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Sample records for bed effective values

  1. Use of wood-based materials in beef bedded manure packs: 2. Effect on odorous volatile organic compounds, odor activity value, , and nutrient concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiehs, Mindy J; Brown-Brandl, Tami M; Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E; Parker, David B; Miller, Daniel N; Jaderborg, Jeffrey P; DiCostanzo, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of three types of wood-based bedding materials (kiln-dried pine wood chips, dry cedar chips, and green cedar chips) and corn stover on the concentration of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total in bedded pack material. Four bedded packs of each bedding material were maintained for two 42-d periods ( = 32; eight replicates/bedding material). Straight- and branched-chained fatty acids, aromatic compounds, and sulfide compounds were measured from the headspace above each bedded pack. Green cedar bedding had the highest concentration of odorous VOCs, and pine chip bedding had the lowest ( dry cedar, corn stover, and pine chip bedding. As the bedded packs aged, the concentration of odorous VOCs increased, particularly in the bedded packs containing green cedar chips and dry cedar chips. Total concentrations increased from Days 0 to 21 and then began to decline and were similar among all bedding materials ( < 0.10). Results of this study indicate that producers using a long-term bedded pack management in their facility may benefit from using pine chips because they do not appear to increase odor over time. Cedar-based bedding materials may be better suited for a scrape-and-haul system, where the bedded pack is removed after 1 or 2 wk. Total concentrations did not differ between any of the four bedding materials over time.

  2. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  3. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  4. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s{sup -1}), amplitude (0 mm-1 mm), bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m) as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups). The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within {+-}15%, was proposed. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s-1, amplitude (0 mm-1 mm, bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups. The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within ±15%, was proposed.

  6. CFD-DEM study of effect of bed thickness for bubbling fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingwen, Li; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Garg, Rahul; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2011-10-01

    The effect of bed thickness in rectangular fluidized beds is investigated through the CFD–DEM simulations of small-scale systems. Numerical results are compared for bubbling fluidized beds of various bed thicknesses with respect to particle packing, bed expansion, bubble behavior, solids velocities, and particle kinetic energy. Good two-dimensional (2D) flow behavior is observed in the bed having a thickness of up to 20 particle diameters. However, a strong three-dimensional (3D) flow behavior is observed in beds with a thickness of 40 particle diameters, indicating the transition from 2D flow to 3D flow within the range of 20–40 particle diameters. Comparison of velocity profiles near the walls and at the center of the bed shows significant impact of the front and back walls on the flow hydrodynamics of pseudo-2D fluidized beds. Hence, for quantitative comparison with experiments in pseudo-2D columns, the effect of walls has to be accounted for in numerical simulations.

  7. CFD-DEM study of effect of bed thickness for bubbling fluidized beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingwen Li; Pradeep Gopalakrishnana; Rahul Garg; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2012-01-01

    The effect of bed thickness in rectangular fluidized beds is investigated through the CFD-DEM simulations of small-scale systems.Numerical results are compared for bubbling fluidized beds of various bed thicknesses with respect to particle packing,bed expansion,bubble behavior,solids velocities,and particle kinetic energy.Good two-dimensional (2D) flow behavior is observed in the bed having a thickness of up to 20 particle diameters.However,a strong three-dimensional (3D) flow behavior is observed in beds with a thickness of 40 particle diameters,indicating the transition from 2D flow to 3D flow within the range of 20-40 particle diameters.Comparison of velocity profiles near the walls and at the center of the bed shows significant impact of the front and back walls on the flow hydrodynamics of pseudo-2D fluidized beds.Hence,for quantitative comparison with experiments in pseudo-2D columns,the effect of wails has to be accounted for in numerical simulations.

  8. Effectiveness of bed bug monitors for detecting and trapping bed bugs in apartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changlu; Tsai, Wan-Tien; Cooper, Richard; White, Jeffrey

    2011-02-01

    Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are now considered a serious urban pest in the United States. Because they are small and difficult to find, there has been strong interest in developing and using monitoring tools to detect bed bugs and evaluate the results of bed bug control efforts. Several bed bug monitoring devices were developed recently, but their effectiveness is unknown. We comparatively evaluated three active monitors that contain attractants: CDC3000, NightWatch, and a home-made dry ice trap. The Climbup Insect Interceptor, a passive monitor (without attractants), was used for estimating the bed bug numbers before and after placing active monitors. The results of the Interceptors also were compared with the results of the active monitors. In occupied apartments, the relative effectiveness of the active monitors was: dry ice trap > CDC3000 > NightWatch. In lightly infested apartments, the Interceptor (operated for 7 d) trapped similar number of bed bugs as the dry ice trap (operated for 1 d) and trapped more bed bugs than CDC3000 and NightWatch (operated for 1 d). The Interceptor was also more effective than visual inspections in detecting the presence of small numbers of bed bugs. CDC3000 and the dry ice trap operated for 1 d were equally as effective as the visual inspections for detecting very low level of infestations, whereas 1-d deployment of NightWatch detected significantly lower number of infestations compared with visual inspections. NightWatch was designed to be able to operate for several consecutive nights. When operated for four nights, NightWatch trapped similar number of bed bugs as the Interceptors operated for 10 d after deployment of NightWatch. We conclude these monitors are effective tools in detecting early bed bug infestations and evaluating the results of bed bug control programs.

  9. Prevention of Bed Agglomeration Problems in a Fluidized Bed Boiler by Finding the Trigging Value of Sewage Sludge Dosage Added to Combustion of Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kajsa; Gervind, Pernilla

    2009-07-01

    Agglomeration of bed sand is a common problem during combustion of biofuels with high ash content in fluidized bed boilers. Former studies have shown that co-combustion of biofuels with sewage sludge increases the agglomeration temperature. Sewage sludge has a low heating value and high ash content. It would therefore be better to use sludge as an additive to the combustion than as a co-combusted biofuel. In this study the trigging value of sludge addition to the combustion of some biofuel was investigated. The effect of adding sludge with different precipitation chemicals, iron sulphate and aluminium sulphate, was investigated. The biofuels used for the experiments were bark, refused derived fuel (RDF) and a mixture of wood and straw, 75/25 % on energy basis. All experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. Analyses of chemical composition of bed sand and SEM/EDX analyses were performed after the combustion. Eventually agglomeration tests were performed in order to find the agglomeration temperature of the samples. Some of the samples sintered during the combustion and were not tested for the agglomeration temperature. SEM/EDX showed that all samples of bed sand contained sand particles with more or less coatings. In some cases the coatings seemed to consist of one dense inner layer and one more porous outer layer. From SEM/EDX and chemical composition analyses it was found that the total amount of phosphorous in the bed sand samples was increased with an increased addition of sludge in all experiments. The concentration of phosphorous was especially higher in the outer layers/coatings. It was also found that elements from the sludge seem to get caught by a sticky layer at the bed sand surface and form a non-sticky or less sticky layer that prevents agglomeration. The total amount of aluminium was increased with an increased addition of sludge for the wood/straw samples, while it increased with an increased amount of combusted fuel for

  10. Effects of Immersed Surfaces on the Combustor Efficiency of Small-Scale Fluidized Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Nurdil Eskin; Afsin Gungor

    2005-01-01

    In this study, effects of the different types of heat exchanger surfaces on the second law efficiency of a small-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor are analyzed and the results are compared with the bubbling fluidized bed coal combustor effectiveness values. Using a previously developed simulation program, combustor efficiency and entropy generation values are obtained at different operation velocities at different height and volume ratios of the immersed surfaces, both for circu...

  11. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  12. Effects of bed-load movement on flow resistance over bed forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Hossein Omid; Masoud Karbasi; Javad Farhoudi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of bed-load transport on flow resistance of alluvial channels with undulated bed was experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in a tilting flume 250 mm wide and 12·5 m long with glass-sides of rectangular cross-section and artificial dune shaped floor that was made from Plexi-glass. Steady flow of clear as against sediment-laden water with different flow depths and velocities were studied in the experiments with a fine sand ($d_{50} =$ 0·5 mm). The results indicate that the transport of fine particles ($d_{50} =$ 0·5 mm) can decrease the friction factor by 22% and 24% respectively for smooth and rough beds. Increasing the bed-load size ($d_{50} =$ 2·84 mm) can decrease the friction factor by 32% and 39% respectively for smooth and rough beds. The decrease in flow resistance is due to filling up of the troughs of dunes. This separation zone is responsible for increasing the flow resistance. On the upstream side of dunes condition is similar to plane bed. Presence of bed-load causes to increase the shear velocity and hence increasing flow resistance. But decreasing in flow resistance is more and it causes to decrease the total flow resistance. Grains saturated the troughs in the bed topography, effectively helping in smoothening of bed irregularities.

  13. Aspen shaving versus chip bedding: effects on breeding and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, E; Demarest, K; Eckert, W J; Cates-Gatto, C; Nadav, T; Cates, L N; Howard, H; Roberts, A J

    2015-01-01

    The choice of laboratory cage bedding material is often based on both practical and husbandry issues, whereas behavioral outcomes rarely appear to be considered. It has been noted that a breeding success difference appears to be associated with the differential use of aspen chip and aspen shaving bedding in our facility; therefore, we sought to analyze breeding records maintained over a 20-month period. In fact, in all four mouse strains analyzed, shaving bedding was associated with a significant increase in average weanlings per litter relative to chip bedding. To determine whether these bedding types also resulted in differences in behaviors associated with wellbeing, we examined nest building, anxiety-like, depressive-like (or helpless-like), and social behavior in mice housed on chip versus shaving bedding. We found differences in the nests built, but no overall effect of bedding type on the other behaviors examined. Therefore, we argue that breeding success, perhaps especially in more challenging strains, is improved on shaving bedding and this is likely due to improved nest-building potential. For standard laboratory practices, however, these bedding types appear equivalent.

  14. Stabilizing effect of plasma discharge on bubbling fluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Dang, Sai-Chao; Ma, Qiang; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-07-01

    Fluidized beds have been widely used for processing granular materials. In this paper, we study the effect of plasma on the fluidization behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed with an atmospheric pressure plasma discharger. Experiment results show that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with the discharge of plasma. When the discharge current reaches a minimum stabilization current Cms, air bubbles in the bed will disappear and the surface fluctuation is completely suppressed. A simplified model is proposed to consider the effect of electric Coulomb force generated by the plasma. It is found that the Coulomb force will propel the particles to move towards the void area, so that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with a high enough plasma discharge. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005 and 11034010).

  15. The effect of hospital bed reduction on the use of beds: a comparative study of 10 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Siegers, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In Europe, the reduction of acute care hospital beds has been one of the measures implemented to restrict hospital expenditure. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effect bed reductions have on the use of the remaining beds within different healthcare systems. We concentrated on two

  16. The lumping of heat transfer parameters in cooled packed beds: effect of the bed entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, E.J.; Gerner, J.W.; Gerner, J.W.; Westerterp, K.R.; van der Wal, S.

    1993-01-01

    The lumping of the heat transfer parameters of the one- and the two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a cooled fixed bed were compared. It appeared that the lumping of the two-dimensional parameters, being the effective radial conductivity h-eff and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall (a

  17. Effects of bed material grain-size distribution on bed morphology at a river confluence - numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadian, Rasool; Đorđević, Dejana; Ghanbari, Sara

    2017-04-01

    50 as the uniform sediment (1.95 mm), but different values of standard deviation (σ ∈(1.5, 2.9)). It is shown that the scour hole is extended further downstream from the separation zone with the increasing non-uniformity of the bed material (increasing σ). However, the zone of maximum scour and its inclination angle with respect to the main channel axis are reduced and moved towards the downstream junction corner. There is pronounced self-armouring of a riverbed within the CHZ. The self-armouring accelerates both bed scouring and the deposition of coarse particles in the flow separation zone. However, it has an adverse effect on the scouring and deposition - the scouring is reduced, while the height of the separation zone bar is increased. Additionally, it is observed that the water surface and bed profiles are out of phase. The maximal water surface elevation is located above the bottom of the scour hole. Water surface longitudinal gradients increase with the increase in the σ-value due to reduction of the scour-hole size and the upstream shift of the bar crest. The possible corridor of sediment movement in the CHZ is a narrow strip which skirts the separation zone bar.

  18. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  19. Analysis of effective solid stresses in a conical spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARBEL A. L. T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of spouted beds have been limited by problems with spout stability. In order to overcome these limitations, research should be concentrated on describing the mechanism by which the spout is developed. This work presents a theoretical and experimental study to describe the effective solid stress distribution in the annular region of a conical spouted bed. From experimental observation, the failure state of the bed of particles at the outset of spouting is identified and related to fluid-particle properties and column dimensions. Linear and angular momentum balances for the solid phase are then formulated as a function of the bed failure state. The set of equations obtained is solved using numerical methods, and results regarding stress distribution, stability and spout shape are presented and discussed.

  20. Effects of gasifying conditions and bed materials on fluidized bed steam gasification of wood biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Horio, Masayuki; Tangsathitkulchai, Chaiyot

    2009-02-01

    The effect of steam gasification conditions on products properties was investigated in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor, using larch wood as the starting material. For bed material effect, calcined limestone and calcined waste concrete gave high content of H(2) and CO(2), while silica sand provided the high content of CO. At 650 degrees C, calcined limestone proved to be most effective for tar adsorption and showed high ability to adsorb CO(2) in bed. At 750 degrees C it could not capture CO(2) but still gave the highest cold gas efficiency (% LHV) of 79.61%. Steam gasification gave higher amount of gas product and higher H(2)/CO ratio than those obtained with N(2) pyrolysis. The combined use of calcined limestone and calcined waste concrete with equal proportion contributed relatively the same gas composition, gas yield and cold gas efficiency as those of calcined limestone, but showed less attrition, sintering, and agglomeration propensities similar to the use of calcined waste concrete alone.

  1. Tube array heat transfer in fluidized beds; a study of particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T.Y.; Welty, J.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-07-01

    Experiments were performed with an array of horizontal tubes, arranged in a regular equilateral triangular pattern, immersed in a fluidized bed operating at 812 {Kappa}. Data are reported for heat transfer between the bed and a centrally-located tube in the array. Both total and radiative heat transfer rates were measured for superficial velocities spanning the range from packed bed conditions to over twice the minimum fluidization velocity. Results are presented for five different-size particles. Local heat transfer values, measured around the tube periphery, and integrated averages are reported for all test conditions. Comparisons are also made between the heat transfer behavior of a tube in an array and that for a single tube in a hot fluidized bed under the same overall operating conditions. The results of this comparison suggests that the two mechanisms, gas convection and radiation, are competing effects.

  2. The effect of hospital bed reduction on the use of beds: a comparative study of 10 European countries.

    OpenAIRE

    Kroneman, M.; Siegers, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In Europe, the reduction of acute care hospital beds has been one of the measures implemented to restrict hospital expenditure. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effect bed reductions have on the use of the remaining beds within different healthcare systems. We concentrated on two healthcare system elements: hospital financing system (per diem and global budget systems) and physician remuneration system (fee-for-service and salary systems). We also controlled for technological...

  3. Effect of prolonged bed rest on the anterior hip muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilani Mendis, M; Hides, Julie A; Wilson, Stephen J; Grimaldi, Alison; Belavý, Daniel L; Stanton, Warren; Felsenberg, Dieter; Rittweger, Joern; Richardson, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    Prolonged bed rest and inactivity is known to cause muscular atrophy with previous research indicating that muscles involved in joint stabilisation are more susceptible. The anterior hip muscles are important for hip joint function and stability but little is known about the effects of prolonged inactivity on their function. This study investigated the effect of prolonged bed rest on the size of the anterior hip muscles and their pattern of recovery. The effect of resistive vibration exercise (RVE) as a countermeasure to muscle atrophy was also investigated. 12 male participants, randomly assigned to either a control or an exercise group, underwent 8 weeks of bed rest with 6 months follow-up. Changes in muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles were measured by magnetic resonance imaging at regular intervals during bed rest and recovery phases. CSAs of iliopsoas and sartorius decreased at the hip joint (piliacus, psoas, and rectus femoris CSAs were unchanged (p>0.05). No significant difference was found between the two groups for all muscles (all p>0.1), suggesting inefficacy of the countermeasure in this sample. These findings suggest that prolonged bed rest can result in the atrophy of specific muscles across the hip joint which may affect its stability and function.

  4. Determination of effective heat transport coefficients for wall-cooled packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence is studied of several assumptions, often made in literature, on the values for the effective radial heat conductivity, wall heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient, as obtained from experiments in wall-cooled packed beds without a chemical reaction. Especially t

  5. Effectiveness of fluidized pellet bed for removing soluble contaminants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaochang; LI Zhihua; WANG Zhen; LI Jinrong; LI Jiayu; CHEN Rong

    2009-01-01

    Fluidized pellet bed (FPB) has been successfully applied in water and wastewater treatment. However, the removal mechanism of contaminants especially the soluble ones, is still unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of FPB reactor for removing soluble contaminants from synthetic wastewater. By only coagulation through jar test operation with addition of polyaluminium chloride (PACl) as primary coagulant and polyacryamide (PAM) as coagulant-aid, the removals of soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), and NH4+-N were found to be only 2.2%--7.5%, 5.7%--25.5%, and 9.9%--18.5%, respectively. However, by FPB operation under the same dosage of coagulants, these values increased to 82.7%, 37.2%, and 50%, indicating that the formation of pellets in the FPB effectively enhanced the removal of soluble contaminants. By careful comparison of the settleablility and filterability of the pollutants after coagulation, the originally soluble contaminants could be divided into three groups, namely: (i) coagulated-and-settleable, (ii) coagulated-but-nonsettleable, and (iii) uncoagulable. It was found that not only the first two groups but also a large part of the third group could be effectively removed by FPB operation. However, the mechanism for the removal of the uncoagulable pollutants by FPB operation still needs further investigation.

  6. Buoyancy Effect on MHD Flow Past a Permeable Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Venkataramana

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of buoyancy force on the parallel flows bounded above by a rigid permeable plate which may be moving or stationary and below, by a permeable bed has been investigated. To discuss the solution, the flow region is divided into two zones. In Zone 1, the flow is laminar and is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations from the impermeable upper rigid plate to the permeable bed. In Zone 2, the flow is governed by the Darcy law in the permeable bed below the nominal surface. The expressions for velocity and temparature distributions, Slip velocity, slip temperature, mass flow rate and the rates of heat transfer coefficients are obtained. The effects of magnetic, porous, slip and buoyancy parameters and Biot number on the above physical quantities are investigated. The thickness of the boundary layer in Zone 2 has been evaluated.

  7. The effect of hospital bed reduction on the use of beds: a comparative study of 10 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneman, Madelon; Siegers, Jacques J

    2004-10-01

    In Europe, the reduction of acute care hospital beds has been one of the measures implemented to restrict hospital expenditure. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effect bed reductions have on the use of the remaining beds within different healthcare systems. We concentrated on two healthcare system elements: hospital financing system (per diem and global budget systems) and physician remuneration system (fee-for-service and salary systems). We also controlled for technological development and demand for healthcare. We used data from the OECD health data files of 10 North-Western European countries on hospital bed supply and use. The hospital bed indicators used were occupancy rate, average length of stay and admission rate. The data were analysed with multilevel analysis. We found some indication that the different financial incentives of hospital financing systems do indeed influence hospital bed use in the case of reductions in acute care hospital bed supply in different ways. However, we found significant effects only for the hospital bed use indicators "occupancy rate" and "admission rate". For physician financing systems, no significant effects were found.

  8. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3083, VIC (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: shengyaojiang@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  9. Implementation of transformed lenses in bed of nails reducing refractive index maximum value and sub-unity regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Daniel R; Osipov, Andrey V; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar

    2015-03-15

    Transformation optics with quasi-conformal mapping is applied to design a Generalized Maxwell Fish-eye Lens (GMFEL) which can be used as a power splitter. The flattened focal line obtained as a result of the transformation allows the lens to adapt to planar antenna feeding systems. Moreover, sub-unity refraction index regions are reduced because of the space compression effect of the transformation, reducing the negative impact of removing those regions when implementing the lens. A technique to reduce the maximum value of the refractive index is presented to compensate for its increase because of the transformation. Finally, the lens is implemented with the bed of nails technology, employing a commercial dielectric slab to improve the range of the effective refractive index. The lens was simulated with a 3D full-wave simulator to validate the design, obtaining an original and feasible power splitter based on a dielectric lens.

  10. The effects of sufentanil in the feline pulmonary vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Alan D; Phelps, James; Baluch, Amir; Ibrahim, Ikhlass N; Hoover, Jason M; Baber, Syed R; Zhang, Cuihua; Armstrong, Christopher; Huffman, Shane; Fields, Aaron

    2006-03-18

    The purpose of this prospective vehicle controlled study was to test the hypothesis that sufentanil induces a depressor response in the pulmonary vascular bed of the cat and identify the receptors involved in the mediation or modulation of these effects. In separate experiments, the effects of diphenydramine (histamine receptor blocker), glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl) ornithine hydrochloride (L-NIO) (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), nimesulide (selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor), and naloxone (opiate receptor antagonist) were investigated on pulmonary arterial responses to sufentanil and other agonists in the feline pulmonary vascular bed. The lobar arterial perfusion pressures were continuously monitored, electronically averaged, and recorded. In the feline pulmonary vascular bed of the isolated left lower lobe, sufentanil induced a dose-dependent vasodepressor response that was not significantly altered after administration of glibenclamide, L-NIO, and nimesulide. However, the responses to sufentanil were significantly attenuated following administration of diphenhydramine and naloxone. The results of the present study suggest that sufentanil has potent vasodepressor activity in the pulmonary vascular bed of the cat and that this response may be mediated or modulated by both histaminergic and opioid receptor sensitive pathways.

  11. Comparison of ANN (MLP), ANFIS, SVM, and RF models for the online classification of heating value of burning municipal solid waste in circulating fluidized bed incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Haihui; Ma, Zengyi; Tang, Yijun; Wang, Yuelan; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa; Huang, Qunxing

    2017-10-01

    The heating values, particularly lower heating values of burning municipal solid waste are critically important parameters in operating circulating fluidized bed incineration systems. However, the heating values change widely and frequently, while there is no reliable real-time instrument to measure heating values in the process of incinerating municipal solid waste. A rapid, cost-effective, and comparative methodology was proposed to evaluate the heating values of burning MSW online based on prior knowledge, expert experience, and data-mining techniques. First, selecting the input variables of the model by analyzing the operational mechanism of circulating fluidized bed incinerators, and the corresponding heating value was classified into one of nine fuzzy expressions according to expert advice. Development of prediction models by employing four different nonlinear models was undertaken, including a multilayer perceptron neural network, a support vector machine, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, and a random forest; a series of optimization schemes were implemented simultaneously in order to improve the performance of each model. Finally, a comprehensive comparison study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the models. Results indicate that the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model outperforms the other three models, with the random forest model performing second-best, and the multilayer perceptron model performing at the worst level. A model with sufficient accuracy would contribute adequately to the control of circulating fluidized bed incinerator operation and provide reliable heating value signals for an automatic combustion control system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of bed height on the biomechanics of hospital bed entry and egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merryweather, Andrew S; Morse, Janice M; Doig, Alexa K; Godfrey, Nathan W; Gervais, Pierre; Bloswick, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    Although a significant proportion of patient falls in hospitals occur in the vicinity of the hospital bed, little is known about the contribution of bed height to fall risk. To compare lower extremity joint torques and angles during hospital bed entry and egress at two bed heights. Twelve adults (age > 55) were purposively selected and had variety of strength and mobility limitations. Biomechanical data for this pilot study were collected with three digital video cameras and processed to obtain estimates for joint torques and included angles. At the low bed height, hip torque for bed entry was significantly higher, and hip, knee, and ankle flexion angles were significantly smaller. The absence of significant differences in knee and ankle torques were the result of a compensation strategy that shifts the center of mass forward by flexing the torso during low bed ingress. Torque data from the egress motion were similar, however 50% of participants were unable to rise from the low bed without assistance. Healthcare providers should be aware that low bed heights pose safety risks to the population for which they were designed-elderly persons at high risk for falling.

  13. Fluid and salt supplementation effect on body hydration and electrolyte homeostasis during bed rest and ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Kuznetsov, Nikolai A.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Bed rest (BR) induces significant urinary and blood electrolyte changes, but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on catabolism, hydration and electrolytes. The aim was to measure the effect of FSS on catabolism, body hydration and electrolytes during BR. Studies were done during 7 days of a pre-bed rest period and during 30 days of a rigorous bed rest period. Thirty male athletes aged, 24.6±7.6 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS groups were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS daily took 30 ml water per kg body weight and 0.1 sodium chloride per kg body weight. Plasma sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels, urinary Na, K, Ca and Mg excretion, plasma osmolality, plasma protein level, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) level increased significantly ( p≤0.05), while plasma volume (PV), body weight, body fat, peak oxygen uptake, food and fluid intake decreased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. In contrast, plasma and urinary electrolytes, osmolality, protein level, whole blood Hct and Hb level decreased significantly ( p≤0.05), while PV, fluid intake, body weight and peak oxygen uptake increased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. The data indicate that FSS stabilizes electrolytes and body hydration during BR, while BR alone induces significant changes in electrolytes and body hydration. We conclude that FSS may be used to prevent catabolism and normalize body hydration status and electrolyte values during BR.

  14. Effect of pressure on combustion of char in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, E.; Blackshaw, H.W.; Davidson, J.F.; Goodyer, P.T.Y.; Hopes, R.B.; Kossakowski, E.R.

    1984-07-01

    Measurements of burn-out time are reported, for 0.25-1.7 mm carbon particles in an air-fluidised 100 mm dia bed of sand at pressures up to 17 bar absolute and bed temperatures of 1023-1173 K. A variety of carbons was used including (i) coke (ii) chars formed from coals of different ranks: thus the carbons had various porosities and surface areas. The effect of increased pressure is to increase the combustion rate, because of the higher oxygen concentration which accelerates the chemical reactions of combustion. On the other hand, pressure has virtually no influence on diffusion of oxygen towards a burning particle, because the higher oxygen concentration is offset by a proportionately lower diffusion coefficient. The overall effect is that as pressure increases, the chemical rate controlling steps become less important, so at very high pressure, combustion is diffusion controlled.

  15. Effects of shear elasticity on sea bed scattering: numerical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakin, A N; Jackson, D R

    1998-01-01

    It is known that marine sediments can support both compressional and shear waves. However, published work on scattering from irregular elastic media has not examined the influence of shear on sea bed scattering in detail. A perturbation model previously developed by the authors for joint roughness-volume scattering is used to study the effects of elasticity for three sea bed types: sedimentary rock, sand with high shear speed, and sand with "normal" shear wave speed. Both bistatic and monostatic cases are considered. For sedimentary rock it is found that shear elasticity tends to increase the importance of volume scattering and decrease the importance of roughness scattering relative to the fluid case. Shear effects are shown to be small for sands.

  16. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°, five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay, two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations. “Score” was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01. Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05 scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01. Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was

  17. On the effect of segregation on intense bimodal bed load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrostlík Štěpán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-channel two-phase flow above a granular mobile bed is studied experimentally and theoretically. In the two-phase flow, water serves as a carrying liquid for plastic grains transported as collisional contact load in the upper-stage plane bed regime. The investigation evaluates friction- and transport characteristics of the flow under the condition of intense collisional transport of grains and links them with the internal structure of the two-phase flow. The paper focusses on the effect of bimodal solids (mixed two fractions of grains of similar density and different size and shape on the flow characteristics and internal structure. Hence, experimental results obtained for the bimodal mixture are compared with results for individual grain fractions. The experiments show that the bimodal character of the transported solids affects the layered internal structure of the flow as a result of fraction segregation due primarily to gravity (kinetic sieving during transport. The segregation also affects the friction- and transport characteristics of intense bed load. In the paper, the effects are described and quantified.

  18. Numerical Simulations of the Effects of a Tidal Turbine Array on Near-Bed Velocity and Local Bed Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gillibrand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to consider the potential effects of energy extraction by an array of tidal turbines on the ambient near-bed velocity field and local bed shear stress in a coastal channel with strong tidal currents. Local bed shear stress plays a key role in local sediment dynamics. The model solves the Reynold-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations on an unstructured mesh using mixed finite element and finite volume techniques. Tidal turbines are represented through an additional form drag in the momentum balance equation, with the thrust imparted and power generated by the turbines being velocity dependent with appropriate cut-in and cut-out velocities. Arrays of 1, 4 and 57 tidal turbines, each of 1.5 MW capacity, were simulated. Effects due to a single turbine and an array of four turbines were negligible. The main effect of the array of 57 turbines was to cause a shift in position of the jet through the tidal channel, as the flow was diverted around the tidal array. The net effect of this shift was to increase near-bed velocities and bed shear stress along the northern perimeter of the array by up to 0.8 m·s−1 and 5 Pa respectively. Within the array and directly downstream, near-bed velocities and bed shear stress were reduced by similar amounts. Changes of this magnitude have the potential to modify the known sand and shell banks in the region. Continued monitoring of the sediment distributions in the region will provide a valuable dataset on the impacts of tidal energy extraction on local sediment dynamics. Finally, the mean power generated per turbine is shown to decrease as the turbine array increased in size.

  19. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  20. EFFECT OF VERTICAL BAFFLES ON PARTICLE MIXING AND DRYING IN FLUIDIZED BEDS OF GROUP D PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chung Lim Law; Siti Masrinda Tasirin; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Derek Geldart

    2003-01-01

    This study reports the effect of vertical baffles on the group D powder mixing and drying characteristics in a batch fluidized bed dryer. Results obtained in this study showed that operating the fluidized bed dryer with vertical baffles gave better particle mixing. This is due to the fact that the vertical baffles acted to limit the growth of small bubbles into large bubbles and the small bubbles caused more vigorous mixing in the bed of particles before finally erupting at the bed surface. Thus, insertion of vertical baffles is a useful way to process group D particles in a fluidized bed, especially when the fluidized bed is large.

  1. Effect of Values-Clarification Workshop on Value Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlde, Carroll D.; Vinitsky, Michael H.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of self-esteem and values-clarification strategies on value awareness were assessed in an hour values-clarification workshop. Subjects participating in the workshop showed significantly greater gains in value awareness than nonparticipants, confirming that values-clarification strategies are valid means for clarifying personal values of…

  2. Effect of flushing condensate by bed water in Bakhar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimov, E.Kh.; Mamiyev, G.S.; Yusufzade, B.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis is made of the features of manifestation of elastic-water pressure mode and flooding of wells in the Bakhar field. Results are presented of operating a series of flooded wells illustrating the effects of flushing of the condensate that has fallen into the bed. The presence of individual interlayers causes selective advance of the water towards the well and results in spasmodic change in water recovery. The period of increased condensate content during flooding is 6-8 months and the additional extracted condensate can reach a high quantity.

  3. The effect of bed rest and an exercise countermeasure on leg venous function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Bleeker, M.W.P.; Groot, P.C.E. de; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Felsenberg, D.; Rittweger, J.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the effect of resistive vibration exercise during bed rest deconditioning on venous vascular dimension and function, as measured with ultrasound in the popliteal vein. Sixteen men were assigned to bed rest (BR-Ctrl) or bed rest with resistive vibration exercise

  4. Effects of ultralow oxygen and vacuum treatments on bed bug (Heteroptera: Cimicidae) survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of bed bugs has always been problematic, balancing among efficacy, safety, and cost. In this study, ultralow oxygen (ULO) and vacuum treatments were tested on bed bugs to develop a safer, effective, and environmental friendly solution to bed bug infestations. ULO treatments were establishe...

  5. Effect of static bed height in the upper fluidized bed on flow behavior in the lower riser section of a coupled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dewu Wang; Chunxi Lu; Chaoyu Yan

    2009-01-01

    To study olefin reduction by using an auxiliary reactor for FCC naphtha upgrading, a large-scale cold model of a riser-bed coupled to an upper fluidized bed was established. The effect of static bed height in the upper fluidized bed on particle flow behavior in the lower riser was investigated experimentally. A restriction index of solids holdup was used to evaluate quantitatively the restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed. Experimental results show that, under the restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed, the riser could be divided into three regions in the longitudinal direction: accelerating, fully developed and restriction. The axial distribution of solids holdup in the riser is characterized by large solids holdup in the top and bottom sections and small solids holdup in the middle section. Overall solids holdup increased with increasing static bed height in the upper fluidized bed, while particle velocity decreased. Such restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed could extend from the middle and top sections to the whole riser volume when riser outlet resistance is increased, which increases with increasing static bed height in the upper fluidized bed. The upper bed exerts the strongest restriction on the area close to the riser outlet.

  6. Investigation of effective thermal conductivity for pebble beds by one-way coupled CFD-DEM method for CFETR WCCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Huang, Kai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A CFD-DEM coupled numerical model is built based on the prototypical blanket pebble bed. • The numerical model can be applied to simulate heat transfer of a pebble bed and estimate effective thermal conductivity. • The numerical model agrees well with the theoretical SZB model. • Effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds for WCCB is estimated by the current model. - Abstract: The mono-sized beryllium pebble bed and the multi-sized Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed are the main schemes for the Water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). And the effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of the pebble beds is important to characterize the thermal performance of WCCB. In this study, a one-way coupled CFD-DEM method was employed to simulate heat transfer and estimate k{sub eff}. The geometric topology of a prototypical blanket pebble bed was produced by the discrete element method (DEM). Based on the geometric topology, the temperature distribution and the k{sub eff} were obtained by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The current numerical model presented a good performance to calculate k{sub eff} of the beryllium pebble bed, and according to the modeling of the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed, k{sub eff} was estimated with values ranged between 2.0 and 4.0 W/(m∙K).

  7. Thermofluid effect on energy storage in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Nadjiba; El Ganaoui, Mohammed; Moummi, Abdelhafid

    2016-05-01

    The development of innovative systems of heat storage is imperative to improve the efficiency of the existing systems used in the thermal solar energy applications. Several techniques were developed and realized in this context. The technology of the sand fluidized bed (sandTES) offers a promising alternative to the current state-of-the-art of the heat storage systems, such as fixed bed using a storage materials, as sand, ceramic, and stones, etc. Indeed, the use of the fluidization technique allows an effective heat transfer to the solid particles. With the sand, an important capacity of storage is obtained by an economic and ecological material [N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, Appl. Mech. Mater. 621, 214 (2014); N. Mahfoudi, A. Khachkouch, A. Moummi B. Benhaoua, M. El Ganaoui, Mech. Ind. 16, 411 (2015); N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, F. Mnasri, K.M. Aboudou, 3e Colloque internationale Francophone d"énergétique et mécanique, Comores, 2014, p. 91]. This paper presents a CFD simulation of the hydrodynamics and the thermal transient behavior of a fluidized bed reactor of sand, to determine the characteristics of storage. The simulation shows a symmetry breaking that occurs and gave way to chaotic transient generation of bubble formation after 3 s. Furthermore, the predicted average temperature of the solid phase (sand) increases gradually versus the time with a gain of 1 °C in an interval of 10 s. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  8. Experimental analysis of the effect of vegetation on flow and bed shear stress distribution in high-curvature bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Donatella

    2016-12-01

    The cross-sectional circulation, which develops in meandering bends, exerts an important role in velocity and the boundary shear stress redistributions. This paper considers the effect of vegetation on cross-sectional flow and bed shear distribution along a high-curvature bend. The analysis is conducted with the aid of data collected in a large-amplitude meandering flume during a reference experiment without vegetation and an experiment with vegetation on the bed. The results show that the presence of vegetation modifies the curvature-induced flow pattern and the directionality of turbulent structures. In fact, in the presence of vegetation, the turbulent structures tend to develop within and between the vegetated elements. The pattern of cross-sectional flow, modified by the presence of vegetation, affects the bed shear stress distribution along the bend so that the core of the highest value of the bed shear stress does not reach the outer bank.

  9. The effect of 8 days of strict bed rest on the incretin effect in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Harder-Lauridsen, Nina Majlund; Benatti, Fabiana Braga

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest and physical inactivity are the consequences of hospital admission for many patients. Physical inactivity induces changes in glucose metabolism, but its effect on the incretin effect, which is reduced in, e.g., Type 2 diabetes, is unknown. To investigate how 8 days of strict bed rest...... affects the incretin effect, 10 healthy nonobese male volunteers underwent 8 days of strict bed rest. Before and after the intervention, all volunteers underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by an intravenous glucose infusion (IVGI) on the following day to mimic the blood glucose profile...... difference between the area under the curve for the insulin response during the OGTT and that of the corresponding IVGI, respectively. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and GIP measured during the OGTT were higher after the bed rest intervention (all P

  10. Effect of promoters on dynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed-Statistical and ANN approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a bubbling fluidized bed column, 99 mm in inside diameter and 960 mm in height, was used to investigate the effect of rod and disc promoters on fluctuation and expansion ratios. Factorial design (statistical approach) and artificial neural network (ANN) models were developed to predict the fluctuation and expansion ratios in this gas-solid fluidized bed with varying gas flow rates, bed heights, particle sizes and densities. The fluctuation and expansion predicted using these statistical and ANN models, for beds with and without promoters, were found to agree well with corresponding experiments. The statistical model was found to be superior to the ANN model due to its ability to take into account both individual and interactive effects. The rod promoters were found to be more effective in reducing bed fluctuation, and in increasing bed expansion at high gas mass velocities.

  11. A study on the effects of operational parameters on bed-to-wall heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, A. [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-08-15

    In this study the effects of operational parameters on bed-to-wall heat transfer in CFBs are investigated such as solids volume fraction, particle diameter, suspension density, solid circulation rate. Based on a previously developed 2D CFB model, a modified cluster renewal model is used in this investigation. The model uses the particle-based approach (PBA) and integrates the hydrodynamics and combustion aspects. The study is also validated with experimental data. As a result of this study, it is observed that the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficients are strongly dependent on particle diameter and solids concentration at the riser wall. The smaller particles result in higher heat transfer coefficients than larger particles for the same solids volume fraction values. The heat transfer coefficient increases with suspension density. However, at a constant suspension density, the superficial velocity does not have a significant influence on the heat transfer coefficient. PBA is satisfactorily adapted to cluster renewal model so that to define the bed-to-wall heat transfer mechanisms for the upper zone.

  12. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  13. NUMERICAL STUDY ON EFFECT OF WAVING BED ON THE SURFACE WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zheng-ren; CHENG You-liang; WANG Song-ling

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the waving bed on the surface wave was investigated. The wave equation was reduced from the potential flow theory with the perturbation technique, and then was solved by using the pseudo-spectral method. The waterfall of the surface wave was simulated with the Matlab. It is shown that for the waving bed, an additional harmonic wave appears on the surface together with the solitary wave existing for the non-waving bed, and two kinds of waves do not interfere with each other. With the development of time, the waveform for the waving bed is kept invariable, and just the amplitude is reduced gradually. Wave-breaking phenomenon for the non-waving bed does not appear, so the waving bed seems useful to prevent the breaking of the wave.

  14. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  15. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 2. Comparison with skewness, asymmetry, and other effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    contributions believed to play a prominent role in cross-shore boundary layer and sediment transport processes: (1) converging-diverging effects from bed slope, (2) wave skewness, (3) wave asymmetry, and (4) waves combined with superposed negative currents (intended to loosely represent, for example, return...... currents or undertow). The effects from each of the four components are isolated and quantified using a standard set of bed shear stress quantities, allowing their easy comparison. For conditions representing large shallow-water waves on steep slopes, the results suggest that converging-diverging effects...... from beach slope may make a significant onshore bed load contribution. Generally, however, the results suggest wave skewness (in addition to conventional steady streaming) as the most important onshore contribution outside the surf zone. Streaming induced within the wave boundary layer is also...

  16. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  17. Thermal field of the Joule-Thomson effect under conditions of bed cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafutdinov, R.F.; Filippov, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Features are examined of the thermal field for the Joule-Thomson effect under bed conditions when there is cooling by injected water. It is indicated that the time for establishing the temperature significantly depends on the thermophysical properties of the bed and underlying rocks. Results of calculations of the temperature relationship for different conditions of well operation are presented.

  18. Effect of Climatic Conditions on Differences in Thermo-Technical Properties of Organic Bedding in Laboratory Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendelová Jana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to analyse the influence of climatic factors on the thermal performance of separated liquid manure. The samples of organic bedding were collected from the lying area of dairy housing and preparatory store. The measurement of properties of recycled manure solids (RMS was carried out in laboratory conditions. Samples were examined with determining the temperature effect on the thermal conductivity λ of ’dry‘ separated liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 60% and ’wet‘ liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 26%, in air temperatures ranging from 0 °C to 40 °C. Subsequently, the thermal resistance of three selected types of cows lying structures was calculated for winter and summer boundary values. Based on the results of thermal conductivity and thermal resistance, it was observed that dry separated liquid manure as an alternative bedding has, in low temperature (up to 5 °C, the most suitable thermal performance if it is maintained in a dry condition (with a dry matter content of 60%. With increasing temperature (above 20 °C and increasing humidity of bedding (below 26%, thermo-technical properties get worse; however, when comparing the thermal resistance of the cow bed structure with sandwich mattresses with a 50 mm layer of organic bedding and the deep cubicle filled with 200 mm of organic bedding, the thermal resistance of floor structure decreases by 7.6% or 18.4%, respectively. With a proper handling of the recycled organic bedding, it is possible to use its economic advantages.

  19. Effects of head-down bed rest on the executive functions and emotional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Liu

    Full Text Available Prolonged bed rest may cause changes in the autonomic nervous system that are related to cognition and emotion. This study adopted an emotional flanker task to evaluate the effect of 45 days -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR on executive functioning in 16 healthy young men at each of six time points: the second-to-last day before the bed rest period, the eleventh, twentieth, thirty-second and fortieth day during the bed rest period, and the eighth day after the bed rest period. In addition, self-report inventories (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, PANAS were conducted to record emotional changes, and the participants' galvanic skin response (GSR, heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV were assessed as measures of physiological activity. The results showed that the participants' reaction time on the flanker task increased significantly relative to their responses on the second-to-last day before the period of bed rest, their galvanic skin response weakened and their degrees of positive affect declined during the bed rest period. Our results provide some evidence for a detrimental effect of prolonged bed rest on executive functioning and positive affect. Whether this stems from a lack of aerobic physical activity and/or the effect of HDBR itself remains to be determined.

  20. Non-linear effects on solute transfer between flowing water and a sediment bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2011-11-15

    A previously developed model of periodic pore water flow in space and time, and associated solute transport in a stream bed of fine sand is extended to coarse sand and fine gravel. The pore water flow immediately below the sediment/water interface becomes intermittently a non-Darcy flow. The periodic pressure and velocity fluctuations considered are induced by near-bed coherent turbulent motions in the stream flow; they penetrate from the sediment/water interface into the sediment pore system and are described by a wave number (χ) and a period (T) that are given as functions of the shear velocity (U(∗)) between the flowing water and the sediment bed. The stream bed has a flat surface without bed forms. The flow field in the sediment pore system is described by the continuity equation and a resistance law that includes both viscous (Darcy) and non-linear (inertial) effects. Simulation results show that non-linear (inertial) effects near the sediment/water interface increase flow resistance and reduce mean flow velocities. Compared to pure Darcy flow, non-linear (inertial) effects reduce solute exchange rates between overlying water and the sediment bed but only by a moderate amount (less than 50%). Turbulent coherent flow structures in the stream flow enhance solute transfer in the pore system of a stream bed compared to pure molecular diffusion, but by much less than standing surface waves or bed forms.

  1. Effect of impulse and bedding on impact toughness of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-jiang; WANG Lai-gui; LI Jian-xin

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the properties of impact toughness of coal at different impact speeds,and the change of impact toughness of lump coal to joint directivity of lump coal,a series of impact tests were conducted on Beijing Da'anshan Lump Coal at different impact speeds and in different impact direction.Through analyzing the test result,it is shown that the change of testing samples is similar when impact is exerted on the vertical bedding and the parallel bedding when the impulse is less than 20 Nos,and the difference increases with the impulse increasing when the impulse is more than 20 Nos.At the same time,the expanding energy of fracture in samples increases with its expanding speed,and the expanding energy of fracture has close relation with the impact direction of the tested samples.And the difference of impact toughness of lump coal produced by different impact direction increase with the impact speed.The fracture surface of lump coal when impact is exerted on the vertical bedding is smooth and the broken block number is fewer;but the fracture surface of lump coal when impact is exerted on the parallel bedding isn't smooth and the broken block number is more,which inflects impact toughness of coal is sensitive to some deficiency.

  2. Effect of impulse and bedding on impact toughness of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-jiang; WANG Lai-gui; LI Jian-xin

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the properties of impact toughness of coal at different impact speeds, and the change of impact toughness of lump coal to joint directivity of lump coal, a series of impact tests were conducted on Beijing Da'anshan Lump Coal at different impact speeds and in different impact direction. Through analyzing the test result, it is shown that the change of testing samples is similar when impact is exerted on the vertical bedding and the parallel bedding when the impulse is less than 20 Nos, and the difference increases with the impulse increasing when the impulse is more than 20 Nos. At the same time, the expanding energy of fracture in samples increases with its expanding speed, and the expanding energy of fracture has close relation with the impact direction of the tested samples. And the difference of impact toughness of lump coal produced by different im-pact direction increase with the impact speed. The fracture surface of lump coal when im-pact is exerted on the vertical bedding is smooth and the broken block number is fewer; but the fracture surface of lump coal when impact is exerted on the parallel bedding isn't smooth and the broken block number is more, which inflects impact toughness of coal is sensitive to some deficiency.

  3. Nonequilibrium effects in fixed-bed interstitial fluid dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronberg, A.E.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Continuum models for the role of the interstitial fluid with respect to mass and heat dispersion in a fixed bed are discussed. It is argued that the departures from local equilibrium and not the concentration and temperature gradients as such should be considered as the driving forces for mass and h

  4. Influence of bedforms on the transverse bed slope effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, A.W.; Kleinhans, M.G.; Smit, Jaco; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The deflection of sediment transport on a transverse slope due to gravity determines the large scale morphology by influencing bar dimensions and bifurcation dynamics. However, existing transverse bed slope predictors in morphodynamic models are based on a small range of flow conditions and sediment

  5. The feedback effect caused by bed load on a turbulent liquid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes; Rosa, Eugênio Spanó

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on the effects due solely to a mobile granular layer on a liquid flow are presented (feedback effect). Nonintrusive measurements were performed in a closed conduit channel of rectangular cross section where grains were transported as bed load by a turbulent water flow. The water velocity profiles were measured over fixed and mobile granular beds of same granulometry by Particle Image Velocimetry. The spatial resolution of the measurements allowed the experimental quantification of the feedback effect. The present findings are of importance for predicting the bed-load transport rate and the pressure drop in activities related to the conveyance of grains.

  6. The determination of values of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials used in track bed structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The report concentrates on the determination of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials (liapor, styrodur, foam concrete. The aim of the report is to gain the necessary input parameters for the numerical modelling of the temperature changes of various track bed structures of the railway line where a part or, if appropriate, the whole protective layer is replaced by the material with better thermal insulation properties. There are described the methods for stating the specific heat capacity as well as the calibration of the calorimeter for stating of the calorimetric constant in the introduction of the report. The parameters needed for calculation of the specific heat capacity of the selected thermal insulation materials are characterized in the second part of the report. There are also introduced the laboratory stated values of the parameter in question. The comparison of the values stated by the laboratory measurements with the values introduced in the technical data sheets from their producers (or if appropriate gained from the foreign sources is made in the conclusion of the report.

  7. Standard metabolic rate of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius: effects of temperature, mass, and life stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic rates provide important information about the biology of organisms. For ectothermic species such as insects, factors such as temperature and mass heavily influence metabolism, but these effects differ considerably between species. In this study we examined the standard metabolic rate of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. We used closed system respirometry and measured both O2 consumption and CO2 production across a range of temperatures (10, 20, 25, 30, 35°C) and life stages, while also accounting for activity. Temperature had a stronger effect on the mass specific .VO2 (mlg(-1)h(-1)) of mated males (Q10=3.29), mated females (Q10=3.19), unmated males (Q10=3.09), and nymphs that hatched (first instars, Q10=3.05) than on unmated females (Q10=2.77) and nymphs that molted (second through fifth instars, Q10=2.78). First instars had significantly lower respiratory quotients (RQ) than all other life stages. RQ of all stages was not affected by temperature. .VO2 (mlh(-1)) scaled more with mass than values previously reported for other arthropods or that would be predicted by the 3/4-power law. The results are used to understand the biology and ecology of the bed bug.

  8. Tracking bed bugs (Cimex lectularius): a study of the effect of physiological and extrinsic factors on the response to bed bug-derived volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, E N I; Logan, J G; Birkett, M A; Pickett, J A; Cameron, M M

    2013-02-01

    The common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, feeds on the blood of mammal and bird hosts, and is a pest of global importance. Semiochemicals are chemicals involved in animal communication that may affect behaviour and/or physiology. Attractive semiochemicals that play a role in mediating bed bug behaviour could be exploited for the development of a highly effective novel monitoring device. Tracking software was used to record the response of bed bugs to volatiles from paper previously exposed to conspecific bugs in a still-air olfactometer illuminated by infrared lights, through a variety of activity variables. The effect of time of day as an extrinsic factor, and sex, stage, mating status and nutritional status as physiological factors on the response of bed bugs to the volatiles was examined. Bed bugs of both sexes and all stages responded to the volatiles from bed bug-exposed papers, showing significant attraction and orientation towards the volatile source whether they were starved or engorged. Confirmation that the physiological factors examined do not affect the response of bed bugs to the volatiles from bed bug-exposed papers provides evidence that these bed bug-derived volatiles contain aggregation cues, as semiochemicals that promote aggregation should by definition be detected by both sexes and all life stages. A device baited with such semiochemicals could play a major role in limiting the impact of the current bed bug resurgence by enabling timely detection of infestations, along with quantitative evaluation of control and effective surveillance of the geographical distribution of the pest species.

  9. Effectiveness of a Sugar-Yeast Monitor and a Chemical Lure for Detecting Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Effective bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) monitors have been actively sought in the past few years to help detect bed bugs and measure the effectiveness of treatments. Most of the available active monitors are either expensive or ineffective. We designed a simple and affordable active bed bug monitor that uses sugar-yeast fermentation and an experimental chemical lure to detect bed bugs. The sugar-yeast mixture released carbon dioxide at a similar rate (average 405.1 ml/min) as dry ice (average 397.0 ml/min) during the first 8 h after activation. In naturally infested apartments, the sugar-yeast monitor containing an experimental chemical lure (nonanal, L-lactic acid, 1-octen-3-ol, and spearmint oil) was equally effective as the dry ice monitor containing the same lure in trapping bed bugs. Placing one sugar-yeast monitor per apartment for 1-d was equally effective as 11-d placement of 6-18 Climbup insect interceptors (a commonly used bed bug monitor) under furniture legs for trapping bed bugs. When carbon dioxide was present, pair-wise comparisons showed the experimental lure increased trap catch by 7.2 times. This sugar-yeast monitor with a chemical lure is an affordable and effective tool for monitoring bed bugs. This monitor is especially useful for monitoring bed bugs where a human host is not present. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. CNPC Develops Effective Coal-bed Methane Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The technology for recovery of coal-bed methane developed by China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), which is the parent company of PetroChina, will help the nation lower reliance on overseas companies and better position itself to produce that resource at a low cost. Trapped in coal deposits, the special type of methane is one among several types of high-energy unconventional gases that are expected to become important sources of the country's energy.

  11. The Effect of Fines in Mixed Size Sediment Transport in a Gravel Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. M.; Baumgardner, S.; Gaffney, J.; Wilcock, P.; Paola, C.

    2011-12-01

    Washload is a widely recognized concept that remains difficult to define. In a gravel-bed river, washload has been defined as those sizes present in the bed only in small proportions. It has also been defined as the portion of transported sediment that has little effect on bed material transport. We experimentally investigate the impact of fine sediment on the mobility and composition of a gravel bed. We conducted flume experiments using a constant water discharge and feed rate of gravel. After reaching steady state, we doubled the feed rate by feeding sediment of finer size, using size ratios from 1:1 to 1:16. As we decrease the size of the fine particles relative to the size of the gravel particles, the system transitions between three regimes. (1) For particle size ratios close to one, the bed slope increases to supply the additional shear stress needed to transport the additional load of similar-sized particles. (2) For intermediate particle size ratios the increased fines content increases the mobility of the sediment mix, resulting in a decreased bed slope. The bed composition is a mix of fine and coarse grains. (3) For the largest particle size ratios (the smallest fines), the additional fines travel primarily in suspension and cause essentially no change in bed slope, though the subsurface becomes clogged with fine sediment. The behavior for near-unity and intermediate particle size ratios can be predicted using a mixed-size bed-material transport formula. For the mixtures with the smallest fine particles, the presence of fines has little effect on the mobility of the gravel and thus the total transport can no longer be predicted with a bed material transport formula. These results provide useful insights concerning the nature of wash load. The effect of sediment feed on gravel mobility and bed slope is not controlled solely by the amount of fines in the bed (the first definition of wash load), but also depends strongly on the relative grain size of the

  12. Quantification of the bed load effects on turbulent open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Detian; Liu, Xiaofeng; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Guangqian

    2016-04-01

    With a computational model combining large eddy simulation and a discrete element model, detailed quantification of the bed load effects on turbulent open-channel flows is presented. The objective is the revelation of bed load particle impact on the mean flow properties and coherent structures. Two comparative numerical experiments with mobile and immobile beds are conducted. Mean properties (e.g., velocity and Reynolds stress profiles) show good agreement with experimental data. Comparing the mobile and immobile cases, the effective bed position is nearly the same, whereas the equivalent sand roughness is changed. The flow experiences higher bottom shear stress over immobile bed. To quantify impact on turbulent structures, a revised quadrant analysis is performed to calculate four key parameters of ejection and sweep events (duration, maximum shear stress, transported momentum, and period). Results show that the ejection and sweep events have comparable importance in the outer region. However, sweep becomes dominant in the near-wall region. The motion of particles enhances the sweep dominance by breaking up the ejection structures and decreasing their occurrence ratio. The results also suggest that the ejection events are easier to be influenced by the particle motions because they originate from the near-wall region. The duration, maximum shear stress, and transported momentum decrease close to the bed. The period remains relatively constant in the outer region but decreases near the bed. Visualization of the coherent structure reveals that the instantaneous particle motion has strong correlation with the bursting cycle events.

  13. Effect of plastic tarps over raised-beds and potassium thiosulfate in furrows on chloropicrin emissions from drip fumigated fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ruijun; Gao, Suduan; McDonald, Jason A; Ajwa, Husein; Shem-Tov, Shachar; Sullivan, David A

    2008-06-01

    Plastic tarps are commonly used in raised bed strawberry production to minimize emissions of preplant soil fumigants and are left in place throughout the growing season as part of the standard cultural practices. Soil amendments with chemicals such as thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)) can reduce fumigant emissions. A field study was conducted near Santa Maria, CA to determine the effects of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and virtually impermeable film (VIF) over raised-beds and applying potassium thiosulfate (KTS) in furrows on reducing chloropicrin (CP) emissions from a strawberry field. Four fields (or treatments) were tested with 224 kg ha(-1) CP drip-applied threecm under the soil surface. The CP flux from bed tops and furrows and gas-phase concentrations under the tarps were monitored for five d. The CP emission flux and concentration under tarp were highest immediately following application. Diurnal temperature change affected CP concentration and emission fluxes (higher values during the day and lower at night). Slightly higher CP cumulative emission occurred using LDPE tarp (19%) compared to VIF (17%). Normalized flux (CP emission flux from the beds divided by CP concentration under the tarp) being estimated from field measurement was slightly higher for LDPE than VIF indicating different tarp permeability in the field. Because of extremely low emissions from the furrows (emission loss), KTS application to furrow treatments did not show further emission reductions than non-KTS treatments. This indicates that emission reduction should focus on the tarp above raised-beds when fumigant was drip-applied near bed-surface.

  14. IN THE FLUIDIZED BED THE EFFECT OF SOLID QUANTITY ON THE HEIGHT OF BED AND SOLID OF RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Bekir KOÇ

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of meeting the growing demand for electric power and heat, coal will play an increasingly important role in the world wide. Fluidized combustion offers a clean and relatively inexpensive method for coal combustion, a method insensitive to fuel quality and capable of reducing sulfur and nitric oxides emission. At the work, a prototype fluid bed was produced and the distance between the holes had been narrower towards to the center of the distributor sieve in order to balance the distribution of the air. Later on, the quantity of the coal was decreased continuously and at the end of the measurements, the heights of the solids and the rates of the solid had been defined and the effects of the coal quantity had been investigated.

  15. Exercise Effects on the Course of Gray Matter Changes Over 70 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, V.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight affects posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes through direct effects on peripheral changes that result from reduced vestibular stimulation and body unloading. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on earth using bed rest studies. Long duration bed rest serves as a space-flight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. It has been hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that has been observed in microgravity could potentially affect central nervous system function and structure, and thereby indirectly affect sensorimotor or cognitive functioning. Preliminary results of one of our ongoing studies indeed showed that 70 days of long duration head down-tilt bed rest results in focal changes in gray matter volume from pre-bed rest to various time points during bed rest. These gray matter changes that could reflect fluid shifts as well as neuroplasticity were related to decrements in motor skills such as maintenance of equilibrium. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both inand post-flight we are currently conducting a study that investigates the potential preventive effects of exercise on gray matter and motor performance changes that we observed over the course of bed rest. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain structure and cognitive performance in healthy and demented subjects over a large age range. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention in bed rest could potentially mitigate or prevent the effects of bed rest on the central nervous system. Here we present preliminary outcomes of our study.

  16. Effect of prolonged standardized bed rest on cystatin C and other markers of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinell Karin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sedentary lifestyle is associated with coronary artery disease but even shorter periods of physical inactivity may increase cardiovascular risk. Cystatin C is independently associated with cardiovascular disease and our objective was to investigate the relation between this novel biomarker and standardized bed rest. Research of immobilization physiology in humans is challenging because good biological models are in short supply. From the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study (WISE we studied markers of atherosclerosis and kidney function, including cystatin C, in a standardized bed rest study on healthy volunteers. Fifteen healthy female volunteers participated in a 20-day ambulatory control period followed by 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6° 24 h a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n = 8 that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n = 7 that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training. Results Compared to baseline values there was a statistically significant increase in cystatin C in both groups after bed rest (P Conclusion During and following prolonged standardized bed rest the concentrations of several clinically relevant cardiovascular risk markers change.

  17. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Brain Functional Connectivity and Sensorimotor Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Castenada, R. Riascos; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor functioning. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt (HDT) position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with behavior is largely unknown, but of importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. In the present study, we investigate the effects of prolonged exposure to HDT bed rest on resting state brain functional connectivity and its association with behavioral changes in 17 male participants. To validate that our findings were not due to confounding factors such as time or task practice, we also acquired resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and behavioral measurements from 14 normative control participants at four time points. Bed rest participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Rs-fMRI and behavioral data were obtained at seven time points averaging around: 12 and 8 days prior to bed rest; 7, 50, and 70 days during bed rest; and 8 and 12 days after bed rest. 70 days of HDT bed rest resulted in significant increases in functional connectivity during bed rest followed by a reversal of changes in the post bed rest recovery period between motor cortical and somatosensory areas of the brain. In contrast, decreases in connectivity were observed between temporoparietal regions. Furthermore, post-hoc correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between motor-somatosensory network connectivity and standing balance performance changes; participants that exhibited the greatest increases in connectivity strength showed the least deterioration in postural

  18. Value-Based Purchasing: The Effect of Hospital Ownership and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, J Seth

    2016-01-01

    This research tests the effect of hospital ownership and size on value-based purchasing scores. Representative samples were randomly selected of short-term acute-care hospitals from across the nation and grouped into 3 categories of both ownership and size. The ownership categories are as follows: (1) for-profit, (2) nonprofit, and (3) government. The size categories are as follows: (1) small, 99 beds or fewer; (2) medium, 100 to 249 beds; (3) large, 250 beds or more. Value-based purchasing scores for the 12 process-of-care (PC) measures and the 8 patient experience-of-care (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System [HCAHPS]) measures were calculated and combined into their single total performance score (TPS). The results reveal that for-profit controlled hospitals outperform both nonprofit and government-controlled hospitals in PC measures, HCAHPS measures, and value-based purchasing TPSs. The results also reveal that small hospitals (≤99 beds) outperform both medium hospitals (100-249 beds) and large hospitals (≥250 beds) in PC measures, HCAHPS measures, and TPS. Results are discussed.

  19. Effect of ash content on the combustion process of simulated MSW in the fixed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2016-02-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigates the effects of ash content on the combustion process of simulated Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). A fixed-bed experimental reactor was utilized to reveal the combustion characteristics. Temperature distributions, ignition front velocity, and the characteristics of gas species' release were measured and simulated during the combustion process. In the present work, the two-dimensional unsteady mathematical heterogeneous model was developed to simulate the combustion process in the bed, including the process rate model as well as NOx production model. The simulation results in the bed are accordant with the experimental results. The results show that as ash content increases, the lower burning rate of fuel results in char particles leaving the grate without being fully burned, causing a loss of combustible material in the MSW in a fixed bed and therefore reducing the combustion efficiency and increasing the burning time of the MSW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The experiment study on slippage effect of the coal-bed methane transfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.; Pan, Y.; Xiao, C.; Chen, C. [Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin (China). College of Science

    2008-12-15

    When gas flows in a compact porous medium at low speed, it has a slippage effect which is caused by molecular collisions of gas with the solid skeleton. Using the gas transfusion slippage effect for researching coal bed transfusion, a mathematical model of the coal bed was established which considered the slippage effect. The experiment indicates that the higher the surrounding pressure, the more marked is the slippage effect. At the same condition of axial pressure and surrounding pressure, with an increase of the hole pressure, the coal permeability become higher and then lower. The coal body effective stress and the permeability curve also has the same change tendency. Thus the conclusion can be drawn that the transfusion of the gas in the coal bed generally has a slippage effect. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The experiment study on slippage effect of the coal-bed methane transfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xiao-hua; PAN Yi-shan; XIAO Xiao-chun; CHEN Chang-hua

    2008-01-01

    When the gas flow in the compact porous medium at low speed,it has slippage effect which is caused by the gas molecular collision whit the solidskeleton.Using the gas transfusion slippage effect at researching the coal bed transfusion rule,established the transfusion mathematical model of the coal bed which had considered the slippage effect.Observing the influence of the different toencircle presses,the different hole press and the different actual stress to the coal bed by using the three-axles permeameter.Thus summarized the transfusion rule of the coal bed.The experiment indicates that the bigger of the surrounding pressure,the more obvious of the slippage effect.At the same condition of axial pressure and the surrounding pressure,with the increase of the hole pressure,the coal permeability became bigger and then smaller.The coal body effective tress and the permeability curve nearly also has the same change tendency.Thus we can draws the conclusion that the transfusion of the gas in the coal bed generally has the slippage effect.

  2. The experiment study on slippage effect of the coal-bed methane transfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xiao-hua; PAN Yi-shan; XIAO Xiao-chun; CHEN Chang-hua

    2008-01-01

    When the gas flow in the compact porous medium at low speed, it has slippage effect which is caused by the gas molecular collision whit the solidskeleton. Using the gas transfusion slippage effect at researching the coal bed transfusion rule, established the transfusion mathematical model of the coal bed which had considered the slippage effect. Observing the influence of the different toencircle presses, the different hole press and the different actual stress to the coal bed by using the three-axles permeameter. Thus sum-marized the transfusion rule of the coal bed. The experiment indicates that the bigger of the surrounding pressure, the more obvious of the slippage effect. At the same condition of axial pressure and the surrounding pressure, with the increase of the hole pressure, the coal permeability became bigger and then smaller. The coal body effective tress and the permeability curve nearly also has the same change tendency. Thus we can draws the conclusion that the transfusion of the gas in the coal bed generally has the slippage effect.

  3. Effect of Operating Conditions on Catalytic Gasification of Bamboo in a Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanasit Wongsiriamnuay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic gasification of bamboo in a laboratory-scale, fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of reactor temperature (400, 500, and 600°C, gasifying medium (air and air/steam, and catalyst to biomass ratio (0 : 1, 1 : 1, and 1.5 : 1 on product gas composition, H2/CO ratio, carbon conversion efficiency, heating value, and tar conversion. From the results obtained, it was shown that at 400°C with air/steam gasification, maximum hydrogen content of 16.5% v/v, carbon conversion efficiency of 98.5%, and tar conversion of 80% were obtained. The presence of catalyst was found to promote the tar reforming reaction and resulted in improvement of heating value, carbon conversion efficiency, and gas yield due to increases in H2, CO, and CH4. The presence of steam and dolomite had an effect on the increasing of tar conversion.

  4. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  5. Effect of substrate concentration on dark fermentation hydrogen production using an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, Eduardo Lucena Cavalcante; Sader, Leandro Takano; Silva, Edson Luiz

    2012-03-01

    The effect of substrate (glucose) concentration on the stability and yield of a continuous fermentative process that produces hydrogen was studied. Four anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs) were operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 1 to 8 h and an influent glucose concentration from 2 to 25 g L(-1). The reactors were inoculated with thermally pre-treated anaerobic sludge and operated at a temperature of 30 °C with an influent pH around 5.5 and an effluent pH of about 3.5. The AFBRs with a HRT of 2 h and a feed strength of 2, 4, and 10 g L(-1) showed satisfactory H(2) production performance, but the reactor fed with 25 g L(-1) of glucose did not. The highest hydrogen yield value was obtained in the reactor with a glucose concentration of 2 g L(-1) when it was operated at a HRT of 2 h. The maximum hydrogen production rate value was achieved in the reactor with a HRT of 1 h and a feed strength of 10 g L(-1). The AFBRs operated with glucose concentrations of 2 and 4 g L(-1) produced greater amounts of acetic and butyric acids, while AFBRs with higher glucose concentrations produced a greater amount of solvents.

  6. Effects of 60-day bed rest with and without exercise on cellular and humoral immunological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Paula; Belavý, Daniel L; Huscher, Dörte; Lang, Annemarie; Hahne, Martin; Kuhlmey, Anne-Kathrin; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Fitzner, Rudolf; Perschel, Frank H; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Straub, Rainer H; Felsenberg, Dieter; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Exercise at regular intervals is assumed to have a positive effect on immune functions. Conversely, after spaceflight and under simulated weightlessness (e.g., bed rest), immune functions can be suppressed. We aimed to assess the effects of simulated weightlessness (Second Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2) on immunological parameters and to investigate the effect of exercise (resistive exercise with and without vibration) on these changes. Twenty-four physically and mentally healthy male volunteers (20-45 years) performed resistive vibration exercise (n=7), resistance exercise without vibration (n=8) or no exercise (n=9) within 60 days of bed rest. Blood samples were taken 2 days before bed rest, on days 19 and 60 of bed rest. Composition of immune cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines and neuroendocrine parameters were analyzed by Luminex technology and ELISA/RIA in plasma. General changes over time were identified by paired t-test, and exercise-dependent effects by pairwise repeated measurements (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). With all subjects pooled, the number of granulocytes, natural killer T cells, hematopoietic stem cells and CD45RA and CD25 co-expressing T cells increased and the number of monocytes decreased significantly during the study; the concentration of eotaxin decreased significantly. Different impacts of exercise were seen for lymphocytes, B cells, especially the IgD(+) subpopulation of B cells and the concentrations of IP-10, RANTES and DHEA-S. We conclude that prolonged bed rest significantly impacts immune cell populations and cytokine concentrations. Exercise was able to specifically influence different immunological parameters. In summary, our data fit the hypothesis of immunoprotection by exercise and may point toward even superior effects by resistive vibration exercise.

  7. The effect of different methods of seed bed preparation on greenhouse cucumber yield and yield components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Momeni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of different methods of seed bed preparation on yield of greenhouse cucumber, a two-year long experiment was conducted as a randomized complete block design with four replications in Jiroft from 2004. Different methods of seed bed preparation were as follows: 1 ridge with 20 cm height and 50 cm width and 2 plant rows with 40 cm distance, 2 furrow with 20 cm depth and 50 cm width and 2 plant rows inside, with 40 cm distance, and 3 planting on flat area with 40 cm distance. The results showed that the effect of planting bed on yield of greenhouse cucumber was significant. Furrow and flat area increased yield significantly, compared to the ridge treatment. Analysis of yield components such as plant height, number of pickling fruits, number of leaves, photosynthetic area and number of flowers showed that they are all correlated with fruit yield. The number of pickling fruits was significantly more in furrow and flat area than in ridge treatment. The height of cucumber plants on flat bed was significantly higher than that of the other treatments. The number of leaves and photosynthetic area of plants on flat bed were significantly greater than those in the other treatments. The least dead plants due to fungi disease were observed in ridge treatment. In view of yield and its components under the condition of this experiment, it can be concluded that flat area and furrow treatments are better than ridge treatment.

  8. Effects of biofilm on flow over and through a permeable bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Aybar, Marcelo; Perez-Calleja, Patricia; Nerenberg, Robert; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Best, James; Sambrook-Smith, Gregory; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the interface of fluids and solids, such as riverbeds. Biofilms are permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structures that can influence the flow and mass/momentum transport, yet their interaction with flow is not fully understood in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. The porosity of river beds results in the generation of a diverse mosaic of 'suction' and 'ejection' events that are far removed from typical assumptions of turbulent flow structure over an impermeable bed. In this work, the effect of biofilm on bed permeability is studied. Experiments are conducted in a closed water channel equipped with 4-cm-deep permeable bed models consisting of horizontal cylinders normal to the bulk flow direction, forming an idealized two-dimensional permeable bed. Prior to conducting flow experiments, the models are placed within an independent biofilm reactor to initiate and control the biofilm growth. Once a targeted biofilm growth stage is achieved, the models are transferred to the water channel and subjected to transitional and turbulent flows. Long-distance microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements are performed to quantify the effect of biofilm on the turbulence structure of the free flow as well as the freestream-subsurface flow interaction.

  9. Effect of Fluidized Bed Stirring on Drying Process of Adhesive Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hoffman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an attempt to optimize fluidized bed drying of wet and adhesive particles (with an initial diameter of about 580 mm with the use of stirring, and discusses the influence of stirring on the total drying time. The goal was to demonstrate the positive effect of stirring a fluidized bed to the drying time, to find the optimal parameters (stirrer design, speed, and size. Experiments were conducted on a drying chamber in batch operation. The objective was to evaluate the effect of stirring on the total drying time. The drying chambers were 85 mm, 100 mm, and 140 mm in diameter. An optimal stirrer shape and speed were specified. Our arrangement of the fluidized bed resulted in a decrease in drying time by up to 40 %.

  10. Effect of bed width on the quality of compressions in simulated resuscitation: a randomized crossover manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian-Long; Sheng, Li-Ping; Wang, Jing; Li, Shun-Qing; Wang, Huang-Lei; Ni, Shao-Zhou; Jiang, Shan; Zhao, Yan; Shen, Jun; Yang, Qi-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of bed width on the quality of chest compressions during simulated in-hospital resuscitation. Each candidate performed two 2-minute cycles of compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation on an adult manikin placed on either an emergency stretcher (narrow bed) or a standard hospital bed (wide bed) in random order at 1 day intervals. We conducted subjective assessments of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and rescuer fatigue at the end of each session, using surveys. There were no significant differences between narrow and wide bed sessions in either mean depth or the percentage of compressions with adequate depth (P=.56 and .58, respectively). The mean rate of compressions and the percentage of compressions with adequate rate were also similar between sessions (P=.24 and .27, respectively). However, the percentage of correct hand position and complete chest recoil was significantly higher in the narrow bed session than in the wide bed session (P=.02 and .02, respectively). In addition, survey results showed that rescuers felt more comfortable and less exhausted in the narrow bed session compared with the wide bed session (Phospital bed. Therefore, we propose a narrow bed for critically ill inpatients with high risk of cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of direct effects of enoximone on systemic and pulmonary vascular bed in animals with a Jarvik total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, P H; Rande, J L; Okude, J; Wan, F; Brunet, S; Thoraval, F R; Cachera, J P; Loisance, D Y

    1992-03-01

    Enoximone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has positive inotropic and vasodilating actions. To evaluate specific effects of this drug on the systemic and pulmonary vascular bed, we administered enoximone as a 10-minute intravenous bolus at two different doses of 2 and 3 mg/kg of body weight, at different days, to five Holstein calves with a Jarvik 7-70 ml total artificial heart (Symbion, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah). The calves were monitored for aortic pressure, right atrial pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and left atrial pressure. For each experiment cardiac output was maintained constant, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances were calculated at 0, 15, 30, and 60 minutes and every hour for 8 hours after infusion. Statistical analysis used analysis of variance and the paired t test with Bonferroni's correction. Data showed the following: (1) a marked systemic vasodilating action of enoximone at peak effect at 30 minutes with a 20% decrease in systemic vascular resistance from baseline value under constant cardiac output, returning progressively to normal values throughout the 8 hours; (2) a comparable effect for the two separate doses tested; (3) no specific action on the pulmonary vascular bed with "nonunidirectional" changes in pulmonary vascular resistance. This model was validated by the infusion of prostaglandin I2 in the same animals, at different days, which significantly decreased pulmonary vascular resistance of 50% at peak effect, under constant cardiac output. In summary, enoximone showed a proper systemic vasodilating effect with no specific action on the pulmonary vascular bed in an animal model of the total artificial heart. Decrease in pulmonary vascular resistances obtained with enoximone in clinical practice seems more related to the inotropic properties of the drug. Enoximone should not be administered in pulmonary hypertension, as suggested before.

  12. Effect of Chinese herbal medicine on vascular functions during 60-day head-down bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Alameddine, Asmaa; Coupé, Mickael; Navasiolava, Nastassia M; Li, Yongzhi; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Bai, Yanqiang; Jiang, Shizhong; Wan, Yumin; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Yinghui; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2015-09-01

    Chinese herbal medicine is a promising countermeasure against cardiovascular dysfunction associated with a sedentary lifestyle. We examined the impact of the Chinese herb, Taikong Yangxin, on the micro- and macrovascular dysfunction associated with a 60-day bed rest. Fourteen healthy men were randomly divided into two groups: those given herbal supplement, and the control group; the two groups underwent a 60-day bed rest. The macrovasculature was assessed by sonography. Skin microvascular functions were assessed with laser Doppler. The plasma level of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), markers of endothelial injury, was determined. Bed rest induced a 33 % decrease in the femoral artery diameter and compliance whereas carotid wall thickness, diameter, and compliance remained unchanged. The early phase of endothelium-dependent vasodilation to ACh was unmodified by bed rest, while the late phase was reduced by 30 % along with a twofold increase in EMPs. In those given Taikong Yangxin, the early phase was amplified by 2.5-fold, and the effects of bed rest on the late phase were prevented. These findings indicate that Taikong Yangxin ameliorates endothelium-dependent vasodilation, likely by improving the NO pathway. The study suggests Taikong Yangxin as a new countermeasure to prevent the changes in microvascular function induced by physical inactivity.

  13. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczuk, Artur

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR) on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater) and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  14. LONG TERM EFFECTS OF REHABILITATION MEASURES ON BED LOAD TRANSPORT AT THE SALZACH RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sven HARTMANN

    2001-01-01

    The river Salzach and its tributary Saalach as part of the border line between Germany and Austria represents a permanent water management problem since centuries. While in former times threats for the people mainly arose from severe flood events the present situation is characterized by significant ecological deficits. These were caused by a rectification of the river resulting in a concentration of the flow followed by erosion of the river bed. The situation got worse in the late 60s after construction of hydropower plants started upstream holding back nearly all bed load material. The degradation of the river bed in the downstream section of the Salzach is stated critical by the authorities in respect of the lack of sufficient gravel remaining on top of fine material. As erosion processes of fine sand and silt cannot be predicted accurately but will be probably much faster than those of the gravel bed measures are necessary to stabilize the river bottom to avoid major damages of the embankments and further degradation of the groundwater table. Different alternatives were investigated in a framework of a wide range of studies over the past years. One of the major tasks was to estimate the long term effects on bed load transport.

  15. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  16. An overview of the issues: physiological effects of bed rest and restricted physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity with confinement to bed rest is well recognized. Underlying physiological mechanisms include dramatic reductions in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake. However, bed rest by itself does not appear to contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Increased muscle fatigue is associated with reduced muscle blood flow, red cell volume, capillarization and oxidative enzymes. Loss of muscle mass and bone density may be reflected by reduced muscle strength and higher risk for injury to bones and joints. The resultant deconditioning caused by bed rest can be independent of the primary disease and physically debilitating in patients who attempt to reambulate to normal active living and working. A challenge to clinicians and health care specialists has been the identification of appropriate and effective methods to restore physical capacity of patients during or after restricted physical activity associated with prolonged bed rest. The examination of physiological responses to bed rest deconditioning and exercise training in healthy subjects has provided significant information to develop effective rehabilitation treatments. The successful application of acute exercise to enhance orthostatic stability, daily endurance exercise to maintain aerobic capacity, or specific resistance exercises to maintain musculoskeletal integrity rather than the use of surgical, pharmacological, and other medical treatments for clinical conditions has been enhanced by investigation and understanding of underlying mechanisms that distinguish physical deconditioning from the disease. This symposium presents an overview of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with reduced physical work capacity following prolonged bed rest and exercise training regimens that have proven successful in ameliorating or reversing these adverse effects.

  17. An overview of the issues: physiological effects of bed rest and restricted physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of exercise capacity with confinement to bed rest is well recognized. Underlying physiological mechanisms include dramatic reductions in maximal stroke volume, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake. However, bed rest by itself does not appear to contribute to cardiac dysfunction. Increased muscle fatigue is associated with reduced muscle blood flow, red cell volume, capillarization and oxidative enzymes. Loss of muscle mass and bone density may be reflected by reduced muscle strength and higher risk for injury to bones and joints. The resultant deconditioning caused by bed rest can be independent of the primary disease and physically debilitating in patients who attempt to reambulate to normal active living and working. A challenge to clinicians and health care specialists has been the identification of appropriate and effective methods to restore physical capacity of patients during or after restricted physical activity associated with prolonged bed rest. The examination of physiological responses to bed rest deconditioning and exercise training in healthy subjects has provided significant information to develop effective rehabilitation treatments. The successful application of acute exercise to enhance orthostatic stability, daily endurance exercise to maintain aerobic capacity, or specific resistance exercises to maintain musculoskeletal integrity rather than the use of surgical, pharmacological, and other medical treatments for clinical conditions has been enhanced by investigation and understanding of underlying mechanisms that distinguish physical deconditioning from the disease. This symposium presents an overview of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with reduced physical work capacity following prolonged bed rest and exercise training regimens that have proven successful in ameliorating or reversing these adverse effects.

  18. The effect of biomass immobilization support material and bed porosity on hydrogen production in an upflow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, B S; Saavedra, N K; Maintinguer, S I; Sette, L D; Oliveira, V M; Varesche, M B A; Zaiat, M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the support material used for biomass attachment and bed porosity on the potential generation of hydrogen gas in an anaerobic bioreactor treating low-strength wastewater. For this purpose, an upflow anaerobic packed-bed (UAPB) reactor fed with sucrose-based synthetic wastewater was used. Three reactors with various support materials (expanded clay, vegetal coal, and low-density polyethylene) were operated for hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.5 and 2 h. Based on the results obtained, three further reactors were operated with low-density polyethylene as a material support using various bed porosities (91, 75, and 50 %) for an HRT of 0.5 h. The UAPB reactor was found to be a feasible technology for hydrogen production, reaching a maximum substrate-based hydrogen yield of 7 mol H₂ mol(-1) sucrose for an HRT of 0.5 h. The type of support material used did not affect hydrogen production or the microbial population inside the reactor. Increasing the bed porosity to 91 % provided a continuous and cyclic production of hydrogen, whereas the lower bed porosities resulted in a reduced time of hydrogen production due to biomass accumulation, which resulted in a decreasing working volume.

  19. Effect of H2O2 injection patterns on catalyst bed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjae; Lee, Dahae; Kang, Shinjae; Kwon, Sejin

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition process of hydrogen peroxide can be applied to a bipropellant thruster, as well as to monopropellant thruster. To provide a framework for the optimal design of the injector and catalyst bed depending on a type of thruster, this research scrutinizes the effect of injection patterns of the propellant on the performance of the catalyst bed. A showerhead injector and impinging jet injector were tested with a 50 N monopropellant thruster. Manganese oxide/γ-alumina catalyst and manganese oxide/lanthanum-doped alumina catalyst were prepared and tested. The showerhead injector provided a fast response time, suitable for pulse mode operation. The impinging jet injector mitigated the performance instability and catalyst attrition that is favorable for large scale bipropellant thrusters. The design of a dual catalyst bed was conceptually proposed based on the data obtained from firing tests.

  20. Effect of temperature in fluidized bed fast pyrolysis of biomass: oil quality assessment in test units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  1. Effect of Temperature in Fluidized Bed Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass: Oil Quality Assessment in Test Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, R.J.M.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  2. Experimental investigation of a draft tube spouted bed for effects of geometric parameters on operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizaddini, Seyednezamaddin; Lin, Weigang; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Experiments are performed in a draft tube spouted bed (DTSB) to investigate effects of the operating conditions and the geometric parameters on the hydrodynamics. Geometry parameters, such as heights of the entrained zone, draft tube inner diameter, inner angle of the conical section were studied...

  3. Decreasing ventromedial prefrontal cortex deactivation in risky decision making after simulated microgravity: Effects of -6 degree head-down tilt bed rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Lin eRao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Space is characterized by risk and uncertainty. As humans play an important role in long-duration space missions, the ability to make risky decisions effectively is important for astronauts who spend extended time periods in space. The present study used the Balloon Analog Risk Task to conduct both behavioral and fMRI experiments to evaluate the effects of simulated microgravity on individuals’ risk-taking behavior and the neural basis of the effect. The results showed that participants’ risk-taking behavior was not affected by bed rest. However, we found that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC showed less deactivation after bed rest and that the VMPFC activation in the active choice condition showed no significant difference between the win outcome and the loss outcome after bed rest, although its activation was significantly greater in the win outcome than in the loss outcome before bed rest. These results suggested that the participants showed a decreased level of value calculation after the bed rest. Our findings can contribute to a better understanding of the effect of microgravity on individual higher-level cognitive functioning.

  4. Separate effects tests to determine the thermal dispersion in structured pebble beds in the PBMR HPTU test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toit, C.G. du, E-mail: jat.dutoit@nwu.ac.za; Rousseau, P.G.; Kgame, T.L.

    2014-05-01

    Thermal-fluid simulations are used extensively to predict the maximum fuel temperatures, flows, pressure drops and thermal capacitance of pebble bed gas cooled reactors in support of the reactor safety case. The PBMR company developed the HTTF test facility in cooperation with M-Tech Industrial (Pty) Ltd. and the North-West University in South Africa to conduct comprehensive separate effects tests as well as integrated effects tests to study the different thermal-fluid phenomena. This paper describes the separate effects tests that were conducted to determine the effect of the porous structure on the fluid effective thermal conductivity due to the thermal dispersion. It also presents the methodology applied in the data analysis to derive the resultant values of the effective thermal conductivity and its associated uncertainty.

  5. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1,2 Renlai Zhou,1–4 Xin Zhao,5 Tian Po S Oei6 1Beijing Key Lab of Applied Experimental Psychology, School of Psychology, 2Research Center of Emotion Regulation, 3State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, International Data Group/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Psychology, School of Social and Behavioral Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 5Behavior Rehabilitation Training Research Institution, School of Psychology, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China; 6School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Background: The weightlessness caused by prolonged bed rest results in changes in cerebral circulation and thus, brain functions, which is of interest. Methods: We investigated the effects of 45-day, -6° head-down bed rest, which stimulated microgravity, on working memory in 16 healthy male participants. The 2-back task was used to test the working memory variations on the 2nd day before bed rest (R-2; on the 11th (R11, 20th (R20, 32nd (R32, and 40th (R40 days of bed rest; and on the eighth day after bed rest (R+8. The cognitive response and the physiological reactivity (such as galvanic skin response, heart rate, and heart rate variability under the 2-back task were recorded simultaneously. Results: The results showed that compared with R-2, on the R+8, the participants’ galvanic skin response increased significantly, and the high frequency of heart rate variability (HF, low frequency of heart rate variability (LF, and reaction time in the 2-back task decreased significantly. There were positive correlations between the participants’ reaction time of working memory and the LF/HF under head-down bed rest (at R11, R20, and R32. Conclusion: The results suggested that the prolonged head-down bed rest may have a detrimental effect on individual

  6. Effect of feeding status on mortality response of adult bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) to some insecticide products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Campbell, Kathleen

    2014-06-01

    Fresh and aged residual deposits of several insecticide products were tested against bed bug adults to determine if a recent bloodmeal affected their mortality response to the residues. The bed bugs with a recent bloodmeal survived significantly longer compared with the unfed ones on their exposure to fresh or aged residual deposits of chlorfenapyr and aged residual deposits of deltamethrin on a wooden substrate. Even though the survival time of fed bed bugs was significantly longer than that of unfed ones on their exposure to fresh residue of deltamethrin and aged residue of desiccant pyrethrin dust, these treatments resulted in similarly high final mortalities regardless of feeding status of the insects. Mortality responses of fed and unfed bed bugs were similar to fresh or aged residual deposits of imidacloprid + cyfluthrin combination and fresh residual deposits of desiccant pyrethrin dust. Topical application assays indicated that a recent bloodmeal significantly increased the bed bug's survival time for chlorfenapyr, but not for deltamethrin. Pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs also showed a similar increase in their survival time for chlorfenapyr after a bloodmeal. The comparison of mortality responses between fed and unfed bed bugs treated with similar amount of chlorfenapyr per fresh body weight indicated that increased body mass was not the primary cause for this bloodmeal-induced tolerance increase for chlorfenapyr. Because the surviving bed bugs can continue ovipositing, the effectiveness of chlorfenapyr residual deposits in bed bug harborages could be significantly affected by the feeding status of the adult bed bug populations.

  7. Effects of check dams on bed-load transport and steep-slope stream morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2017-08-01

    Check dams are transversal structures built across morphologically-active streams in mountainous regions. These structures have been used widely in torrent-hazard mitigation for over 150 years. Thousands of them are regularly maintained by stream managers and torrent-control services. The stabilization role of these structures is well known, i.e. they durably constrain the stream-bed through the creation of vertical and planar fixed points. What is not yet clear is to what extent check dams influence bed-load transport: How do peak solid discharge or flood-transported volume change when check dams are added to a reach? To address these questions, long-lasting small-scale experiments were conducted in a 4.8-m-long flume with either one, three or no structures. The results show that the addition of structures creates independent compartments in the bed level, which have a strong influence on bed surface armouring and stream morphodynamics: the consequence is that instantaneous transport intensities are unchanged, but peak solid discharge occur more often and for shorter duration. This results in the same total transported volume over the long term, but reduced volume for a single transport event. It reaffirms the observation of pioneering authors of the mid-19th and early 20th century who conceptualized the possible sediment transport regulation function of check dams: in addition to stabilizing the stream-bed, check dams influence bed-load transport through a buffering effect, releasing frequently and in small doses what, in their absence, would be transported abruptly en masse during rare extreme events.

  8. Tourism Development Value of'Red Beds Desert'in South China%南方"红层荒漠"旅游开发价值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗谷松; 彭华; 闫罗彬; 陈智

    2016-01-01

    occurred in redbeds areas in Southern China. The interruption of people is the trigger factor, and strong weathering and water erosion are dynamic factor. Red beds desert can be subdivided into two types, redbeds desertification with bare top and badlands-like redbeds desertification. In this article, we put more emphasis on the badlands-like redbeds desertification and its tour-ism exploitation. In China, redbeds desert (especially in humid regions) received no attention, we analyzed its feasibility by discussing its features, types, and so on. Red beds deserts are tensely distributed in Guangdong, Jiangxi, Hunan and other humid areas in Southern China. Generally, the areas of serious desertification are less developed areas and thus it's significant to study red beds desert and its rational development and utilization. The protection and utilization of badlands-like redbeds desertification abroad has three main approaches, first, protection for the purpose, second, fix it for farming, third, open to tourists as one special landscape. This arti-cle points out that as a tourism resource, because of its desolation, fire-like collour against the landscape of green mountains and clear waters in South of China, redbeds desert can be a attraction with features of com-mon sense subversion, ecological science popularization and integrated landscaping and that it also has high tourism development value and feasibility to tourists. Redbeds desert is fourth grade tourism resource contain-ing recreational value, science and educational value, economic value, environmental value, social value et al. The exploitation of redbeds desert should not follow the conventional mode. Only maintaining landscape with-out vegetation and optimizing the surrounding environment can ensure the comprehensive benefits of exploita-tion. This article claims that during the development course, in the principle of environmental protection, char-acteristics strengthening and comprehensive benefit

  9. Effect of multi-temperature aging on the characterization of aluminum based castings heat treated using fluidized bed technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Kh. A.; Samuel, A. M.; Al-Ahmari, A. M. A.; Samuel, F. H.; Doty, H. W.

    2013-07-01

    The current study investigates the influences of the fluidized bed heat treatment on the quality indices and microstructural characterization of A356.2 and B319.2 castings. Traditional heat treatment technology, employing circulating air convection furnaces (CF), was used to establish a relevant comparison with fluidized sand bed (FB) for the heat treatment of the alloys investigated, employing T6 continuous aging cycles or multi-temperature aging cycles. The results of alloys subjected to multi-temperature aging cycles reveal that the strength results obtained after the T6 continuous aging treatment of A356 alloys are not improved by means of multi-temperature aging cycles, indicating therefore that the optimum properties are obtained using a T6 aging treatment. The optimum strength properties of B319.2 alloys, however, is obtained by applying multi-temperature aging cycles such as, for example, 230 °C/2 h followed by 180 °C/8 h, rather than T6 aging treatment. In the case of multi-temperature aging cycles, the modification factor has the most significant role in improving the quality index values of 356 and 319 alloys. The FB heattreated alloys have the highest strength values for all heat treatment cycles compared to CF heat-treated alloys; however, the FB has no significant effect on the quality values of 319 alloys compared to the CF.

  10. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  11. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems: effect of process variables on in-bed corrosion. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchener, A.J.; Rogers, E.A.; LaNauze, R.D.

    1980-08-01

    The influence of operating conditions in a coal fired fluidized bed combustor on the rate of fireside corrosion of air cooled heat exchanger tubes, with metal temperatures in the range 540/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C, has been investigated. Four 250 hour tests were carried out on a 0.3 m square atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustor operating with a fluidizing velocity of 0.9 ms/sup -1/, 10 to 20% excess air and bed temperatures of 850/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C. The feed coal was Illinois No. 6 which was used both with and without the addition of limestones to suppress the emission of sulfur oxides. A test without the addition of limestone showed very little corrosive attack of any metal components. Tests with the addition of limestone showed a range of corrosive attack. In general, where different alloy types were exposed at the same metal temperature, the iron based austenitic steels showed a better corrosion resistance than the nickel based alloys. This result strongly supports the model for the corrosion which has been developed as a result of the earlier investigations. This model postulates that local regions of low oxygen activity exist in the system, and, in the presence of calcium sulfate, these result in the generation of high local sulfur activities. The combination of low oxygen and high sulfur activities leads to sulfidation of sensitive alloys.

  12. Analytical solution of coal-bed methane migration with slippage effects in hvpotonic reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xiao-chun; PAN Yi-shan; YU Li-yan; JIANG Chun-yu

    2011-01-01

    Using theoretical analysis, the single-phase gas seepage mathematical model influenced by slippage effects was established. The results show that the pressure of producing wells attenuates more violently than the wells without slippage effects. The decay rate of reservoir pressure is more violent as the Klinkenberg factor increases. The gas prediction output gradually increases as the Klinenberg factor increases when considering gas slippage effects. Through specific examples, analyzed the law of stope pore pressure and gas output forecast changing in a hypotonic reservoir with slippage effects. The results have great theoretical significance in the study of the law of coal-bed methane migration in hypotonic reservoirs and for the exploitation of coal-bed methane.

  13. Effects of Starvation on Deltamethrin Tolerance in Bed Bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary C. DeVries

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are a major pest in the urban environment. Their presence often results in physical, psychological, and financial distress of homeowners and apartment dwellers. Although many insecticide bioassays have been performed on this pest, little attention has been paid to bed bug feeding status, which is closely linked to metabolism, molting, and mass. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of topically applied deltamethrin on insecticide susceptible adult male bed bugs fed 2 d, 9 d, and 21 d prior to testing. When toxicity was evaluated on a “per-bug” basis, there was no difference between 2 d [LD50 = 0.498 (0.316 − 0.692 ng·bug−1] and 9 d [LD50 = 0.572 (0.436 − 0.724 ng·bug−1] starved bugs, while 21 d starved bugs had a significantly lower LD50 [0.221 (0.075 − 0.386 ng·bug−1]. When toxicity was evaluated in terms of body mass, 9 d starved bugs had the highest LD50 values [0.138 (0.102 − 0.176 ng·mg−1], followed by 2 d starved bugs [0.095 (0.060 − 0.134 ng·mg−1], and then 21 d starved bugs [0.058 (0.019–0.102 ng·mg−1]; the LD50 values of 2 d and 9 d starved bugs were significantly different from 21 d starved bugs. These results indicate that feeding status plays an important role in the toxicity of deltamethrin. In addition, the lack of differences between 2 d and 9 d starved bugs indicate that the blood meal itself has little impact on tolerance, but rather it is some physiological change following feeding that confers increased tolerance to bed bugs.

  14. Effects of Starvation on Deltamethrin Tolerance in Bed Bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C; Reid, William R; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-09

    Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are a major pest in the urban environment. Their presence often results in physical, psychological, and financial distress of homeowners and apartment dwellers. Although many insecticide bioassays have been performed on this pest, little attention has been paid to bed bug feeding status, which is closely linked to metabolism, molting, and mass. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of topically applied deltamethrin on insecticide susceptible adult male bed bugs fed 2 d, 9 d, and 21 d prior to testing. When toxicity was evaluated on a "per-bug" basis, there was no difference between 2 d [LD50 = 0.498 (0.316 - 0.692) ng·bug(-1)] and 9 d [LD50 = 0.572 (0.436 - 0.724) ng·bug(-1)] starved bugs, while 21 d starved bugs had a significantly lower LD50 [0.221 (0.075 - 0.386) ng·bug(-1)]. When toxicity was evaluated in terms of body mass, 9 d starved bugs had the highest LD50 values [0.138 (0.102 - 0.176) ng·mg(-1)], followed by 2 d starved bugs [0.095 (0.060 - 0.134) ng·mg(-1)], and then 21 d starved bugs [0.058 (0.019-0.102) ng·mg(-)¹]; the LD50 values of 2 d and 9 d starved bugs were significantly different from 21 d starved bugs. These results indicate that feeding status plays an important role in the toxicity of deltamethrin. In addition, the lack of differences between 2 d and 9 d starved bugs indicate that the blood meal itself has little impact on tolerance, but rather it is some physiological change following feeding that confers increased tolerance to bed bugs.

  15. Effect of work of adhesion on deep bed filtration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Rafał; Jackiewicz, Anna; WoŻniak, Michał; Gradoń, Leon

    2016-06-01

    Collection of aerosol particles in the particular steps of the technology of their production, and purification of the air at the workplace and atmospheric environment, requires the efficient method of separation of particulate matter from the carrier gas. There are many papers published in last few years in which the deposition of particles on fibrous collectors is considered, Most of them assume that collisions between particle and collector surface is 100% effective. In this work we study the influence of particles and fiber properties on the deposition efficiency. For the purpose of this work the lattice-Boltzmann model describes fluid dynamics, while the solid particle motion is modeled by the Brownian dynamics. The interactions between particles and surface are modelled using energy balanced oscillatory model. The work of adhesion was estimated using Atomic Force Microscopy.

  16. Effect of work of adhesion on deep bed filtration process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przekop, Rafał; Jackiewicz, Anna; Gradoń, Leon [Warsaw University of Technology Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering Ul. Waryńskiego 1, 00-645 Warsaw (Poland); Wożniak, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology Faculty of Material Science and Engineering Ul. Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Warsaw University of Technology University Research Centre Functional Materials Ul. Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-06-08

    Collection of aerosol particles in the particular steps of the technology of their production, and purification of the air at the workplace and atmospheric environment, requires the efficient method of separation of particulate matter from the carrier gas. There are many papers published in last few years in which the deposition of particles on fibrous collectors is considered, Most of them assume that collisions between particle and collector surface is 100% effective. In this work we study the influence of particles and fiber properties on the deposition efficiency. For the purpose of this work the lattice-Boltzmann model describes fluid dynamics, while the solid particle motion is modeled by the Brownian dynamics. The interactions between particles and surface are modelled using energy balanced oscillatory model. The work of adhesion was estimated using Atomic Force Microscopy.

  17. The life cycle and effectiveness of insecticides against the bed bugs of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannayod, Suttida; Chanbang, Yaowaluk; Buranapanichpan, Sawai

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the life cycle and effectiveness of insecticides against bed bugs in Thailand. Bed bugs from dwelling places in Chon Buri and Chiang Mai provinces were determined to be Cimex hemipterus and Cimex lectularius, respectively. Both bed bug species were reared by feeding on rabbit blood at 2-day intervals in laboratory conditions at 28-32 degrees C with 75% relative humidity. The duration from egg to adult stages took 39.9 +/- 7.0 and 36.9 +/- 8.2 days in C. hemipterus and C. lectularius, respectively. The insecticides, propetamphos 20% CS, pirimiphos-methyl 50% EC, bifenthrin 25% WP and alpha-cypermethrin 5% SC, were tested against adult C. lectularius using a Potter spray tower. The concentrations at which 50% of bed bugs were either dead or moribund (ED50) for propetamphos and pirimiphos-methyl were 6.67 and 14.93 mg/m2 for the active ingredients on day 3 and the ED50 for bifenthrin and alpha-cypermethrin were 1,767.76 and 353.55 mg/m2, respectively. The results reveal C. lectularius in Thailand has a tendency to develop pyrethroid resistance.

  18. Studies on Low Calorific Value Coal Bed Methane Burner and Optimal Analysis%低热值煤层气燃烧器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨盼盼; 施永红

    2015-01-01

    低热值煤层气一般与固体燃料混烧,被广泛应用于发电、化工等工业领域。因此,研究和开发适合低热值煤层气的燃烧器具有重要的工业应用价值和学术意义。介绍了三种燃气燃烧器的结构、工作原理及其特点,对其燃烧效率等进行分析对比。并介绍了低热值煤层气燃烧器的研究进展、存在问题和未来的发展趋势。%Low calorific value CBM generally burn with solid fuel.It is widely used in industrial fields for power generation, chemical industry and so on.Therefore, researching and development suited to low calorific value coal bed methane burner has important industrial application value and academic significance. This paper introduces three gas burner structure, working principle and characteristics, comparatively analyzed to combustion efficiency,etc. And describes the research progress,the existing problems and future trends in low calorific value coal bed methane burner.

  19. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  20. Effectiveness of Mutual Learning Approach in the Academic Achievement of B.Ed Students in Learning Optional II English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at finding out the effectiveness of Mutual learning approach over the conventional method in learning English optional II among B.Ed students. The randomized pre-test, post test, control group and experimental group design was employed. The B.Ed students of the same college formed the control and experimental groups. Each…

  1. Introduction to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that there are ways to control bed bugs. Getting good, solid information is the first step in both prevention and control. While there is no chemical quick fix, there are effective strategies to control bed bugs involving both non-chemical and chemical methods. Bed bugs can be hard to find and ...

  2. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  3. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species.

  4. Characteristics and associated factors in patient falls, and effectiveness of the lower height of beds for the prevention of bed falls in an acute geriatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M D; Alonso, J; Miñana, J C; Arche, J M; Díaz, J M; Vazquez, F

    2013-01-01

    Whereas several studies about patient falls have provided data for long-term healthcare institutions, less information is available for acute care centres. The objective was to analyze the characteristics of the patient falls and associated factors, and the effectiveness of the lower beds' height to reduce the frequency and the harms of the patient falls in an acute geriatric hospital. A descriptive and retrospective study using a mandatory safety incident report, the IHI Global Trigger Tool, and the claims related to patient falls between 2007 and 2011 in a 200-bed university-associated geriatric hospital. The falls rate was 5.4 falls per 1000 patient days (1.3% of falls led to fractures) and there was exitus in 6 patients (0.6%). Nearly half of the falls ocurred during the night shift (42.4%). By wards, falls were more frequent in acute geriatric wards (42.9%). A 7.5% of patients had a fall before admission. 3 (0.2%) claims due to possible clinical negligence were found. A reduction (28.3%) of bed falls with the lower height of the bed and a 1.88 times less falls with harm (RR 0.53; CI 95% 0.83-0.34) (p=0.006) was observed. The prevention of patient falls is an important task in geriatric units with a potential reduction of harms and costs, some measures such as the lower height of the bed showed a significant reduction of the falls. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative analysis of CFD models for jetting fluidized beds: Effect of particle-phase viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Pei; Kai Zhang; Gang Xu; Yongping Yang; Dongsheng Wen

    2012-01-01

    Under the Eulerian-Eulerian framework of simulating gas-solid two-phase flow,the accuracy of the hydrodynamic prediction is strongly affected by the selection of rheology of the particulate phase,for which a detailed assessment is still absent.Using a jetting fluidized bed as an example,this work investigates the influence of solid theology on the hydrodynamic behavior by employing different particle-phase viscosity models.Both constant particle-phase viscosity model (CVM) with different viscosity values and a simple two-fluid model without particle-phase viscosity (NVM) are incorporated into the classical twofluid model and compared with the experimental measurements.Qualitative and quantitative results show that the jet penetration depth,jet frequency and averaged bed pressure drop are not a strong function of the particle-phase viscosity.Compared to CVM,the NVM exhibits better predictions on the jet behaviors,which is more suitable for investigating the hydrodynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed with a central jet.

  6. Bed Slope Effect on Non-uniform Flow through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanu Prakasham Reddy, N.; Krishnaiah, S.; Ramakrishna Reddy, M.

    2016-09-01

    The tilting angle or bed slope (φ) effect on piezometric head was studied in a tilting angle converging permeameter for different rate of flows and for different bed slopes or tilting angles (φ) and the equipotential lines of piezometric head are depicted pictorially to establish the suitability of the convergent flow assumption and have a proper insight into the subject of seepage flow. The porosity effect is considered while computing seepage velocity (V), linear parameter, non-linear parameter, increases with decrease of porosity (N) and increases with decrease of angle of inclination. In order to meet the objective of this study, a crushed rock of size 7.30 mm was used as media and water as fluid, to develop curves relating friction factor (FR) and Reynolds number (RR) for different ratios of width using hydraulic radius (R) as characteristic length for different bed slopes or tilting angles (φ). The effect of varying tilting angles (φ) on head loss of fluid flow through porous media when packed between convergent boundaries for different ratios of width (B1/B2) was studied and inferred that tilting angles (φ) have a significant effect on the non uniform flow.

  7. Effects of fluidized bed combustion residue on pecan seedling growth and nutrient content. [Carya illinoensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.H.; White, A.W. Jr.; Bennett, O.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion residue from a calcitic limestone source (FBCRC), a by-product of scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from fossil fuel fired boilers using the FBC technique was evaluated as a source of calcium for pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch) seedlings. Fluidized bed combustion residue produced following injection of calcitic limestone into the combustion chamber was more effective in neutralizing soil acidity and increasing extractable soil Ca levels than agricultural calcitic limestone. The Ca concentration in the pecan leaves was increased linearly by Ca rates for both 12- and 24-week growth periods, but stem and petiole Ca concentration was increased linearly for the second 12-week growth period. Macronutrient concentrations were affected by Ca rates for both 12- and 24-week growth periods, but no effect was observed with Ca source. The primary difference was between the control and all other Ca rates.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Vibration upon Elastic and Cohesive Properties of Beds of Wet Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alsop

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of sinusoidal vibrations through beds of cohesive particulate solids was measured. Results were interpreted in terms of a critical state model to predict the elastic swelling constant k, and the cohesive stress C. Factorial experimental design was used to identify significant parameters. Factors that affect k include percent moisture, bulk density, sample size, sample shape, the presence of a supporting membrane, and loading order. Factors that affect C include percent moisture and particle size distribution. Factors affecting k were interpreted in terms of their effects upon bed structure and factors affecting C in terms of an equivalent pore water pressure due to capillary and liquid bridge effects. The critical state model was modified to incorporate general relationships between axial and radial strains.

  9. Edge Effects Are Important in Supporting Beetle Biodiversity in a Gravel-Bed River Floodplain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding complex, dynamic, and diverse ecosystems is essential for developing sound management and conservation strategies. Gravel-bed river floodplains are composed of an interlinked mosaic of aquatic and terrestrial habitats hosting a diverse, specialized, and endangered fauna. Therefore, they serve as excellent models to investigate the biodiversity of multiple ecotones and related edge effects. In this study, we investigated the abundance, composition, richness, and conservation stat...

  10. Solid conduction effects and design criteria in moving bed heat exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Almendros-Ibáñez, J.A.; Soria-Verdugo, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, U.; Santana, D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This work presents a theoretical study of the energetic performance of a Moving Bed Heat Exchanger (MBHE), which consists on a ow of solid particles moving down that recovers heat from a gas ow percolating the solids in cross ow. In order to defne the solid conduction effects, two solutions for the MBHE energy equations have been studied: an analytical solution considering only convection heat transfer (and neglecting solid conduction) and a numerical solution with the sol...

  11. Effect of Faulting on Ordovician Carbonate Buried-Hill Reservoir Beds in Hetianhe Gas Field,Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Xiuxiang; Bai Zhongkai; Li Jianjiao; Wang Weiguang; Fu Hui; Wang Qinghua

    2008-01-01

    Ordovician carbonate buried-hill reservoir beds in the Hetianhe (和田河) gas field,located in the Mazhatage (玛扎塔格) structural belt on the southern margin of the Bachu (巴楚) faulted uplift,southwestern Tarim basin,were studied.Based on field survey,core and slice observation,the general characteristics of carbonate buried-hill reservoir beds and specifically Ordovician carbonate buried-hill reservoir beds in the Hetianhe gas field were discussed.The karst zone of the reservoir beds in Hetianhe gas field was divided into superficial karst zone,vertical infiltration karst zone,lower subsurface flow karst zone,and deep sluggish flow zone from top to bottom.The effects of faulting on Ordovician carbonate buried-hill reservoir beds in the Hetianhe gas field were obvious.The faulting intensified the karstification and increased the depth of denudation.Faulting and subsequent fracture growth modified the reservoir beds and improved the physical property and quality of the reservoir beds.Moreover,faulting enhanced the development of the dissolution holes and fractures and increased the thickness of the effective reservoir beds.Meanwhile,faulting made the high porosity-permeability carbonate belts,which created conditions for the hydrocarbon accumulation,develop near the fault zone.

  12. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  13. Effects of sintered metal distributor on fluidization quality of the air dense medium fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuliang; Zhao Yuemin; Luo Zhenfu; Chen Zengqiang; Song Shulei

    2011-01-01

    Dry coal beneficiation using an air dense medium fluidized bed (ADMFB) requires the formation of a stable and uniform bed from the dense medium.Others have shown that the structure and geometric parameters of the air distributor have a significant influence on the experimentally observed fluidization quality.In this study we used a sintered metal distributor (SMD) in the ADMFB separator and study its effect on the fluidization quality.The results show that for the same open area ratio (OAR),a smaller aperture in the SMD will provide improved fluidization quality.If aperture size is held constant bigger open area ratios result in improved fluidization quality.And,the fluidization quality also improves when the pressure drop across the SMD increases.A model relating distributor pressure drop and the geometric parameters of the SMD is also proposed.

  14. Physiological Effects of Aquatic Exercise in Pregnant Women on Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechrist, Dawndra M; Tiongco, Cynthia Gorter; Whisner, Sandra M; Geddie, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effectiveness of an Aquatic Exercise Program (AEP) provided by an occupational therapist for pregnant women on hospitalized bed rest. Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of hospitalized pregnant women comparing those who attended an AEP (n = 19) to a control group who received no AEP (n = 12). Statistical tests were used to assess evidence of differences in length of gestation as well as blood pressure and amniotic fluid index (AFI) at discharge. Women who received an AEP had increased AFI and length of gestation compared to the control group. This study supports the use of an AEP as an intervention for pregnant women on prescribed bed rest. Further research is recommended to validate these findings with a larger sample.

  15. Effect of Wetting and Contamination of Granular Beds During Sphere Impact

    KAUST Repository

    Kouraytem, Nadia

    2013-03-01

    This thesis presents results from an experimental study of the impact of dense solid spheres onto granular beds. The overall aim is to further our understanding of the dynamical response of granular materials to impact. In order to do this, we will study both the initial penetration stages and peak acceleration exerted on the sphere by using high-speed imaging. Another critical part is to measure the penetration depth of the sphere and calculate the corresponding depth-averaged stopping force. Both of these main focal points will be assessed for not only dry, but wet and “contaminated” grains, whereby the granular bed will be comprised of two distinct size ranges of base grains. In doing so, we aim to broadly determine whether contaminated grains or wet grains are more effective at increasing the tensile strength of granular materials.

  16. Effect of Microwave on Fluidized Bed Drying of Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of inlet air temperature and velocity on the drying characteristics of beetroot’s (Beta vulgaris L. pieces in microwave assisted fluidized bed drying (MAFBD system. The results were compared with samples of beetroot dried in a fluidized bed dryer (FBD at the same combination of temperatures and air velocities. The selected inlet air temperatures and inlet air velocities were 60°C, 67.50°C and 75°C and 9 m/s, 10.50 m/s and 12 m/s, respectively. Moisture content and outlet air humidity was measured at 5 minutes interval. The MAFBD method offered two to three times reduction in drying time as compared to the FBD method. It was also observed that the beetroot samples obtained from the MAFBD system had lower final moisture content than those obtained from the FBD system.

  17. Effects of different types of bedding materials on behavioral development in laboratory CD1 mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toyohito; Ogata, Akio; Inomata, Akiko; Nakae, Dai

    2014-10-01

    Male and female mice were housed in cages, containing different types of bedding materials (wood flakes or pulp chips), from 4 weeks of age in the F0 generation to 11 weeks of age in the F1 generation; selected reproductive and neurobehavioral parameters were measured in the F1 generation. There were no adverse effects of bedding materials on litter size, litter weight, or sex ratios at the time of birth. With regard to behavioral development parameters, bedding materials did not influence any variables (p > 0.05) in both sexes. Regarding exploratory behavior in the F1 generation, number of defecations significantly varied (p = 0.0203) with bedding materials in males at 3 weeks of age. The number of horizontal activities also significantly varied (p = 0.0342) with bedding materials in males at 8 weeks of age. Multiple-T water maze performance data indicated that the time required was significantly shortened across trials in pulp chips group than wood flakes group in males (p = 0.0211). Moreover, all spontaneous behavior variables in males significantly varied with bedding materials, particularly the average time of movement was significantly different (p = 0.0037) in distance between parallel lines of types of bedding materials in the F1 generation. The present study shows that bedding materials influence the neurobehavioral development in mice.

  18. Numerical study of cavitation and pinning effects due to gas injection through a bed of particles: application to a radial-flow moving-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Guillaume; Vasquez, Felaurys; Richard, Florence; Applied Mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    In the petroleum and chemical industries, radial-flow moving-bed reactors are used to carry out chemical reactions such as catalytic reforming. Radial-flow reactors provide high capacity without increased pressure drop or greatly increased vessel dimensions. This is done by holding the catalyst in a basket forming an annular bed, and causing the gas to flow radially between the outer annulus and the central tube. Catalyst enter the top of the reactor, move through the vessel by gravity to the bottom where it is removed and then regenerated. Within the catalytic bed, the combined effects of particles motion and radial injection of the gas may lead to cavitation and pinning phenomenon that may clearly damage the reactor. We study both cavitation and pinning effects using an in-house numerical software, named PeliGRIFF (www.peligriff.com/), designed to simulate particulate flows at different scales; from the particle scale, where fluid/particle interactions are directly solved, to the particles suspension scale where the fluid/solid interactions are modeled. In the past, theoretical and experimental studies have already been conducted in order to understand the way cavitation and pinning occur. Here, we performed simulations involving a few thousands of particles aiming at reproducing experimental experiments. We will present comparisons between our numerical results and experimental results in terms of pressure drop, velocity, porosity.

  19. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  20. Health impact and cost-effectiveness of a private sector bed net distribution: experimental evidence from Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Relatively few programmes have attempted to actively engage the private sector in national malaria control efforts. This paper evaluates the health impact of a large-scale distribution of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) conducted in partnership with a Zambian agribusiness, and its cost-effectiveness from the perspective of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP). Methods The study was designed as a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A list of 81,597 cotton farmers was obtained from Dunavant, a contract farming company in Zambia’s cotton sector, in December 2010. 39,963 (49%) were randomly selected to obtain one ITN each. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 438 farmers in the treatment and 458 farmers in the control group in June and July 2011. Treatment and control households were compared with respect to bed net ownership, bed net usage, self-reported fever, and self-reported confirmed malaria. Cost data was collected throughout the programme. Results The distribution effectively reached target beneficiaries, with approximately 95% of households in the treatment group reporting that they had received an ITN through the programme. The average increase in the fraction of household members sleeping under an ITN the night prior to the interview was 14.6 percentage points (p-value <0.001). Treatment was associated with a 42 percent reduction in the odds of self-reported fever (p-value <0.001) and with a 49 percent reduction in the odds of self-reported malaria (p-value 0.002). This was accomplished at a cost of approximately five US$ per ITN to Zambia’s NMCP. Conclusions The results illustrate that existing private sector networks can efficiently control malaria in remote rural regions. The intra-household allocation of ITNs distributed through this channel was comparable to that of ITNs received from other sources, and the health impact remained substantial. PMID:23506170

  1. Effects of space flight and -6 degrees bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically fit subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksinantová, Lucia; Koska, Juraj; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan; Macho, Ladislav; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the fifth day of SF, on days 2 and 16 after landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the fifth day of prolonged bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots, aged 33.5 +/- 1.4 years, body mass index (BMI) 26.5 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2), maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) 55.2 +/- 2.4 mL/kg/min, who volunteered for the study. ITT was induced by i.v. administrations of 0.1 IU/kg body weight insulin (Actrapid HM) in a bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in preflight, actual flight conditions, and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in preflight studies. However, an evidently reduced plasma elevation of EPI was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, ITT activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent that at conditions of the Earth's gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE did not differ from those of preflight values, since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth's gravitation was fast. It seems that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of the deconditioning effect of 5 days of bed rest on the stress response.

  2. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  3. Insecticide-impregnated bed nets for malaria control: varying experiences from Ecuador, Colombia, and Peru concerning acceptability and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, A; Mancheno, M; Alarcon, J; Pesse, K

    1995-10-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, an intervention program with permethrin- and lambdacyhalothrin-impregnated bed nets was carried out over a period of nine months in each of five endemic, malarious areas of Ecuador, Peru, and Colombia. This program was evaluated through household surveys, blood sampling, in-depth longitudinal studies, and entomologic analysis. Eighty-four communities (including approximately 35,000 individuals) were paired according to malaria incidence, size, and coverage with bed nets and then randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. The results showed that peoples' acceptance of the measure was related to their perception of an immediate protective effect against insects. The effectiveness of the bed nets, measured as a reduction of malaria incidence in intervention communities as against control communities, showed large variations between and within the study areas. The protective efficacy varied between 0% and 70% when looking only at the postintervention differences between intervention and control groups. The average protection was 40.8% when considering a four-month incidence of clinical malaria attacks and 28.3% when considering a two-week malaria incidence. Important factors for the success of the bed net program were insect susceptibility to pyrethroids, high coverage with impregnated bed nets, high malaria incidence, good community participation, high mosquito densities when people go to bed, and a high proportion of Plasmodium falciparum. In one area, where DDT spraying in the control communities was executed, the effectiveness of bed net impregnation was slightly better than that of spraying.

  4. Fluidized-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudjoi, A.; Heinolainen, A.; Hippinen, I.; Lu, Y. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Hybrid combined cycle processes have been presented as possibilities for power generation in the future. In the processes based on partial gasification of coal, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed char) contain unburned fuel, which is burned either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. Pressurised fluidised-bed (PFB) combustion of gasification residues were studied experimentally by Helsinki University of Technology. The gasification residues, i.e. cyclone fines and bed chars, came from pilot scale PFB gasification tests of bituminous coals. The combustion efficiency was high in cyclone fines combustion. The calcium sulphide oxidised effectively to calcium sulphate in the combustion of cyclone fines. In bed char combustion the residual sulphide contents in solids after combustion were still relatively high. In general, sulphur dioxide emissions in residue combustion were low. The recarbonation of calcium oxide was observed in bed char combustion. Fuel-N conversion to NO{sub x} during bed char combustion and in most of the test runs with cyclone fines was higher than in bituminous coal combustion. In bed char combustion the conversion was significantly higher than in cyclone fines combustion. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing excess air for both residues, as was expected. In bed char combustion the highest NO{sub x} emissions were measured at higher pressure. Calculated mass reactivity values of equal particle size of all bed chars studied had similar trends with burnout. The biggest particles had the lowest reactivity values throughout the combustion, while reactivity for finer particles was at considerably higher level and sharply increases with burnout. In the constant combustion conditions used in the tests, no significant differences were observed in rate-controlling mechanisms for bed char fractions studied. 25 refs., 13 figs., 15 tab.

  5. Effect of sleeping alone on sleep quality in female bed partners of snorers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumen, M; Quera Salva, M A; d'Ortho, M-P; Leroux, K; Audibert, P; Fermanian, C; Chabolle, F; Lofaso, F

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to objectively measure the effect of sleeping alone for one night on sleep quality in female bed partners of male snorers. Females complaining of poor sleep due to snoring by their bed partner and having no known hearing loss or snoring were included in a prospective multicentre cross-sectional study. 23 females underwent one polysomnography recording while sleeping with their bed partner and another while sleeping alone. Their sleep parameters were compared between the two nights. We excluded seven couples because the female partner snored for >10% of the sleep time (n = 6) or had obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (n = 1). In the remaining 16 females, sleep time, sleep efficiency, arousal index and percentages of deep sleep (stages 3-4) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were not significantly different between the two nights. Percentages of light sleep (non-REM stage 2) and awakening index were lower when sleeping alone (p = 0.023 and p = 0.046, respectively). Sleep quality was decreased and sleep fragmentation increased in females sleeping with male snorers. Some females had unrecognised snoring. However, our data do not suggest that objective sleep quality improves substantially in the female nonsnoring partner when she sleeps alone for one night.

  6. The effect of coal-bed methane water on spearmint and peppermint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Cantrell, Charles L; Astatkie, Tess; Schlegel, Vicki; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina; Lowe, Derek

    2013-11-01

    Coal bed methane is extracted from underground coal seams that are flooded with water. To reduce the pressure and to release the methane, the water needs to be pumped out. The resulting waste water is known as coal bed methane water (CBMW). Major concerns with the use of CBMW are its high concentrations of S, Na, dissolved Ca, Mg, SO, and bicarbonate (HCO). Irrigation water is a scarce resource in most of the western states. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of CBMW on the growth, essential oil content, composition, and antioxidant activity of spearmint ( L.) and peppermint ( L.) crops that were irrigated with the water. These two crops are grown in some western states and are potential specialty crops to Wyoming farmers. The irrigation treatments were 0% CBMW (tap water only), 25% CBMW (25% CBMW plus 75% tap water), 50% CBMW (50% CBMW and 50% tap water), 75% CBMW (75% CBMW plus 25% tap water), and 100% CBMW. Analyses of the data revealed that the CBMW treatments did not affect the antioxidant capacity of spearmint or peppermint oil (242 and 377 μmol L Trolox g, respectively) or their major oil constituents (carvone or menthol). Coal bed methane water at 100% increased total phenols and total flavonoids in spearmint but not in peppermint. Coal bed methane water also affected oil content in peppermint but not in spearmint. Spearmint and peppermint could be watered with CBMW at 50% without suppression of fresh herbage yields. However, CBMW at 75 and 100% reduced fresh herbage yields of both crops and oil yields of peppermint relative to the control.

  7. Effect of surface structure of kaolinite on aggregation, settling rate, and bed density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianhua; Morris, Gayle; Pushkarova, Rada A; Smart, Roger St C

    2010-08-17

    The flocculation and solid/liquid separation of four well-characterized kaolinites (2 well, 2 poorly crystallized) have been studied for comparison of surface structure (SEM), aggregate structure during flocculation (cryo-SEM), settling rate, and bed density (with raking). It is shown that major differences in these properties are largely due to crystallinity and consequent surface structure of the extensive (larger dimension "basal") face. Well-crystallized kaolinites, with higher Hinckley indices and lower aspect ratios, have relatively smooth, flat basal surfaces and thicker edge planes promoting both effective initial bridging flocculation (largely edge-edge) and structural rearrangement to face-face during the raking process. This results in faster settling rates and more compact bed structures. Poorly crystallized kaolinites, with low Hinckley indices and high aspect ratios, exhibit ragged, stepped structures of the extensive face with a high proportion of nanosized islands forming cascade-like steps (i.e., multiple edges) contributing up to 30% of the specific surface area and providing flocculant adsorption sites (hydroxyl groups) across this extensive face. This leads to bridging flocculation taking place on both edge and extensive ("basal") planes, producing low-density edge-face structures during flocculation which leads to slow settling rates and poor bed densities. In particular, the complex surface morphology of the poorly crystallized kaolinites resists the transformation of edge-face structures to dense face-face structures under shear force introduced by raking. This results in low sediment density for poorly crystallized kaolinites. The studies suggest that the main influence on settling rates and bed densities of kaolinites in mineral tailings is likely to be related to the crystallinity and surface morphology of the kaolinite. They also suggest that interpretation of kaolinite behavior based on models of a flat (001) basal plane and edge sites

  8. Exercise Effects on the Brain and Sensorimotor Function in Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; De Dios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, R. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; Seidler, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight microgravity results in cephalad fluid shifts and deficits in posture control and locomotion. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on Earth using head down tilt bed rest (HDBR). HDBR serves as a spaceflight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. Preliminary results from our prior 70 days HDBR studies showed that HDBR is associated with focal gray matter (GM) changes and gait and balance deficits, as well as changes in brain functional connectivity. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers we investigated whether exercise reduces the effects of HDBR on GM, functional connectivity, and motor performance. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on brain health. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention during HDBR could potentially mitigate the effects of HDBR on the central nervous system. Eighteen subjects were assessed before (12 and 7 days), during (7, 30, and 70 days) and after (8 and 12 days) 70 days of 6-degrees HDBR at the NASA HDBR facility in UTMB, Galveston, TX, US. Each subject was randomly assigned to a control group or one of two exercise groups. Exercise consisted of daily supine exercise which started 20 days before the start of HDBR. The exercise subjects participated either in regular aerobic and resistance exercise (e.g. squat, heel raise, leg press, cycling and treadmill running), or aerobic and resistance exercise using a flywheel apparatus (rowing). Aerobic and resistance exercise intensity in both groups was similar, which is why we collapsed the two exercise groups for the current experiment. During each time point T1-weighted MRI scans and resting state functional connectivity scans were obtained using a 3T Siemens scanner. Focal changes over time in GM density were assessed using voxel based morphometry (VBM8) under SPM. Changes in resting state functional connectivity was assessed

  9. Soil application of ash produced by low-temperature fluidized bed gasification: effects on soil nutrient dynamics and crop response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Holm, Jens Kai

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of residual products of bioenergy conversion processes is important for adding value to the technologies and as a potential beneficial soil fertility amendment. In this study, two different ash materials originating from low temperature circulating fluidized bed (LT-CFB) gasification...... of either wheat straw (SA) or residue fibers mainly from citrus peels (CP) were tested regarding their potential to be used as fertilizer on agricultural soils. A soil incubation study, a greenhouse experiment with barley and faba bean, and an accompanying outdoor experiment with maize were carried out...... to investigate the effects of the ashes on soil microbiological and chemical properties and on the response of the three crops. The ash treatments were compared with a control treatment that received only nitrogen, magnesium, and sulphur (CO) and a fully fertilized control (COPK). Soil microbial parameters were...

  10. Mortality, temporary sterilization, and maternal effects of sublethal heat in bed bugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Arne Rukke

    Full Text Available Adult bed bugs were exposed to the sublethal temperatures 34.0°C, 35.5°C, 37.0°C, 38.5°C, or 40.0°C for 3, 6, or 9 days. The two uppermost temperatures induced 100% mortality within 9 and 2 days, respectively, whereas 34.0°C had no observable effect. The intermediate temperatures interacted with time to induce a limited level of mortality but had distinct effects on fecundity, reflected by decreases in the number of eggs produced and hatching success. Adult fecundity remained low for up to 40 days after heat exposure, and the time until fertility was restored correlated with the temperature-sum experienced during heat exposure. Three or 6 days of parental exposure to 38.5°C significantly lowered their offspring's feeding and moulting ability, which consequently led to a failure to continue beyond the third instar. Eggs that were deposited at 22.0°C before being exposed to 37.0°C for 3 or 6 days died, whereas eggs that were exposed to lower temperatures were not significantly affected. Eggs that were deposited during heat treatment exhibited high levels of mortality also at 34.0°C and 35.5°C. The observed negative effects of temperatures between 34.0°C and 40.0°C may be utilized in pest management, and sublethal temperature exposure ought to be further investigated as an additional tool to decimate or potentially eradicate bed bug populations. The effect of parental heat exposure on progeny demonstrates the importance of including maternal considerations when studying bed bug environmental stress reactions.

  11. Mortality, temporary sterilization, and maternal effects of sublethal heat in bed bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukke, Bjørn Arne; Aak, Anders; Edgar, Kristin Skarsfjord

    2015-01-01

    Adult bed bugs were exposed to the sublethal temperatures 34.0°C, 35.5°C, 37.0°C, 38.5°C, or 40.0°C for 3, 6, or 9 days. The two uppermost temperatures induced 100% mortality within 9 and 2 days, respectively, whereas 34.0°C had no observable effect. The intermediate temperatures interacted with time to induce a limited level of mortality but had distinct effects on fecundity, reflected by decreases in the number of eggs produced and hatching success. Adult fecundity remained low for up to 40 days after heat exposure, and the time until fertility was restored correlated with the temperature-sum experienced during heat exposure. Three or 6 days of parental exposure to 38.5°C significantly lowered their offspring's feeding and moulting ability, which consequently led to a failure to continue beyond the third instar. Eggs that were deposited at 22.0°C before being exposed to 37.0°C for 3 or 6 days died, whereas eggs that were exposed to lower temperatures were not significantly affected. Eggs that were deposited during heat treatment exhibited high levels of mortality also at 34.0°C and 35.5°C. The observed negative effects of temperatures between 34.0°C and 40.0°C may be utilized in pest management, and sublethal temperature exposure ought to be further investigated as an additional tool to decimate or potentially eradicate bed bug populations. The effect of parental heat exposure on progeny demonstrates the importance of including maternal considerations when studying bed bug environmental stress reactions.

  12. Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  13. Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  14. The effects of twelve weeks of bed rest on bone histology, biochemical markers of bone turnover, and calcium homeostasis in eleven normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwekh, J. E.; Ruml, L. A.; Gottschalk, F.; Pak, C. Y.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of 12 weeks of skeletal unloading on parameters of calcium homeostasis, calcitropic hormones, bone histology, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in 11 normal subjects (9 men, 2 women; 34 +/- 11 years of age). Following an ambulatory control evaluation, all subjects underwent 12 weeks of bed rest. An additional metabolic evaluation was performed after 12 days of reambulation. Bone mineral density declined at the spine (-2.9%, p = 0.092) and at the hip (-3.8%, p = 0.002 for the trochanter). Bed rest prompted a rapid, sustained, significant increase in urinary calcium and phosphorus as well as a significant increase in serum calcium. Urinary calcium increased from a pre-bed rest value of 5.3 mmol/day to values as high as 73 mmol/day during bed rest. Immunoreactive parathyroid hormone and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D declined significantly during bed rest, although the mean values remained within normal limits. Significant changes in bone histology included a suppression of osteoblastic surface for cancellous bone (3.1 +/- 1.3% to 1.9 +/- 1.5%, p = 0.0142) and increased bone resorption for both cancellous and cortical bone. Cortical eroded surface increased from 3.5 +/- 1.1% to 7.3 +/- 4.0% (p = 0.018) as did active osteoclastic surface (0.2 +/- 0.3% to 0.7 +/- 0.7%, p = 0.021). Cancellous eroded surface increased from 2.1 +/- 1.1% to 4.7 +/- 2.2% (p = 0.002), while mean active osteoclastic surface doubled (0.2 +/- 0.2% to 0.4 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.020). Serum biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and type I procollagen extension peptide) did not change significantly during bed rest. Urinary biochemical markers of bone resorption (hydroxyproline, deoxypyridinoline, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen) as well as a serum marker of bone resorption (type I collagen carboxytelopeptide) all demonstrated significant increases during bed rest which declined toward normal

  15. Coal-Bed Methane Water Effects on Dill and Its Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Shital; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Cantrell, Charles L; Kelleners, Thijs

    2016-03-01

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic method of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as "coal-bed methane water" (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In the past 25 yr, the United States has seen a 16-fold increase in the production of coal bed methane gas, and trillions of cubic meters are yet to be extracted. There is no sustainable disposal method for CBMW, and there are very few studies investigating the effects of this water on plants and their secondary metabolites and on soil properties. This study was conducted to determine the effects of CBMW on soil chemical properties and on the biomass and essential oil yield and composition of dill ( L.). This crop was grown in a greenhouse and was subjected to different levels of CBMW treatment: tap water only; 25% CBMW, 75% tap water; 50% CBMW, 50% tap water; 75% CBMW, 25% tap water; and 100% CBMW. The major dill oil constituents, limonene and α-phellandrene, were not affected by the treatments; however, the concentration of dill ether increased with increasing CBMW levels, whereas the concentration of carvone decreased. In soil, sodium level significantly increased with increasing level of treatment, but pH and cation exchange capacity were not much affected. Coal bed methane water could be used for irrigation of dill for one growing season, but longer-term studies may be needed to clarify the long-term effects on soil and plant.

  16. Effect of cohesion on granular-fluid flows in spouted beds: PIV measurement and DEM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Runru; LI, Shuiqing; Yao, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to wet granular flows, the effect of cohesion on complex granular-fluid flows is intriguing but much challenging. The liquid bridges, forming between binary particles with the addition of a small amount of liquids, might significantly change the granular-fluid system due to both cohesion and lubrication effects. In this paper, a spouted bed, among various fluidization technologies, is particularly selected as a prototypical system for studying granular-fluid flows, since it can provide a quasi-steady flow pattern of granular particles, i.e., a core of upward granular-fluid flow called the "spout" and a surrounding region of downward quasi-static granular flow called the "annulus". Firstly, using self-developed particle image velocimetery (PIV) technique, the effects of cohesion on the spout-annulus interface (namely the spout width) and on the particle velocity profiles in distinct zones are examined. Further, the discrete element method (DEM), by incorporating liquid bridge adhesion into soft-sphere model, is established and used to predict the microdynamic behavior of particles in spouted beds. Finally, based on both experiments and DEM validation, the effects on the granular patterns in these two zones are comparatively discussed.

  17. Capacity and Utilization in Health Care: The Effect of Empty Beds on Neonatal Intensive Care Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    Because geographic variation in medical care utilization is jointly determined by both supply and demand, it is difficult to empirically estimate whether capacity itself has a causal impact on utilization in health care. In this paper, I exploit short-term variation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) capacity that is unlikely to be correlated with unobserved demand determinants. I find that available NICU beds have little to no effect on NICU utilization for the sickest infants, but do increase utilization for those in the range of birth weights where admission decisions are likely to be more discretionary.

  18. Effect of Mulch Surface Color on Root-knot of Tomato Grown in Simulated Planting Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Fortnum, B. A.; Kasperbauer, M. J.; Decoteau, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of different-colored polyethylene mulches on quantity and spectra of reflected light, plant morphology, and root-knot disease was studied in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown in simulated planting beds. Tomato plants were inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita at initial populations (Pi) of 0, 1,000, 10,000, or 50,000 eggs/plant, and grown in a greenhouse for 50 days over white, red, or black mulch. Soil temperature was kept constant among the mulch treatments by placing an ins...

  19. The origin ofhigh hydraulic resistance for filter cakes ofdef ormable particles: cell-bed deformation or surface-layer effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Meireles, Martine; Molle, C.; Clifton, Michaël; Aimar, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This study reports a numerical approach for modeling the hydraulic resistance ofa filter cake ofdef ormable cells. First, a mechanical and osmotic model that describes the volume fraction ofsolids in a bed ofyeast cells as a function ofthe compressive pressure it experiences is presented. The effects ofpressure on the compressibility ofyeast cells beds were further investigated both by filtration experiments and by centrifugal experiments based on the multiple speed equilibrium sediment he...

  20. Modeling of spatial lag in bed-load transport processes and its effect on dune morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van O.J.M.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Ribberink, J.S.; Dohmen-Janssen, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, two bed-load transport models are introduced in an existing idealized dune model. These allow for the modeling of the spatial lag between the sediment transport rate and bed shear stress along dune surfaces. This lag is an important factor in determining transitions between bed

  1. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  2. Effect of hydraulic parameters on sediment transport capacity in overland flow over erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Sterk, G.; Seeger, M.; Boersema, M.; Peters, P.

    2012-02-01

    Sediment transport is an important component of the soil erosion process, which depends on several hydraulic parameters like unit discharge, mean flow velocity, and slope gradient. In most of the previous studies, the impact of these hydraulic parameters on transport capacity was studied for non-erodible bed conditions. Hence, this study aimed to examine the influence of unit discharge, mean flow velocity and slope gradient on sediment transport capacity for erodible beds and also to investigate the relationship between transport capacity and composite force predictors, i.e. shear stress, stream power, unit stream power and effective stream power. In order to accomplish the objectives, experiments were carried out in a 3.0 m long and 0.5 m wide flume using four well sorted sands (0.230, 0.536, 0.719, 1.022 mm). Unit discharges ranging from 0.07 to 2.07 × 10-3 m2 s-1 were simulated inside the flume at four slopes (5.2, 8.7, 13.2 and 17.6%) to analyze their impact on sediment transport rate. The sediment transport rate measured at the bottom end of the flume by taking water and sediment samples was considered equal to sediment transport capacity, because the selected flume length of 3.0 m was found sufficient to reach the transport capacity. The experimental result reveals that the slope gradient has a stronger impact on transport capacity than unit discharge and mean flow velocity due to the fact that the tangential component of gravity force increases with slope gradient. Our results show that unit stream power is an optimal composite force predictor for estimating transport capacity. Stream power and effective stream power can also be successfully related to the transport capacity, however the relations are strongly dependent on grain size. Shear stress showed poor performance, because part of shear stress is dissipated by bed irregularities, bed form evolution and sediment detachment. An empirical transport capacity equation was derived, which illustrates that

  3. Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

    2007-06-15

    The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

  4. Effects of herbivorous birds on intertidal seagrass beds in the northern Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacken, M.; Reise, K.

    2000-07-01

    During autumn migration (September to December), brent geese (Branta b. bernicla) and wigeon (Anas penelope) feed on the seagrass Zostera noltii in the nearshore, upper tidal zone leeward of the island of Sylt (eastern North Sea). To graze on leaves and shoots above the sediment and on rhizomes and roots below, these birds reworked the entire upper 1 cm layer of sediment eight times within this 3-month period. In addition, brent geese excavated pits 3-10 cm deep by trampling in order to feed on below-ground phytomass. About 12% of the seagrass beds became pitted to an average depth of 4.5 cm. Using net exclosures, it was estimated that birds removed 34 g dry weight m-2 of above-ground and 28 g of below-ground phytomass. This corresponds to 45% of the phytomass in September. Of the overall loss of phytomass from September to December, 63% was caused by birds. Roughly half of the leaves fell off anyway until December and the other half were taken by the birds. Below the ground, phytomass remained almost constant where birds were excluded, while with birds phytomass of rhizomes and roots was halved. In spite of this strong effect, in the next vegetation period the blade density was lower at former exclosure sites compared to the ambient seagrass bed. The underlying process seems to be a self-inhibition of dense overwintering seagrass by mud accretion. Assuming our experimental results can be scaled up to the entire seagrass bed, we hypothesize that in the sheltered upper intertidal zone, seasonal erosion caused by herbivorous geese and ducks is necessary for the persistence of Z. noltii.

  5. The effect of certificate-of-need laws on hospital beds and healthcare expenditures: an empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the effect of certificate-of-need legislation on hospital bed supply and healthcare expenditures. This study uses state data on several variables, including healthcare expenditures, hospital bed supply, and the existence of a certificate-of-need program, from 4 periods (1985, 1990, 1995, and 2000). We estimate 2 multivariate regression equations. In the first equation, hospital bed supply is the dependent variable, and certificate of need is included as an independent variable. In the second equation, healthcare expenditures is the dependent variable, and hospital bed supply and certificate of need are included as independent variables. Certificate-of-need laws have reduced the number of hospital beds by about 10% and have reduced healthcare expenditures by almost 2%. Certificate-of-need programs did not have a direct effect on healthcare expenditures. Certificate-of-need programs have limited the growth in the supply of hospital beds, and this has led to a slight reduction in the growth of healthcare expenditures.

  6. Effects of process parameters on solid self-microemulsifying particles in a laboratory scale fluid bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tusharmouli; Plakogiannis, Fotios M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select the critical process parameters of the fluid bed processes impacting the quality attribute of a solid self-microemulsifying (SME) system of albendazole (ABZ). A fractional factorial design (2(4-1)) with four parameters (spray rate, inlet air temperature, inlet air flow, and atomization air pressure) was created by MINITAB software. Batches were manufactured in a laboratory top-spray fluid bed at 625-g scale. Loss on drying (LOD) samples were taken throughout each batch to build the entire moisture profiles. All dried granulation were sieved using mesh 20 and analyzed for particle size distribution (PSD), morphology, density, and flow. It was found that as spray rate increased, sauter-mean diameter (D(s)) also increased. The effect of inlet air temperature on the peak moisture which is directly related to the mean particle size was found to be significant. There were two-way interactions between studied process parameters. The main effects of inlet air flow rate and atomization air pressure could not be found as the data were inconclusive. The partial least square (PLS) regression model was found significant (P < 0.01) and predictive for optimization. This study established a design space for the parameters for solid SME manufacturing process.

  7. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest with and without fly-wheel exercise on heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Curnier, Daniel; Bernard, Jacques; Beroud, Stephane; Costes-Salon, Marie-Claude; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Pathak, Atul; Galinier, Michel

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged Head down bed rest (HDBR) (90 days) on heart rate variability (HRV) in 25 healthy male volunteers (mean age: 33 y). Nine subjects performed flywheel resistance muscular training. 24h-ECG recordings were performed in pre- HDBR (D-12, D-3), HDBR (D 15, D 32, D 62, D 85) and recovery (D+4). The mean HR, SDNN and coefficient of variation (SDNN normalized by HR) reflecting overall HRV were calculated as well as the power in Low (LF) and High (HF) frequencies (24h- period). HDBR induced a significant decrease in HRV favoured by inactivity. LF and LF/HF mainly under sympathetic influence decreased significantly on D15 and then tended to stabilise around baseline values. HF reflecting parasympathetic modulation decreased with HDBR but some changes occurred in pre-HDBR, in relation with the experiment conditions, and raised the issue of reference values. No exercise effect was observed.

  8. Effectiveness of a Reduced-Risk Insecticide Based Bed Bug Management Program in Low-Income Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinderpal Singh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. infestations are becoming increasingly common in low-income communities. Once they are introduced, elimination is very difficult. As part of the efforts to develop effective and safe bed bug management programs, we conducted a laboratory study evaluating the efficacy of a reduced-risk insecticide—Alpine aerosol (0.5% dinotefuran. We then conducted a field evaluation of a reduced-risk insecticide based integrated pest management (IPM program in low-income family apartments with young children. In laboratory evaluations, direct spray and 5 min exposure to dry Alpine aerosol residue caused 100.0 ± 0.0 and 91.7 ± 8.3% mortality to bed bug nymphs, respectively. Direct Alpine aerosol spray killed 91.3 ± 4.3% of the eggs. The IPM program included education, steam, bagging infested linens, placing intercepting devices under furniture legs and corners of rooms, applying Alpine aerosol and Alpine dust (0.25% dinotefuran, 95% diatomaceous earth dust, and regularly scheduled monitoring and re-treatment. Nine apartments ranging from 1–1,428 (median: 29 bed bugs based on visual inspection and Climbup interceptor counts were included. Over a 6-month period, an average 172 g insecticide (Alpine aerosol + Alpine dust was used in each apartment, a 96% reduction in pesticide usage compared to chemical only treatment reported in a similar environment. The IPM program resulted in an average of 96.8 ± 2.2% reduction in the number of bed bugs. However, elimination of bed bugs was only achieved in three lightly infested apartments (<30 bed bugs at the beginning. Elimination success was closely correlated with the level of bed bug populations.

  9. Effectiveness of a Batteryless and Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Identifying Bed and Chair Exits in Healthy Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Roberto Luis Shinmoto; Visvanathan, Renuka; Hoskins, Stephen; van den Hengel, Anton; Ranasinghe, Damith C

    2016-04-15

    Aging populations are increasing worldwide and strategies to minimize the impact of falls on older people need to be examined. Falls in hospitals are common and current hospital technological implementations use localized sensors on beds and chairs to alert caregivers of unsupervised patient ambulations; however, such systems have high false alarm rates. We investigate the recognition of bed and chair exits in real-time using a wireless wearable sensor worn by healthy older volunteers. Fourteen healthy older participants joined in supervised trials. They wore a batteryless, lightweight and wireless sensor over their attire and performed a set of broadly scripted activities. We developed a movement monitoring approach for the recognition of bed and chair exits based on a machine learning activity predictor. We investigated the effectiveness of our approach in generating bed and chair exit alerts in two possible clinical deployments (Room 1 and Room 2). The system obtained recall results above 93% (Room 2) and 94% (Room 1) for bed and chair exits, respectively. Precision was >78% and 67%, respectively, while F-score was >84% and 77% for bed and chair exits, respectively. This system has potential for real-time monitoring but further research in the final target population of older people is necessary.

  10. Effectiveness of a Batteryless and Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Identifying Bed and Chair Exits in Healthy Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Luis Shinmoto Torres

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aging populations are increasing worldwide and strategies to minimize the impact of falls on older people need to be examined. Falls in hospitals are common and current hospital technological implementations use localized sensors on beds and chairs to alert caregivers of unsupervised patient ambulations; however, such systems have high false alarm rates. We investigate the recognition of bed and chair exits in real-time using a wireless wearable sensor worn by healthy older volunteers. Fourteen healthy older participants joined in supervised trials. They wore a batteryless, lightweight and wireless sensor over their attire and performed a set of broadly scripted activities. We developed a movement monitoring approach for the recognition of bed and chair exits based on a machine learning activity predictor. We investigated the effectiveness of our approach in generating bed and chair exit alerts in two possible clinical deployments (Room 1 and Room 2. The system obtained recall results above 93% (Room 2 and 94% (Room 1 for bed and chair exits, respectively. Precision was >78% and 67%, respectively, while F-score was >84% and 77% for bed and chair exits, respectively. This system has potential for real-time monitoring but further research in the final target population of older people is necessary.

  11. Effect of 21 days of horizontal bed rest on behavioural thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogev, Daniel; Eiken, Ola; Pisot, Rado; Biolo, Gianni; di Prampero, Pietro; Narici, Marco; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of 21 days of horizontal bed rest on cutaneous cold and warm sensitivity, and on behavioural temperature regulation. Healthy male subjects (N = 10) were accommodated in a hospital ward for the duration of the study and were under 24-h medical care. All activities (eating, drinking, hygiene, etc.) were conducted in the horizontal position. On the 1st and 22nd day of bed rest, cutaneous temperature sensitivity was tested by applying cold and warm stimuli of different magnitudes to the volar region of the forearm via a Peltier element thermode. Behavioural thermoregulation was assessed by having the subjects regulate the temperature of the water within a water-perfused suit (T (wps)) they were wearing. A control unit established a sinusoidal change in T (wps), such that it varied from 27 to 42 degrees C. The subjects could alter the direction of the change of T (wps), when they perceived it as thermally uncomfortable. The magnitude of the oscillations towards the end of the trial was assumed to represent the upper and lower boundaries of the thermal comfort zone. The cutaneous threshold for detecting cold stimulus decreased (P behavioural thermoregulatory responses.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF STEP-POOL SEQUENCE AND ITS EFFECTS IN RESISTANCE AND STREAM BED STABILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Yin WANG; Jiang XU; Changzhi LI

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted and field investigations were performed to study the development of step-pool sequence and its effects on resistance to the flow and stream bed stability. Step-pool sequence develops in incised channels as a result of streambed erosion, which is compared with sand dunes and armor layer of the role in resistance and streambed protection. The tight interlocking of particles in steps gives them an inherent stability which only extreme floods are likely to disturb. That stability suggests that step-pools are a valid equilibrium form, especially when coupled with their apparent regularity form and their role in satisfying the extreme condition of resistance maximization. The development degree of step-pools, SP, is proportional to the streambed slope. If the incoming sediment load is equal to or more than the sediment-carrying capacity of the flow, there is no bed erosion and thence there are no step-pools. Ifthe flow depth increases and is over the step-height the resistance caused by the step-pool sequence will be greatly reduced. The rate of energy dissipation by step-pools is a function of SP. The higher is SP, the larger is the rate of energy dissipation. The step-pool sequence increases the resistance and flow depth, reduces the shear stress of the flow and protects the streambed from erosion. Moreover,step-pool sequence provides ecologically sound habitats for aquatic bio-community as well.

  13. Effects of biomass on dynamics of combustion in circulating fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourunen Antti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed technology is very suitable for the combustion of biomass Nevertheless substitution of coal with biomass affects boiler operation and especially dynamics and controllability. Non-homogeneity of biomass and fuel feeding disturbances cause process instability, such as variations in temperatures and pressures, which reduce lifetime of equipment and structures. Because of process instability higher air coefficient must be used in order to avoid CO emissions, which is not economical. Combustion profiles for coal, wood and peat, measured at the VTT Processes Pilot circulating fluidized bed reactor, have been compared. Process stability and char inventories have been studied by the measurements and the model. Biofuel are usually very reactive and their combustion profiles are quite different compared to coals. Because of high reactivity and low char content combustion process with biofuel is very sensitive for fuel feeding. Also low char inventory effect on load changes combined with combustion profile that differs from coals. Because of different combustion profile heat transfer can be a limiting factor in load changes despite the high reactivity and fast oxygen response.

  14. Spouted bed drying of Bauhinia forficata link extract: the effects of feed atomizer position and operating conditions on equipment performance and product properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. F. Souza

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effects of feed atomizer position and operating conditions on equipment performance (accumulation rate, product recovery, elutriation and thermal efficiency and product properties (moisture content, size distribution, flavonoid degradation and flow properties during spouted bed drying of Bauhinia forficata Link extract are evaluated. The parameters studied were the position of the atomizer system (top spray or bottom spray, the inlet temperature of the spouting gas (80 and 150oC and the feed mass flow rate of concentrated extract relative to the evaporation capacity of the dryer, Ws/Wmax (15 to 100%. Higher accumulation rate values were obtained with the atomizer placed at the bottom of the bed. In this configuration, the accumulation rate increases with the increase in the Ws/Wmax ratio. The best drying performance was obtained for the top spray configuration.

  15. THE EFFECT OF REINFORCEMENT ON THE GBFS AND LIME TREATED MARINE CLAY FOR FOUNDATION SOIL BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koteswara Rao,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available India being peninsular country has large area coming under coastal region and also it has been the habitat for considerable percentage of population. The marine clays are generally found in the coastal region of West Bengal, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Maharashtra and some parts of Gujarat. Marine or soft clays exists in these region are weak and deformative in nature. The present study deals with the strength characteristics of the marine clay collected from Kakinada Sea Port Ltd, Kakinada, A.P, India. The effect of lime on the strength characteristics of marine clay are studied in this investigation along with the reinforcement effect using geotextile as reinforcement and separator for the foundation soil bed.

  16. Negative effects of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds in Flensborg fjord, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Hanne Fogh; Laursen, Jens Sund; Holmer, Marianne

    2008-03-01

    The effect of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds was studied from June 2004 to July 2005 in Flensborg fjord, Denmark. The field experiments were conducted at two stations, one with only Z. marina (Eelgrass station) present and one where M. edulis were present in the Z. marina beds (Mixed station). Zostera marina parameters were measured (growth of leaves, shoot density, leaf length, and nutrient content) in combination with epiphyte cover and sediment parameters (sulphate reduction rates, sediment nutrient fluxes, organic content, C, N and P content) to examine possible positive and negative effects of the mussels on eelgrass performance. The fluxes of ammonium from the sediments were stimulated at all sampling dates at the Mixed station, and possibly stimulated epiphyte growth at this station. Further 15N signals in epiphytes from the Mixed station suggested that excretion products from the mussels were important nitrogen sources at this station. Sulphate reduction rates were enhanced at the Mixed station and also sediment sulphide concentrations increased under mussel influence, which may have resulted in sulphide toxicity and decreased growth of Z. marina at this station. The study indicates that for Z. marina beds in Flensborg Fjord the effects of M. edulis in seagrass beds are primarily negative, and raises the question whether this leads to negative effects on the stability and expansion of Z. marina beds.

  17. Thresholds of flow-induced bed disturbances and their effects on stream metabolism in an agricultural river

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ben L.; Harvey, Judson W.; McPhillips, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    Storm-driven flow pulses in rivers destroy and restructure sediment habitats that affect stream metabolism. This study examined thresholds of bed disturbances that affected patch- and reach-scale sediment conditions and metabolism rates. A 4 year record of discharge and diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations (ΔDO) was analyzed for disturbances and recovery periods of the ΔDO signal. Disturbances to the ΔDO signal were associated with flow pulses, and the recovery times for the ΔDO signal were found to be in two categories: less than 5 days (30% of the disturbances) or greater than 15 days (70% of the disturbances). A field study was performed during the fall of 2007, which included a storm event that increased discharge from 3.1 to 6.9 m3/s over a 7 h period. During stable flow conditions before the storm, variability in patch-scale stream metabolism values were associated with sediment texture classes with values ranging from −16.4 to 2.3 g O22/d (negative sign indicates net respiration) that bounded the reach-averaged rate of −5.6 g O22/d. Hydraulic modeling of bed shear stresses demonstrated a storm-induced flow pulse mobilized approximately 25% of the bed and reach-scale metabolism rates shifted from −5 to −40 g O22/d. These results suggest that storm-induced bed disturbances led to threshold behavior with respect to stream metabolism. Small flow pulses resulted in partial-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by increased turbidity with short recovery times. Large flow pulses resulted in full-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by destroying periphyton habitats with long recovery times.

  18. COUPLING EFFECT BETWEEN RELIABILITY OF BEDDING LAYER AND STABILITY OF DOWNSTREAM CONCRETE SLAB OF OVERFLOW EARTH-ROCK COFFERDAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The protection of downstream concrete slab is a key issue for the stability of overflow earth-rock cofferdam. The coupling effect between bedding layer and concrete slab was taken into account when the stability of downstream concrete slab was researched. The characteristics of overflow and seepage over the downstream concrete slab were investigated when floodwater passes over the cofferdam. Firstly a limit equation of seepage failure for the bedding layer was derived with the consideration of geometric and mechanical factors, and a reliability model was established and numerically simulated. Then based on the reliability calculation for the bedding layer, the coupling effect between bedding layer and downstream concrete slab was analyzed. Under the most unfavorable pressure condition for the concrete slab, its instability criterion was put forward, which offers a structural design tool of downstream concrete slab for overflow earth-rock cofferdam. Compared with model tests, it shows that the model of reliability calculation of bedding layer and the stability analysis of downstream concrete slab are effective.

  19. Edge effects are important in supporting beetle biodiversity in a gravel-bed river floodplain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone D Langhans

    Full Text Available Understanding complex, dynamic, and diverse ecosystems is essential for developing sound management and conservation strategies. Gravel-bed river floodplains are composed of an interlinked mosaic of aquatic and terrestrial habitats hosting a diverse, specialized, and endangered fauna. Therefore, they serve as excellent models to investigate the biodiversity of multiple ecotones and related edge effects. In this study, we investigated the abundance, composition, richness, and conservation status of beetle assemblages at varying sediment depth (0, 0.1, 0.6 and 1.1 m, distance from the channel (1, 5, 20, and 60-100 m, and 5 m within the riparian forest, and time of the year (February-November across a 200 m-wide gravel bar at the near-natural Tagliamento River (Italy, to detect edge effects in four floodplain ecotones: aquatic-terrestrial, forest-active floodplain, sediment-air, and sediment-groundwater. We used conventional pitfall traps and novel tube traps to sample beetles comparably on the sediment surface and within the unsaturated sediments. We found a total of 308 beetle species (including 87 of conservation concern that showed multiple, significant positive edge effects across the floodplain ecotones, mainly driven by spatial heterogeneity: Total and red list beetle abundance and richness peaked on the sediment surface, at channel margins, and at the edge of the riparian forest. All ecotones possessed edge/habitat specialists. Most red list species occurred on the sediment surface, including five species previously considered extinct--yet two of these species occurred in higher densities in the unsaturated sediments. Conservation and management efforts along gravel-bed rivers must therefore promote a dynamic flow and sediment regime to create and maintain habitat heterogeneity and ecotone diversity, which support a unique and high biodiversity.

  20. Edge effects are important in supporting beetle biodiversity in a gravel-bed river floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Simone D; Tockner, Klement

    2014-01-01

    Understanding complex, dynamic, and diverse ecosystems is essential for developing sound management and conservation strategies. Gravel-bed river floodplains are composed of an interlinked mosaic of aquatic and terrestrial habitats hosting a diverse, specialized, and endangered fauna. Therefore, they serve as excellent models to investigate the biodiversity of multiple ecotones and related edge effects. In this study, we investigated the abundance, composition, richness, and conservation status of beetle assemblages at varying sediment depth (0, 0.1, 0.6 and 1.1 m), distance from the channel (1, 5, 20, and 60-100 m, and 5 m within the riparian forest), and time of the year (February-November) across a 200 m-wide gravel bar at the near-natural Tagliamento River (Italy), to detect edge effects in four floodplain ecotones: aquatic-terrestrial, forest-active floodplain, sediment-air, and sediment-groundwater. We used conventional pitfall traps and novel tube traps to sample beetles comparably on the sediment surface and within the unsaturated sediments. We found a total of 308 beetle species (including 87 of conservation concern) that showed multiple, significant positive edge effects across the floodplain ecotones, mainly driven by spatial heterogeneity: Total and red list beetle abundance and richness peaked on the sediment surface, at channel margins, and at the edge of the riparian forest. All ecotones possessed edge/habitat specialists. Most red list species occurred on the sediment surface, including five species previously considered extinct--yet two of these species occurred in higher densities in the unsaturated sediments. Conservation and management efforts along gravel-bed rivers must therefore promote a dynamic flow and sediment regime to create and maintain habitat heterogeneity and ecotone diversity, which support a unique and high biodiversity.

  1. Cost-effective nanoporous Agar-Agar polymer/Nickel powder composite particle for effective bio-products adsorption by expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Setareh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2014-09-26

    degree, viscosity of the liquid phase and the density of adsorbent. It was observed that the application of matrix with high density was proper for high operation, fluid velocity, since the addition of densifier improves the rigidity of the matrix. Three momentous factors, pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of BSA were analyzed. The best results showed that the adsorption equilibrium isotherms seems to follow a typical Langmuir isotherm and also the maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of BSA on RB4-Agar-Ni (64.01 mg/ml adsorbent) was higher than that on RB4-Streamline commercial adsorbent (about 54 mg.ml adsorbent). Additionally kinetic adsorption processes were characterized by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics equations. The experimental data followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic equation. Also the breakthrough curves were investigated. It was found that dynamic binding capacity (DBC) decreased with increasing the flow rate and the values of DBC decreased from 21.08 to 11.15 mg/ml adsorbent when the density of composite beads increased from 1.64 to 2.78 g/ml. All results indicate that the prepared composite is promising for efficient bioproduct adsorption with good hydrodynamic characteristics, high stability and it is suitable for expanded bed usage as a cost-effective adsorbent.

  2. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  3. Zebra mussel beds: an effective feeding ground for Ponto-Caspian gobies or suitable shelter for their prey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Kobak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggregations of the Ponto-Caspian invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha constitute a suitable habitat for macroinvertebrates, considerably increasing their abundance and providing effective antipredator protection. Thus, the overall effect of a mussel bed on particular predator species may vary from positive to negative, depending on both prey density increase and predator ability to prey in a structurally complex habitat. Alien Ponto-Caspian goby fish are likely to be facilitated when introduced into new areas by zebra mussels, provided that they are capable of utilizing mussel beds as habitat and feeding grounds. We ran laboratory experiments to find which prey (chironomid larvae densities (from ca. 500 to 2,000 individuals m−2 in a mussel bed make it a more beneficial feeding ground for the racer goby Babka gymnotrachelus (RG and western tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris (WTG compared to sandy and stone substrata (containing the basic prey density of 500 ind. m−2. Moreover, we checked how food availability affects habitat selection by fish. Mussel beds became more suitable for fish than alternative mineral substrata when food abundance was at least two times higher (1,000 vs. 500 ind. m−2, regardless of fish size and species. WTG was associated with mussel beds regardless of its size and prey density, whereas RG switched to this habitat when it became a better feeding ground than alternative substrata. Larger RG exhibited a stronger affinity for mussels than small individuals. WTG fed more efficiently from a mussel bed at high food abundances than RG. A literature review has shown that increasing chironomid density, which in our study was sufficient to make a mussel habitat an attractive feeding ground for the gobies, is commonly observed in mussel beds in the field. Therefore, we conclude that zebra mussels may positively affect the alien goby species and are likely to facilitate their establishment in novel areas

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  5. Effects of coal-bed methane discharge waters on the vegetation and soil ecosystem in Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, M.; Tindall, J.A.; Cronin, G.; Friedel, M.J.; Bergquist, E.

    2005-01-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) co-produced discharge waters in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, resulting from extraction of methane from coal seams, have become a priority for chemical, hydrological and biological research during the last few years. Soil and vegetation samples were taken from affected and reference sites (upland elevations and wetted gully) in Juniper Draw to investigate the effects of CBM discharge waters on soil physical and chemical properties and on native and introduced vegetation density and diversity. Results indicate an increase of salinity and sodicity within local soil ecosystems at sites directly exposed to CBM discharge waters. Elevated concentrations of sodium in the soil are correlated with consistent exposure to CBM waters. Clay-loam soils in the study area have a much larger specific surface area than the sandy soils and facilitate a greater sodium adsorption. However, there was no significant relation between increasing water sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values and increasing sediment SAR values downstream; however, soils exposed to the CBM water ranged from the moderate to severe SAR hazard index. Native vegetation species density was highest at the reference (upland and gully) and CBM affected upland sites. The affected gully had the greatest percent composition of introduced vegetation species. Salt-tolerant species had the greatest richness at the affected gully, implying a potential threat of invasion and competition to established native vegetation. These findings suggest that CBM waters could affect agricultural production operations and long-term water quality. ?? Springer 2005.

  6. In situ strength of coal bed based on the size effect study on the uniaxial compressive strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzatti C.; Zorzi L.; Agostini I.M.; Fiorentini J.A.; Viero A.P.; Philipp R.P.

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Foundation for Science and Technology of Rio Grande do Sul State (CIENTEC) developed a pioneering study in Brazil, related to the simultaneous mining of multiple coal seams. One of the activities included detailed studies on the geomechanical characterization of materials present in the Irapua coal seam, under exploitation in the A-Sangao Mine, located near the city of Criciuma-SC, within the South-Catarinense coalfield. The goal of the laboratory tests was to define the behavior of the uniaxial compressive strength of the Irapua coal seam and establish a first approximation for the in situ strength value of this coal seam, since existing knowledge is solely based on practical mining experience over the years. Large samples of the coal seam were collected, using special techniques to maintain the integrity of the material, and a set of 56 uniaxial compression tests in cubic specimens, with side length ranging from 4.5 to 31 cm, were conducted in laboratory. This paper describes the experimen-tal techniques used in the assays, and also presents the uniaxial compression strength results obtained. Moreover, important aspects of this type of study are considered, highlighting the size effect for the carbonaceous bed and the estimation of in situ strength values for the Irapua coal seam.

  7. Numerical simulation of scale-up effects of methanol-to-olefins fluidized bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan; Luo, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Scale-up of fluidized bed reactors has long been regarded as a big challenge in chemical reaction engineering. While traditional scaling theories are mostly based on hydrodynamics similarity, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) aided approach allows direct coupling between hydrodynamics and reaction...... features can be reasonably predicted, while the prediction of reaction behavior shows growing discrepancy with increasing reactor size. Possible reasons are discussed in the last section along with future work presented for scale-up studies....... factors and is expected to speed up the experiment-based scale-up process with lower cost. In this study, we aim to investigate the scale-up effects through simulations of a series of methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reactors of different sizes. The two-fluid model and energy-minimization multi-scale (EMMS...

  8. Effectiveness of Mathematics Teaching and Learning Experiences through Wireless Technology as Recent Style to Enhance B.Ed. Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of learning through Wireless technologies and the traditional method in teaching and learning Mathematics. The investigator adopted experimental research to find the effectiveness of implementing Wireless technologies in the population of B.Ed. trainees. The investigator selected 32 B.Ed.…

  9. Creating an Effective Customer Value Proposition Process

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a Customer Value Proposition building process for the case company and to focus the company’s sales and marketing operations through building a Customer Value Proposition to the company’s most potential customers in selected new markets using the established concept. The case company operates in the IT industry and its market territory is limited to Finland. After numerous rather steady years, the owners have set very high targets for growth...

  10. Effects of Long Duration Spaceflight on Venous and Arterial Compliance: Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L. Christine; Platts, Steven H.; Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Martin, David S.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Stenger, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective was to determine whether a high sodium diet during bed rest induced alterations in vascular compliance and was related to the incidence of VIIP. Ocular structural and functional measures and vascular ultrasound of the head and neck were acquired in bed rest subjects completing 10-14 days in 6deg head-down tilt.

  11. Numerical study of propagation effects in a wireless mesh test bed

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present layout of the indoor wireless mesh network test-bed build at the Meraka Institute is introduced. This is followed by a description of a numerical electromagnetic model for the complete test-bed, including the coupling and diffraction...

  12. Effectiveness of powered hospital bed movers for reducing physiological strain and back muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, Nathan; Merrett, Simon; Paul, Gunther

    2014-07-01

    Battery powered bed movers are becoming increasingly common within the hospital setting. The use of powered bed movers is believed to result in reduced physical efforts required by health care workers, which may be associated with a decreased risk of occupation related injuries. However, little work has been conducted assessing how powered bed movers impact on levels of physiological strain and muscle activation for the user. The muscular efforts associated with moving hospital beds using three different methods; powered StaminaLift Bed Mover (PBM1), powered Gzunda Bed Mover (PBM2) and manual pushing were measured on six male subjects. Fourteen muscles were assessed moving a weighted hospital bed along a standardized route in an Australian hospital environment. Trunk inclination and upper spine acceleration were also quantified. Powered bed movers exhibited significantly lower muscle activation levels than manual pushing for the majority of muscles. When using the PBM1, users adopted a more upright posture which was maintained while performing different tasks (e.g. turning a corner, entering a lift), while trunk inclination varied considerably for manual pushing and the PBM2. The reduction in lower back muscular activation levels may result in lower incidence of lower back injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of a powered drive on pushing and pulling forces when transporting bariatric hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggermann, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Powered drives designed to assist with moving hospital beds are commercially available but no studies have evaluated whether they reduce the push and pull forces likely contributing to injury in caregivers. This study measured hand forces of 10 caregivers maneuvering a manual and powered bariatric bed through simulated hospital environments (hallway, elevator, and ramp). Peak push and pull forces exceeded previously established psychophysical limits for all activities with the manual bed. For the powered bed, peak forces were significantly (p forces between 38% (maneuvering into elevator) and 94% (descending ramp). Powered drive also reduced stopping distance by 55%. When maneuvering, the integral of hand force was 34% lower with powered drive, but average forces during straight-line pushing did not differ between beds. Powered drive may reduce the risk of injury or the number of caregivers needed for transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  15. An aerated and fluidized bed membrane bioreactor for effective wastewater treatment with low membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli

    2016-09-24

    Anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors (AFMBRs) use granular activated carbon (GAC) particles suspended by recirculation to effectively treat low strength wastewaters (∼100–200 mg L−1, chemical oxygen demand, COD), but the effluent can contain dissolved methane. An aerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AOFMBR) was developed to avoid methane production and the need for wastewater recirculation by using rising air bubbles to suspend GAC particles. The performance of the AOFMBR was compared to an AFMBR and a conventional aerobic membrane bioreactor (AeMBR) for domestic wastewater treatment over 130 d at ambient temperatures (fixed hydraulic retention time of 1.3 h). The effluent of the AOFMBR had a COD of 20 ± 8 mg L−1, and a turbidity of <0.2 NTU, for low-COD influent (153 ± 19 and 214 ± 27 mg L−1), similar to the AeMBR and AFMBR. For the high-COD influent (299 ± 24 mg L−1), higher effluent CODs were obtained for the AeMBR (38 ± 9 mg L−1) and AFMBR (51 ± 11 mg L−1) than the AOFMBR (26 ± 6 mg L−1). Transmembrane pressure of the AOFMBR increased at 0.04 kPa d−1, which was 20% less than the AeMBR and 57% less than the AFMBR, at the low influent COD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated a more uniform biofilm on the membrane in AOFMBR than that from the AeMBR biofilm, and no evidence of membrane damage. High similarity was found between communities in the suspended sludge in the AOFMBR and AeMBR (square-root transformed Bray–Curtis similarity, SRBCS, 0.69). Communities on the GAC and suspended sludge were dissimilar in the AOFMBR (SRBCS, 0.52), but clustered in the AFMBR (SRBCS, 0.63).

  16. Numerical simulation of dune-flat bed transition and stage-discharge relationship with hysteresis effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y.; Giri, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nelson, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents recent advances on morphodynamic modeling of bed forms under unsteady discharge. This paper includes further development of a morphodynamic model proposed earlier by Giri and Shimizu (2006a). This model reproduces the temporal development of river dunes and accurately replicates the physical properties associated with bed form evolution. Model results appear to provide accurate predictions of bed form geometry and form drag over bed forms for arbitrary steady flows. However, accurate predictions of temporal changes of form drag are key to the prediction of stage-discharge relation during flood events. Herein, the model capability is extended to replicate the dune-flat bed transition, and in turn, the variation of form drag produced by the temporal growth or decay of bed forms under unsteady flow conditions. Some numerical experiments are performed to analyze hysteresis of the stage-discharge relationship caused by the transition between dune and flat bed regimes during rising and falling stages of varying flows. The numerical model successfully simulates dune-flat bed transition and the associated hysteresis of the stage-discharge relationship; this is in good agreement with physical observations but has been treated in the past only using empirical methods. A hypothetical relationship for a sediment parameter (the mean step length) is proposed to a first level of approximation that enables reproduction of the dune-flat bed transition. The proposed numerical model demonstrates its ability to address an important practical problem associated with bed form evolution and flow resistance in varying flows. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Effects of High-Temperature Preoxidation on the Titanomagnetite Ore Structure and Reduction Behaviors in Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoyan; Adetoro, Ajala Adewole; Pan, Feng; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Qingshan

    2017-02-01

    The oxidation behaviors of South Africa (SA) titanomagnetite (TTM) and its effects on the gas solid reduction in the fluidized bed were investigated on the basis of the two-stage short process of direct reduction-electric arc furnace (DR-EAF) melting separation. The results showed that the oxidation phase transformations in the high-temperature range from 1073 K to 1223 K (800 °C to 950 °C) can be divided into two typical processes: with the fast generation of pseudobrookite and with the maghemite generation at the initial stage. The reduction efficiency for SA TTM was improved by the preoxidation treatment, mainly because of the dissociation of titania-ferrous oxides to the easy reducible hematite. However, at a preoxidation temperature higher than 1173 K (900 °C), the improving effect became weak, due to high-temperature sintering and the larger crystallite size of oxidation products. There is an extreme value of the preoxidation influence, and the optimum preoxidation time is different for various temperatures. The reduction metallization degree of SA TTM can be relatively improved by 14.5 and 4.5 pct for the first and second reduction steps, respectively, by 1173 K (900 °C) preoxidation with an optimum time of 30 minutes. Finally, the equilibrium relationship between the metallization degree and the gas reduction potential for TTM ore with preoxidation treatment was built.

  18. Effects of 3-day bed rest on physiological responses to graded exercise in athletes and sedentary men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kaminska, E.; Cybulski, G.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed-rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status, 12 sedentary men and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to 3-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise test until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously, and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate concentration ([LA]), epinephrine concentration ([Epi]), norepinephrine concentration ([NE]), plasma renin activity (PRA), human growth hormone concentration ([hGH]), testosterone, and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes than in the remaining groups (17 vs. 10%). Decrements in VO(2 peak) correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, P exercise respiratory exchange ratios were increased in athletes. Cardiac output was unchanged by BR in all groups, but exercise HR was increased and SV diminished in the sedentary subjects. The submaximal [LA] and [LA] thresholds were decreased in the endurance athletes from 71 to 60% VO(2 peak) (P exercise. These effects were insignificant in the remaining subjects. In conclusion, reduction of exercise performance and modifications in neurohormonal response to exercise after BR depend on the previous level and mode of physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  19. Effects of gravitational stress, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the structure of the vascular bed of the spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of two extreme factors, hypokinesia and hypodynamia, on spleen vascular beds were studied on 180 male and female albino rats. Vessels were studied by roentgenography, microroentgenography, clearing of sections and histology. Gravity stress yielded construction of all links of arterial bed and of order 5-7 veins. Large intraorganic vein diameters changed significantly but erratically. Hypokinesia in early phases produced pronounced spleen size reduction. Veins and arteries constricted along entire length. Later hypokinetic stages showed arteries still constricted; veins began to dilate from week 4 of hypokinesia. Sinuosity, uneven contours and varicose dilations of walls in large arteries and veins occurred. Abrupt changes in parenchyma, e.g., atrophy of folliculi, narrowing of lumen of central arteries from thickening of muscular wall. After exposure to hypokinesia followed by gravitational stress, pronounced lesions such as deformation of vascular wall, including rupture, in all vessels of the spleen vascular bed.

  20. Effects of lateral confinement in natural and leveed reaches of a gravel-bed river: Snake River, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Christina M.; Legleiter, Carl; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of natural and anthropogenic changes in confining margin width by applying remote sensing techniques – fusing LiDAR topography with image-derived bathymetry – over a large spatial extent: 58 km of the Snake River, Wyoming, USA. Fused digital elevation models from 2007 and 2012 were differenced to quantify changes in the volume of stored sediment, develop morphological sediment budgets, and infer spatial gradients in bed material transport. Our study spanned two similar reaches that were subject to different controls on confining margin width: natural terraces versus artificial levees. Channel planform in reaches with similar slope and confining margin width differed depending on whether the margins were natural or anthropogenic. The effects of tributaries also differed between the two reaches. Generally, the natural reach featured greater confining margin widths and was depositional, whereas artificial lateral constriction in the leveed reach produced a sediment budget that was closer to balanced. Although our remote sensing methods provided topographic data over a large area, net volumetric changes were not statistically significant due to the uncertainty associated with bed elevation estimates. We therefore focused on along-channel spatial differences in bed material transport rather than absolute volumes of sediment. To complement indirect estimates of sediment transport derived by morphological sediment budgeting, we collected field data on bed mobility through a tracer study. Surface and subsurface grain size measurements were combined with bed mobility observations to calculate armoring and dimensionless sediment transport ratios, which indicated that sediment supply exceeded transport capacity in the natural reach and vice versa in the leveed reach. We hypothesize that constriction by levees induced an initial phase of incision and bed armoring. Because levees prevented bank erosion, the channel excavated sediment by

  1. Effects of sand addition on turbulent flow over an immobile gravel bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, D. G.; Langendoen, E. J.; Kuhnle, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    The factors controlling the complex interaction of a coarse streambed with flow and sediment are difficult to measure. However, planning for reservoir flushing or dam removal requires knowledge of these interactions. In both cases, impounded sediments are introduced to channel beds that have had fine sediment particles removed without replacement. The channel bed pore space interacts with the flow and provides storage for particles. In order to address the need for information on such systems, an adjustable-slope, recirculating laboratory flume was used to study the changes in flow and turbulence caused by sand added to an immobile gravel bed. Detailed measurements were made using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter that collected three velocity components at a rate of 200 Hz. Because of the rough nature of the bed, individual velocity profiles varied significantly; therefore, in order to determine general trends, the data were spatially averaged over six 10 × 20 cm planes parallel to the bed with the lowest plane about 2 cm below the maximum gravel elevation. The increasing elevation of sand relative to the gravel layer resulted in decreased bed shear stress, decreased Reynolds stress, increased relative turbulence intensity, and a near-bed shift toward sweep-dominated turbulence.

  2. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; Kelly, Richard; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague-Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system.

  3. Effect of 2 Bedding Materials on Ammonia Levels in Individually Ventilated Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Jason M; Kumsher, David M; III, Richard Kelly; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to identify an optimal rodent bedding and cage-change interval to establish standard procedures for the IVC in our rodent vivarium. Disposable cages were prefilled with either corncob or α-cellulose bedding and were used to house 2 adult Sprague–Dawley rats (experimental condition) or contained no animals (control). Rats were observed and intracage ammonia levels measured daily for 21 d. Intracage ammonia accumulation became significant by day 8 in experimental cages containing α-cellulose bedding, whereas experimental cages containing corncob bedding did not reach detectable levels of ammonia until day 14. In all 3 experimental cages containing α-cellulose, ammonia exceeded 100 ppm (our maximum acceptable limit) by day 11. Two experimental corncob cages required changing at days 16 and 17, whereas the remaining cage containing corncob bedding lasted the entire 21 d without reaching the 100-ppm ammonia threshold. These data suggests that corncob bedding provides nearly twice the service life of α-cellulose bedding in the IVC system. PMID:26817976

  4. Investigation of the baffle effects on reactor of fluidized beds with circulating flow along with ozone decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zohrabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized beds with circulating flow, as the gas-solid contactors, are widely used in physical and chemical processes such as drying of solids, pharmaceutical industries, coating solids, granulation, and water and wastewater treatment industry. In this study, numerical simulation using FLUENT software was conducted to investigate the distribution of solid particles of fluidized beds with circulating flow. To conduct simulation, Eulerian-Eulerian with the help of kinetic theory of granular flow was used. Various values of particle-wall elastic modulus were studied. After selecting the appropriate model to predict the particles flow behavior, ozone decomposition reaction was carried out in fluidized beds with circulating flow and they were solved by FLUENT software. The results showed that the location of ring baffles has the greatest impact on fluctuation of system pressure drop, and adverse mix of gas and increase of solid materials are tangible by baffles, resulting from regulation of bed and accumulation of circulating particles beside the wall.

  5. Vascular adaptation to deconditioning and the effect of an exercise countermeasure: results of the Berlin Bed Rest study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.W.P.; Groot, P.C.E. de; Rongen, G.A.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.; Smits, P.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2005-01-01

    Deconditioning is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The physiology of vascular adaptation to deconditioning has not been elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of bed rest deconditioning on vascular dimension and function of leg conduit arteries. In addition,

  6. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Two percent of adolescents and young adults suffer from therapy-resistant enuresis, with considerable negative impact on self-esteem and relationships. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapyresistant group of adolescents with

  7. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis/aims of study Two percent of adolescents and adults suffers from enuresis. In this age group, social problems can arise. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapy-resistant group of adolescents and adults with enuresis, provided by a specialize

  8. High short-term effectiveness of modulated dry bed training in adolescents and young adults with treatment-resistant enuresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, I.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, J.G.L.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Mulder, Z.; Steffens, M.G.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Van Capelle, J.W.; Blanker, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Two percent of adolescents and young adults suffer from therapy-resistant enuresis, with considerable negative impact on self-esteem and relationships. We evaluated the effect of a Modulated Dry Bed Training (MDBT) in a previously therapyresistant group of adolescents with

  9. Effects of cohesion on the flow patterns of granular materials in spouted beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Runru; Li, Shuiqing; Yao, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Two-dimensional spouted bed, capable to provide both dilute granular gas and dense granular solid flow patterns in one system, was selected as a prototypical system for studying granular materials. Effects of liquid cohesion on such kind of complex granular patterns were studied using particle image velocimetry. It is seen that the addition of liquid oils by a small fraction of 10-3-10-2 causes a remarkable narrowing (about 15%) of the spout area. In the dense annulus, as the liquid fraction increases, the downward particle velocity gradually decreases and approaches a minimum where, at a microscopic grain scale, the liquid bridge reaches spherical regimes with a maximum capillarity. Viscous lubrication effect is observed at a much higher fraction but is really weak with respect to the capillary effect. In the dilute spout, in contrast to the dry grains, the wet grains have a lightly smaller acceleration in the initial 1/3 of the spout, but have a dramatically higher acceleration in the rest of the spout. We attribute the former to the additional work needed to overcome interparticle cohesion during particle entrainment at the spout-annulus interface. Then, using mass and momentum balances, the latter is explained by the relative higher drag force resulting from both higher gas velocities and higher voidages due to spout narrowing in the wet system. The experimental findings will provide useful data for the validation of discrete element simulation of cohesive granular-fluid flows.

  10. Effects of Pulse Ultrasound on Adsorption of Geniposide on Resin 1300 in a Fixed Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆向红; 徐之超; 计建炳

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pulse ultrasound with different pulse parameters on the breakthrough curves of Geniposide on Resin 1300 were studied. The mass transfer model describing the adsorption process was constructed. Adsorption capability and the overall mass-transfer coefficient were obtained by fitting the constructed mass-transfer model and the experimental data. The effects of pulse ultrasound on adsorption of Geniposide on Resin1300 in a fixed bed were studied and compared. Amount of Geniposide adsorbed on Resin 1300 in the presence of ultrasound is lower than that in the absence of ultrasound, but the mass-transfer rate with ultrasonic irradiation is higher than that without ultrasound. Furthermore, mass transfer rate is enhanced by pulse modulation. In the conditions studied, the adsorption equilibrium constant decreases with increasing ultrasonic power, while the overall mass-transfer co-efficient increases. With increasing pulse duty ratio, adsorption equilibrium constant decreases initially, reaches a minimum when pulse duty ratio is 0.5, and then increases. On the contrary, the overall mass-transfer coefficient in-creases initially and reaches a maximum when pulse ratio is 0.5, and then decreases. Effects of pulse period on ad-sorption equilibrium and mass transfer rate reached the peak at pulse period of 28.6 ms.

  11. Practical aspects and uncertainty analysis of biological effective dose (BED) regarding its three-dimensional calculation in multiphase radiotherapy treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I., E-mail: Kauweloa@livemail.uthscsa.edu; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Bergamo, Angelo; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 and Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: There is a growing interest in the radiation oncology community to use the biological effective dose (BED) rather than the physical dose (PD) in treatment plan evaluation and optimization due to its stronger correlation with radiobiological effects. Radiotherapy patients may receive treatments involving a single only phase or multiple phases (e.g., primary and boost). Since most treatment planning systems cannot calculate the analytical BED distribution in multiphase treatments, an approximate multiphase BED expression, which is based on the total physical dose distribution, has been used. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the mathematical properties of the approximate BED formulation, relative to the true BED. Methods: The mathematical properties of the approximate multiphase BED equation are analyzed and evaluated. In order to better understand the accuracy of the approximate multiphase BED equation, the true multiphase BED equation was derived and the mathematical differences between the true and approximate multiphase BED equations were determined. The magnitude of its inaccuracies under common clinical circumstances was also studied. All calculations were performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the three-dimensional dose matrices. Results: Results showed that the approximate multiphase BED equation is accurate only when the dose-per-fractions (DPFs) in both the first and second phases are equal, which occur when the dose distribution does not significantly change between the phases. In the case of heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the inaccuracy of the approximate multiphase BED is greater. These characteristics are usually seen in the dose distributions being delivered to organs at risk rather than to targets. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that the true multiphase BED equation should be implemented in the treatment planning

  12. Effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-Day Bed Rest on Postural Control in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Julie; Taylor, Laura C.; Vanya, Robert D.; Dean, S. Lance; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDT) has been used as a safe gr ound-based analog to mimic and develop countermeasures for the physiological effects of spaceflight, including decrements in postural stability. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of 30-, 60-, and 90-day bed rest on postural control in men and women. METHODS Twenty-nine subjects (18M,11F) underwent 13 days of ambula tory acclimatization and were placed in 6? HDT for 30 (n=12), 60 (n=8), or 90 (n=9) days, followed by 14 days of ambulatory recovery. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) was used to assess changes in sensory and motor components of postural control, and recovery after HDT. Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) objectively evaluate one?s ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Stability during the SOTs was assessed using peak-to-peak sway and convergence toward stability limits to derive an equilibrium score. Motor Control Tests (MCTs) evaluate one?s ability to recover from unexpected support surface perturbations, with performance determined by center-of-pressure path length. Whole-body kinematic data were collected to determine body-sway strategy used to maintain stability during each condition. Baselines were determined pre-HDT. Recovery was tracked post-HDT on days 0, 1, 2, and 4. RESULTS Immediately after HDT, subjects showed decreased performance on most SOTs, primarily on sway-referenced support conditions, typically returning to baseline levels within 4 days. MCT performance was not significantly affected. There were no significant gender or duration differences in performance. Kinematic data revealed a tendency to use ankle strategy to maintain an upright stance during most SOT conditions. Interestingly, six subjects (2M,4F) experienced orthostatic intolerance and were unable to complete day 0 testing. CONCLUSION HDT mimics some un loading mechanisms of spaceflight and

  13. Effects of Artificial Gravity and Bed Rest on Spatial Orientation and Balance Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H.; Moore, S. T.; Feiveson, A. H.; Taylor, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    While the vestibular system should be well-adapted to bed rest (a condition it experiences approximately 8/24 hrs each day), questions remain regarding the degree to which repeated exposures to the unusual gravito-inertial force environment of a short-radius centrifuge might affect central processing of vestibular information used in spatial orientation and balance control. Should these functions be impaired by intermittent AG, its feasibility as a counter-measure would be diminished. We, therefore, examined the effects of AG on spatial orientation and balance control in 15 male volunteers before and after 21 days of 6 HDT bed rest (BR). Eight of the subjects were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet; 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls (C). Spatial orientation was assessed by measures of ocular counter-rolling (OCR; rotation of the eye about the line of sight, an otolith-mediated reflex) and subjective visual vertical (SVV; perception of the spatial upright). Both OCR and SVV measurements were made with the subject upright, lying on their left sides, and lying on their right sides. OCR was measured from binocular eye orientation recordings made while the subjects fixated for 10s on a point target directly in front of the face at a distance of 1 m. SVV was assessed by asking subjects (in the dark) to adjust to upright (using a handheld controller) the orientation of a luminous bar randomly perturbed (15) to either side of the vertical meridian. Balance control performance was assessed using a computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol similar to that currently required for all returning crew members. During each session, the subjects completed a combination of trials of sensory organization test (SOT) 2 (eyes closed, fixed platform) and SOT 5 (eyes closed, sway-referenced platform) with and without static and dynamic pitch plane head movements (plus or minus 20 deg., dynamic

  14. Effects of fluidized bed drying on the quality of soybean kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosain Darvishi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of air temperature and velocity on the drying qualities (cracking, bulk density, shrinkage and rehydration of soybean kernels in fluidized bed dryer were investigated. Drying was carried out at 80, 100, 120 and 140 °C and air velocity of 1.8, 3.1 and 4.5 m/s. Soybean kernels were dehydrated from the initial moisture content of 25% (w.b to a final moisture content of 10%. The drying evaluation showed that high drying temperature and air velocity resulted in high cracking and low rehydration ratios (P < 0.05. However, air velocity had no significant effect on bulk density and shrinkage of soybeans. By increasing the temperature and air velocity over their full ranges, drying time decreased from 380 to 50 min. Cracking, bulk density, degree of shrinkage and rehydration ratio varied from 31.80% to 58.22%, 1101.31 to 1186.39 kg/m3, 0.730 to 0.787, and 0.583 to 0.873, respectively. Regression equations were established which can be used for the estimation of the quality parameters as a function of the drying variables.

  15. Effect of particle distribution on the compaction behavior of granular beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, C. A.; Longbottom, A. W.

    2006-06-01

    This research determines how particle size and particle distribution affects the compaction of granular beds. A modelling and experimental effort was recently designed to compare the compaction behavior of two types of granular HMX: prepressed conventional (coarse) HMX material (mean diameter of 40μm) and microfine HMX (mean diameter Journal of Applied Physics 97, 093521 (2005)]. The microfine material demonstrated higher levels of granular bed strength. Mesoscale modelling of granular beds that are of fixed initial solid volume fraction but vary in particle size and distribution have been undertaken that include a simple elastic-plastic strength model. These suggest that it is not inherently the "size" of a particle that controls the bed strength but the morphology and distribution of particle grains. These solutions are compared with the behavior predicted from continuum scale models of material compaction.

  16. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  17. Size and value effects in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Bodeutsch (Denice); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper studies the link between stock returns and size and book-to-market equity effects for 10 companies listed at the Suriname Stock Exchange. We analyze the cross-sectional variation in average returns and we find that there is apparently no size effect, but the

  18. Size and value effects in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Bodeutsch (Denice); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper studies the link between stock returns and size and book-to-market equity effects for 10 companies listed at the Suriname Stock Exchange. We analyze the cross-sectional variation in average returns and we find that there is apparently no size effect, but

  19. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during bed rest: effect on recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Donaldson, M. R.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Baggett, D. W.; Boden, G.

    2003-01-01

    Bed rest is associated with a loss of protein from the weight-bearing muscle. The objectives of this study are to determine whether increasing dietary branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) during bed rest improves the anabolic response after bed rest. The study consisted of a 1-day ambulatory period, 14 days of bed rest, and a 4-day recovery period. During bed rest, dietary intake was supplemented with either 30 mmol/day each of glycine, serine, and alanine (group 1) or with 30 mmol/day each of the three BCAAs (group 2). Whole body protein synthesis was determined with U-(15)N-labeled amino acids, muscle, and selected plasma protein synthesis with l-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine. Total glucose production and gluconeogenesis from alanine were determined with l-[U-(13)C(3)]alanine and [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. During bed rest, nitrogen (N) retention was greater with BCAA feeding (56 +/- 6 vs. 26 +/- 12 mg N. kg(-1). day(-1), P BCAA supplementation on either whole body, muscle, or plasma protein synthesis or the rate of 3-MeH excretion. Muscle tissue free amino acid concentrations were increased during bed rest with BCAA (0.214 +/- 0.066 vs. 0.088 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein, P BCAA group in the recovery phase. In conclusion, the improved N retention during bed rest is due, at least in part, to accretion of amino acids in the tissue free amino acid pools. The amount accreted is not enough to impact protein kinetics in the recovery phase but does improve N retention by providing additional essential amino acids in the early recovery phase.

  20. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (pirrigated groups (K=5.6%, S=5.1% vs. without irrigation groups K=9.4%, S=9.3%). The first K drill generated more heat than the remaining drills. No significant differences were detected among temperature values in any of the analyzed drill groups. Unlike irrigation, drill use and type were observed to have no significant impact on heat generation. The stainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440.

  1. Glutamatergic systems in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, effects on cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Nasimi, Ali

    2007-04-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is a part of the limbic system. Two studies have shown that microinjection of L: -glutamate in the BST elicited cardiovascular depressive and bradycardic responses, but in one study, both pressor and depressor responses were observed in the chemical stimulation of BST by glutamate in the urethane-anesthetized rats. Also, the roles of glutamate receptor subtypes have not been investigated yet. The aim of this study was to find the effects of glutamate and its receptors on the blood pressure and heart rate in the BST of urethane-anesthetized rats. The drugs (50 nl) were microinjected into the BST of anaesthetized rats. The blood pressure and heart rate were recorded throughout each experiment. The average changes in the mean arterial pressure and heart rate at different intervals were compared both within each case group and between the case and the control groups, using repeated measures ANOVA. Microinjection of L: -glutamate (0.25 M) into the BST resulted in the decrease of the mean arterial pressure (-18.85 +/- 3.84 mmHg) and heart rate (-18 +/- 4 beats/min). Injection of AP5, antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptor (2.5 , 5 mM) and CNQX, antagonist of glutamate AMPA receptor (0.5, 1 mM) had no significant effect on the mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Either Ap5 or CNQX, when co-injected with glutamate, abolished the depressor and bradycardic effects of glutamate, suggesting that simultaneous activation of both glutamate receptors is necessary for the effect of glutamate system to emerge.

  2. Effects of a malfunctional column on conventional and FeedCol-simulated moving bed chromatography performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Donghoon; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2015-07-17

    The effects of a malfunctional column on the performance of a simulated moving bed (SMB) process were studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental results of conventional four-zone SMB (2-2-2-2 configuration) and FeedCol operation (2-2-2-2 configuration with one feed column) with one malfunctional column were compared with simulation results of the corresponding SMB processes with a normal column configuration. The malfunctional column in SMB processes significantly deteriorated raffinate purity. However, the extract purity was equivalent or slightly improved compared with the corresponding normal SMB operation because the complete separation zone of the malfunctional column moved to a lower flow rate range in zones II and III. With the malfunctional column configuration, FeedCol operation gave better experimental performance (up to 7%) than conventional SMB operation because controlling product purity with FeedCol operation was more flexible through the use of two additional operating variables, injection time and injection length. Thus, compared with conventional SMB separation, extract with equivalent or slightly better purity could be produced from FeedCol operation even with a malfunctional column, while minimizing the decrease in raffinate purity (less than 2%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Liquid Viscosity and Solid Inventory on Hydrodynamics in a Liquid - solid Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala sundaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive hydrodynamic study of a Liquid - Solid Circulating Fluidized Bed (LSCFB is conducted with changes in viscosity of the fluidizing medium and the inventory height of solids initially fed into the system. An LSCFB of height 2.95m and riser outer diameter 0.1m was chosen for experimentation. The three liquid media systems with varying viscosities that were chosen were water, glycerol 10% (v/v and glycerol 20% (v/v. Effect of inventory on the hydrodynamics was also studied, by taking initial heights of inventory to be 15cm, 25cm and 35cm. The hydrodynamic studies concentrated on pressure gradients along the axial pressure tapings, axial solid holdup, average solid holdup, solid circulation rate and slip velocity. Uniformity in axial solid holdup and average solid holdup was validated for changes in viscosity and inventory. Solid flux was seen to follow an inverse relationship to holdup. The changes in slip velocity with varying viscosity and inventory were studied, and found to decrease with both variables. The distribution parameter, Co of the drift flux model was found to be in the range of 0.983-0.994, suggesting non-uniformity in radial solid distribution, with higher solid concentration by the walls compared to the core of the column.

  4. Effect of hydraulic retention time on metal precipitation in sulfate reducing inverse fluidized bed reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Villa-Gómez, Denys Kristalia

    2014-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Metal sulfide recovery in sulfate reducing bioreactors is a challenge due to the formation of small precipitates with poor settling properties. The size of the metal sulfide precipitates with the change in operational parameters such as pH, sulfide concentration and reactor configuration has been previously studied. The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the metal precipitate characteristics such as particle size for settling has not yet been addressed. RESULTS: The change in size of the metal (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) sulfide precipitates as a function of the HRT was studied in two sulfate reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors operating at different chemical oxygen demand concentrations to produce high and low sulfide concentrations. The decrease of the HRT from 24 to 9h in both IFB reactors affected the contact time of the precipitates formed, thus making differences in aggregation and particle growth regardless of the differences in sulfide concentration. Further HRT decrease to 4.5h affected the sulfate reducing activity for sulfide production and hence, the supersaturation level and solid phase speciation. Metal sulfide precipitates affected the sulfate reducing activity and community in the biofilm, probably because of the stronger local supersaturation causing metal sulfides accumulation in the biofilm. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the HRT is an important factor determining the size and thus the settling rate of the metal sulfides formed in bioreactors.

  5. Effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on the fixed-bed pyrolysis of sunflower bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putun, E.; Kockar, O.M.; Gercel, F. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    There are a number of waste and biomass sources being considered as potential sources of fuels and chemical feedstocks. The economics for biomass pyrolysis are generally considered to be most favourable for (1) plants which grow abundantly and require little cultivation in and lands and (2) wastes available in relatively large quantities from agricultural plants, for example, sunflower and hazel nuts. For the former, one such group of plants is Euphorbiaceae which are characterised by their ability to produce a milky latex, an emulsion of about 30% w/w terpenoids in water. One species in the family, Euphorbia Rigida from Southwestern Anatolia, Turkey is cultivated in close proximity to the sunflower growing regions and their oil extraction plants. The Turkish sunflower oil industry generates 800,000 tons of extraction residue (bagasse) per annum. Thus, both sunflower wastes and latex-producing plants are being considered as feedstocks for a future thermochemical demonstration unit in Turkey. Pyrolysis at relatively high hydrogen pressures (hydropyrolysis) has not been widely investigated for biomass. A potential advantage of hydropyrolysis is the ability to upgrade tar vapours over hydroprocessing catalysts. Fixed-bed pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis experiments have been conducted on sunflower bagasse to assess the effects of mass transfer and hydrogen pressure on oil yield and quality.

  6. Effects of age and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest on atrophy of trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Tome; Mori, Natsuko; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age and inactivity due to being chronically bedridden on atrophy of trunk muscles. The subjects comprised 33 young women (young group) and 41 elderly women who resided in nursing homes or chronic care institutions. The elderly subjects were divided into two groups: independent elderly group who were able to perform activities of daily living involving walking independently (n = 28) and dependent elderly group who were chronically bedridden (n = 13). The thickness of the following six trunk muscles was measured by B-mode ultrasound: the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, thoracic erector spinae (longissimus) and lumbar multifidus muscles. All muscles except for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles were significantly thinner in the independent elderly group compared with those in the young group. The thicknesses of all muscles in the dependent elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, whereas there were no differences between the dependent elderly and independent elderly groups in the muscle thicknesses of the rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. In conclusion, our results suggest that: (1) age-related atrophy compared with young women was less in the deep antigravity trunk muscles than the superficial muscles in the independent elderly women; (2) atrophy associated with chronic bed rest was more marked in the antigravity muscles, such as the back and transversus abdominis.

  7. Changes in plasma volume during bed rest - Effects of menstrual cycle and estrogen administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, S. M.; Beckett, W. S.; Carpenter, A. J.; Davis, J.; Drew, H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of increased blood estrogen concentration, caused either during normal menstrual cycles or by exogenous administration of premarin, on the bed-rest (BR) induced decrease in plasma volume (PV) was investigated. In women who underwent duplicate 11-day BR without estrogen supplementation, the PV was found to decrease significantly, during the first 5 days of BR, to a lower level at which it remained for the rest of the BR period. In women who began BR in the periovulatory stage of the menstrual cycle, the loss of PV was delayed, while women who began BR during other stages of the cycle exhibited the usual trend of the PV decrease during the BR. In women who underwent a single 12-day BR period while taking premarin (1.25 mg/day), PV was found to decrease during the first 4-5 days of BR, but then returned toward the pre-BR level during the remainder of the BR, indicating that estrogens have a role in stabilizing body fluid volume.

  8. Air effects on subharmonic bifurcations of impact in vertically vibrated granular beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Han, H.; Zhang, R.; Li, X. R.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of interstitial air on the impact bifurcations in vertically vibrated granular beds. The impact of particles on the container bottom commonly undergoes a series of subharmonic bifurcations in the sequence of period-2, period-4, chaos, period-3, period-6, chaos, period-4, period-8, and so on. In the container with an air impermeable bottom, air flows are induced and air drag on the particles causes the bifurcations to be dependent on the particle size; the bifurcation point increases with the decreasing of particle size. This makes the higher-order bifurcations become unobservable when the particle size is sufficiently small. Meanwhile, such bifurcations are shown to be controlled by both the normalized vibration acceleration and the vibration frequency. However, in the container with an air permeable bottom the size dependence of bifurcations is cancelled, and the bifurcations turn to be controlled solely by the normalized vibration acceleration. The observed results are explained in terms of an inelastic bouncing ball model with air dragging terms involved.

  9. Effects of seagrass bed removal for tourism purposes in a Mauritian bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daby, D

    2003-10-01

    Tourism affects marine environments adversely and these effects may be a major threat to the future of tourism. - Stresses and shocks are increasing on the main natural assets in Mauritius (Western Indian Ocean) by tourism (marine-based) development activities. Seagrasses are removed by hotels in the belief that they are unsightly or harbour organisms causing injury to bathers. Environmental changes (e.g. sediment characteristics and infauna distribution, water quality, seagrass biomass) resulting from clearing of a seagrass bed to create an aesthetically pleasant swimming zone for clients of a hotel were monitored during June 2000-July 2001, and compared to conditions prevailing in an adjacent undisturbed area. Key observations in the disturbed area were: highly turbid water overlying a destabilized lagoon seabed, complete loss of sediment infauna, and dramatic dry weight biomass declines (e.g. 72 and 65% in S. isoetifolium and H. uninervis, respectively). Such disruptions draw-down resilience rendering the marine habitats less robust and more vulnerable to environmental change and extreme events, with higher risks of chaos and ecological collapse, and constitute a major threat to the industry itself.

  10. Numerical simulation of flow and bed morphology in the case of dam break floods with vegetation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜恒志; 张明亮; 许媛媛; 乔洋; 张钟哲; 张国胜

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a depth-averaged 2-D hydrodynamic and sediment transport model for the dam- break flows with vegetation effect. The generalized shallow water equations are solved using an explicit finite volume method with unstructured quadtree rectangular grid, and in the hydrodynamic model, a Harten-Lax-Van Leer (HLL) approximate Riemann solver is used to calculate the intercell flux for capturing the dry-to-wet moving boundary. The sediment transport and bed variation equations in a coupled fashion are calculated by including the bed variation and the variable flow density in the flow continuity and momentum equations. The drag force of vegetation is modeled as the sink terms in the momentum equations. The developed model is tested against lab experiments of the dam-break flows over a fix bed and a movable bed in vegetated and non-vegetated channels. The results are compared with experimental data, and good agreement is obtained. It is shown that the reduced velocity under vegetated conditions leads to a decrease of the peak discharge and a rise of the water level of rivers and also an enhancement of the sediment deposition.

  11. LBNP/ergometer effects on female cardiovascular and muscle deconditioning in 15d head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jie

    2012-07-01

    Female has already been an important part of astronaut corps but gender characteristics in weightlessness and countermeasure effects still not clearly elucidated. In this study the LBNP/Ergometer effects on female cardiovascular deconditioning and muscle atrophy in 15d head-down bed rest were explored. 22 female university students were recruited as volunteers that participated in the 15d head-down bed rest. They were divided into control group (Con,n=8), LBNP exercise group (LBNP,n=7) and LBNP combined with ergometer exercise group (LBNP+Ergo, n=7). Grade negative pressures of -10,-20,-30,-40mmHg 20 or 55min were used in LBNP exercise. In ergometer exercises the subjects must maintain 60-80% VO2peak of pre-bed rest at pedal speed of about 70cycle/min for 15min and the entire exercise duration was 30min. LBNP were performed at 6th,8th,10th,12th,and 13th day and Ergometer were operated at 4th,5th,7th,9th,11th day during bed rest. Before and after bed rest, cardiovascular tilt test were performed to evaluate orthostatic intolerance, supine cycle ergometer were used to test the cardiopulmonary function, MRI tests were operated to examine the volume variations of leg muscle groups and isokinetic test were given to test the muscle strength and endurance of knee. 40% of female subjects did not pass the tilt table test after bed rest and exercises made no difference. Compared with pre-BR, VO2max and VO2max /body weight, VO2/HRmax, maximal power and duration significantly decreased in CON group and LBNP group. For the ERGO+LBNP group, there were no visible different in the parameters of cardiopulmonary function except that maximal power and duration decreased. Muscle maximal voluntary contraction and muscle (quadriceps, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius and soleus) volume decreasing in non-predominant leg was larger in Con group than in LBNP+Ergo group. It is suggested that LBNP combined with ergometer in some degrees can counteract the cardiovascular and muscle deconditioning

  12. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  13. Nitrification of an industrial wastewater in a moving-bed biofilm reactor: effect of salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, Simone; Dezotti, Marcia; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification of wastewaters from chemical industries can pose some challenges due to the presence of inhibitory compounds. Some wastewaters, besides their organic complexity present variable levels of salt concentration. In order to investigate the effect of salt (NaCl) content on the nitrification of a conventional biologically treated industrial wastewater, a bench scale moving-bed biofilm reactor was operated on a sequencing batch mode. The wastewater presenting a chloride content of 0.05 g l(-1) was supplemented with NaCl up to 12 g Cl(-) l(-1). The reactor operation cycle was: filling (5 min), aeration (12 or 24h), settling (5 min) and drawing (5 min). Each experimental run was conducted for 3 to 6 months to address problems related to the inherent wastewater variability and process stabilization. A PLC system assured automatic operation and control of the pertinent process variables. Data obtained from selected batch experiments were adjusted by a kinetic model, which considered ammonia, nitrite and nitrate variations. The average performance results indicated that nitrification efficiency was not influenced by chloride content in the range of 0.05 to 6 g Cl(-) l(-1) and remained around 90%. When the chloride content was 12 g Cl(-) l(-1), a significant drop in the nitrification efficiency was observed, even operating with a reaction period of 24 h. Also, a negative effect of the wastewater organic matter content on nitrification efficiency was observed, which was probably caused by growth of heterotrophs in detriment of autotrophs and nitrification inhibition by residual chemicals.

  14. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  15. Irregular Wave Forces on Monopile Foundations. Effect af Full Nonlinearity and Bed Slope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2011-01-01

    Forces on a monopile from a nonlinear irregular unidirectional wave model are investigated. Two seabed profiles of different slopes are considered. Morison’s equation is used to investigate the forcing from fully nonlinear irregular waves and to compare the results with those obtained from linear...... wave theory and with stream function wave theory. The latter of these theories is only valid on a flat bed. The three predictions of wave forces are compared and the influence of the bed slope is investigated. Force-profiles of two selected waves from the irregular wave train are further compared...... with the corresponding forceprofiles from stream function theory. The results suggest that the nonlinear irregular waves give rise to larger extreme wave forces than those predicted by linear theory and that a steeper bed slope increases the wave forces both for linear and nonlinear waves. It is further found...

  16. Effects of an intervention to increase bed alarm use to prevent falls in hospitalized patients: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, Ronald I; Chandler, A Michelle; Mion, Lorraine C; Waters, Teresa M; Liu, Minzhao; Daniels, Michael J; Kessler, Lori A; Miller, Stephen T

    2012-11-20

    Bed alarm systems intended to prevent hospital falls have not been formally evaluated. To investigate whether an intervention aimed at increasing bed alarm use decreases hospital falls and related events. Pair-matched, cluster randomized trial over 18 months. Nursing units were allocated by computer-generated randomization on the basis of baseline fall rates. Patients and outcome assessors were blinded to unit assignment; outcome assessors may have become unblinded. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00183053) 16 nursing units in an urban community hospital. 27 672 inpatients in general medical, surgical, and specialty units. Education, training, and technical support to promote use of a standard bed alarm system (intervention units); bed alarms available but not formally promoted or supported (control units). Pre-post difference in change in falls per 1000 patient-days (primary end point); number of patients who fell, fall-related injuries, and number of patients restrained (secondary end points). Prevalence of alarm use was 64.41 days per 1000 patient-days on intervention units and 1.79 days per 1000 patient-days on control units (P = 0.004). There was no difference in change in fall rates per 1000 patient-days (risk ratio, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.53]; difference, 0.41 [CI, -1.05 to 2.47], which corresponds to a greater difference in falls in control vs. intervention units) or in the number of patients who fell, injurious fall rates, or the number of patients physically restrained on intervention units compared with control units. The study was conducted at a single site and was slightly underpowered compared with the initial design. An intervention designed to increase bed alarm use in an urban hospital increased alarm use but had no statistically or clinically significant effect on fall-related events or physical restraint use. National Institute on Aging.

  17. Effects of high-protein intake on bone turnover in long-term bed rest in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Baecker, Natalie; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Graf, Sonja; Zwart, Sara R; Biolo, Gianni; Smith, Scott M

    2017-01-19

    Bed rest (BR) causes bone loss, even in otherwise healthy subjects. Several studies suggest that ambulatory subjects may benefit from high-protein intake to stimulate protein synthesis and to maintain muscle mass. However, increasing protein intake above the recommended daily intake without adequate calcium and potassium intake may increase bone resorption. We hypothesized that a regimen of high-protein intake (HiPROT), applied in an isocaloric manner during BR, with calcium and potassium intake meeting recommended values, would prevent any effect of BR on bone turnover. After a 20-day ambulatory adaptation to a controlled environment, 16 women participated in a 60-day, 6° head-down-tilt (HDT) BR and were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups. Control (CON) subjects (n = 8) received 1 g/(kg body mass·day)(-1) dietary protein. HiPROT subjects (n = 8) received 1.45 g protein/(kg body mass·day)(-1) plus an additional 0.72 g branched-chain amino acids per day during BR. All subjects received an individually tailored diet (before HDTBR: 1888 ± 98 kcal/day; during HDTBR: 1604 ± 125 kcal/day; after HDTBR: 1900 ± 262 kcal/day), with the CON group's diet being higher in fat and carbohydrate intake. High-protein intake exacerbated the BR-induced increase in bone resorption marker C-telopeptide (>30%) (p protein intake. We conclude that high-protein intake in BR might increase bone loss. Further long-duration studies are mandatory to show how the positive effect of protein on muscle mass can be maintained without the risk of reducing bone mineral density.

  18. Effects of 3-day bed rest on physiological responses to graded exercise in athletes and sedentary men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorawinski, J.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kaminska, E.; Cybulski, G.; Kodrzycka, A.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that short-term bed-rest (BR) deconditioning influences metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and neurohormonal responses to exercise and that these effects depend on the subjects' training status, 12 sedentary men and 10 endurance- and 10 strength-trained athletes were submitted to 3-day BR. Before and after BR they performed incremental exercise test until volitional exhaustion. Respiratory gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously, and stroke volume (SV) was measured at submaximal loads. Blood was taken for lactate concentration ([LA]), epinephrine concentration ([Epi]), norepinephrine concentration ([NE]), plasma renin activity (PRA), human growth hormone concentration ([hGH]), testosterone, and cortisol determination. Reduction of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)) after BR was greater in the endurance athletes than in the remaining groups (17 vs. 10%). Decrements in VO(2 peak) correlated positively with the initial values (r = 0.73, P < 0.001). Resting and exercise respiratory exchange ratios were increased in athletes. Cardiac output was unchanged by BR in all groups, but exercise HR was increased and SV diminished in the sedentary subjects. The submaximal [LA] and [LA] thresholds were decreased in the endurance athletes from 71 to 60% VO(2 peak) (P < 0.001); they also had an earlier increase in [NE], an attenuated increase in [hGH], and accentuated PRA and cortisol elevations during exercise. These effects were insignificant in the remaining subjects. In conclusion, reduction of exercise performance and modifications in neurohormonal response to exercise after BR depend on the previous level and mode of physical training, being the most pronounced in the endurance athletes.

  19. Stratification effects on flow field and bed topography in meandering rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla Pittaluga, M.

    2010-12-01

    and eddy diffusivity, enhances significantly the vertical distribution of lateral velocity. Next, we investigate whether the point bar pattern in the inner bank and pool in the outer bank typically observed in meandering rivers may be significantly affected by the stratification effect. With the help of the Exner equation we show that, in the ideal case analyzed here, namely a uniform and steady flow in a constant curvature channel, stratification gives rise to steeper lateral bed profiles with respect to the unstratified case.

  20. Effects of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Kenji [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan)], E-mail: kenji.sugimoto@kanhokyo.or.jp; Hiraoka, Kiyonori [Hiroshima Environment and Health Association, 9-11, Hirosekitamachi Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8631 (Japan); Ohta, Seiji [Hiroshima Defense Facilities Administration Bureau, 6-30, Kamihattyobori, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-0012 (Japan); Niimura, Yoko [National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea, 2-17-5 Maruishi Ohno, Saeki, Hiroshima 739-0452 (Japan); Terawaki, Toshinobu [Fisheries Research Agency, Queen' s Tower-B 15F, Minato-Mirai, West, Yokohama 220-6115 (Japan); Okada, Mitsumasa [Hiroshima University, 1-4-1, Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effect of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of an eelgrass bed by the coast of Iwakuni, Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We monitored eelgrass shoot density and volume of ulvoid accumulation in the study site and evaluated effects of the accumulated ulvoid canopy on the percent survival, seedling density, growth rates, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and carbon contents of eelgrass. Eelgrass shoot density decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid. Also, seedling density decreased by the increase in the ulvoid volumes. Shoot density, seedling density and leaf elongation were negatively correlated with ulvoid volume. Carbon contents in eelgrass decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid (canopy height: 25 cm). These results suggest that accumulation of ulvoid bloom has significant negative impacts on the structure and function of eelgrass bed, i.e. decreases in vegetative shoot density, seedling density, shoot height and growth rate.

  1. Effects of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenji; Hiraoka, Kiyonori; Ohta, Seiji; Niimura, Yoko; Terawaki, Toshinobu; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effect of ulvoid (Ulva spp.) accumulation on the structure and function of an eelgrass bed by the coast of Iwakuni, Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We monitored eelgrass shoot density and volume of ulvoid accumulation in the study site and evaluated effects of the accumulated ulvoid canopy on the percent survival, seedling density, growth rates, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and carbon contents of eelgrass. Eelgrass shoot density decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid. Also, seedling density decreased by the increase in the ulvoid volumes. Shoot density, seedling density and leaf elongation were negatively correlated with ulvoid volume. Carbon contents in eelgrass decreased by the accumulation of ulvoid (canopy height: 25cm). These results suggest that accumulation of ulvoid bloom has significant negative impacts on the structure and function of eelgrass bed, i.e. decreases in vegetative shoot density, seedling density, shoot height and growth rate.

  2. Accelerating effect of hydroxylamine and hydrazine on nitrogen removal rate in moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Kroon, Kristel; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Tomingas, Martin; Vabamäe, Priit; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-09-01

    In biological nitrogen removal, application of the autotrophic anammox process is gaining ground worldwide. Although this field has been widely researched in last years, some aspects as the accelerating effect of putative intermediates (mainly N₂H₄ and NH₂OH) need more specific investigation. In the current study, experiments in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and batch tests were performed to evaluate the optimum concentrations of anammox process intermediates that accelerate the autotrophic nitrogen removal and mitigate a decrease in the anammox bacteria activity using anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) biomass enriched on ring-shaped biofilm carriers. Anammox biomass was previously grown on blank biofilm carriers for 450 days at moderate temperature 26.0 (±0.5) °C by using sludge reject water as seeding material. FISH analysis revealed that anammox microorganisms were located in clusters in the biofilm. With addition of 1.27 and 1.31 mg N L⁻¹ of each NH₂OH and N₂H₄, respectively, into the MBBR total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was rapidly restored after inhibitions by NO₂⁻. Various combinations of N₂H₄, NH₂OH, NH₄⁺, and NO₂⁻ were used as batch substrates. The highest total nitrogen (TN) removal rate with the optimum N₂H₄ concentration (4.38 mg N L⁻¹) present in these batches was 5.43 mg N g⁻¹ TSS h⁻¹, whereas equimolar concentrations of N₂H₄ and NH₂OH added together showed lower TN removal rates. Intermediates could be applied in practice to contribute to the recovery of inhibition-damaged wastewater treatment facilities using anammox technology.

  3. The Effects of Spaceflight and Head Down Tilt Bed Rest on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Rachael D.; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott; Mulavara, Ajit; Kofman, Igor; De Dios, Yiri; Gadd, Nicole; Stepanyan, Vahagn

    2017-01-01

    Spaceflight effects on gait, balance, & manual motor control have been well studied; some evidence for cognitive deficits. Rodent cortical motor & sensory systems show neural structural alterations with spaceflight. specific Aims: Aim 1-Identify changes in brain structure, function, and network integrity as a function of head down tilt bed rest and spaceflight, and characterize their time course. Aim 2-Specify relationships between structural and functional brain changes and performance and characterize their time course.

  4. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analogue on Resting State Sensorimotor Network Functional Connectivity and Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; Yuan, P.; Cooke, K.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor systems and neurocognitive performance. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with neurocognitive performance is largely unknown, but of potential importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. The aims of the present study are 1) to identify changes in sensorimotor resting state functional connectivity that occur with extended bed rest exposure, and to characterize their recovery time course; 2) to evaluate how these neural changes correlate with neurocognitive performance. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data were collected from 17 male participants. The data were acquired through the NASA bed rest facility, located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. RsfMRI data were obtained at seven time points: 7 and 12 days before bed rest; 7, 50, and 65 days during bed rest; and 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis was performed to measure the connectivity of sensorimotor networks in the brain before, during, and post-bed rest. We found a decrease in left putamen connectivity with the pre- and post-central gyri from pre bed rest to the last day in bed rest. In addition, vestibular cortex connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex decreased from pre to post bed rest. Furthermore, connectivity between cerebellar right superior posterior fissure and other cerebellar regions decreased from

  5. The effect of sulphate on methanol conversion in mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.; Chi, T.M.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    Mesophilic (30 °C) upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors were fed with an influent containing sulphate (2 g l-1) and methanol (1.33 g l-1). More than 90% of the methanol was mineralised to methane, while only ˜5–10% of the methanol was used for sulphate reduction. This pattern was independent of

  6. The effect of operational conditions on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the sludge bed in UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao, R.C.; Santaellla, S.T.; Haandel, van A.C.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the hydrodynamic properties of the sludge bed of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors based on its settleability and expansion characteristics. The methodologies used for the evaluation of the settleability of aerobic activated sludge, and for the expansibility

  7. Modeling of structural effects in biomedical elements after titanium oxidation in fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendzik K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation is one of the most employed methods to improve titanium and its alloys properties especially due to medical application. This process like most of the thermochemical treatment processes substantially influences on the characteristic of surface layers and the same on its mechanical and useful properties. Oxide coatings produced during titanium oxidation were examined due to their composition identification. Titanium was oxidized in fluidized bed in temperature range between 500÷700°C. Microstructures of titanium with a visible oxide coating on its surface after thermochemical treatment and changes of grain size in core of titanium samples are described. Moreover Xray phase analysis of obtained oxides coatings was made as well as microhardness measurements of titanium surface layers after oxidation process. Finally, the surfaces of titanium after oxidation in fluidized bed were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. All research results are used to built numerical model of oxidation process in fluidized. Titanium oxidation process in fluidized bed is very complicated, because changes of parameters are non linear characteristics. This fact and lack of mathematical algorithms describing this process makes modeling properties of titanium elements by traditional numerical methods difficult or even impossible. In this case it is possible to try using artificial neural network. Using neural networks for modeling oxidizing in fluidized bed is caused by several nets' features: non linear character, ability to generalize the results of calculations for data out of training set, no need for mathematical algorithms describing influence changes input parameters on modeling materials properties.

  8. Effects of bedding material on ammonia volatilization in a broiler house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from poultry house bedding material is a major production issues because the buildup of ammonia within the facilities is a human health issue and can negatively impact the performance of the birds. Major operational cost is associated with the ventilation of poultry houses to ...

  9. Effect of sediment transport boundary conditions on the numerical modeling of bed morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental sediment transport studies in laboratory flumes can use two sediment-supply methods: an imposed feed at the upstream end or recirculation of sediment from the downstream end to the upstream end. These methods generally produce similar equilibrium bed morphology, but temporal evolution c...

  10. Coal-bed methane water effects on dill and essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic way of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as coal-bed methane water (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In past 25 years, th...

  11. Passively Aerated Composting of Straw-Rich Pig Manure : Effect of Compost Bed Porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Wilde, de V.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Straw-rich manure from organic pig farming systems can be composted in passively aerated systems as the high application of straw results in a compost bed with good structure and porosity. The passively aerated composting process was simulated in one-dimensional reactors of 2 m3 for straw-rich

  12. Effect of contaminant concentration on aerobic microbial mineralization of DCE and VC in stream-bed sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater continuously discharges, demonstrated rapid mineralization of DCE and VC under aerobic conditions. Over 8 days, the recovery of [1,2-14C]DCE radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 17% to 100%, and the recovery of [1,2- 14C]VC radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 45% to 100%. Rates of DCE and VC mineralization increased significantly with increasing contaminant concentration, and the response of apparent mineralization rates to changes in DCE and VC concentrations was adequately described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics.Discharge of DCE and VC to an aerobic surface water system simultaneously represents a significant environmental concern and, potentially, a non-engineered opportunity for efficient contaminant bioremediation. The potential for bioremediation, however, depends on the ability of the stream-bed microbial community to efficiently and completely degrade DCE and VC over a range of contaminant concentrations. The purposes of the studies reported here were to assess the potential for aerobic DCE and VC mineralization by stream-bed microorganisms and to evaluate the effects of DCE and VC concentrations on the apparent rates of aerobic mineralization. Bed-sediment microorganisms indigenous to a creek, where DCE-contaminated groundwater

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of dense gas-fluidised beds using the kinetic theory of granular flow: effect of coefficient of restitution on bed dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-fluid Eulerian CFD model with closure laws according to the kinetic theory of granular flow has been applied to study the influence of the coefficient of restitution on the hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised beds. It is demonstrated that hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised

  14. Hydrodynamic modeling of dense gas-fluidised beds using the kinetic theory of granular flow: effect of coefficient of restitution on bed dynamics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-fluid Eulerian CFD model with closure laws according to the kinetic theory of granular flow has been applied to study the influence of the coefficient of restitution on the hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised beds. It is demonstrated that hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised

  15. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sint Annaland, van M.; Kürten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target pro

  16. Hydrodynamic modeling of dense gas-fluidised beds using the kinetic theory of granular flow: effect of coefficient of restitution on bed dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-fluid Eulerian CFD model with closure laws according to the kinetic theory of granular flow has been applied to study the influence of the coefficient of restitution on the hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised beds. It is demonstrated that hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised

  17. Hydrodynamic modelling of dense gas-fluidised beds using the kinetic theory of granular flow: effect of coefficient of restitution on bed dynamics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-fluid Eulerian CFD model with closure laws according to the kinetic theory of granular flow has been applied to study the influence of the coefficient of restitution on the hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised beds. It is demonstrated that hydrodynamics of dense gas-fluidised

  18. Effect of head-down bed rest on the neuroendocrine response to orthostatic stress in physically fit men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, J; Ksinantová, L; Kvetnanský, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2003-01-01

    The role of neuroendocrine responsiveness in the development of orthostatic intolerance after bed rest was studied in physically fit subjects. Head-down bed-rest (HDBR, -6 degrees, 4 days) was performed in 15 men after 6 weeks of aerobic training. The standing test was performed before, after training and on day 4 of the HDBR. Orthostatic intolerance was observed in one subject before and after training. The blood pressure response after training was enhanced (mean BP increments 18+/-2 vs. 13+/- 2 mm Hg, pE.M.), although noradrenaline response was diminished (1.38+/-0.18 vs. 2.76+/-0.25 mol.l(-1), pstanding and had no effect on the orthostatic tolerance. In orthostatic intolerance the BP response induced by subsequent HDBR was absent despite an enhanced sympathetic response.

  19. Experimental and modeling study of fluidized bed granulation: Effect of binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Vengateson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed granulation is a widely used technique of producing granules in pharmaceutical, food, detergent, and fertilizer industries. In this study, fluidized bed granulation of two powders – wheat flour and rice powder – with water as binder is studied experimentally and by modeling. The effects of two process parameters – binder flow rate, fluidizing air velocity – are determined. Experimental results show that increasing the binder flow rate favors the formation of bigger granules while increasing fluidizing air velocity leads to a decrease in average granule diameter. Population balance model with suitable form of coalescence kernel (β has been used to describe the granule growth. Later, this kernel is linked with process parameters – binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity.

  20. Effect of char preparation temperature on the evolution of nitrogen-containing species during char oxidation at fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, W.; Lu, J.; Yue, G. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuel Engineering; Molina, A.; Sarofim, A.F. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is gaining popularity as a means to burn coal and waste fuels because the low temperatures of fluidized bed combustors generally result in low thermal nitric oxide (NO) production. However, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions can be relativity high and strategies must be developed to reduce emissions of this greenhouse gas. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study that examined the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the conversion of char-N to N{sub 2}O, NO and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fluidized bed combustion. When anthracite coal was used, an increase in the pyrolysis temperature resulted in reduced conversion of char-N to N{sub 2}O and HCN. However, the conversion to NO increased. This observation may be due to the lower hydrogen content of the chars produced at higher temperature and their lower reactivity. Other possibilities may be that the lower char reactivity for chars produced at high pyrolysis temperature may affect the reactions occurring in the boundary layer. Chars of lower reactivity in particular, may react at lower particle temperature and under high transient oxygen concentrations. A simplified char combustion representation was used to examine the effect of temperature and equivalence ratio on HCN oxidation. A reduction of equivalence ratio could explain some of the observed variations in product distribution with increased pyrolysis temperature. 19 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  1. EFFECTS OF NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT ON PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND BIOMASS OF SEDIMENT MICROALGAE IN A SUBTROPICAL SEAGRASS BED(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucolo, Philip; Sullivan, Michael J; Zimba, Paul V

    2008-08-01

    Eutrophication of coastal waters often leads to excessive growth of microalgal epiphytes attached to seagrass leaves; however, the effect of increased nutrient levels on sediment microalgae has not been studied within seagrass communities. A slow-release NPK Osmocote fertilizer was added to sediments within and outside beds of the shoal grass Halodule wrightii, in Big Lagoon, Perdido Key, Florida. Gross primary production (GPP) and biomass (HPLC photopigments) of sediment microalgae within and adjacent to fertilized and control H. wrightii beds were measured following two 4-week enrichment periods during June and July 2004. There was no effect of position on sediment microalgal GPP or biomass in control and enriched plots. However, nutrient enrichment significantly increased GPP in both June and July. These results suggest that sediment microalgae could fill some of the void in primary production where seagrass beds disappear due to excessive nutrient enrichment. Sedimentary chl a (proxy of total microalgal biomass) significantly increased only during the June enrichment period, whereas fucoxanthin (proxy of total diatom biomass) was not increased by nutrient enrichment even though its concentration doubled in the enriched plots in June.

  2. THE EFFECT OF THE THICKNESS OF A PACKED BED ON THE DYNAMIC AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A SOLAR DRYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S KHALDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying food in the sun is a safe, easy and economical way to preserve food, especially fruits. Cabinet dryers are the most popular equipment for fruit drying. Because of intermittent nature of solar energy, storage is required for uninterrupted supply in order to match the needs. The main objective of this study is to assess effectiveness of continuous solar dryer integrated with packed bed as thermal storage with natural airflow for drying figs (Ficuscarica. The cabinet dryer were envisaged theoretically (computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The distribution of the velocity and temperature of air within the solar dryer were presented during one day of August and under the climate conditions of Tlemcen (Algeria.  The effects of presence of a packed bed on the distribution of velocity and temperature of airflow and on the temperature of figs were analyzed. The results show that the solar dryer design, incorporating a packed bed enhances the capabilities and performance of the solar dryer, through increasing time of drying.

  3. Biological aspects and ecological effects of a bed of the invasive non-indigenous mussel Brachidontes pharaonis (Fischer P., 1870 in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. BONNICI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available No mussel beds were known to occur in the Maltese Islands previous to 2009, when a single bed of the Lessepsian immigrant Brachidontes pharaonis, first recorded from the islands in 1970, was discovered in Birzebbugia Bay. The population structure of B. pharaonis was investigated to assess its potential to spread and colonise new shores, while the biotic community at the mussel bed was compared to that present on uncolonised substratum to determine the effects of mussel bed establishment on the associated biota. Results indicate a lower species richness and slightly different community structure with greater small-scale heterogeneity at the mussel bed site compared to the adjacent rocky shore where mussels are present but where there is no bed formation. The B. pharaonis population had a peak density of 16550 ± 2051 ind.m-2 within the mussel bed and included recent recruits. These data suggest that the B. pharaonis population has the potential to expand. Establishment of extensive beds by this invasive mussel could change the structure of native rocky shore assemblages around the Maltese Islands and elsewhere in the Mediterranean.

  4. Biological aspects and ecological effects of a bed of the invasive non-indigenous mussel Brachidontes pharaonis (Fischer P., 1870 in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. BONNICI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available No mussel beds were known to occur in the Maltese Islands previous to 2009, when a single bed of the Lessepsian immigrant Brachidontes pharaonis, first recorded from the islands in 1970, was discovered in Birzebbugia Bay. The population structure of B. pharaonis was investigated to assess its potential to spread and colonise new shores, while the biotic community at the mussel bed was compared to that present on uncolonised substratum to determine the effects of mussel bed establishment on the associated biota. Results indicate a lower species richness and slightly different community structure with greater small-scale heterogeneity at the mussel bed site compared to the adjacent rocky shore where mussels are present but where there is no bed formation. The B. pharaonis population had a peak density of 16550 ± 2051 ind.m-2 within the mussel bed and included recent recruits. These data suggest that the B. pharaonis population has the potential to expand. Establishment of extensive beds by this invasive mussel could change the structure of native rocky shore assemblages around the Maltese Islands and elsewhere in the Mediterranean.

  5. Effects of bedding with recycled sand on lying behaviors, udder hygiene, and preference of lactating Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, J A; Ingle, H D; Black, R A; Eberhart, N L; Krawczel, P D

    2017-09-01

    Effects of bedding with recycled sand and season on lying behaviors, hygiene, and preferences of late-lactation Holstein cows were studied. It was hypothesized that recycled sand will decrease lying time and increase hygiene scores due to increased moisture content and organic matter, and thus a preference for the control sand will be evident. Cows (n = 64) were divided into 4 groups (n = 8 per group) per season. In summer (August to September), cows were balanced by days in milk (268.1 ± 11.9 d) and parity (2.0 ± 0.2). In winter (January to February), mean DIM was 265.5 ± 34.1 d. Cows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatments using a crossover design with each treatment lasting 7 d (no-choice phase): bedding with recycled sand (RS; n = 32) or control (CO; clean sand; n = 32). Stocking density was maintained at 100%. The choice phase allowed cows to have access to either treatment with stocking density at 50%. Accelerometers recorded daily lying time, number of lying bouts per day, lying bout duration (min/bout), and total steps per day. Teat swabs, milk, sand samples, and udder hygiene scores were collected on d 0, 3, and 7 of each experimental week. Samples were cultured for streptococci, staphylococci, and gram-negative bacteria. Video data were used to assess bedding preferences. All data were analyzed using the MIXED and GLIMMIX procedures of SAS 9.4 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Lying time was not affected by treatment, but cows did take more steps during winter. Bacterial counts were elevated for cows on recycled sand. A preference was observed for clean sand during the summer, but no preference was observed for sand during the winter. Regardless of bedding, the most commonly observed behavior was lying in the stalls, which suggested either bedding might be suitable. Caution should be used with this interpretation of preference, as sand was recycled only once. This limited reclamation was still sufficient to potentially alter the composition of sand, driving

  6. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Nan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: lijie@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Benzene was successfully degraded by dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas. • Different electrode geometry has distinct effect on plasmas oxidation performance. • Benzene degradation and energy performance were enhanced when using the coil electrode. • The reaction products were well determined by online FTIR analysis. -- Abstract: In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and HNO{sub 3} were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants.

  7. Modeling the competitive effect of ammonium oxidizers and heterotrophs on the degradation of MTBE in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model was used to study effects on the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in a packed bed reactor due to the presence of contaminants such as ammonium, and the mix of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). It was shown that competition between the slower...... where the co-contaminants were oxidized. The results of the model further indicate that contradicting findings in the literature about the effects of BTEX on the degradation of MTBE are mainly due to differences in the study methodologies. Effects such as short-term toxicity of BTEX and the lack...

  8. Assessment of the effects of concentration fluctuations on the penetration of toxic vapors through a carbon bed. Suffield memorandum No. 1457

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, E.C.

    1995-12-31

    This study uses a simple mathematical model for the penetration of a vapor through an adsorbent carbon bed to investigate the effects of naturally induced concentration fluctuations on the breakthrough time and the degree of penetration through the bed. The study presents results of computer simulations using a steady and a fluctuating inlet concentration with the same dosage over a fixed exposure time, showing the effect of concentration fluctuations on vapor penetration through a carbon bed. Assumptions used in the model include irreversible adsorption and a first-order local rate of removal with respect to the vapor concentration and the concentration of unoccupied adsorption sites.

  9. Influence of catalyst dilution by inert particles on the effectivity of a catalytical process in a fluidized bed. [Increasing selectivity by decreasing local reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augenblick, A.A. (Karpov Physico-Chemical Inst., Moscow, USSR); Kernerman, V.A.; Abayev, G.N.; Slin' ko, M.G.; Sergeev, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    The method of the increasing a selectivity of catalytic processes in fluidized bed reactor by decreasing local chemical reaction rates together with increasing a reactive volume is discussed. Based on the two-phase model of a fluidized bed it is shown that the dilution of a catalyst by inert particles leads to an increasing of effective interphase exchange coefficients and a decreasing of effective axial mixing coefficients. Restrictions to applications of the method connected with local features of a bed structure are discussed. 3 figures.

  10. Effects of prolonged bed rest on the total peripheral resistance baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Mukkamala, R.; Sheynberg, N.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exposure to microgravity continues to be a primary concern of the human space program. Reduced autonomic tone has been demonstrated to contribute to this phenomenon, and the heart rate baroreflex, in particular, has been repeatedly shown to be impaired. However, only the works of Yelle et al. have attempted to address the role of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) baroreflex, a potentially more significant contributor to blood pressure regulation. We applied a previously developed method for estimating the static gains of both the arterial and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes to data obtained before and after 16-day bed rest. Reductions in the estimated static gains of the arterial (statistically significant) and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes were found after bed rest. This study supports the works of Yelle et al, which imply that the TPR baroreflex is reduced after spaceflight.

  11. Development of an Effective Special Therapy Bed Management System at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    term care of the elderly , health care providers began looking for better bed surfaces for their high risk patients. The search for a pressure relieving...immobile patients at risk for pressure sore development is the role of proper positioning by nursing personnel. The repositioning of patients every...and efficacy of air-fluidized therapy in the treatment of pressure ulcers . Journal of Enterostomal Therapy, 15(6), 247-251. Hargest, T. S., & Artz, C

  12. Effect of filter media thickness on the performance of sand drying beds used for faecal sludge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, M; Evans, B E; Camargo-Valero, M A; Horan, N J

    2016-12-01

    The effect of sand filter media thickness on the performance of faecal sludge (FS) drying beds was determined in terms of: dewatering time, contaminant load removal efficiency, solids generation rate, nutrient content and helminth eggs viability in the dried sludge. A mixture of ventilated improved pit latrine sludge and septage in the ratio 1:2 was dewatered using three pilot-scale sludge drying beds with sand media thicknesses of 150, 250 and 350 mm. Five dewatering cycles were conducted and monitored for each drying bed. Although the 150 mm filter had the shortest average dewatering time of 3.65 days followed by 250 mm and 350 mm filters with 3.83 and 4.02 days, respectively, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) attributable to filter media thickness configurations. However, there was a significant difference for the percolate contaminant loads in the removal and recovery efficiency of suspended solids, total solids, total volatile solids, nitrogen species, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand, with the highest removal efficiency for each parameter achieved by the 350 mm filter. There were also significant differences in the nutrient content (NPK) and helminth eggs viability of the solids generated by the tested filters. Filtering media configurations similar to 350 mm have the greatest potential for optimising nutrient recovery from FS.

  13. Understanding and predicting bed humidity in fluidized bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhui; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-04-01

    Bed humidity is a critical parameter that needs to be controlled in a fluidized bed granulation to ensure reliability. To predict and control the bed humidity during the fluidized bed granulation process, a simple model based on the mass conservation of moisture was developed. The moisture mass balance model quantitatively simulates the effects of spray rate, binder solution concentration, airflow rate, inlet air temperature, and dew point on the bed humidity. The model was validated by a series of granulations performed in different scale granulators including Glatt GPCG-1, GPCG-15, and GPCG-60. Good agreement was observed between the theoretical prediction and the measured loss on drying (LOD). The model developed in the current work enables us to choose the appropriate parameters for the fluidized bed granulation and can be used as a valuable tool in process scaling-up.

  14. The Soret and Dufour Effects in Non-thermal Equilibrium Packed Beds with Forced Convection and Endothermic Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明春; 赵中亮; 静宇; 刘家涛; 吴玉胜

    2013-01-01

    To study the influence of the Soret and Dufour effects on the reactive characteristics of a porous packed bed with endothermic reactions and forced convection, a two-dimensional mathematical model considering the cross-diffusion effects was developed in accordance with the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and the lo-cal thermal non-equilibrium model. The simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental data. The influence of the Soret and Dufour effects on the heat transfer, mass transfer and endothermic chemical reaction in the non-thermal equilibrium packed bed is discussed. It was found that when the Peclet number reaches 1865, the maximum relative error of the concentration of gas product induced by the Soret effect is 34.7% and that of the solid fractional conversion caused by the Dufour effect is 10.8%at reaction time 160 s and initial temperature 1473 K. The differences induced by the Soret and Dufour effects are demonstrated numerically to increase gradually with the initial temperature of feeding gas and the Peclet number.

  15. The Effects of Context Extinction on US Signal Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard Murray J.

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments with rats examined the effects of context extinction on responding to the signal value of an unconditioned stimulus (US). In Experiment 1, US signal value was first trained when a single food pellet signaled the delivery of three additional pellets. After training, rats received either context extinction (CE) or home cage (HC)…

  16. Effects of basic human values on host community acculturation orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Irene; Hichy, Zira; Guarnera, Maria; Nuovo, Santo Di

    2010-08-01

    Although literature provides evidence for the relationship between values and acculturation, the relationship between host community acculturation orientations has not yet been investigated. In this study we tested the effects of four high-order values (openness to change, self-transcendence, conservation, and self-enhancement, devised according to Schwartz's model) on host community acculturation orientations towards immigrants (devised according the interactive acculturation model) in the public domain of employment and the private domain of endogamy/exogamy. Participants were 264 Italian University students, who completed a questionnaire containing the Portrait Values Questionnaire, a measure of personal values, and the Host Community Acculturation Scale, aimed at measuring Italian acculturation strategies towards three groups of immigrants: Immigrants (the general category), Chinese (the valued immigrant group), and Albanians (the devalued immigrant group). Results showed that personal values are related to the adoption of acculturation orientations: In particular, the values that mostly impacted on acculturation orientations were self-transcendence and conservation. Values concerning self-transcendence encourage the adoption of integrationism, integrationism-transformation, and individualism and reduce the adoption of assimilationism, segregationism, and exclusionism. Values concerning conservation encourage the adoption of assimilation, segregation and exclusion orientations and reduce the adoption of both types of integrationism and individualism. Minor effects were found regarding self-enhancement and openness to change.

  17. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated.

  18. Effect of particle size and interparticle force on the fluidization behavior of gas-fluidized beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, J M; Castellanos, A; Mills, P; Quintanilla, M A S

    2003-05-01

    Gas-fluidized powders of fine particles display a fluidlike regime in which the bed does not have a yield strength, it expands uniformly as the gas velocity is increased and macroscopic bubbles are absent. In this paper we test the extension of this fluidlike regime as a function of particle size and interparticle attractive force. Our results show that for sufficiently large particles, bubbling initiates just after the solidlike fluidized regime as it is obtained experimentally by other workers. A scaling behavior of the solid-phase pressure in the fluidlike regime and a predictive criterion for the onset of macroscopic bubbling are analyzed in the light of these results.

  19. Moving From the Old to the New: Insecticide Research on Bed Bugs since the Resurgence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Romero

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The scarcity of bed bugs in many countries over the last 50 years has resulted in a lack of modern research into the toxicology of this pest. Although bed bugs resurged in the late 1990s, published research related to insecticides has lagged behind and only began to appear in 2006. The difficulty in controlling bed bugs triggered the interest of both private and academic sectors to determine the value of currently available insecticides. What follows, is updated information on effectiveness of products, studies on insecticide susceptibility, identification of mechanisms of insecticide resistance and chemical strategies proposed to overcome resistance in modern bed bug populations.

  20. Moving From the Old to the New: Insecticide Research on Bed Bugs since the Resurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alvaro

    2011-05-05

    The scarcity of bed bugs in many countries over the last 50 years has resulted in a lack of modern research into the toxicology of this pest. Although bed bugs resurged in the late 1990s, published research related to insecticides has lagged behind and only began to appear in 2006. The difficulty in controlling bed bugs triggered the interest of both private and academic sectors to determine the value of currently available insecticides. What follows, is updated information on effectiveness of products, studies on insecticide susceptibility, identification of mechanisms of insecticide resistance and chemical strategies proposed to overcome resistance in modern bed bug populations.

  1. The origin of high hydraulic resistance for filter cakes of deformable particles: cell-bed deformation or surface-layer effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Meireles, Martine; Molle, Catherine; Clifton, Michael J.; Aimar, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    International audience; This study reports a numerical approach for modeling the hydraulic resistance of a filter cake of deformable cells. First, a mechanical and osmotic model that describes the volume fraction of solids in a bed of yeast cells as a function of the compressive pressure it experiences is presented. The effects of pressure on the compressibility of yeast cells beds were further investigated both by filtration experiments and by centrifugal experiments based on the multiple sp...

  2. Effects of NH3 on N2O Formation and Destruction in Fluidized Bed Coal Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianWeiYuan; BoFeng; 等

    1994-01-01

    The NH3 oxidation and reduction process are experimentally and kinetically studied in this paper,It is found that NH3 has contributions not only to N2O formation,but also to N2O destruction in certain conditions.The main product of homogeneous NH3 oxidation is found to be NO rather than N2O,but some bed materials and suplhur sorbents have catalytic contributions to N2O formation from NH3 oxidation.In reduction atmosphere,NH3 can promote the KC destruction.It is deduced that the ammonia injection into fluidized bed coal combustion flue gas can decrease both NOx and N2O emissions.The ammonia injection process is kinetically simulated in this study,and the reduction.rates of NOx and N2O are found to depend on temperature,O2 concentration,initial NOx and N2O concentrations,and amount of injected ammonia.

  3. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  4. Fumigation of bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae): effective application rates for sulfuryl fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas W; Aikins, Michael J; Thoms, Ellen; Demark, Joe; Wang, Changlu

    2014-08-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has resurged recently as a domestic pest in North America with very limited options for decisive control. We report efficacy studies with sulfuryl fluoride (SF) toward use as a structural fumigant to control bed bugs. Laboratory studies were conducted in which eggs, adults, and nymphs from a pesticide susceptible laboratory population were fumigated for 24 h using SF at 99.8% purity in airtight, 3.8-liter glass containers under two temperatures, 25 degrees C and 15 degrees C. Bed bugs were placed in separate ventilated glass vials and wrapped in mattress padding before fumigation. The gas concentration within each jar was determined using quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dose-response trials using eggs of known age (48-96 h) were conducted at five or six target concentrations measured as concentration x time accumulated dosages (g-h/m3) and one untreated control at each temperature. Each target dose was replicated in four different fumigation containers (replicates), with at least 32 eggs per replicate. The number of hatched and unhatched eggs postfumigation, and number of live and dead nymphs that resulted from hatched eggs, were evaluated daily for at least 1 wk after egg hatch. The lethal accumulated dosage (LAD99) for bed bug eggs was 69.1 (95% fiducial limits [FLs] of 62.9-79.5) g-h/m3 at 25 degrees C and 149.3 (95% FLs of 134.4-177.9) g-h/m3 at 15 degrees C. Confirmatory trials with dosages of 1.5x the LAD99 were conducted at 25 degrees C and 1.5x the threshold mortality dose at 15 degrees C with at least 15 adults, 13 late-instar nymphs and 79 eggs of known age per replicate. At 25 degrees C, a target dosage of 103.7 g-h/m3 resulted in 100% mortality of adults and late-instar nymphs. Nymphs emerged and survived from two of 439 eggs treated with SF dosages that were 6-7 g-h/m3 less than the target dosage. No nymphs emerged from eggs fumigated with dosages > 97.9 g-h/m3 in the

  5. Bed Bug Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  6. Effective PSHE Education: Values, Purposes and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ben; Clague, Lucy; Coldwell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and…

  7. Statistical analysis of effective singular values in matrix rank determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinides, Konstantinos; Yao, Kung

    1988-01-01

    A major problem in using SVD (singular-value decomposition) as a tool in determining the effective rank of a perturbed matrix is that of distinguishing between significantly small and significantly large singular values to the end, conference regions are derived for the perturbed singular values of matrices with noisy observation data. The analysis is based on the theories of perturbations of singular values and statistical significance test. Threshold bounds for perturbation due to finite-precision and i.i.d. random models are evaluated. In random models, the threshold bounds depend on the dimension of the matrix, the noisy variance, and predefined statistical level of significance. Results applied to the problem of determining the effective order of a linear autoregressive system from the approximate rank of a sample autocorrelation matrix are considered. Various numerical examples illustrating the usefulness of these bounds and comparisons to other previously known approaches are given.

  8. Bed Bug Guidance for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    School nurses are often called upon to provide vital information to students, parents, teachers, and administrators. These tips on identifying, managing and preventing bed bugs will help you to effectively respond if bed bugs appear in your school.

  9. Effect of industrial wastewater effluent containing heavy metals and phosphate on the bed soil of the zayandehrood river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Vahid Dastjerdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This research was conducted to determine the concentration of Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr and orthophosphates in the soil of the river bed from Zayandehrood dam to Gavkhoni wetland. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Zayandehrood river of Isfahan, central area of Iran. Seventeen points were sampled through the upstream, Zayandehrood Dam, and downstream, Gavkhooni Wetland, of the river. The samples were selected from soil of the river bed at certain locations during 6 months. Heavy metals and orthophosphates analysis was done by Atomic Absorption and Spectrophotometry methods, respectively. Results: The results indicated that concentration of heavy metals and orthophosphates increased from upstream to Choom bridge in downstream of the river and then decreased from this point to Govkhooni wetland. In the first sampling point, the concentration of Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr and orthophosphates were 29, 9, 51, 83, 49, and 570 mg/kg (dried weight. For Choom bridge it were 1413, 406, 289, 123, 86, and 104 mg/kg and in the wetland were 820, 24, 49, 68, 87, and 88 mg/kg (dried weight, respectively. Conclusion: The metal concentration from the first point to Choom bridge has been increased and then has been decreased in the wetland. The maximum amount of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Pb in the river bed was higher than and closer to maximum allowed concentration of heavy metals in soil (mg/kg dried weight and for Cr was within normal limits. Industrial plants located on the banks of the river, widening of the river in downstream and entering the drainages to the river are among effective factors in these changes.

  10. Effect of high sodium intake during 14 days of bed-rest on acid-base balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frings, P.; Baecker, N.; Heer, M.

    Lowering mechanical load like in microgravity is the dominant stimulus leading to bone loss However high dietary sodium intake is also considered as a risk factor for osteoporosis and thereby might exacerbate the microgravity induced bone loss In a metabolic balance non bed-rest study we have recently shown that a very high sodium intake leads to an increased bone resorption most likely because of a mild metabolic acidosis Frings et al FASEB J 19 5 A1345 2005 To test if mild metabolic acidosis also occurs during immobilization we examined the effect of increased dietary sodium on bone metabolism and acid-base balance in eight healthy male test subjects mean age 26 25 pm 3 49 years body weight 77 98 pm 4 34 kg in our metabolic ward during a 14-day head-down tilt HDT bed-rest study The study was designed as a randomized crossover study with two study periods Each period was divided into three parts 4 ambulatory days with 200 mmol sodium intake 14 days of bed-rest with either 550 mmol or 50 mmol sodium intake and 3 recovery days with 200 mmol sodium intake The sodium intake was altered by variations in dietary sodium chloride content Blood pH P CO2 and P O2 were analyzed in fasting morning fingertip blood samples several times during the entire study Bicarbonate HCO 3 - and base excess BE were calculated according to the Henderson-Hasselbach equation Preliminary results in the acid-base balance from the first study period 4 subjects with 550 mmol and 4 subjects with 50 mmol sodium intake strongly

  11. A geochemical investigation into the effect of coal rank on the potential environmental effects of CO2 sequestration in deep coal beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolak, Jonathan J.; Burruss, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Coal samples of different rank were extracted in the laboratory with supercritical CO2 to evaluate the potential for mobilizing hydrocarbons during CO2 sequestration or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from deep coal beds. The concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons mobilized from the subbituminous C, high-volatile C bituminous, and anthracite coal samples were 41.2, 43.1, and 3.11 ?g g-1 dry coal, respectively. Substantial, but lower, concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were mobilized from these samples: 2.19, 10.1, and 1.44 ?g g-1 dry coal, respectively. The hydrocarbon distributions within the aliphatic and aromatic fractions obtained from each coal sample also varied with coal rank and reflected changes to the coal matrix associated with increasing degree of coalification. Bitumen present within the coal matrix may affect hydrocarbon partitioning between coal and supercritical CO2. The coal samples continued to yield hydrocarbons during consecutive extractions with supercritical CO2. The amount of hydrocarbons mobilized declined with each successive extraction, and the relative proportion of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons increased during successive extractions. These results demonstrate that the potential for mobilizing hydrocarbons from coal beds, and the effect of coal rank on this process, are important to consider when evaluating coal beds for CO2 storage.

  12. Effects of altered estuarine submerged macrophyte bed cover on the omnivorous Cape stumpnose Rhabdosargus holubi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, J N; Whitfield, A K; Cowley, P D; Hill, J M

    2012-03-01

    The ecological importance of submerged macrophyte beds to fishes within estuaries was investigated through the example of the ubiquitous Cape stumpnose Rhabdosargus holubi, an omnivorous, vegetation and estuary-dependent species, using stable-isotope techniques and long-term abundance (catch-per-unit-effort) data from the East Kleinemonde Estuary, South Africa. Outputs from a Bayesian mixing model using δ(13) C and δ(15) N signatures indicated that the submerged macrophytes Ruppia cirrhosa and Potamogeton pectinatus were not a primary source of nutrition for R. holubi, confirming previous work that revealed that macrophytes are consumed but not digested. Long-term seine netting data showed reduced abundance of R. holubi during a prolonged period of macrophyte senescence, suggesting that submerged macrophyte habitats provide shelter that reduces mortality (predation risk) and a food-rich foraging area. © 2012 SAIAB. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. The effect of bubble plume on oxygen transfer for moving bed biofilm reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen; LIU Hu; WANG Meng; WANG Min

    2014-01-01

    The movement of the bubble plume plays an important role in the operation of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), and it directly affects the contact and the mixture of the gas-liquid-solid phases in the aeration tank and also the oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the liquid phase. In this study, the velocity field is determined by a 4-frame PTV as well as the time-averaged and time- dependent velocity distributions. The velocity distribution of the bubble plume is analyzed to evaluate the operating efficiency of the MBBR. The results show that the aeration rate is one of the main factors that sway the velocity distribution of the bubble plumes and affect the operating efficiency of the reactor.

  14. Values, Norms, and Peer Effects on Weight Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    This study uses data from the European Social Survey in order to test the Prinstein-Dodge hypothesis that posits that peer effects may be larger in collectivistic than in individualistic societies. When defining individualism and collectivism at the country level, our results show that peer effects on obesity are indeed larger in collectivistic than in individualistic societies. However, when defining individualism and collectivism with individual values based on the Shalom Schwartz universal values theory, we find little support for this hypothesis. PMID:28348886

  15. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  16. Intrinsic bacterial burden associated with intensive care unit hospital beds: effects of disinfection on population recovery and mitigation of potential infection risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaway, Hubert H; Fairey, Sarah; Steed, Lisa L; Salgado, Cassandra D; Michels, Harold T; Schmidt, Michael G

    2012-12-01

    Commonly touched items are likely reservoirs from which patients, health care workers, and visitors may encounter and transfer microbes. A quantitative assessment was conducted of the risk represented by the intrinsic bacterial burden associated with bed rails in a medical intensive care unit (MICU), and how disinfection might mitigate this risk. Bacteria present on the rails from 36 patient beds in the MICU were sampled immediately before cleaning and at 0.5, 2.5, 4.5, and 6.5 hours after cleaning. Beds were sanitized with either a bottled disinfectant (BD; CaviCide) or an automated bulk-diluted disinfectant (ABDD; Virex II 256). The majority of bacteria recovered from the bed rails in the MICU were staphylococci, but not methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were recovered from 3 beds. Bottled disinfectant reduced the average bacterial burden on the rails by 99%. However, the burden rebounded to 30% of that found before disinfection by 6.5 hours after disinfection. ABDD reduced the burden by an average of 45%, but levels rebounded within 2.5 hours. The effectiveness of both disinfectants was reflected in median reductions to burden of 98% for BD and 95% for ABDD. Cleaning with hospital-approved disinfectants reduced the intrinsic bacterial burden on bed rail surfaces by up to 99%, although the population, principally staphylococci, rebounded quickly to predisinfection levels. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the effect of grounding the column wall in gas-solid fluidized beds on electrostatic charge generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowinski, Andrew; Mayne, Antonio; Javed, Bassam; Mehrani, Poupak, E-mail: poupak.mehrani@uottawa.ca [University of Ottawa, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, 161 Louis Pasteur St., Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-06-23

    In gas-solid fluidized beds as particles are fluidized, they continuously come into contact with other particles, as well as the fluidization column wall. This generates electrostatic charges by means of triboelectrification and frictional charging, leading to particle agglomeration, reactor wall fouling, and eventually process downtime and large financial losses. Grounding the fluidization column has been considered as a means of helping electrostatic charge dissipation within fluidized beds; however, in industrial applications despite the process vessels being grounded, the electrostatic problem still persists. This work focused on the effect of fluidization column grounding on particle wall fouling. Experiments were conducted in an atmospheric system consist of a 0.1 m in diameter carbon steel fluidization column. The mass and charge-to-mass ratio (q/m) of the particles that remained adhered to the column wall upon the completion of one hour fluidization period were measured in an electrically isolated and grounded columns to quantitatively determine the amount of reactor wall fouling. Polyethylene particles with different particle size ranges (300- 1000 {mu}m) were fluidized with extra dry air at 1.5 times their respective minimum fluidization velocity (u{sub mf}). Results obtained in the grounded fluidization column were not significantly different from those in the isolated column for all particle size ranges tested where the particles mass collected and q/m and were found to be generally similar.

  18. The effect of channel shape, bed morphology, and shipwrecks on flow velocities in the Upper St. Clair River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Oberg, Kevin; Best, Jim; Parsons, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Great Lakes of North America, the St. Clair River is the major outlet of Lake Huron and conveys water to Lake St. Clair which then flows to Lake Erie. One major topic of interest is morphological change in the St. Clair River and its impact on water levels in the Upper Great Lakes and connecting channel flows. A combined multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric survey and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) flow survey of the outlet of Lake Huron and the Upper St. Clair River was conducted July 21 – 25, 2008. This paper presents how channel morphology and shipwrecks affect the flow in the Upper St. Clair River. The river is most constricted at the Blue Water Bridge near Port Huron, Michigan, with water velocities over 2 ms-1 for a flow of 5,200 m3s-1. Downstream of this constriction, the river flows around a bend and expands creating a large recirculation zone along the left bank due to flow separation. This recirculation zone reduces the effective channel width, and thus increases flow velocities to over 2 ms-1 in this region. The surveys reveal several shipwrecks on the bed of the St. Clair River, which possess distinct wakes in their flow velocity downstream of the wrecks. The constriction and expansion of the channel, combined with forcing of the flow by bed topography, initiates channel-scale secondary flow, creating streamwise vortices that maintain coherence downstream over a distance of several channel widths.

  19. The effect of rowing ergometry and resistive exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function during bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainski, Felix; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Heinicke, Katja; Romain, Nadine; Pacini, Eric L; Snell, Peter G; Wyrick, Phil; Palmer, M Dean; Haller, Ronald G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to microgravity causes functional and structural impairment of skeletal muscle. Current exercise regimens are time-consuming and insufficiently effective; an integrated countermeasure is needed that addresses musculoskeletal along with cardiovascular health. High-intensity, short-duration rowing ergometry and supplemental resistive strength exercise may achieve these goals. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers completed 5 wk of head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR): 18 were randomized to exercise, 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of rowing ergometry 6 days/wk, including interval training, and supplemental strength training 2 days/wk. Measurements before and after HDBR and following reambulation included assessment of strength, skeletal muscle volume (MRI), and muscle metabolism (magnetic resonance spectroscopy); quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained to assess muscle fiber types, capillarization, and oxidative capacity. Sedentary bed rest (BR) led to decreased muscle volume (quadriceps: -9 ± 4%, P antigravity muscles. Due to its integrated cardiovascular benefits, rowing ergometry could be a primary component of exercise prescriptions for astronauts or patients suffering from severe deconditioning.

  20. Experimental Study on Conductivity Anisotropy of Limestone Considering the Bedding Directional Effect in the Whole Process of Uniaxial Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinji; Liu, Bin; Li, Shucai; Yang, Lei; Song, Jie; Li, Ming; Mei, Jie

    2016-03-04

    Experimental studies were conducted on the changes of the potential differences in different directions during the uniaxial compression on limestone samples parallel and normal to the bedding plane. In the test, electric current was supplied at both ends of the samples, and concurrent measurement was conducted in four measuring lines at a 45-degree angle to each other. First, the change laws of the potential differences in different directions and the similarities and differences of rock samples were summarized. In regards to the uniaxial compression properties and crack growth, the above-mentioned similarities and differences were further analyzed. Then, the anisotropy factor was introduced to further explore the response characteristics. It was found that the anisotropic changes of rock samples went through three stages during the uniaxial compression process, providing a reference for describing the properties in different failure stages of rock samples and obtaining precursory information about the fracture. Besides, the relationship between the peak stress and initial potential difference in a direction normal to the current direction was obtained by means of data fitting, providing a new method of predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of rock samples. According to the preceding analysis, this paper studied rock anisotropy by considering the bedding directional effect in terms of conductivity and provided a reference for subsequent study on rock materials' properties and engineering practices.

  1. Experimental Study on Conductivity Anisotropy of Limestone Considering the Bedding Directional Effect in the Whole Process of Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinji Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted on the changes of the potential differences in different directions during the uniaxial compression on limestone samples parallel and normal to the bedding plane. In the test, electric current was supplied at both ends of the samples, and concurrent measurement was conducted in four measuring lines at a 45-degree angle to each other. First, the change laws of the potential differences in different directions and the similarities and differences of rock samples were summarized. In regards to the uniaxial compression properties and crack growth, the above-mentioned similarities and differences were further analyzed. Then, the anisotropy factor was introduced to further explore the response characteristics. It was found that the anisotropic changes of rock samples went through three stages during the uniaxial compression process, providing a reference for describing the properties in different failure stages of rock samples and obtaining precursory information about the fracture. Besides, the relationship between the peak stress and initial potential difference in a direction normal to the current direction was obtained by means of data fitting, providing a new method of predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of rock samples. According to the preceding analysis, this paper studied rock anisotropy by considering the bedding directional effect in terms of conductivity and provided a reference for subsequent study on rock materials’ properties and engineering practices.

  2. MONITORING OF COAL BED EXTRACTION AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL FOR IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION RESULTS OF A MINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold BIAŁY

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic source of information necessary for proper and effective management of a hard coal mine is continuous monitoring of the mining process. An increased number of machines and devices used in a mine caused a need for continuous monitoring of mining departments’ work. Monitoring of the extraction of hard coal beds is crucial for this process management, as it determines the proper course of the mining process. Hence, monitoring can be considered the most important element of the controlling process, especially in the area of mining process management in a mine. Effective monitoring and proper, quick reacting to any irregularities in this process have a significant influence on the production results of a mine.

  3. Effect of liquid viscosity on hydrodynamic behavior in inverse three-phase turbulent bed%液体黏度对气液固逆流三相湍动床动力学行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹长青; 刘明言; 王一平; 秦秀云; 胡宗定

    2005-01-01

    Local phase holdups in an inverse three-phase turbulent bed of 150 mm i.d. auu 4350 mm height were measured simultaneously by micro-electrical conductivity probe technique in this study. Theexperiments were carried out with polyethylene particles (dp=4.01 mm, ps=926 kg·m-3), air, and water [0.05% (mass) SCMC, 0.20% (mass) SCMC] as solid phase, gas phase and liquid phase respectively. 540 sets of experimental data of local phase holdups in radial direction were obtained under Ug=Ug3. It was found that the distribution of local solid holdup showed a maximum peak at r/R=(0.75-0.90). The range of maximum peaks was larger than that of conventional fluidized beds. The distribution of local gas holdup in radial direction showed a maximum value at the column center and a minimum value near the wall. Moreover, the non-homogeneous distribution of local gas holdup in radial directions was more evident than that of conventional fluidized beds. The different operation regimes as well as the corresponding three specific gas velocities (Ug1, Ug2 and Ug3) were obtained on the basis of the axial distribution characteristics of cross-sectional average solid holdups. The effect of the operating conditions (liquid viscosity, initial volume fraction of solids Hs0/H0, initial liquid height Hl0) on the specific gas velocities was presented.

  4. Lean-team effectiveness through leader values and members’ informing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dun, Desirée Hermina; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although empirical tests of effective lean-team leadership are scarce, leaders are often blamed when lean work-floor initiatives fail. In the present study, a lean-team leader’s work values are assumed to affect his or her team members’ behaviors and, through them, to attain team effectivene

  5. Lean-team effectiveness through leader values and members’ informing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dun, van Desirée H.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although empirical tests of effective lean-team leadership are scarce, leaders are often blamed when lean work-floor initiatives fail. In the present study, a lean-team leader’s work values are assumed to affect his or her team members’ behaviors and, through them, to attain team effectivene

  6. Effective PSHE education: values, purposes and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and long-standing policy agendas. We conclude by attempting to locate PSHE education in the new and rapidly evolving policy context and discuss some potentia...

  7. Effect of filling fraction on the performance of sponge-based moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Chen, Xun; Zhang, Chunqing; Wen, Haitao; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2016-11-01

    Cubic-shaped polyurethane sponges (15×15×15mm) in the form of biofilm carriers were used in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for treating synthetic domestic wastewater. Results indicated there was no significant difference in total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonia (NH4(+)-N) removal at different filling fractions. Three reactors exhibited high removal efficiencies of over 93% TOC and 95% NH4(+)-N on average at an HRT of 12h and aeration flow of 0.09m(3)/h. However, total nitrogen (TN) removal and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) increased with increasing the filling fraction. TN removal averaged at 77.2, 85.5% and 86.7% in 10%, 20% and 30% filling fraction reactor, respectively. Correspondingly, SND were 85.5±8.7%, 91.3±9.4% and 93.3±10.2%. Moreover, it was observed that sponge carriers in the 20% filling fraction reactor achieved the maximum biomass amount per gram sponge, followed by the 10% and 30% filling fraction reactors.

  8. Effect of downward seepage on turbulent flow characteristics and bed morphology around bridge piers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Rutuja; Sharma, Anurag; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2017-03-01

    In this work, experimental investigations have been pursued to analyse the influence of downward seepage on the turbulent characteristics of flow and corresponding changes in vortex structure around circular bridge pier in alluvial channel. Experiments were conducted in sand bed channel with circular piers of different sizes for no seepage, 10% seepage and 20% seepage cases. The measurement of turbulent flow statistics such as velocity and Reynolds stresses is found to be negative within the scour hole at upstream of the pier whereas application of downward seepage retards the reversal of the flow causing a decrement in the velocity and Reynolds stresses. Higher Reynolds shear stress prevails at the downstream side because of the production of wake vortices. Contribution of all bursting events to the total Reynolds shear stress production has been observed to increase with downward seepage. The analysis of integral scale suggest that size of eddies increases with seepage, which is responsible for increase in particle mobility. Initially rate of scouring is more which abatements gradually with expanding time as well as with the increased of downward seepage. Presence of downward seepage reduces the depth and length of vortex and shifts towards downstream side of the pier.

  9. Effects of Nitrogen source, empty bed residence time and inlet concentration on biofilter removal of chlorobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Can; Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2009-04-15

    A new biofilter with bamboo carriers was used to remove gaseous chlorobenzene. Operating parameters such as the nitrogen source, the empty bed residence time (EBRT) and the inlet concentration of chlorobenzene were varied. The ability of the biofilter to remove chlorobenzene was evaluated under each set of conditions. The experimental results indicated that better biofilter performance was achieved using ammonium instead of nitrate nitrogen as the nitrogen source. However, an addition of excess ammonium did not further increase the removal efficiency. The optimal ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply (C/N) was 7:1-14:1. Increasing EBRT increased the biofilter efficiency from 0-20% (EBRT=24 s) to 30-50% (EBRT=41 s) and to 50-70% (EBRT=122 s). The relationship between removal efficiency and EBRT indicated that the removal of chlorobenzene is a pseudo first order kinetic process below the concentration of 400 mg/m{sup 3}. A substrate inhibition model, the Haldane equation, successfully described the removal rate of the biofilter at various inlet concentrations. With increasing inlet concentration, the removal rate initially rose and then declined. The highest removal rate of 18 g/m{sup 3} x h was achieved at an inlet concentration of 1440 mg/m{sup 3}. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Effects of seagrass bed removal for tourism purposes in a Mauritian bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daby, D

    2003-01-01

    Stresses and shocks are increasing on the main natural assets in Mauritius (Western Indian Ocean) by tourism (marine-based) development activities. Seagrasses are removed by hotels in the belief that they are unsightly or harbour organisms causing injury to bathers. Environmental changes (e.g. sediment characteristics and infauna distribution, water quality, seagrass biomass) resulting from clearing of a seagrass bed to create an aesthetically pleasant swimming zone for clients of a hotel were monitored during June 2000-July 2001, and compared to conditions prevailing in an adjacent undisturbed area. Key observations in the disturbed area were: highly turbid water overlying a destabilized lagoon seabed, complete loss of sediment infauna, and dramatic dry weight biomass declines (e.g. 72 and 65% in S. isoetifolium and H. uninervis, respectively). Such disruptions draw-down resilience rendering the marine habitats less robust and more vulnerable to environmental change and extreme events, with higher risks of chaos and ecological collapse, and constitute a major threat to the industry itself.

  11. Hydrodynamic modeling of juvenile mussel dispersal in a large river: The potential effects of bed shear stress and other parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daraio, J.A.; Weber, L.J.; Newton, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Because unionid mussels have a parasitic larval stage, they are able to disperse upstream and downstream as larvae while attached to their host fish and with flow as juveniles after excystment from the host. Understanding unionid population ecology requires knowledge of the processes that affect juvenile dispersal prior to establishment. We examined presettlement (transport and dispersion with flow) and early postsettlement (bed shear stress) hydraulic processes as negative censoring mechanisms. Our approach was to model dispersal using particle tracking through a 3-dimensional flow field output from hydrodynamic models of a reach of the Upper Mississippi River. We tested the potential effects of bed shear stress (??b) at 5 flow rates on juvenile mussel dispersal and quantified the magnitude of these effects as a function of flow rate. We explored the reach-scale relationships of Froude number (Fr), water depth (H), local bed slope (S), and unit stream power (QS) with the likelihood of juvenile settling (??). We ran multiple dispersal simulations at each flow rate to estimate ??, the parameter of a Poisson distribution, from the number of juveniles settling in each grid cell, and calculated dispersal distances. Virtual juveniles that settled in areas of the river where b > critical shear stress (c) were resuspended in the flow and transported further downstream, so we ran simulations at 3 different conditions for ??c (??c = ??? no resuspension, 0.1, and 0.05 N/m2). Differences in virtual juvenile dispersal distance were significantly dependent upon c and flow rate, and effects of b on settling distribution were dependent upon c. Most simulations resulted in positive correlations between ?? and ??b, results suggesting that during early postsettlement, ??b might be the primary determinant of juvenile settling distribution. Negative correlations between ?? and ??b occurred in some simulations, a result suggesting that physical or biological presettlement processes

  12. Bed rest during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000581.htm Bed rest during pregnancy To use the sharing features on ... few days or weeks. This is called bed rest. Bed rest used to be recommended routinely for ...

  13. Determination of true bed thickness using folded bed model and borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.S.; Velasquillo-Martinez, L.G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Murillo-Muneton, G. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Garcia-Hernandez, J. [Petroleos Mexicanos Exploracion y Produccion, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Nieto-Samaniego, A.F. [Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Univ., Veracruz (Mexico). Centro de Geociencias

    2007-11-15

    The actual thickness of a given formation perpendicular to the bedding plane is known as the true bed thickness. Petroleum engineers rely on information regarding true bed thickness, particularly in dipping beds and in deviated holes because reservoir volume and isochore maps depend on these properties and not on the measured thickness. True bed thickness can be estimated from information gathered from well logs such as the dipmeter and borehole images. However, when deviations and dips exceed 10 degrees, corrections are needed. In this paper, a folded bed model was proposed to calculate the true bed thickness in the subsurface utilizing well log data. The value of true bed thickness (t) was shown to depend on the angle and the direction of the dip of the measured formation, as well as the drift angle and azimuth of the borehole. A case study from the Cantarell oil field in the southern Gulf of Mexico, offshore Campeche, was used to test the folded bed method. The model was shown to yield more uniform spatial change of the values of t, compared to the monoclinal bed model that often overestimates the average value of t. The maximum relative deviation of t from the monoclinal bed model reached 22.3 per cent and the maximum absolute deviation of t reached 34.5 m. The key factors that influence the values of t were found to be the bed dip, the dip difference between the top and base of the bed and the deviated angle of the well. The folded bed model yielded fewer changed values of the true bed thickness. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  14. Effects of pH value and coagulant dosage on contact filtration of humic substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋绍阶; 刘宗源; 梁建军

    2009-01-01

    Humic substances (especially fulvic acid (FA)) are the major components of natural organic matter (NOM) that widely exist in drinking water source. Due to their potential effects on public health,the removal of FA was one of the main concerns during the water treatment. Therefore,the contact filtration of FA by using aluminum sulfate as coagulant on the basis of jar tests was carried out. The effects of pH and coagulant dosage on the FA removal and the development of head loss were investigated. The results show that the range of pH value during the FA contact filtration can be effectively influenced by the dosage of aluminum sulfate,and the high aluminum sulfate dosage is an important factor that can result in early filter breakthrough. The FA filtration by deep-bed filtration or by membrane filtration is sometimes disparate under the same coagulation conditions. The choice of aluminum sulfate dosage by the method of membrane filtration,i.e. the "true color measurement",may result in inappropriate filter run,whereas it can be determined with simple jar tests by observing the formation of micro flocs. Considering the effects of pH on aluminum sulfate dosage and FA removal,the optimal pH range of 5.5?6.0 is suggested.

  15. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  16. [Effects of different electrodes on bioelectrical impedance values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadomo, F; Tanaka, K; Yokoyama, T; Maeda, K

    1990-01-01

    Effects of different electrodes on bioelectrical impedance values measured by the Selco bioelectrical impedance plethysmograph (SIF-881, Japan) were investigated using 8 adult females (age: 35.3 +/- 7.6 yr, Ht: 156.9 +/- 3.8 cm, Wt: 57.1 +/- 9.9 kg, and hydrodensitometrically determined body fat: 29.4 +/- 6.0%). The Lectec MP3000 electrode (Liberty Carton, USA) and the Bipolar electrode (Sanwa, Japan) produced significantly higher impedance values when compared to the Disposable electrode (Adovance, Japan) and the ECG electrode (Nihon Kohden, Japan). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower for the Disposable electrode (0.8%) and the ECG electrode (0.2%) than that for the Lectec MP3000 electrode (2.3%) and the Bipolar electrode (4.9%). In conclusion, the ECG electrode provides higher bioelectrical impedance values with the highest reproducibility in the assessment of human body composition by the bioelectrical impedance plethysmography.

  17. Effect of HCO3- concentration on anammox nitrogen removal rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Vabamäe, Priit; Kroon, Kristel; Loorits, Liis; Saluste, Alar; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-01-01

    Anammox biomass enriched in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) fed by actual sewage sludge reject water and synthetically added NO2- was used to study the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of the anammox process depending on bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration. MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1100 g N m(-3) d(-1) when the optimum HCO3- concentration (910 mg L(-1)) was used. The average reaction ratio of NO2- removal, NO3- production and NH4+ removal were 1.18/0.20/1. When the HCO3- concentration was increased to 1760mg L(-1) the TN removal rate diminished to 270 g N m(-3) d(-1). The process recovered from bicarbonate inhibition within 1 week. The batch tests performed with biomass taken from the MBBR showed that for the HCO3- concentration of 615 mg L(-1) the TN removal rate was 3.3 mg N L(-1) h(-1), whereas for both lower (120 mg L(-1)) and higher (5750 mg L(-1)) HCO3- concentrations the TN removal rates were 2.3 (+/- 0.15) and 1.6 (+/- 0.12) mg N L(-1) d(-1), respectively. PCR and DGGE analyses resulted in the detection of uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 and, surprisingly, low-oxygen-tolerant aerobic ammonia oxidizers. The ability of anammox bacteria for mixotrophy was established by diminished amounts of nitrate produced when comparing the experiments with an organic carbon source and an inorganic carbon source.

  18. Effect of dietary sodium on fluid/electrolyte regulation during bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Gretebeck, Randall J.; Lane, Helen W.; Stuart, Charles A.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A negative fluid balance during bed rest (BR) is accompanied by decreased plasma volume (PV) which contributes to cardiovascular deconditioning. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake would increase plasma osmolality (POSM), stimulate fluid conserving hormones, and reduce fluid/electrolyte (F/E) losses during BR; conversely, decreasing dietary sodium would decrease POSM, suppress fluid conserving hormones, and increase F/E losses. METHODS: We controlled fluid intake (30 ml x kg(-1) x d(-1)) in 17 men who consumed either a 4.0 +/- 0.06 g x d(-1) (174 mmol x d(-1)) (CONT; n = 6), 1.0 +/- 0.02 g x d(-1) (43 mmol x d(-1)) (LS; n = 6), or 10.0 +/- 0.04 g x d(-1) (430 mmol x d(-1)) (HS; n = 5) sodium diet before, during, and after 21 d of 6 degrees head-down BR. PV, total body water, urine volume and osmolality, POSM, and F/E controlling hormone concentrations were measured. RESULTS: In HS subjects, plasma renin activity (-92%), plasma/urinary aldosterone (-59%; -64%), and PV (-15.0%; 6.0 ml x kg(-1); p plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (+34%) and urine antidiuretic hormone (+24%) increased during BR (p plasma renin activity (+166%), plasma aldosterone (+167%), plasma antidiuretic hormone (+19%), and urinary aldosterone (+335%) increased with no change in PV compared with CONT (p < 0.05). Total body water did not change in any of the subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to our hypothesis, increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake during BR resulted in a greater loss of PV compared with the CONT subjects. Reducing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake did not alter the PV response during BR compared with CONT subjects.

  19. No effect of artificial gravity on lung function with exercise training during head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Longxiang; Guo, Yinghua; Wang, Yajuan; Wang, Delong; Liu, Changting

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of microgravity simulated by head-down bed rest (HDBR) and artificial gravity (AG) with exercise on lung function. Twenty-four volunteers were randomly divided into control and exercise countermeasure (CM) groups for 96 h of 6° HDBR. Comparisons of pulse rate, pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) and lung function were made between these two groups at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96 h. Compared with the sitting position, inspiratory capacity and respiratory reserve volume were significantly higher than before HDBR (0° position) (P control nor CM groups showed significant differences in pulse rate, SpO2, pulmonary volume and pulmonary ventilation function over the HDBR observation time. Postural changes can lead to variation in lung volume and ventilation function, but a HDBR model induced no changes in pulmonary function and therefore should not be used to study AG countermeasures.

  20. Effect of hydrogen combustion reaction on the dehydrogenation of ethane in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Hasany; Mohammad Malakootikhah; Vahid Rahmanian; Soheila Yaghmaei

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional non-isothermal mathematical model has been developed for the ethane dehydrogenation reaction in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an equilibrium reaction, removal of produced hydrogen by the membrane shifts the thermodynamic equilibrium to ethylene production. For further displacement of the dehydrogenation reaction, oxidative dehydrogenation method has been used. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an endothermic reaction, the energy produced by the oxidative dehydrogena-tion method is consumed by the dehydrogenation reaction. The results show that the oxidative dehydrogenation method generated a substantial improvement in the reactor performance in terms of high conversions and significant energy saving. It was also established that the sweep gas velocity in the shell side of the reactor is one of the most important factors in the effectiveness of the reactor.

  1. [Treatment effect of biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system on greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Rui; Xiang, Kun; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2014-08-01

    Unorganized discharge of greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater has brought several negative influences on the ecological environment in the rural area of Yangtze River Delta. Biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system is a potential ecological method for greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater treatment. In order to explore the feasibility of this system and evaluate the contribution of vegetable uptake of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in treating greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater, three types of vegetables, including Ipomoea aquatica, lettuce and celery were selected in this study. Results showed the combined system had a high capacity in simultaneous removal of organic matter, N and P. The removal efficiencies of COD, NH4(+)-N, TN and TP from the wastewater reached up to 93.2%-95.6%, 97.2%-99.6%, 73.9%-93.1% and 74.9%-90.0%, respectively. System with I. aquatica had the highest efficiencies in N and P removal, followed by lettuce and celery. However, plant uptake was not the primary pathway for TN arid TP removal in the combined system. The vegetable uptake of N and P accounted for only 9.1%-25.0% of TN and TP removal from the wastewater while the effect of microorganisms would be dominant for N and P removal. In addition, the highest amounts of N and P uptake in I. aquatica were closely related with the biomass of plant. Results from the study indicated that the biological filtration and vegetable floating-bed combined system was an effective approach to treating greenhouse turtle breeding wastewater in China.

  2. Simulation of groundwater flow, effects of artificial recharge, and storage volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer near the city of Wichita, Kansas well field, 1935–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Pickett, Linda L.; Hansen, Cristi V.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    storage area compared to metered recharge of 1,796 acre-ft indicates some loss of metered recharge. Increased storage outside of the basin storage area of 183 acre-ft accounts for all but 6 acre-ft or 0.33 percent of the total. Previously estimated recharge credits for 2007 and 2008 are 1,018 and 600 acre-ft, respectively, and a total estimated recharge credit of 1,618 acre-ft. Storage changes calculated for this study are 4.42 percent less for 2007 and 5.67 percent more for 2008 than previous estimates. Total storage change for 2007 and 2008 is 0.68 percent less than previous estimates. The small difference between the increase in storage from artificial recharge estimated with the groundwater-flow model and metered recharge indicates the groundwater model correctly accounts for the additional water recharged to the Equus Beds aquifer as part of the Aquifer Storage and Recovery project. Small percent differences between inflows and outflows for all stress periods and all index cells in the basin storage area, improved calibration compared to the previous model, and a reasonable match between simulated and measured long-term base flow indicates the groundwater model accurately simulates groundwater flow in the study area. The change in groundwater level through recent years compared to the August 1940 groundwater level map has been documented and used to assess the change of storage volume of the Equus Beds aquifer in and near the Wichita well field for three different areas. Two methods were used to estimate changes in storage from simulation results using simulated change in groundwater levels in layer 1 between stress periods, and using ZONEBUDGET to calculate the change in storage in the same way the effects of artificial recharge were estimated within the basin storage area. The three methods indicate similar trends although the magnitude of storage changes differ. Information about the change in storage in response to hydrologic stresses is important for managing

  3. The High Value CVT Concept--Cost Effective and Powerful

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Englisch,; A. Teubert; A. Gotz; E. Muller; E. Simon; B. Walter; A. Baumgartner

    2011-01-01

    Based on the comprehensive comparison of vehicle performance in economy,engine power,driving smoothness,and efficiency cost as well as pollutant emission etc,the paper discussed the high value CVT concept from an angle of the cost effective and powerful for vehicle.In the paper,it researched the related technical detail in CVT.By means of realizing the continuous change in transmission ratio,it could obtain the optimal matching between transmission system and engine operating mode,and enhance the characteristic of fuel oil in economy,and also improve the convenience in manipulation for driver and make passenger comfortable.For easy to understand the concept,the paper made the comparison analysis in many aspects such as performance,transmission specification,high value CVT hybrid,orifice torque sensor,hydraulic system,high value CVT em,new chain portfolio and assessment of the high value CVT on the NEDC.Finally it showed the potential advantages of CVT technology development,and proposed future developing trends to realize technical scheme of high value CVT.

  4. The effect of rarity and uncertainty on innovation value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Lauto, Giancarlo

    This paper addresses the core notions of the Resource Based View, that rarity provides superior performance. We examine the limits of rarity as a driver of performance in the process of innovation. We also claim that uncertainty affects this process, both directly and moderating the effect of rar...... on innovation value, as in conditions of low uncertainty incremental innovation tends to prevail, while high uncertainty leads to imitation of successful practices. Low, but not high, uncertainty moderates the relationship between rarity and innovation value.......This paper addresses the core notions of the Resource Based View, that rarity provides superior performance. We examine the limits of rarity as a driver of performance in the process of innovation. We also claim that uncertainty affects this process, both directly and moderating the effect...... of rarity. Using patent data relative to hydrocracking – a mature technology experiencing periods of stable and unpredictable development – we find that rarity has a U-shaped effect on innovation value, as both rare and non-rare inventions are valuable. Uncertainty has an inverted U-shaped effect...

  5. What is a hospital bed day worth? A contingent valuation study of hospital Chief Executive Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Katie; Barnett, Adrain G; Graves, Nicholas

    2017-02-14

    Decreasing hospital length of stay, and so freeing up hospital beds, represents an important cost saving which is often used in economic evaluations. The savings need to be accurately quantified in order to make optimal health care resource allocation decisions. Traditionally the accounting cost of a bed is used. We argue instead that the economic cost of a bed day is the better value for making resource decisions, and we describe our valuation method and estimations for costing this important resource. We performed a contingent valuation using 37 Australian Chief Executive Officers' (CEOs) willingness to pay (WTP) to release bed days in their hospitals, both generally and using specific cases. We provide a succinct thematic analysis from qualitative interviews post survey completion, which provide insight into the decision making process. On average CEOs are willing to pay a marginal rate of $216 for a ward bed day and $436 for an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) bed day, with estimates of uncertainty being greater for ICU beds. These estimates are significantly lower (four times for ward beds and seven times for ICU beds) than the traditional accounting costs often used. Key themes to emerge from the interviews include the importance of national funding and targets, and their associated incentive structures, as well as the aversion to discuss bed days as an economic resource. This study highlights the importance for valuing bed days as an economic resource to inform cost effectiveness models and thus improve hospital decision making and resource allocation. Significantly under or over valuing the resource is very likely to result in sub-optimal decision making. We discuss the importance of recognising the opportunity costs of this resource and highlight areas for future research.

  6. The effectiveness of a nationwide universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated bed nets on childhood malaria in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins O. F. Zamawe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated mosquito bed nets (ITNs has been associated with improved malaria outcomes, recent reports indicate that the campaign is losing its sparkle in some countries. In Malawi, the universal coverage campaign was implemented in 2012, but its impacts are yet to be ascertained. Thus, this study examined the effects of the campaign on malaria morbidity among children in Malawi. Methods This is a repeated cross-sectional study. The study used nationally-representative malaria indicator survey (MIS data collected in 2012 and 2014. In total, the analysis included 4193 children between the ages of 6 and 59 months (2171 from 2012 MIS and 2022 from 2014 MIS. ITNs coverage and malaria morbidity before (2012 = pre-test/control and after (2014 = post-test/treated the universal coverage campaign of ITNs were compared. The treated and control samples were matched on measured relevant covariates using propensity scores. Results The mean number of ITNs per household improved significantly from 1.1 (SD 1.0 in 2012 to 1.4 (SD 1.1 in 2014 (p < 0.001. Nonetheless, the prevalence of malaria among children increased considerably from 27.7 % (2012 to 32.0 % (2014 (p = 0.002. The risk of malaria was also significantly higher in 2014 compared to 2012 (RR = 1.14; 95 % CI 1.01–1.29. Besides, the use of bed nets was not significantly associated with malaria morbidity in 2014 (RR = 0.92; 95 % CI 0.76–1.12, but it was in 2012 (RR = 0.83; 95 % CI 0.70–1.00. Conclusions The universal coverage campaign of ITNs was not associated with a reduced burden of malaria among children in Malawi. This was likely due to increased insecticide resistance, inconsistent use of bed nets and under-utilization of other methods of malaria control. This calls for a multifaceted approach in the fight against malaria instead of simple dependence on ITNs. In particular, local or community level

  7. Integrating Effectiveness, Transparency and Fairness into a Value Elicitation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortier, Michael; Sheng, Grant [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Faculty of Environmental Studies; Collins, Alison [York Centre for Applied Sustainability, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    As part of the evaluation of Canada's proposed nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Panel (FEARP) undertook an extensive, nation-wide public hearing process. The hearing process itself was contentious and has been criticized on numerous grounds. It is our contention that the fundamental weakness of the FEARP process was that it was designed as an information-based forum, as opposed to a value-based forum.' Our observations and analyses of these hearings indicate that the FEARP envisioned a different purpose and a different outcome of this process than the public in general. As a result, public acceptability for the Concept or even the assessment process itself was not garnered due to a failure in the process to identify, address and incorporate values. To address this, we proposed a seven-step value elicitation process specifically designed to assess public acceptability of the disposal concept. An unfortunate consequence of the flawed public consultation process employed by the FEARP is that it is unclear exactly what it is the public finds unacceptable. Both from discussions and observations, it is difficult to ascertain whether the unacceptability lies with the Concept itself and/or the process by which the Concept was to be assessed. As a result, there is uncertainty as to what questions should be asked and how should the 'unacceptability' be addressed. In other words, does Canada need a new concept? Does Canada need to develop a mechanism for assessing the public acceptability of the Concept? Or both? The inability of the current process to answer such fundamental questions demonstrates the importance of developing an effective public acceptability and consultation process. We submit that, to create an acceptable Public Participation mechanism, it is necessary to found the construction of such a mechanism on the principles of effectiveness, transparency and fairness. Moreover, we believe that

  8. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...... mattresses have a positive effect on LBP, and especially a hard mattress is commonly believed to have a positive effect. METHODS: One hundred sixty CLBP patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups, having a mattress/bed mounted in their sleeping room for 1 month. The beds were: (1) waterbed (Akva), (2) body......-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night. RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients...

  9. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. The effectiveness of a nationwide universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated bed nets on childhood malaria in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamawe, Collins O F; Nakamura, Kanan; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-10-18

    Although the universal coverage campaign of insecticide-treated mosquito bed nets (ITNs) has been associated with improved malaria outcomes, recent reports indicate that the campaign is losing its sparkle in some countries. In Malawi, the universal coverage campaign was implemented in 2012, but its impacts are yet to be ascertained. Thus, this study examined the effects of the campaign on malaria morbidity among children in Malawi. This is a repeated cross-sectional study. The study used nationally-representative malaria indicator survey (MIS) data collected in 2012 and 2014. In total, the analysis included 4193 children between the ages of 6 and 59 months (2171 from 2012 MIS and 2022 from 2014 MIS). ITNs coverage and malaria morbidity before (2012 = pre-test/control) and after (2014 = post-test/treated) the universal coverage campaign of ITNs were compared. The treated and control samples were matched on measured relevant covariates using propensity scores. The mean number of ITNs per household improved significantly from 1.1 (SD 1.0) in 2012 to 1.4 (SD 1.1) in 2014 (p universal coverage campaign of ITNs was not associated with a reduced burden of malaria among children in Malawi. This was likely due to increased insecticide resistance, inconsistent use of bed nets and under-utilization of other methods of malaria control. This calls for a multifaceted approach in the fight against malaria instead of simple dependence on ITNs. In particular, local or community level malaria interventions should go hand in hand with the universal coverage campaign.

  11. Hospital Bed Type, the Electronic Medical Record, and Safe Bed Elevation in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Zachary W; Duquaine, Damon; Ohkuma, Rika; Schneider, Eric B; Whitman, Glenn J R

    2016-01-01

    In mechanically ventilated patients, head of bed (HOB) elevation above 30° decreases the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The research team studied (a) compliance with proper HOB elevation in their cardiac surgical intensive care unit, (b) the accuracy of HOB angles recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR), and (c) the effect of bed type on (a) and (b). Nurses were polled to discover how HOB angles were measured in practice. HOB angles were compliant in 80% of observations. Compliance was more frequent in beds with side-of-bed angle indicators (SBI) than beds with under-bed angle indicators (UBI; 88% vs 77%, P = .04). Charting in the EMR was accurate in 50% of SBI bed observations but only 20% of UBI bed observations (P bed type. Bedside indicators are underutilized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on properties of bio-oil produced from fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng; Zhao, Zengli; Zheng, Anqing; Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Zhen; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Eucalyptus wood powder was first subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment in a high-pressure reactor at 160-190°C, and subsequently fast pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor at 500°C to obtain high quality bio-oil. This study focused on investigating effect of hydrothermal pretreatment on bio-oil properties. Hemicellulose and some metals were effectively removed from eucalyptus wood, while cellulose content was enhanced. No significant charring and carbonization of constituents was observed during hydrothermal pretreatment. Thus pretreated eucalyptus wood gave higher bio-oil yield than original eucalyptus wood. Chemical composition of bio-oil was examined by GC/MS and (13)C NMR analyses. Bio-oil produced from pretreated eucalyptus wood exhibited lower contents of ketones and acids, while much higher levoglucosan content than bio-oil produced from original eucalyptus wood, which would help to improve thermal stability of bio-oil and extract levoglucosan from bio-oil. Hydrothermal pretreatment also improved bio-oil fuel quality through lowering water content and enhancing heating value.

  13. The effects of competencies on the company value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Růžičková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Competent management of a company is an important generator of a company value. The aim of the article is to provide detailed academic discussion of the human capital potential and its effects on the value of the company. Attention is paid especially to the definition of the human resources in this context and possible measurability, assuming what can be measured, can be increased. Although the company value can be measured by financial analyses tools, we have in the article moved on to the empirical dimension and provide a theoretical framework of the represented issue. Firstly, we stressed the importance of knowledge in the society of today, secondly, we outlined the indispensability of the intellectual capital for the companies and after that we dealt with the human capital itself, both competences and competencies and their measurability. Based on the partial results, the fi­gure describing the creation of company value was formed; we identified important variables and one of the triggers of these variables. All findings are supported with the literature review e. g. Andreissen (2004, Boddy (2008, Kubeš, et al. (2004, Marinič (2008, Stewart (1998 and Sullivan (2000.

  14. Effect of Different Feed Structures and Bedding on the Horizontal Spread of Campylobacter jejuni within Broiler Flocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Moen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of different feed structures and beddings on the spread of C. jejuni in broiler flocks, and the effect on the cecal microbiota. Broiler chickens raised in 24 eight-bird group cages on either rubber mat or wood shavings were fed either a wheat-based control diet (Control, a diet where 50% of the ground wheat was replaced by whole wheat prior to pelleting (Wheat, or a wheat-based diet, such as the control diet diluted with 12% oat hulls (Oat. Samples from the cloacal mucosa of all birds were taken daily for C. jejuni quantification and cecum samples were collected at the end of the experiment for C. jejuni quantification and microbiota analyses. We have shown a statistically significant effect of increased feed structure on the reduced spread of C. jejuni in chicken flocks, but no significant differences were detected between types of structure included in the feed. No significant changes in the dominating microbiota in the lower lower gastrointestinal (GI tract were observed, which indicates that feed structure only has an effect on the upper GI tract. Delaying the spread of C. jejuni in broiler flocks could, at time of slaughter, result in fewer C. jejuni-positive broilers.

  15. The duration effect: a link between TTO and VAS values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Benjamin M

    2009-02-01

    The value of a health state may depend on how long an individual has had to endure the health state (i.e. hedonic load). In this paper, we test the constant proportionality (CP) assumption and determine the sign of relationship between duration and health state value for 42 health states using the nationally representative data from the United Kingdom Measurement and Valuation of Health study. The results reject the CP assumption and suggest that the relationship is negative for optimal health (i.e. fair innings argument) and that the relationship is positive for poorer health states (i.e. adaptation). We find no evidence of the maximum endurable time hypothesis using these data. This evidence on the duration effect has important implications for outcomes research and the economic evaluation of interventions.

  16. Nitrate removal, communities of denitrifiers and adverse effects in different carbon substrates for use in denitrification beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Sören; Schipper, Louis A; Matiasek, Michael G; Scow, Kate M; Cameron, Stewart; Bruesewitz, Denise A; McDonald, Ian R

    2011-11-01

    Denitrification beds are containers filled with wood by-products that serve as a carbon and energy source to denitrifiers, which reduce nitrate (NO(3)(-)) from point source discharges into non-reactive dinitrogen (N(2)) gas. This study investigates a range of alternative carbon sources and determines rates, mechanisms and factors controlling NO(3)(-) removal, denitrifying bacterial community, and the adverse effects of these substrates. Experimental barrels (0.2 m(3)) filled with either maize cobs, wheat straw, green waste, sawdust, pine woodchips or eucalyptus woodchips were incubated at 16.8 °C or 27.1 °C (outlet temperature), and received NO(3)(-) enriched water (14.38 mg N L(-1) and 17.15 mg N L(-1)). After 2.5 years of incubation measurements were made of NO(3)(-)-N removal rates, in vitro denitrification rates (DR), factors limiting denitrification (carbon and nitrate availability, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and concentrations of NO(3)(-), nitrite and ammonia), copy number of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) genes, and greenhouse gas production (dissolved nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane), and carbon (TOC) loss. Microbial denitrification was the main mechanism for NO(3)(-)-N removal. Nitrate-N removal rates ranged from 1.3 (pine woodchips) to 6.2 g N m(-3) d(-1) (maize cobs), and were predominantly limited by C availability and temperature (Q(10) = 1.2) when NO(3)(-)-N outlet concentrations remained above 1 mg L(-1). The NO(3)(-)-N removal rate did not depend directly on substrate type, but on the quantity of microbially available carbon, which differed between carbon sources. The abundance of denitrifying genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ) was similar in replicate barrels under cold incubation, but varied substantially under warm incubation, and between substrates. Warm incubation enhanced growth of nirS containing bacteria and bacteria that lacked the nosZ gene, potentially explaining the greater N(2)O emission in

  17. Effects of health insurance on non-working married women’s medical care use and bed days at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether bed days are alternative methods to medical care use for treating a particular illness. If bed days at home are considered as an alternative to medical treatment, then medical care use and bed days at home should be influenced by an individual’s health insurance status. Method This study uses data from the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) on medical care use and bed days at home for each contracted illness of non-working married women. Results The results suggest that the health insurance status of non-working married women has considerable influence on their choice between medical care use and bed days at home. In addition, those with health insurance are more likely to use medical care and less likely to use bed days at home, but they tend to avoid the simultaneous use of medical care and bed days at home. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies’ findings indicating that absences from work and medical care use among working males may be complements, this study’s results for non-working married women without health insurance suggest that they use rest and medical treatment as substitutes, not complements. PMID:23816313

  18. Mathematical modelling of particle mixing effect on the combustion of municipal solid wastes in a packed-bed furnace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao Bin; Swithenbank, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Packed bed combustion is still the most common way to burn municipal solid wastes. In this paper, a dispersion model for particle mixing, mainly caused by the movement of the grate in a moving-burning bed, has been proposed and transport equations for the continuity, momentum, species, and energy conservation are described. Particle-mixing coefficients obtained from model tests range from 2.0x10(-6) to 3.0x10(-5)m2/s. A numerical solution is sought to simulate the combustion behaviour of a full-scale 12-tonne-per-h waste incineration furnace at different levels of bed mixing. It is found that an increase in mixing causes a slight delay in the bed ignition but greatly enhances the combustion processes during the main combustion period in the bed. A medium-level mixing produces a combustion profile that is positioned more at the central part of the combustion chamber, and any leftover combustible gases (mainly CO) enter directly into the most intensive turbulence area created by the opposing secondary-air jets and thus are consumed quickly. Generally, the specific arrangement of the impinging secondary-air jets dumps most of the non-uniformity in temperature and CO into the gas flow coming from the bed-top, while medium-level mixing results in the lowest CO emission at the furnace exit and the highest combustion efficiency in the bed.

  19. The Effect of Computer Games on the Proficiency of the B.Ed. Teacher Trainees in Using the Conventional Expressions in Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of computer games on the proficiency of the B.Ed teacher trainees in using the conventional expressions in conversations. The role of technology in language learning has made outdated, drills, grammatical explanations and translation of texts, and the focus is shifted to communication based…

  20. A conceptual framework for shear flow-induced erosion of soft cohesive sediment beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterwerp, J. C.; van Kesteren, W. G. M.; van Prooijen, B.; Jacobs, W.

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for erosion of cohesive sediment beds. We focus on cohesive beds, distinguishing between floc erosion, surface erosion, and mass erosion. By (our) definition, surface erosion is a drained soil mechanical process, whereas mass erosion occurs under undrained conditions. The eroding shear stress is modeled through a probability density function. This yields a continuous description of floc erosion and surface erosion as a function of mean bed shear stress. Furthermore, we assume a distribution for the bed strength. The mean values of the bed strength are derived from soil mechanical theory, assuming that the surface erosion rate is limited by the swelling rate from the undrained shear strength in the bed to its drained value at its surface. The rate of erosion then relates to the undrained shear strength of the soil, and its consolidation (swelling) coefficient. The critical shear stress for erosion is slightly larger than the true cohesion of the bed, i.e., the drained strength, and follows a power law relation with the plasticity index. The conceptual framework proposed herein has been validated against a limited number of experimental data, and has a series of advantages above other methods of direct measuring erodibility, as it is inexpensive and can be used to attain space-covering information on the sediment bed. Moreover, the use of bulk soil mechanical parameters accounts implicitly for the effects of organic material, though the role of, e.g., macrophytobenthos mats and/or bioturbation is difficult to capture a priori.

  1. Effect of spatial distribution of porous matrix surface charge heterogeneity on nanoparticle attachment in a packed bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effect of spatial distribution of the porous matrix surface heterogeneity on nanoparticle deposition is numerically explored using lattice Boltzmann simulation methods and tracking of individual particles with Lagrangian algorithms. Packed beds with four different patterns of surface charge heterogeneity, on which favorable surfaces for particle attachment are located at different locations, are generated. The heterogeneity is binary, so that the porous surface can either accommodate nanoparticle attachment or not. It is found that the heterogeneity pattern has a stronger effect when the rate constant for particle attachment is high, when the particle size is small, and/or when the fraction of the surface area that is favorable to attachment is about 0.5. At fixed conditions, the heterogeneity pattern with randomly and uniformly distributed active surface area is the most favorite for particle attachment, compared to those where the active surface areas are banded perpendicularly to the flow direction. There exists a critical ratio of the Damkohler number to the Peclet number, beyond which the heterogeneity pattern effect becomes more visible.

  2. Using an extreme bony prominence anatomical model to examine the influence of bed sheet materials and bed making methods on the distribution of pressure on the support surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Terumi; Nakajima, Yukari; Fukuda, Moriyoshi; Matsuo, Junko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko

    2014-05-01

    Bed sheets generate high surface tension across the support surface and increase pressure to the body through a process known as the hammock effect. Using an anatomical model and a loading device characterized by extreme bony prominences, the present study compared pressure distributions on support surfaces across different bed making methods and bed sheet materials to determine the factors that influence pressure distribution. The model was placed on a pressure mapping system (CONFORMat; NITTA Corp., Osaka, Japan), and interface pressure was measured. Bed sheet elasticity and friction between the support surface and the bed sheets were also measured. For maximum interface pressure, the relative values of the following methods were higher than those of the control method, which did not use any bed sheets: cotton sheets with hospital corners (1.28, p = 0.02), polyester with no corners (1.29, p = 0.01), cotton with no corners (1.31, p = 0.003), and fitted polyester sheets (1.35, p = 0.002). Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that maximum interface pressure was negatively correlated with bed sheet elasticity (R(2) = 0.74). A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between maximum interface pressure and immersion depth, which was measured using the loading device (r = -0.40 and p = 0.04). We found that several combinations of bed making methods and bed sheet materials induced maximum interface pressures greater than those observed for the control method. Bed sheet materials influenced maximum interface pressure, and bed sheet elasticity was particularly important in reducing maximum interface pressure.

  3. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Immo A; Rodriguez, Stacy D; Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Blakely, Brittny N; Hammond, John I; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y; Maio, William A; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers.

  4. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immo A Hansen

    Full Text Available Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs and odorant receptors (ORs associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco. Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers.

  5. Radial heat transport in packed beds at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Values were measured for the effective radial heat conductivity λeff, r and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall αw in a packed bed. This was done for superficial velocities of 5 – 70 cm s−1 and at pressures from 1 – 10 bar. Values for λeff, r and αw were obtained by simultaneous fitting of

  6. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  7. Carrier effects on tertiary nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor: An examination of performance, biofilm and biologically produced solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Daina; Delatolla, Robert; Kennedy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly stricter ammonia and nitrogen release regulations with respect to wastewater effluents are creating a need for tertiary treatment systems. The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is being considered as an upgrade option for an increasing number of wastewater treatment facilities due to its small footprint and ease of operation. Despite the MBBRs creation as a system to remove nitrogen, recent research on MBBR systems showing that the system's performance is directly related to carrier surface area and is irrespective of carrier shape and type has been performed exclusively on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal systems. Furthermore, the influence of carrier type on the solids produced by MBBR systems has also been exclusively studied for COD removal systems. This work investigates the effects of three specific carrier types on ammonia removal rates, biofilm morphology, along with solids production and settleability of tertiary nitrifying MBBR systems. The study concludes that carrier type has no significant effect on tertiary nitrifying MBBR system performance under steady, moderate loading conditions. The research does however highlight the propensity of greater surface area to volume carriers to become clogged under high loading conditions and that the high surface area carriers investigated in this study required longer adjustment periods to changes in loading after becoming clogged.

  8. Mechanisms of Neuroplasticity and Ethanol's Effects on Plasticity in the Striatum and Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, David M; Kash, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic function (i.e., synaptic plasticity) have long been thought to contribute to information storage in the nervous system. Although synaptic plasticity mainly has adaptive functions that allow the organism to function in complex environments, it is now clear that certain events or exposure to various substances can produce plasticity that has negative consequences for organisms. Exposure to drugs of abuse, in particular ethanol, is a life experience that can activate or alter synaptic plasticity, often resulting in increased drug seeking and taking and in many cases addiction.Two brain regions subject to alcohol's effects on synaptic plasticity are the striatum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), both of which have key roles in alcohol's actions and control of intake. The specific effects depend on both the brain region analyzed (e.g., specific subregions of the striatum and BNST) and the duration of ethanol exposure (i.e., acute vs. chronic). Plastic changes in synaptic transmission in these two brain regions following prolonged ethanol exposure are thought to contribute to excessive alcohol drinking and relapse to drinking. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this plasticity may lead to new therapies for treatment of these and other aspects of alcohol use disorder.

  9. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata; bioaccumulation from bedded sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    In previous studies with San Francisco Bay sediments, minimal chronic sublethal effects were detected (Miscellaneous Paper D-93-1 and another Miscellaneous Paper in preparation by Moore and Dillon). To ensure that the lack of effects was not due to a lack of contaminant uptake, a bioaccumulation experiment was conducted. Bioaccumulation from bedded sediments was evaluated following a 9-week exposure with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Two sediments were evaluated, a contaminated San Francisco Bay test sediment and a clean control sediment from Sequim, WA. Animals were exposed as early juveniles through adulthood. Tissues were analyzed for metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pesticides. Worms exposed to the contaminated San Francisco Bay sediment had significantly higher tissue residues of silver (0.30 mg/kg dry weight) and tributyltin (0.298 mg/kg dry weight). Conversely, tissue residues of control animals were significantly higher in cadmium (0.67 mg/kg dry weight) and lead (1.89 mg/kg dry weight). Small Amounts (0.02 mg/kg dry weight) of aldrin and dieldrin were measured in worms exposed to the contaminated sediment, while dieldrin and 8-BHC were found in Bioaccumulation, Neanthes, Chronic sublethal, San Francisco Bay, Dredged, Material, Sediment.

  10. Effect of heating style on gasification process of pilot scale bubble fluidized bed%升温方式对中试鼓泡流化床气化过程的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓伟; 刘建坤; 王贵路; 李明鹤; 郑磊; 叶仁文; 张大雷

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the heat process characteristics of pilot scale bubbing fluidized bed, by using the self heating pilot scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor of 50 kg/h in capacity, with sawdust as raw material, the experimental study on air gasification were conducted. At present, the externally heating for the fluidized bed startup was widely used in bench scale experiment. It had the advantages of rapidly raising of temperature, accurate control, etc., but the equipment was complex and difficult for maintenance, and was higher energy cost, especially, the externally heating was quite different with that for practical utilization. It is not helpful for find out the reaction characteristics so that the guiding for practical utilization was weakened. For solving the problem, using the pilot scale fluidized bed reactor as experimental device which is self heated, continuously fed and operated, air gasification experiment study on 3 temperature raising modes were conducted. Three temperature raising modes, which were sawdust combustion heating, sawdust/charcoal mixture combustion heating and charcoal combustion heating, were adopted respectively. The influence of different temperature raising ways on gasification temperature, tar content, the minimum fluidization velocity and gas quality in the process of gasification has been studied. The results showed that the heating effect of charcoal combustion was more ideal, and its heat value of charcoal was up to 32 MJ/kg, thus the heat released was much larger than that of sawdust. It provided more heat for bed heating process. In the preheating process, the warming up process was faster in the first hour, along with the increase of bed height, the heat storage in the bed material was also increased, and the heating rate was steady. It took 2.5 h for the gasification reactor to reach the reaction temperature. Due to the complexity for adding bed material and charcoal in the reactor, the optimization on the feeding device

  11. Gasification of lignocellulosic biomass in fluidized beds for renewable energy development: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alauddin, Zainal Alimuddin Bin Zainal; Lahijani, Pooya [School of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Mohammadi, Maedeh; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    A literature review on gasification of lignocellulosic biomass in various types of fluidized bed gasifiers is presented. The effect of several process parameters such as catalytic bed material, bed temperature and gasifying agent on the performance of the gasifier and quality of the producer gas is discussed. Based on the priorities of researchers, the optimum values of various desired outputs in the gasification process including improved producer gas composition, enhanced LHV, less tar and char content, high gas yield and enhanced carbon conversion and cold gas efficiency have been reported. The characteristics and performance of different fluidized bed gasifiers were assessed and the obtained results from the literature have been extensively reviewed. Survey of literature revealed that several industrial biomass gasification plants using fluidized beds are currently conducting in various countries. However, more research and development of technology should be devoted to this field to enhance the economical feasibility of this process for future exploitations. (author)

  12. Discrete element modelling of pebble packing in pebble bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikkanen, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.suikkanen@lut.fi; Ritvanen, Jouni, E-mail: jouni.ritvanen@lut.fi; Jalali, Payman, E-mail: payman.jalali@lut.fi; Kyrki-Rajamäki, Riitta, E-mail: riitta.kyrki-rajamaki@lut.fi

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A discrete element method code is developed for pebble bed reactor analyses. • Methods are established to extract packing information at various spatial scales. • Packing simulations inside annular core geometry are done varying input parameters. • The restitution coefficient has the strongest effect on the resulting packing density. • Detailed analyses reveal local densification especially near the walls. - Abstract: It is important to understand the packing characteristics and behaviour of the randomly packed pebble bed to further analyse the reactor physical and thermal-hydraulic behaviour and to design a safe and economically feasible pebble bed reactor. The objective of this work was to establish methods to model and analyse the pebble packing in detail to provide useful tools and data for further analyses. Discrete element method (DEM) is a well acknowledged method for analysing granular materials, such as the fuel pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this work, a DEM computer code was written specifically for pebble bed analyses. Analysis methods were established to extract data at various spatial scales from the pebble beds resulting from the DEM simulations. A comparison with available experimental data was performed to validate the DEM implementation. To test the code implementation in full-scale reactor calculations, DEM packing simulations were done in annular geometry with 450,000 pebbles. Effects of the initial packing configuration, friction and restitution coefficients and pebble size distribution to the resulting pebble bed were investigated. The packing simulations revealed that from the investigated parameters the restitution coefficient had the largest effect on the resulting average packing density while other parameters had smaller effects. Detailed local packing density analysis of pebble beds with different average densities revealed local variations especially strong in the regions near the walls. The implemented DEM

  13. Classifying bed inclination using pressure images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran Pouyan, M; Ostadabbas, S; Nourani, M; Pompeo, M

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is one of the most prevalent problems for bed-bound patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Pressure ulcers are painful for patients and costly for healthcare systems. Accurate in-bed posture analysis can significantly help in preventing pressure ulcers. Specifically, bed inclination (back angle) is a factor contributing to pressure ulcer development. In this paper, an efficient methodology is proposed to classify bed inclination. Our approach uses pressure values collected from a commercial pressure mat system. Then, by applying a number of image processing and machine learning techniques, the approximate degree of bed is estimated and classified. The proposed algorithm was tested on 15 subjects with various sizes and weights. The experimental results indicate that our method predicts bed inclination in three classes with 80.3% average accuracy.

  14. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Packed Beds with Uniform Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    Point contact models for the effective thermal conductivity of porous media with uniform spherical inclusions have been briefly reviewed. The model of Zehner and Schlunder (1970) has been further validated with recent experimental data over a broad range of conductivity ratio from 8 to 1200 and over a range of solids fraction up to about 0.8. The comparisons further confirm the validity of Zehner-Schlunder model, known to be applicable for conductivity ratios less than about 2000, above which area contact between the particles becomes significant. This validation of the Zehner-Schlunder model has implications for its use in the prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of water frost (with conductivity ratio around 100) which arises in many important areas of technology.

  15. The effect of temperature and flow rate on the clarification of the aqueous stevia-extract in a fixed-bed column with zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovaneli I. C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia is being used as a sweetener due to its low calorific value and its taste, which is very similar to that of sucrose. After extraction from dried leaves, stevia extract is dark in colour so needs to be clarified for better acceptance by consumers. Adsorption is one of the most important processes in this clarification. In this work the clarification of extract stevia extract in fixed-bed columns with calcium zeolites was studied. Two temperatures (10ºC and 30ºC and six different flow rates (2, 5, 9, 12, 16 and 19 mL/min were studied. The results showed that the mass-transfer coeffcient increases with an increase in flow rate and the length of unused bed reaches a maximum at 9 mL/min for both temperatures. The fit of the Thomas model with the breakthrough data was not very good.

  16. On the effect of cross sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of sediments in fixed bed channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Mir-Jafar-Sadegh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The condition of incipient motion and deposition are of the essential issues for the study of sediment transport. This phenomenon is of great importance to hydraulic engineers for designing sewers, drainage, as well as other rigid boundary channels. This is a study carried out with the objectives of describing the effect of cross-sectional shape on incipient motion and deposition of particles in rigid boundary channels. In this research work, the experimental data given by Loveless (1992 and Mohammadi (2005 are used. On the basis of the critical velocity approach, a new incipient motion equation for a V-shaped bottom channel and incipient deposition of sediment particles equations for rigid boundary channels having circular, rectangular, and U-shaped cross sections are obtained. New equations were compared to the other incipient motion equations. The result shows that the cross-sectional shape is an important factor for defining the minimum velocity for no-deposit particles. This study also distinguishes incipient motion of particles from incipient deposition for particles. The results may be useful for designing fixed bed channels with a limited deposition condition.

  17. Effect of sand bed depth and media age on Escherichia coli and turbidity removal in biosand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napotnik, Julie A; Baker, Derek; Jellison, Kristen L

    2017-02-17

    The main objective of this study was to build several full-scale biosand filters (BSFs) and assess the long-term (9 month) efficacy for particulate and Escherichia coli removal under simulated real-world usage. Four replicates of three different filter designs were built: the traditional concrete BSF, and two scaled-down versions that use a 5-gal or 2-gal bucket, respectively, as the casing material. The smaller sand bed depths in the bucket-sized filters did not impact filter performance with respect to (i) turbidity and E. coli removal or (ii) effluent levels of turbidity and E. coli. All filters produced effluents with a mean turbidity of <0.6 NTU. In addition, 78%, 74%, and 72% of effluent samples for the concrete, 5-gal, and 2-gal filters, respectively, had E. coli concentrations <1 CFU/100 mL. The bucket-sized filters were found to be a potential alternative to the concrete BSFs for the removal of E. coli and turbidity from drinking water. Since smaller BSFs must be filled more frequently than larger BSFs to produce comparable water volumes, the effect of shorter pause periods on BSF performance should be investigated.

  18. Application of principal component analysis enables to effectively find important physical variables for optimization of fluid bed granulator conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Iwao, Yasunori; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2011-05-16

    Principal component analysis was applied to effectively optimize the operational conditions of a fluidized bed granulator for preparing granules with excellent compaction and tablet physical properties. The crucial variables that affect the properties of the granules, their compactability and the resulting tablet properties were determined through analysis of a series of granulation and tabletting experiments. Granulation was performed while the flow rate and concentration of the binder were changed as independent operational variables, according to a two-factor central composite design. Thirteen physicochemical properties of granules and tablets were examined: powder properties (particle size, size distribution width, Carr's index, Hausner ratio and aspect ratio), compactability properties (pressure transmission ratio, die wall force and ejection force) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, disintegration time, weight variation and drug content uniformity). Principal component analysis showed that the pressure transmission ratio, die wall force and Carr's index were the most important variables in granule preparation. Multiple regression analysis also confirmed these results. Furthermore, optimized operational conditions obtained from the multiple regression analysis enabled the production of granules with desirable properties for tabletting. This study presents the first use of principle component analysis for identifying and successfully predicting the most important variables in the process of granulation and tabletting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of freeboard extension on co-combustion of coal and olive cake in a fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpulat, Onur; Varol, Murat; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2010-08-01

    In this study, flue gas emissions and combustion efficiencies during combustion and co-combustion of olive cake and coal were investigated in a bubbling fluidized bed. Temperature distributions along the combustion column and flue gas concentrations of O(2), CO, SO(2) and NO(x) were measured during combustion experiments. Two sets of experiments were performed to examine the effect of fuel composition, excess air ratio and freeboard extension on flue gas emissions and combustion efficiency. The results of the experiments showed that coal combustion occurs at lower parts of the combustion column whereas olive cake combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. As olive cake percentage in the fuel mixture increased, CO emissions increased, SO(2) and NO(x) emissions decreased. Additionally, flue gas emissions could be lowered with the freeboard extension while burning biomass or biomass/coal mixtures. Noticeable decrease in CO emissions and slight increase in combustion efficiencies were observed with a column height of 1900 mm instead of 900 mm.

  20. Effects of octahedral molecular sieve on treatment performance, microbial metabolism, and microbial community in expanded granular sludge bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fei; Xu, Aihua; Xia, Dongsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Guo; Meyer, Melissa; Zhao, Dongye; Huang, Ching-Hua; Wu, Qihang; Fu, Jie

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated the effects of synthesized octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) nanoparticles on the anaerobic microbial community in a model digester, expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. The addition of OMS-2 (0.025 g/L) in the EGSB reactors resulted in an enhanced operational performance, i.e., COD removal and biogas production increased by 4% and 11% respectively, and effluent volatile fatty acid (VFA) decreased by 11% relative to the control group. The Biolog EcoPlate™ test was employed to investigate microbial metabolism in the EGSB reactors. Results showed that OMS-2 not only increased the microbial metabolic level but also significantly changed the community level physiological profiling of the microorganisms. The Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated OMS-2 enhanced the microbial diversity and altered the community structure. The largest bacterial genus Lactococcus, a lactic acid bacterium, reduced from 29.3% to 20.4% by abundance in the presence of 0.25 g/L OMS-2, which may be conducive to decreasing the VFA production and increasing the microbial diversity. OMS-2 also increased the quantities of acetogenic bacteria and Archaea, and promoted the acetogenesis and methanogenesis. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy illustrated that Mn(IV)/Mn(III) with high redox potential in OMS-2 were reduced to Mn(II) in the EGSB reactors; this in turn affected the microbial community.

  1. Effect of influenza-induced fever on human bioimpedance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Marini

    Full Text Available Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is a widely used technique to assess body composition and nutritional status. While bioelectrical values are affected by diverse variables, there has been little research on validation of BIA in acute illness, especially to understand prognostic significance. Here we report the use of BIA in acute febrile states induced by influenza.Bioimpedance studies were conducted during an H1N1 influenza A outbreak in Venezuelan Amerindian villages from the Amazonas. Measurements were performed on 52 subjects between 1 and 40 years of age, and 7 children were re-examined after starting Oseltamivir treatment. Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA and permutation tests were applied.For the entire sample, febrile individuals showed a tendency toward greater reactance (p=0.058 and phase angle (p=0.037 than afebrile individuals, while resistance and impedance were similar in the two groups. Individuals with repeated measurements showed significant differences in bioimpedance values associated with fever, including increased reactance (p<0.001 and phase angle (p=0.007, and decreased resistance (p=0.007 and impedance (p<0.001.There are bioelectrical variations induced by influenza that can be related to dehydration, with lower extracellular to intracellular water ratio in febrile individuals, or a direct thermal effect. Caution is recommended when interpreting bioimpedance results in febrile states.

  2. Bed Bugs - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bed Bugs URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Bed Bugs - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  4. 一种床单位臭氧消毒器杀菌效果的观察%OBSERVATION ON DISINFECTION EFFECT OF A TYPE OF BED UNIT OZONE DISINFECTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李菊莲; 李国达; 张新玲; 慕海霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the disinfection effect and practical application of a type of bed unit ozone disinfector. Methods The carrier quantitative germicidal test and field disinfection trail were used to carry out laboratory study on disinfection effect of the bed unit ozone disinfector. Results After the bed unit disinfector operating for 10 minutes, the concentration of ozone was 2 494 mg/m in the disinfector. The average disinfection logarithm values of Slaphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans on carriers put on the different parts ( upper layer, middle layer and lower layer) of the bed unit in the disinfector and fumigated in ozone for 30 min were > 3. 00. That of nature bacteria on bed surface which was put in the disinfector and incubated for 30 min was > 1. 00. Conclusion The bed unit ozone infector has good germicidal effect on vegetative form of bacteria and fungi and the actural disinfection effect can achieve canonical requisition of practical disinfect effect on bed unit.%目的 观察一种床单位臭氧消毒器杀菌效果及其实际应用消毒效果.方法 采用载体定量杀菌试验和现场消毒试验方法,对该床单位臭氧消毒器消毒效果进行了实验室观察.结果 该床单位臭氧消毒器启动运行10min,在消毒容器内臭氧浓度为2 494 mg/m3.将染菌载体布放到床单位消毒器内床单位上、中、下层,经臭氧熏蒸消毒30 min,对载体上污染的金黄色葡萄球菌、大肠杆菌、铜绿假单胞菌和白色念珠菌平均杀灭对数值均>3.00.在相同条件下,将一组床单位置于臭氧消毒器内消毒作用30 min,对被褥表面自然菌的杀灭对数值均>1.00.结论 该床单位臭氧消毒器利用臭氧熏蒸消毒对多种细菌繁殖体和真菌都具有较好的杀灭作用,对床单位实际消毒效果能达到规范的要求.

  5. Nutritional value-dependent and nutritional value-independent effects on Drosophila melanogaster larval behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwedder, Astrid; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E; Ramsperger, Noel; Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Widmann, Annekathrin; Thum, Andreas S

    2012-10-01

    Gustatory stimuli allow an organism not only to orient in its environment toward energy-rich food sources to maintain nutrition but also to avoid unpleasant or even poisonous substrates. For both mammals and insects, sugars-perceived as "sweet"-potentially predict nutritional benefit. Interestingly, even Drosophila adult flies are attracted to most high-potency sweeteners preferred by humans. However, the gustatory information of a sugar may be misleading as some sugars, although perceived as "sweet," cannot be metabolized. Accordingly, in adult Drosophila, a postingestive system that additionally evaluates the nutritional benefit of an ingested sugar has been shown to exist. By using a set of seven different sugars, which either offer (fructose, sucrose, glucose, maltodextrin, and sorbitol) or lack (xylose and arabinose) nutritional benefit, we show that Drosophila, at the larval stage, can perceive and evaluate sugars based on both nutrition-dependent and -independent qualities. In detail, we find that larval survival and feeding mainly depend on the nutritional value of a particular sugar. In contrast, larval choice behavior and learning are regulated in a more complex way by nutrition value-dependent and nutrition value-independent information. The simplicity of the larval neuronal circuits and their accessibility to genetic manipulation may ultimately allow one to identify the neuronal and molecular basis of the larval sugar perception systems described here behaviorally.

  6. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia); Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat [Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Naser, Jamal, E-mail: jnaser@swin.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2016-07-12

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO{sub 2} emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can’t model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  7. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat; Naser, Jamal

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO2 emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can't model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  8. Effect of organic loading rate on a wastewater treatment process combining moving bed biofilm and membrane reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, E; Leiknes, T; Helness, H; Rasmussen, V; Odegaard, H

    2005-01-01

    The effect of moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) loading rate on membrane fouling rate was studied in two parallel units combining MBBR and membrane reactor. Hollow fiber membranes with molecular weight cut-off of 30 kD were used. The HRTs of the MBBRs varied from 45 min to 4 h and the COD loading rates ranged from 4.1 to 26.6 g COD m(-2) d(-1). The trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was very sensitive to fluxes for the used membranes and the experiments were carried out at relatively low fluxes (3.3-5.6 l m(-2) h(-1)). Beside the test with the highest flux, there were no consistent differences in fouling rate between the low- and high-rate reactors. Also, the removal efficiencies were quite similar in both systems. The average COD removal efficiencies in the total process were 87% at 3-4 h HRT and 83% at 0.75-1 h HRT. At high loading rates, there was a shift in particle size distribution towards smaller particles in the MBBR effluents. However, 79-81% of the COD was in particles that were separated by membranes, explaining the relatively small differences in the removal efficiencies at different loading rates. The COD fractionation also indicated that the choice of membrane pore size within the range of 30 kD to 0.1 microm has very small effect on the COD removal in the MBBR/membrane process, especially with low-rate MBBRs.

  9. Effect of Distributor Design on Gas-Liquid Distribution in Monolithic Bed at High Gas/Liquid Ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周媛; AL-DAHHAN Muthanna; DUDUKOVIC Milorad; 刘辉

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the liquid flow distribution at high gas/liquid ratios in a cold model monolith bed of a 0.048 m diameter with 62 cells per cm2.Three types of distributor for the liquid distribu-tion were used to evaluate their distribution performance.Local liquid saturation in individual channels was meas-ured using 16 single-point optical fiber probes mounted inside the channels.The results indicate that 1) The optical fiber probe technique can measure phase distribution in the monolith bed;2) Liquid saturation distribution along the radial direction of the monolith bed is not uniform and the extent of non-uniformity depends on the distributor de-sign and phase velocities;and 3) The tube array distributor provides superior liquid distribution performance over the showerhead and nozzle distributors.

  10. Effects of material properties on the competition mechanism of heat transfer of a granular bed in rotary cylinders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Zhi-Yin; Feng Jun-Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Mixing and heat transfer processes of the granular materials within rotary cylinders play a key role in industrial processes.The numerical simulation is carried out by using the discrete element method (DEM) to investigate the influences of material properties on the bed mixing and heat transfer process,including heat conductivity,heat capacity,and shear modulus.Moreover,a new Péclet number is derived to determine the dominant mechanism of the heating rate within the particle bed,which is directly related to thermal and mechanical properties.The system exhibits a faster heating rate with the increase of ratio of thermal conductivity and heat capacity,or the decrease of shear modulus when inter-particle conduction dominates the heating rate; conversely,it shows a fast-mixing bed when particle convection governs the heating rate.The simulation results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  11. Effects of untreated bed nets on the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax and Wuchereria bancrofti in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkot, T R; Garner, P; Paru, R; Dagoro, H; Barnes, A; McDougall, S; Wirtz, R A; Campbell, G; Spark, R

    1990-01-01

    The impact of untreated bed nets on the transmission of human malaria and filariasis in a village in a hyperendemic area of Papua New Guinea was studied. In anopheline mosquitoes, the Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite antigen positivity rate, filarial infection rates and human blood indices dropped significantly after bed nets were introduced. This reduction in human-vector contact did not affect mosquito density as no significant difference in either landing rates or indoor resting catches was found. The number of bed nets in a house and ownership of dogs were factors significantly associated with a reduction in the number of indoor resting mosquitoes. However, the reduction in the P. falciparum sporozoite antigen rate in mosquitoes was not accompanied by a reduction in either malaria parasite or antibody prevalences or titres against the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

  12. The Effects of Acquisitions on Firm Value, Evidence from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Büşra GÜNAY BENDAŞ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquisitions are assumed to create value for both the target and the acquiring firm. This paper analyzes the sources of value creation in acquisitions and examines the domestic acquisitions that took place in Turkey in 2013. By taking the overall market considerations into account, I measure the degree of value creation over different periods of time. I use the standard market value technique to calculate abnormal returns in stock prices of the acquiring firms and find that the increase in firm value is statistically significant in the long run but not in the short run.

  13. Vasopressin and sympathetic systems mediate the cardiovascular effects of the GABAergic system in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Kharazmi, Fatemeh; Nasimi, Ali

    2009-12-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is an important part of the limbic system. It has been shown that chemical stimulation of the BST elicited cardiovascular depressive and bradycardic responses. It was also demonstrated that GABA is present in the BST, though its role in cardiovascular control is not yet understood. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA receptor subtypes in the BST on cardiovascular responses and to find the possible mechanisms that mediate these responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Microinjection of muscimol (500 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) agonist, into the BST produced a weak unsignificant decrease in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Injection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, caused a significant increase in the MAP (41.3+/-5.1 mmHg) as well as in the HR (33.2+/-5.6 beats/min). Injection of two doses (500 and 1000 pmol/100 nl) of phaclofen, a GABA(B) antagonist, produced no significant change in either MAP or HR. Administration (i.v.) of the muscarinic receptor blocker, homatropine methyl bromide had no effect on the magnitude of mean arterial pressure or heart rate responses to BMI. This suggests that the parasympathetic system is not involved in these responses. However, administration (i.v.) of the nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium bromide had no effect on the magnitude of mean arterial pressure response but abolished heart rate response to BMI. This suggests that the sympathetic system is involved in the bradycardic effect of GABA. On the other hand, administration (i.v.) of a selective vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist abolished the pressor effect of BMI, which indicates that the GABAergic system of the BST decreases the arterial pressure via tonic inhibition of vasopressin release. In summary, we demonstrated, for the first time, that GABA exerts its influence in the BST through the activation of GABA(A), but not GABA(B), receptors that, in

  14. The Effects of Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest on Neurocognitive Performance: The Effects of Exercise Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz. B.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. Our ongoing bed rest participants are also engaging in exercise studies directed by Dr. Lori Ploutz Snyder. In this presentation, I will briefly highlight the existing literature linking exercise and fitness to brain and behavioral functions. I will also overview the metrics from my study that could be investigated in relation to the exercise and control subgroups.

  15. Research on Purification of Domestic Sewage by Artificially Strengthened Ecological Filter Bed in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue; SHEN

    2013-01-01

    Artificially strengthened filter bed is an innovative wastewater treatment technology based on the coupling of eco-contact oxidation filters and artificial wetlands purification mechanism.By small scale laboratory equipment,the effects of cascade aeration,filter type,filter clogging and other ecological factors on the operation effect of artificial filter bed were studied.As indicated by the results,the pretreatment of cascade aeration had obvious effect and could satisfy the oxygen requirements of artificially strengthened ecological filter bed.Through the analysis on the purification results of volcanic and gravel filter,the effluent quality of volcanic filter was better than that of gravel filter.With the advantages of low operations costs and good effluent quality,the artificially strengthened ecological filter bed has great value to be popularized in North China.

  16. Effects of the land use change on ecosystem service value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of land utilization change on the ecosystem service values in Daqing during 1995 to 2015 were analyzed based on unit area ecosystem service value of Chinese territorial ecosystem from Mr. Xie Gaodi and ecosystem service value calculation formula from Costanza. Results showed that the ecosystem service value of Daqing decreased from US $4343.1559m in 1995 to US $3824.327m in 2015, with the ecological value of US $518.8289 m decreased during the past 20 years. Wetland and water body were the two main land utilization types with the greatest contributions to the ecosystem service value. Ecosystem services value of per capita decreased 23.52%. The sensitivity coefficient of eco-service values of all types of land utilization to their value coefficients were all less than 1 in Daqing area. The sensitivity coefficients followed that wetland > water body > woodland > unutilized land > pasture land> cultivated land in 2015, which indicating that the changes of the land utilization are lack of flexibility to the changes of the ecosystem service value.

  17. Studies of the quality of the intraosseous dental implant bed and of thermal effects in implant pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K

    2000-07-01

    Dental implants may offer solutions to problems of tooth loss and removable dentures, avoiding the blighting of sound teeth in conventional bridgework. However, there may be severe problems due to deficient and poor quality host bone, particularly in the maxillary sinus region. The success of particulate irradiated mineralised cancellous allograft (IMCA) in generating new bone in the sinus was analysed using the trephine bone cores removed to create an implant bed. Bone cores were embedded and examined using 3D fluorescence fight microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode to study the quantity and the quality [degree of mineralisation] of bone in implant sites. In all graft cases, new bone as immature (woven) or mature (lamellar) bone formed on the surfaces of the allograft. The bone volume fraction was found to be significantly greater within 5 mm height of the host sinus floor. In an extended study, control sinuses grafted with IMCA soaked in saline showed no significant difference to the test side treated with the patient's own serum. IMCA was shown to retain much of its original topographical and morphological characteristics. Biopsy core specimens from other (non-sinus) sites in both maxilla and mandible were treated similarly. The highest mineral density distributions were observed in the mandible, with the lowest in the residual posterior maxilla beneath the sinus floor. A novel quantitative bone quality scale is proposed to include three parameters of bone quality: mineralisation density, bone volume fraction and connectivity. Clinical use of Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) confirmed positive blood flow in grafts, sinus membrane, and oral tissues. A model of heat conduction in dental implants, predicted oral heat to be a possible factor in implant pathology. The effect of temperature on avian osteoclastic resorption in vitro was studied using a volumetric pit assay. Osteoclastic function measured as volumes and

  18. Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs was developed by the Federal Bed Bug Workgroup to clarify the federal role in bed bug control and highlight ways that government, community, academia and private industry can work together on bed bug issues.

  19. Alignment Effectiveness for Value Creation with Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina MITAMBO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises often face problems while executing business strategies to exploit opportunities or solve problems. Within enterprises, strategy blindness could be affected by mistranslation of strategic intent, flexibility of the information system, or cognitive entrenchment. The alignment between business strategy and business processes is a critical factor in the ability of enterprises to overcome the phenomenon. Opportunities for value creation include magnifying the positive spread in cash flow or pursuing growth opportunities. Information systems could greatly simplify the processes involved in business strategy by integrating process-related decision-making with the business strategy. Decision support tools such as knowledge management, decision strategy, decision content, and expert groups, customised for organisational information systems can help enterprises optimise operations in a variety of ways such as becoming more responsive to changing market conditions in hypercompetitive markets. Greatest opportunities for decision support are incorporating external sources of data such as economic data and user behaviour analytics. Benefits are more effective utilisation of resources, larger product portfolio, better product or service quality, and shorter delivery times.

  20. An improved effective cost review process for value engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, D S; Park, J I

    2014-01-01

    Second-look value engineering (VE) is an approach that aims to lower the costs of products for which target costs are not being met during the production stage. Participants in second-look VE typically come up with a variety of ideas for cost cutting, but the outcomes often depend on their levels of experience, and not many good alternatives are available during the production stage. Nonetheless, good ideas have been consistently generated by VE experts. This paper investigates past second-look VE cases and the thinking processes of VE experts and proposes a cost review process as a systematic means of investigating cost-cutting ideas. This cost review process includes the use of an idea checklist and a specification review process. In addition to presenting the process, this paper reports on its feasibility, based on its introduction into a VE training course as part of a pilot study. The results indicate that the cost review process is effective in generating ideas for later analysis.

  1. Critical conditions of bed sediment entrainment due to debris flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Papa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes entrainment characteristics of bed material into debris flow, based on flume tests, numerical and dimensional analyses. Flume tests are conducted to investigate influences of bed sediment size on erosion rate by supplying debris flows having unsaturated sediment concentration over erodible beds. Experimental results show that the erosion rate decreases monotonically with increase of sediment size, although erosion rate changes with sediment concentration of debris flow body. In order to evaluate critical condition of bed sediment entrainment, a length scale which measures an effective bed shear stress is introduced. The effective bed shear stress is defined as total shear stress minus yield stress on the bed surface. The results show that critical entrainment conditions can be evaluated well in terms of Shields curve using the effective bed shear stress instead of a usual bed shear stress.

  2. Resonance effects on the dynamics of dense granular beds: achieving optimal energy transfer in vibrated granular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windows-Yule, C.R.K.; Rosato, A.D.; Thornton, A.R.; Parker, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of experimental techniques and discrete particle method simulations, we investigate the resonant behaviour of a dense, vibrated granular system. We demonstrate that a bed of particles driven by a vibrating plate may exhibit marked differences in its internal energy dependent on t

  3. Effect of pressure on gas-solid flow behavior in dense gas-fluidised beds: a discrete particle simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jie; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A computational study has been carried out to assess the influence of pressure on the flow structures and regime transitions in dense gas-fluidized beds using the discrete particle simulation (DPS) approach. By employing particle level simulation, the particle–particle–fluid interactions were analyz

  4. Effect of urinations on the ammonia emission from group-housing systems for sows with straw bedding: Model assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenestein, C.M.; Monteny, G.J.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Metz, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    A model was developed as a tool for designing straw-bedded sow group-housing systems with low ammonia emission. Using mechanistic and empirical relationships it calculates the total ammonia emission by integrating ammonia volatilisations from all the urine pools in the house. The reference data were

  5. Exposure of bed bugs to metarhizium anisopliae, and the effect of defensive secretions on fungal growth in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs Cimex lectularius were treated with conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae by topical, spray, and contact exposure. One week post-exposure, inconsistent mortalities were observed, averaging 30% across all treatment groups and replicates. Microscopic examination of top...

  6. The effect of an experimentally created mussel bed on bird densities and food intake of the Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ens, BJ; Alting, D

    1996-01-01

    When an experimental mussel bed was created in 1987 on the mudflats south of Schiermonnikoog, Herring Gulls immediately increased in numbers, consuming starfish and damaged Mussels. The build-up of oyster catcher numbers was more gradual, but persisted for longer. Most Oystercatchers attracted to th

  7. Oxygen distribution in packed bed membrane reactors for partial oxidation systems and the effect on the product selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kürten, U.; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Packed bed membrane reactors (PBMRs) are currently considered for the distributive addition of oxygen in partial oxidation systems. Among other advantages the decreased oxygen concentrations in the PBMR can result in improved product selectivities for reaction systems in which the oxygen dependency

  8. Effect-based trigger values for in vitro bioassays: Reading across from existing water quality guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2015-09-15

    Cell-based bioassays are becoming increasingly popular in water quality assessment. The new generations of reporter-gene assays are very sensitive and effects are often detected in very clean water types such as drinking water and recycled water. For monitoring applications it is therefore imperative to derive trigger values that differentiate between acceptable and unacceptable effect levels. In this proof-of-concept paper, we propose a statistical method to read directly across from chemical guideline values to trigger values without the need to perform in vitro to in vivo extrapolations. The derivation is based on matching effect concentrations with existing chemical guideline values and filtering out appropriate chemicals that are responsive in the given bioassays at concentrations in the range of the guideline values. To account for the mixture effects of many chemicals acting together in a complex water sample, we propose bioanalytical equivalents that integrate the effects of groups of chemicals with the same mode of action that act in a concentration-additive manner. Statistical distribution methods are proposed to derive a specific effect-based trigger bioanalytical equivalent concentration (EBT-BEQ) for each bioassay of environmental interest that targets receptor-mediated toxicity. Even bioassays that are indicative of the same mode of action have slightly different numeric trigger values due to differences in their inherent sensitivity. The algorithm was applied to 18 cell-based bioassays and 11 provisional effect-based trigger bioanalytical equivalents were derived as an illustrative example using the 349 chemical guideline values protective for human health of the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. We illustrate the applicability using the example of a diverse set of water samples including recycled water. Most recycled water samples were compliant with the proposed triggers while wastewater effluent would not have been compliant with a few

  9. Effect of head-down-tilt bed rest and hypovolemia on dynamic regulation of heart rate and blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, K. I.; Zhang, R.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest leads to an apparent abnormality of baroreflex regulation of cardiac period. We hypothesized that this "deconditioning response" could primarily be a result of hypovolemia, rather than a unique adaptation of the autonomic nervous system to bed rest. To test this hypothesis, nine healthy subjects underwent 2 wk of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. One year later, five of these same subjects underwent acute hypovolemia with furosemide to produce the same reductions in plasma volume observed after bed rest. We took advantage of power spectral and transfer function analysis to examine the dynamic relationship between blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval. We found that 1) there were no significant differences between these two interventions with respect to changes in numerous cardiovascular indices, including cardiac filling pressures, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or stroke volume; 2) normalized high-frequency (0.15-0.25 Hz) power of R-R interval variability decreased significantly after both conditions, consistent with similar degrees of vagal withdrawal; 3) transfer function gain (BP to R-R interval), used as an index of arterial-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, decreased significantly to a similar extent after both conditions in the high-frequency range; the gain also decreased similarly when expressed as BP to heart rate x stroke volume, which provides an index of the ability of the baroreflex to alter BP by modifying systemic flow; and 4) however, the low-frequency (0.05-0.15 Hz) power of systolic BP variability decreased after bed rest (-22%) compared with an increase (+155%) after acute hypovolemia, suggesting a differential response for the regulation of vascular resistance (interaction, P < 0.05). The similarity of changes in the reflex control of the circulation under both conditions is consistent with the hypothesis that reductions in plasma volume may be largely responsible for the observed changes in cardiac

  10. Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Dunton

    2000-12-20

    The dynamics of the seagrass-sulfide interaction were examined in relation to diel changes in sediment pore water sulfide concentrations in Thalassia testudinum beds and adjacent bare areas in Corpus Christi Bay and lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA, during July 1996. Pore water sulfide concentrations in seagrass beds were significantly higher than in adjacent bare areas and showed strong diurnal variations; levels significantly decreased during mid-day at shallow sediment depths (0-10 cm) containing high below-ground tissue biomass and surface area. In contrast, diurnal variations in sediment sulfide concentrations were absent in adjacent bare patches, and at deeper (>10 cm) sediment depths characterized by low below-ground plant biomass or when the grasses were experimentally shaded. These observations suggest that the mid-day depressions in sulfide levels are linked to the transport of photosynthetically produced oxygen to seagrass below-ground tissues that fuels sediment sulfide oxidation. Lower sulfide concentrations in bare areas are likely a result of low sulfate reduction rates due to low organic matter available for remineralization. Further, high reoxidation rates due to rapid exchange between anoxic pore water and oxic overlying water are probably stimulated in bare areas by higher current velocity on the sediment surface than in seagrass beds. The dynamics of pore water sulfides in seagrass beds suggest no toxic sulfide intrusion into below-ground tissues during photosynthetic periods and demonstrate that the sediment chemical environment is considerably modified by seagrasses. The reduced sediment sulfide levels in seagrass beds during photosynthetic periods will enhance seagrass production through reduced sulfide toxicity to seagrasses and sediment microorganisms related to the nutrient cycling.

  11. The effect of dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on oxygen diffusion and bacterial community structure in moving bed sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongfeng; Zhang, Chaosheng; Rong, Hongwei; Zheng, Guilin; Zhao, Limin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was studied in a moving bed sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) by microelectrode measurements and by real-time PCR. In this system, the biofilm grew on polyurethane foam carriers used to treat municipal sewage at five DO concentrations (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 mg/L). The results indicated that the MBSBR exhibited good removal of chemical oxygen demand (92.43%) and nitrogen (83.73%) when DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L. Increasing the oxygen concentration in the reactor was inhibitory to denitrification. Microelectrode measurements showed that the thickness of oxygen penetration increased from 1.2 to 2.6 mm when the DO concentration (from 1.5 mg/L to 5.5 mg/L) in the system increased. Oxygen diffusion was not significantly limited by the boundary layer surrounding the carrier and had the largest slope when DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L. The real-time PCR analysis indicated that the amount of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria increased slowly as DO concentration increased. The proportions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, as a percentage of the total bacteria, were low with average values of 0.063% and 0.67%, respectively. When the DO concentration was 2.5 mg/L, oxygen diffusion was optimal and ensured the optimal bacterial community structure and activity; under these conditions, the MBSBR was efficient for total inorganic nitrogen removal. Changing the DO concentration could alter the aerobic zone and the bacterial community structure in the biofilm, directly influencing the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification activity in MBSBRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling biomass gasification in circulating fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qi

    reactions occur in gas phase. Each section was divided into a number of small cells, over which mass and energy balances were applied. Due to the high heating rate in circulating fluidized bed, the pyrolysis was considered instantaneous. A number of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were considered in the model. Mass transfer resistance was considered negligible since the reactions were under kinetic control due to good gas-solid mixing. The model is capable of predicting the bed temperature distribution along the gasifier, the concentration and distribution of each species in the vertical direction of the bed, the composition and lower heating value (LHV) of produced gas, the gasification efficiency, the overall carbon conversion and the produced gas production rate. A sensitivity analysis was performed to test its response to several gasifier operating conditions. The model sensitivity analysis showed that equivalence ratio (ER), bed temperature, fluidization velocity, biomass feed rate and moisture content had various effects on the gasifier performance. However, the model was more sensitive to variations in ER and bed temperature. The model was validated using the experimental results obtained from the demonstration plant. The reactor was operated on rice husk at various ERs, fluidization velocities and biomass feed rates. The model gave reasonable predictions. The model was also validated by comparing the simulation results with two other different size CFBBGs using different biomass feedstock, and it was concluded that the developed model can be applied to other CFBBGs using various biomass fuels and having comparable reactor geometries. A thermodynamic model was developed under ASPEN PLUS environment. Using the approach of Gibbs free energy minimization, the model was essentially independent of kinetic parameters. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the model to test its response to operating variables, including ER and biomass moisture content. The results

  13. Evaluating Value Chain Development Programs: Assessing Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Equity Effects of Contract Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, R.

    2015-01-01

    Provides insights regarding the possible procedures for assessing welfare, efficiency, and equity effects of value chain development (VCD) programs, taking advantage of available analytical tools derived from impact analysis, transaction cost theory, and contract choice approaches and briefly

  14. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  15. Effect of granular activated carbon concentration on the content of organic matter and salt, influencing E. coli activity and survival in fluidized bed disinfection reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racyte, Justina; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Ribeiro, Ana F M M R; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-10-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is used in water treatment systems, typically to remove pollutants such as natural organic matter, volatile organic compounds, chlorine, taste, and odor. GAC is also used as a key component of a new technology that combines a fluidized bed reactor with radio frequency electric fields for disinfection. So far, the effects of GAC on bacteria in these fluidized bed reactors are unclear. This paper describes a systematic study of the physico-chemical changes in five microbial media compositions caused by different concentrations (23-350 g/L) of GAC, and the effects of these physico-chemical changes on the metabolic activity and survival of a model microorganism (Escherichia coli YMc10) in a fluidized bed reactor. The chemical adsorption taking place in suspensions with specific GAC changed nutritional, osmotic, and pH conditions in the investigated microbial media (LB, diluted LB, PBS, diluted PBS, and tap water), leading to a decay of the metabolic activity and survival of E. coli. Especially media that are poor in organic and mineral compounds (e.g., PBS) with suspended GAC showed a concentration decay of 3.5 Log CFU/mL E. coli after 6 h. Organic compounds depletion and severe pH variation were enhanced in the presence of higher GAC concentrations.

  16. Pig manure vermicompost as a component of a horticultural bedding plant medium: effects on physicochemical properties and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, R M; Edwards, C A; Subler, S; Metzger, J D

    2001-05-01

    This experiment was designed to characterize the physical, chemical and microbial properties of a standard commercial horticultural, greenhouse container, bedding plant medium (Metro-Mix 360), that had been substituted with a range of increasing concentrations (0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50% and 100% by volume) of pig manure vermicompost and to relate these properties to plant growth responses. The growth trials used tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), grown in the substituted media for 31 days under glasshouse conditions, with seedling growth recorded in 20 pots for each treatment. Half of the tomato seedlings (10 pots per treatment) were watered daily with liquid inorganic fertilizer while the other half received water only. The percentage total porosity, percentage air space, pH and ammonium concentrations of the container medium all decreased significantly, after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with equivalent amounts of pig manure vermicompost; whereas bulk density, container capacity, electrical conductivity, overall microbial activity and nitrate concentrations, all increased with increasing substitutions of vermicompost. The growth of tomato seedlings in the potting mixtures containing 100% pig manure vermicompost was reduced, possibly as a result of high soluble salt concentrations in the vermicompost and poorer porosity and aeration. The growth of tomato seedlings was greatest after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with between 25% and 50% pig manure vermicompost, with more growth occurring in combinations of pig manure vermicompost treated regularly with a liquid fertilizer solution than in those with no fertilizer applied. Some of the growth enhancement in these mixtures seemed to be related to the combined effects of improved porosity, aeration and water retention in the medium and the high nitrate content of the substrate, which produced an increased uptake of nitrogen by the plant tissues, resulting in increased plant growth. When the tomato seedlings were

  17. Experiences with Rice Grown on Permanent Raised Beds:Effect of Crop Establishment Techniques on Water Use, Productivity, Profitability and Soil Physical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.K.NARESH; S.S.TOMAR; Dipender KUMAR; Samsher; Purushottam; S.P.SINGH; Ashish DWIVEDI; Vineet KUMAR

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, conventional rice production technologies have been leading to deterioration of soil health and declining farm profitability due to high inputs of water and labor. Conservation agriculture (CA) based resource-conserving technologies i.e. zero-tillage (ZT), raised-bed planting and direct-seeded rice (DSR) have shown promise as alternatives to conventional production technologies to overcome these problems. Present study was undertaken during 2009-2012 to establish an understanding of how permanent raised bed cropping system could be practiced to save water at the field application level to improve water productivity and also have the capability to enhance productivity, profitability and soil physical quality. The results showed that among different crop establishment techniques, conventional-tilled puddle transplanted rice (CT-TPR) required 14%-25% more water than other techniques. Compared with the CT-TPR system, zero till direct-seeded rice (ZT-DSR) consumed 6%-10%less water with almost equal system productivity and demonstrated higher water productivity. Wide raised beds saved about 15%-24% water and grain yield decrease of about 8%. Direct-seeded rice after ZT or reduced tillage or on unpuddled soil provided more net income than CT-TPR. The CT-TPR system had higher bulk density and penetration resistance due to compaction caused by the repeated wet tillage in rice. The steady-state infiltration rate and soil aggregation (> 0.25 mm) were higher under permanent beds and ZT and lower in the CT-TPR system. Under CT-TPR, soil aggregation was static across seasons, whereas it improved under no-till and permanent beds. Similarly, mean weight diameter of aggregates was higher under ZT and permanent beds and increased over time. The study reveals that to sustain the rice productivity, CA-based planting techniques can be more viable options. However, the long-term effects of these alternative technologies need to be studied under varying agro-ecologies in

  18. Effects of weir height and reservoir widening on sediment continuity at run-of-river hydropower plants in gravel bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Christine; Schobesberger, Johannes; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-08-01

    This study conducted scaled physical model tests of a run-of-river hydropower plant (RoR). The physical model represented an idealized gravel bed river with a width of 20 m, a slope of 0.005, a mean annual flow of 15 m3 s- 1 and a 1-year flood flow of 80 m3 s- 1. Substrate and bed load had a characteristic grain size dm of 56 mm. The model scale was 1:20. The study was designed to test the effects of weir height and reservoir widening on sediment continuity and flushing efficiency at low-head RoR plants. Three different weir heights and two reservoir widths were investigated to assess and quantify their influence. As long as equilibrium conditions had not been established in the reservoir the flushing efficiency was low and thus the sediment continuity was not met. The experiments revealed that both parameters had a significant effect regarding the time needed to reach equilibrium conditions. The equilibrium slope that established was independent of weir height. Weir height, however, determined the starting point from where the equilibrium slope was built up. Accordingly, an increase in weir height will increase the reservoir bed levels by the same amount. A large weir height leads to huge sedimentation volumes and thus to a lack of sediments and to river bed erosion downstream of the hydropower plant. It could also considerably increase the flood risk at the head of the reservoir. This calls for regular maintenance work to re-establish flood safety. The experimental results suggest new concepts of low weir heights and cross sectional reservoir widths in the design of low-head RoR plants to facilitate frequent and efficient flushings, to enhance sediment continuity, and to reduce maintenance and operational costs.

  19. The influence of fibrous bed bulk density on the bed properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov-Sokolović Radmila M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean properties of seven different fibrous materials and the properties of their different bed bulk densities were investigated. The morphology of the surface, size and geometry were measured by optical microscopy. The bed porosity was measured by the weighing method. The experimental bed permeability, in a high range of bulk density, was calculated from the values of the sanitary water pressure drop at a constant temperature of 15°C, since the data followed Darcy's law. The Reynolds number for a fibrous bed was calculated using a relation from the literature. The Reynolds number was less than 1 for all ranges of fluid velocity. Three empirical relations for fibrous bed permeability were used and compared with the experimental data. It was determined that the empirical data depended on the fiber diameter and fraction of solid in the bed. The relative error linearly increased with increasing fiber diameter.

  20. Bed dynamics of gas-solid fluidized bed with rod promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a gas-solid fluidized bed with different rod promoters have been investigated in terms of bed expansion and fluctuation, minimum fluidization velocity and distributor-to-bed pressure drop ratio at minimum fluidization velocity. Experimentation based on statistical design has been carried out and model equations using factorial design of experiments have been developed for the above mentioned quantities for a promoted gas-solid fluidized bed. The model equations have been tested with additional experimental data. The system variables include four types of rod promoters of varying blockage volume, bed particles of four sizes and four initial static bed heights. A comparison between the predicted values of the output variables using the proposed model equation with their corresponding experimental ones shows fairly good agreement.

  1. Effect of Traditional smoking Method on Nutritive Values and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SH

    ancient times, smoking has been used to preserve fish products and improve their taste, aroma and colour. The ... It is against this background that this study aimed at .... The nutritional value of fish meat .... Fisheries Technical Paper, 329.

  2. The Effect of Values on System Development Project Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Holley, 1987:591) 91 Recall from the earlier discussion on the Fast value that valuing speed does not dictate a specific development timeline...petal got tangled in the deflated airbag .” (McCurdy, 2001:67) “The lander bounced at least 15 times up to 12 in high without airbag rupture...landing missions used complex engines to control the descent after several orbits. MPF went to a simple design of an inflatable airbag to protect the

  3. Quantification of patient migration in bed: catalyst to improve hospital bed design to reduce shear and friction forces and nurses' injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowski, Susan E; Davis, Kermit G; Wiggermann, Neal; Williamson, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    The study objective was to quantify the movement of hospital bed occupants relative to the bed in typical bed articulations. Movement of a patient in bed results in two common adverse events: (a) increase in shear and friction forces between the patient and bed, which are extrinsic pressure ulcer risk factors, and (b) musculoskeletal injuries to nurses, resulting from repositioning patients who have migrated down in bed. The study involved 12 participants who lay supine in three hospital beds, which were articulated to common positions. Body movement relative to the bed was quantified with the use of motion capture. Cumulative movement, net displacement, and torso compression (shoulder to trochanter distance) were calculated for different bed types and bed movements. Bed design and bed movement had a significant effect on most of the dependent variables. Bed design (e.g., type) influenced cumulative movement by up to 115%, net displacement by up to 70%, and torso compression by about 20%. Bed movement (e.g., knee elevation) reduced cumulative migration by up to 35%. The quantification of patient migration provides a metric for evaluating the interaction between body and bed surfaces. Overall, the measures were sensitive to design changes in bed frames, bed articulations, and mattress inflation. Documentation of the cumulative movement, net displacement, and torso compression provides hospital bed designers quantifiable measures for reducing migration and potentially shear and friction forces when designing bed frames, bed articulations, and mattresses. Optimization of these metrics may ultimately have an impact on patient and caregiver health.

  4. [Effect of hypodynamia on the hemomicrocirculatory bed of the triceps muscle and brachial fascia in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, M V; Shafikova, L F

    1984-10-01

    By means of amputation of the forearm (the place of the brachial musculus attachment is kept intact) in 30 male rats certain conditions are produced for decreasing force activity in the m. triceps brachii. Anatomical changes in structure and in distribution of links of the hemomicrocirculatory bed (HMCB) are followed in the medial head of the muscle and in the fascia covering it. Time of observations - 1-60 days. The sections of the muscles and some parts of the fascia are impregnated with silver nitrate solution. The greatest changes are observed to occur in the capillary-venular links of the HMCB during the interval of 1.14-4.5 days and are manifested as initial congestion of venous blood in these links. Later (4.5-15.3 and further 60 days) together with stable dilatation of all venous components of the blood bed certain qualitative changes take place in the arteriolar links of the HMCB.

  5. Effect of fouling on the capacity and breakthrough characteristics of a packed bed ion exchange chromatography column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sun Chau; Baldascini, Helen; Hearle, David C; Hoare, Mike; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the impact of fouling with yeast homogenate on capacity and breakthrough performance of an ion exchange packed bed column. Column performance was assessed by analysis of breakthrough curves obtained with BSA as a test protein. The overall impact of fouling on breakthrough performance depended heavily on the level of clarification of the feed stream. Challenging the column with particulate-free homogenate caused no change in column performance. Loading successive small volumes of poorly clarified homogenate, interspersed with frequent column salt washes, did not alter significantly the column capacity. By contrast, when the column was challenged with an equivalent cumulative volume of poorly clarified homogenate, dynamic binding capacity decreased significantly and changes in breakthrough curves suggested increased intraparticle and external mass transfer limitations. These changes were ascribed to deposition of solid particulates in void spaces in the bed and colloidal contaminants in the bead pores.

  6. Effect of change in patient′s bed angles on pain after coronary angiography according to vital signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Amin Younessi Heravi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most common and important diagnostic methods for the detection of heart diseases is coronary angiography. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum angle of the bed by using vital signals to optimize the patient′s position after the angiography. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (RCT on participants after angiography who were divided into five groups. The first group was placed routinely in a supine position. In the other groups, all of the patients were placed in bed by angle 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° upward. In each group, vital signals were measured that included blood pressure, percent of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate, and temperature. All of measured data compared with the pain score has been achieved from numerical pain scale. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics method, variance analysis, and post hoc tests in the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 16. Estimation of the relationship was done by MATLAB version 2011. The level of significance was considered to be 0.05. Results: In various groups, there was no significance difference in demographic variables such as gender, age, height, and weight. The mean of pain score, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate changed significantly (P 0.05. It showed linear changes between pain and systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, and heart rate changes. A dramatic reduction was also seen in systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, and also pain at an angle of 45 ° . Conclusion: This study showed that, 45 ° was the best angle of the bed to optimize the patient′s position after the procedure, based on his/her vital signs and pain score. Thus, in order to relive pain, this change in bed angle is advised to be planned by postangiography nurses in patients after coronary angiography.

  7. Displacement Damage Effects in Solar Cells: Mining Damage From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Walters, R. J.; Morton, T. L.; Messenger, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop an improved space solar cell radiation response analysis capability and to produce a computer modeling tool which implements the analysis. This was accomplished through analysis of solar cell flight data taken on the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed experiment. This effort specifically addresses issues related to rapid technological change in the area of solar cells for space applications in order to enhance system performance, decrease risk, and reduce cost for future missions.

  8. THE VALUE AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF UNAPPLIED INVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Sorin V. FÂNTÂNĂ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The accounting regulations, the guidelines for their application and other articles by accounting specialists argue that inventions created internally are not recognized as intangible assets. Only assets acquired separately can be measured reliably, based on the document justifying the purchase transaction. Other specialised papers show that it is difficult to establish the existence of this intangible asset and its credible cost. That is, it can give or calculate a value of the invention only if it can show the acceptable cost of achieving it. But all these works argue that the protection of inventions is profitable if it is the basis of a new business, if it promotes or protects the current activity. However, these papers elude - because it is uncomfortable - the situation where an invention created internally has a value only because it forecloses the market. It is curious that an invention has accounting value only when traded.

  9. Effect of Air Staging Ratios on the Burning Rate and Emissions in an Underfeed Fixed-Bed Biomass Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Regueiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work studies a small-scale biomass combustor (5–12 kW with an underfed fixed bed using low air staging ratios (15%–30%. This document focuses on the influence of the operative parameters on the combustion process, so gaseous emissions and the distribution and concentration of particulate matter have also been recorded. The facility shows good stability and test repeatability. For the studied airflow ranges, the results show that increasing the total airflow rate does not increase the overall air excess ratio because the burning rate is proportionally enhanced (with some slight differences that depend on the air staging ratio. Consequently, the heterogeneous reactions at the bed remain in the so-called oxygen-limited region, and thus the entire bed operates under sub-stoichiometric conditions with regards of the char content of the biomass. In addition, tests using only primary air (no staging may increase the fuel consumption, but in a highly incomplete way, approaching a gasification regime. Some measured burning rates are almost 40% higher than previous results obtained in batch combustors due to the fixed position of the ignition front. The recorded concentration of particulate matter varies between 15 and 75 mg/Nm3, with a main characteristic diameter between 50 and 100 nm.

  10. Effects of the updated national emission regulation in China on circulating fluidized bed boilers and the solutions to meet them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingji; Yang, Hairui; Wu, Yuxin; Lv, Junfu; Yue, Guangxi

    2013-06-18

    The advantage of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers in China is their ability to utilize low rank coal with low cost emission control. However, the new National Emission Regulation (NER) issued in early 2012 brings much more stringent challenges on the CFB industries, which also causes much attention from other countries. Based on the principle of a CFB boiler and previous operating experience, it is possible for the CFB boilers to meet the new NER and maintain the advantage of low cost emission control, while, more influences should be considered in their design and operation. To meet the requirement of the new NER, the fly ash collector should adopt a bag house or combination of electrostatic precipitator and bag filter to ensure dust emissions of less than 30 mg · Nm(-3). For SO2 emission control, the bed temperature should be strictly lower than 900 °C to maintain high reactivity and pores. The limestone particle size distribution should be ranged within a special scope to optimize the residence time and gas-solid reaction. At the same time, the injecting point should be optimized to ensure fast contact of lime with oxygen. In such conditions, the desulfurization efficiency could be increased more than 90%. For lower sulfur content fuels (bed temperature lower than 900 °C for fuels with low volatiles content (circulating ash, the efficiency of SNCR could reach as high as 70%. The Hg emission of CFB is very low for the new NER due to its innate property.

  11. Effect of particle shape of active pharmaceutical ingredients prepared by fluidized-bed jet-milling on cohesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaka, Tadashi; Sawaguchi, Kohta; Golman, Boris; Shinohara, Kunio

    2005-05-01

    Milling is a common procedure to improve bioavailability of many active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which typically have low solubility in water. But such micronization can yield an increase in the cohesiveness of particles. Although particle cohesiveness is desirable for tablet strength in the subsequent formulation process, increased particle cohesiveness can lead to operational difficulties in a milling equipment due to compaction of particles inside. In this article, the impact of milling via a fluidized-bed jet-mill on the cohesive strength and interparticle force was studied using Ethenzamide as a pharmaceutical model compound. As a result, the particle shape was found to affect both the tensile strength of powder bed and the interparticle cohesive force. A powder bed, having relatively high void fraction by direct tensile test, shows a positive correlation between the cohesive force and the particle sphericity, while powders with low void fraction by diametral compression test show a positive correlation between the cohesive force and the angularity of the particle.

  12. Mechanism for Increasing Effective Inputs in Urban Agriculture through Industrial Value Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Xiao-lan

    2012-01-01

    This paper firstly introduces the value chain management thought, current situations of utilization, and connotation of mechanism for increasing effective inputs in urban agriculture through industrial value chain. On the basis of basic idea of value chain management, this paper is to explore the mechanism for increasing effective inputs in urban agriculture through the value chain of urban agriculture linking with other industries.

  13. The effect of ocean acidification on carbon storage and sequestration in seagrass beds; a global and UK context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Samantha L; Beaumont, Nicola J

    2014-09-15

    Ocean acidification will have many negative consequences for marine organisms and ecosystems, leading to a decline in many ecosystem services provided by the marine environment. This study reviews the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on seagrasses, assessing how this may affect their capacity to sequester carbon in the future and providing an economic valuation of these changes. If ocean acidification leads to a significant increase in above- and below-ground biomass, the capacity of seagrass to sequester carbon will be significantly increased. The associated value of this increase in sequestration capacity is approximately £500 and 600 billion globally between 2010 and 2100. A proportionally similar increase in carbon sequestration value was found for the UK. This study highlights one of the few positive stories for ocean acidification and underlines that sustainable management of seagrasses is critical to avoid their continued degradation and loss of carbon sequestration capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Simulated Level Loading of Supply and Demand for Beds in a Tertiary Care Children's Hospital Reduces Overall Bed Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Sandeep; Belpanno, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Anticipating throughput and allocating resources effectively in children's hospitals have unique challenges relative to adult inpatient centers. The seasonal and daily variation can be difficult to anticipate in terms of impact and creating plans for adequate preparation. Discrete event simulation methodology can be helpful in determining appropriate allocation of resources and has been increasingly appropriated in health care from industry. A representative sample set was abstracted from the Cohen Children's Medical Center census tracking system to describe the present state. A larger data set was used to determine the appropriate level load. The total work performed each hour from 8 AM to 8 PM was evaluated against the level load plan of 11.5%. During the initial hours of the working period when the total work was low, more discharges were added. For each discharge added, an equal quantity of discharges was subtracted from the later hours of the day to bring the total work below 11.5% for each hour. Once the simulated state discharges were determined, a new aggregate bed supply line was created. These values were then added to the original visualization to show improvement. Our analysis suggests that a large part of the discharge/transfer activity and bed demand activity occurs in the pediatric intensive care unit in a roughly 4- to 5-hour window. Our simulation analysis suggests that level loading of this resource-intensive activity period has a potential to reduce bed occupancy, increase bed availability in peak bed demand times, and improve efficiency and throughput throughout the hospital. Discrete event simulation can be an effective tool for pediatric inpatient centers to determine appropriate allocation of resources to enhance patient safety and throughput without significant, costly expansion of bed capacity.

  15. Udder health in a Danish compost bedded pack barn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennesen, Line; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt

    Besides welfare advantages of the compost bedded pack system (CBP) there could be a negative effect of the organic bedding on udder health. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of a CBP on udder health compared to a free stall system (FS) with sand bedded cubicles. Within the same Danish...

  16. Long Duration Head Down Tilt Bed Rest and Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    We have recently completed a long duration head down tilt bed rest (HDBR) study in which we performed structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations in a spaceflight analog environment. We are also collecting the same measures in crewmembers prior to and following a six month International Space Station mission. We will present data demonstrating that bed rest resulted in functional mobility and balance deterioration with recovery post-HDBR. We observed numerous changes in brain structure, function, and connectivity relative to a control group which were associated with pre to post bed rest changes in sensorimotor function. For example, gray matter volume (GMv) increased in posterior parietal areas and decreased in frontal regions. GMv increases largely overlapped with fluid decreases and vice versa. Larger increases in precentral gyrus (M1)/ postcentral gyrus (S1+2) GMv and fluid decreases were associated with smaller balance decrements. Vestibular activation in the bilateral insular cortex increased with bed rest and subsequently recovered. Larger increases in vestibular activation in multiple brain regions were associated with greater decrements in balance and mobility. We found connectivity increases between left M1 with right S1+2 and the superior parietal lobule, and right vestibular cortex with the cerebellum. Decreases were observed between right Lobule VIII with right S1+2 and the supramarginal gyrus, right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) with occipital regions, and the right superior posterior fissure with right Crus I and II. Connectivity strength between left M1 and right S1+2/superior parietal lobule increased the most in individuals that exhibited the least balance impairments. In sum, we observed HDBR-related changes in measures of brain structure, function, and network connectivity, which correlated with indices of sensorimotor

  17. Credit Rationing Effects of Credit Value-at-Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Slijkerman; D.J.C. Smant (David); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBanks provide risky loans to firms which have superior information regarding the quality of their projects. Due to asymmetric information the banks face the risk of adverse selection. Credit Value-at-Risk (CVaR) regulation counters the problem of low quality, i.e. high risk, loans and

  18. Birth Order Effects on Holland Type, Occupational Interests, and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.; Leong, Frederick T. L.; Grotti, Shannon D.; Goh, David; Gaylor, Michael

    This investigation examined in two different samples, whether only children differ significantly from firstborn and later-born children in terms of their vocational personality type as described in Holland's RIASEC model, occupational interests, and work values. Literature on family configuration and vocational behavior is reviewed, and current…

  19. On different regime relations between bed load transport and bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Duan, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load transport is determined by the effective part of the total shear stress subtracting the form drag that arises from bed topography. Wang et al. (2004) quantified the overall topographic roughness of the channel bed with the parameter Sp and claimed that the increasing Sp corresponds with increasing flow resistance and decreasing bed load transport rate due to increasing form drag and decreasing skin friction. However, the flume experiments for non-uniform sediment transport on steep slope at the University of Arizona show opposite results that bed load transport increases with Sp. We investigate the physical reason of the contrasting results for the full understanding of the different regimes between bed load transport and bed topography. We develop the energy conveyance equation for water flow and bed load transport and apply it to the development of the equilibrium relation between bed load transport and energy dissipation due to the form drag. The energy theory for bed load transport shows that since our flume experiments achieved the equilibrium transport state with water and sediment circulating supplying, the bed topography Sp is determined by the flow and sediment grain size, and the bed load transport is positively related to the energy dissipation rate which is thus positively related to Sp. However, in the field experiment of Wang et al. (2004), at first, the referenced Sp is determined by the most recent significant flood whereas the bed load transport is always below the transport capacity with insufficient sediment supply. After one-time sediment feed, the bed load transport rapidly varies from ephemeral full capacity state to sediment starving state. In this process, the removal of relative fine sediment results in the rapid increment of Sp from the instant equilibrium state to the referenced Sp whereas the coarsen bed leads to decrement of bed load transport. Eventually, the sediment starving state results in the increasing Sp and decreasing

  20. [Radiation transformation mechanism in a photocatalytic reactor of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hong; Luo, Wei-nan; Yao, Jie; Chen, Ping; Cai, Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    A novel three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor was established and the radiation transformation in which was investigated. The experimental results indicate that with the interaction of gas and solid (gas flux > 0.3m3/h), the radiation transformation in the reactor along radial direction conforms to a definite exponential function, which agrees to formula Rose about the rules of light intensity distribution through evenly suspended particles. The value of radiation energy is affected by the initial light intensity, the concentration of photocatalyst and the thickness of liquid layer. The aerated gas amount only influence the state of the fluidized bed and has little effect on the distribution of light intensity along radical direction. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B indicate that the efficiency of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed is much higher than slurry bed. The optimal catalyst concentration of this system is 10 - 12g/L.

  1. Engineering Value-Effective Healthcare Solutions: A Systems Design Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patou, François; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Our modern healthcare systems commonly face an important dilemma. While they depend on innovation to provide continuously greater healthcare value, they also struggle financially with the burden of adopting a continuous flow of new products and services. Although several disruptive healthcare...... models, i.e. decentralised, personalised, pervasive, connected, and stratified, promise to relieve some of this tension, they do not per se guarantee optimal value generation. We argue that systems thinking and engineering design can remedy this limitation. We support this claim by making the case...... of Design for Evolvability and by elaborating on two examples: MRI systems and Point-of-Care in-vitro diagnostics solutions. We specifically argue that Design for Evolvability can realign the agendas of various healthcare stakeholders, serving both individual and national interests. We finally acknowledge...

  2. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, Daniel I; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-12-09

    The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH₄ emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH₄ emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH₄ emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH₄ emissions.

  3. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel I. Massé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss in dairy slurry on fugitive CH4 emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29% the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS, fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH4 emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05 for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH4 emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05 in fugitive CH4 emissions.

  4. Assessing urban forest effects and values, Scranton's urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Robert E. III Hoehn; Daniel E. Crane; Jack C. Stevens; Vincent. Cotrone

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of trees in the urbanized portion of Scranton, PA, reveals that this area has about 1.2 million trees with canopies that cover 22.0 percent of the area. The most common tree species are red maple, gray birch, black cherry, northern red oak, and quaking aspen. Scranton's urban forest currently store about 93,300 tons of carbon valued at $1.9 million. In...

  5. Fluidized bed calciner apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Thomas J.; Klem, Jr., Michael J.; Cash, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

  6. Modelling the bed characteristics in fluidised-beds for top-spray coating processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike Vanderroost; Frederik Ronsse; Koen Dewettinck; Jan G.Pieters

    2012-01-01

    A particle sub-model describing the bed characteristics of a bubbling fluidised bed is presented.Atomisation air,applied at high pressures via a nozzle positioned above the bed for s pray formation,is incorporated in the model since its presence has a profound influence on the bed characteristics,though the spray itself is not yet considered.A particle sub-model is developed using well-known empirical relations for particle drag force,bubble growth and velocity and particle distribution above the fluidised-bed surface.Simple but effective assumptions and abstractions were made concerning bubble distribution,particle ejection at the bed surface and the behaviour of atomisation air flow upon impacting the surface of a bubbling fluidised bed.The model was shown to be capable of predicting the fluidised bed characteristics in terms of bed heights,voidage distributions and solids volume fractions with good accuracy in less than 5 min of calculation time on a regular desktop PC.It is therefore suitable for incorporation into general process control models aimed at dynamic control for process efficiency and product quality in top-spray fluidised bed coating processes.

  7. Credit Rationing Effects of Credit Value-at-Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Slijkerman, J.F.; Smant, David; Vries, Casper

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBanks provide risky loans to firms which have superior information regarding the quality of their projects. Due to asymmetric information the banks face the risk of adverse selection. Credit Value-at-Risk (CVaR) regulation counters the problem of low quality, i.e. high risk, loans and therefore reduces the risk of the bank loan portfolio. However, CVaR regulation distorts the operation of credit markets. We show that a binding CVaR constraint introduces credit rationing and lowers...

  8. Valuing a More Rigorous Review of Formative Assessment's Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apthorp, Helen; Klute, Mary; Petrites, Tony; Harlacher, Jason; Real, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Prior reviews of evidence for the impact of formative assessment on student achievement suggest widely different estimates of formative assessment's effectiveness, ranging from 0.40 and 0.70 standard deviations in one review. The purpose of this study is to describe variability in the effectiveness of formative assessment for promoting student…

  9. Effect of Process and Post-Process Conditions on the Mechanical Properties of an A357 Alloy Produced via Laser Powder Bed Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberta Aversa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A357 samples were realized by laser powder bed fusion (LPBF on building platforms heated up to different temperatures. The effect of the preheating temperature and of the post processing heat treatment on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the samples was studied. It was demonstrated that building platform heating can act as an in situ ageing heat treatment following the fast cooling that arises during laser scanning. A 17% higher ultimate tensile strength was achieved by the selection of the optimum building platform temperature. Moreover, the possibility to further increase the mechanical properties by means of a direct ageing heat treatment was investigated.

  10. Cofiring of difficult fuels: The effect of Ca-based sorbents on the gas chemistry in fluidised bed combustion; Kalsiumpohjaisten lisaeaineiden vaikutus leijukerrospolton kaasukemiaan vaikeiden polttoaineiden sekapoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeijaelae, M.; Partanen, J.; Fabritius, M.; Elo, T.; Virta, A.K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish the effects of Ca-based sorbents on sulphur, halogen and alkaline chemistry in fluidised bed combustion of difficult fuels, and to find out any restrictions on the use of these sorbents. The aim is to acquire sufficient knowledge to ensure the operational reliability of power plants and to minimise the emissions and costs of flue gas cleaning. The results enable the owner to anticipate necessary changes associated with slagging, fouling and emission control in the existing power plants, when there are plans to increase the range of fuels used. (orig.)

  11. Paediatric burn unit in Portugal: Beds needed using a bed-day approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João V; Viana, João; Amarante, José; Freitas, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high burden of children with burns, there is not a paediatric burn unit (PBU) in Portugal. We aimed to estimate the Portuguese health care providing needs on paediatric burns. We performed a nation-wide retrospective study, between 2009 and 2013, among less than 16 years-old inpatients with burns that met the transfer criteria to a burn unit in Portugal. A bed-day approach was used, targeting an occupancy rate of 70-75%, and possible locations were studied. The primary outcome was the number of beds needed, and secondary outcomes were the overload and revenue for each possible number of beds in a PBU. A total of 1155 children met the transfer criteria to a burn unit, representing a total of 17,371 bed-days. Occupancy rates of 11-bed, 12-bed, 13-bed and 14-bed PBU were, respectively, 79.7%, 75.3%, 71.0% and 66.8%. The 13-bed PBU scenario would represent an overload of 523 bed-days, revenue of more than 5 million Euros and a ratio of 1 PBU bed per 123,409 children. Using a groundbreaking approach, the optimal number of PBU beds needed in Portugal is 13. However, as half of the patients who met burn transfer criteria are not transferred, this bed number might be overestimated if this pattern maintains, despite the underestimation with our method approach. If a PBU is to be created the preferable location is Porto. Cost-effectiveness studies should be performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Materialistic Values among Chinese Adolescents: Effects of Parental Rejection and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinyuan; Kou, Yu; Yang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: Materialistic values among today's adolescents have been a concern around the world, yet few studies concerning Chinese adolescents' materialistic values have been conducted. Additionally, the joint effects of parental rejection and self-esteem on materialistic values remain unclear. Objective: We examined materialistic values in a…

  13. Materialistic Values among Chinese Adolescents: Effects of Parental Rejection and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinyuan; Kou, Yu; Yang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: Materialistic values among today's adolescents have been a concern around the world, yet few studies concerning Chinese adolescents' materialistic values have been conducted. Additionally, the joint effects of parental rejection and self-esteem on materialistic values remain unclear. Objective: We examined materialistic values in a…

  14. The average value inequality in sequential effect algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Shen

    2009-01-01

    A sequential effect algebra $(E,0,1, \\oplus, \\circ)$ is an effect algebra on which a sequential product $\\circ$ with certain physics properties is defined, in particular, sequential effect algebra is an important model for studying quantum measurement theory. In 2005, Gudder asked the following problem: If $a, b\\in (E,0,1,\\oplus, \\circ)$ and $a\\bot b$ and $a\\circ b\\bot a\\circ b$, is it the case that $2(a\\circ b)\\leq a^2\\oplus b^2$ ? In this paper, we construct an example to answer the problem negatively.

  15. Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaylor, Mary Beth; Wenning, Paul; Eddy, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that the resurgence of bed bugs in the U.S. has occurred at an alarming rate. Assumptions have been made that socioeconomic status is not associated with the prevalence of bed bug infestations. Little information is available at the local level, however, about the prevalence of bed bugs in private homes. The authors' pilot study aimed to identify prevalence, knowledge, and concern about bed bugs in one higher income village in Ohio utilizing survey methodology. Responses from 96 individuals who completed the Prevalence, Knowledge, and Concern About Bed Bugs survey were utilized for analysis. The majority of the sample respondents were white and 95% reported that they owned their residence. Only 6% knew someone with bed bugs. Additionally, 52% reported they were somewhat concerned about bed bugs. About 46% reported that they had changed their behavior. For a higher income area, the prevalence was dissimilar to the rate reported in the general public (about 20%). This suggests that bed bugs may be an environmental issue effecting low-income populations disproportionately. Further research is needed in areas of differing socioeconomic levels.

  16. Effects of encouraged water drinking on thermoregulatory responses after 20 days of head-down bed rest in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Kanikowska, Dominika; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2009-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that encouraged water drinking according to urine output for 20 days could ameliorate impaired thermoregulatory function under microgravity conditions. Twelve healthy men, aged 24 ± 1.5 years (mean ± SE), underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 20 days. During bed rest, subjects were encouraged to drink the same amount of water as the 24-h urine output volume of the previous day. A heat exposure test consisting of water immersion up to the knees at 42°C for 45 min after a 10 min rest (baseline) in the sitting position was performed 2 days before the 20-day HDBR (PRE), and 2 days after the 20-day HDBR (POST). Core temperature (tympanic), skin temperature, skin blood flow and sweat rate were recorded continuously. We found that the -6° HDBR did not increase the threshold temperature for onset of sweating under the encouraged water drinking regime. We conclude that encouraged water drinking could prevent impaired thermoregulatory responses after HDBR.

  17. Effects of endurance training on endocrine response to physical exercise after 5 days of bed rest in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Kvetnanský, Richard; Hamar, Dusan; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    The study was designed to evaluate how a bout of endurance training (ET) influences the endocrine response after head-down bed rest (HDBR). Eleven healthy males completed the study, which consisted of a 6-wk ET followed by 5 days of -6 degrees head-down HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pretraining maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) was performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO(2max) by 13%. The response of norepinephrine was attenuated after ET and exaggerated after HDBR (P < 0.001). The differences in epinephrine responses were not statistically significant. The responses of cortisol and plasma renin activity (PRA) were unchanged after ET and were enhanced after HDBR (P < 0.001). The response of growth hormone after HDBR was reduced (P < 0.05). Only the change in cortisol response was associated with the increment of VO(2max) after ET (r = 0.68, P < 0.01). Endurance training failed to completely prevent changes in endocrine responses seen after HDBR. Improvement of physical fitness was associated with an enhancement of the cortisol response to exercise following the period of bed rest.

  18. Biogeomorphological effects of leaf accumulations in stepped-bed channels: Exploratory study, Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mountains, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Přibyla Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stepped-bed system, with a step-like longitudinal profile, is typical morphology in steep headwater streams. These systems are created by a series of coarse sediments or instream wood (steps with supercritical flows interspaced with finer material (forming pools with subcritical flows. In the case of well-developed steps and pools, the resulting channel-reach morphology is referred to as “step-pool” morphology. In this study, we identify a previously undescribed type of step-pool formation, the “foliaged step-pool”, in the high-gradient Stoligy Stream of the Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mountains. The defining feature of this formation is the significant presence of leaves in the step structure. The geometry of the steps and pools was measured and the parameters that characterise the distribution, amount and function of leaves acting in these areas were defined. Statistical results showed differences between non-foliaged and foliaged step-pool formations, in which the latter showed a significant increase in storage level, influencing the channel’s hydrodynamics. Particle-size analyses demonstrated that foliaged step-pool formations had finer sediment in the pools, which indicates that there are differences in sediment transport processes between foliaged and non-foliaged formations. These results offer new insights into stepped-bed and step-pool morphology, providing directions for further research on small streams in deciduous forested regions.

  19. The effects of muscle exercise and bed rest on [{sup 18}F]methylcholine PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roef, Mark; Vogel, Wouter V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    This study evaluated the impact of limited and strenuous physical exercise on [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in muscle. Ten consecutive patients participated, three of whom had strict bed rest, three were allowed to walk around and four performed strenuous single arm exercise by lifting a 7.5-kg weight. [{sup 18}F]Methylcholine uptake was measured in the biceps and gluteus muscles on both sides. Strenuous exercise resulted in a 202% increase in [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in the activated biceps muscle as well as a 112% increase in muscle groups used to retain body position. This resulted in asymmetrical images that were visually less easy to interpret. In walking patients there was a more limited increase in biceps (45%) and gluteus (74%) muscle uptake, without visually recognizable differences. Strenuous exercise may result in a considerable increase in [{sup 18}F]methylcholine uptake in muscle and should be avoided prior to imaging. Strict bed rest does not seem to be required. Tracer injection while resting on the scanner remains a safe approach. (orig.)

  20. Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The bed bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on bed bug management, we reviewed bed bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. In addition, we conducted telephone interviews to 68 pest control companies within two cities in March 2011. Two species of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F. are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide “Four-Pest Elimination” campaigns (bed bugs being one of the targeted pests were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of bed bug infestations in most communities. Commonly used bed bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of bed bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts. Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000–2010, there have only been sporadic new infestations reported in recent years. During 1999–2009, all documented bed bug infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons, hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong experienced significantly higher number of bed bug infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current bed bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates. There have not been any studies or reports on bed bug insecticide

  1. The effects of fabric for sleepwear and bedding on sleep at ambient temperatures of 17°C and 22°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirim Shin,1 Mark Halaki,1 Paul Swan,2 Angus Ireland,2 Chin Moi Chow1 1Exercise, Health and Performance Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 2Australian Wool Innovation Limited, The Woolmark Company, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The fibers used in clothing and bedding have different thermal properties. This study aimed to investigate the influences of textile fabrics on sleep under different ambient temperature (Ta conditions. Seventeen healthy young participants (ten males underwent nine nights of polysomnography testing including an adaptation night. Participants were randomized to each of the three binary factors: sleepwear (cotton vs wool, bedding (polyester vs wool, and Ta (17°C vs 22°C with relative humidity set at 60%. Skin temperature (Tsk and core temperature (Tc were monitored throughout the sleep period. Sleep onset latency (SOL was significantly shortened when sleeping in wool with trends of increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency compared to cotton sleepwear. At 17°C, the proportion of sleep stages 1 (%N1 and 3 (%N3 and rapid eye movement sleep was higher, but %N2 was lower than at 22°C. Interaction effects (sleepwear × Ta showed a significantly shorter SOL for wool than cotton at 17°C but lower %N3 for wool than cotton at 22°C. A significantly lower %N2 but higher %N3 was observed for wool at 17°C than at 22°C. There was no bedding effect on sleep. Several temperature variables predicted the sleep findings in a stepwise multiple regression analysis and explained 67.8% of the variance in SOL and to a lesser degree the %N2 and %N3. These findings suggest that sleepwear played a contributory role to sleep outcomes and participants slept better at 17°C than at 22°C.Keywords: cotton, polyester, wool, polysomnography, skin temperature, core body temperature

  2. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  3. Fluidization of potato starch in a stirred vibrating fluidized bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J M; Stamhuis, Eize; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1996-01-01

    A novel gas-solid reactor for cohesive C-powders such as potato starch is introduced, designed and characterized, the so-called stirred vibrating fluidized bed. The effects of a sinusoidal vibration of the gas distributor and/or stirring of the bed are investigated. The fluidization index, bed expan

  4. Fluidization of potato starch in a stirred vibrating fluidized bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J M; Stamhuis, Eize; Beenackers, A.A C M

    A novel gas-solid reactor for cohesive C-powders such as potato starch is introduced, designed and characterized, the so-called stirred vibrating fluidized bed. The effects of a sinusoidal vibration of the gas distributor and/or stirring of the bed are investigated. The fluidization index, bed

  5. Peering inside the granular bed: illuminating feedbacks between bed-load transport and bed-structure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssais, M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The threshold of motion is perhaps the most important quantity to determine for understanding rates of bed load transport, however it is a moving target. Decades of research show that it changes in space and in time within a river, and is highly variable among different systems; however, these differences are not mechanistically understood. Recent researchers have proposed that the critical Shields stress is strongly dependent on the local configuration of the sediment bed [Frey and Church, 2011]. Critical Shields stress has been observed to change following sediment-transporting flood events in natural rivers [e.g., Turowski et al., 2011], while small-scale laboratory experiments have produced declining bed load transport rates associated with slow bed compaction [Charru et al., 2004]. However, no direct measurements have been made of the evolving bed structure under bed load transport, so the connection between granular controls and the threshold of motion remains uncertain. A perspective we adopt is that granular effects determine the critical Shields stress, while the fluid supplies a distribution of driving stresses. In order to isolate the granular effect, we undertake laminar bed load transport experiments using plastic beads sheared by a viscous oil in a small, annular flume. The fluid and beads are refractive index matched, and the fluid impregnated with a fluorescing powder. When illuminated with a planar laser sheet, we are able to image slices of the granular bed while also tracking the overlying sediment transport. We present the first results showing how bed load transport influences granular packing, and how changes in packing influence the threshold of motion to feed back on bed load transport rates. This effect may account for much of the variability observed in the threshold of motion in natural streams, and by extension offers a plausible explanation for hysteresis in bed load transport rates observed during floods. Charru, F., H. Mouilleron, and

  6. Higher Inpatient Medical Surgical Bed Occupancy Extends Admitted Patients’ Stay

    OpenAIRE

    Krall, Scott P.; O'Connor, Robert E.; Maercks, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effect that increased medical surgical (med/surg) bed occupancy has on the time interval from admission order to arrival in the bed for the patients admitted from the emergency department (ED). Methods: This retrospective observational study compares the total hospital bed occupancy rate and the medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy rate to daily averages for the time interval from admission order (patient posting for admission) to the patient’s arrival in...

  7. Control of the Bed Temperature of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler by using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYGUN, H.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Circulating fluidized bed boilers are increasingly used in the power generation due to their higher combustion efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Such boilers require an effective control of the bed temperature, because it influences the boiler combustion efficiency and the rate of harmful emissions. A Particle-Swarm-Optimization-Proportional-Integrative-Derivative (PSO-PID controller for the bed temperature of a circulating fluidized bed boiler is presented. In order to prove the capability of the proposed controller, its performances are compared at different boiler loads with those of a Fuzzy Logic (FL controller. The simulation results demonstrate some advantages of the proposed controller.

  8. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas [Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, 75169, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min{sup -1}). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min{sup -1}. Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  9. Plasma-Augmented Fluidized Bed Gasification of Sub-bituminous Coal in CO2-O2 Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelievre, C.; Pickles, C. A.; Hultgren, S.

    2016-01-01

    The gasification of a sub-bituminous coal using CO2-O2 gas mixtures was studied in a plasma-augmented fluidized bed gasifier. Firstly, the coal was chemically characterized and the gasification process was examined using Thermogravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis (TGA/DTA) in CO2, O2 and at a CO2 to O2 ratio of 3 to 1. Secondly, the equilibrium gas compositions were obtained using the Gibbs free energy minimization method (HSC Chemistry®7). Thirdly, gasification tests were performed in a plasma-augmented fluidized bed and the off-gas temperatures and compositions were determined. Finally, for comparison purposes, control tests were conducted using a conventional fluidized bed coal gasifier and these results were compared to those achieved in the plasma-augmented fluidized bed gasifier. The effects of bed temperature and CO2 to O2 ratio were studied. For both gasifiers, at a given bed temperature, the off-gas compositions were in general agreement with the equilibrium values. Also, for both gasifiers, an experimental CO2 to O2 ratio of about 3 to 1 resulted in the highest syngas grade (%CO + %H2). Both higher off-gas temperatures and syngas grades could be achieved in the plasma-augmented gasifier, in comparison to the conventional gasifier. These differences were attributed to the higher bed temperatures in the plasma-augmented fluidized bed gasifier.

  10. Bound values for Hall conductivity of heterogeneous medium under quantum Hall effect conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V E Arkhincheev

    2008-02-01

    Bound values for Hall conductivity under quantum Hall effect (QHE) conditions in inhomogeneous medium has been studied. It is shown that bound values for Hall conductivity differ from bound values for metallic conductivity. This is due to the unusual character of current percolation under quantum Hall effect conditions.

  11. Managing Effective Organization: Public Administration and the Competing Values Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ROHRBAUGH

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As we begin to develop the curriculum of public administration for the next century, one fundamental question remains unanswered. By what standards do we judge the effectiveness of government agencies? Our students will be leading some of the most important organizations in their countries, if not in the world. Our charge is to prepare them for distinguished management careers in which through thoughtful redesign they will be responsible for the creation of far better organizational structures and processes than existed in this decade or the last. To design curriculum appropriate to this challenge, we must be guided by a better understanding of effective and ineffective performance in the public sector.

  12. Values, Norms, and Peer Effects on Weight Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Peng; Gwozdz, Wencke; Reisch, Lucia A.

    2017-01-01

    This study uses data from the European Social Survey in order to test the Prinstein-Dodge hypothesis that posits that peer effects may be larger in collectivistic than in individualistic societies. When defining individualism and collectivism at the country level, our results show that peer effec...

  13. Quality Teaching and Values Education: Coalescing for Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovat, Terence; Clement, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Awareness of the potential of quality teaching (or teacher excellence in content, knowledge and pedagogy) to impact upon student achievement is an outcome of recent school-effectiveness research. This research has extended the understanding of the conception of "teacher" beyond surface factual learning to that of induction into learning…

  14. Electrodialytic treatment for metal removal from sewage sludge ash from fluidized bed combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazos, Marta; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Sewage sludge contains several potentially hazardous compounds such as heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, etc. However, elements with high agricultural value (P, K or Ca) are also present. During the last years, the fluidized bed sludge combustor (FBSC) is considered an effective and novel alternative...

  15. The effect of comparative effectiveness research on drug development innovation: a 360° value appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle JJ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available John J DoyleQuintiles, NY, USAAbstract: The drug development process is in dire need of transformation. Even after achieving regulatory approval, pharmaceutical companies are increasingly seeing their products subjected to health technology assessments (HTAs by public and private payers. The cornerstone of HTA value appraisal, and thus reimbursability, is comparative effectiveness research (CER, a ‘real-world’ comparison of a new product with the existing standard of care. Burgeoning demand for CER will fundamentally transform drug development by forcing biopharmaceutical manufacturers to view drug innovation from a holistic, 360° perspective. Specifically, drug and device developers must alter their existing approach to R&D by: adapting experimental research design methods to address multiple stakeholder demands; demonstrating real-world value through a suite of post-market observational research methods; and creating a transparent CER evaluation protocol based on standard principles. In the long-term, CER is forecast to propel innovation by focusing R&D on products that deliver real-world value to multiple customers and market stakeholders.Keywords: comparative effectiveness research, comparative effectiveness balance sheet, health technology assessment, large simple trial, moderator, observational studies, patient randomized clinical trial, registry, ‘real-world’ value

  16. Ultra high temperature particle bed reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, Otto; Ludewig, Hans; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.

    1990-01-01

    A direct nuclear propulsion engine which could be used for a mission to Mars is designed. The main features of this reactor design are high values for I(sub sp) and very efficient cooling. This particle bed reactor consists of 37 cylindrical fuel elements embedded in a cylinder of beryllium which acts as a moderator and reflector. The fuel consists of a packed bed of spherical fissionable fuel particles. Gaseous H2 passes over the fuel bed, removes the heat, and is exhausted out of the rocket. The design was found to be neutronically critical and to have tolerable heating rates. Therefore, this particle bed reactor design is suitable as a propulsion unit for this mission.

  17. Investigation on side-spray fluidized bed granulation with swirling airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Poh Mun; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2013-03-01

    Top-spray fluidized bed granulation with axial fluidization airflow from the bottom of the granulator is well-established in the pharmaceutical industry. The application of swirling airflow for fluidized bed granulation was more recently introduced. This study examined the effects of various process parameters on the granules produced by side-spray fluidized bed with swirling airflow using the central composite and Box-Behnken design of experiment. Influence of the amount of binder solution, spray rate, and distance between spray nozzle and powder bed were initially studied to establish operationally viable values for these parameters. This was followed by an in-depth investigation on the effects of inlet airflow rate, atomizing air pressure and distance between spray nozzle and powder bed on granule properties. It was found that the amount of binder solution had a positive correlation with granule size and percentage of lumps but a negative correlation with size distribution and Hausner ratio of the granules. Binder solution spray rate was also found to affect the granules size. High drug content uniformity was observed in all the batches of granules produced. Both inlet airflow rate and atomizing air pressure were found to correlate negatively with granule size and percentage of lumps but correlate positively with the size distribution of the granule produced. Percentage of fines was found to be significantly affected by inlet airflow rate. Distance between spray nozzle and powder bed generally affected the percentage of lumps.

  18. Effects of neural androgen receptor disruption on aggressive behavior, arginine vasopressin and galanin systems in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis and lateral septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Bolborea, Matei; Monin, Marion; Picot, Marie; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the androgen receptor (AR) in the nervous system in the regulation of aggressive behavior and arginine vasopressin and galanin systems by testosterone. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking AR gene in the nervous system, backcrossed onto the C57BL/6J strain. Adult males were gonadectomized and supplemented with similar amounts of testosterone. When tested on two consecutive days in the resident intruder paradigm, fewer males of the mutant group exhibited aggressive behavior compared to their control littermates. In addition, a high latency to the first offensive attack was observed for the few animals that exhibited fighting behavior. This alteration was associated with a normal anogenital chemoinvestigation of intruder males. In olfactory discrimination tasks, sexual experience enhanced preference towards female-soiled bedding rather than male-soiled bedding and estrus females rather than intact males, regardless of genotype. This indicated that the behavioral alteration induced by neural AR mutation occurs in brain areas located downstream from the olfactory bulb. Quantification of the sexually dimorphic cell populations expressing preprovasopressin and galanin mRNAs in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) and vasopressin-neurophysin 2 and galanin immunoreactivity in the lateral septum showed no significant differences between the two genotypes. The present findings indicate that the neural AR is required in the expression of aggressive behavior but not in the sexual differentiation of AVP and galanin cell number in the BNST and fiber immunoreactivity in the lateral septum. They also suggest that AR in the nervous system could mediate activational effects of testosterone in the regulation of aggressive behavior during adulthood.

  19. [Comparison of PAHs distribution in stabilized sludge by sludge drying bed and reed bed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yu-Bo; Sun, Hong-Jie; Ran, Chun-Qiu; Li, Jin-Feng; Xie, Yao

    2013-03-01

    The difference in the removal efficiencies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in planted and unplanted sludge drying bed was investigated. Pilot-scale sludge drying bed and reed bed had the same size of 3.0 m x 1.0 m x 1.3 m (L x W x H), and the bed height consisted of a 65 cm media layer and a 65 cm super height. Both beds had a ventilation pipe which was mounted on the drainage pipes. The experiment lasted for three years, and the first two years was the sludge loading period, and the third year was the natural stabilization period. In the first two years, a total thickness of 8.4 m of sludge was loaded and the average sludge loading rate was 41.3 kg x (m2 x a)(-1). After the three-year stabilization, the contents of the sixteen PAHs decreased with time in both the sludge drying bed and the reed bed. The total PAHs contents in the surface, middle and bottom sludge layers in the sludge drying bed were 4.161, 3.543 and 3.118 mg x kg(-1) (DW), corresponding to 26.91%, 37.77% and 45.23% of removal; and the values in the reed bed were 2.722, 1.648 and 1.218 mg x kg(-1) (DW), corresponding to 52.18%, 71.05% and 78.60% of removal. The average PAHs removal in the reed bed was 29.86% higher than that in the sludge drying bed. In the stabilized sludge, the removal of low-molecular-weight PAHs predominated. The results suggested that reed played a positive role in the removal of PAHs.

  20. Creation of Pd/Al2O3 Catalyst by a Spray Process for Fixed Bed Reactors and Its Effective Removal of Aqueous Bromate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Li, Qi

    2017-02-01

    Palladium nanoparticles were grown on sub-millimeter activated Al2O3 particle support by spraying H2PdCl4 solution evenly onto the support, followed with a thermal reduction under H2 atmosphere. Compared with its counterpart created by the conventional impregnation method, the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst created by the spray process could enrich the existence of active Pd nanoparticles on the surface of the catalyst support and increase their degree of dispersion, resulting in a much higher activity in the catalytic reduction of bromate in water. The effect of Al2O3 support particle size on the bromate removal rate was also investigated, which demonstrated that smaller support particle size could have higher activity in the catalytic reduction of bromate in water because of its larger exposed surface. This Pd/Al2O3 catalyst could be easily used in the fixed bed reactor due to its large support size and demonstrated excellent stability in the catalytic reduction of bromate in mineral water. This Pd/Al2O3 catalyst also exhibited a good catalytic reduction performance on azo dyes as demonstrated by its effective catalytic hydrogenation of methyl orange. Thus, catalysts prepared by the spray method developed in this work could have the potential to be used in fixed bed reactors for various water treatment practices.

  1. Effect of small-scale biomass gasification at the state of refractory lining the fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janša, Jan, E-mail: jan.jansa@vsb.cz; Peer, Vaclav, E-mail: vaclav.peer@vsb.cz; Pavloková, Petra, E-mail: petra.pavlokova@vsb.cz [VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Energy Research Center, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    The article deals with the influence of biomass gasification on the condition of the refractory lining of a fixed bed reactor. The refractory lining of the gasifier is one part of the device, which significantly affects the operational reliability and durability. After removing the refractory lining of the gasifier from the experimental reactor, there was done an assessment how gasification of different kinds of biomass reflected on its condition in terms of the main factors affecting its life. Gasification of biomass is reflected on the lining, especially through sticking at the bottom of the reactor. Measures for prolonging the life of lining consist in the reduction of temperature in the reactor, in this case, in order to avoid ash fusion biomass which it is difficult for this type of gasifier.

  2. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    CERN Document Server

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  3. The effects of material property assumptions on predicted meltpool shape for laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chong; Ashby, Kathryn; Phan, Nam; Pal, Deepankar; Stucker, Brent

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide guidance on material specifications for powders used in laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing (AM) processes. The methodology was to investigate how different material property assumptions in a simulation affect meltpool prediction and by corrolary how different material properties affect meltpool formation in AM processes. The sensitvity of meltpool variations to each material property can be used as a guide to help drive future research and to help prioritize material specifications in requirements documents. By identifying which material properties have the greatest affect on outcomes, metrology can be tailored to focus on those properties which matter most; thus reducing costs by eliminating unnecessary testing and property charaterizations. Futhermore, this sensitivity study provides insight into which properties require more accurate measurements, thus motivating development of new metrology methods to measure those properties accurately.

  4. Application of a packed bed reactor for the production of hydrogen from cheese whey permeate: effect of organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Camino; Carracedo, Begoña; Martínez, Elia Judith; Gómez, Xiomar; Morán, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The production of H2 was studied using a packed bed reactor with polyurethane foam acting as support material. Experiments were performed using mixed microflora under non sterile conditions. The system was initially operated with synthetic wastewater as the sole substrate. Subsequently, cheese whey permeate was added to the system at varying organic loading rates (OLR). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by applying a continuous decrease in OLR. As a result, a significant decrease in H2 yields (HY) was observed with the decrease in OLR from 18.8 to 6.3 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L d. Microbial analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of non-hydrogen producers, Sporolactobacillus sp. and Prevotella, was the main reason for low HYs obtained. This behavior indicates that the fermentation under non-sterile conditions was favored by high concentrations of substrate by creating an adverse environment for nonhydrogen producer organisms.

  5. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN TEACHING PRACTICE FOR STUDENT TEACHERS OF B.ED PROGRAMME Issues, Predicaments & Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama BHARGAVA

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In teacher training programme (B.Ed period of teaching practice is considered as very demanding, hectic and exhaustive. Yet the essence of teacher training lies in it. Every year student teachers are sent for teaching practice to different schools. This period extends approximately for 21-25 days. On returning to department, as per practice, student teachers share their views, concerns, experiences and gains with their lecturers in evaluation session. This feedback proves beneficial while making plans for next session. For last four years, some problems, experiences, impediments remain same for most of the students. This paper takes into account the various predicaments faced by student teachers and ways to strengthen the teaching practice so that reflective teaching practice can be encouraged.

  7. Mechanism for Increasing Effective Inputs in Urban Agriculture through Industrial Value Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This paper firstly introduces the value chain management thought,current situations of utilization,and connotation of mechanism for increasing effective inputs in urban agriculture through industrial value chain.On the basis of basic idea of value chain management,this paper is to explore the mechanism for increasing effective inputs in urban agriculture through the value chain of urban agriculture linking with other industries.

  8. Kinetics of potato drying using fluidized bed dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakal, Sushant Balasaheb; Sharma, Gyanendra Prasad; Sonawane, Somnath P; Verma, Radhachran C

    2012-10-01

    The effect of air temperature and two different shapes (cuboidal and cylindrical) with 3 aspect ratio of each shape on the drying kinetics of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in fluidized bed dryer was investigated. Drying was carried out at 50, 60 and 70°C at 7 m/s air velocity. Drying data were analysed to obtain effective diffusivity of moisture transfer. During drying moisture transfer from potato were described by Fick's diffusion model. Two mathematical models were fitted to experimental data. The Page model gave better fit than simple exponential model. The Arrehnious activation energy value expresses the effect of temperature on diffusivity.

  9. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  10. Clinical effectiveness of a mite allergen-impermeable bed-covering system in asthmatic mite-sensitive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bemt, Lisette; van Knapen, Lieke; de Vries, Marjolein P; Jansen, Margreet; Cloosterman, Sonja; van Schayck, Constant P

    2004-10-01

    Exposure to allergens plays a role in the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and in the chronic inflammatory response seen in asthmatic patients. House dust mites (HDMs) are an important source of allergen. Reduction of these allergens might lead to better lung function and reduction of asthma symptoms. The effect of HDM-impermeable covers on HDM allergen levels, peak flow values, and asthma symptoms were measured. Therefore a randomized clinical trial was carried out. Fifty-two allergic asthmatic patients were randomly allocated to use the HDM-impermeable or placebo covers. During the study period, daily peak flow and asthma symptom scores were recorded. Dust samples were taken from the mattresses. We observed a significant reduction in HDM allergen levels on the mattresses after encasing them with HDM-impermeable covers (reduction of 87% of Der p 1 in micrograms per gram of dust; P impermeable covers significantly decreased the level of HDM allergens. Furthermore, morning peak flow was significantly increased during the intervention period. This study indicates that HDM allergen-avoidance measures might have beneficial effects on allergen reduction and asthma outcome.

  11. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  12. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not determined ... sleep. These areas include apartments, shelters, rooming houses, hotels, cruise ships, buses, trains, and dorm rooms. They ...

  13. Moving-bed sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, R.E.; Gupta, R.P.; Chuck, T.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to develop mixed-metal oxide sorbent formulations that are suitable for moving-bed, high-temperature, desulfurization of coal gas. Work continues on zinc titanates formulations and Z-sorb III sorbent.

  14. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  15. Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to deal with bed bugs in one printable page. Ten tips include ensuring correct insect identification, reducing clutter, understand integrated pest management, using mattress and box spring encasements, and heat treatment.

  16. Selecting Testlet Features With Predictive Value for the Testlet Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muirne C. S. Paap

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High-stakes tests often consist of sets of questions (i.e., items grouped around a common stimulus. Such groupings of items are often called testlets. A basic assumption of item response theory (IRT, the mathematical model commonly used in the analysis of test data, is that individual items are independent of one another. The potential dependency among items within a testlet is often ignored in practice. In this study, a technique called tree-based regression (TBR was applied to identify key features of stimuli that could properly predict the dependence structure of testlet data for the Analytical Reasoning section of a high-stakes test. Relevant features identified included Percentage of “If” Clauses, Number of Entities, Theme/Topic, and Predicate Propositional Density; the testlet effect was smallest for stimuli that contained 31% or fewer “if” clauses, contained 9.8% or fewer verbs, and had Media or Animals as the main theme. This study illustrates the merits of TBR in the analysis of test data.

  17. Logging Evaluation of the Ordovician Carbonate Reservoir Beds in the Lungudong Region,Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wenjing; XIAO Chengwen; LIU Luofu; QI Guangzhong; JIANG Zhenxue; YUAN Yunchun; WANG Weili; YANG Song

    2010-01-01

    In recent years,great progress has been made constantly in oil and gas exploration in the Lungudong region of the Tarim Basin.However,progress has been slow in the evaluation of its main oil-producing horizons-the Ordovician carbonate reservoir beds.Based on previous researches and on the various data such as drilling,geology and oil test,in combination with the interpretation of each single-well imaging and conventional logging data,and through analysis and comparison,the identification methods in imaging and conventional logging for four types of carbonate reservoir beds in this region are summarized in this paper.Calculation formulas for four reservoir bed parameters,i.e.shale content,porosity,permeability and oil saturation in this region are proposed;and reservoir beds in this region are divided into three levels (Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ) by combining oil test data and logging data,The lower limits of the effective porosity of reservoir beds and the fracture porosity of effective reservoir beds are determined as 1.8% and 0.04%,respectively.The physical property parameters are calculated by conventional logging curves,and the most advantageous areas for reservoir development are predicted comprehensively.On the plane,the high-value zones of reservoir bed parameters are mainly concentrated in the N-S-trending strike-slip fault,the Sangtamu fault horst zone and near the LG38 well area;vertically,the reservoir bed parameters of the Yijianfang Formation are better than those of the Yingshan and Lianglitage formations.

  18. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio 2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  19. Effect Of The Board Of Commissioners Of Its Value Through Quality Of Financial Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Sukmono

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is based on a statement of the value of the company determined the quality of financial reporting and financial reporting quality monitoring board determined Commissioner in implementing corporate governance. This study was to examine the effect of the commissioners on firm value. Hypothesis no significant effect on the value of the company board of directors through quality financial pelporan. The results showed a significant positive effect commissioners through the quality of financial reporting.

  20. Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: Effects of main physical processes on dynamical melt flow and pore formation from mesoscopic powder simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Khairallah, Saad A; Rubenchik, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    There is a need in laser powder-bed fusion of metals to produce high quality parts without pores by better understanding the complex interplay of process parameters. This study considers the main physical phenomena involved in laser powder interactions using a high fidelity three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation model of 316L stainless steel powder. The model emphasizes the importance of the recoil pressure and the Marangoni effect in generating strong dynamical melt flow and the role of radiative and evaporative cooling at capping the maximum surface temperature. The melt track is divided into an indentation, transition and tail end regions, each being the stage of specific physical effects. Pore formation mechanisms are observed at the edge of a scan track, at the melt pool bottom center during collapse of the indentation, and at the end of the melt track during laser power ramp down. Remedies to these undesirable pores are discussed.

  1. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  2. Materialistic Values among Chinese Adolescents: Effects of Parental Rejection and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinyuan; Kou, Yu; Yang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: Materialistic values among today's adolescents have been a concern around the world, yet few studies concerning Chinese adolescents' materialistic values have been conducted. Additionally, the joint effects of parental rejection and self-esteem on materialistic values remain unclear. Objective: We examined materialistic…

  3. Geochemical Effects of Induced Stream-Water and Artificial Recharge on the Equus Beds Aquifer, South-Central Kansas, 1995-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer is part of a strategy implemented by the city of Wichita, Kansas, to preserve future water supply and address declining water levels in the aquifer of as much as 30 feet caused by withdrawals for water supply and irrigation since the 1940s. Water-level declines represent a diminished water supply and also may accelerate migration of saltwater from the Burrton oil field to the northwest and the Arkansas River to the southwest into the freshwater of the Equus Beds aquifer. Artificial recharge, as a part of the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge Project, involves capturing flows larger than base flow from the Little Arkansas River and recharging the water to the Equus Beds aquifer by means of infiltration or injection. The geochemical effects on the Equus Beds aquifer of induced stream-water and artificial recharge at the Halstead and Sedgwick sites were determined through collection and analysis of hydrologic and water-quality data and the application of statistical, mixing, flow and solute-transport, and geochemical model simulations. Chloride and atrazine concentrations in the Little Arkansas River and arsenic concentrations in ground water at the Halstead recharge site frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. During 30 percent of the time from 1999 through 2004, continuous estimated chloride concentrations in the Little Arkansas River at Highway 50 near Halstead exceeded the Secondary Drinking-Water Regulation of 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations in shallow monitoring wells located adjacent to the stream exceeded the drinking-water criterion five times from 1995 through 2004. Atrazine concentrations in water sampled from the Little Arkansas River had large variability and were at or near the drinking-water Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter as an annual average established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine

  4. The Effects of Dinner-to-Bed Time and Post-Dinner Walk on Gastric Cancer Across Different Age Groups: A Multicenter Case-Control Study in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jun; Dai, Jia-Xi; Lin, Ren-Qin; Tian, Fang-Xi; Liang, Bing; Guo, Yi-Nan; Luo, Hui-Yu; Li, Ni; Fang, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Ruo-Hua; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major killer throughout the world. Despite the dramatic decrease in GC over the last century, its etiology has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the possible independent and combined effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on the risk for GC across different age groups. A population-based, case-control study was conducted in southeast China, including 452 patients with GC and 465 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic characteristics, dinner-to-bed time, post-dinner walk, and other behavioral factors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk as well as their joint effect on the risk for GC across different age groups. Individuals with dinner-to-bed time time was, the higher was the risk for GC (Ptrend time and post-dinner walk on GC risk was detected (AOR = 1.862, 95% CIs = 1.584-3.885, synergy index [SI] = 2.654, 95% CIs = 2.27-3.912). Participants with dinner-to-bed time times likely to suffer from GC (AOR = 7.401, 95% CIs = 4.523-13.16) than those with dinner-to-bed time ≥4 hours who took such walk. The risk of GC due to dinner-to-bed time time 55 years old.

  5. Effect on Value Earnings Management Company with Good Corporate Governance Practices as Moderating Variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuniarti Emylia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Firm value reflects the size of the stock market reaction to the company. Increasing the value of the company is an achievement that suitable with the desire of the owner, because as the value of the company increasing as well the welfare of the owner. Earnings management has an influence on the value of the company. Good Corporate Governance to be one way to eliminate the management engineering efforts specifically to make regulations with the requirement for the companies to disclose certain information mandatorily and voluntarily. This research will discuss the influence of earnings management on company value, the effect of Corporate Governance on company value directly, and the effect of Corporate Governance as a moderating variable from the influence of earnings management and firm value. Data analysis technique used in this research is a descriptive data analysis method, analysis model and classical assumption check because this research aims to determine the effect of earnings management, company value and Corporate Governance on Enterprise State-owned Enterprises listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange. The results of this study are earnings management negatively affect the value of the company, corporate governance itself has no effect on firm value, but as a moderating variable of corporate governance affect earnings management effect on firm value.

  6. The Impacts of Human Visitation on Mussel Bed Communities Along the California Coast: Are Regulatory Marine Reserves Effective in Protecting These Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jayson R.; Fong, Peggy; Ambrose, Richard F.

    2008-04-01

    Rocky intertidal habitats frequently are used by humans for recreational, educational, and subsistence-harvesting purposes, with intertidal populations damaged by visitation activities such as extraction, trampling, and handling. California Marine Managed Areas, particularly regulatory marine reserves (MRs), were established to provide legal protection and enhancement of coastal resources and include prohibitions on harvesting intertidal populations. However, the effectiveness of MRs is unclear as enforcement of no-take laws is weak and no regulations protect intertidal species from other detrimental visitor impacts such as trampling. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine impacts from human visitation on California mussel populations ( Mytilus californianus) and mussel bed community diversity; and (2) to investigate the effectiveness of regulatory MRs in reducing visitor impacts on these populations. Surveys of mussel populations and bed-associated diversity were compared: (1) at sites subjected to either high or low levels of human use, and (2) at sites either unprotected or with regulatory protection banning collecting. At sites subjected to higher levels of human visitation, mussel populations were significantly lower than low-use sites. Comparisons of mussel populations inside and outside of regulatory MRs revealed no consistent pattern suggesting that California no-take regulatory reserves may have limited effectiveness in protecting mussel communities. In areas where many people visit intertidal habitats for purposes other than collecting, many organisms will be affected by trampling, turning of rocks, and handling. In these cases, effective protection of rocky intertidal communities requires an approach that goes beyond the singular focus on collecting to reduce the full suite of impacts.

  7. Effect of 21-day head down bed rest on urine proteins related to endothelium: Correlations with changes in carbohydrate metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashirina, D.; Pastushkova, L.; Custaud, M. A.; Dobrokhotov, I.; Brzhozovsky, A.; Navasiolava, N.; Nosovsky, A.; Kononikhin, A.; Nikolaev, E.; Larina, I.

    2017-08-01

    We performed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric study of the urine proteome in 8 healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 44 y.o. who have completed 21-day head-down bed rest. ANDSystem software which builds associative networks was used to identify the urinary proteins functionally related to the endothelium. We identified 7 endothelium-related biological processes, directly linked to 13 urine proteins. We performed manual annotation of the proteins which were the most important in terms of endothelial functions. Analysis of the correlations with biochemical variables revealed a positive correlation between fasting blood glucose and the following urine proteins: albumin, CD44 antigen, endothelial protein C receptor, mucin-1, osteopontin, receptor tyrosine kinase. As well, we found a positive correlation between HOMA-insulin resistance index and the following urine proteins: endothelial protein C receptor and syndecan-4. These results might suggest the involvement of above-mentioned proteins in glucose metabolism and their participation in the response to changes in blood glucose level.

  8. Effect of temperature and salinity on the wastewater treatment performance of aerobic submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, G; Jank, M; Schlegel, S; Koeser, H

    2007-01-01

    The influence of temperature (5-35 C) and salinity (up to 20 g/l NaCl) on the wastewater purification process in completely mixed and aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors (SFBBRs) was studied. C- and N-conversion in SFBBRs designed according to the DWA (German Association for Water, Wastewater and Waste) rules for carbon removal was investigated for several months on synthetic wastewater. The DOC degradation rate was even at, according to the DWA, high DOC/BOD loading rates not much affected by temperatures between 5-35 degrees C and salt contents up to 20 g/L NaCl. At these high DOC loadings an appreciable ammonium conversion could also be observed. The ammonium conversion proved to be sensitive to temperature and salinity. At 5 degrees C the ammonium removal rate decreased by a factor of five compared to 25-35 degrees C. Under many operation conditions investigated more than 50% of the converted ammonium was transformed into gaseous nitrogen. The addition of 20 g/L NaCl caused a strong inhibition of the ammonium removal rate over the whole temperature range investigated.

  9. Effects of leg strength and bicycle ergometry exercise on cardiovascular deconditioning after 30-day head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Liu, Yusheng; Sun, Hongyi; Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Ni, Chengzhi

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the intermittent leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could attenuate cardiovascular deconditioning induced by prolonged -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR). Fifteen male subjects were randomly allocated into group A ( n=5, 30 days HDBR without exercise), group B ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with leg muscular strength exercise) and group C ( n=5, 30 days HDBR with bicycle ergometry exercise). The orthostatic tolerance (OT) was determined by +75°/20 min head-up tilt (HUT) test and the submaximal exercise capacity was determined by bicycle ergometry before and after HDBR. The results were as follows: (1) Compared with that before HDBR, OT time decreased dramatically by 57.6% ( pexercise time decreased significantly by 17.7% ( p0.77) in group C. (3) compared with that before HDBR, the changes of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were slightly improved in group B and C, while deteriorated in group A during orthostatic test and exercise test after HDBR. The results indicate that leg muscular strength exercise and bicycle ergometry exercise could partially attenuate the cardiovascular deconditioning induced by 30 d HDBR, and the latter exercise training could fully provide the protection for the loss of exercise capacity.

  10. Optimizing aeration rates for minimizing membrane fouling and its effect on sludge characteristics in a moving bed membrane bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Yousef, E-mail: yrahimi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabian, Ali, E-mail: atorabi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrdadi, Naser, E-mail: mehrdadi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi-Rezaie, Mehran, E-mail: mhabibi@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pezeshk, Hamid, E-mail: pezeshk@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer, College of Science, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nabi-Bidhendi, Gholam-Reza, E-mail: ghhendi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} There is an optimum aeration rate in the MBMBR process compartments. {yields} Optimum aeration rate maximizes nutrients removal. {yields} Optimum aeration rate minimizes membrane fouling. {yields} Both aeration rates in MBBR and membrane compartment can affect on membrane permeability. - Abstract: In MBR processes, sufficient aeration is necessary to maintain sustainable flux and to retard membrane fouling. Membrane permeability, sludge characteristics, nutrient removal and biomass growth at various air flow rates in the membrane and moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) compartments were studied in a pilot plant. The highest nitrogen and phosphorous removal rates were found at MBBR aeration rates of 151 and 85 L h{sup -1} and a specific aeration demand per membrane area (SAD{sub m}) of 1.2 and 0.4m{sub air}{sup 3} m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, respectively. A linear correlation was found between the amount of attached biofilm and the nutrient removal rate. The aeration rate in the MBBR compartment and SAD{sub m} significantly influenced the sludge characteristics and membrane permeability. The optimum combination of the aeration rate in the MBBR compartment and SAD{sub m} were 151 L h{sup -1} and 0.8-1.2m{sub air}{sup 3}m{sub membrane}{sup -2} h{sup -1}, respectively.

  11. Bed Stability and Debris Flow Erosion: A Dynamic "Shields Criterion" Associated with Bed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longjas, A.; Hill, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are mass movements that play an important role in transporting sediment from steep uplands to rivers at lower slopes. As the debris flow moves downstream, it entrains materials such as loose boulders, gravel, sand and mud deposited locally by shorter flows such as slides and rockfalls. To capture the conditions under which debris flows entrain bed sediment, some models use something akin to the Shields' criterion and an excess shear stress of the flow. However, these models typically neglect granular-scale effects in the bed which can modify the conditions under which a debris flow is erosional or depositional. For example, it is well known that repeated shearing causes denser packing in loose dry soils, which undoubtedly changes their resistance to shear. Here, we present laboratory flume experiments showing that the conditions for entrainment by debris flows is significantly dependent on the aging of an erodible bed even for narrowly distributed spherical particles. We investigate this quantitatively using particle tracking measurements to quantify instantaneous erosion rates and the evolving bed structure or "fabric". With progressive experiments we find a signature that emerges in the bed fabric that is correlated with an increasing apparent "fragility" of the bed. Specifically, a system that is originally depositional may become erosional after repeated debris flow events, and an erodible bed becomes increasingly erodible with repeated flows. We hypothesize that related effects of bed aging at the field scale may be partly responsible for the increasing destructiveness of secondary flows of landslides and debris flows.

  12. Earth-moon Lagrangian points as a test bed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-09-01

    We first analyze the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid. This scheme allows us to take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. A vehicle initially placed at L4 or L5 will not remain near the respective points. In particular, in the classical case the vehicle moves on a trajectory about the libration points for at least 700 days before escaping. We show that this is true also if the modified long-distance Newtonian potential of effective gravity is employed. We also evaluate the impulse required to cancel out the perturbing force due to the Sun in order to force the spacecraft to stay precisely at L4 or L5. It turns out that this value is slightly modified with respect to the corresponding Newtonian one. In the second part of the paper, we first evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters and describe a tiny departure from the equilateral triangle. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. In other words, we deal with a theory involving quantum corrections to Einstein gravity, rather than to Newtonian gravity. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the long-distance form of the potential among two masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for the Lagrangian points of stable equilibrium, we find quantum corrections of order 2 mm, whereas for Lagrangian points of unstable

  13. Estimativa das propriedades térmicas efetivas de grãos em um secador de leito fixo Estimation of effective grain thermal properties in a fixed bed dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Fregolente

    2004-06-01

    parameters can be obtained from the adjustment of a steadystate two-dimensional pseudohomogeneous model to several fixed bed temperature measurements at the end of the drying process. The results show that the strategy used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and the effective wall heat transfer coefficient was appropriate. In addition, among the grains analysed - soy, bean, corn and wheat-, soy presents the smallest values of effective radial conductivity, while wheat presents the greatest effective wall heat transfer value.

  14. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on the nutritive value of oat forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen fertilization is a routine part of forage management strategies for grasses, but the effects on forage nutritive value have been inconsistent. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of N fertilization on the nutritive value of fall-grown oat fertilized at planting with 20, 40, 60, 80, ...

  15. Effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on water quality in the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds Aquifer, south-central Kansas, 2011-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Garrett, Jessica D.; Poulton, Barry C.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2016-07-18

    The Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas is aprimary water source for the city of Wichita. The Equus Beds aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project was developed to help the city of Wichita meet increasing current (2016) and future water demands. The Equus Beds ASR project pumps water out of the Little Arkansas River during above-base flow conditions, treats it using drinking-water quality standards as a guideline, and recharges it into the Equus Beds aquifer for later use. Phase II of the Equus Beds ASR project currently (2016) includes a river intake facility and a surface-water treatment facility with a 30 million gallon per day capacity. Water diverted from the Little Arkansas River is delivered to an adjacent presedimentation basin for solids removal. Subsequently, waste from the surface-water treatment facility and the presedimentation basin is returned to the Little Arkansas River through a residuals return line. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, developed and implemented a hydrobiological monitoring program as part of the ASR project to characterize and quantify the effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds aquifer water quality.Data were collected from 2 surface-water sites (one upstream and one downstream from the residuals return line), 1 residuals return line site, and 2 groundwater well sites (each having a shallow and deep part): the Little Arkansas River upstream from the ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (upstream surface-water site 375350097262800), about 0.03 mile (mi) upstream from the residuals return line site; the Little Arkansas River near Sedgwick, Kans. (downstream surface-water site 07144100), about 1.68 mi downstream from the residuals return line site; discharge from the Little Arkansas River ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (residuals return line site 375348097262800); 25S 01 W 07BCCC01 SMW–S11 near CW36 (MW–7 shallow groundwater well

  16. Effect of leg exercise training on vascular volumes during 30 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma and red cell volumes, body density, and water balance were measured in 19 men (32-42 yr) confined to bed rest (BR). One group (n = 5) had no exercise training (NOE), another near-maximal variable-intensity isotonic exercise for 60 min/day (ITE; n = 7), and the third near-maximal intermittent isokinetic exercise for 60 min/day (IKE; n = 7). Caloric intake was 2,678-2,840 kcal/day; mean body weight (n = 19) decreased by 0.58 +/- 0.35 (SE) kg during BR due to a negative fluid balance (diuresis) on day 1. Mean energy costs for the NOE, and IKE, and ITE regimens were 83 (3.6 +/- 0.2 ml O2.min-1.kg-1), 214 (8.9 +/- 0.5 ml.min-1.kg-1), and 446 kcal/h (18.8 +/- 1.6 ml.min-1.kg-1), respectively. Body densities within groups and mean urine volumes (1,752-1,846 ml/day) between groups were unchanged during BR. Resting changes in plasma volume (ml/kg) after BR were -1.5 +/- 2.3% (NS) in ITE, -14.7 +/- 2.8% (P less than 0.05) in NOE, and -16.8 +/- 2.9% (P less than 0.05) in IKE, and mean water balances during BR were +295, -106, and +169 ml/24 h, respectively. Changes in red cell volume followed changes in plasma volume. The significant chronic decreases in plasma volume in the IKE and NOE groups and its maintenance in the ITE group could not be accounted for by water balance or by responses of the plasma osmotic, protein, vasopressin, or aldosterone concentrations or plasma renin activity. There was close coupling between resting plasma volume and plasma protein and osmotic content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  17. Effect of the empty fraction in a solar reactor of fluidized bed; Efecto de la fraccion vacia en un reactor solar de lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Alejandro; Romero-Paredes, Hernando; Vazquez, Alejandro; Torijano, Eugenio; Ambriz, Juan J [Universidad Autonoma Metropilitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to obtain the temperature profiles and concentration of a solar reactor of fluidized bed that simultaneously serves as a solar receiver of a thermo-chemical storage system of solar energy. The complex phenomena that are inherent of these reactors make their sizing difficult for their solar application. For this reason, to model and to simulate its behavior without and with the chemical reaction helps to palliate this disadvantage. One of the present phenomena is the change of the empty fraction in which we concentrate our attention. In this paper an alternative is proposed in the modeling of these systems, considering local fluctuations of the empty fraction or porosity {epsilon}(x,y) in the bed. For this a probabilistic uniform distribution is proposed for all the nodes of the (x, y) mesh of the bed where local values of porosity for each node of the mesh are associated by means of a random generator where {epsilon}(x, y){epsilon} [0.1]. The hollow fraction plays a very important role because the penetration of the solar radiation in these systems of opaque bodies depends directly on the distribution of empty spaces in the trajectory of the incident radiation that affects its thermal and kinetic behavior. From the results the characteristic of non- isothermicity of the reactor can be incorporated which entails, once reached the reaction temperature, to a dispersed profile of concentrations. The empty fraction is a parameter that influences greatly in these profiles and that increasing the fluidization number is the way this time is diminished. In conclusion, the importance the empty fraction plays in the evolution of the temperature profiles as well as in the concentration profiles is emphasized. The behavior of the bed in the simulation becomes more precise in agreement with the experimental results previously obtained. [Spanish] El objetivo de este trabajo es obtener los perfiles de temperatura y concentracion de un reactor solar

  18. Effects of packing rates of cubic-shaped polyurethane foam carriers on the microbial community and the removal of organics and nitrogen in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Quan; Wang, Yuxiao; Wang, Tianmin; Zheng, Hao; Chu, Libing; Zhang, Chong; Chen, Hongzhang; Kong, Xiuqin; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2012-08-01

    The effects of packing rates (20%, 30%, and 40%) of polyurethane foam (PUF) to the removal of organics and nitrogen were investigated by continuously feeding artificial sewage in three aerobic moving bed biofilm reactors. The results indicated that the packing rate of the PUF carriers had little influence on the COD removal efficiency (81% on average). However, ammonium removal was affected by the packing rates, which was presumably due to the different relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria. A high ammonium removal efficiency of 96.3% at a hydraulic retention time of 5h was achieved in 40% packing rate reactor, compared with 37.4% in 20% packing rate. Microprofiles of dissolved oxygen and nitrate revealed that dense biofilm limits the DO transfer distance and nitrate diffusion. Pyrosequencing analysis of the biofilm showed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were the three most abundant phyla, but the proportions of the microbial community varied with the packing rate of the PUF carriers.

  19. Effect of hot vapor filtr