searching scheme to investigate the best values of SVR parameters. In this paper, it will be confirmed that how the new computing approach is effective in prediction of EIDS. The outcomes affirm that the SVR-BBO strategy with chaos can be employed effectively as a predicting tool for evaluating the EIDS.

  13. Drainage effects on the transient, near-surface hydrologic response of a steep hillslope to rainfall: Implications for slope stability, Edmonds, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biavati, G.; Godt, J.W.; McKenna, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Shallow landslides on steep (>25??) hillsides along Puget Sound have resulted in occasional loss of life and costly damage to property during intense or prolonged rainfall. As part of a larger project to assess landslide hazards in the Seattle area, the U.S. Geological Survey instrumented two coastal bluff sites in 2001 to observe the subsurface hydrologic response to rainfall. The instrumentation at one of these sites, near Edmonds, Washington, consists of two rain gauges, two water-content probes that measure volumetric water content at eight depths between 0.2 and 2.0 m, and two tensiometer nests that measure soil-water suction at six depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.5m. Measurements from these instruments are used to test one- and two-dimensional numerical models of infiltration and groundwater flow. Capillary-rise tests, performed in the laboratory on soil sample from the Edmonds site, are used to define the soil hydraulic properties for the wetting process. The field observations of water content and suction show an apparent effect of porosity variation with depth on the hydraulic response to rainfall. Using a range of physical properties consistent with our laboratory and field measurements, we perform sensitivity analyses to investigate the effects of variation in physical and hydraulic properties of the soil on rainfall infiltration, pore-pressure response, and, hence, slope stability. For a two-layer-system in which the hydraulic conductivity of the upper layer is at least 10 times greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, and the infiltration rate is greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, a perched water table forms above the layer boundary potentially destabilizing the upper layer of soil. Two-dimensional modeling results indicate that the addition of a simple trench drain to the same two-layer slope has differing effects on the hydraulic response depending on the initial pressure head conditions. For slope-parallel flow conditions

  14. Drainage effects on the transient, near-surface hydrologic response of a steep hillslope to rainfall: implications for slope stability, Edmonds, Washington, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biavati

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow landslides on steep (>25° hillsides along Puget Sound have resulted in occasional loss of life and costly damage to property during intense or prolonged rainfall. As part of a larger project to assess landslide hazards in the Seattle area, the U.S. Geological Survey instrumented two coastal bluff sites in 2001 to observe the subsurface hydrologic response to rainfall. The instrumentation at one of these sites, near Edmonds, Washington, consists of two rain gauges, two water-content probes that measure volumetric water content at eight depths between 0.2 and 2.0 m, and two tensiometer nests that measure soil-water suction at six depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 m. Measurements from these instruments are used to test one- and two-dimensional numerical models of infiltration and groundwater flow. Capillary-rise tests, performed in the laboratory on soil sample from the Edmonds site, are used to define the soil hydraulic properties for the wetting process. The field observations of water content and suction show an apparent effect of porosity variation with depth on the hydraulic response to rainfall. Using a range of physical properties consistent with our laboratory and field measurements, we perform sensitivity analyses to investigate the effects of variation in physical and hydraulic properties of the soil on rainfall infiltration, pore-pressure response, and, hence, slope stability. For a two-layer-system in which the hydraulic conductivity of the upper layer is at least 10 times greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, and the infiltration rate is greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, a perched water table forms above the layer boundary potentially destabilizing the upper layer of soil. Two-dimensional modeling results indicate that the addition of a simple trench drain to the same two-layer slope has differing effects on the hydraulic response depending on the initial pressure head conditions. For slope

  15. Cost and cost effectiveness of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets - a model-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulkki-Brännström Anni-Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization recommends that national malaria programmes universally distribute long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs. LLINs provide effective insecticide protection for at least three years while conventional nets must be retreated every 6-12 months. LLINs may also promise longer physical durability (lifespan, but at a higher unit price. No prospective data currently available is sufficient to calculate the comparative cost effectiveness of different net types. We thus constructed a model to explore the cost effectiveness of LLINs, asking how a longer lifespan affects the relative cost effectiveness of nets, and if, when and why LLINs might be preferred to conventional insecticide-treated nets. An innovation of our model is that we also considered the replenishment need i.e. loss of nets over time. Methods We modelled the choice of net over a 10-year period to facilitate the comparison of nets with different lifespan (and/or price and replenishment need over time. Our base case represents a large-scale programme which achieves high coverage and usage throughout the population by distributing either LLINs or conventional nets through existing health services, and retreats a large proportion of conventional nets regularly at low cost. We identified the determinants of bed net programme cost effectiveness and parameter values for usage rate, delivery and retreatment cost from the literature. One-way sensitivity analysis was conducted to explicitly compare the differential effect of changing parameters such as price, lifespan, usage and replenishment need. Results If conventional and long-lasting bed nets have the same physical lifespan (3 years, LLINs are more cost effective unless they are priced at more than USD 1.5 above the price of conventional nets. Because a longer lifespan brings delivery cost savings, each one year increase in lifespan can be accompanied by a USD 1 or more increase in price

  16. Submarine slope failures due to pipe structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Judith; Berndt, Christian; Rüpke, Lars; Krastel, Sebastian; Gross, Felix; Geissler, Wolfram H

    2018-02-19

    There is a strong spatial correlation between submarine slope failures and the occurrence of gas hydrates. This has been attributed to the dynamic nature of gas hydrate systems and the potential reduction of slope stability due to bottom water warming or sea level drop. However, 30 years of research into this process found no solid supporting evidence. Here we present new reflection seismic data from the Arctic Ocean and numerical modelling results supporting a different link between hydrates and slope stability. Hydrates reduce sediment permeability and cause build-up of overpressure at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. Resulting hydro-fracturing forms pipe structures as pathways for overpressured fluids to migrate upward. Where these pipe structures reach shallow permeable beds, this overpressure transfers laterally and destabilises the slope. This process reconciles the spatial correlation of submarine landslides and gas hydrate, and it is independent of environmental change and water depth.

  17. A Different Pitch to Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbert, William

    2017-01-01

    The query "When are we ever going to use this?" is easily answered when discussing the slope of a line. The pitch of a roof, the grade of a road, and stair stringers are three applications of slope that are used extensively. The concept of slope, which is introduced fairly early in the mathematics curriculum has hands-on applications…

  18. EPA-Registered Bed Bug Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat your bed bug infestation. Foggers and bug bombs should not be used as the only method ... effective but take some time to kill the population); or Bed bugs’ becoming resistant to a specific ...

  19. Transient Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Reactor with a Fixed Bed of Catalyst Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analysis of small temperature disturbances in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor with a fixed bed of catalyst particles various scenarios of thermal instability were investigated. There are two possible scenarios of thermal instability of the reactor. First, thermal explosion may occur due to growth of temperature disturbances inside a catalytic granule. Second scenario connected with loss of thermal stability as a result of an initial increase in temperature in the reactor volume. The boundaries of thermal stability of the reactor were estimated by solving the eigenvalue problems for spherical catalyst particles and cylindrical reactor. Processes of diffusional resistance inside the catalytic granule and heat transfer from wall of the reactor tube are taken into account. Estimation of thermal stability area is compared with the results of numerical simulation of behavior of temperature and concentration of synthesis gas.

  20. Fluidized bed material apples at disposal levels: effects on an apple orchard. [Malus domestica Borkh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korcak, R.F.

    Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion represents and economical technology for the burning of high S fossil fuel. The combustion residue is a dry, alkaline material resulting from the burning of coal (or other fuel source) and limestone. Although the residue has been assessed as a limestone substitute, the current study examines the potential for disposing of relatively large quantities. Fluidized bed material (FBM) was applied at two rates to the surface area within the rows of an established apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) orchard containing four tree types. The rates were either 9.2 kg/m/sup 2/ (low rate), 36 kg/m/sup 2/ (high rate), or untreated control. The tree types used were Spuree Rome on M9, Redchief Delicious on M9 or M9/MM106, and Sturdeespur Delicious on M9. Cumulative yields (kg/tree) were enhanced on three of four tree types over a period of 6 yr. A 15% reduction in yield was noted for Redchief Delicious on M9/MM106 stocks at the high FBM rate. No nutritional related problems were noted for this or any other of the tree types used. Part of the yield reduction noted was due to fruit size differences and/or differential sensitivity of this interstock/rootstock combination to the altered soil chemical properties. Generally, amended soil pH increased to about 7.0 for either rate, and electrical conductivity increased five fold at the high rate of FBM addition. Agricultural utilization of large volume (up to 112 Mg/ha) of FBM, compared to past research where FBM was used as a lime substitute (2-6 mg/ha), appears to be a feasible alternative. However, rootstock selection for apple may need to consider the resultant changes in soil chemical status from FBM additions.

  1. The Effects of Three Sessions of Running on a Negative Slope on Serum Levels of Liver Enzymes in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rezaei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three sessions of running on a negative slope (eccentric contraction on changes of the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanin aminotransferaze (ALT in adult male rats. Materials and Methods: 20 adult male rats were divided randomly into two equal groups (exercise and control. Levels of AST and ALT in both groups were measured in a fasting state, 24 hours before and 24 hours after the last session of training.Results: Exercise increased the levels of serum AST and ALT enzymes, significantly (p<0.05.Conclusion: Eccentric exercise, without allowing enough time for returning to the pre-exercise state, leads to the damage of some body organs such as the liver.

  2. Symmetry energy, its density slope, and neutron-proton effective mass splitting at normal density extracted from global nucleon optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, it is shown that both the symmetry energy E sym (ρ) and its density slope L(ρ) at normal density ρ 0 are completely determined by the nucleon global optical potentials. The latter can be extracted directly from nucleon-nucleus scatterings, (p,n) charge-exchange reactions, and single-particle energy levels of bound states. Averaging all phenomenological isovector nucleon potentials constrained by world data available in the literature since 1969, the best estimates of E sym (ρ 0 )=31.3 MeV and L(ρ 0 )=52.7 MeV are simultaneously obtained. Moreover, the corresponding neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter of isospin asymmetry δ is estimated to be (m n * -m p * )/m=0.32δ.

  3. Effect of Heterogeneity in Coal Ash Chemical Composition on the Onset of Conditions Favorable for Agglomeration in Fluid Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi B. Khadilkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ash agglomeration issues that arise due to the sticking of slag-wetted, colliding particles have been creating operational difficulties and monetary losses for the fluidized bed combustion (FBC industry. Difficulties have been experienced in the detection of slag-liquid at the low operating temperatures in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs and predicting the agglomeration behavior of fuel. This study aims to study the effect of heterogeneity in ash composition on the detection of slag-liquid in FBCs. It quantifies the slag-liquid amounts at the particle-level, under oxidizing environments, by dividing the bulk fuel into density classes. FactSage™ thermodynamic simulations of each of the particle classes, along with experimental validation of the trends with thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD were performed. The results obtained can be used to estimate the stickiness of particles in the development of ash agglomeration models based on particle collisions. The study of these particle classes shows that particle classes with specific minerals can form low temperature eutectics and lead to onset of slag-liquid formation at temperatures below those predicted by bulk analysis alone. Comparison of the differences in slag-liquid formation tendencies under reducing and oxidizing environments is also presented.

  4. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  5. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M.; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW

  6. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: Effects of -6 degree head-down tilt bed rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Lin eRao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals’ risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants’ risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning.

  7. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification in a packed bed reactor: effects of hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Lee, K H; Park, K Y; Maeng, S K

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen dissolution and hydrogenotrophic denitrification performance were investigated in a lab-scale packed bed reactor (PBR) by varying the hydrogen flow rate and hydraulic retention time (HRT). The denitrification performance was enhanced by increasing the hydrogen flow rate and HRT as a result of high dissolved hydrogen concentration (0.39mg/L) and utilization efficiencies (79%). In this study, the hydrogen-to-water flow rate ratio (Q(g)/Q(w)) was found to be a new operating factor representing the two parameters of hydrogen flow rate and HRT. Hydrogen dissolution and denitrification efficiency were nonlinearly and linearly correlated with the Q(g)/Q(w), respectively. Based on its excellent linear correlation with denitrification efficiency, Q(g)/Q(w) should be greater than 2.3 to meet the WHO's guideline of nitrate nitrogen for drinking water. This study demonstrates that Q(g)/Q(w) is a simple and robust factor to optimize hydrogen-sparged bioreactors for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomechanical Effects of Posterior Condylar Offset and Posterior Tibial Slope on Quadriceps Force and Joint Contact Forces in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Tak Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the biomechanical effect of the posterior condylar offset (PCO and posterior tibial slope (PTS in posterior-stabilized (PS fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA. We developed ±1, ±2, and ±3 mm PCO models in the posterior direction and −3°, 0°, 3°, and 6° PTS models using a previously validated FE model. The influence of changes in the PCO and PTS on the biomechanical effects under deep-knee-bend loading was investigated. The contact stress on the PE insert increased by 14% and decreased by 7% on average as the PCO increased and decreased, respectively, compared to the neutral position. In addition, the contact stress on post in PE insert increased by 18% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6°. However, the contact stress on the patellar button decreased by 11% on average as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all different PCO cases. The quadriceps force decreased by 14% as PTS increased from −3° to 6° in all PCO models. The same trend was found in patellar tendon force. Changes in PCO had adverse biomechanical effects whereas PTS increase had positive biomechanical effects. However, excessive PTS should be avoided to prevent knee instability and subsequent failure.

  9. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  10. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  11. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-colonise and stabilise slopes affected by superficial soil failure with plants essential requirements have to be met: the plants must grow the plants must survive sustainably plant succession must start and continuously develop These requirements, however, are anything but easy given, particularly under the often hostile environmental conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. Mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, are said to improve the plants' ability to overcome periods governed by strongly (growth) limiting factors. Subsequently, results of investigations are presented of mycorrhizal effects on different plant and soil functions related to eco-engineering in general and soil and slope stabilisation in particular. Generally, inoculation yielded higher biomass of the host plants above as well as below ground. Furthermore, the survival rate was higher for mycorrhized compared to non-mycorrhized plants, particularly under extreme environmental conditions. However, the scale of the mycorrhizal impact may be species specific of both the plant host as well as the fungal partner(s) and often becomes evident only after a certain time lag. Depending on the plant-fungus combination the root length per soil volume was found to be between 0 and 2.5 times higher for inoculated compared to non-inoculated specimens. On an alpine graded ski slope the survival of inoculated compared to non-treated Salix herbacea cuttings was significant after one vegetation period only for one of the three added mycorrhizal fungus species. However, after three years all of the inoculated plantlets performed significantly better than the non-inoculated controls. The analysis of the potential for producing and stabilising soil aggregates of five different ectomycorrhizal fungi showed high variation and, for the species Inocybe lacera, no significant difference compared to untreated soil. Furthermore, inoculation of Salix

  12. Effect of HCO3- concentration on anammox nitrogen removal rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Vabamäe, Priit; Kroon, Kristel; Loorits, Liis; Saluste, Alar; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-01-01

    Anammox biomass enriched in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) fed by actual sewage sludge reject water and synthetically added NO2- was used to study the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of the anammox process depending on bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration. MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1100 g N m(-3) d(-1) when the optimum HCO3- concentration (910 mg L(-1)) was used. The average reaction ratio of NO2- removal, NO3- production and NH4+ removal were 1.18/0.20/1. When the HCO3- concentration was increased to 1760mg L(-1) the TN removal rate diminished to 270 g N m(-3) d(-1). The process recovered from bicarbonate inhibition within 1 week. The batch tests performed with biomass taken from the MBBR showed that for the HCO3- concentration of 615 mg L(-1) the TN removal rate was 3.3 mg N L(-1) h(-1), whereas for both lower (120 mg L(-1)) and higher (5750 mg L(-1)) HCO3- concentrations the TN removal rates were 2.3 (+/- 0.15) and 1.6 (+/- 0.12) mg N L(-1) d(-1), respectively. PCR and DGGE analyses resulted in the detection of uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 and, surprisingly, low-oxygen-tolerant aerobic ammonia oxidizers. The ability of anammox bacteria for mixotrophy was established by diminished amounts of nitrate produced when comparing the experiments with an organic carbon source and an inorganic carbon source.

  13. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (pirrigated groups (K=5.6%, S=5.1% vs. without irrigation groups K=9.4%, S=9.3%). The first K drill generated more heat than the remaining drills. No significant differences were detected among temperature values in any of the analyzed drill groups. Unlike irrigation, drill use and type were observed to have no significant impact on heat generation. The stainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440.

  14. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  15. Effects of Bed Type, Corm Weight and Lifting Time on Quantitative and Qualitative Criteria of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mollafiilabi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Saffron (Crocus sativus L. as the most important medicinal and agricultural crop of the world has therapeutic properties including laxative, stomach stimulant, anti cancer, anti inflammation and against spasm. One of the reasons of lower yield in traditional farms of Iran is using small corms of old farms. Combining the date of corm lifting and the duration of 25°C incubation, corms could be flowered from early September to mid-December. The results showed that corm weight of saffron affects significantly on flowering and yield. Soils covered by mulch or surface mulch compared with soils lack of mulch have a higher thermal adjustment so that in higher ambient temperature the soil can be warm later and at night they lose their warmth later. This research was conducted to find the effects of corm weight, planting beds under hydroponics at commercial level and determination of the best time of corm lifting from farm and its transfer for production and their interaction under controlled conditions on yield and other characters of this precious crop. Material and Methods In order to study effects of corm weight and time of its lifting from farm in planting beds an experiment was conducted as factorial in the form of RCBD in three replicates at the agric. Research complex of Fadak and Research Institute of Food Science and Technology (RIFST in 2010. Factors under study were: two corm weights (8 to 10 and more than 10 g, two planting beds (stone wool and peat moss and six lifting times (mid June, early July, mid July, early August , mid August and early October. For 40 days, 457 corms per m-2 were stored in incubation with 85% relative humidity and 25°C temperature at the darkness. Then, saffron corms were transferred in growth chamber with 17° C in 8/16 h light and dark. Characteristics such as number of flower, fresh weight of flower, dry weight of flower, fresh and dry weight of stigma, fresh and dry weight of style, fresh and dry

  16. Effects of 3-day bed rest on physiological responses to graded exercise in athletes and sedentary men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kaminska, E.; Cybulski, G.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed-rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status, 12 sedentary men and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to 3-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise test until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously, and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate concentration ([LA]), epinephrine concentration ([Epi]), norepinephrine concentration ([NE]), plasma renin activity (PRA), human growth hormone concentration ([hGH]), testosterone, and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes than in the remaining groups (17 vs. 10%). Decrements in VO(2 peak) correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, P physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  17. The effects of agglomeration/defluidization on emission of heavy metals for various fluidized parameters in fluidized-bed incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chih-Hung [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, 811 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The agglomeration/defluidization may be produced to generate the secondary pollutant during incineration. However, the effects of agglomeration/defluidization on heavy metal distribution have rarely been examined. Therefore, the effects of the agglomeration/defluidization process on heavy metal emission in flue gas are studied. The artificial waste is employed to simulate municipal waste and to form agglomerates, which contain alkali metals, earth alkali metals, a mixture of metals (Pb, Cr and Cd) and sawdust. The fluidized parameters (including gas velocity, sand particle size and static bed height) are varied to determine their influences on heavy metal emission. The results indicate that addition of Na increases the risk of agglomeration/defluidization, but the emission concentration of heavy metals decreases during agglomeration/defluidization. The heavy metals may react with Na to form the eutectics or are covered and adhered by the liquid-phase eutectics of Na to stay in sand particle and lead to a decrease in the emission of heavy metals. The system was operated at a low gas velocity that not only easily resulted in agglomeration/defluidization but also increased the emission concentration of heavy metals. Large particles (920 {mu}m), which have a poor fluidized quality, had the highest emission concentration. Small particles (645 {mu}m) were uniformly fluidized to enhance the fluidization quality and to decrease the emission concentration. Additionally, adding Ca did not decrease the heavy metal emission concentration, but maintained the fluidization during eutectic accumulation. The Ca prevented the sand bed from quickly achieving defluidization and prolonged the increased emission of heavy metals after defluidization. (author)

  18. [Treatment effect of biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system on greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Rui; Xiang, Kun; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    Unorganized discharge of greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater has brought several negative influences on the ecological environment in the rural area of Yangtze River Delta. Biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system is a potential ecological method for greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater treatment. In order to explore the feasibility of this system and evaluate the contribution of vegetable uptake of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in treating greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater, three types of vegetables, including Ipomoea aquatica, lettuce and celery were selected in this study. Results showed the combined system had a high capacity in simultaneous removal of organic matter, N and P. The removal efficiencies of COD, NH4(+)-N, TN and TP from the wastewater reached up to 93.2%-95.6%, 97.2%-99.6%, 73.9%-93.1% and 74.9%-90.0%, respectively. System with I. aquatica had the highest efficiencies in N and P removal, followed by lettuce and celery. However, plant uptake was not the primary pathway for TN arid TP removal in the combined system. The vegetable uptake of N and P accounted for only 9.1%-25.0% of TN and TP removal from the wastewater while the effect of microorganisms would be dominant for N and P removal. In addition, the highest amounts of N and P uptake in I. aquatica were closely related with the biomass of plant. Results from the study indicated that the biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system was an effective approach to treating greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater in China.

  19. Effect of acidity and elevated PCO2 on acid. Neutralization within pulsed limestone bed reactors receiving coal mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Schwartz, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), but its use has been restricted by slow dissolution rates and sensitivity to scale forming reactions that retard transport of H+ at the solid-liquid interface. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) remediation process designed to circumvent these problems through use of intermittently fluidized beds of granular limestone and elevated carbon dioxide pressure. PLB limestone dissolution (LD, mg/L), and effluent alkalinity (Alk, mg/L) were correlated with reactor pressure (PCO2, kPa), influent acidity (Acy, mg/L) and reactor bed height (H, cm) using a prototype capable of processing 10 L/min. The PLB process effectively neutralized sulfuric acid acidity over the range of 6-1033 mg/L (as CaCO3) while generating high concentrations of alkalinity (36-1086 mg/L) despite a hydraulic residence time of just 4.2-5.0 min. Alk and LD (mg/L CaCO3) rose with increases in influent acidity and PCO2 (p < 0.001) according to the models: Alk = 58 + 38.4 (PCO2)0.5 + 0.080 (Acy) - 0.0059(PCO2) 0.5 (Acy); LD = 55 + 38.3 (PCO2)0.5 + 1.08 (Acy) - 0.0059 (PCO2)0.5 (Acy). Alkalinity decreased at an increasing rate with reductions in H over the range of 27.3-77.5 cm (p < 0.001). Carbon dioxide requirements (Q(avg)CO2, L/min) increased with PCO2 (p < 0.001) following the model Q(avg)CO2 = 0.858 (PCO2)0.620, resulting in a greater degree of pH buffering (depression) within the reactors, a rise in limestone solubility and an increase in limestone dissolution related to carbonic acid attack. Corresponding elevated concentrations of effluent alkalinity allow for sidestream treatment with blending. Numerical modeling demonstrated that carbon dioxide requirements are reduced as influent acidity rises and when carbon dioxide is recovered from system effluent and recycled. Field trials demonstrated that the PLB process is capable of raising the pH of AMD above that

  20. Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.

  1. Role of slope on infiltration: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2018-02-01

    Partitioning of rainfall at the soil-atmosphere interface is important for both surface and subsurface hydrology, and influences many events of major hydrologic interest such as runoff generation, aquifer recharge, and transport of pollutants in surface waters as well as the vadose zone. This partitioning is achieved through the process of infiltration that has been widely investigated at the local scale, and more recently also at the field scale, by models that were designed for horizontal surfaces. However, infiltration, overland flows, and deep flows in most real situations are generated by rainfall over sloping surfaces that bring in additional effects. Therefore, existing models for local infiltration into homogeneous and layered soils and those as for field-scale infiltration, have to be adapted to account for the effects of surface slope. Various studies have investigated the role of surface slope on infiltration based on a theoretical formulations for the dynamics of infiltration, extensions of the Green-Ampt approach, and from laboratory and field experiments. However, conflicting results have been reported in the scientific literature on the role of surface slope on infiltration. We summarize the salient points from previous studies and provide plausible reasons for discrepancies in conclusions of previous authors, thus leading to a critical assessment of the current state of our understanding on this subject. We offer suggestions for future efforts to advance our knowledge of infiltration over sloping surfaces.

  2. Performance of bed-load transport equations relative to geomorphic significance: Predicting effective discharge and its transport rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Barry; John M. Buffington; Peter Goodwin; John .G. King; William W. Emmett

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies assessing the accuracy of bed-load transport equations have considered equation performance statistically based on paired observations of measured and predicted bed-load transport rates. However, transport measurements were typically taken during low flows, biasing the assessment of equation performance toward low discharges, and because equation...

  3. Effects of Long-term Conservation Tillage on Soil Nutrients in Sloping Fields in Regions Characterized by Water and Wind Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunjian; Cao, Xue; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Weiyu; Feng, Yongzhong; Qiao, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and yield, a long-term experiment was set up in a region affected by water and wind erosion on the Loess Plateau. The treatments used were traditional tillage (CK), no tillage (NT), straw mulching (SM), plastic-film mulching (PM), ridging and plastic-film mulching (RPM) and intercropping (In). Our results demonstrate that the available nutrients in soils subjected to non-traditional tillage treatments decreased during the first several years and then remained stable over the last several years of the experiment. The soil organic matter and total nitrogen content increased gradually over 6 years in all treatments except CK. The nutrient content of soils subjected to conservative tillage methods, such as NT and SM, were significantly higher than those in soils under the CK treatment. Straw mulching and film mulching effectively reduced an observed decrease in soybean yield. Over the final 6 years of the experiment, soybean yields followed the trend RPM > PM > SM > NT > CK > In. This trend has implications for controlling soil erosion and preventing non-point source pollution in sloping fields by sacrificing some food production.

  4. Effects of Long-term Conservation Tillage on Soil Nutrients in Sloping Fields in Regions Characterized by Water and Wind Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunjian; Cao, Xue; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Weiyu; Feng, Yongzhong; Qiao, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and yield, a long-term experiment was set up in a region affected by water and wind erosion on the Loess Plateau. The treatments used were traditional tillage (CK), no tillage (NT), straw mulching (SM), plastic-film mulching (PM), ridging and plastic-film mulching (RPM) and intercropping (In). Our results demonstrate that the available nutrients in soils subjected to non-traditional tillage treatments decreased during the first several years and then remained stable over the last several years of the experiment. The soil organic matter and total nitrogen content increased gradually over 6 years in all treatments except CK. The nutrient content of soils subjected to conservative tillage methods, such as NT and SM, were significantly higher than those in soils under the CK treatment. Straw mulching and film mulching effectively reduced an observed decrease in soybean yield. Over the final 6 years of the experiment, soybean yields followed the trend RPM > PM > SM > NT > CK > In. This trend has implications for controlling soil erosion and preventing non-point source pollution in sloping fields by sacrificing some food production.

  5. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of acetic acid injection and operating conditions on NO emission in a vortexing fluidized bed combustor using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuping Qian; Chiensong Chyang; Weishen Yen [Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan (China). School of Civil Engineering and Architecture

    2009-07-15

    The effects of acetic acid injection and operating conditions on NO emission were investigated in a pilot scale vortexing fluidized bed combustor (VFBC), an integration of circular freeboard and a rectangular combustion chamber. Operating conditions, such as the stoichiometric oxygen in the combustion chamber, the bed temperature and the injecting location of acetic acid, were determined by means of response surface methodology (RSM), which enables the examination of parameters with a moderate number of experiments. In RSM, NO emission concentration after acetic acid injection and NO removal percentage at the exit of the VFBC are used as the objective function. The results show that the bed temperature has a more important effect on the NO emission than the injecting location of acetic acid and the stoichiometric oxygen in the combustion chamber. Meanwhile, the injecting location of acetic acid and the stoichiometric oxygen in the combustion chamber have a more important effect on the NO removal percentage than the bed temperature. NO emission can be decreased by injecting the acetic acid into the combustion chamber, and NO emission decreases with the height of the acetic acid injecting location above the distributor. On the other hand, NO removal percentage increases with the height of the acetic acid injecting location, and NO emission increases with the stoichiometric oxygen in the combustion chamber and the bed temperature. NO removal percentage increases with the stoichiometric oxygen, and increases first, then decreases with the bed temperature. Also, a higher NO removal percentage could be obtained at 850{sup o}C. 26 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, R., E-mail: remi.clavier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chikhi, N., E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SAG/LEPC, Cadarache bât. 700, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Université de Toulouse – INPT – UPS – Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS – IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  8. Modified Limiting Equilibrium Method for Stability Analysis of Stratified Rock Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stratified rock of Jurassic strata is widely distributed in Three Gorges Reservoir Region. The limit equilibrium method is generally utilized in the stability analysis of rock slope with single failure plane. However, the stratified rock slope cannot be accurately estimated by this method because of different bedding planes and their variable shear strength parameters. Based on the idealized model of rock slope with bedding planes, a modified limiting equilibrium method is presented to determine the potential sliding surface and the factor of safety for the stratified rock slope. In this method, the S-curve model is established to define the spatial variations of the shear strength parameters c and  φ of bedding plane and the tensile strength of rock mass. This method was applied in the stability evaluation of typical stratified rock slope in Three Gorges Reservoir Region, China. The result shows that the factor of safety of the case study is 0.973, the critical sliding surface for the potential slip surface appears at bedding plane C, and the tension-controlled failure occurs at 10.5 m to the slope face.

  9. Slope failure simulations with MPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Wang, B.; Hicks, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The simulation of slope failures, including both failure initiation and development, has been modelled using the material point method (MPM). Numerical case studies involving various slope angles, heterogeneity and rainfall infiltration are presented. It is demonstrated that, by utilising a

  10. Slope Failure Simulations with MPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Wang, B.; Hicks, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The simulation of slope failures, including both failure initiation and development, has been modelled using the material point method. By utilising a constitutive model which encompasses, in a simplified manner, both pre- and post-failure behaviour, the majority of types of geotechnical slope

  11. the Modeling of Hydraulic Jump Generated Partially on Sloping Apron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Abdulatif Jalil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling aims to characterize system behavior and achieve simulation close as possible of the reality. The rapid energy exchange in supercritical flow to generate quiet or subcritical flow in hydraulic jump phenomenon is important in design of hydraulic structures. Experimental and numerical modeling is done on type B hydraulic jump which starts first on sloping bed and its end on horizontal bed.  Four different apron slopes are used, for each one of these slopes the jump is generated on different locations by controlling the tail water depth.  Modelling validation is based on 120 experimental runs which they show that there is reliability. The air volume fraction which creates in through hydraulic jump varied between 0.18 and 0.28. While the energy exchanges process take place within 6.6, 6.1, 5.8, 5.5 of the average relative jump height for apron slopes of 0.18, 0.14, 0.10, 0.07 respectively. Within the limitations of this study, mathematical prediction model for relative hydraulic jump height is suggested.The model having an acceptable coefficient of determination.

  12. Modeling the effects of pulsed versus chronic sand inputs on salmonid spawning habitat in a low-gradient gravel-bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar Maturana; Daniele Tonina; James A. McKean; John M. Buffington; Charles H. Luce; Diego Caamano

    2013-01-01

    It is widely recognized that high supplies of fine sediment, largely sand, can negatively impact the aquatic habitat quality of gravel-bed rivers, but effects of the style of input (chronic vs. pulsed) have not been examined quantitatively. We hypothesize that a continuous (i.e. chronic) supply of sand will be more detrimental to the quality of aquatic habitat than an...

  13. Effects of permethrin-treated bed nets on immunity to malaria in western Kenya II. Antibody responses in young children in an area of intense malaria transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariuki, Simon K.; Lal, Altaf A.; Terlouw, Dianne J.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Ong'echa, John M. O.; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; Orago, Alloys S. S.; Kolczak, Margarette S.; Hawley, William A.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Shi, Ya Ping

    2003-01-01

    As part of a large community-based trial on the impact of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed nets (ITNs) on childhood morbidity and mortality in an area of intense perennial malaria transmission in western Kenya, we assessed the effects of ITNs on malaria-specific humoral responses in young

  14. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, Daniel I.; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding corn DDGS to the dairy cow diet as well as the bedding types (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) on manure fugitive CH4 emissions. The incorporation of DDGS in the diet has increased manure methane emission by 15% and the use of peat moss as bedding has increased manure methane emission by 27%. Abstract The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH4 emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH4 emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05) for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH4 emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH4 emissions. PMID:26479012

  15. Effects of droplet size and type of binder on the agglomerate growth mechanisms by melt agglomeration in a fluidised bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Anette; Holm, Per; Schaefer, Torben

    2002-08-01

    This study was performed in order to evaluate the effects of binder droplet size and type of binder on the agglomerate growth mechanisms by melt agglomeration in a fluidised bed granulator. Lactose monohydrate was agglomerated with melted polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 or Gelucire 50/13 (esters of polyethylene glycol and glycerol), which was atomised at different nozzle air flow rates giving rise to median droplet sizes of 40, 60, and 80 microm. Different product temperatures were investigated, below the melting range, in the middle of the melting range, and above the melting range for each binder. The agglomerates were found to be formed by initial nucleation of lactose particles immersed in the melted binder droplets. Agglomerate growth occurred by coalescence between nuclei followed by coalescence between agglomerates. Complex effects of binder droplet size and type of binder were seen at low product temperatures. Low product temperatures resulted in smaller agglomerate sizes, because the agglomerate growth was counteracted by very high binder viscosity or solidification of the binder. At higher product temperatures, neither the binder droplet size nor the type of binder had a clear effect on the final agglomerate size.

  16. Fluidized bed ash and passive treatment reduce the adverse effects of acid mine drainage on aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Clint M; Nairn, Robert W

    2010-10-15

    Elevated concentrations of acidity and metals in acid mine drainage (AMD) may be effectively addressed by active and passive treatment technologies. However, typical evaluations consider only chemical water quality with little if any regard for biological metrics. Robust evaluations including both chemical and biological indicators of water quality improvement are needed. In this study, injection of alkaline fluidized bed ash (FBA) into a flooded underground coal mine was coupled with a five-cell passive treatment system to ameliorate an abandoned AMD discharge in eastern Oklahoma. The passive system included process units promoting both aerobic and anaerobic treatment mechanisms. Resulting water quality changes and biological responses were evaluated. Organisms of two distinct functional groups (the filter-feeding mollusk Corbicula fluminea and the wide-spectrum feeding fish Lepomis macrochirus) were exposed to mine waters in several treatment cells. The combination of treatment technologies was hypothesized to limit potential negative effects on these aquatic organisms. Tissues were harvested and analyzed for concentrations of several metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Ni, Cu and Zn) of interest. Organismal responses, such as hepatosomatic index, condition factor, and condition index, did not vary significantly among organisms exposed within different treatment cells when compared to non-AMD impaired waters. Metal tissue accumulation trends, compared to aqueous concentrations, were observed for Fe, Ni and Zn. Exposure experiments with these two organisms indicated that FBA introductions coupled with passive treatment decreased the potential adverse effects of AMD to biological systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost-effective nanoporous Agar-Agar polymer/Nickel powder composite particle for effective bio-products adsorption by expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Setareh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2014-09-26

    In the present work a novel kind of dense nanoporous composite matrix for expanded bed application has been successfully first prepared with Nickel powder as a densifier and was covered with Agar-Agar layer as a skeleton, through the method of water-in-oil emulsification. Agar-Agar is a porous and inexpensive polymer. In order to fabricate cost-effective adsorbent with favorable qualities Agar-Agar polymer was used. Thereafter, the customized composite particle was modified by pseudo-affinity dye-ligand, Reactive Blue 4 (RB4), aimed at preparing a pseudo-affinity adsorbent (RB4-Agar-Ni) for bioprodut adsorption from aqueous solution. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was selected as a model protein to investigate the adsorption behavior in batchwise and expanded bed chromatography, and the obtained results were evaluated with that of Streamline™ (Amersham-Pharmacia Biotech, Sweden). Spherical appearance and porous structure of composite particles were observed by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results suggested that the matrices followed the logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 65-300 μm and average diameter of 126.81-151.47 μm, proper wet density of 1.64-2.78 g/ml, water content of 62.74-34%, porosity of 98-90% and pore size of about 38-130 nm. For better comprehension of the impact of solid phase properties on the performance of the expanded bed, the expansion and hydrodynamic properties of a composite matrix with a series of densities was evaluated and estimated by the retention time distribution method (RTD) in an expanded bed and was compared with that of other matrices. According to obtained results the expansion factors under the same fluid velocity decreased by increasing the matrix density. Moreover, the axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) is the most appropriate parameter for evaluating the stability of expanded bed, on various operating conditions, such as different flow velocity, bed expansion

  18. An alternative soil nailing system for slope stabilization: Akarpiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun-Lan; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    This research proposes an innovative solution for slope stabilization with less environmental footprint: AKARPILES. In Malaysia, landslide has become common civil and environmental problems that cause impacts to the economy, safety and environment. Therefore, effective slope stabilization method helps to improve the safety of public and protect the environment. This study focused on stabilizing surfacial slope failure. The idea of AKARPILES was generated from the tree roots system in slope stabilization. After the piles are installed in the slope and intercepting the slip plane, grout was pumped in and discharged through holes on the piles. The grout then filled the pores in the soil with random flow within the slip zone. SKW mixture was used to simulate the soil slope. There were two designs being proposed in this study and the prototypes were produced by a 3D printer. Trial mix of the grout was carried out to obtain the optimum mixing ratio of bentonite: cement: water. A series of tests were conducted on the single-pile-reinforced slope under vertical slope crest loading condition considering different slope gradients and nail designs. Parameters such as ultimate load, failure time and failure strain were recorded and compared. As comparison with the unreinforced slope, both designs of AKARPILES showed better but different performances in the model tests.

  19. Effects of uncertain topographic input data on two-dimensional modeling of flow hydraulics, habitat suitability, and bed mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; McDonald, R.; Kyriakidis, P. C.; Nelson, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical models of flow and sediment transport increasingly are used to inform studies of aquatic habitat and river morphodynamics. Accurate topographic information is required to parameterize such models, but this fundamental input is typically subject to considerable uncertainty, which can propagate through a model to produce uncertain predictions of flow hydraulics. In this study, we examined the effects of uncertain topographic input on the output from FaSTMECH, a two-dimensional, finite difference flow model implemented on a regular, channel-centered grid; the model was applied to a simple, restored gravel-bed river. We adopted a spatially explicit stochastic simulation approach because elevation differences (i.e., perturbations) at one node of the computational grid influenced model predictions at nearby nodes, due to the strong coupling between proximal locations dictated by the governing equations of fluid flow. Geostatistical techniques provided an appropriate framework for examining the impacts of topographic uncertainty by generating many, equally likely realizations, each consistent with a statistical model summarizing the variability and spatial structure of channel morphology. By applying the model to each realization in turn, a distribution of model outputs was generated for each grid node. One set of realizations, conditioned to the available survey data and progressively thinned versions thereof, was used to quantify the effects of sampling strategy on topographic uncertainty and hence the uncertainty of model predictions. This analysis indicated that as the spacing between surveyed cross-sections increased, the reach-averaged ensemble standard deviation of water surface elevation, depth, velocity, and boundary shear stress increased as well, for both baseflow conditions and for a discharge of ~75% bankfull. A second set of realizations was generated by retaining randomly selected subsets of the original survey data and used to investigate the

  20. Studying the effect of medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy on the posterior slope of tibia among patients with Genu varum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Raza Sharifzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background A slight change in the posterior slope of tibia results in complications such as limited movement of knee joint and higher risks of Osteoarthritis. Aims The present research seeks to study levels of tibia’s posterior slope change and limited movement of knee joint and knee stability following medial open wedge osteotomy used to treat patients with genu varum. Methods The present research is a clinical trial conducted in the form of a before and after study on patients with genu varum resorting to Imam Reza (PBUH, Khanevade, and Fajr hospitals from 2009 to 2012. As many as 40 knees (32 patients were studied and the posterior slope of tibia before and after medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy was measured by someone totally unaware of the research using true lateral radiography. Movement limitation and stability of the knee was measured before and after the operation using scope of motion and Lachman and Drawer test. Paired sample test was used in this research and SPSS was used to analyse the data. Results The average posterior slope of tibia before the operation was 9.912, while this value changed to 11.625 after the operation signifying a significant increase. In terms of limited knee joint movement, 7 patients were diagnosed with grade 5 Extension LAG after operation, while the remaining 33 patients had a normal motion range (Extension LAG=0. Conclusion Medial open wedge osteotomy above tibia can help increase the posterior slope of tibia.

  1. GIS-based modelling of (all) glacier beds in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsbauer, A.; Paul, F.; Hoelzle, M.; Haeberli, W.

    2009-04-01

    Due to the ongoing and expected future increase in global mean temperature, the Alpine environment will continue to get further away from equilibrium. Glaciers are a part of the high-mountain cryosphere, and their changes are considered to be the best natural indicators of climatic changes. The calculation and visualization of future glacier development is thus an important task of communicating climate change effects to a wider public. One of the most challenging topics in the assessment of climate change impacts on future glacier development is the unknown glacier bed and the related uncertainties in glacier volume estimations (Driedger and Kennard, 1986). In this respect, an estimated topography of the glacier bed would facilitate the calculation of glacier volume, the detection of local depressions, and the visualization of future ice-free grounds. We here present a simple but robust GIS-tool which allows to calculate an approximate bed topography for a large sample of glaciers. The only input used is a DEM, glacier outlines, and a set of flow lines. The method is based on the calculation of the ice thickness along selected points of the flow lines from the shallow ice approximation and subsequent spatial interpolation using topogrid and is independent of glacier size, type or climatic setting. The generated ice thickness distribution is in good agreement with direct measurements (GPR profiles) and results from more sophisticated methods that include assumptions on glacier flow. However, local derivations exist due to the very sensitive dependence on surface slope.

  2. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date interrill erosion processes and regimes are not fully understood. The objectives are to 1) identify the erosion regimes and limiting processes between detachment and transport on steep slopes, 2) characterize the interactive effects between rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment trans...

  3. RMS slope of exponentially correlated surface roughness for radar applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    In radar signature analysis, the root mean square (RMS) surface slope is utilized to assess the relative contribution of multiple scattering effects. For an exponentially correlated surface, an effective RMS slope can be determined by truncating the high frequency tail of the roughness spectrum...

  4. Effect of gravitational acceleration, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the structure of the intestinal vascular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments comparing single and combined effects of hypokinesia and gravitational acceleration on morphology of intestinal blood vessels are discussed. Results indicate that hypokinesia has a whole body nonspecific effect reflected even in an organ whose activity shows little or no change due to hypokinesia. In early hypokinetic stages blood redistribution caused anorexia, intestinal atonia, and secretory disruption. Destructive changes from further exposure include aneurisms, varicoses, extravascular movement of blood elements, and vascular wall muscle fiber degeneration. The effect of acceleration is greatest in the ventrodorsal direction. Changes due to acceleration then hypokinesia are like those due to hypokinesia alone; changes due to acceleration before and after hypokinesia are like those due to acceleration. Adaptation raises acceleration tolerance but the effects do not survive four-week hypokinesia.

  5. Model tests of geosynthetic reinforced slopes in a geotechnical centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aklik, P.

    2012-01-01

    Geosynthetic-reinforced slopes and walls became very popular in recent years because of their financial, technical, and ecological advantages. Centrifuge modelling is a powerful tool for physical modelling of reinforced slopes and offers the advantage to observe the failure mechanisms of the slopes. In order to replicate the gravity induced stresses of a prototype structure in a geometrically 1/N reduced model, it is necessary to test the model in a gravitational field N times larger than that of the prototype structure. In this dissertation, geotextile-reinforced slope models were tested in a geotechnical centrifuge to identify the possible failure mechanisms. Slope models were tested by varying slope inclination, tensile strengths of the geotextiles, and overlapping lengths. Photographs of the geotextile reinforced slope models in flight were taken with a digital camera and the soil deformations of geotextile reinforced slopes were evaluated with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experimental results showed that failure of the centrifuge models initiated at midheight of the slope, and occurred due to geotextile breakage instead of pullout. The location of the shear surface is independent of the tensile strength of the geotextile; it is dependent on the shear strength of the soil. It is logical to see that the required acceleration of the centrifuge at slope failure was decreased with increasing slope inclination. An important contribution to the stability of the slope models was provided by the overlapping of the geotextile layers. It has a secondary reinforcement effect when it was prolonged and passed through the shear surface. Moreover, the location of the shear surface observed with PIV analysis exactly matches the tears of the retrieved geotextiles measured carefully after the centrifuge testing. It is concluded that PIV is an efficient tool to instrument the slope failures in a geotechnical centrifuge.(author) [de

  6. The influence of bed roughness on partial alluviation in an experimental bedrock channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Demeter, G. I.; Johnson, J. P.; Whipple, K. X.

    2005-12-01

    The extent of alluvial cover on a bedrock channel bed strongly influences the efficiency of river incision, and can affect the quality of habitat for aquatic ecosystems. The extent of partial cover is commonly modeled as a simple function of sediment supply relative to the transport capacity of the stream, although other factors are likely to be important, particularly the roughness of the underlying bedrock surface. Here we report results of a set of laboratory experiments investigating the influence of bedrock channel bed topography on the dynamics of partial bed alluviation. The experiments were conducted in a tilting flume 8 m long and 0.3 m wide with an erodible bedrock bed made of a sand-cement mixture. The flume has a calibrated sediment feed and a double-basket sediment trap that provides a continuous record of sediment flux out of the downstream end. We used a uniform grain size of 5 mm, and varied the sediment supply rate from zero to that sufficient to create a fully alluviated bed. We created a variety of bedrock roughness conditions, from smooth, nearly planar surfaces to an egg-carton texture made with a plaster-coated foam mold. Intermediate roughness was achieved by chiseling into smooth beds and by allowing the bed topography to evolve by sustained bedload abrasion. We used a laser microtopography scanning device to make topographic maps of the bed surface, with a vertical resolution of 0.2 mm and a horizontal spacing of 5 mm. From these data we quantify bedrock bed roughness as the standard deviation of the distribution of bed elevations relative to a plane inclined at the mean bed slope. To guide our selection of bed roughness values we made topographic surveys of a number of bedrock channel beds, including partially alluviated channels where we dug trenches through alluvial deposits to expose the underlying bedrock surface. For each bed roughness condition we systematically varied the sediment supply rate and repeatedly mapped the extent of

  7. Wall-Roughness Effects on Flow and Scouring in Curved Channels with Gravel Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Hersberger, D.; Franca, Mário J.; Schleiss, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Due to a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, the outer banks of river bends are predisposed to erosion. When endangering civil structures, preventing measures to mitigate this erosion are thus required. Vertical ribs at protection walls for scour reduction have been applied to several flood protection projects in mountain rivers; nevertheless, no systematic and intensive study has been presented so far to evaluate their effect. This paper investigates experimentally the effect of vertical...

  8. Stability Analysis for Loosened Rock Slope of Jinyang Grand Buddha in Taiyuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, Jinzhong; TIAN, Xiaofu; GUAN, Xudong; YU, Yonggui; YANG, Xiusheng

    On the basis of the status quo of Jinyang Grand Buddha in Taiyuan, some factors such as topography, geological structures, climate, hydrology, and engineering geology that influence the stability of the Buddha slope are considered, and several working situations of the slope that possibly suffered are presented in this article. The Buddha slope stands upright and the rock masses are composed of thick Permian sandstone, which dips slightly inward to the slope. Affected by both the incision of regional joints and the load relief to the free surface, the rock mass of the Buddha slope has turned into loosened blocks. Numerical stability analysis by FLAC-2D on the basis of the strength reduction method reveals that the localized deformation of the rock masses near the vertical surface of the slope may trigger reversing of rock beddings making the back dip slope convert into a dip slope with the possibility of plane sliding failure. Furthermore, the pseudostatic method for the dynamic process and limit equilibrium method for the static process are applied to different working situations of the Buddha slope. The analytical results illustrate that plane sliding failure will not occur when the slope is affected only by seism. However, water filling in the cracks of the loosened rock mass may greatly contribute to the potential plane sliding failure. When horizontal seism-force and hydrostatic pressure are coupled, the Buddha slope can hardly keep stable. Additionally, the loosened rock masses are prone to block toppling failure when influenced by the seism force.

  9. Dynamic model development and validation for a nitrifying moving bed biofilter: Effect of temperature and influent load on the performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Weijma, Jan; Spanjers, Henri

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model with adequate complexity integrating hydraulics, biofilm and microbial conversion processes is successfully developed for a continuously moving bed biofilter performing tertiary nitrification. The model was calibrated and validated using data from Nether Stowey pilot plant...

  10. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  11. Mechanisms of Neuroplasticity and Ethanol's Effects on Plasticity in the Striatum and Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, David M; Kash, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic function (i.e., synaptic plasticity) have long been thought to contribute to information storage in the nervous system. Although synaptic plasticity mainly has adaptive functions that allow the organism to function in complex environments, it is now clear that certain events or exposure to various substances can produce plasticity that has negative consequences for organisms. Exposure to drugs of abuse, in particular ethanol, is a life experience that can activate or alter synaptic plasticity, often resulting in increased drug seeking and taking and in many cases addiction.Two brain regions subject to alcohol's effects on synaptic plasticity are the striatum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), both of which have key roles in alcohol's actions and control of intake. The specific effects depend on both the brain region analyzed (e.g., specific subregions of the striatum and BNST) and the duration of ethanol exposure (i.e., acute vs. chronic). Plastic changes in synaptic transmission in these two brain regions following prolonged ethanol exposure are thought to contribute to excessive alcohol drinking and relapse to drinking. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this plasticity may lead to new therapies for treatment of these and other aspects of alcohol use disorder.

  12. Effects of heat exchanger tubes on hydrodynamics and CO 2 capture of a sorbent-based fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Canhai; Xu, Zhijie; Li, Tingwen; Lee, Andrew; Dietiker, Jean-François; Lane, William; Sun, Xin

    2017-12-01

    In virtual design and scale up of pilot-scale carbon capture systems, the coupled reactive multiphase flow problem must be solved to predict the adsorber’s performance and capture efficiency under various operation conditions. This paper focuses on the detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of a pilot-scale fluidized bed adsorber equipped with vertical cooling tubes. Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFiX), an open-source multiphase flow CFD solver, is used for the simulations with custom code to simulate the chemical reactions and filtered models to capture the effect of the unresolved details in the coarser mesh for simulations with reasonable simulations and manageable computational effort. Previously developed two filtered models for horizontal cylinder drag, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics have been modified to derive the 2D filtered models representing vertical cylinders in the coarse-grid CFD simulations. The effects of the heat exchanger configurations (i.e., horizontal or vertical) on the adsorber’s hydrodynamics and CO2 capture performance are then examined. The simulation result subsequently is compared and contrasted with another predicted by a one-dimensional three-region process model.

  13. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Short-term measures for runoff water control on sloping land (temporary ditches and grass strips in controlling soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The agronomic measures made obligatory by the cross-compliance Standard Temporary measures for runoff water control on sloping land included in the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MiPAAF decree on cross compliance until 2008, and by Standard 1.1 Creation of temporary ditches for the prevention of soil erosion in the 2009 decree, certainly appear to be useful for the control of soil erosion and runoff. The efficacy of temporary drainage ditches and of grass strips in controlling runoff and erosion has been demonstrated in trials conducted in field test plots in Italy. When level temporary drainage ditches are correctly built, namely with an inclination of not more than 2.5% in relation to the maximum hillslope gradient, they allow the suspended sediment eroded upstream to settle in the ditches, retaining the material carried away on the slope and, as a result, reducing the quantity of sediment delivered to the hydrographic network. In particular, among all the results, the erosion and runoff data in a trial conducted in Guiglia (Modena showed that in corn plots, temporary drainage ditches reduced soil erosion by 94%, from 14.4 Mg ha-1 year-1 (above the limit established by the NRCS-USDA of 11.2 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 0.8 Mg ha-1 year-1 (within the NRCS limit and also within the more restrictive limit established by the OECD of 6.0 Mg ha-1 year-1. With respect to the grass buffer strips the most significant research was carried out in Volterra. This research demonstrated their efficacy in reducing erosion from 8.15 Mg ha-1 to 1.6 Mg ha-1, which is approximately 5 times less than the erosion observed on bare soil. The effectiveness of temporary drainage ditches was also assessed through the application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE erosion model to 60 areas under the control of the Agency for Agricultural Payments (AGEA in 2009, comparing the risk of erosion in these sample areas by simulating the presence and

  14. Individual and combined effects of water quality and empty bed contact time on As(V) removal by a fixed-bed iron oxide adsorber: implication for silicate precoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2012-10-15

    The individual and combined effects of changes in water quality (i.e. pH, initial concentrations of arsenate (As(V)) and competing ions) and empty bed contact time (EBCT) on As(V) removal performance of a fixed-bed adsorber (FBA) packed with a nanostructured goethite-based granular porous adsorbent were systematically studied under environmentally relevant conditions. Rapid small scale column tests (RSSCTs) were extensively conducted at different EBCTs with synthetic waters in which pH and the concentrations of competing ions (phosphate, silicate, and vanadate) were controlled. In the absence of the competing ions, the effects of initial As(V) concentration, pH, and EBCT on As(V) breakthrough curves were successfully predicted by the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) with adsorption isotherms predicted by the extended triple layer model (ETLM). The interference effects of silicate and phosphate on As(V) removal were strongly influenced by pH, their concentrations, and EBCT. In the presence of silicate (≤21 mg/L as Si), a longer EBCT surprisingly resulted in worse As(V) removal performance. We suggest this is because silicate, which normally exists at much higher concentration and moves more quickly through the bed than As(V), occupies or blocks adsorption sites on the media and interferes with later As(V) adsorption. Here, an alternative operating scheme of a FBA for As(V) removal is proposed to mitigate the silicate preloading. Silicate showed a strong competing effect to As(V) under the tested conditions. However, as the phosphate concentration increased, its interference effect dominated that of silicate. High phosphate concentration (>100 μg/L as P), as experienced in some regions, resulted in immediate As(V) breakthrough. In contrast to the observation in the presence of silicate, longer EBCT resulted in improved As(V) removal performance in the presence of phosphate. Vanadate was found to compete with As(V) as strongly as phosphate. This study

  15. Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.; Rowe, J.

    1980-02-01

    The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases.

  16. Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, J.; Rowe, J.

    1980-02-01

    The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases

  17. Numerical simulation of scale-up effects of methanol-to-olefins fluidized bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan; Luo, Hao

    2017-01-01

    factors and is expected to speed up the experiment-based scale-up process with lower cost. In this study, we aim to investigate the scale-up effects through simulations of a series of methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reactors of different sizes. The two-fluid model and energy-minimization multi-scale (EMMS...

  18. Caffeine effects on sleep taken 0, 3, or 6 hours before going to bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Christopher; Roehrs, Timothy; Shambroom, John; Roth, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Sleep hygiene recommendations are widely disseminated despite the fact that few systematic studies have investigated the empirical bases of sleep hygiene in the home environment. For example, studies have yet to investigate the relative effects of a given dose of caffeine administered at different times of day on subsequent sleep. This study compared the potential sleep disruptive effects of a fixed dose of caffeine (400 mg) administered at 0, 3, and 6 hours prior to habitual bedtime relative to a placebo on self-reported sleep in the home. Sleep disturbance was also monitored objectively using a validated portable sleep monitor. Results demonstrated a moderate dose of caffeine at bedtime, 3 hours prior to bedtime, or 6 hours prior to bedtime each have significant effects on sleep disturbance relative to placebo (p sleep time suggests that caffeine taken 6 hours before bedtime has important disruptive effects on sleep and provides empirical support for sleep hygiene recommendations to refrain from substantial caffeine use for a minimum of 6 hours prior to bedtime.

  19. The effect of bed roughness on the free surface of an open channel flow and implications for remotely monitoring river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erika; Cowen, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    The effect of increased bed roughness on the free surface turbulence signature of an open channel flow is investigated with the goal of incorporating the findings into a methodology to remotely monitor volumetric flow rates. Half of a wide (B = 2 m) open channel bed is covered with a 3 cm thick layer of loose gravel (D50 = 0.6 cm). Surface PIV (particle image velocimetry) experiments are conducted for a range of flow depths (B/H = 10-30) and Reynolds numbers (ReH = 10,000-60,000). It is well established that bed roughness in wall-bounded flows enhances the vertical velocity fluctuations (e.g. Krogstad et al. 1992). When the vertical velocity fluctuations approach the free surface they are redistributed (e.g. Cowen et al. 1995) to the surface parallel component directions. It is anticipated and confirmed that the interaction of these two phenomena result in enhanced turbulence at the free surface. The effect of the rough bed on the integral length scales and the second order velocity structure functions calculated at the free surface are investigated. These findings have important implications for developing new technologies in stream gaging.

  20. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Packed Beds with Uniform Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    Point contact models for the effective thermal conductivity of porous media with uniform spherical inclusions have been briefly reviewed. The model of Zehner and Schlunder (1970) has been further validated with recent experimental data over a broad range of conductivity ratio from 8 to 1200 and over a range of solids fraction up to about 0.8. The comparisons further confirm the validity of Zehner-Schlunder model, known to be applicable for conductivity ratios less than about 2000, above which area contact between the particles becomes significant. This validation of the Zehner-Schlunder model has implications for its use in the prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of water frost (with conductivity ratio around 100) which arises in many important areas of technology.

  1. Clinical evaluation of an automated turning bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, H I; Langemo, D; Hanson, D; Olson, B; Hunter, S

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess client comfort and sleep quality, client physiologic response (skin and respiratory status), the effect on the need for caregiver assistance, and cost when using an automated turning bed. Nonexperimental, evaluative study. Twenty-four adult home or long-term care resident subjects who had a degenerative disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy, or back surgery. Each subject agreed to use the automated turning bed for four weeks. Researchers completed a demographic survey and skin assessment, and assessed each subject for pressure ulcer risk and for the need of assistance of a care giver for turning before and after the four weeks of using the turning bed. Subjects rated the turning bed in terms of comfort and sleep quality. Subjects rated the turning bed as more comfortable than their own bed and expressed satisfaction at the pain relief attained when on the turning bed. While using the turning bed, there was a significant improvement in sleep quality. No skin breakdown or deterioration in respiratory status occurred. Fewer subjects required the assistance of a caregiver for turning when on the turning bed. This automated turning bed shows great promise in meeting a need for patients with limited mobility whether they are homebound or in a residential community. Future studies that further investigate use of the turning bed for postoperative back patients while still in the acute care setting are indicated. Replicative studies with a larger sample size are also indicated.

  2. Application of principal component analysis enables to effectively find important physical variables for optimization of fluid bed granulator conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Iwao, Yasunori; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2011-05-16

    Principal component analysis was applied to effectively optimize the operational conditions of a fluidized bed granulator for preparing granules with excellent compaction and tablet physical properties. The crucial variables that affect the properties of the granules, their compactability and the resulting tablet properties were determined through analysis of a series of granulation and tabletting experiments. Granulation was performed while the flow rate and concentration of the binder were changed as independent operational variables, according to a two-factor central composite design. Thirteen physicochemical properties of granules and tablets were examined: powder properties (particle size, size distribution width, Carr's index, Hausner ratio and aspect ratio), compactability properties (pressure transmission ratio, die wall force and ejection force) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, disintegration time, weight variation and drug content uniformity). Principal component analysis showed that the pressure transmission ratio, die wall force and Carr's index were the most important variables in granule preparation. Multiple regression analysis also confirmed these results. Furthermore, optimized operational conditions obtained from the multiple regression analysis enabled the production of granules with desirable properties for tabletting. This study presents the first use of principle component analysis for identifying and successfully predicting the most important variables in the process of granulation and tabletting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Steam-air fluidized bed gasification of distillers grains: Effects of steam to biomass ratio, equivalence ratio and gasification temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Eskridge, Kent; Jones, David D; Hanna, Milford A

    2009-03-01

    In this study, thermochemical biomass gasification was performed on a bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Distillers grains, a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstock for the gasification. The goal was to investigate the effects of furnace temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition, carbon conversion efficiency and energy conversion efficiency of the product gas. The experiments were conducted using a 3x3x3 full factorial design with temperatures of 650, 750 and 850 degrees C, steam to biomass ratios of 0, 7.30 and 14.29 and equivalence ratios of 0.07, 0.15 and 0.29. Gasification temperature was found to be the most influential factor. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents, carbon conversion and energy efficiencies. Increasing equivalence ratio decreased the hydrogen content but increased carbon conversion and energy efficiencies. The steam to biomass ratio was optimal in the intermediate levels for maximal carbon conversion and energy efficiencies.

  4. On the effect of cross sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of sediments in fixed bed channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Mir-Jafar-Sadegh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The condition of incipient motion and deposition are of the essential issues for the study of sediment transport. This phenomenon is of great importance to hydraulic engineers for designing sewers, drainage, as well as other rigid boundary channels. This is a study carried out with the objectives of describing the effect of cross-sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of particles in rigid boundary channels. In this research work, the experimental data given by Loveless (1992 and Mohammadi (2005 are used. On the basis of the critical velocity approach, a new incipient motion equation for a V-shaped bottom channel and incipient deposition of sediment particles equations for rigid boundary channels having circular, rectangular, and U-shaped cross sections are obtained. New equations were compared to the other incipient motion equations. The result shows that the cross-sectional shape is an important factor for defining the minimum velocity for no-deposit particles. This study also distinguishes incipient motion of particles from incipient deposition for particles. The results may be useful for designing fixed bed channels with a limited deposition condition.

  5. Effects of solar collecting area and water flow rate on the performance of a sand bed solar collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maganhar, A.L.; Memon, A.H.; Panhwar, M.I.

    2005-01-01

    The often discussed renewable sources of energy have been great interest to energy researchers and planners for quite some time. The primary of renewing all sources of energy is the sun. There have been two main problems not yet fully resolved. One is the large scale production of energy and other is the cost factor. In the present study, the cost factor is under consideration. In this regard a non-conventional solar collector using indigenous material (pit sand) as solar absorber is designed and manufactured. This paper presents the results of an investigation of the effect of solar collecting area and water flow rate on the performance of a pit sand bed solar collector especially in terms of rise in water temperature. Three pit sand solar collectors of area 1m/sup 2/ each were connected in series to enhance the collecting area and the system was tested for different flow rates. Experimental results proved that there was increase in water temperature with increase in solar collecting area an decreases in water temperature with increase in flow rate. (author)

  6. Biomass gasification in atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed: effect of the type of gasifying agent on the product distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, J.; Aznar, M.P.; Caballero, M.A. [University of Saragossa (Spain). Chemical and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Corella, J. [University ' ' Complutense' ' of Madrid (Spain). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the type of gasifying agent used in biomass gasification on product distribution (gas, char and tar yields) and gas quality (Contents in H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4},..., tars) is analyzed. Gasifying agents taken into account are: air, pure steam, and steam-O{sub 2} mixtures. Process considered is biomass gasification in atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed. Previous results by Herguido et al. (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 1992; 31(2): 1274-82), Gil et al. (Energy and Fuels 1997; 11(6): 1109-18) and Narvaez et al. (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 1996; 35(7): 2110-20) are compared. Such authors carried their research on biomass gasification under similar conditions but varying the gasifying agent. Three different gasifying agent-to-biomass ratios are needed and used to compare results. The relationships between the H{sub 2}, CO,..., tar contents in the flue gas and the type and amount of gasifying agent used are shown after a careful analysis. (author)

  7. Slope failure investigation management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Highway slopes are exposed to a variety of environmental and climatic conditions, such as deforestation, cycles of : freezing and thawing weather, and heavy storms. Over time, these climatic conditions, in combination with other : factors such as geo...

  8. Light and Dark Slope Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    21 July 2004 Dark slope streaks are a common feature on slopes thickly-mantled by dust, especially in the Tharsis, Arabia, and western Amazonis regions of Mars. Less common are light-toned slope streaks, which often occur in the same area as dark streaks. They are most common in Arabia Terra, and some are shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Slope streaks are probably the result of sudden avalanches of extremely dry dust. The behavior of the avalanching dust is somewhat fluid-like, and new streaks have been observed to form over intervals of a few months to a Mars year. This image is located near 13.4oN, 340.3oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Compost for steep slope erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to develop guidelines for maintenance erosion control measures for steep slopes. The study focused on evaluating and monitoring KY-31 fescue germination rates using two media treatments 1) 100 percent by weight compost and 2)...

  10. Effects of dwarf pine stands on slope deformation processes, as a basis for their management in the Hrubý Jeseník Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roštínský, Pavel; Šenfeldr, M.; Maděra, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 63-83 ISSN 1803-2427 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0004 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : hazardous slope deformation * non-indigenous dwarf pine * management approach Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www.journaloflandscapeecology.cz/index.php?page= issues

  11. Application of the Time-Dependent Mild-Slope Equations for the Simulation of Wake Effects in the Lee of a Farm of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beels, Charlotte; Troch, Peter; Visch, Kenneth De

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent mild-slope equations have been extensively used to compute wave transformations near coastal and offshore structures for more than 20 years. Recently the wave absorption characteristics of a Wave Energy Converter (abbreviated as WEC) of the overtopping type have been implemented...

  12. Nitrogen isotopic composition of plants and soil in an arid mountainous terrain: south slope versus north slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen cycling is tightly associated with environment. The south slope of a given mountain could significantly differ from north slope in environment. Thus, N cycling should also be different between the two slopes. Since leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil (Δδ15Nleaf-soil =  leaf δ15N − soil δ15N could reflect the N cycling characteristics, we put forward a hypothesis that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil should differ between the two slopes. However, such a comparative study between two slopes has never been conducted. In addition, environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N derived from studies at global scale were often found to be different from those on a regional scale. This led to our argument that environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N could depend on local environment. To confirm our hypothesis and argument, we measured leaf and soil δ15N on the south and north slopes of Tian Shan. Remarkable environmental differences between the two slopes provided an ideal opportunity for our test. The study showed that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and δ15Nleaf-soil on the south slope were greater than those on the north slope, although the difference in soil δ15N was not significant. The result confirmed our hypothesis and suggested that the south slope has higher soil N transformation rates and soil N availability than the north slope. In addition, in this study it was observed that the significant influential factors of leaf δ15N were temperature, precipitation, leaf N, leaf C ∕ N, soil moisture and silt ∕ clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope only leaf C ∕ N was related to leaf δ15N. The significant influential factors of soil δ15N were temperature, precipitation, soil moisture and silt ∕ clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope, mean annual precipitation and soil moisture exerted significant effects. Precipitation exerted contrary effects on soil

  13. Nitrogen isotopic composition of plants and soil in an arid mountainous terrain: south slope versus north slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chongjuan; Jia, Yufu; Chen, Yuzhen; Mehmood, Imran; Fang, Yunting; Wang, Guoan

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen cycling is tightly associated with environment. The south slope of a given mountain could significantly differ from north slope in environment. Thus, N cycling should also be different between the two slopes. Since leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil (Δδ15Nleaf-soil = leaf δ15N - soil δ15N) could reflect the N cycling characteristics, we put forward a hypothesis that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil should differ between the two slopes. However, such a comparative study between two slopes has never been conducted. In addition, environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N derived from studies at global scale were often found to be different from those on a regional scale. This led to our argument that environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N could depend on local environment. To confirm our hypothesis and argument, we measured leaf and soil δ15N on the south and north slopes of Tian Shan. Remarkable environmental differences between the two slopes provided an ideal opportunity for our test. The study showed that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and δ15Nleaf-soil on the south slope were greater than those on the north slope, although the difference in soil δ15N was not significant. The result confirmed our hypothesis and suggested that the south slope has higher soil N transformation rates and soil N availability than the north slope. In addition, in this study it was observed that the significant influential factors of leaf δ15N were temperature, precipitation, leaf N, leaf C / N, soil moisture and silt / clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope only leaf C / N was related to leaf δ15N. The significant influential factors of soil δ15N were temperature, precipitation, soil moisture and silt / clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope, mean annual precipitation and soil moisture exerted significant effects. Precipitation exerted contrary effects on soil δ15N between the two slopes. Thus, this study

  14. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi 2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  15. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  16. Biomass pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: Effects of pyrolysis parameters on product yields and characterization of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aysu, Tevfik; Küçük, M. Maşuk

    2014-01-01

    Slow pyrolysis of eastern giant fennel (Ferula orientalis L.) stalks has been performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with (ZnO, Al 2 O 3 ) and without catalyst at six different temperatures ranging from 350 °C to 600 °C with heating rates of 15, 30, 50 °C/min. The amounts of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by FT-IR and GC–MS. The effects of pyrolysis parameters such as temperature, catalyst and ratio of catalyst, particle size (D p ) and sweeping gas flow rate on product yields were investigated. According to results, temperature and catalyst seem to be the main factors effecting the conversion of F. orientalis L. into solid, liquid and gaseous products. The highest liquid yield (45.22%) including water was obtained with 15% zinc oxide catalyst at 500 °C temperature at a heating rate of 50 °C/min when 0.224 > D p > 0.150 mm particle size raw material and 100 cm 3 /min of sweeping gas flow rate were used. - Highlights: • Ferula orientalis L. stalks were converted to solid, liquid and gaseous products. • Effects of various parameters on product yields were investigated. • 500 °C of temperature, heating rate of 50 °C/min and zinc oxide provide the optimum conditions for bio-oil formation. • 81 different compounds were identified by GC–MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500 °C

  17. The use of a rigid disc to protect exposed structures in wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy: effects on wound bed pressure and microvascular blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anesäter, Erik; Borgquist, Ola; Torbrand, Christian; Roupé, K Markus; Ingemansson, Richard; Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing reports of deaths and serious complications associated with the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Bleeding may occur in patients when NPWT is applied to a wound with exposed blood vessels or vascular grafts, possibly due to mechanical deformation and hypoperfusion of the vessel walls. Recent evidence suggests that using a rigid barrier disc to protect underlying tissue can prevent this mechanical deformation. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of rigid discs on the tissue exposed to negative pressure with regard to tissue pressure and microvascular blood flow. Peripheral wounds were created on the backs of eight pigs. The pressure and microvascular blood flow in the wound bed were measured when NPWT was applied. The wound was filled with foam, and rigid discs of different designs were inserted between the wound bed and the foam. The discs were created with or without channels (to accommodate exposed sensitive structures such as blood vessels and nerves), perforations, or a porous dressing that covered the underside of the discs (to facilitate pressure transduction and fluid evacuation). When comparing the results for pressure transduction to the wound bed, no significant differences were found using different discs covered with dressing, whereas pressure transduction was lower with bare discs. Microvascular blood flow in the wound bed decreased by 49 ± 7% when NPWT was applied to control wounds. The reduction in blood flow was less in the presence of a protective disc (e.g., -6 ± 5% for a dressing-covered, perforated disc, p = 0.006). In conclusion, NPWT causes hypoperfusion of superficial tissue in the wound bed. The insertion of a rigid barrier counteracts this effect. The placement of a rigid disc over exposed blood vessels or nerves may protect these structures from rupture and damage. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Effective bulk and surface temperatures of the catalyst bed of FT-IR cells used for in situ and operando studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoguang; Rivallan, Mickael; Thibault-Starzyk, Frederic; Travert, Arnaud; Meunier, Frederic C

    2013-05-21

    The temperature prevailing in the catalyst bed of three different IR spectroscopic reaction cells was assessed by means of thermocouples, an optical pyrometer and reaction rate measurements. One of the cells was a custom-made transmission FT-IR cell for use with thin wafers and the two others were commercial Harrick and Spectra-Tech diffuse reflectance FT-IR (DRIFTS) cells used for the analysis of powdered samples. The rate of CO methanation measured over a 16 wt% Ni/alumina catalyst was used as a means to derive the effective temperature prevailing in the IR cells from that existing in a traditional (non-spectroscopic) reactor having a well-controlled temperature. The sample bed of these three IR cells exhibited a significantly lower temperature than that of the corresponding measure thermocouple, which was yet located in or close to the sample bed. The comparison of Arrhenius plots enabled us to determine a temperature correction valid over a large temperature range. The use of an optical pyrometer was assessed with a view to determining the temperature of the surface of the powdered beds and that at the centre of the wafer. The optical pyrometer proved useful in the case of the catalyst powder, which behaved as a black non-reflecting body. In contrast, the temperature reading was inaccurate in the case of the pressed wafer, probably due to the shiny surface and minute thickness of the wafer, which led to a significant portion of the IR radiation of the surroundings being reflected by and transmitted through the wafer. The optical pyrometer data showed that the temperature of the surface of the powdered beds was significantly lower than that of the bulk of the bed, and that the total flow rate and composition did not affect this value. This work emphasises that the effective bed temperature in spectroscopic cells can be significantly different from that given by measure thermocouples, even when located in the vicinity of the sample, but that the calibration

  19. Analysis of Rainfall Infiltration Law in Unsaturated Soil Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-rong; Qian, Ya-jun; Wang, Zhang-chun; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering the characteristics of slope and rainfall, the key factors affecting rainfall infiltration of slope, including hydraulic properties, water storage capacity (θ s - θ r), soil types, rainfall intensities, and antecedent and subsequent infiltration rates on unsaturated soil slope, are discussed by using theory analysis and numerical simulation technology. Based on critical factors changing, this paper presents three calculation models of rainfall infiltrability for unsaturated slope, including (1) infiltration model considering rainfall intensity; (2) effective rainfall model considering antecedent rainfall; (3) infiltration model considering comprehensive factors. Based on the technology of system response, the relationship of rainfall and infiltration is described, and the prototype of regression model of rainfall infiltration is given, in order to determine the amount of rain penetration during a rain process. PMID:24672332

  20. Analysis of Covariance and Randomized Block Design with Heterogeneous Slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockars, Alan J.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2001-01-01

    Compared the Type I error rate and the power to detect differences in slopes and additive treatment effects of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and randomized block designs through a Monte Carlo simulation. Results show that the more powerful option in almost all simulations for tests of both slope and means was ANCOVA. (SLD)

  1. Hybrid moving bed biofilm reactors: an effective solution for upgrading a large wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been a growing attention regarding the receiving water body quality state. As a matter of a fact, the Directive 91/271 of the European Union (EU) replaced the "emission standard" concept that fixes discharge limits depending on polluting emission characteristics, with the "stream standard" concept that fixes discharge limits for each polluting substance depending on self-depurative characteristics of the RWB. In this context, several WWTPs need to be upgraded in order to meet stricter effluent limits. The need of WWTP upgrading was also emphasized by the growing urbanization that have led, in most cases, to get overloaded WWTP due to an overcoming of the maximum WWTP capacity. In order to upgrade existing WWTP basically two main possibilities can be chosen: building new tanks or modify the WWTP by introducing new technologies such as the HMBBR systems. In this paper, such latter possibility was explored and as a case study an existing Italian WWTP (Acqua dei Corsari) located in Palermo (IT) was analysed. The main goal was to test the effectiveness of HMBBR systems with respect to the WWTP upgrading. The survey was carried out by means of model simulation and an HMBBR pilot plant. This latter was employed for the evaluation of the model parameters as well as kinetic coefficients for the HMBBR. The model results are encouraging towards the WWTP upgrading by means of HMBBR. As a matter of fact, the model simulation results showed that the WWTP maximum capacity can be upgraded from 480,000 up to one million PE.

  2. The sloping land conversion program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen; Lan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Through addressing the motivations behind rural households’ livelihood diversification, this paper examines the effect of the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on livelihood diversification using a longitudinal household survey data set spanning the overall implementation of the SLCP. Our...... results show that the SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention to increase rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that the implementation of the SLCP has had heterogeneous effects on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower...

  3. Nitrate removal, communities of denitrifiers and adverse effects in different carbon substrates for use in denitrification beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Sören; Schipper, Louis A.; Matiasek, Michael G.; Scow, Kate M.; Cameron, Stewart; Bruesewitz, Denise A.; McDonald, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Denitrification beds are containers filled with wood by-products that serve as a carbon and energy source to denitrifiers, which reduce nitrate ( NO3−) from point source discharges into non-reactive dinitrogen (N2) gas. This study investigates a range of alternative carbon sources and determines rates, mechanisms and factors controlling NO3− removal, denitrifying bacterial community, and the adverse effects of these substrates. Experimental barrels (0.2 m3) filled with either maize cobs, wheat straw, green waste, sawdust, pine woodchips or eucalyptus woodchips were incubated at 16.8 °C or 27.1 °C (outlet temperature), and received NO3− enriched water (14.38 mg N L−1 and 17.15 mg N L−1). After 2.5 years of incubation measurements were made of NO3−−N removal rates, in vitro denitrification rates (DR), factors limiting denitrification (carbon and nitrate availability, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and concentrations of NO3−, nitrite and ammonia), copy number of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK ) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ ) genes, and greenhouse gas production (dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane), and carbon (TOC) loss. Microbial denitrification was the main mechanism for NO3−−N removal. Nitrate–N removal rates ranged from 1.3 (pine woodchips) to 6.2 g N m−3 d−1 (maize cobs), and were predominantly limited by C availability and temperature (Q10 = 1.2) when NO3−−N outlet concentrations remained above 1 mg L−1. The NO3−−N removal rate did not depend directly on substrate type, but on the quantity of microbially available carbon, which differed between carbon sources. The abundance of denitrifying genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ ) was similar in replicate barrels under cold incubation, but varied substantially under warm incubation, and between substrates. Warm incubation enhanced growth of nirS containing bacteria and bacteria that lacked the nosZ gene, potentially explaining the greater N2O emission in warmer

  4. Effect of Superficial Gas Velocity on the Solid Temperature Distribution in Gas Fluidized Beds with Heat Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaei, Mohammad; Jegers, Jeroen; van Sint Annaland, Martin; Kuipers, Johannes A M; Deen, Niels G

    2017-08-02

    The hydrodynamics and heat transfer of cylindrical gas-solid fluidized beds for polyolefin production was investigated with the two-fluid model (TFM) based on the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF). It was found that the fluidized bed becomes more isothermal with increasing superficial gas velocity. This is mainly due to the increase of solids circulation and improvement in gas solid contact. It was also found that the average Nusselt number weakly depends on the gas velocity. The TFM results were qualitatively compared with simulation results of computational fluid dynamics combined with the discrete element model (CFD-DEM). The TFM results were in very good agreement with the CFD-DEM outcomes, so the TFM can be a reliable source for further investigations of fluidized beds especially large lab-scale reactors.

  5. Morphological characteristics of overdeepenings in high-mountain glacier beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberli, Wilfried; Cochachin, Alejo; Fischer, Urs; Giráldez, Claudia; Linsbauer, Andreas; Salazar, Cesar

    2014-05-01

    Overdeepenings, i.e. closed topographic depressions with adverse slopes in the flow direction, are characteristic for glacier beds and glacially sculpted landscapes. Besides their importance as geomorphological landforms, groundwater bodies and sedimentary archives, they are of increasing interest in relation to climate-induced lake formation in de-glaciating landscapes and to depth erosion under ice age conditions in connection with the long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories in some mid-latitude countries. Quantitative predictions of their shape, distribution and conditions of occurrence, however, remain difficult. One major problem thereby relates to the still unsatisfactory treatment in glacier erosion theory of sediment evacuation at glacier beds, especially by subglacial meltwater. An alternative way of searching for realistic/empirical quantitative estimates is, therefore, to analyse the geometry of well-documented overdeepenings. The present study attempts to do this by combining statistical analyses of (a) detailed bathymetries from recently exposed lakes in the Peruvian Andes, (b) numerous bed overdeepenigs below still existing glaciers of the Swiss Alps and the Himalaya-Karakoram region modelled with a robust shear stress approximation linking surface slope to ice thickness at high resolution, and (c, for comparison) reconstructed overdeepenings produced by ice age glaciers in the Swiss Plateau based on numerous drillings and geophysical soundings. The sample of (a) has the advantage that geometries are exactly measured and only subject to young/small sedimentation effects. Sample (b) allows for a comparison with a modern model calculation and with known glacier characteristics. Sample (c) may provide some insights into the question how safely results from high mountain topography can be transferred to sites with markedly different topographic, climatic and glaciological controls (cold-arid lowland). Where possible, mean and maximum values of

  6. Thermomechanical forcing of deep rock slope deformation: 1. Conceptual study of a simplified slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin S.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Evans, Keith F.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Thermo-elastic rock slope deformation is often considered to be of relatively minor importance and limited to shallow depths subject to seasonal warming and cooling. In this study, we demonstrate how thermomechanical (TM) effects can drive rock slope deformation at greater depths below the annual thermal active layer. Here in Part 1 of two companion papers, we present 2D numerical models of a simplified slope subject to annual surface temperature cycles. The slope geometry and discontinuity sets are loosely based on the Randa instability considered in detail in Part 2. Results show that near-surface thermo-elastic stresses can propagate to depths of 100 m and more as a result of topography and elasticity of the rock mass. Shear dislocation along discontinuities can have both a reversible component controlled by discontinuity compliance and, provided that the stress state is sufficiently close to the strength limit, an irreversible component (i.e., slip). Induced slip increments are followed by stress redistribution resulting in the propagation of slip fronts. Thus, deformation and progressive rock slope failure can be driven solely by thermomechanical forcing. The influence of TM-induced stress changes becomes stronger for increasing numbers of critically stressed discontinuities and is enhanced if failure of discontinuities involves slip-weakening. The net TM effect acts as a meso-scale fatigue process, involving incremental discontinuity slip and hysteresis driven by periodic loading.

  7. Thresholds of flow-induced bed disturbances and their effects on stream metabolism in an agricultural river

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ben L.; Harvey, Judson W.; McPhillips, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    Storm-driven flow pulses in rivers destroy and restructure sediment habitats that affect stream metabolism. This study examined thresholds of bed disturbances that affected patch- and reach-scale sediment conditions and metabolism rates. A 4 year record of discharge and diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations (ΔDO) was analyzed for disturbances and recovery periods of the ΔDO signal. Disturbances to the ΔDO signal were associated with flow pulses, and the recovery times for the ΔDO signal were found to be in two categories: less than 5 days (30% of the disturbances) or greater than 15 days (70% of the disturbances). A field study was performed during the fall of 2007, which included a storm event that increased discharge from 3.1 to 6.9 m3/s over a 7 h period. During stable flow conditions before the storm, variability in patch-scale stream metabolism values were associated with sediment texture classes with values ranging from −16.4 to 2.3 g O22/d (negative sign indicates net respiration) that bounded the reach-averaged rate of −5.6 g O22/d. Hydraulic modeling of bed shear stresses demonstrated a storm-induced flow pulse mobilized approximately 25% of the bed and reach-scale metabolism rates shifted from −5 to −40 g O22/d. These results suggest that storm-induced bed disturbances led to threshold behavior with respect to stream metabolism. Small flow pulses resulted in partial-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by increased turbidity with short recovery times. Large flow pulses resulted in full-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by destroying periphyton habitats with long recovery times.

  8. Hydrologic behavior of model slopes with synthetic water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuang; Lourenço, Sérgio D. N.; Cleall, Peter J.; Chui, Ting Fong May; Ng, Angel K. Y.; Millis, Stuart W.

    2017-11-01

    In the natural environment, soil water repellency decreases infiltration, increases runoff, and increases erosion in slopes. In the built environment, soil water repellency offers the opportunity to develop granular materials with controllable wettability for slope stabilization. In this paper, the influence of soil water repellency on the hydrological response of slopes is investigated. Twenty-four flume tests were carried out in model slopes under artificial rainfall; soils with various wettability levels were tested, including wettable (Contact Angle, CA 90°). Various rainfall intensities (30 mm/h and 70 mm/h), slope angles (20° and 40°) and relative compactions (70% and 90%) were applied to model the response of natural and man-made slopes to rainfall. To quantitatively assess the hydrological response, a number of measurements were made: runoff rate, effective rainfall rate, time to ponding, time to steady state, runoff acceleration, total water storage and wetting front rate. Overall, an increase in soil water repellency reduces infiltration and shortens the time for runoff generation, with the effects amplified for high rainfall intensity. Comparatively, the slope angle and relative compaction had only a minor contribution to the slope hydrology. The subcritical water repellent soils sustained infiltration for longer than both the wettable and water repellent soils, which presents an added advantage if they are to be used in the built environment as barriers. This study revealed substantial impacts of man-made or synthetically induced soil water repellency on the hydrological behavior of model slopes in controlled conditions. The results shed light on our understanding of hydrological processes in environments where the occurrence of natural soil water repellency is likely, such as slopes subjected to wildfires and in agricultural and forested slopes.

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness factor along immobilized enzyme fixed-bed reactors: design of a reactor with naringinase covalently immobilized into glycophase-coated porous glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjon, A.; Iborra, J.L.; Gomez, J.L.; Gomez, E.; Bastida, J.; Bodalo, A.

    1987-09-01

    A design equation is presented for packed-bed reactors containing immobilized enzymes in spherical porous particles with internal diffusion effects and obeying reversible one-intermediate Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The equation is also able to explain irreversible and competitive product inhibition kinetics. It allows the axial substrate profiles to be calculated and the dependence of the effectiveness factor along the reactor length to be continuously evaluated. The design equation was applied to explain the behavior of naringinase immobilized in Glycophase-coated porous glass operating in a packed-bed reactor and hydrolyzing both p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-rhamnoside and naringin. The theoretically predicted results were found to fit well with experimentally measured values. (Refs. 28).

  10. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Nina; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  11. The correction of pebble bed reactor nodal cross sections for the effects of leakage and depletion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nathanael Harrison

    An accurate and computationally fast method to generate nodal cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) was presented. In this method, named Spectral History Correction (SHC), a set of fine group microscopic cross section libraries, pre-computed at specified depletion and moderation states, was coupled with the nodal nuclide densities and group bucklings to compute the new fine group spectrum for each node. The relevant fine group cross-section library was then recollapsed to the local broad group cross-section structure with this new fine group spectrum. This library set was tracked in terms of fuel isotopic densities. Fine group modulation factors (to correct the homogeneous flux for heterogeneous effects) and fission spectra were also stored with the cross section library. As the PBR simulation converges to a steady state fuel cycle, the initial nodal cross section library becomes inaccurate due to the burnup of the fuel and the neutron leakage into and out of the node. Because of the recirculation of discharged fuel pebbles with fresh fuel pebbles, a node can consist of a collection of pebbles at various burnup stages. To account for the nodal burnup, the microscopic cross sections were combined with nodal averaged atom densities to approximate the fine group macroscopic cross-sections for that node. These constructed, homogeneous macroscopic cross sections within the node were used to calculate a numerical solution for the fine group spectrum with B1 theory. This new fine spectrum was used to collapse the pre-computed microscopic cross section library to the broad group structure employed by the fuel cycle code. This SHC technique was developed and practically implemented as a subroutine within the PBR fuel cycle code PEBBED. The SHC subroutine was called to recalculate the broad group cross sections during the code convergence. The result was a fast method that compared favorably to the benchmark scheme of cross section calculation with the lattice

  12. Studies of the quality of the intraosseous dental implant bed and of thermal effects in implant pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.

    2000-01-01

    Dental implants may offer solutions to problems of tooth loss and removable dentures, avoiding the blighting of sound teeth in conventional bridgework. However, there may be severe problems due to deficient and poor quality host bone, particularly in the maxillary sinus region. The success of particulate irradiated mineralised cancellous allograft (IMCA) in generating new bone in the sinus was analysed using the trephine bone cores removed to create an implant bed. Bone cores were embedded and examined using 3D fluorescence fight microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode to study the quantity and the quality [degree of mineralisation] of bone in implant sites. In all graft cases, new bone as immature (woven) or mature (lamellar) bone formed on the surfaces of the allograft. The bone volume fraction was found to be significantly greater within 5 mm height of the host sinus floor. In an extended study, control sinuses grafted with IMCA soaked in saline showed no significant difference to the test side treated with the patient's own serum. IMCA was shown to retain much of its original topographical and morphological characteristics. Biopsy core specimens from other (non-sinus) sites in both maxilla and mandible were treated similarly. The highest mineral density distributions were observed in the mandible, with the lowest in the residual posterior maxilla beneath the sinus floor. A novel quantitative bone quality scale is proposed to include three parameters of bone quality: mineralisation density, bone volume fraction and connectivity. Clinical use of Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) confirmed positive blood flow in grafts, sinus membrane, and oral tissues. A model of heat conduction in dental implants, predicted oral heat to be a possible factor in implant pathology. The effect of temperature on avian osteoclastic resorption in vitro was studied using a volumetric pit assay. Osteoclastic function measured as volumes and depths

  13. Studies of the quality of the intraosseous dental implant bed and of thermal effects in implant pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K

    2000-07-01

    Dental implants may offer solutions to problems of tooth loss and removable dentures, avoiding the blighting of sound teeth in conventional bridgework. However, there may be severe problems due to deficient and poor quality host bone, particularly in the maxillary sinus region. The success of particulate irradiated mineralised cancellous allograft (IMCA) in generating new bone in the sinus was analysed using the trephine bone cores removed to create an implant bed. Bone cores were embedded and examined using 3D fluorescence fight microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode to study the quantity and the quality [degree of mineralisation] of bone in implant sites. In all graft cases, new bone as immature (woven) or mature (lamellar) bone formed on the surfaces of the allograft. The bone volume fraction was found to be significantly greater within 5 mm height of the host sinus floor. In an extended study, control sinuses grafted with IMCA soaked in saline showed no significant difference to the test side treated with the patient's own serum. IMCA was shown to retain much of its original topographical and morphological characteristics. Biopsy core specimens from other (non-sinus) sites in both maxilla and mandible were treated similarly. The highest mineral density distributions were observed in the mandible, with the lowest in the residual posterior maxilla beneath the sinus floor. A novel quantitative bone quality scale is proposed to include three parameters of bone quality: mineralisation density, bone volume fraction and connectivity. Clinical use of Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) confirmed positive blood flow in grafts, sinus membrane, and oral tissues. A model of heat conduction in dental implants, predicted oral heat to be a possible factor in implant pathology. The effect of temperature on avian osteoclastic resorption in vitro was studied using a volumetric pit assay. Osteoclastic function measured as volumes and

  14. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Rong

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2-4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  15. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  16. SO3 Formation and the Effect of Fly Ash in a Bubbling Fluidised Bed under Oxy-Fuel Combustion Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sarbassov, Y.; Duan, L.; Jeremiáš, Michal; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 167, DEC 1 (2017), s. 314-321 ISSN 0378-3820 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SO3 formation * oxy-fuel combustion * fluidised bed Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuels Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2016

  17. Modelling of Effects of Operating Conditions and Coal Reactivity on Temperature of Burning Particles in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Pohořelý, Michael; Trnka, Otakar

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2004), s. 261-274 ISSN 1211-1910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072201; GA AV ČR IAA4072001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : fluidized bed combustion * char temperature * modelling Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality

  18. Oxygen distribution in packed bed membrane reactors for partial oxidation systems and the effect on the product selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurten, U.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Packed bed membrane reactors (PBMRs) are currently considered for the distributive addition of oxygen in partial oxidation systems. Among other advantages the decreased oxygen concentrations in the PBMR can result in improved product selectivities for reaction systems in which the oxygen dependency

  19. Fluidized bed catalytic pyrolysis of eucalyptus over hzsm-5: effect of acid density and gallium modification on catalyst deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood was performed on a continuous laboratory scale fluidized bed fast pyrolysis system. Catalytic activity was monitored from use of fresh catalyst up to a cumulative biomass to catalyst ratio (B/C) of 4/1 over extruded pellets of three different ZSM-5 catalys...

  20. The effects of sower and bed density on bareroot loblolly pine seedling morphology and early height growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans M. Williams; Tim Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Precision sowing is commonly used at forest tree nurseries in order to improve the growing space uniformity of seedlings in the beds. Temple-Inland Forest Products Corporation recently purchased a vacuum sower and requested a study be conducted comparing their new sower with a drill sower on the morphological characteristics of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda...

  1. 16 determination of posterior tibia slope and slope deterioration with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orth (SA), FCS (ECSA), Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, P.O. Box. 84074, Mombasa, Kenya. Email: michenimuthuuri@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Background: The posterior inclination of the tibia plateaux relative to the longitudinal axis of the tibia is referred to as the Posterior Tibia Slope (PTS). Fore knowledge of the mean ...

  2. Reed beds receiving industrial sludge containing nitroaromatic compounds. Effects of outgoing water and bed material extracts in the umu-c genotoxicity assay, DR-CALUX assay and on early life stage development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Lillemor; Hollert, Henner; Jonsson, Sofie; van Bavel, Bert; Engwall, Magnus

    2007-05-01

    Sweden has prohibited the deposition of organic waste since January, 2005. Since 1 million tons of sludge is produced every year in Sweden and the capacity for incineration does not fill the demands, other methods of sludge management have to be introduced to a larger degree. One common method in the USA and parts of Europe is the use of wetlands to treat wastewater and sewage sludge. The capacity of reed beds to affect the toxicity of a complex mixture of nitroaromatics in sludge, however, is not fully elucidated. In this study, an industrial sludge containing explosives and pharmaceutical residues was therefore treated in artificial reed beds and the change in toxicity was studied. Nitroaromatic compounds, which are the main ingredients of many pharmaceuticals and explosives, are well known to cause cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Recently performed studies have also showed that embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) are sensitive to nitroaromatic compounds. Therefore, we tested the sludge passing through constructed wetlands in order to detect any changes in levels of embryotoxicity, genotoxicity and dioxin-like activity (AhR-agonists). We also compared unplanted and planted systems in order to examine the impact of the root system on the fate of the toxicants. An industrial sludge containing a complex mixture of nitroaromatics was added daily to small-scale constructed wetlands (vertical flow), both unplanted and planted with Phragmites australis. Sludge with an average dry weight of 1.25%, was added with an average hydraulic loading rate of 1.2 L/day. Outgoing water was collected daily and stored at -20 degrees C. The artificial wetland sediment was Soxhlet extracted, followed by clean-up with multi-layer silica, or extracted by ultrasonic treatment, yielding one organic extract and one water extract of the same sample. Genotoxicity of the extracts was measured according to the ISO protocol for the umu-C genotoxicity assay (ISO/TC 147/SC 5/ WG9 N8), using

  3. On partial fluidization in rotating fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.; Pfeffer, R.; Tardos, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a rotating fluidized bed, unlike in a conventional fluidized bed, the granules are fluidized layer by layer from the (inner) free surface outward at increasing radius as the gas velocity is increased. This is a very significant and interesting phenomenon and is extremely important in the design of these fluidized beds. The phenomenon was first suggested in a theoretical analysis and recently verified experimentally in the authors' laboratory. However, in the first paper, the equations presented are too cumbersome and the influence of bed thickness is not clearly stated. In this note the authors present simplified equations, based on that paper, for the pressure drop and the minimum fluidizing velocities in a rotating fluidized bed. Experimental data are also shown and compared with the theoretical model, and the effect of bed thickness is shown. Furthermore, an explanation for the observation of a maximum in the pressure drop vs. velocity curve instead of the plateau derived by Chen is proposed

  4. Combined effects of dam removal and past sediment mining on a relatively large lowland sandy gravel bed river (Vienne River, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursache, Ovidiu; Rodrigues, Stephane; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Jugé, Philippe; Richard, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Dam removal is of growing interest for the management of sediment fluxes within fluvial basins, morphological evolution and ecological restoration of rivers. If dam removal experiments are now quite well documented for small streams located in the upstream parts of river networks, examples of lowland and relatively large rivers are still scarce. In this study we present a dam removal operation carried out on the Vienne River (France) to restore both sediment and biotic continuity. The Vienne River is 363 km in length. On its middle reaches the average slope is equal to 0.0003 m.m-1 and the average annual discharge is 195 m3.s-1 at the gauging station of Nouâtre. The river is characterized by a sinuous single channel of an average width of 150 m. The sediments are mainly made of a siliceous mixture of sands and gravels and were intensively mined between years 1930 and 1995's. In 1920, a 4 m height dam was built just downstream the confluence between the Vienne and Creuse Rivers triggering a total sediment deposition upstream of 900 000 m3 in 75 years. Hence, in 1998, the removal of the dam increased severely the sediment supply delivered to the Vienne River. The objective of this study is to understand and quantify the fluvial processes and morphological evolution on a reach of 50 km of the Vienne associated with the dam remova and the presence of ancient sand pits located along the riverbed. This study is based on field data collected during 7 surveys performed between 1998 and 2013. This large dataset focuses on bed geometry (detailed bathymetrical surveys), sediment grain size, and bedload fluxes measured using isokinetic samplers. It was combined with a 1D numerical model developed to assess flow dynamics and sediment transport capacity before and after dam removal. Results show that dam removal triggered both headward and progressive (near the dam) erosions and that discharges higher than 100 m3.s-1 were sufficient to erode the sandy sediments trapped by the

  5. An evaluation of the effects of bed rest, sleep deprivation and discontinuance of training on the physical fitness of highly trained young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olree, H. D.; Corbin, B.; Dugger, G.; Smith, C.

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine what physiological effects result when highly trained subjects are confined to bed, deprived of sleep, or allowed to discontinue training. Results indicated: (1) There was a moderate increase in strength variables due to the training in this experiment but the stress which the subjects received caused a negligible change in strength variables. (2) The training program resulted in highly significant changes in specific bicycle ergometer variables indicating good increases in cardiopulmonary fitness. Five days of bed rest or fifty hours of sleep deprivation caused comparable drastic decreases in cardiopulmonary fitness. Post stress the subjects reverted to a normal daily schedule and after two weeks they had recovered about half of what they lost. (3) Cardiac output remains relatively constant at a constant work load, but stroke volume increases with conditioning and decreases with deconditioning due to stress.

  6. Biomass gasification with air in an atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. Effect of six operational variables on the quality of the produced raw gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, I.; Orio, A.; Corella, J. [Univ. Complutense of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Aznar, M.P. [Univ. of Saragossa (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Biomass gasification with air in a bubbling fluidized bed is studied in a small pilot plant. Variables analyzed are equivalence ratio (from 0.20 to 0.45), temperatures of the gasifier bed (750--850 C) and of its freeboard (500--600 C), H/C ratio in the feed, use of secondary air (10% of the overall) in the freeboard, and addition (2--5 wt %) of a calcined dolomite mixed with the biomass used as the feedstock. Using advanced tar and gas sampling and analysis methods, the gas composition and tar content in the gas are determined and their variation with the operation parameters is given. A statistical analysis of the effects of the gasification variables is also here presented.

  7. Spouted bed drying of Bauhinia forficata link extract: the effects of feed atomizer position and operating conditions on equipment performance and product properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. F. Souza

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effects of feed atomizer position and operating conditions on equipment performance (accumulation rate, product recovery, elutriation and thermal efficiency and product properties (moisture content, size distribution, flavonoid degradation and flow properties during spouted bed drying of Bauhinia forficata Link extract are evaluated. The parameters studied were the position of the atomizer system (top spray or bottom spray, the inlet temperature of the spouting gas (80 and 150oC and the feed mass flow rate of concentrated extract relative to the evaporation capacity of the dryer, Ws/Wmax (15 to 100%. Higher accumulation rate values were obtained with the atomizer placed at the bottom of the bed. In this configuration, the accumulation rate increases with the increase in the Ws/Wmax ratio. The best drying performance was obtained for the top spray configuration.

  8. An examination of fire spread thresholds in discontinuous fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Kara M. Yedinak

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on environmental factors like wind, slope, and fuel moisture content. To investigate threshold spread behaviours, we conducted a set...

  9. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C. (John); Wang, Z. L.

    2017-05-01

    To date interrill erosion processes are not fully understood under different rainfall and soil conditions. The objectives are to 1) identify the interrill erosion regime and limiting process under the study condition, 2) characterize the interactive effects of rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment transport competency and mode, and 3) develop a lumped interrill erosion model. A loess loam soil with 39% sand and 45% silt was packed to flumes and exposed to simulated rainfall. A complete factorial design with three factors was used, which included rainfall intensity (48, 62, 102, 149, and 170 mm h-1), slope gradient (17.6, 26.8, 36.4, 46.6, and 57.7%), and slope length (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m). Rain splash, sediment discharge in runoff, and flow velocity were measured. Results showed that rainfall intensity played a dual role not only in detaching soil materials but also in enhancing sediment transport. Sediment transport was the process limiting interrill erosion rate under the study condition. Two major sediment transport modes were identified: rainfall-driven rolling/creeping and flow-driven rolling/sliding. The relative importance of each mode was largely determined by flow depth. The competence of the flow in transporting sediment decreased downslope as flow depth increased due to increased dissipation of raindrop energy. The optimal mean flow depth for the maximal interrill erosion rates was erosion rate. The negative correlation seemed stronger for heavier rains, indicating the cushioning effects of flow depth. Lumped interrill erosion models, developed from short slopes, are likely to overestimate erosion rates. Given transport as the limiting process, the so called erodibility value, estimated with those models, is indeed sediment transportability under the study condition. The effects of slope length on interrill erosion regimes need to be studied further under a wider range of conditions.

  10. Bed care for patients in palliative settings: considering risks to caregivers and bed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Ensuring patients are comfortable in bed is key to effective palliative care, but when moving and positioning patients in bed, health professionals face an occupational risk of injury. The turning and positioning (TAP) system is a new method of moving patients in bed, that evidence has shown to reduce the risk of injury to caregivers. Providing the correct bed surface is another aspect of bed care essential to the comfort of the palliative patient, and to aid wound prevention and treatment. It is important to take a patient-centred approach when considering the most appropriate bed surface patients. This article provides an overview and discussion of these two aspects of bed care for palliative patients.

  11. Meta-analysis of the effectiveness of psychological and medical treatments for binge-eating disorder (MetaBED): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Petroff, David; Herpertz, Stephan; Kersting, Anette; Pietrowsky, Reinhard; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vocks, Silja; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-03-29

    Binge-eating disorder (BED) was included as its own diagnostic entity in the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). An increasing number of treatment studies have been published, but an up-to-date comprehensive meta-analysis on diverse treatment approaches for BED is lacking. In an updated and extension of a previous meta-analysis, the goals of this study are to assess the short-term and long-term effectiveness of psychological and medical treatments for BED. We will search bibliographic databases and study registries, including manual searches for studies published before January 2016. The search strategy will include terms relating to binge eating and diverse forms of psychological and medical interventions. Language will be restricted to English. The studies included will be treatment studies, that is, randomised-controlled trials, and non-randomised and non-controlled studies, for individuals with BED (DSM-IV or DSM-5), and studies that provided a pre-treatment and at least one post-treatment or follow-up assessment of binge eating. The primary outcomes will be the number of binge-eating episodes, abstinence from binge eating and diagnosis of BED at post-treatment and/or follow-up(s), and changes from pre-treatment to post-treatment and/or follow-up(s). Likewise, as secondary outcomes, eating disorder and general psychopathology, quality of life, and body weight will be analysed and adverse events and treatment drop-out will be examined. Study search, selection and data extraction, including risk of bias assessment, will be independently performed by 2 reviewers and consensus will be sought. Moderator analyses will be conducted, and equity aspects will be considered. Sensitivity analyses will be conducted to determine the robustness of the results. Ethical approval is not required for this meta-analysis. Published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated electronically and in print, this meta-analysis will form

  12. Effective biofilm removal and changes in bacterial biofilm building capacity after wound debridement with low-frequency ultrasound as part of wound bed preparation before skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarets Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yuliya Yarets Clinical Laboratory Medicine Department, The Republican Scientific Centre for Radiation Medicine and Human Ecology, Gomel, Belarus Abstract: The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement (UAW used for wound bed preparation of chronic wounds prior to skin grafting. Initially, 140 patients were enrolled into study. Group 1 patients (n=53 with critically colonized wounds underwent a single UAW procedure before skin grafting. Group 2 patients (n=87 with colonized wounds received two UAW sessions, skin grafting followed by the second UAW treatment. Initial wound classification in colonized and critically colonized wounds did not correlate with results from microbiological analysis of wound swab samples. Hence, comparison of efficacy of one or two debridement sessions was conducted solely for a similar group of patients, that is, patients with colonized wounds of group 1 (n=40 and group 2 (n=47. In wounds of group 1 patients, a single debridement session resulted in reduction of bacteria from >104 to <104 CFU/mL. However, bacteria remaining at wound site showed minor differences in biofilm slime production, with skin graft failure being observed in 25% cases. In wounds of group 2 patients, two debridement sessions significantly reduced bacterial presence up to <102 CFU/mL. Bacteria remaining at wound site showed low capacity for biofilm slime production and high accumulation of biomass; a complete graft healing was observed in all patients. We suggest two to three debridement sessions with UAW to be most effective in wound bed preparation before skin grafting of chronic wounds. UAW showed to be effective in cleaning the wound bed, destroying the extracellular substances in biofilms, and influencing biofilm slime building capacity of bacteria left at wound site. Keywords: wound debridement, wound bed preparation, biofilm, low-frequency ultrasound, skin grafting, biofilm assay

  13. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A "randomized"/stratified, single-blinded, parallel-group study. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate 3 structurally different mattresses relative influence on patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In several advertisements, it is proclaimed that certain...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  14. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  15. Slope-Velocity-Equilibrium and evolution of surface roughness on a stony hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slope-velocity equilibrium is hypothesized as a state that evolves naturally over time due to the interaction between overland flow and bed morphology, wherein steeper areas develop a relative increase in physical and hydraulic roughness such that flow velocity is a unique function of overland flow ...

  16. Effect of a strengthened ecological floating bed on the purification of urban landscape water supplied with reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Huai; Wang, Yi; Li, Zhi; Wei, Cun-Zhi; Zhao, Jing-Chan; Sun, Lu-Qin

    2018-05-01

    A floating bed (FB) system vegetated with calamus, iris, lythrum, and Hydrocotyle vulgaris, and a strengthened FB (SFB) system with zeolite and sponge iron as fillers were simultaneously applied to purify urban landscape water in different zones. The urban landscape water, an artificial lake of approximately 326m 2 , was supplied with reclaimed water during a six-month experiment. Results indicated that the concentrations of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the SFB zone (SFBZ) were significantly lower than those in the control zone (CZ) and the FB zone (FBZ) after six months of operation. The average removal efficiencies (AREs) in the SFBZ, FBZ and CZ were 89.98%, 77.39% and 56.37%, respectively, for ammonia nitrogen (NH 4 + -N); 92.49%, 79.55% and 47.85%, respectively, for phosphate (PO 4 3- -P). Meanwhile, the average concentration of Chlorophyll a and the algae density in SFBZ during the experiment were 12.54μg/L and 1.31×10 4 cells/mL, which were lower, obviously, than those in the FBZ and CZ. Moreover, the contribution rates analysis of nutrient removal exhibited that the plant absorption in the removal of N and P occupied 27.85% and 26.36%, whereas the filler adsorption occupied 7.93% and 11.93%, respectively, in the SFB. Thus, the water quality of the artificial lake was improved greatly by the SFB which hybridized fillers and FB together. Finally, it was found that the AREs of NH 4 + -N and PO 4 3- -P in the SFBZ could reach 73.93% and 84.56%, approximately 1.39 and 1.41 times that of the FBZ during the winter. Therefore, the application of an SFB can keep a stable water quality in urban landscape water and avoid the lower removal rate of an FB at low-temperature. In summary, the SFB could effectively improve the water quality of urban landscape water supplied with reclaimed water even in winter. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Effect of Mass Media Campaign on the Use of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets among Pregnant Women in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ankomah, A.; Adebayo, S. B.; Arogundade, E. D.; Anyanti, J.; Nwokolo, E.; Inyang, U.; Ipadeola, Oladipupo B.; Meremiku, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Malaria during pregnancy is a major public health problem in Nigeria especially in malaria-endemic areas. It increases the risk of low birth weight and child/maternal morbidity/mortality. This paper addresses the impact of radio campaigns on the use of insecticide-treated bed nets among pregnant women in Nigeria. Methods. A total of 2,348 pregnant women were interviewed during the survey across 21 of Nigeria's 36 states. Respondents were selected through a multistage sampling tech...

  18. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  19. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  20. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  1. Effect of Air Staging Ratios on the Burning Rate and Emissions in an Underfeed Fixed-Bed Biomass Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Regueiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work studies a small-scale biomass combustor (5–12 kW with an underfed fixed bed using low air staging ratios (15%–30%. This document focuses on the influence of the operative parameters on the combustion process, so gaseous emissions and the distribution and concentration of particulate matter have also been recorded. The facility shows good stability and test repeatability. For the studied airflow ranges, the results show that increasing the total airflow rate does not increase the overall air excess ratio because the burning rate is proportionally enhanced (with some slight differences that depend on the air staging ratio. Consequently, the heterogeneous reactions at the bed remain in the so-called oxygen-limited region, and thus the entire bed operates under sub-stoichiometric conditions with regards of the char content of the biomass. In addition, tests using only primary air (no staging may increase the fuel consumption, but in a highly incomplete way, approaching a gasification regime. Some measured burning rates are almost 40% higher than previous results obtained in batch combustors due to the fixed position of the ignition front. The recorded concentration of particulate matter varies between 15 and 75 mg/Nm3, with a main characteristic diameter between 50 and 100 nm.

  2. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  3. Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest and Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    We have recently completed a long duration head down tilt bed rest (HDBR) study in which we performed structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations in a spaceflight analog environment. We are also collecting the same measures in crewmembers prior to and following a six month International Space Station mission. We will present data demonstrating that bed rest resulted in functional mobility and balance deterioration with recovery post-HDBR. We observed numerous changes in brain structure, function, and connectivity relative to a control group which were associated with pre to post bed rest changes in sensorimotor function. For example, gray matter volume (GMv) increased in posterior parietal areas and decreased in frontal regions. GMv increases largely overlapped with fluid decreases and vice versa. Larger increases in precentral gyrus (M1)/ postcentral gyrus (S1+2) GMv and fluid decreases were associated with smaller balance decrements. Vestibular activation in the bilateral insular cortex increased with bed rest and subsequently recovered. Larger increases in vestibular activation in multiple brain regions were associated with greater decrements in balance and mobility. We found connectivity increases between left M1 with right S1+2 and the superior parietal lobule, and right vestibular cortex with the cerebellum. Decreases were observed between right Lobule VIII with right S1+2 and the supramarginal gyrus, right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) with occipital regions, and the right superior posterior fissure with right Crus I and II. Connectivity strength between left M1 and right S1+2/superior parietal lobule increased the most in individuals that exhibited the least balance impairments. In sum, we observed HDBR-related changes in measures of brain structure, function, and network connectivity, which correlated with indices of sensorimotor

  4. The effects of using different grades of PVP and gelatin as binders in the fluidized bed granulation and tabletting of lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, P P; Malamataris, S; Dolamidis, G

    1983-04-01

    The effects of using different grades of PVP and gelatin binders on three sieve fractions of lactose granulated in a fluidized bed granulator and tablets have been studied. Increasing the molecular mass of PVP or bloom number of gelatin resulted in a decrease in granule friability but in an increase in their average size and porosity and in the tensile strengths of the resulting tablets when compressed to a fixed apparent density. The results have been explained in terms of the effects of moist and dry binder bridges on bonding of particles in granules and tablets.

  5. Impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicated on high variability in salt accumulation along natural and cultivated slopes, even for relatively homogeneous soil conditions. It was hypothesised that slope inclination has an impact on the location of salt accumulation along the slope. A set of laboratory experiments and numerical models were used to explore the impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation. It was shown, experimentally, that for conditions of saline water source at the lower boundary of the slope - salt accumulates in low concentrations and homogeneously along the entire slope, for moderate slopes. However, as inclination increases high salt concentrations were observed at the upper parts of the slope, leaving the lower parts of the slope relatively free of salt. The traditional flow and transport models did not predict the experimental observations as they indicated also for the moderate slopes on salt accumulation in the elevated parts of the slope, away of the saline water source. Consequently - a conceptual model was raised to explain the laboratory observations. It was suggested that the interactions between slope angle, evaporation rates, hydraulic conductivity of the medium and distribution of wetness along the slope affect the saline water flow path through the medium. This lead to preferential flow path close to the soil-atmosphere interface for the steep slopes, which leads to constant wash of the salts from the evaporation front upward towards the slope upper parts, whereas for the moderate slopes, flow path is below the soil-atmosphere interface, therefore salt that accumulates at the evaporation front is not being transported upward. Understanding of salt dynamics along slopes is important for agricultural and natural environments, as well as for civil engineering purposes. Better understanding of the salt transport processes along slopes will improve our ability to minimize and to cope with soil salinization processes. The laboratory experiments and

  6. Udder health in a Danish compost bedded pack barn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennesen, Line; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt

    Besides welfare advantages of the compost bedded pack system (CBP) there could be a negative effect of the organic bedding on udder health. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of a CBP on udder health compared to a free stall system (FS) with sand bedded cubicles. Within the same Danish...

  7. The scale effect on soil erosion. A plot approach to understand connectivity on slopes under cultivation at variable plot sizes and under Mediterranean climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Bagarello, Vicenzo; Ferro, Vito; Iovino, Massimo; Borja, Manuel Estaban Lucas; Francisco Martínez Murillo, Juan; González Camarena, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion changes along time and seasons and attention was paid to this issue in the past (González Hidalgo et al., 2010; 2012). However, although the scientific community knows that soil erosion is also a time spatial scale-scale dependent process (Parsons et al., 1990; Cerdà et al., 2009; González Hidalgo et al., 2013; Sadeghi et al., 2015) very little is done on this topic. This is due to the fact that at different scales, different soil erosion mechanisms (splash, sheetflow, rill development) are active and their rates change with the scale of measurement (Wainwright et al., 2002; López-Vicente et al., 2015). This is making the research on soil erosion complex and difficult, and it is necessary to develop a conceptual framework but also measurements that will inform about the soil erosion behaviour. Connectivity is the key concept to understand how changes in the scale results in different rates of soil and water losses (Parsons et al., 1996; Parsons et al., 2015; Poeppl et al., 2016). Most of the research developed around the connectivity concept was applied in watershed or basin scales (Galdino et al., 2016; Martínez-Casasnovas et al., 2016; López Vicente et al., 2016; Marchamalo et al., 2015; Masselink et al., 2016), but very little is known about the connectivity issue at slope scale (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011). El Teularet (Eastern Iberian Peninsula) and Sparacia (Sicily) soil erosion experimental stations are being active for 15 years and data collected on different plots sizes can shed light into the effect of scale on runoff generation and soil losses at different scales and give information to understand how the transport of materials is determined by the connectivity between pedon to slope scale (Cerdà et al., 2014; Bagarello et al., 2015a; 2015b). The comparison of the results of the two research stations will shed light into the rates of soil erosion and mechanisms involved that act under different scales. Our

  8. The Effects of Dinner-to-Bed Time and Post-Dinner Walk on Gastric Cancer Across Different Age Groups: A Multicenter Case-Control Study in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jun; Dai, Jia-Xi; Lin, Ren-Qin; Tian, Fang-Xi; Liang, Bing; Guo, Yi-Nan; Luo, Hui-Yu; Li, Ni; Fang, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Ruo-Hua; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major killer throughout the world. Despite the dramatic decrease in GC over the last century, its etiology has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the possible independent and combined effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on the risk for GC across different age groups. A population-based, case-control study was conducted in southeast China, including 452 patients with GC and 465 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic characteristics, dinner-to-bed time, post-dinner walk, and other behavioral factors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk as well as their joint effect on the risk for GC across different age groups. Individuals with dinner-to-bed time 55 years old.

  9. Effect of antecedent-hydrological conditions on rainfall triggering of debris flows in ash-fall pyroclastic mantled slopes of Campania (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, E.; Fusco, F; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.; De Vita, P.

    2016-01-01

    Mountainous areas surrounding the Campanian Plain and the Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy) are among the most risky areas of Italy due to the repeated occurrence of rainfallinduced debris flows along ash-fall pyroclastic soil-mantled slopes. In this geomorphological framework, rainfall patterns, hydrological processes taking place within multi-layered ash-fall pyroclastic deposits and soil antecedent moisture status are the principal factors to be taken into account to assess triggering rainfall conditions and the related hazard. This paper presents the outcomes of an experimental study based on integrated analyses consisting of the reconstruction of physical models of landslides, in situ hydrological monitoring, and hydrological and slope stability modeling, carried out on four representative source areas of debris flows that occurred in May 1998 in the Sarno Mountain Range. The hydrological monitoring was carried out during 2011 using nests of tensiometers and Watermark pressure head sensors and also through a rainfall and air temperature recording station. Time series of measured pressure head were used to calibrate a hydrological numerical model of the pyroclastic soil mantle for 2011, which was re-run for a 12-year period beginning in 2000, given the availability of rainfall and air temperature monitoring data. Such an approach allowed us to reconstruct the regime of pressure head at a daily time scale for a long period, which is representative of about 11 hydrologic years with different meteorological conditions. Based on this simulated time series, average winter and summer hydrological conditions were chosen to carry out hydrological and stability modeling of sample slopes and to identify Intensity- Duration rainfall thresholds by a deterministic approach. Among principal results, the opposing winter and summer antecedent pressure head (soil moisture) conditions were found to exert a significant control on intensity and duration of rainfall

  10. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  11. Insights from analog gelatin experiments on the effect of bedding dip on sill morphology and crystal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. M.; Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.

    2010-12-01

    The profusion of sills the world over offers a wide spectrum of geologic conditions under which to study emplacement mechanisms and the establishment of the initial conditions governing the subsequent magmatic evolution. Many diabase/dolerite sills are featureless bodies whose only record of solidification is contained in the variation of crystal size. But other sills formed of magma containing crystals entrained from earlier crystallization episodes often show a rich history of interaction between settling crystals and solidification fronts such that the physical history of differentiation can be readily observed. This work explores this aspect of sills using visco-elastic gelatin as country rock, molten wax as magma and tiny particles as phenocrysts. Magmatic sills form mechanically, when an ascending dike encounters a more rigid layer, is diverted laterally, and systematically inflates as guided along by the interface. In this manner, sills grow about the injection site, and can do so symmetrically or asymmetrically. The degree of asymmetry is affected by the dip angle of the interface. An angled interface implies a directional pressure gradient, and magma flows preferentially in the direction of decreasing pressure, in this case, up tilt. So, the greater the tilt, the greater the asymmetry. By experimentally producing sills in layered, tilted, media, we have investigated the influence of bed dip on sill morphology. Experiments were performed by injecting wax and particles into gelatin where the layers were poured at set angles to mimic tilted bedding. In addition to its visco-elastic properties, gelatin also has the added benefit of transparency, allowing for direct observation during the experiment and can be washed away later to reveal the exact details of the remaining solid. To emulate magma as a multi-phase slurry, a magmatic analog was used consisting of a mixture of molten wax near its liquidus and ultrafine glitter. Wax solidifies in response to thermal

  12. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  13. Cofiring of difficult fuels: The effect of Ca-based sorbents on the gas chemistry in fluidised bed combustion; Kalsiumpohjaisten lisaeaineiden vaikutus leijukerrospolton kaasukemiaan vaikeiden polttoaineiden sekapoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeijaelae, M.; Partanen, J.; Fabritius, M.; Elo, T.; Virta, A.K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish the effects of Ca-based sorbents on sulphur, halogen and alkaline chemistry in fluidised bed combustion of difficult fuels, and to find out any restrictions on the use of these sorbents. The aim is to acquire sufficient knowledge to ensure the operational reliability of power plants and to minimise the emissions and costs of flue gas cleaning. The results enable the owner to anticipate necessary changes associated with slagging, fouling and emission control in the existing power plants, when there are plans to increase the range of fuels used. (orig.)

  14. Removal of mercury in fixed-bed continuous upflow reactors by mercury-resistant bacteria and effect of sodium chloride on their performance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De; Leonhauser, J.; Vardanyan, L

    : De J, Leonha¨user J, Vardanyan L. Removal of mercury in fixed-bed continuous upflow reactors by mercury-resistant bacteria and effect of sodium chloride on their performance, QScience Connect 2014:17 http://dx.doi.org/10.5339/connect.2014.17 http... for medium; 2, channel for wastewater inflow; 3, channel for wastewater outflow; 4, medium; 5, pump for medium; 6, pump for wastewater; 7, bubble trap. Page 4 of 9 De, Leonha¨user, Vardanyan. QScience Connect 2014:17 supplemented with 4 g/l glucose) were...

  15. The effects of seagrass (Zostera japonica) canopy structure on associated fauna: a study using artificial seagrass units and sampling of natural beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Y.; Fong, C W.; Wu, R S.S.

    2001-04-30

    The importance of seagrass canopy to associated fauna was assessed by comparing the species richness, abundance and diversity of the epi- and infaunal macroinvertebrate assemblages in a seagrass (Zostera japonica Ascherson and Graebner) bed and the adjacent unvegetated area in Hong Kong. Seagrass cover had significant effects on the composition and abundance of the associated fauna and the amount of detritus accumulated on the sediment surface. Detritus abundance was significantly higher in the seagrass bed, and was positively correlated with both the above- and belowground biomass of Z. japonica. Both the abundance and species richness of the epi- and infauna were significantly positively correlated with the belowground biomass of the seagrass and detritus standing crop. Macrofaunal species richness was higher (118) in the seagrass bed than the adjacent unvegetated areas (70), with a higher degree of similarity between the infauna than the epifauna of the two habitats. While all species recorded from the unvegetated areas were found in the seagrass bed, 48 species occurred only in the seagrass-covered areas. Species richness of epifauna was significantly higher in the seagrass bed, but there was no difference between infaunal species of the two habitats. On the contrary, faunal (epi- and infauna) abundance was significantly higher in seagrass areas. The seagrass bed also supported species of small tellinid bivalves previously not recorded from Hong Kong. Artificial seagrass units (ASUs, 0.2 m(2)) with four combinations of leaf density and leaf length and a control (bare sand) were placed at short distances from natural patches of Z. japonica. The composition, abundance and biomass of the epibenthos associated with the ASUs and the control were recorded after 3 months in the field. While species richness did not differ among the treatments, total abundance of epibenthos was significantly higher in the high density-long leaves (HL) treatment than in the control

  16. Direction of Auditory Pitch-Change Influences Visual Search for Slope From Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Stacey; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Orte, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Huntington, Mark D; Suzuki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Linear trend (slope) is important information conveyed by graphs. We investigated how sounds influenced slope detection in a visual search paradigm. Four bar graphs or scatter plots were presented on each trial. Participants looked for a positive-slope or a negative-slope target (in blocked trials), and responded to targets in a go or no-go fashion. For example, in a positive-slope-target block, the target graph displayed a positive slope while other graphs displayed negative slopes (a go trial), or all graphs displayed negative slopes (a no-go trial). When an ascending or descending sound was presented concurrently, ascending sounds slowed detection of negative-slope targets whereas descending sounds slowed detection of positive-slope targets. The sounds had no effect when they immediately preceded the visual search displays, suggesting that the results were due to crossmodal interaction rather than priming. The sounds also had no effect when targets were words describing slopes, such as "positive," "negative," "increasing," or "decreasing," suggesting that the results were unlikely due to semantic-level interactions. Manipulations of spatiotemporal similarity between sounds and graphs had little effect. These results suggest that ascending and descending sounds influence visual search for slope based on a general association between the direction of auditory pitch-change and visual linear trend.

  17. Effect of hydraulic retention time on hydrodynamic behavior of anaerobic-aerobic fixed bed reactor treating cattle slaughterhouse effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Cristina de Freitas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the hydrodynamic behavior in reactors provides characteristics of the flow regime and its anomalies that can reduce biological processes efficiency due to the decrease of the useful volume and the hydraulic retention time required for the performance of microbial activity. In this study, the hydrodynamic behavior of an anaerobic-aerobic fixed bed reactor, operated with HRT (hydraulic retention time of 24, 18 and 12 hours, was evaluated in the treatment of raw cattle slaughterhouse wastewater. Polyurethane foam and expanded clay were used as support media for biomass immobilization. Experimental data of pulse type stimulus-response assays were performed with eosin Y and bromophenol blue, and adjusted to the single-parameter theoretical models of dispersion and N-continuous stirred tank reactors in series (N-CSTR. N-CSTR model presented the best adjustment for the HRT and tracers evaluated. RDT (residence time distribution curves obtained with N-CSTR model in the assays with bromophenol blue resulted in better adjustment compared to the eosin Y. The predominant flow regime in AAFBR (anaerobic aerobic fixed bed reactor is the N-CSTR in series, as well as the existence of preferential paths and hydraulic short-circuiting.

  18. Preliminary CFD study of Pebble Size and its Effect on Heat Transfer in a Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Enriquez, Christian; Spangler, Julian; Yee, Tein; Park, Jungkyu; Farfan, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    In pebble bed reactors, the typical pebble diameter used is 6cm, and within each pebble is are thousands of nuclear fuel kernels. However, efficiency of the reactor does not solely depend on the number of kernels of fuel within each graphite sphere, but also depends on the type and motion of the coolant within the voids between the spheres and the reactor itself. In this work a physical analysis of the pebble bed nuclear reactor's fluid dynamics is undertaken using Computational Fluid Dynamics software. The primary goal of this work is to observe the relationship between the different pebble diameters in an idealized alignment and the thermal transport efficiency of the reactor. The model constructed of our idealized argument will consist on stacked 8 pebble columns that fixed at the inlet on the reactor. Two different pebble sizes 4 cm and 6 cm will be studied and helium will be supplied as coolant with a fixed flow rate of 96 kg/s, also a fixed pebble surface temperatures will be used. Comparison will then be made to evaluate the efficiency of coolant to transport heat due to the varying sizes of the pebbles. Assistant Professor for the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering PhD.

  19. The effect of Jatropha torrified biomass and coal preparation on steam co-gasification in a fixed bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloqaili, Mashal Mohammed

    Coal fired power stations produce vast amounts of harmful products that may affect our health and environment. Co-gasification of coal and biomass could be a solution to this issue as an emerging technology. Biomass may reduce emissions significantly and it may contribute to reducing capital operational cost while providing high gas yields. This research tests the co-gasification of coal and biomass blended chars. Coal and biomass were both prepared. Coal Illinois No #6 was prepared as coal semi-char and coal-char while Jatropha biomass was torrefied at six different temperatures ranging from [200-300] ºC. The co-gasification experiments was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor. A gasification temperature was 900 ºC and a constant flow rate of 100 mL/min. Carbon conversion, maximum char reactivity, products yield and amount of hydrogen produced were evaluated and studied based on data obtained from the G.C. Additionally, weight of bed material and ash leftover weight from gasification process were significantly contributed in calculating the carbon conversion percentages.

  20. The Effect of Mass Media Campaign on the Use of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets among Pregnant Women in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ankomah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria during pregnancy is a major public health problem in Nigeria especially in malaria-endemic areas. It increases the risk of low birth weight and child/maternal morbidity/mortality. This paper addresses the impact of radio campaigns on the use of insecticide-treated bed nets among pregnant women in Nigeria. Methods. A total of 2,348 pregnant women were interviewed during the survey across 21 of Nigeria’s 36 states. Respondents were selected through a multistage sampling technique. Analysis was based on multivariate logistic regression. Results. Respondents who knew that sleeping under ITN prevents malaria were 3.2 times more likely to sleep under net (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 2.28 to 4.33; P<0.0001. Those who listened to radio are also about 1.6 times more likely to use ITN (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.28; P=0.020, while respondents who had heard of a specific sponsored radio campaign on ITN are 1.53 times more likely to use a bed net (P=0.019. Conclusion. Pregnant women who listened to mass media campaigns were more likely to adopt strategies to protect themselves from malaria. Therefore, behavior change communication messages that are aimed at promoting net use and antenatal attendance are necessary in combating malaria.

  1. The effects of muscle exercise and bed rest on [{sup 18}F]methylcholine PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roef, Mark; Vogel, Wouter V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    This study evaluated the impact of limited and strenuous physical exercise on [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in muscle. Ten consecutive patients participated, three of whom had strict bed rest, three were allowed to walk around and four performed strenuous single arm exercise by lifting a 7.5-kg weight. [{sup 18}F]Methylcholine uptake was measured in the biceps and gluteus muscles on both sides. Strenuous exercise resulted in a 202% increase in [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in the activated biceps muscle as well as a 112% increase in muscle groups used to retain body position. This resulted in asymmetrical images that were visually less easy to interpret. In walking patients there was a more limited increase in biceps (45%) and gluteus (74%) muscle uptake, without visually recognizable differences. Strenuous exercise may result in a considerable increase in [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in muscle and should be avoided prior to imaging. Strict bed rest does not seem to be required. Tracer injection while resting on the scanner remains a safe approach. (orig.)

  2. Biogeomorphological effects of leaf accumulations in stepped-bed channels: Exploratory study, Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mountains, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Přibyla Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stepped-bed system, with a step-like longitudinal profile, is typical morphology in steep headwater streams. These systems are created by a series of coarse sediments or instream wood (steps with supercritical flows interspaced with finer material (forming pools with subcritical flows. In the case of well-developed steps and pools, the resulting channel-reach morphology is referred to as “step-pool” morphology. In this study, we identify a previously undescribed type of step-poo