WorldWideScience

Sample records for bed combustion coal

  1. Atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustion research, development and application

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, M

    1994-01-01

    The use of fluidized bed coal combustion technology has been developed in the past decade in The Netherlands with a view to expanding the industrial use of coal as an energy supply. Various research groups from universities, institutes for applied science and from boiler industries participated and contributed to this research area. Comprehensive results of such recent experimentation and development work on atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of coal are covered in this volume. Each chapter, written by an expert, treats one specific subject and gives both the theoretical background as well a

  2. Fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustion residues for secondary pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoori, N.; Diawara, H.; Wang, L.

    2009-01-01

    The United States produced nearly 125 million tons of coal combustion products in 2006. These by-products include fly ash, flue gas desulphurization materials, bottom ash, boiler slag, and other power plant by-products. The expense associated with waste disposal, lack of disposal sites, and significant environmental damage linked with the disposal of coal combustion residues have encouraged innovative utilization strategies such as the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit. This paper presented the results of a laboratory investigation that examined the properties of composites developed with different proportions of pre-conditioned FBC spent bed, pulverized coal combustion fly ash, natural fine aggregate, and Portland cement. The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which the by-product composites could replace currently used materials in secondary roads. The paper presented the research objectives and experimental programs, including matrix constituent and proportions; mixture proportions; and mixing, curing, sampling, and testing. The discussion of results centered around compressive strength and expansion by internal sulfate attack. It was concluded that with proper proportioning, by-products of pulverized and fluidized bed combustion promote binding of sand particles and provide adequate strength under various curing and moisture conditions 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Coal-char combustion in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrotra, S.P.; Pande, M. [Indian Institute of Technolgy, Kanpur (India)

    2001-12-01

    Combustion of bituminous coal chars ranging from 0.8 mm to 1.8 mm has been studied in a fluidised bed reactor at temperatures ranging from 500 to 850{sup o}C. The fluidised bed consists of inert sand particles of average size of 0.5 mm and reactive coal char particles. A heat balance has been worked out to calculate the rate of combustion of char from measured incremental changes in the bed temperature during combustion. Investigations on partially burnt particles suggest that the ash layer which builds up around the burning core of char particles is non-flaking and the particles burn in a shrinking core manner. Analysis of rate data indicates that the rate of combustion is controlled by chemical reaction kinetics, though diffusion of oxygen through the bundary layer begins to influence the overall reaction kinetics at higher temperatures. The burnt out time varies linearly with particle size. Activation energy for the chemical reaction control regime is found to be around 68 kJ/mole.

  4. Nitrogen Chemistry in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn

    and reduction by homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The data for the estimation of kinetics of the heterogeneous reactions were measured by one of the partners in the project for char and bed material sampled from a pressurized FBC pilot plant burning Kiveton Park coal. Experimental data from the pilot...... plant were used for model verification. The simulations of the NO emission during staged combustion and NH3 injection for NO reduction were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. A parametric study of the influence of operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-N to NO showed......, the gas interchange coefficient, the bubble size and the bubble rise velocity. The most important combustion parameters were the rate of CO and CH4 combustion and the fraction of CO produced from char combustion. By using a rate of production analysis, the important reactions in the NO model were...

  5. The combustion of coal blends in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Dulce; Abelha, Pedro; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Cabrita, Isabel

    1999-07-01

    Combustion studies of five coals of different origin were carried out in a laboratory scale fluidised bed combustor. Five blends prepared by mixing two coals based on their petrological characterisation, in varying amounts, were selected to study the possibility of reduction NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions. The results showed that some blends had the opposite behaviour concerning the release of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in relation to parent coals, and the emissions were higher than expected. The N{sub 2}O amounts observed were, however, in almost all blends tested, lower than predicted values. With some blends, the mixing levels intended to reduce SO{sub 2} were not always found to correspond to those for simultaneous decrease of Nox. Most of the blends studied showed some evidence of interaction between them. Varying the proportion of the blend components was observed to alter the temperatures at which interactions were stronger.

  6. Co-combustion of risk husk with coal in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, A.K.; Alias, A.B.; Savory, R.M.; Cliffe, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes agricultural residue waste. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from agricultural residues (rice husk) was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and CO emissions were studied and compared with those for pure coal combustion. Biomass waste with up to 70% mass fraction can be co-combusted in a fluidized bed combustor designed for coal combustion with a maximum drop of efficiency of 20% depending upon excess air levels. CO levels fluctuated between 200-700 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of rice husk with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers. (Author)

  7. Co-combustion of waste with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Abelha, P.; Lopes, H.; Cabrita, I. [DEECA-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a study of cocombustion of waste with coal is described. Various wastes (biomass, sludge, and refuse derived fuel) were burned with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor. Conditions that prevent segregated combustion, reduce production of nitrogen oxides, and attain high combustion efficiency were studied. The effects of variations in air staging in the riser, mixing of air with volatiles, coal/biomass ratio, methods of feeding biomass, and temperature are described. 5 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Fluidized bed combustion of low-grade coal and wastes: Research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Vinogradov, L.M. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus). A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst.; Dobkin, S.M.; Telegin, E.M. [Special Design Office, Brest (Belarus)

    1994-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization of fuel as single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin, leather sewage sludge and Belarussian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. It is found that the devolatilization process depends on moisture and ash contents in fuel and on the external heat and mass transfer rate. The char combustion occurs largely in the intermediate region. Kinetic parameters of the devolatilization and char combustion are obtained. A low-capacity fluidized bed boiler suitable for combustion of coal and different wastes is described.

  9. Temporal measurements and kinetics of selenium release during coal combustion and gasification in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Fenghua; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Yingju

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The temporal release of Se from coal combustion and gasification was measured. • Kinetic laws for Se release from coal combustion and gasification were determined. • The influences of temperature and chemical composition of flue gas were clarified. • The interactions of Se species with mineral affect the release kinetics of Se. - Abstract: The temporal release of selenium from coal during combustion and gasification in a fluidized bed was measured in situ by an on-line analysis system of trace elements in flue gas. The on-line analysis system is based on an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and can measure concentrations of trace elements in flue gas quantitatively and continuously. The results of on-line analysis suggest that the concentration of selenium in flue gas during coal gasification is higher than that during coal combustion. Based on the results of on-line analysis, a second-order kinetic law r(x) = 0.94e −26.58/RT (−0.56 x 2 −0.51 x + 1.05) was determined for selenium release during coal combustion, and r(x) = 11.96e −45.03/RT (−0.53 x 2 −0.56 x + 1.09) for selenium release during coal gasification. These two kinetic laws can predict respectively the temporal release of selenium during coal combustion and gasification with an acceptable accuracy. Thermodynamic calculations were conducted to predict selenium species during coal combustion and gasification. The speciation of selenium in flue gas during coal combustion differs from that during coal gasification, indicating that selenium volatilization is different. The gaseous selenium species can react with CaO during coal combustion, but it is not likely to interact with mineral during coal gasification.

  10. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  11. Simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times during fluidized bed combustion of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christofiedes, N.; Brown, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate a method for simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times based on the analysis of CO 2 emissions from a fluidized bed combustor. The technique is non-intrusive and can be performed under realistic combustion conditions. The authors' method involves batching single-size coal samples in a fluidized bed combustor that is heated with propane gas or other fuel. Carbon dioxide profiles versus time for the batch tests are analyzed with a linear model to obtain characteristic time constants for coal devolatilization and char combustion which can be related to total devolatilization time and burnout time for a coal sample. The authors' approach does not require special sample preparation, can be performed in actual combustion equipment and employs standard boiler instrumentation

  12. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Banerjee, D.D. (Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950[degree]C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  13. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Banerjee, D.D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950{degree}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics simulation for chemical looping combustion of coal in a dual circulation fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Mingze; Zhao, Haibo; Ma, Jinchen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD simulation of a 5 kW_t_h CLC reactor of coal was conducted. • Gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency of the reactor was analyzed. • Optimal condition was achieved based on operation characteristics understanding. - Abstract: A dual circulation fluidized bed system is widely accepted for chemical looping combustion (CLC) for enriching CO_2 from the utilization of fossil fuels. Due to the limitations of the measurement, the details of multiphase reactive flows in the interconnected fluidized bed reactors are difficult to obtain. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation provides a promising method to understand the hydrodynamics, chemical reaction, and heat and mass transfers in CLC reactors, which are very important for the rational design, optimal operation, and scaling-up of the CLC system. In this work, a 5 kW_t_h coal-fired CLC dual circulation fluidized bed system, which was developed by our research group, was first simulated for understanding gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency. The simulation results achieved good agreement with the experimental measurements, which validates the simulation model. Subsequently, to improve the combustion efficiency, a new operation condition was simulated by increasing the reactor temperature and decreasing the coal feeding. An improvement in the combustion efficiency was attained, and the simulation results for the new operation condition were also validated by the experimental measurements in the same CLC combustor. All of the above processes demonstrated the validity and usefulness of the simulation results to improve the CLC reactor operation.

  15. Effect of coal blending on the leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium in fly ash from fluidized bed coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, F.; Yamada, N.; Sato, A.; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko [Chubu Univ., Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Zhang, L. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The capture ability of fly ash to arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) was investigated through the combustion of two single bituminous coals A and B and their mixture (blending ratio of 1:1, wt/wt) in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor. The leaching characteristics of As and Se in corresponding fly ash were also conducted according to Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS). Speciation of As and Se during fly ash leaching test were predicted from the perspective of thermodynamic equilibrium. The results indicate that, combustion of coal B, containing abundant calcium, possesses a higher capture ability of As and Se than that of coal A through possible chemical reaction between As/Se with CaO. Leaching behavior of As and Se from fly ash is strongly dependent on the pH of the leachate. Free calcium in fly ash generates an alkaline leachate during leaching test and subsequently reduces As and Se leaching, which cause the leaching ratio of As and Se in fly ash derived from the combustion of coal B was much lower, relative to that in coal A. Combustion of blending coal promotes the overall capture ability of the fly ash to As/Se and reduces their leaching from fly ash through the synergy of free CaO between this two kind of fly ash.

  16. The study of partitioning of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of sewage sludge and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Lopes, M.H.; Abelha, P.; Cabrita, I.; Oliveira, J.F.S. [INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-06-15

    The behavior of Cd, Cr, Cu, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Hg during the combustion tests of a dry granular sewage sludge on a fluidized bed combustor pilot (FBC) of about 0.3 MW was evaluated. The emissions of these heavy metals from mono-combustion were compared with those of co-combustion of the sludge with a bituminous coal. The effect of the addition of limestone was also studied in order to retain sulphur compounds and to verify its influence on the retention of heavy metals (HM). Heavy metals were collected and analyzed from different locations of the installation, which included the stack, the two cyclones, and the material removed from the bed. The results showed that the volatility of metals was rather low, resulting in emissions below the legal limits of the new directive on incineration, with the exception of Hg during the mono-combustion tests. The partitioning of metals, except for Hg, appeared to follow that of ashes, amounting to levels above 90% in the bed streams in the mono-combustion case. For co-combustion, there was a lower fixation of HM in the bed ashes, mostly originating essentially from the sewage sludge, ranging between 40% and 80%. It is believed that in this latter case, a slightly higher temperature could have enhanced the volatilization, especially of Cd and Pb. However these metals were then retained in fly ashes captured in the cyclones. In the case of Hg, the volatilisation was complete. The bed ashes were free of Hg and part of Hg was retained in the cyclones and the rest was emitted either with fine ash particles or in gaseous forms. In mono-combustion the Hg emissions from the stack (particles and gas) accounted, for about 50%. This appeared to have significantly decreased in the case of co-combustion, as only about 75% has been emitted, due to the retention effect of cyclone ashes.

  17. The study of partitioning of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of sewage sludge and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Lopes, M. Helena; Abelha, Pedro; Cabrita, Isabel; Oliveira, J.F. Santos

    2003-07-01

    The behaviour of Cd, Cr, Cu, Co, Mn, Pb, Zn and Hg during the combustion tests of granular dry sewage sludges on a pilot FBC of about 0,3 MW was evaluated. The emissions of these heavy metals from mono-combustion were compared with those of co-combustion of the sludge with a bituminous coal. The effect of the addition of limestone was also studied in order to retain sulphur compounds and to verify its influence on the retention of heavy metals. Heavy metals were collected and analysed from different locations of the installation, which included the stack, the two cyclones and the material removed from the bed. The results showed that the volatility of metals was rather low, resulting in emissions below the legal limits of the new directive on incineration, with the exception of Hg during the mono-combustion tests. The partitioning of metals, except for Hg, appeared to follow that of ashes, amounting to levels above 90% in the bed streams in the mono-combustion case. For co-combustion, there was a lower fixation of HM in the bed ashes, mostly originating essentially from the sewage sludge, ranging between 40 and 80%. It is believed that in this latter case, a slightly higher bed temperature could have enhanced the volatilisation, especially of Cd and Pb. However these metals were then retained in cyclone ashes. In the case of Hg, the volatilisation was complete. The bed ashes were free of Hg and part of it was retained in the cyclone and emitted as both fine ash particles and in gaseous forms. In mono-combustion the Hg emissions from the stack (particles and gas) accounted for about 50%, although there was a significant amount unaccounted for. This appeared to have significantly decreased in the case of co-combustion, as only about 15% has been emitted, due to the retention effect of cyclone ashes which presented high quantities of unburned carton and possibly condensed sulphur species.

  18. Pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle power plant with coal gasification: Second generation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, G.L.; Bressan, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the technical and economical background of a research and development program of a novel power generation scheme, which is based on coal gasification, pressurized fluid bed combustion and combined cycles. The participants in this program are: Foster Wheeler (project leader), Westinghouse, IGT and the USA Dept. of Energy. The paper describes the characteristics of the plant, the research program in course of implementation, the components of the pilot plant and the first results obtained

  19. Considerations on valorization of biomass origin materials in co-combustion with coal in fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; H. Lopes; A. Crujeira; I. Cabrita [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-07-01

    Co-combustion of biomass materials with coal is currently gaining increasing importance, in order to meet the targets on greenhouse gas emissions, defined in the Kyoto protocol. Co-firing of coal with biomass materials could be the short-term solution in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from power stations. The work undertaken studied co-firing of meat and bone meal (MBM), olive cake and straw pellets with bituminous coals from Colombia (CC) and Poland (PC), which are commonly used in European power stations. The co-combustion studies were carried out on the pilot fluidized bed installation of INETI. Gaseous pollutants and solid concentration in flue gases and ashes from different locations were monitored. Results obtained indicate that the co-feeding of biomass materials did not present any problem and ensured stable combustion conditions and high efficiency. However, for temperatures above 800{sup o}C, bed agglomeration could be observed for all biomass species studied. Most of the combustion of biomass material, contrary to that of coal, was observed to take place in the riser where the temperature was as high as 150-250{sup o}C above that of the bed. SO{sub 2} and NOx levels were found to be lower. The emissions of dioxins could be considerable with fuels with high Cl as is the case with straw. However, mixing of fuels with high S content could lead to a strong reduction in dioxin emissions. Ashes produced from biomass combustion may be considered for further reutilization or landfilling. Other options depend on their characteristics, chemical composition and leaching behaviour. This was evaluated in this study.

  20. Combustion of agro-waste with coal in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atimtay, Aysel T. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    In this study, a review of the studies done on the co-combustion of some agro-waste in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) having an inside diameter of 102 mm and a height of 900 mm is given. The agro-waste used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics were peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry, and olive cake produced as a waste from the olive oil industry. These are typical wastes for a Mediterranean country. A lignite coal was used for co-combustion. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m} H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. Variations of emissions of various pollutants were studied by changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity and fuel feed rate). Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. Emissions were also monitored from the exhaust. Various combinations of coal and biomass mixtures were tested. During the combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from the biomass quickly volatilizes and mostly burns in the freeboard. The temperature profiles along the bed and the freeboard also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter of the biomass increases, combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. Better combustion conditions occur at higher excess air ratios. The results showed that co-combustion with these three proposed biomasses lowers the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions considerably. CO and hydrocarbon emissions are lower at the higher excess air ratios. (orig.)

  1. N2 O A greenhouse gas released from the combustion of coals in fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boavida, D.; Lobo, L. S.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of the experimental work investigating the formation of N-2 O and NO during fluidized bed combustion of coals, and of chars and volatiles produced from the pyrolysis of these coals. Ammonia (N H 3 ) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are shown to play important roles as gas phase precursors of both NO and N 2 O. The conversion of fuel-N through N H 3 and HCN to N 2 O and NO was studied using a fluidized bed combustor in the temperature range between 973 K and 1273 K, for two different coals. The results suggest that the principal contribution to N 2 O emission Originated from volatile-N, however, char-N could also have an important role, depending upon the temperature. 1 fig., 8 tabs

  2. Co-combustion of peach and apricot stone with coal in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atimtay, Aysel T.; Kaynak, Burcak [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    In this study a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) having an inside diameter of 102 mm and a height of 900 mm was used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics of peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry with coal. A lignite coal was used for co-combustion. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. Variations of emissions of various pollutants were studied by changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity, and fuel feed rate). Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. For co-combustion of apricot and peach fruit stones with a lignite coal, various ratios of biomass to coal ranging from 0 to 100 wt.% were tested. For the peach stone co-combustion tests, efficiencies are about 98% and for the apricot stone co-combustion tests, efficiencies ranged between 94.7% and 96.9% for 25%, 50% and 75% of apricot stone in the fuel mixture. The results of this study have shown that as the biomass ratio in the fuel mixture increases, the combustion takes place at the upper regions of the main column. This causes higher temperatures in the freeboard than the bed. Also the CO and hydrocarbon (C{sub m}H{sub n}) emissions increase as the biomass percentage increases in the fuel mixture. This causes decrease in the combustion efficiency. These results suggest that peach and apricot stones are potential fuels that can be utilized for clean energy production in small-scale fruit juice industries by using BFBC. The percentage of peach stones or apricot stones in the fuel mixture is suggested to be below 50 wt.% in order to obtain the emission limits of EU. During the design of the BFBC, one has to be careful about the volatile matter (VM) content of the biomass. For the complete combustion of the VM, longer freeboard or secondary air addition should be

  3. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  4. Investigation of combustion of coal briquettes in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Dulce; Abelha, Pedro; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Cabrita, Isabel

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the results obtained from an experimental combustion work undertaken to investigate the behaviour of multicomponent briquettes, prepared by mixing two different particle sizes of coal and two different types of binder species. single briquettes were burned over a wide range of temperatures in a laboratory scale fluidised bed combustor facility. Nitrogen (NO{sub x}, and N{sub 2}O) and Sulphur (SO{sub 2}) oxides emissions resulting from the combustion of these briquettes were constantly monitored during the time of burning. The levels of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CO were also recorded during the same period. Experimental results showed that coal particle size influenced burn-out times and emissions levels of some of gaseous species. The hinder type was also found to have a major influence on the emissions of different pollutants.The temperature was observed to significantly influence the extent of the effects of the other operating parameters studied.

  5. Co-combustion of coal and non-recyclable paper and plastic waste in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Boavida; P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2003-10-01

    Co-combustion of waste with coal was carried out using a fluidised bed combustor with the aim of achieving a fuel mixture with little variations in its heating value and simultaneously reducing the accumulation of non-toxic waste material by upgrading them for energy purposes. Results obtained indicate that the feeding of waste materials plays an important role to achieve conditions for a stable combustion. The form in which the fuel is fed to the combustor makes a significant contribution to achieve desirable combustion performance and differences were observed in results regarding the combustion efficiency and emissions when waste was fed densified or in a fluffy state when it was burned mixed with coal. Part of the combustion of waste material, contrary to that of coal, was observed to take place in the freeboard where the temperature was as much as 150{sup o}C above that of the bed. 15 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Co-combustion of coal and non-recyclable paper & plastic waste in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, D.; Abelha, P.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I. [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    Co-combustion of waste with coal was carried out using a fluidised bed combustor with the aim of achieving a fuel mixture with little variations in its heating value and simultaneously reducing the accumulation of non-toxic waste material by upgrading them for energy purposes. Results obtained indicate that the feeding of waste materials could present serious problems which could render conditions for a stable combustion difficult to achieve. The waste was fed mixed with coal and there was some difference observed in results regarding the combustion efficiency and emissions. Part of the combustion of waste material, contrary to that of coal, was observed to take place in the freeboard where the temperature was as much as 150{degree}C above that of the bed. 6 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Co-Combustion of Municipal Sewage Sludge and Hard Coal on Fluidized Bed Boiler WF-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajczyk Rafał

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to data of the Central Statistical Office, the amount of sludge produced in municipal wastewater treatment plants in 2010 amounted to 526000 Mg d.m. The forecast of municipal sewage sludge amount in 2015 according to KPGO2014 will reach 642400 Mg d.m. and is expected to increase in subsequent years. Significant amounts of sludge will create problems due to its utilization. In order to solve this problem the use of thermal methods for sludge utilization is expected. According to the National Waste Management Plan nearly 30% of sewage sludge mass should be thermally utilized by 2022. The article presents the results of co-combustion of coal and municipal sewage sludge in a bubbling fluidized bed boiler made by SEFAKO and located in the Municipal Heating Company in Morag. Four tests of hard coal and sewage sludge co-combustion have been conducted. Boiler performance, emissions and ash quality were investigated.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic matter associated to particulate matter emitted from atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Garcia, T.

    1999-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the organic matter (OM) content associated with particulate matter (PM) emissions from atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustion have been studied. The two main aims of the work have been (a) to study OM and PAH emissions as a function of the coal fluidized bed combustion (FBC) variables in solid phase and (b) to check if there is any correlation between OM and PAH contained in the PM. The combustion was carried out in a laboratory scale plant at different combustion conditions: temperature, percentage of oxygen excess, and total air flow. PAH associated on the particulate matter have been analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy in the synchronous mode (FS) after PM extraction by sonication with dimethylformamide (DMF). It can be concluded that there is not a direct relationship between the OM content and the PAH supported in the PM emitted. In addition, neither PM or OM show dependence between themselves

  9. Fluidized bed combustion of single coal char particles at high CO{sub 2} concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F.; Chirone, R. [CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Combustion of single coal char particles was studied at 850{sup o}C in a lab-scale fluidized bed at high CO{sub 2} concentration, typical of oxyfiring conditions. The burning rate of the particles was followed as a function of time by continuously measuring the outlet CO and O{sub 2} concentrations. Some preliminary evaluations on the significance of homogeneous CO oxidation in the reactor and of carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} in the char were also carried out. Results showed that the carbon burning rate increases with oxygen concentration and char particle size. The particle temperature is approximately equal to that of the bed up to an oxygen concentration of 2%, but it is considerably higher for larger oxygen concentrations. Both CO{sub 2} gasification of char and homogeneous CO oxidation are not negligible. The gasification reaction rate is slow and it is likely to be controlled by intrinsic kinetics. During purely gasification conditions the extent of carbon loss due to particle attrition by abrasion (estimated from the carbon mass balance) appears to be much more important than under combustion conditions.

  10. Coal combustion technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.X.

    1994-01-01

    Coal is the most important energy source in China, the environmental pollution problem derived from coal burning is rather serious in China. The present author discusses coal burning technologies both in boilers and industrial furnaces and their relations with environmental protection problems in China. The technological situations of Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor, Pulverized Coal Combustor with Aerodynamic Flame Holder and Coal Water Slurry Combustion have been discussed here as some of the interesting problems in China only. (author). 3 refs

  11. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) co-firing of coal and hospital waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The proposed project involves co-firing of coal and medical waste (including infectious medical waste) in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) to safely dispose of medical waste and produce steam for hospital needs. Combustion at the design temperature and residence time (duration) in the AFBC has been proven to render infectious medical waste free of disease producing organisms. The project would be located at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The estimated cost of the proposed AFBC facility is nearly $4 million. It would be jointly funded by DOE, Veterans Affairs, and Donlee Technologies, Inc., of York, Pennsylvania, under a cooperative agreement between DOE and Donlee. Under the terms of this agreement, $3.708 million in cost-shared financial assistance would be jointly provided by DOE and the Veterans Affairs (50/50), with $278,000 provided by Donlee. The purposes of the proposed project are to: (1) provide the VA Medical Center and the Good Samaritan Hospital (GSH), also of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, with a solution for disposal of their medical waste; and (2) demonstrate that a new coal-burning technology can safely incinerate infectious medical waste, produce steam to meet hospital needs, and comply with environmental regulations

  12. Release of alkali salts and coal volatiles affecting internal components in fluidized bed combustion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias del Campo, E.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the potential advantages of atmospheric fluidized bed systems, experience has proved that, under certain environments and operating conditions, a given material employed for internal components could lead to catastrophic events. In this study, an attempt is made to establish material selection and operational criteria that optimize performance and availability based on theoretical considerations of the bed hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and combustion process. The theoretical results may indicate that, for high-volatile coals with particle diameters (dc of 1-3 mm and sand particle size (ds of 0.674 mm, a considerable proportion of alkali chlorides may be transferred into the freeboard region of fluidized bed combustors as vapor phase, at bed temperatures (Tb < 840 °C, excess air (XSA ≤ 20 %, static bed height (Hs ≤ 0.2 m and fluidizing velocity (Uo < 1 m/s. Under these operating conditions, a high alkali deposition may be expected to occur in heat exchange tubes located above the bed. Conversely, when the combustors operate at Tb > 890 °C and XSA > 30 %, a high oxidation rate of the in-bed tubes may be present. Nevertheless, for these higher Tb values and XSA < 10 %, corrosion attack of metallic components, via sulfidation, would occur since the excessive gas-phase combustion within the bed induced a local oxygen depletion.

    A pesar de las ventajas potenciales de los sistemas atmosféricos de lecho fluidizado, la experiencia ha demostrado que, bajo ciertas atmósferas y condiciones de operación, un material que se emplea como componente interno podría experimentar una falla y conducir a eventos catastróficos. En este estudio, se intenta establecer un criterio tanto operativo como de selección del material que permita optimizar su disponibilidad y funcionalidad basados en consideraciones teóricas de la hidrodinámica del lecho, la termodin

  13. Application of wasted sea-shell to desulfurizer in fluidized bed coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Ichiro; Saito, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Takahiro

    1999-07-01

    Almost all wasted seashells consist of CaCo{sub 3}, and are similar to limestone. It would be proposed that the seashell could be applied as a desulfurizer. In this study, desulfurization characteristics of the seashell are fundamentally studied by using a thermobalance and a bubbling fluidized coal combustor with comparing the results obtained by limestone as a reference. Under the constant calcination temperature, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells attains more than about 70% after the desulfurization period of 30 h. For the limestones, on the other hand, the desulfurization efficiency becomes only 38%. Under practical conditions of fluidized bed coal combustion, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells also indicates higher value than that for the limestones. The desulfurization efficiency depends on the pore size distribution of CaO rather than its specific surface area. The mean pore size of the calcined seashell is about 10 times as large as that of the calcined limestones. from Scanning Electro-Microscope (SEM) photos of the surface of CaCO{sub 3}, CaO and the sulfurized particles of the seashells the large pores can be observed. In measuring cross-sectional distribution of sulfur inside the particles by using an Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) system, the sulfur in the sulfurized particle of limestone is only trapped near the particle surface. For the seashells, whereas, the sulfur is distributed over the whole body of particle. Desulfurization efficiency for the limestone, into which some alkali metal compounds are added, increases with increasing the concentration of alkali metal compounds added. In order of increasing effect the key elemental species to enhance the desulfurization activities are Cl, Na and K. Alkali metal compounds can enhance the desulfurization activities, due to solution of CaO in molten NaCl. This is one of the reasons why the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells improves.

  14. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  15. Fluidized bed combustion of refuse-derived fuel in presence of protective coal ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, Eduardo [CIRCE, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna, 3, Zaragoza (Spain); Aho, Martti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Silvennoinen, Jaani; Nurminen, Riku-Ville [Kvaerner Power, P.O.Box 109, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    Combustion of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) alone or together with other biomass leads to superheater fouling and corrosion in efficient power plants (with high steam values) due to vaporization and condensation of alkali chlorides. In this study, means were found to raise the portion of RDF to 40% enb without risk to boilers. This was done by co-firing RDF with coal and optimizing coal quality. Free aluminum silicate in coal captured alkalies from vaporized alkali chlorides preventing Cl condensation to superheaters. Strong fouling and corrosion were simultaneously averted. Results from 100 kW and 4 MW CFB reactors are reported. (author)

  16. The identification of unusual microscopic features in coal and their derived chars: Influence on coal fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentim, B. [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Lemos de Sousa, M.J. [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Praca de Gomes Teixeira, 4099-002 Porto (Portugal); Abelha, P.; Boavida, D.; Gulyurtlu, I. [Departamento de Engenharia Energetica e Controlo Ambiental (DEECA), Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao (INETI), Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, Edif. J, 1649-038, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2006-06-06

    During the petrographic study of seven feed coals from different origins, it was found that these coals presented microfeatures such as: material size, shape, weathering, thermally affected particles and contamination. After devolatilization under fluidized bed conditions, some chars presented the consequences of the above mentioned microfeatures, i.e., unreacted coal, unswelled particles, coatings and microstratification. Since the amounts of the microfeatures observed were low (less than 1%), the present study is essentially observational/descriptional. However, it seems very likely, from the observations that were made, that the occurrence of one or more of these microfeatures in coal, depending on their kind and abundance, may have significant effect on the coal devolatilization. (author)

  17. The emissions of VOCs during co-combustion of coal with different waste materials in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; A. Gregorio; A. Garcia-Garcia; D. Boavida; A. Crujeira; I. Cabrita [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2004-06-01

    The combustion of different fuels gives rise to the formation of small but appreciable amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). They basically result from incomplete combustion and their emissions have negative repercussions on health and on the environment in general. As their measurement is difficult, costly, and very time-consuming, very little is reported on the emissions of VOCs from combustion installations. In this study, various blends of two different coals with several wastes were burned in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor and measurements of VOCs at several locations along the combustor height as well as just before the stack were carried out. The results demonstrate that the parameters important for the formation of VOCs are temperature, excess air levels, and the effectiveness of the mixing of air with fuel. Furthermore, it was observed that coal was the principal source of VOCs, but the combustion of volatiles from fuels such as biomass, occurring in the freeboard, was important in reducing the emissions of VOCs to almost zero. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Trace elements partitioning during coal combustion in fluidized bed under O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haixin; Zhao, Changsui; Liang, Cai; Duan, Lunbo; Chen, Huichao [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature and O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere on trace elements (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Se) partitioning during combustion of Xuzhou bituminous coal in a 6 kWth fluidized bed. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) were used to determine trace elements contents in raw coal, bottom ash, fly ash and flue gas. The results indicate that with bed temperature increase, the relative enrichment of all the trace elements except Cr in bottom ash decreases suggesting that their volatility is enhanced. The relative enrichments of hardly volatile elements, like Cr and Mn in fly ash increase with bed temperature increase while those of partially volatile and highly volatile elements in fly ash are opposite. The relative enrichments of trace elements except Cr and Mn in fly ash are higher than those in bottom ash. Increasing bed temperature promotes elements like As, Se and Hg to migrate to vapor phase, Mn to migrate to fly ash and Cr to migrate to both bottom ash and fly ash. 21%O{sub 2}/79%CO{sub 2} atmosphere improves the volatility of Cr, Mn, Co, Se and their migration to fly ash, while restrains the volatility of As, Ni, Pb. It has little effect on the volatility of Hg but improves its migration to fly ash. Mass balance ratio was also calculated to observe trace elements distribution in bottom ash, fly ash and flue gas. There is no much difference in trace elements distribution between the two atmospheres. It can be seen that the trace elements proportion in fly ash is much greater, and more than 40% of Hg is distributed in the gas phase. Most of Hg and Se volatilize during combustion. The mass balance ratios are 87 {proportional_to} 129% which is considered acceptable.

  19. Use of nitrogen stable isotope analysis to understand char nitrogen evolution during the fluidized-bed co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana Arenillas; Roberto Garcia; Chenggong Sun; Colin E. Snape; Angel H. Moreno; Fernando Rubiera; Jose J. Pis [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2005-04-01

    NOx emissions from sewage sludge combustion are a concern, because of the usually high nitrogen content of this fuel. The interactions during co-combustion in a fluidized-bed reactor of sewage sludge and a bituminous coal were evaluated, in relation to the nitrogen evolution during the combustion process. The nitrogen stable isotope measurements provide novel results regarding the tracing of nitrogen during combustion. Our preliminary results show that the co-combustion chars retain more nitrogen than expected, with the additional nitrogen being mainly derived from the sludge. Additional measurements are planned on the resultant co-combustion gases, to aid source apportionment of the NOx arising from coal/sewage interactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Contribution to the combustion and emission of nitrogen oxides of Kosovo and Kolubara coals in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radovanovic, M.; Savic, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the results of combustion of different sizes of domestic lignites Kosovo and Kolubara are presented. Investigation has been carried on a laboratory experimental facility for combustion in fluidized bed, power 1 kW. Specified amount of fuel is put into fluidized bed and temperature and concentration of combustion products (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO, NO{sub s} and SO{sub 2}) are recorded and produced. The emission of nitrogen oxides is specially treated in this paper. Also, the ignition delay of volatile matter, combustion of volatiles and total time of combustion are found. 25 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thornock, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Y Jia, W. Morris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pedel, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rezeai, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  2. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  3. A comparison of circulating fluidised bed combustion and gasification power plant technologies for processing mixtures of coal, biomass and plastic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlveen-Wright, D.R.; Huang, Y.; McMullan, J.T.; Pinto, F.; Franco, C.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Armesto, L.; Cabanillas, A.; Caballero, M.A.; Aznar, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental regulations concerning emission limitations from the use of fossil fuels in large combustion plants have stimulated interest in biomass for electricity generation. The main objective of the present study was to examine the technical and economic viability of using combustion and gasification of coal mixed with biomass and plastic wastes, with the aim of developing an environmentally acceptable process to decrease their amounts in the waste stream through energy recovery. Mixtures of a high ash coal with biomass and/or plastic using fluidised bed technologies (combustion and gasification) were considered. Experiments were carried out in laboratory and pilot plant fluidised bed systems on the combustion and air/catalyst and air/steam gasification of these feedstocks and the data obtained were used in the techno-economic analyses. The experimental results were used in simulations of medium to large-scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) power generation plants. Techno-economic analysis of the modelled CFB combustion systems showed efficiencies of around 40.5% (and around 46.5% for the modelled CFB gasification systems) when fuelled solely by coal, which were only minimally affected by co-firing with up to 20% biomass and/or wastes. Specific investments were found to be around $2150/kWe to $2400/kWe ($1350/kWe to $1450/kWe) and break-even electricity selling prices to be around $68/MWh to $78/MWh ($49/MWh to $54/MWh). Their emissions were found to be within the emission limit values of the large combustion plant directive. Fluidised bed technologies were found to be very suitable for co-firing coal and biomass and/or plastic waste and to offer good options for the replacement of obsolete or polluting power plants. (author)

  4. Nitrogen evolution during the co-combustion of hydrothermally treated municipal solid waste and coal in a bubbling fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Jin, Yuqi; Liu, Hongmei; Ma, Xiaojun; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen evolution was studied during the co-combustion of hydrothermally treated municipal solid wastes (HT MSW) and coal in a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB). HT MSW blending ratios as 10%, 20% and 30% (wt.%) were selected and tested at 700, 800, 900 °C. Emissions of NO and N2O from blends were measured and compared with the results of mono-combustion trials. Moreover, concentrations of precursors like NH3 and HCN were also quantified. The results are summarized as follows: NO emissions were predominant in all the cases, which rose with increasing temperature. The blending of HT MSW contributed to the NO reduction. N2O emissions decreased with temperature rising and the blending of HT MSW also presented positive effects. At 30% HT MSW addition, both NO and N2O emissions showed the lowest values (391.85 ppm and 55.33 ppm, respectively at 900 °C). For the precursors, more HCN was detected than NH3 and both played important roles on the gas side nitrogen evolution. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Fluidised bed combustion: a new route to power and heat from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, H D [Bergbau-Forschung G.m.b.H., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-02-01

    The functioning of fluidized-bed firings and their advantages with regard to SO/sub 2/ emissions are described. The principle of design of a fluidized-bed boiler and a gas/steam turbine power plant with fluidized-bed firing under pressure is outlined. The application and their economics in heat and power generation and marketing potential of fluidized-bed firings and their economics in heat and power generation is pointed out. The construction of waste-fired incinerators has already become possible, but there is still a lot of development work to be done until fluidized-bed firings can be used in central heatings, combined-cycle power plants, and large power plants.

  6. Quantification of chlorine and alkali emissions from fluid bed combustion of coal by equilibrium calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward [IMAF Group, 184 Marlborough Avenue, Ottawa, ON (Canada) K1N 8G4; Zheng, Ligang [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Energy Technology Centre, 1 Haanel Drive, Nepean, ON (Canada) K1A 1M1

    2003-04-15

    A computer model based on the Gibbs energy minimization principle was used to identify and quantify chlorine (Cl)- and alkali-containing species formed in the temperature range from 1100 to 1200 K, air/coal ratio of 1.0 and 1.1 and Ca/S ratio varying from 0 to 2.5 using low and high Cl content coals. HCl, KCl and NaCl were the major Cl-containing volatile compounds. The amount of HCl in the vapor phase decreased and that of KCl and NaCl increased with increasing Ca/S ratio from 0 to 2.5, whereas the increase in the air/coal ratio from 1.0 to 1.1 had the opposite effect. KCl and NaCl were the major, and KOH, NaOH, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} the minor alkali-containing species in the vapor phase of all the cases analyzed. The amount of all alkali metal-containing compounds increased with increasing Ca/S ratio and decreased with increasing air/coal ratio from 1.0 to 1.1. For the low Cl coal, the relative contribution of KOH and NaOH to the overall alkali emissions was greater than that for the high Cl coal.

  7. Study on the influence of electromagnetic field on the property of coal combustion burnout in circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Y. [Ruiping Coal and Electric Power Ltd. Co., Ruzhou (China)

    2008-08-15

    To study the influences of electromagnetism field pretreatment of pulverized Coal (EFPPC) on the properties of its combustion, thermogravimetric analysis, a Muffle furnace experiment and an X-ray diffraction experiment were carried out for three Coal banks. It was shown that EFPPC will induce the molecular structure of Coal to change into amorphous carbon, which causes an increase in the rate of oxygen absorption during the initial stages of Coal burning and reaction activity. It is also shown that the residual carbon of bituminous Coal would be increased by about 0.33% - 0.41%, i.e, the loss of standard Coal is about 3,000 t/a for double 480 t/h boilers, when applying EFPPC for 1 min at a temperature of 800 - 1,000 {sup o}C. When the temperature increases 200 {sup o}C, the residual carbon increases by about 2.07% but the effect of EFPPC is less than 0.21% for bituminous Coal and residual carbon is about 1.47% and the effect of EFPPC is less than 0.05% for lean Coal. Therefore the effect of increasing the temperature of EFPPC on residual carbon is less than that of increasing the time of EFPPC. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Modelling of Effects of Operating Conditions and Coal Reactivity on Temperature of Burning Particles in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Pohořelý, Michael; Trnka, Otakar

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2004), s. 261-274 ISSN 1211-1910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072201; GA AV ČR IAA4072001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : fluidized bed combustion * char temperature * modelling Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality

  9. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  10. Fixed-bed studies of the interactions between mercury and coal combustion fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Grant E.; DeWall, Raymond A. [Energy and Environmental Research Center, 15 North 23rd Street, Grand Forks, ND 58203 (United States); Senior, Constance L. [Reaction Engineering International, 77 West 200 South, Suite 210, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 (United States)

    2003-08-15

    Sixteen different fly ash samples, generated from both pilot-scale and full-scale combustion systems, were exposed to a simulated flue gas containing either elemental mercury or HgCl{sub 2} in a bench-scale reactor system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center to evaluate the interactions and determine the effects of temperature, mercury species, and ash type on adsorption of mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury. The fly ash samples were characterized for surface area, loss on ignition, and forms of iron in the ash. While many of the ash samples oxidized elemental mercury, not all of the samples that oxidized mercury also captured elemental mercury. However, no capture of elemental mercury was observed without accompanying oxidation. Generally, oxidation of elemental mercury increased with increasing amount of magnetite in the ash. However, one high-carbon subbituminous ash with no magnetite showed considerable mercury oxidation that may have been due to unburned carbon. Surface area as well as the nature of the surface appeared to be important for oxidation and adsorption of elemental mercury. The capacity of the ash samples for HgCl{sub 2} was similar to that for elemental mercury. There was a good correlation between the capacity for HgCl{sub 2} and the surface area; capacity decreased with increasing temperature.

  11. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  12. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal as applied to electrical utility systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal (FBC), specifically as applied to base-load generation of electrical energy by utilities. The public health impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) plants are expected to be quite similar to those for Low Sulfur Coal (LSC) and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants because all appear to be able to meet Federal emission standards; however, there are emissions not covered by standards. Hydrocarbon emissions are higher and trace element emissions are lower for FBC than for conventional technologies. For FBC, based on an analytical model and a single emission data point, the polycyclic organic material decreases the anticipated lifespan of the highly exposed public very slightly. Added health protection due to lower trace element emissions is not known. Although there is a large quantity of solid wastes from the generating plant, the environmental impact of the FBC technology due to solid residue appears lower than for FGD, where sludge management requires larger land areas and presents problems due to the environmentally noxious calcium sulfite in the waste. Fixing the sludge may become a requirement that increases the cost of wet-limestone FGD but makes that system more acceptable. The potential for aquatic or terrestrial impacts from hydrocarbon emissions is low. If application of AFBC technology increases the use of local high-sulfur coals to the detriment of western low-sulfur coal, a sociological benefit could accrue to the FBC (or FGD) technology, because impacts caused by western boom towns would decrease. The infrastructure of areas that mine high-sulfur coal in the Midwest are better equipped to handle increased mining than the West.

  13. Assessment of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal-combustion gas-turbine cogeneration system for industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R. L.; Holcomb, R. S.; Tallackson, J. R.

    1979-10-01

    This study was initiated to provide information on the future potential industrial market for a cogeneration system consisting of a fluidized-bed coal combustor coupled to a gas-turbine (Brayton cycle) power system that uses air as the working fluid. In assessing the potential applications for the system, the process heat energy consumption by industry is identified, with special detail included on the six most energy-intensive industries. The potential impact on the nation's oil and natural gas consumption that would result from wide-spread utilization of coal for process heat is also estimated. The fraction of industrial process heat that the system could feasibly satisfy from a thermodynamic viewpoint is estimated, and the performance (potential fuel efficiency and heat/power ratio) of the atmospheric fluidized-bed gas-turbine system is calculated. Also treated are several specific case studies of industries in which the system could be incorporated. Major parameters are specified, and flow sheets are derived for systems that would satisfy the heat and power requirements of the process or industry. The overall fuel utilization efficiency, thermal power rating, and potential number of installations are specified for these case studies. The findings of the study indicate that there is a sizable potential market for the system, with over 1000 possible installations disclosed after reviewing only 8 specific industries from 6 major Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. The potential displacement of oil and gas by coal in process heating is shown to be about 1.60 m/sup 3//sec (870,000 bbl/d) of oil and 4590 m/sup 3//sec (14.0 billion ft/sup 3//d) of natural gas for all industries combined. Continued development of the fluidized-bed coal combustor and power system is recommended so that this potential may be at least partially realized.

  14. The emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O during the combustion of coal blends in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelha, P.; Boavida, D.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I.

    1999-07-01

    Combustion studies of five coals of different origins around the world (Colombia, Spain, South Africa and the US), were carried out in a laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor. Five blends prepared by mixing two coals, in three varying amounts, based on their petrological characterization, were selected to study the possibility of reduction NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} emissions. Temperature, fuel ratio and N/C ratio were found to be the most important parameters affecting NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions among the single coals, while fuel-S content was the major factor in SO{sub 2} emissions. The results showed that some blends had the opposite behavior concerning the release of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in relation to parent coals, and the emissions were higher than expected. The N{sub 2}O amounts observed were however, in almost all blends tested, lower than predicted values. With some blends, the mixing levels intended to reduce SO{sub 2} were not always found to correspond to those for simultaneous decrease of NO{sub x}, raising difficulties in the optimization of both emission levels. Most of the blends studied showed some evidence of interaction between the individual constituent coals. Varying the proportion of the blend components was observed to alter the temperatures at which interactions were stronger.

  15. Co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system with coal and refuse derived fuels and/or sludges. Task 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLallo, M.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1994-01-01

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach, the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire-derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  16. Fluidized bed combustion: mixing and pollutant limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckner, B. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-10-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has been applied commercially during a few decades, and sufficient knowledge is gained to design boilers with sizes of up to several hundreds of megawatt thermal power (MW{sub th}). The knowledge of what goes on inside a large combustion chamber is still limited, however, and this impedes further optimization and efficient solution of problems that might occur. Despite this lack of knowledge the present survey deals with combustion chamber processes and discusses mixing and distribution of fuel and air in the combustion chamber and its importance for sulphur capture and reduction of emissions of nitrogen oxides. It is desirable to present the material in a general way and to cover the entire field of FBC. However, the scarce openly published information deals mostly with coal combustion in atmospheric circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors, and therefore this application will receive most attention, but reference is also made to pressurized combustion and to other fuels than coal. In this context the important work made in the LIEKKI project on the analysis of different fuels and on the influence of pressure should be especially pointed out. (orig.)

  17. Formation and destruction mechanisms of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion in circulating fluidized beds; Mecanismes de formation et de destruction des oxydes d`azote lors de la combustion du charbon en lit fluidise circulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrel, G.; Lecuyer, I. [Universite du Haut-Rhin, 68 - Mulhouse (France)

    1997-01-01

    Formation and reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO and N{sub 2}O) during coal combustion in a circulating fluidized bed (CFBC) are very complicated and yet badly known. The aim of the present study was to better characterize these phenomena on a small-sized experimental unit (reactor diameter: 5 cm), with the possibility to re-inject the solids in the bottom of the furnace, as in a real industrial unit. This should allow then to develop a numerical set of chemical reactions involving the nitrogen oxides. The experimental results showed that coal ash plays a great role in reducing nitrogen oxides, the determining parameter being the quantity of unburnt carbon remaining in the ash. The study then detailed the interaction between nitrogen oxides and de-volatilized (char) according to the temperature, NO{sub x} concentration and the mass of solid. In the absence of oxygen small quantities of char can very significantly reduce NO as well as N{sub 2}O. It was possible to establish destruction kinetics on these particles, and orders of reaction could be determined versus the NO{sub x} concentration and the char particle mass (heterogeneous phase chemical reactions). Then, the coal pyrolysis study enabled to identify the products released during coal devolatilization and thermogravimetric analyses displayed several successive weight losses due CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} releases, during a linear temperature increase. Lastly coal combustion was studied in the small pilot with variable experimental conditions. Using the previous experimental was studied in the small pilot with variable experimental conditions. Using the previous experimental results, a model was developed to calculate NO{sub x} concentrations during the coal combustion and validated. The NO and N{sub 2}O contents calculated are thoroughly correlated with the experimental data whatever the injection carbon/oxygen ratio is. (author) 96 refs.

  18. Method for increasing the calorific value of gas produced by the in situ combustion of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention relates to the production of relatively high Btu gas by the in situ combustion of subterranean coal. The coal bed is penetrated with a horizontally-extending borehole and combustion is initiated in the coal bed contiguous to the borehole. The absolute pressure within the resulting combustion zone is then regulated at a desired value near the pore pressure within the coal bed so that selected quantities of water naturally present in the coal will flow into the combustion zone to effect a hydrogen and carbon monoxide-producing steam-carbon reaction with the hot carbon in the combustion zone for increasing the calorific value of the product gas.

  19. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.; Boysen, John E.

    1992-02-11

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  20. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm and VOC (30 mg/m3 have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the combustion of high quality hard coal, 600 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively. Optional reduction of SO2 and NOx emission may require the installation of flue gas desulphurization and de-NOx systems.

  1. Identification and quantification of priority species from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Zheng, L.; Hlavacek, T. [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories

    1996-07-01

    The objective is to quantify and characterize emissions from pulverized coal combustion of seven coals and the circulating fluidized bed combustion of four coals. The species of particular interest are sulphur, nitrogen, chlorine, arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, potassium, and sodium. The Facility for Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics (F{asterisk}A{asterisk}C{asterisk}T) method is used to predict type and amount of priority species. Prediction is made for combustion with and without the presence of limestone. The results show that the combustion technology used influences the amount of priority species emitted. 16 tabs., 3 apps.

  2. Combustion in fluidized bed reactors; Verbrennung in Wirbelschichtreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, Karl J. [vivis CONSULT GmbH, Nietwerder (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Since the first application for the coal gasification, the fluidized bed technology has passed an impressive development. Nowadays, the fluidized bed technology is utilized at chemical processes, drying and cooling, gasification, combustion and purification of exhaust gas. In the firing technology, the fluidized technology initially has been proved in the combustion of very high ash coal and sewage sludge. Recently, the fluidized bed technology also is applied in the drying of sewage sludge, combustion of domestic waste - as in Japan and Sweden - as well as in the gasification and combustion of substitute fuels, biomass - wood pellets, wood chips, straw, cocoa shells and so forth - and residues from the paper manufacturing - such as in Germany and Austria. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on the combustion of sewage sludge, substitute fuels and biomass.

  3. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  4. Experimental investigation of the oxy-fuel combustion of hard coal in a circulating fluidized-bed combustion; Experimentelle Untersuchung der Oxy-Fuel-Verbrennung von Steinkohle in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Gerrit Arne

    2017-03-16

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 first illustrated the social, economic and politic focus being placed on combating climate change caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases. From there onwards research and development efforts have particularly centred on the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the production of electrical power through the use of carbonaceous fossil fuels. The long-term goal is a conversion to sustainable and CO{sub 2} free means of producing power, utilizing in the main part renewable forms of energy such as solar, wind and hydro power. Currently, such renewable ways of creating electricity only represent a small percentage of global energy production. The technological and economic hurdles that are associated with a substantial increase of renewable energy production have greatly slowed their increased implementation. However, the goal of keeping the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration below 450 ppm requires a significantly faster reduction in the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, considerations are being given to bridge technologies which would be able to capture and store the CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fired power plants. These technologies are referred to as CCS (carbon capture and storage). Oxy-fuel combustion, combustion with pure oxygen instead of air, is one of those technologies and forms the focus of investigation of this work. The Institute of Combustion and Power Plant Technology in Stuttgart, Germany, have researched this matter, carrying out combustion experiments in its 150 kW{sub th} circulating fluidized bed pilot facility. The experiments were aimed at investigating the influence of excess oxygen, combustion temperature and inlet oxygen concentration on the combustion process and comparing air to oxy-fuel combustion. These results were compared to the results of fundamental investigations and combustion experiments carried out by other research groups. The relationship

  5. SELECTION OF SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMBUSTION OF BOSNIAN COALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anes Kazagić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with optimization of coal combustion conditions to support selection a sustainable combustion technology and an optimal furnace and boiler design. A methodology for optimization of coal combustion conditions is proposed and demonstrated on the example of Bosnian coals. The properties of Bosnian coals vary widely from one coal basin to the next, even between coal mines within the same basin. Very high percentage of ash (particularly in Bosnian brown coal makes clear certain differences between Bosnian coal types and other world coal types, providing a strong argument for investigating specific problems related to the combustion of Bosnian coals, as well as ways to improve their combustion behaviour. In this work, options of the referent energy system (boiler with different process temperatures, corresponding to the different combustion technologies; pulverised fuel combustion (slag tap or dry bottom furnace and fluidized bed combustion, are under consideration for the coals tested. Sustainability assessment, based on calculation economic and environment indicators, in combination with common low cost planning method, is used for the optimization. The total costs in the lifetime are presented by General index of total costs, calculated on the base of agglomeration of basic economic indicators and the economic indicators derived from environmental indicators. So, proposed methodology is based on identification of those combustion technologies and combustion conditions for coals tested for which the total costs in lifetime of the system under consideration are lowest, provided that all environmental issues of the energy system is fulfilled during the lifetime. Inputs for calculation of the sustainability indicators are provided by the measurements on an experimental furnace with possibility of infinite variation of process temperature, supported by good praxis from the power plants which use the fuels tested and by thermal

  6. Co-combustion of waste materials using fluidized bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Lopes; I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; T. Crujeira; D. Boavida; I. Cabrita [INETI-DEECA, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in using renewable fuels in order to sustain the CO{sub 2} accumulation. Several waste materials can be used as coal substitutes as long as they contain significant combustible matter, as for example MSW and sewage sludge. Besides the outcome of the energetic valorization of such materials, combustion must be regarded as a pre-treatment process, contributing to the safe management of wastes. Landfilling is an expensive management option and requires a previous destruction of the organic matter present in residues, since its degradation generates greenhouse gases and produces acidic organic leachates. Fluidized bed combustion is a promising technology for the use of mixtures of coal and combustible wastes. This paper presents INETI's experience in the co-combustion of coal with this kind of residues performed in a pilot fluidized bed. Both the RDF (from MSW and sewage sludge) and sewage sludge combustion problems were addressed, relating the gaseous emissions, the behaviour of metals and the leachability of ashes and a comparison was made between co-combustion and mono-combustion in order to verify the influence of the utilization of coal. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  8. The Bulgarian coal and the fluid bed technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, M.; Georgiev, J.; Lebedov, K.; Petrov, N.

    2000-01-01

    Because of low-quality of the most of Bulgarian coal and more rigorous ecological restrictions for decreasing of greenhouse gases the fluidized bed technology is the most appropriate combustion technology. A study with a pilot plant aiming to establish the values of technological parameters in view to maintain stable process of fluidized bed combustion at the specific burning characteristics of the Bulgarian coal was carried out. Coal of different quality and particle size production of 'Marbas' LTD mines were used. Series of experiments with batches of strictly determined content were carried out at minimal, average and maximal load. The technological factors as: layer's aerodynamics, layer's height, fuel's quantity and quantity of inert material were changed at each batch. The ecological factors were optimized considering coal's quality, plant's parameters, limestone's dosing and layer's aerodynamics. A regressive model for optimization of technological and ecological factors was created. An average coefficient of performance was achieved, resp. 82.27 % at combustion of coal from mines 'Maritsa-West' and 90 % from mine 'Lev'. A coefficient of sulfur oxides' capture 70 % was obtained at coal with sulfur content 3.1-3.9 %. In conclusion the fluidized bed technology is very suitable for combustion's characteristics of the Bulgarian coal

  9. Kinetics of gasification and combustion of residues, biomass and coal in a bubbling fluidized bed; Die Kinetik der Vergasung und Verbrennung unterschiedlicher Abfaelle, Biomassen und Kohlen in der blasenbildenden Wirbelschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, S; Krumm, W [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Energie- und Umweltverfahrenstechnik

    1998-09-01

    The combustion and gasification characteristics of Rhenish brown coal, domestic waste, waste plastics, wood and sewage sludge were investigated in a bubbling atmospheric fluidized bed in the laboratory scale. The materials were pyrolyzed in the fluidized bed in a nitrogen atmosphere. The residual coke was combuted in the presence of oxygen with varying operating parameters or else gasified in the presence of carbon dioxide. The different materials were characterized by global combustion rates, and kinetic parameters were determined for residual coke combustion. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Verbrennungs- und Vergasungsverhalten von Rheinischer Braunkohle, Hausmuell, Restkunststoff, Holz und Klaerschlamm wurde in einer blasenbildenden, atmosphaerischen Laborwirbelschicht untersucht. Die Einsatzstoffe wurden in der mit Stickstoff fluidisierten Wirbelschicht pyrolysiert. Der verbleibende Restkoks wurde anschliessend unter Variation der Betriebsparameter mit Sauerstoff verbrannt oder mit Kohlendioxid vergast. Die unterschiedlichen Einsatzstoffe wurden durch globale Vebrennungsraten charakterisiert. Fuer die Restkoksverbrennung wurden kinetische Parameter ermittelt. (orig.)

  10. The release of nitrogen in coal combustion and pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varey, J.E.; Hindmarsh, C.J.; Thomas, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental aspects of coal utilization are a major concern. Recent advances in the development of low NO x burners and the emerging technologies of fluidized bed combustion have led to the identification of coal char nitrogen as the major contributor to the nitrogen oxides released during combustion. The temperature programmed combustion and pyrolysis of a series of coals covering a wide range of rank have been investigated. In addition, maceral concentrates have been investigated to assess the variation in the combustion behavior and the release of nitrogen in the pyrolysis and combustion of macerals. This investigation has involved the use of thermogravimetric analysis - mass spectrometry (TG-MS) with two sampling options: (1) ∼1cm from the sample and (2) at the exit of the TG. The former allows reactive species to be identified in the combustion of the coals. These temperature programmed combustion results have been compared with similar measurements carried out at the exit of the TG where the products are at equilibrium. In addition, pyrolysis studies have been carried out under similar conditions. The results show that reactive intermediate species such as HCN, (CN) 2 , COS etc. can be detected in the combustion products. The evolution of these species during combustion are compared with the pyrolysis products of the coal. The results are discussed in relation to the structure of the coals and the conversion of volatile species and char nitrogen to nitrogen oxides

  11. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  12. Management of coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-01

    It has been estimated that 780 Mt of coal combustion products (CCPs) were produced worldwide in 2010. Only about 53.5% were utilised, the rest went to storage or disposal sites. Disposal of coal combustion waste (CCW) on-site at a power plant may involve decades-long accumulation of waste, with hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of tonnes of dry ash or wet ash slurry being stored. In December 2008, a coal combustion waste pond in Kingston, Tennessee, USA burst. Over 4 million cubic metres of ash sludge poured out, burying houses and rivers in tonnes of toxic waste. Clean-up is expected to continue into 2014 and will cost $1.2 billion. The incident drew worldwide attention to the risk of CCW disposal. This caused a number of countries to review CCW management methods and regulations. The report begins by outlining the physical and chemical characteristics of the different type of ashes generated in a coal-fired power plant. The amounts of CCPs produced and regulations on CCW management in selected countries have been compiled. The CCW disposal methods are then discussed. Finally, the potential environmental impacts and human health risks of CCW disposal, together with the methods used to prevent them, are reviewed.

  13. N2O emission under fluidized bed combustion condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, B.X.; Yao, Q.; Mi, T.; Liu, D.C.; Feng, B.; Winter, Franz

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, many rules about N 2 O and NO x emission under fluidized bed combustion conditions were found by experiments. The research results indicate that CaO, CaSO 4 , Fe 2 O 3 and char have important influence on decomposition of N 2 O; co-combustion of coal and biomass are effective measures to low N 2 O and NO x emission

  14. Emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants during Chinese coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, R.; Zhu, H.J.; Zheng, C.G.; Xu, M.H. [Environmental Technology Institute, Singapore (Singapore). Innovative Center

    2002-05-01

    The emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during the combustion of several typical Chinese coals were investigated. First, the distribution of four types of HAP, i.e., aliphatics, cyclic hydrocarbons, monoaromatic compounds and PAHs, in the CH{sub 2}C{sub l2} extracts of six Chinese coals were studied and the influences of the extractive times and coal varieties were also evaluated. Second, the partitioning of these HAPs in the flue gas during coal combustion in a small-scale reactor were investigated, depending on oven temperatures (500, 600, 700, 800, 900{sup o}C) and coal varieties. The behaviors of HAP in the combustion flue gas were compared with those in the CH{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, extracts. Finally, combustion was conducted at given conditions in two laboratory-scale reactors: a fluidized bed and a fixed bed. Two coals (Shengmu bituminous coal and Xunhuan anthracite coal) and one coke were considered. The HAP partitioning both in flue gases and in ashes were evaluated and compared between the two combustors.

  15. Environmental care in coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Kvaerner Power will supply a CYMIC{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler with a 63 MW electricity capacity to Manitowoc Public Utilities, in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, USA in 2006. This boiler is designed to burn bituminous coal and petroleum coke, with minimised emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx. Kvaerner Power CFBs are capable of burning either coal or biomass (eg paper pellets) in any combination. Recent deliveries, to Indonesia and China as well as the USA, are listed. 1 tab., 5 photos.

  16. Co-combustion of anthracite coal and wood pellets: Thermodynamic analysis, combustion efficiency, pollutant emissions and ash slagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feihong; Zhong, Zhaoping

    2018-08-01

    This work presents studies on the co-combustion of anthracite coal and wood pellets in fluidized bed. Prior to the fluidized bed combustion, thermogravimetric analysis are performed to investigate the thermodynamic behavior of coal and wood pellets. The results show that the thermal decomposition of blends is divided into four stages. The co-firing of coal and wood pellets can promote the combustion reaction and reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as SO 2 and NO. It is important to choose the proportion of wood pellets during co-combustion due to the low combustion efficiency caused by large pellets with poor fluidization. Wood pellets can inhibit the volatilization of trace elements, especially for Cr, Ni and V. In addition, the slagging ratio of wood pellets ash is reduced by co-firing with coal. The research on combustion of coal and wood pellets is of great significance in engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluidized bed combustion with the use of Greek solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakaras Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an overview of the results obtained up to date from the combustion and co-combustion activities with Greek brown coal in different installations, both in semi-industrial and laboratory scale. Combustion tests with Greek lignite were realized in three different Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC facilities. Low rank lignite was burned in a pilot scale facility of approx. 100kW thermal capacity, located in Athens (NTUA and a semi-industrial scale of 1.2 MW thermal capacity, located at RWE's power station Niederaussem in Germany. Co-combustion tests with Greek xylitic lignite and waste wood were carried out in the 1 MWth CFBC installation of AE&E, in Austria. Lab-scale co-combustion tests of Greek pre-dried lignite with biomass were accomplished in a bubbling fluidized bed in order to investigate ash melting problems. The obtained results of all aforementioned activities showed that fluidized bed is the appropriate combustion technology to efficiently exploit the low quality Greek brown coal either alone or in conjunction with biomass species.

  18. Influence of Operating Conditions and Coal Properties on NOx and N2O Emissions in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Subbituminous Coals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Pohořelý, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 83, 7-8 (2004), s. 1095-1103 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : NOx and N2O emissions * combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.368, year: 2004

  19. Conversion of different ash content brown coal in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, P.; Chernyavskiy, N.; Ryzhkov, A.; Remenuk, A. [Ural Federal Univ., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Dept. of Thermal Power Plants; Dulienko, S. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Coal Energy Technology Inst.

    2013-07-01

    Available equations used to determine combustion specific rate of coal-derived cokes describe the burning of carbon particles well enough but are not accurate in case of ash-containing coke particles combustion. This study is an attempt to account for the influence of both initial ash content and its increase in the course of carbon conversion in specific rate calculations. The results of experimental study of burn-out dynamics of Volchanskiy field (North Urals) brown coal and its coke with different ash content under conditions of fluidized bed combustion at impulse-type non-gradient reactor RSC-1 and dynamic installation Pyrolysis-M are summarized. Diffusion and heterogeneous (kinetic) components of carbon combustion rate are identified separately by using diffusion and kinetics equation with correction for carbon mass fraction in particles. Burning particle overheating values and heterogeneous combustion rate constants at different temperatures are estimated.

  20. Combustion studies in a fluidised bed-The link between temperature, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O formation, char morphology and coal type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentim, B.; Lemos de Sousa, M.J. [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Praca de Gomes Teixeira, 4099-002, Porto (Portugal); Abelha, P.; Boavida, D.; Gulyurtlu, I. [Departamento de Engenharia Energetica e Controlo Ambiental (DEECA), Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao (INETI), Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, Edif. J, 1649-038, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2006-06-06

    Five commercially available high volatile bituminous coals from different origins were studied with the objective of characterizing their petrographic nature with respect to emissions of NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O. The chars produced [at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 {sup o}C] from these coals were also petrographic ally analyzed to assess the contribution of char to NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O formation during combustion. Vitrinite-rich coals produced higher porous chars (cenospheres and tenuinetworks) than those that are rich in inertinite. The former coals were, however, found to release lower concentrations of NO. Consistent with previous works, N{sub 2}O emissions were observed to decrease significantly with temperature, however, on the whole, the N{sub 2}O emissions from vitrinite-rich high volatile coals were less than those from inertinite-rich coals. Additionally, high porous chars were found to give rise to lower emissions of NO and N{sub 2}O. (author)

  1. Combustion demonstration plant in circulant fluidized bed of residual coal; Planta de Demostracion de Combustion en Lecho Fluido Circulante de Carbones Residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report incorporates a summary of the operation results during the period of demonstration after started up. The report pretend to give an overview of the operation conditions along of the first year: Running hours, availability, electricity production, shooting downs, incidences, efficiency, fuel characteristics influence, pollutants emissions and standards comparations, etc. The main operation conclusions are: High availability, great number of running hours at full equivalent load; some months even over 100% regarding time scheduled. High reduction of gaseous emissions, really very low respecting the required by the applicable standards. It has been developed the engineering of a prototype project, by 30MW, using mixtures of solid fuels, residues and coals. (Author)

  2. Utilization of coal ash from fluidized-bed combustion boilers as road base material; Sekitandaki ryudoso boiler kara no sekitanbai no robanzai to shite no riyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Y. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Kozasa, K. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuzura, K. [Naruto Salt Mfg. Co. Ltd., Tokushima (Japan); Izumi, H. [Nippon Hodo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Coal ash from the fluidized bed boiler is evaluated for its properties as is, as solidified or granulated, and as the roadbed material. The coal ash tested in the experiment is a mixture of ash from the fluidized bed boiler bottom, ash from the cyclone separator, and ash from the bag filter. In the manufacture of solid or granulated bodies, coal ashes are kneaded in water whose amount puts the mixture near the plasticization limit, are pressed in a low-pressure press and made into solid bodies by a 15-hour curing in 60degC saturated steam, and the solid bodies are crushed into solid granules. A content release test is conducted about the release of dangerous substances, and road paving experiments are conducted to learn the workability and serviceability of the granulated material as a road paving material. A study of the experimental results discloses what is mentioned below. Coal ash containing 10-20vol% of CaO and 15vol% or less of unburnt carbon turns into a high-strength solid after curing in saturated steam whose temperature is not higher than 60degC. The granulated solid satisfies the standards that an upper subbase material is expected to satisfy. It also meets the environmental standards in a release content test for soil set forth by Environment Agency notification No.46. 8 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Bioenergy originating from biomass combustion in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crujeira, T.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Lopes, H.; Abelha, P.; Cabrita, I. [INETI/DEECA, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-07-01

    Bioenergy could significantly contribute to reducing and controlling greenhouse emissions (GHG) and to replace fossil fuels in large power plants. Although the use of biomass, originating from forests, could be beneficial, particularly in preventing fires, there are obstacles to achieve a sustainable supply chain of biomass in most European countries. In addition, there are also technical barriers as requirements of biomass combustion may differ from those of coal, which could mean significant retrofitting of existing installations. The combustion behaviour of different biomass materials were studied on a pilot fluidised bed combustor, equipped with two cyclones for particulate matter removal. The gaseous pollutants leaving the stack were sampled under isokinetic conditions for particulate matter, chlorine compounds, heavy metals and dioxins and furans (PCDD/F). The results obtained indicated that the combustion of these materials did not present any operational problem, although for temperatures above 800{sup o}C, bed agglomeration could be observed for all biomass materials studied. Most of the combustion of biomass, contrary to what is observed for coal, takes place in the riser where the temperature was as much as 150{sup o}C above that of the bed. Stable combustion conditions were achieved as well as high combustion efficiency. When compared with the emissions of bituminous coal, the most used fossil fuel, the emissions of CO and SO2 were found to be lower and NOx emissions were similar to those of coal. HCl and PCDD/F could be considerable with biomasses containing high chlorine levels, as in the case of straw. It was observed that the nature of ash could give rise serious operating problems.

  4. Aerosol sampling of an experimental fluidized bed coal combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Peele, E.R.; Carpenter, R.L.; Yeh, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of coal, lignite or other materials has a potential for widespread use in central electric generating stations in the near future. This technology may allow widespread use of low-grade and/or high sulfur fuels due to its high energy utilization at low combustion temperature and its ability to meet emission criteria by using limestone bed material. Particulate and gaseous products resulting from fuel combustion and fluidization of bed material are discharged and proceed out the exhaust clean-up system. Sampling philosophy, methodology and equipment used to obtain aerosol samples from the exhaust system of the 18-inch fluidized bed combustor (FBC) at the Morgantown Energy Research Center (MERC) are described. Identification of sampling sites led to design of an aerosol sampling train which allowed a known quantity of the effluent streams to be sampled. Depending on the position, a 15 to 25 l/min sample is extracted from the duct, immediately diluted and transferred to a sampling/aging chamber. Transmission and scanning electron microscope samples, two types of cascade impactor samples, vapor-phase and particulate-phase organic samples, spiral duct aerosol centrifuge samples, optical size measurements and filter samples were obtained. Samples are undergoing physical, chemical and biological tests to help establish human health risk estimates for fluidized bed coal combustion and to provide information for use in design and evaluation of control technologies

  5. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Arthur C.; Zboray, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  6. Fluidized bed dry dense medium coal beneficiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    North, Brian C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available medium beneficiation using a fluidized bed was investigated. Bed materials of sand, magnetite and ilmenite were used in a laboratory sized cylindrical fluidized bed. The materials were individually tested, as were mixes of sand and heavy minerals. Coal...

  7. Bed retained products in swept fixed bed (SFB) coal hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Perez-Surio, M.J. [CSIC, Zaragosa (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

    1997-12-31

    The hydropyrolysis of a low rank coal in a swept fixed bed (SFB) reactor is carried out by fixing the hydrogen pressure (40 kg/cm{sup 2}), the hydrogen flow (2 l/min) and the residence time (10 min) at increasing temperatures (400 C, 500 C and 600 C) and coal bed heights (h, 1.5h, 2h, 2.5h and 3h). It is shown that the percentages of tars and char directly depend on the coal bed height and that there is not only a quantitative dependence, but also the height of the coal bed is very important and plays a relevant role on the nature of the conversion products. (orig.)

  8. Advanced coal combustion technologies and their environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozicevic, Maja; Feretic, Danilo; Tomsic, Zeljko

    1997-01-01

    Estimations of world energy reserves show that coal will remain the leading primary energy source for electricity production in the foreseeable future. In order to comply with ever stricter environmental regulations and to achieve efficient use of limited energy resources, advanced combustion technologies are being developed. The most promising are the pressurised fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). By injecting sorbent in the furnace, PFBC removes more than 90 percent of SO 2 in flue gases without additional emission control device. In addition, due to lower combustion temperature, NO x emissions are around 90 percent lower than those from pulverised coal (PC) plant. IGCC plant performance is even more environmentally expectable and its high efficiency is a result of a combined cycle usage. Technical, economic and environmental characteristics of mentioned combustion technologies will be presented in this paper. Comparison of PFBC, IGCC and PC power plants economics and air impact will also be given. (Author)

  9. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nojima, Tomoyuki; Kakuta, Akihiko; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    A conceptual design of an energy recovering system from sewage sludge was proposed. This system consists of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, a gas turbine, and a heat exchanger for preheating of combustion air. Thermal efficiency was estimated roughly as 10-25%. In order to know the combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge under the elevated pressure condition, combustion tests of the dry and wet sewage sludge were carried out by using laboratory scale pressurized fluidized bed combustors. Combustibility of the sewage sludge was good enough and almost complete combustion was achieved in the combustion of the actual wet sludge. CO emission and NOx emission were marvelously low especially during the combustion of wet sewage sludge regardless of high volatile and nitrogen content of the sewage sludge. However, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very high. Hence, almost all nitrogen oxides were emitted as the form of N2O. From these combustion tests, we judged combustion of the sewage sludge with the pressurized fluidized bed combustor is suitable, and the conceptual design of the power generation system is available.

  10. Risk factors for the undermined coal bed mining method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arad, V. [Petrosani Univ., Petrosani (Romania). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Arad, S. [Petrosani Univ., Petrosani (Romania). Dept of Electrical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The Romanian mining industry has been in a serious decline and is undergoing ample restructuring. Analyses of reliability and risk are most important during the early stages of a project in guiding the decision as to whether or not to proceed and in helping to establish design criteria. A technical accident occurred in 2008 at the Petrila coal mine involving an explosion during the exploitation of a coal seam. Over time a series of technical accidents, such as explosions and ignitions of methane gas, roof blowing phenomena or self-ignition of coal and hazard combustions have occurred. This paper presented an analysis of factors that led to this accident as well an analysis of factors related to the mining method. Specifically, the paper discussed the geomechanical characteristics of rocks and coal; the geodynamic phenomenon from working face 431; the spontaneous combustion phenomenon; gas accumulation; and the pressure and the height of the undermined coal bed. It was concluded that for the specific conditions encountered in Petrila colliery, the undermined bed height should be between 5 and 7 metres, depending on the geomechanic characteristics of coal and surrounding rocks. 8 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  11. Staged fluidized-bed coal combustor for boiler retrofit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehmat, A.; Dorfman, L.; Shibayama, G.; Waibel, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Staged Fluidized-Bed Coal Combustion System (ASC) is a novel clean coal technology for either coal-fired repowering of existing boilers or for incremental power generation using combined-cycle gas turbines. This new technology combines staged combustion for gaseous emission control, in-situ sulfur capture, and an ash agglomeration/vitrification process for the agglomeration/vitrification of ash and spent sorbent, thus rendering solid waste environmentally benign. The market for ASC is expected to be for clean coal-fired repowering of generating units up to 250 MW, especially for units where space is limited. The expected tightening of the environmental requirements on leachable solids residue by-products could considerably increase the marketability for ASC. ASC consists of modular low-pressure vessels in which coal is partially combusted and gasified using stacked fluidized-bed processes to produce low-to-medium-Btu, high-temperature gas. This relatively clean fuel gas is used to repower/refuel existing pulverized-coal, natural gas, or oil-fired boilers using bottom firing and reburning techniques. The benefits of ASC coal-fired repowering include the ability to repower boilers without obtaining additional space while meeting the more stringent environmental requirements of the future. Low NO x , SO x , and particulate levels are expected while a nonleachable solid residue with trace metal encapsulation is produced. ASC also minimizes boiler modification and life-extension expenditures. Repowered efficiencies can be restored to the initial operating plant efficiency, and the existing boiler capacity can be increased by 10%. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that ASC will have up to a $250/kW capital cost advantage over existing coal-fired repowering options. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Peach and apricot stone combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaynak, B.; Atimtay, Aysel T. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Topal, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Gazi University, Ankara 06570 (Turkey)

    2005-07-25

    In this study, a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) of 102 mm inside diameter and 900 mm height was used to investigate the combustion characteristics of peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry. A lignite coal was also burned in the same combustor. The combustion characteristics of the wastes were compared with that of a lignite coal that is most widely used in Turkey. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. By changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity, and fuel feed rate), the variation of emissions of various pollutants was studied. Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. During the combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from peach and apricot stones quickly volatilizes and mostly burn in the freeboard. The temperature profiles along the bed and the freeboard also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter of fruit stones increases, the combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. The results of this study have shown that the combustion efficiencies ranged between 98.8% and 99.1% for coal, 96.0% and 97.5% for peach stone and 93.4% and 96.3% for apricot stones. The coal has zero CO emission, but biomass fuels have very high CO emission which indicates that a secondary air addition is required for the system. SO{sub 2} emission of the coal is around 2400-2800 mg/Nm{sup 3}, whereas the biomass fuels have zero SO{sub 2} emission. NO{sub x} emissions are all below the limits set by the Turkish Air Quality Control Regulation of 1986 (TAQCR) for all tests. As the results of combustion of two biomass fuels are compared with each other, peach stones gave lower CO and NO{sub x} emissions but the SO{sub 2} emissions are a little higher than for apricot stones. These results suggest that

  13. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirone, R.; Cammarota, A.

    2001-01-01

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 850 0 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested [it

  14. Factors affecting cleanup of exhaust gases from a pressurized, fluidized-bed coal combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Kobak, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The cleanup of effluent gases from the fluidized-bed combustion of coal is examined. Testing conditions include the type and feed rate of the coal and the sulfur sorbent, the coal-sorbent ratio, the coal-combustion air ratio, the depth of the reactor fluidizing bed, and the technique used to physically remove fly ash from the reactor effluent gases. Tests reveal that the particulate loading matter in the effluent gases is a function not only of the reactor-bed surface gas velocity, but also of the type of coal being burnt and the time the bed is operating. At least 95 percent of the fly ash particules in the effluent gas are removed by using a gas-solids separator under controlled operating conditions. Gaseous pollutants in the effluent (nitrogen and sulfur oxides) are held within the proposed Federal limits by controlling the reactor operating conditions and the type and quantity of sorbent material.

  15. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to

  16. Co-combustion of tannery sludge in a commercial circulating fluidized bed boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hao; Jiang, Xuguang; Lv, Guojun; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    Co-combusting hazardous wastes in existing fluidized bed combustors is an alternative to hazardous waste treatment facilities, in shortage in China. Tannery sludge is a kind of hazardous waste, considered fit for co-combusting with coal in fluidized bedboilers. In this work, co-combustion tests of tannery sludge and bituminous coal were conducted in a power plant in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province. Before that, the combustion behavior of tannery sludge and bituminous were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Tannery sludge presented higher reactivity than bituminous coal. During the co-combustion tests, the emissions of harmful gases were monitored. The results showed that the pollutant emissions met the Chinese standard except for NOx. The Concentrations of seven trace elements (As, Cr, Cd, Ni, Cu, Pb, Mn) in three exit ash flows (bottom ash in bed, fly ash in filter, and submicrometer aerosol in flue gas) were analyzed. The results of mono-combustion of bituminous coal were compared with those of co-combustion with tannery sludge. It was found that chromium enriched in fly ash. At last, the leachability of fly ash and bottom ash was analyzed. The results showed that most species were almost equal to or below the limits except for As in bottom ashes and Cr in the fly ash of co-combustion test. The concentrations of Cr in leachates of co-combustion ashes are markedly higher than that of coal mono-combustion ashes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jer Y.; Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyzes the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step.

  18. Experimental research on combustion fluorine retention using calcium-based sorbents during coal combustion (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Q.; Ma, X.; Liu, J.; Wu, X.; Zhou, J.; Cen, K. [Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin (China). College of Resource and Environment Engineering

    2008-12-15

    Fluoride pollution produced by coal burning can be controlled with the calcium-based sorbent combustion fluorine technique in which calcium-based sorbents are mixed with the coal or sprayed into the combustion chamber. In a fixed bed tube furnace combustion experiment using one calcium-based natural mineral, limestone and one calcium-based building material, it was shown that the calcium-based sorbent particle grain size and pore structure have a big influence on the combustion fluorine retention effect. Reducing the calcium-based sorbent particle grain size and improving the calcium sorbent structure characteristics at very high temperature to enhance the fluorine retention effect is the important approach to the fluorine retention agent development. 8 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Study experimental of the combustion of coal in grill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chejne j, Farid; Florez E, Whady and others

    1997-01-01

    In this article, experiments in which the temperature of the bed and emissions in the combustion chamber were registered were carried out in pilot plant. Also proximate analyses of coal sizing over the average of unburned carbon was studied in pilot plant and industrial boilers. Finally, graphics of CO vs O2, Nox vs temperature and Sox vs temperature were analyzed in order to determinate their kinetic behavior

  20. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  1. Use of a fluidized bed combustor and thermogravimetric analyzer for the study of coal ignition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ávila, Ivonete; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Luna, Carlos M.R.; Milioli, Fernando E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Coal ignition tests were conducted in a fluidized bed and thermogravimetric conditions. • The use of two different ignition criteria showed a similar coal ignition temperature. • Coal ignition temperature was obtained by the changes of gas concentrations in FBC. • Ignition temperatures were associated with the activation energy of coal combustion. - Abstract: Ignition experiments with two bituminous coals were carried out in an atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed combustor (FBC) and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the FBC tests, the rapid increase in O_2, CO_2, and SO_2 concentrations is an indication of the coal ignition. In the TGA technique, the ignition temperature was determined by the evaluation of the TGA curves in both combustion and pyrolysis processes. Model-Free Kinetics was applied and the coal ignition temperatures were associated with changes in the activation energy values during the combustion process. The results show the coal with the lowest activation energy also showed the lowest ignition temperature, highest values of volatile content and a higher heating value. The application of two different ignition criteria (TGA and FBC) resulted in similar ignition temperatures. The FBC curves indicated the high volatile coal ignites in the freeboard, i.e. during the feeding in the reactor, whereas the low volatile coal ignites in the bed. Finally, the physicochemical characteristics of the investigated coal types were correlated with their reactivities for the prediction of the ignition temperatures behaviors under different operating conditions as those in FBC.

  2. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  3. Improvement of Combustion Characteristics in Fluidized Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.S.; El Sourougy, M.R.; Faik, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation is directed towards the experimental study of the effect of a new design of the bed temperature on the overall thermal efficiency and heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in gaseous fuel-fluidized bed combustion system. The experiments are performed on a water-cooled fluidized bed model furnace with cylindrical cross-section of 0.25 m diameter and its height is 0.60 m. the fluidising medium used is sand particles with average diameter 1.5 mm. The bed temperature is varied between 700 degree C and 1100 degree C. Measurements f carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and oxygen concentrations are carried out by using water-cooled sampling probe, and infrared and paramagnetic analyzers. The results obtained show that the bed temperature, the total heat transfer to the wall and the bed combustion efficiency increase with the decrease of the air-fuel ratio. It is also found that 91% of the total heat transfer is in the fluidising part of the bed and most of this heat is transferred by convection from hot sand particles to the wall. Two empirical formulae for the calculation of the wall heat transfer coefficient and the particle convective heat transfer coefficient are proposed. A verification of the proposed empirical formulae is made by comparing the calculated values with the experimental results.

  4. Coal pyrolysis in a continuous fluidized bed - process development studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, N N; Akmal, M A.K.; Vaidyeswaran, R

    1981-10-01

    The paper deals with the development of a process development unit (PDU) for the fluid bed pyrolysis of non-caking slack coal obtained from Singareni and Talcher coalfields. Preheated air is used as the fluidizing medium. It is necessary to avoid its maldistribution by a suitable design of the gas distributor. In this regard perforated conical distributors appear to play an important role. In the low temperature carbonization of coal an operation around 500 C gives optimum yields of char and tar of desirable quality. Carbonization reactions are generally completed within about 20 min of the feed entry into the fluidized bed and the char attains an equilibrium volatile matter content. Since air is used as the fluidizing medium carbonization gas is diluted with nitrogen and non-combustibles. The heating value of the gas is low. (5 refs.)

  5. Environmental remediation with products of fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.G.

    1999-07-01

    Commercialization of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) technology could be enhanced by increased utilization of FBC products (ash). In the US, coal combustion products (CCP) are not hazardous under RCRA and are regulated as residual waste by the states. The composition of CCP from fluidized beds is primarily determined by the inorganic constituents in coal, the sorbent reaction products and the unreacted sorbent. The combustion system and the inclusion of other fuels may also affect the chemical composition, physical properties and leaching behavior. The alkalinity of the FBC material, residual lime and pozzolanic properties are desirable characteristics for use in soil stabilization and mine reclamation. At reclaimed surface coal mines, placement of CCP is intended to reduce the amount of acid mine drainage (AMD) produced at such sites. Neutralization, inhibition of acid forming bacteria, encapsulation of the pyrite or water diversion are believed to be the mechanisms facilitated by the alkaline material. Comparison of water quality, before and after injection of a grout composed of FBC ash and water indicated small increases in pH and decreases in acidity at discharge points. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in water samples generally increased compared to background levels. The average concentration of trace elements (arsenic, cobalt, copper, nickel and zinc) was slightly elevated in the injection areas, but in down dip and discharge water samples were comparable to background levels. Over a four year period, the average acidity in the injected area decreased by approximately 30%, a value similar to another site where a mixture of class F fly ash and cement was injected. Although coal mine remediation is a beneficial environmental use of FBC products, its effectiveness may be related to the amount of FBCB used and the method of emplacement.

  6. Environmental remediation with products of fluidized bed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Commercialization of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) technology could be enhanced by increased utilization of FBC products (ash). In the US, coal combustion products (CCP) are not hazardous under RCRA and are regulated as residual waste by the states. The composition of CCP from fluidized beds is primarily determined by the inorganic constituents in coal, the sorbent reaction products and the unreacted sorbent. The combustion system and the inclusion of other fuels may also affect the chemical composition, physical properties and leaching behavior. The alkalinity of the FBC material, residual lime and pozzolanic properties are desirable characteristics for use in soil stabilization and mine reclamation. At reclaimed surface coal mines, placement of CCP is intended to reduce the amount of acid mine drainage (AMD) produced at such sites. Neutralization, inhibition of acid forming bacteria, encapsulation of the pyrite or water diversion are believed to be the mechanisms facilitated by the alkaline material. Comparison of water quality, before and after injection of a grout composed of FBC ash and water indicated small increases in pH and decreases in acidity at discharge points. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in water samples generally increased compared to background levels. The average concentration of trace elements (arsenic, cobalt, copper, nickel and zinc) was slightly elevated in the injection areas, but in down dip and discharge water samples were comparable to background levels. Over a four year period, the average acidity in the injected area decreased by approximately 30%, a value similar to another site where a mixture of class F fly ash and cement was injected. Although coal mine remediation is a beneficial environmental use of FBC products, its effectiveness may be related to the amount of FBCB used and the method of emplacement

  7. Co-combustion of coal and meat and bone meal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Gulyurtlu; D. Boavida; P. Abelha; M.H. Lopes; I. Cabrita [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-12-01

    Feeding meat and bone meal (MBM) to cattle, sheep or other animals has been banned within the EU since 1 of July 1994. The quantities to be eliminated are measured in millions of tons. Disposal to landfill is not an option, as simply burying the material cannot destroy any potential bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) pathogens. One disposal option is the co-combustion of coal and MBM, to ensure that any living organism is totally thermally destroyed and at the same time valorising its energetic potential. Fluidised bed co-combustion of MBM is considered a viable technological option as it has the flexibility to burn coal with different materials in an efficient way, at relatively low temperatures (750-850{sup o}C) with lower environmental impact. For this purpose, co-combustion tests of coal and MBM were carried out on a pilot scale FBC, to investigate the implications of the results. This involved the determination of the emissions of pollutants like NOx, N{sub 2}O, VOC, CO{sub 2}, as well as the composition and the valorisation of the ashes produced. The ashes from the bed, the cyclones and the stack were collected and analyzed for biological activity, ecotoxicity, heavy metal concentration and leachability. The results obtained suggest that the ashes were suitable to be deposited in municipal landfills. 23 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Field study of wastes from fluidized-bed combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.; Holcombe, L.; Butler, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a research project to monitor advanced coal process wastes placed in natural geologic settings. The overall objective of the study is to gather field data on the engineering and environmental performance of disposed solid waste from various advanced coal processes. The coal ash from a fluidized-bed combustion unit is being studied as part of the DOE program. The unit is a 110-MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) at Colorado Ute Electric Association's Nucla Steam Electric Station, which is being demonstrated with the support of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The Electric Power Research Institute is cofunding the study. In June of 1989, a test cell approximately 100 feet square and 8 feet deep was constructed and filled with ash from the Colorado Ute CFB unit. The cell was instrumented with lysimeters and neutron probe access tubes to monitor water flow and leachate chemistry in the ash; groundwater wells and runoff collection devices were installed to determine the effects on groundwater and surface water quality, and a meteorological station was installed to determine the water balance. Additionally, tests are being performed to evaluate the chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties of the solid waste and geologic materials. Results from the first year of monitoring are presented

  9. Emission characteristics for gaseous- and size-segregated particulate PAHs in coal combustion flue gas from circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruwei; Liu, Guijian; Sun, Ruoyu; Yousaf, Balal; Wang, Jizhong; Liu, Rongqiong; Zhang, Hong

    2018-07-01

    The partitioning behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between gaseous and particulate phases from coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) is critically important to predict PAH removal by dust control devices. In this study, 16 US-EPA priority PAHs in gaseous and size-segregated particulate phases at the inlet and outlet of the fabric filter unit (FFs) of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler were analyzed. The partitioning mechanisms of PAHs between gaseous and particulate phases and in particles of different size classes were investigated. We found that the removal efficiencies of PAHs are 45.59% and 70.67-89.06% for gaseous and particulate phases, respectively. The gaseous phase mainly contains low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs (2- and 3-ring PAHs), which is quite different from the particulate phase that mainly contains medium and high molecular weight (MMW and HMW) PAHs (4- to 6-ring PAHs). The fractions of LMW PAHs show a declining trend with the decrease of particle size. The gas-particle partitioning of PAHs is primarily controlled by organic carbon absorption, in addition, it has a clear dependence on the particle sizes. Plot of log (TPAH/PM) against logD p shows that all slope values were below -1, suggesting that PAHs were mainly adsorbed to particulates. The adsorption effect of PAHs in size-segregated PMs for HMW PAHs is more evident than LMW PAHs. The particle size distributions (PSDs) of individual PAHs show that most of PAHs exhibit bi-model structures, with one mode peaking in the accumulation size range (2.1-1.1 μm) and another mode peaking in coarse size range (5.8-4.7 μm). The intensities of these two peaks vary in function of ring number of PAHs, which is likely attributed to Kelvin effect that the less volatile HMW PAH species preferentially condense onto the finer particulates. The emission factor of PAHs was calculated as 3.53 mg/kg of coal burned, with overall mean EF PAH of 0.55 and 2.98 mg/kg for gaseous and particulate

  10. Bromine based mercury abatement in waste and coal combustion. Mercury retention in the catalyst bed of a tail-end-SCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosteen, Bernhard W. [Vosteen Consulting GmbH, Koeln (Germany); Kanefke, Rico; Beyer, Joachim; Bonkhofer, Theodor Gerhard [CURRENTA GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany); Ullrich, Rick [WastePro Engineering Inc., Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Observations and testing at a CURRENTA waste incineration plant and several coal fired power plants has derived the following aspects of mercury behavior in the plant's waste heat boiler and its gas cleaning train: - Hg{sub met} is oxidized to Hg{sub ion} most readily by bromine, and also by chlorine, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) inhibit the Hg{sub met} chlorination but not the Hg{sub met} bromination, - Hg{sub met} passes through scrubbers and is adsorbed onto the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR, slowly oxidized and finally elutes off as Hg{sub ion}, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) impacts the reduction of molecular halogens in different ways; SO{sub 2} reduces Cl{sub 2} at elevated temperatures (boiler range), but reduces Br{sub 2} only at low temperatures (scrubber range) The operational tests and studies performed in the spring and summer of 2000 at this plant led to some specific knowledge about Hg{sub met} adsorption and also Hg{sub ion} desorption at the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR. This knowledge, which was at that time in many respects novel, has provided more insight into the mercury oxidation behaviour. Today, process options derived from this knowledge could be implemented in hazardous waste incineration plants and also municipal solid waste incineration plants, to achieve complete mercury halogenation in the boiler flue gas, ahead of the scrubber system, at any time. This might prevent penetration of metallic mercury to the tail-end SCR and avoid the corresponding long time mercury elution. For effective prevention to be achieved in practice, it is strongly recommended to also install a continuously measuring (possibly uncalibrated) AAS mercury monitor for immediate detection of any unexpected Hg{sub met} breakthrough, for example caused by ''hidden mercury'' in the waste feed, and to initiate the rapid (preferably automized) injection of some bromine compound before even more mercury is transferred into the tail-end SCR, stored there as Hg

  11. Influence of Coal Quality on Combustion Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    mixing pattern on NO formation under these conditions. Emissions from the opposed fired plant with all combustion air introduced through the burners could only be qualitatively reproduced by the pilot furnace. Under single stage conditions the test rig provided higher NO levels. Carbon in ash levels did...... not show any correlation between the coals and the furnaces. An engineering, mathematical model has been developed describing radiation heat transfer and coal combustion in full scale furnaces. The model has been validated against measured temperatures and the amount of carbon in fly ash. The model...

  12. Incipient motion of gravel and coal beds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    2. 1Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, ... the particle size distribution curve following the relationship by Christensen .... where f = friction factor, ρ = mass density of fluid, and V = mean velocity of flow. .... for the incipient motion of gravel and coal beds have been represented by simple empirical.

  13. Coal combustion aerothermochemistry research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, A.B.; Gat, N.; Denison, M.R.; Cohen, L.M.

    1980-12-15

    On the basis of extensive aerothermochemistry analyses, laboratory investigations, and combustor tests, significant headway has been made toward improving the understanding of combustion phenomena and scaling of high swirl pulverized coal combustors. A special attempt has been made to address the gap between scientific data available on combustion and hardware design and scaling needs. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were conducted to improve the predictive capability of combustor scaling laws. The scaling laws derived apply to volume and wall burning of pulverized coal in a slagging high-swirl combustor. They incorporate the findings of this investigation as follows: laser pyrolysis of coal at 10/sup 6/ K/sec and 2500K; effect of coal particle shape on aerodynamic drag and combustion; effect of swirl on heat transfer; coal burnout and slag capture for 20 MW/sub T/ combustor tests for fine and coarse coals; burning particle trajectories and slag capture; particle size and aerodynamic size; volatilization extent and burnout fraction; and preheat level. As a result of this work, the following has been gained: an increased understanding of basic burning mechanisms in high-swirl combustors and an improved model for predicting combustor performance which is intended to impact hardware design and scaling in the near term.

  14. Mercury speciation in air-coal and oxy-coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Duan, Yufeng; Mao, Yongqiu [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of air-coal and oxy-coal combustion on mercury emission, Xuzhou bituminous coal was burnt in a 6 kWth fluidized bed at 800 and 850 C in four atmospheres: air, 21%O{sub 2}/79%CO{sub 2}, 30%O{sub 2}/70%CO{sub 2}, 40%O{sub 2}/60%CO{sub 2} analysed with an online flue gas analyzer. Ontario Hydro method (OHM) was employed to measure mercury speciation in flue gas. The result indicated that more elemental mercury and oxidized mercury are released when burned in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere than in air at 800 C, while the situation is just opposite, when coal was burnt at 850 C, less Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere than in air. The concentration of Hg{sup 0} rises as temperature increases both in the conditions of the air combustion and oxy-coal combustion, but the concentration of Hg{sup 2+} increases with the increase of temperature only in the condition of air combustion and decreases in the oxy-coal combustion. With the increase of the oxygen concentration which is in the range of 21-40%, the concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} decrease first and then increase. When excess air coefficient increases, the oxygen content is higher and the vaporization rate of Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} decrease.

  15. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for

  16. Modern fluidized bed combustion in Ostrava-Karvina cogeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazac, V. [Energoprojekt Praha, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia); Novacek, A. [Moravskoslezske teplamy, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia); Volny, J. [Templamy Karvina (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    The contemporary situation of our environment claims the sensitive approach to solving effective conversion of energy. Limited supplies of noble fuels and their prices evoke the need to use new combustion technologies of accessible fuels in given region without negative ecological influences. Energoproject participates in the preparation of the two projects in Ostrava-Karvin{acute a} black coal field in Czech Republic. The most effective usage of fuel energy is the combined of electricity and heat. If this physical principle is supported by a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) one obtains a high electricity/heat ratio integrated steam-gas cycle on the basis of solid fuel. Cogeneration plant Toebovice is the dominant source (600 MW{sub th}) of Ostrava district heating system (1100 MW{sub th}). The high utilization of the installed output and utilization of the clean, compact and efficient of the PFBC technology is the principal but not the single reason for the selection of the Toebovice power plant as the first cogeneration plant for installation of the PFBC in Czech Republic. The boiler will burn black coal from the neighboring coal basin.

  17. Predicting the combustion kinetics of Chinese coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niksa, Stephen [Niksa Energy Associates LLC, Belmont, CA (United States); Fujiwara, Naoki [Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environment Research Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The database on the devolatilization of Chinese coals in the English literature represents coals from all ranks and the major Chinese mines. It was mostly acquired with TGAs. There are sufficient datasets from devices that imposed rapid heating rates to bracket combustor behavior. The domains of heating rate, temperature, pressure, and particle size are either directly relevant to combustion conditions, or close enough to manage with modest extrapolations. Whereas the data on ultimate total yields is sufficient to validate a model for any coal type, more detailed product distributions and char compositions would be desirable. Based on the accurate interpretation of this database, there are few unresolved issues surrounding the applicability of FLASHCHAIN {sup registered} for combustion applications in China. The sub-database on devolatilization under rapid heating conditions represents 34 samples. The predicted yields were within the measurement uncertainties of 4 daf wt. % for 29 of these coals. Among the five ultimate yields that were not accurately predicted, three had measured values less than the proximate volatile matter (PVM), despite the rapid heating rates in the tests. Similarly, the sub-database on devolatilization under slow heating conditions characterizes ultimate devolatilization yields of 30 samples. The predicted yields were within the measurement uncertainties for 22 of these coals. Among the eight that were not accurately predicted, three had measured values that were much lower than the PVM (which is a problem even after accounting for the slow heating rates in the tests) and three were in studies that did not report ultimate analyses for the coals tested. Unfortunately, the database on the combustion behavior of the chars from Chinese coals is insufficient to specify char oxidation kinetics.

  18. Fluidised bed gasification of low grade South African coals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    North, BC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available gasifiers. Fluidised bed Entrained flow Coal particle size 0.5 mm – 5 mm 0 – 0.5 mm Coal moisture Dry Dry/slurry Coal type Non-caking coals Any coal Ash in coal < 60% < 30% Gasification agents Air/steam/oxygen Steam/oxygen Gasification... properties important for fluidised bed gasification are: square4 Coal reactivity in atmospheres of CO2 and H2O square4 Caking index and free swelling index (FSI) square4 Ash fusion temperature (AFT) 5.1 Coal reactivity The gasifcation reactions (1...

  19. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of the combustion of brown coal, refuse and mixed fuels in a circulating fluidized bed combustor; Experimentelle Untersuchung und mathematische Modellierung der Verbrennung von Braunkohle, Abfallstoffen und Mischbrennstoffen in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W; Brunne, T; Hiller, A [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Albrecht, J [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Quang, N [Polytechnic Inst., Danang (Viet Nam)

    1998-09-01

    Extensive experiments on combustion of biological materials and residues in fluidized bed combustors and dust combustors have been carried out at the Department of Power Plant Engineering of Dresden University since the early nineties. Particular interest was taken in mixing brown coal with sewage sludge, sugar pulp and waste wood. The experiments were supplemented by modelling in a research project funded jointly by the BMBF and Messrs. Lurgi since early 1997. A combustion cell model designed by Siegen University is being modified for the new mixed fuels, and preliminary investigations were carried out on a batch reactor while the modelling work was continued. (orig.) [Deutsch] An dem Lehrstuhl fuer Kraftwerkstechnik der TU Dresden werden seit Anfang der 90-iger Jahre umfangreiche experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Bio- und Reststoffen in Wirbelschicht- und Staubfeuerungen durchgefuehrt. Dabei war vor allem die Zufeuerung dieser Stoffe in Waermeerzeugeranlagen auf Braunkohlenbasis von besonderem Interesse. Experimentell konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass sowohl Biobrennstoffe als auch Abfaelle in zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerungen umweltschonend zur Waermeerzeugung eingesetzt werden koennen. Als Beispiel wird das an Hand von Braunkohle-Klaerschlammgemischen sowie Bagasse- und Holz-Braunkohlegemischen gezeigt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen bietet die Modellierung der Verbrennungsvorgaenge ein geeignetes Mittel um Voraussagen zu anderen Mischungsanteilen sowie anderen geometrischen Abmessungen machen zu koennen. Seit Anfang 1997 wird dazu ein vom BMBF und der Firma Lurgi gefoerdertes Forschungsvorhaben bearbeitet. Ein von der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen fuer die Braunkohleverbrennung konzipiertes Zellenmodell wird auf die neuen Brennstoffgemische erweitert. Da grundsaetzlich andere Stoffzusammensetzungen vorliegen, wurden an einem Batch-Reaktor Voruntersuchungen zum Pyrolyseverhalten der Brennstoffe durchgefuehrt. Erste

  20. Combustion of uraniferous lignites in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, G.; Gasos, P.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper a description of the continuous fluid bed combustion pilot plant unit, installed in the Junta de Energia Nuclear facilities, is presented. Besides, this paper deals with some of the studies carried out in the pilot plant aimed at the recovery of uranium from lignites, high in sulfur and ashes, coming from Calaf basin (Barcelona). These studies include the recovery of the heating value of these lignites and the reduction of environmental effect of SO 2 . Based on these studies an application exercise is presented. 9 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  1. Effects of biomass on dynamics of combustion in circulating fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourunen Antti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed technology is very suitable for the combustion of biomass Nevertheless substitution of coal with biomass affects boiler operation and especially dynamics and controllability. Non-homogeneity of biomass and fuel feeding disturbances cause process instability, such as variations in temperatures and pressures, which reduce lifetime of equipment and structures. Because of process instability higher air coefficient must be used in order to avoid CO emissions, which is not economical. Combustion profiles for coal, wood and peat, measured at the VTT Processes Pilot circulating fluidized bed reactor, have been compared. Process stability and char inventories have been studied by the measurements and the model. Biofuel are usually very reactive and their combustion profiles are quite different compared to coals. Because of high reactivity and low char content combustion process with biofuel is very sensitive for fuel feeding. Also low char inventory effect on load changes combined with combustion profile that differs from coals. Because of different combustion profile heat transfer can be a limiting factor in load changes despite the high reactivity and fast oxygen response.

  2. Modification of combustion behaviour and NO emissions by coal blending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, Fernando; Arenillas, Ana; Arias, Borja; Pis, Jose J. [Department of Energy and Environment, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-06-20

    Combustion profiles determined by TGA and experiments in a laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) were used in this work to assess the relative combustion reactivities of different rank coals and their binary coal blends. The combustion behaviour of coal blends in TGA was greatly influenced by coal rank and the proportion of each component in the blend. Higher volatile coals exerted more influence in the low-temperature region and less reactive coals in the char combustion zone. The results in the EFR indicated that coal blends burnout and NO emissions show additivity in the case of similar nature coals. When one of the components was a high-rank coal, the burnout of the blend exhibited, in some cases, positive synergistic effects, while a clear deviation from linearity was found in NO emissions.

  3. Slagging behavior of upgraded brown coal and bituminous coal in 145 MW practical coal combustion boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Katsuya; Pak, Haeyang; Takubo, Yoji [Kobe Steel, Ltd, Kobe (Japan). Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.; Tada, Toshiya [Kobe Steel, Ltd, Takasago (Japan). Coal and Energy Technology Dept.; Ueki, Yasuaki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Energy Science Div.; Yoshiie, Ryo; Naruse, Ichiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Science and Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate behaviors of ash deposition during combustion of Upgraded Brown Coal (UBC) and bituminous coal in a 145 MW practical coal combustion boiler. A blended coal consisting 20 wt% of the UBC and 80 wt% of the bituminous coal was burned for the combustion tests. Before the actual ash deposition tests, the molten slag fractions of ash calculated by chemical equilibrium calculations under the combustion condition was adopted as one of the indices to estimate the tendency of ash deposition. The calculation results showed that the molten slag fraction for UBC ash reached approximately 90% at 1,523 K. However, that for the blended coal ash became about 50%. These calculation results mean that blending the UBC with a bituminous coal played a role in decreasing the molten slag fraction. Next, the ash deposition tests were conducted, using a practical pulverized coal combustion boiler. A water-cooled stainless-steel tube was inserted in locations at 1,523 K in the boiler to measure the amount of ash deposits. The results showed that the mass of deposited ash for the blended coal increased and shape of the deposited ash particles on the tube became large and spherical. This is because the molten slag fraction in ash for the blended coal at 1,523 K increased and the surface of deposited ash became sticky. However, the mass of the deposited ash for the blended coal did not greatly increase and no slagging problems occurred for 8 days of boiler operation under the present blending conditions. Therefore, appropriate blending of the UBC with a bituminous coal enables the UBC to be used with a low ash melting point without any ash deposition problems in a practical boiler.

  4. Development of second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and its team members, Westinghouse, Gilbert/Commonwealth, and the Institute of Gas Technology are developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology capable of achieving net plant efficiency in excess of 45 percent based on the higher heating value of the coal. A three-phase program entails design and costing of a 500 MWe power plant and identification of developments needed to commercialize this technology (Phase 1), testing of individual components (Phase 2), and finally testing these components in an integrated mode (Phase 3). This paper briefly describes the results of the first two phases as well as the progress on the third phase. Since other projects which use the same technology are in construction or in negotiation stages-namely, the Power System Development Facility and the Four Rivers Energy Modernization Projects-brief descriptions of these are also included.

  5. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for

  6. Comparative Study of Coal and Biomass Co-Combustion With Coal Burning Separately Through Emissions Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Siddique; Suhail Ahmed Soomro; Aziza Aftab; Zahid Naeem Qaisrani; Abdul Sattar Jatoi; Asadullah; Ghulamullah Khan; Ehsanullah Kakar

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate eco-friendly methods to mitigate the problem of emissions from combustion of fossil fuel are highly demanded. The current study was focused on the effect of using coal & coal-biomass co-combustion on the gaseous emissions. Different biomass' were used along with coal. The coal used was lignite coal and the biomass' were tree waste, cow dung and banana tree leaves. Various ratios of coal and biomass were used to investigate the combustion behavior of coal-biomass blends and their ...

  7. Indoor Emissions from the Household Combustion of Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the lung cancer risk associated with burning coal inside your home. Indoor emissions from the household combustion of coal contain harmful chemicals such as benzene, carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde.

  8. Integration of coal gasification and packed bed CLC for high efficiency and near-zero emission power generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spallina, V.; Romano, M.C.; Chiesa, P.; Gallucci, F.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Lozza, G.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed thermodynamic analysis has been carried out of large-scale coal gasification-based power plant cycles with near zero CO2 emissions, integrated with chemical looping combustion (CLC). Syngas from coal gasification is oxidized in dynamically operated packed bed reactors (PBRs), generating a

  9. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  10. Coal combustion products: trash or treasure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T.

    2006-07-15

    Coal combustion by-products can be a valuable resource to various industries. The American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) collects data on production and uses of coal combustion products (CCPs). 122.5 million tons of CCPs were produced in 2004. The article discusses the results of the ACCA's 2004 survey. Fly ash is predominantly used as a substitute for Portland cement; bottom ash for structural fill, embankments and paved road cases. Synthetic gypsum from the FGD process is commonly used in wallboard. Plant owners are only likely to have a buyer for a portion of their CCPs. Although sale of hot water (from Antelope Valley Station) from condensers for use in a fish farm to raise tilapia proved unviable, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant which manufactures natural gas from lignite produces a wide range of products including anhydrous ammonia, phenol, krypton, carbon dioxide (for enhanced oil recovery), tar oils and liquid nitrogen. ACCA's goal is to educate people about CCPs and how to make them into useful products, and market them, in order to reduce waste disposal and enhance revenue. The article lists members of the ACCA. 2 photos., 1 tab.

  11. Radioactivity of combustion residues from coal-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vom Berg, W.; Puch, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    Each year in Germany, about 18 mill. t of combustion residues are produced from the combustion of bituminous coal and lignite. They are utilized to a great extent in the construction industry and in mining. During the combustion of coal, the radio-nuclides remain predominantly in the ash. The radionuclide concentration in lignite ash is within the range of that in natural soil. The combustion residues of bituminous coal contain radio-nuclides of a similar order of magnitude as also can occur in natural rock. The utilization of combustion residues in construction materials makes a negligible contribution to radiation exposure through retention in buildings. (orig.) [de

  12. Boiler for combustion fuel in a fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laković Mirjana S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustion is a process that is current and which every day gives more attention and there are many studies that have been closely associated with this technology. This combustion technology is widespread and constantly improving the range of benefits it provides primarily due to reduced emissions. This paper presents the boilers for combustion in a fluidized bed, whit characteristics and advantages. Also is shown the development of this type of boilers in Republic of Serbia. In this paper is explained the concept of fluidized bed combustion. Boilers for this type of combustion can be improved and thereby increase their efficiency level. More detailed characteristics are given for boilers with bubbling and circulating fluidized bed as well as their mutual comparison.

  13. Co-combustion of agricultural wastes in a circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseyin Topal; Aysel T. Atimtay [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    In this study a circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) of 125 mm inside diameter and 1800 mm height was used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics of peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry, and sunflower stems produced as a waste from the edible oil industry with a lignite coal. Lignite coal is a coal most widely used in Turkey. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NOx and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. By changing the operating parameters the variation of emissions of various pollutants were studied. During combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from agro-wastes quickly volatilizes and mostly burn in the riser. The temperature profiles along the bed and the rise also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter content of agro-waste increases, the combustion efficiency increases and the combustion takes place more in the upper region of the riser. These results suggest that agro-wastes are potential fuels that can be utilized for clean energy production by using CFBC in countries where agricultural activities are heavy. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Ninth annual coal-fueled heat engines, advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion, and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Welcoming address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The market for retrofit and new capacity in the electric utility is expected to be very large: 250 gigawatt (GW) and 500 GW by the year 2030--an amount which equals the presently installed capacity in the US Overseas, the market is even larger exclamation point This large market will be driven by a number of key ''drivers.'' In order for power generation systems to compete in this market, they will have to satisfy the market drivers. This will lead us inevitably to modular, low cost, super clean, efficient, and reliable products which are fuel flexible and can meet either retrofit, repowering, or new capacity applications. I believe clean coal technologies that we are developing will meet these market demands and will penetrate--and eventually dominate--the power generation market of the next century. But for this market penetration and widespread deployment to take place, the products we are jointly developing must be continuously improved. We must together set our goals on a rapid march down the learning curve from the present high ''projected costs'' of these systems to an acceptable market clearing price on the order of $1000 to $1200 per kilowatt (kw) and with heat rates approaching 7500 Btu per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The projected learning curve for integrated gasification combined cycle systems is a good illustration of the aggressive goals we need to achieve

  15. Fluidized-bed calciner with combustion nozzle and shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielang, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Kerr, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A nozzle employed as a burner within a fluidized bed is coaxially enclosed within a tubular shroud that extends beyond the nozzle length into the fluidized bed. The open-ended shroud portion beyond the nozzle end provides an antechamber for mixture and combustion of atomized fuel with an oxygen-containing gas. The arrangement provides improved combustion efficiency and excludes bed particles from the high-velocity, high-temperature portions of the flame to reduce particle attrition. 4 claims, 2 figures

  16. Update on status of fluidized-bed combustion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallings, J.; Boyd, T.; Brown, R.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1980s, fluidized-bed combustion technology has become the dominant technology for solid-fuel-fired power generation systems in the United States. Atmospheric fluidized beds as large as 160 MWe in capacity are now in operation, while pressurized systems reaching 80 MWe have started up in the last year. The commercial status, boiler performance, emissions, and future developments for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion systems are discussed

  17. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindley, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  18. State of the art and the future fuel portfolio of fluidized bed combustion systems; Status und kuenftiges Brennstoffportfolio bei Wirbelschichtfeuerungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szentannai, Pal; Friebert, Arpad; Winter, Franz [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrens-, Umwelttechnik und technische Biowissenschaften

    2008-07-01

    Coal, biomass and substitute fuels energetically can be used efficiently and with low pollution in fluidized bed plants. In comparison to biomass there are significant differences between the circulating and stationary fluidized bed technology. The stationary fluidised bed is fed predominantly with biomasses and residual substances. Coal usually is the basis fuel in the circulating fluidised bed. Biomass and residual substances frequently are course-fired. The state of the art is the employment of a broad fuel mixture in small and large fluidized-bed combustion systems. Future developments present an increased use of sewage sludge, fluidized bed combustion systems with wood as a basis fuel, utilization of household waste and the gas production.

  19. The Effect of Bedding Structure on Mechanical Property of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical property of coal, influencing mining activity considerably, is significantly determined by the natural fracture distributed within coal mass. In order to study the effecting mechanism of bedding structure on mechanical property of coal, a series of uniaxial compression tests and mesoscopic tests have been conducted. The experimental results show that the distribution characteristic of calcite particles, which significantly influences the growth of cracks and the macroscopic mechanical properties of coal, is obviously affected by the bedding structure. Specifically, the uniaxial compression strength of coal sample is mainly controlled by bedding structure, and the average peak stress of specimens with axes perpendicular to the bedding planes is 20.00 MPa, which is 2.88 times the average amount of parallel ones. The test results also show a close relationship between the bedding structure and the whole deformation process under uniaxial loading.

  20. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal biosolubilisation was investigated in stirred tank reactor, fluidised bed and fixed bed bioreactors with a view to highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each of these reactor configurations. The stirred aerated bioreactor and fluidised...

  1. A study on the combustion behaviour of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Fuente, E.; Arenillas, A.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Combustion behaviour of four coals of varying rank and their binary blends was studied using temperature programmed combustion tests, and thermogravimetric analysis. Characteristic parameters could not be predicted from the weight percentage of individual coals in the blend. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Effects of setting new source performance standards for fluidized-bed combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    This study was undertaken for the US Environmental Protection Agency to examine the potential consequences of revisions in New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on fluidized-bed combustor-based steam electric generators of greater than 250,000,000 Btu. A study of the appropriateness and differential effects of alternate regulatory approaches to the standards-setting process was made. Problems dealing with an emerging technology such as fluidized-bed combustion were emphasized. Finally, an examination was made of the potential benefits of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems relative to conventional coal-fired systems equipped with scrubbers. Information is included on the relative advantages and disadvantages of utility-sized fluidized-bed combustors, the technical consequences of NSPS alternatives, policy implications concerning NSPS for steam-electric generators, and cost models for atmospheric and pressurized FBC systems. (LCL)

  3. Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    This Ph.D. thesis describes an experimental and modeling investigation of the thermal conversion of coal and an experimental investigation of the emission of NO from char combustion in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres. The motivation for the work has been the prospective use of the technology “Oxy......-Fuel Combustion” as a mean of CO2 abatement in large scale energy conversion. Entrained Flow Reactor (EFR) experiments have been conducted in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 mixtures in the temperature interval 1173 K – 1673 K using inlet O2 concentrations between 5 – 28 vol. %. Bituminous coal has been used as fuel in all....... % it was found that char conversion rate was lowered in O2/CO2 compared to O2/N2. This is caused by the lower diffusion coefficient of O2 in CO2 (~ 22 %) that limits the reaction rate in zone III compared to combustion in O2/N2. Using char sampled in the EFR experiments ThermoGravimetric Analyzer (TGA...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A VORTEX CONTAINMENT COMBUSTOR FOR COAL COMBUSTION SYTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a vortex containment combustor (VCC) for coal combustion systems, designed to solve major problems facing the conversion of oil- and gas-fired boilers to coal (e.g., derating, inorganic impurities in coal, and excessive formation of NOx and...

  5. Geochemistry of coals, coal ashes and combustion wastes from coal-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, S.V.; Vassileva, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Contents, concentration trends, and modes of occurrence of 67 elements in coals, coal ashes, and combustion wastes at eleven Bulgarian thermoelectric power stations (TPS) were studied. A number of trace elements in coal and coal ash have concentrations greater than their respective worldwide average contents (Clarke values). Trace elements are concentrated mainly in the heavy accessory minerals and organic matter in coal. In decreasing order of significance, the trace elements in coal may occur as: element-organic compounds; impurities in the mineral matter; major components in the mineral matter; major and impurity components in the inorganic amorphous matter; and elements in the fluid constituent. A number of trace elements in the waste products, similar to coal ashes, exceed known Clarke contents. Trace elements are mainly enriched in non-magnetic, heavy and fine-grained fractions of fly ash. They are commonly present as impurities in the glass phases, and are included in the crystalline components. Their accessory crystalline phases, element-organic compounds, liquid and gas forms, are of subordinate importance. Some elements from the chalcophile, lithophile and siderophile groups may release into the atmosphere during coal burning. For others, the combustion process appears to be a powerful factor causing their relative enrichment in the fly ash and rarely in the bottom ash and slag. 65 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs

  6. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  7. Large-eddy simulation of swirling pulverized-coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X.; Xu, C.S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    A Eulerian-Lagrangian large-eddy simulation (LES) with a Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale stress model, presumed-PDF fast chemistry and EBU gas combustion models, particle devolatilization and particle combustion models are used to study the turbulence and flame structures of swirling pulverized-coal combustion. The LES statistical results are validated by the measurement results. The instantaneous LES results show that the coherent structures for pulverized coal combustion is stronger than that for swirling gas combustion. The particles are concentrated in the periphery of the coherent structures. The flame is located at the high vorticity and high particle concentration zone.

  8. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF THE OXYFUEL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS IN A BUBBLING FLUIDIZED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxyfuel combustion is a promising approach for capturing CO2 from power plants. This technology produces a flue gas with a high concentration of CO2. Our paper presents a verification of the oxyfuel combustion conditions in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor. It presents a theoretical analysis of oxyfuel combustion and makes a comparison with combustion using air. It is important to establish a proper methodology for stoichiometric calculations and for computing the basic characteristic fluidization properties. The methodology presented here has been developed for general purposes, and can be applied to calculations for combustion with air and with oxygen-enriched air, and also for full oxyfuel conditions. With this methodology, we can include any water vapour condensation during recirculation of the flue gas when dry flue gas recirculation is used. The paper contains calculations for a lignite coal, which is taken as a reference fuel for future research and for the experiments.

  9. Combustion and co-combustion of biomass in a bubbling fluidized bed boiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    This PhD dissertation concerns the study of different aspects of biomass (co)-combustion in small-scale fluidized bed boilers for heat generation. The most renowned gaseous emissions from fluidized bed combustion, namely, CO and NO, are investigated with the help of experimental and theoretical

  10. Combustion behaviour of ultra clean coal obtained by chemical demineralisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Rubiera; A. Arenillas; B. Arias; J.J. Pis; I. Suarez-Ruiz; K.M. Steel; J.W. Patrick [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-10-01

    The increasing environmental concern caused by the use of fossil fuels and the concomitant need for improved combustion efficiency is leading to the development of new coal cleaning and utilisation processes. However, the benefits achieved by the removal of most mineral matter from coal either by physical or chemical methods can be annulled if poor coal combustibility characteristics are attained. In this work a high volatile bituminous coal with 6% ash content was subjected to chemical demineralisation via hydrofluoric and nitric acid leaching, the ash content of the clean coal was reduced to 0.3%. The original and treated coals were devolatilised in a drop tube furnace and the structure and morphology of the resultant chars was analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopies. The reactivity characteristics of the chars were studied by isothermal combustion tests in air at different temperatures in a thermogravimetric system. Comparison of the combustion behaviour and pollutant emissions of both coals was conducted in a drop tube furnace operating at 1000{sup o}C. The results of this work indicate that the char obtained from the chemically treated coal presents very different structure, morphology and reactivity behaviour than the char from the original coal. The changes induced by the chemical treatment increased the combustion efficiency determined in the drop tube furnace, in fact higher burnout levels were obtained for the demineralised coal.

  11. Dynamic behavior of tobacco waste in the coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Jian; Chen, Honggang; Yang, Yongping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). National Eng Lab for Biomass Power Generation Equipment; Yu, Bangting [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Heavy Oil Processing

    2013-07-01

    Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology is an advanced method for utilizing coal and other solid fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. During the processing procedure in the nicotiana tabacum plants, lots of tobacco stem wastes are produced, which are normally being dumped to the landfill field. If this kind of waste can be used as a part of the fuel to be added into the coal in a CFB combustor, it will reduce the use of coal and then cut the net carbon emissions. To understand the complicated fluid dynamics of nicotiana tabacum wastes in the coal-fired CFB boiler, the mixing and segregation behavior of tobacco stalk are preliminary measured in a cylindrical fluidized bed. Obvious segregation behavior is found due to distinct differences in density and shape between tobacco stem and coal, which results in poor fluidization quality and bad combustion efficiency. To overcome this disadvantage, a jet with high gas velocity is introduced through the air distributor and a detailed experimental study is conducted in a fluidized bed made up of stem-sand mixture with different solid components at various jet velocities, which greatly improve the mixing performance of stem in the fluidized bed. The above findings are helpful for the technological upgrading of small- or middle-sized CFB boiler with adding tobacco stem into coal.

  12. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature......Straw is being used as main renewable energy source in grate boilers in Denmark. For optimizing operating conditions and design parameters, a one-dimensional unsteady heterogeneous mathematical model has been developed and experiments have been carried out for straw combustion in a fixed bed...... are in good agreement with measurements at different operating conditions such as primary air-flow rate, pre-heating of the primary air, oxygen concentration, moisture content in straw, and bulk density of the straw in the fixed bed. A parametric study indicates that the effective heat conductivity, straw...

  13. Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion testing of North Dakota lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goblirsch, G; Vander Molen, R H; Wilson, K; Hajicek, D

    1980-05-01

    The sulfur retention by the inherent alkali, and added limestone sorbent, perform about the same and are reasonably predictable within a range of about +-10% retention by application of alkali to sulfur ratio. Temperature has a substantial effect on the retention of sulfur by the inherent alkali or limestone. The temperature effect is not yet fully understood but it appears to be different for different coals and operational conditions. The emission of SO/sub 2/ from the fluid bed burning the Beulah lignite sample used for these tests can be controlled to meet or better the current emission standards. The injection of limestone to an alkali-to-sulfur molar ratio of 1.5 to 1, should lower the SO/sub 2/ emissions below the current requirement of 0.6 lb SO/sub 2//10/sup 6/ Btu to 0.4 lb SO/sub 2//10/sup 6/ Btu, a safe 33% below the standard. Agglomeration of bed material, and consequent loss of fluidization quality can be a problem when burning high sodium lignite in a silica bed. There appears, however, to be several ways of controlling the problem including the injection of calcium compounds, and careful control of operating conditions. The heat transfer coefficients measured in the CPC and GFETC tests are comparable to data obtained by other researchers, and agree reasonably well with empirical conditions. The NO/sub x/ emissions measured in all of the tests on Beulah lignite are below the current New Source Performance Standard of 0.5 lb NO/sub 2//10/sup 6/ Btu input. Combustion efficiencies for the Beulah lignite are generally quite high when ash recycle is being used. Efficiencies in the range of 98% to 99%+ have been measured in all tests using this fuel.

  14. Lab-scale investigation of Middle-Bosnia coals to achieve high-efficient and clean combustion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajevic Izet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes full lab-scale investigation of Middle-Bosnia coals launched to support selection an appropriate combustion technology and to support optimization of the boiler design. Tested mix of Middle-Bosnia brown coals is projected coal for new co-generation power plant Kakanj Unit 8 (300-450 MWe, EP B&H electricity utility. The basic coal blend consisting of the coals Kakanj: Breza: Zenica at approximate mass ratio of 70:20:10 is low grade brown coal with very high percentage of ash - over 40%. Testing that coal in circulated fluidized bed combustion technique, performed at Ruhr-University Bohum and Doosan Lentjes GmbH, has shown its inconveniency for fluidized bed combustion technology, primarily due to the agglomeration problems. Tests of these coals in PFC (pulverized fuel combustion technology have been performed in referent laboratory at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of Sarajevo University, on a lab-scale PFC furnace, to provide reliable data for further analysis. The PFC tests results are fitted well with previously obtained results of the burning similar Bosnian coal blends in the PFC dry bottom furnace technique. Combination of the coals shares, the process temperature and the air combustion distribution for the lowest NOx and SO2 emissions was found in this work, provided that combustion efficiency and CO emissions are within very strict criteria, considering specific settlement of lab-scale furnace. Sustainability assessment based on calculation economic and environmental indicators, in combination with Low Cost Planning method, is used for optimization the power plant design. The results of the full lab-scale investigation will help in selection optimal Boiler design, to achieve sustainable energy system with high-efficient and clean combustion technology applied for given coals.

  15. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shan, N.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Swenson, S.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.; Mroczkowski, S.; Helble, J.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Sterling, R.; Dunham, G.; Miller, S.

    2000-08-17

    The final program review meeting of Phase II was held on June 22 in Salt Lake City. The goals of the meeting were to present work in progress and to identify the remaining critical experiments or analyses, particularly those involving collaboration among various groups. The information presented at the meeting is summarized in this report. Remaining fixed bed, bench-scale experiments at EERC were discussed. There are more ash samples which can be run. Of particular interest are high carbon ash samples to be generated by the University of Arizona this summer and some ash-derived sorbents that EERC has evaluated on a different program. The use of separation techniques (electrostatic or magnetic) was also discussed as a way to understand the active components in the ash with respect to mercury. XAFS analysis of leached and unleached ash samples from the University of Arizona was given a high priority. In order to better understand the fixed bed test results, CCSEM and Moessbauer analyses of those ash samples need to be completed. Utah plans to analyze the ash from the single particle combustion experiments for those major elements not measured by INAA. USGS must still complete mercury analyses on the whole coals and leaching residues. Priorities for further work at the SHRIMP-RG facility include arsenic on ash surfaces and mercury in sulfide minerals. Moessbauer analyses of coal samples from the University of Utah were completed; samples from the top and bottom layers of containers of five different coals showed little oxidation of pyrite in the top relative to the bottom except for Wyodak.

  16. The upper pennsylvanian pittsburgh coal bed: Resources and mine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, W.D.; Ruppert, L.F.; Tewalt, S.J.; Bragg, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed a digital coal resource assessment model of the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed, which indicates that after subtracting minedout coal, 16 billion short tons (14 billion tonnes) remain of the original 34 billion short tons (31 billion tonnes) of coal. When technical, environmental, and social restrictions are applied to the remaining Pittsburgh coal model, only 12 billion short tons (11 billion tonnes) are available for mining. Our assessment models estimate that up to 0.61 billion short tons (0.55 billion tonnes), 2.7 billion short tons (2.4 billion tonnes), and 8.5 billion short tons (7.7 billion tonnes) could be available for surface mining, continuous mining, and longwall mining, respectively. This analysis is an example of a second-generation regional coal availability study designed to model recoverability characteristics for all the major coal beds in the United States. ?? 2001 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  17. Effect of the grinding behaviour of coal blends on coal utilisation for combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Fuente, E.; Pis, J.J. [Inst. Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain); Miles, N. [School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering, Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    Grinding of a high volatile bituminous coal was performed in three comminution devices: Raymond Mill (RM), Rolls Crusher (RC) and Ball Mill (BM). The pulverised samples were sieved to obtain four particle size fractions, and temperature-programmed combustion (TPC) was used for the evaluation of their combustion behaviour. In addition, three coals of different hardness and rank were mixed in various proportions in order to compare the combustibility characteristics of the binary coal blends with those of the individual coals. The effect of coal blending on grindability was also studied. It was found that grindability was non-additive especially when coals of very different hardgrove grindability index (HGI) were blended. The combustion studies also suggested that there exists an interaction between individual coals when they are burnt as a blend. (orig.)

  18. Combustion of Jordanian oil shale using circulating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, M.; Al-Azzam, S.

    1998-11-01

    this study re[resents design and manufacturing of a lab-scale circulating fluidized bed (C.F.B) to burn low grade fuel such as Jordanian oil shale. Hydrodynamic properties of C.F.B. were studied like minimum fluidization velocity, circulation flux and carryover rate. a hot run was firstly conducted by the combustion of L.P.G. to start up the combustion process. It proceeds until reaching the minimum burning temperature of oil shale particles, at which time the LPG supply was gradually reduced and oil shale feeding started. soon after reaching a self sustainable condition of oil shale particles, the LPG supply was cut off. The main combustion variables were investigated such as air to fuel ratios, temperature profiles across the bed, exhaust gas analysis and combustion efficiency. a combustion intensity of 859 kg/hr.m 2 and combustion efficiency of 96% were achieved. (authors). 19 refs., 9 tab., 18 fig

  19. Possibility of Coal Combustion Product Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyński, Tomasz Z.; Król, Maciej R.

    2018-03-01

    This paper is focused on properties of materials known as green binders. They can be used to produce aluminium-siliceous concrete and binders known also as geopolymers. Comparing new ecological binders to ordinary cements we can see huge possibility of reducing amount of main greenhouse gas which is emitted to atmosphere by 3 to even 10 times depending of substrate type used to new green material production. Main ecological source of new materials obtaining possibility is to use already available products which are created in coal combustion and steel smelting process. Most of them are already used in many branches of industry. They are mostly civil engineering, chemistry or agriculture. Conducted research was based on less popular in civil engineering fly ash based on lignite combustion. Materials were examine in order to verify possibility of obtaining hardened mortars based of different factors connected with process of geopolymerization, which are temperature, amount of reaction reagent and time of heat treatment. After systematizing the matrices for the basic parameters affecting the strength of the hardened mortars, the influence of the fly ash treatment for increasing the strength was tested.

  20. Lewis pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion program. Data and calculated results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1982-03-01

    A 200 kilowatt (thermal), pressurized, fluidized bed (PFB) reactor and research test facility were designed, constructed, and operated. The facility was established to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that may have applications in stationary powerplant turbogenerators. The facility was intended for research and development work and was designed to operate over a wide range of conditions. These conditions included the type and rate of consumption of fuel (e.g., coal) and sulfur reacting sorbent material: the ratio of feed fuel to sorbent material; the ratio of feed fuel to combustion airflow; the depth of the fluidized reaction bed; the temperature and pressure in the reaction bed; and the type of test unit that was exposed to the combustion exhaust gases.

  1. Conversion of metallurgical coke and coal using a Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) moving bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Siwei; Bayham, Samuel; Zeng, Liang; McGiveron, Omar; Chung, Elena; Majumder, Ankita; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Accumulated more than 300 operation hours were accomplished for the moving bed reducer reactor. • Different reactor operation variables were investigated with optimal conditions identified. • High conversions of sub-bituminous coal and bituminous coal were achieved without flow problems. • Co-current and counter-current contact modes were tested and their applicability was discussed. - Abstract: The CLC process has the potential to be a transformative commercial technology for a carbon-constrained economy. The Ohio State University Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) process directly converts coal, eliminating the need for a coal gasifier oran air separation unit (ASU). Compared to other solid-fuel CLC processes, the CDCL process is unique in that it consists of a countercurrent moving bed reducer reactor. In the proposed process, coal is injected into the middle of the moving bed, whereby the coal quickly heats up and devolatilizes, splitting the reactor roughly into two sections with no axial mixing. The top section consists of gaseous fuel produced from the coal volatiles, and the bottom section consists of the coal char mixed with the oxygen carrier. A bench-scale moving bed reactor was used to study the coal conversion with CO 2 as the enhancing gas. Initial tests using metallurgical cokefines as feedstock were conducted to test the effects of operational variables in the bottom section of the moving bed reducer, e.g., reactor temperature, oxygen carrier to char ratio, enhancer gas CO 2 flow rate, and oxygen carrier flow rates. Experiments directly using coal as the feedstock were subsequently carried out based on these test results. Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and Illinois #6 coal were tested as representative sub-bituminous and bituminous coals, respectively. Nearly complete coal conversion was achieved using composite iron oxide particles as the oxygen carriers without any flow problems. The operational results demonstrated that a

  2. Axial concentration profiles and N{sub 2}O flue gas in a pilot scale bubbling fluidised bed coal combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarelho, L.A.C.; Matos, M.A.A.; Pereira, F.J.M.A. [Environment and Planning Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2005-05-15

    Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidised Bed Coal Combustion (ABFBCC) of a bituminous coal and anthracite with particle diameters in the range 500-4000 {mu}m was investigated in a pilot-plant facility (circular section with 0.25 m internal diameter and 3 m height). The experiments were conducted at steady-state conditions using three excess air levels (10%, 25% and 50%) and bed temperatures in the 750-900 {sup o}C range. Combustion air was staged, with primary air accounting for 100%, 80% and 60% of total combustion air. For both types of coal, virtually no N{sub 2}O was found in significant amounts inside the bed. However, just above the bed-freeboard interface, the N{sub 2}O concentration increased monotonically along the freeboard and towards the exit flue. The N{sub 2}O concentrations in the reactor ranged between 0-90 ppm during bituminous coal combustion and 0-30 ppm for anthracite. For both coals, the lowest values occurred at the higher bed temperature (900 {sup o}C) with low excess air (10%) and high air staging (60% primary air), whereas the highest occurred at the lower bed temperature (750 {sup o}C for bituminous, 825 {sup o}C for anthracite) with high excess air (50%) and single stage combustion. Most of the observed results could be qualitatively interpreted in terms of a set of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions, where catalytic surfaces (such as char, sand and coal ash) can play an important role in the formation and destruction of N{sub 2}O and its precursors (such as HCN, NH{sub 3} and HCNO) by free radicals (O, H, OH) and reducing species (H{sub 2}, CO, HCs)

  3. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with on-line battery of analyzers. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behaviour in other combustion equipments, i.e. fluidized bed combustors. It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range NO heterogeneous reduction seems to be controlled by the evolution of surface complexes. In the high-temperature range a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Nitric oxide reduction in coal combustion: role of char surface complexes in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Ana; Rubiera, Fernando; Pis, José J

    2002-12-15

    Nitrogen oxides are one of the major environmental problems arising from fossil fuel combustion. Coal char is relatively rich in nitrogen, and so this is an important source of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion. However, due to its carbonaceous nature, char can also reduce NO through heterogeneous reduction. The objectives of this work were on one hand to compare NO emissions from coal combustion in two different types of equipment and on the other hand to study the influence of char surface chemistry on NO reduction. A series of combustion tests were carried out in two different scale devices: a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer and an FTIR (TG-MS-FTIR) and a fluidized bed reactor with an on line battery of analyzers. The TG-MS-FTIR system was also used to perform a specific study on NO heterogeneous reduction reactions using chars with different surface chemistry. According to the results obtained, it can be said that the TG-MS-FTIR system provides valuable information about NO heterogeneous reduction and it can give good trends of the behavior in other combustion equipments (i.e., fluidized bed combustors). It has been also pointed out that NO-char interaction depends to a large extent on temperature. In the low-temperature range (800 degrees C), a different mechanism is involved in NO heterogeneous reduction, the nature of the carbon matrix being a key factor.

  5. Staged fluidized-bed combustion and filter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, J.S.; Halow, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    A staged fluidized-bed combustion and filter system are described for substantially reducing the quantity of waste through the complete combustion into ash-type solids and gaseous products. The device has two fluidized-bed portions, the first primarily as a combustor/pyrolyzer bed, and the second as a combustor/filter bed. The two portions each have internal baffles to define stages so that material moving therein as fluidized beds travel in an extended route through those stages. Fluidization and movement is achieved by the introduction of gases into each stage through a directional nozzle. Gases produced in the combustor/pyrolyzer bed are permitted to travel into corresponding stages of the combustor/filter bed through screen filters that permit gas flow but inhibit solids flow. Any catalyst used in the combustor/filter bed is recycled. The two beds share a common wall to minimize total volume of the system. A slightly modified embodiment can be used for hot gas desulfurization and sorbent regeneration. Either side-by-side rectangular beds or concentric beds can be used. The system is particularly suited to the processing of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. 10 figures

  6. Experimental investigations on drying behaviour of Bulgarian brown coal in steam fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschsieweke, F.; Koenig, J.

    1999-01-01

    The main targets were: to investigate the parameters for optimizing the drying process as steam pressure, fluidization velocity and particle size; to identify the cost of drying and combustion processes considering the necessity of milling the coal (raw or dried). Test series with Bulgarian brown coal from Maritsa-East has been made. Two fractions with different particle size was got: A from 0 to 1.6 mm (0.5 mm average) and B, resp. 1.6 to 6.3 (1.7 mm). The particle size is depending on the coal moisture. The fluidized bed process with the both fractions was performed at variations of the following parameters: steam velocity (0.07 to 1.7 m/s); raw coal feed rate (4 to 16 kg/h); raw moisture (18 to 43 wt %) and pressure (1.3 and 5 bar). Also the shrinking behaviour of the coal in different pore sizes was tested. Comparing pore size of the oven dried coal to the fluidized bed dried coal, significantly higher inner surface for the oven dried coal was established. To indicate the pore size of raw coal samples were made by freeze drying. Ice expanding should cause higher inner surface compared to oven drying method but no significant difference was established. A significant increase of heat transfer of the particles from A fraction (300 to 350 W/m 2 K0 compared to B (200 to 230 W/m 2 K) was determined. The heat transfer coefficient increased at increasing of the raw coal feed rate, mostly significant for A, due to higher particle contact. In conclusion: the particle convective mechanism is predominant for the heat transfer; development of pressurized fluidized bed drying is not of interest and the question about the total expenditure for crushing and milling remains open

  7. Methodology for Evaluating Encapsulated Beneficial Uses of Coal Combustion Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary purpose of this document is to present an evaluation methodology developed by the EPA for making determinations about environmental releases from encapsulated products containing coal combustion residuals.

  8. Microbial diversity of western Canadian subsurface coal beds and methanogenic coal enrichment cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, Tara J.; Foght, Julia M. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Budwill, Karen [Carbon and Energy Management, Alberta Innovates-Technology Futures, 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-01

    Coalbed methane is an unconventional fuel source associated with certain coal seams. Biogenic methane can comprise a significant portion of the gas found in coal seams, yet the role of microbes in methanogenesis in situ is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to detect and identify major bacterial and archaeal species associated with coal sampled from sub-bituminous methane-producing coal beds in western Canada, and to examine the potential for methane biogenesis from coal. Enrichment cultures of coal samples were established to determine how nutrient amendment influenced the microbial community and methane production in the laboratory. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed using DNA extracted and amplified from uncultured coal samples and from methanogenic coal enrichment cultures. Libraries were screened using restriction fragment length polymorphism, and representative clones were sequenced. Most (> 50%) of the bacterial sequences amplified from uncultured coal samples were affiliated with Proteobacteria that exhibit nitrate reduction, nitrogen fixation and/or hydrogen utilization activities, including Pseudomonas, Thauera and Acidovorax spp., whereas enrichment cultures were dominated by Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and/or Lactobacillales. Archaeal 16S rRNA genes could not be amplified from uncultured coal, suggesting that methanogens are present in coal below the detection levels of our methods. However, enrichment cultures established with coal inocula produced significant volumes of methane and the archaeal clone libraries were dominated by sequences closely affiliated with Methanosarcina spp. Enrichment cultures incubated with coal plus organic nutrients produced more methane than either nutrient or coal supplements alone, implying that competent methanogenic consortia exist in coal beds but that nutrient limitations restrict their activity in situ. This report adds to the scant literature on coal bed microbiology and suggests how microbes may be

  9. NOx emissions and combustibility characteristics of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Arias, B.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Energy and Environment

    2001-07-01

    In this work, a series of coals with different origin and rank were blended and several aspects of the resultant blends were studied. This included determination of the grindability of individual coals and blends by means of the Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI), and temperature programmed combustion test, which were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyser (TG) coupled to a quadruple mass spectrometer (MS) for evolved gas analysis. Special attention was paid to the combustibility parameters and the NO emissions during blends combustion. It was found that while some coal blends present interaction between the individual coals, others do not. This behaviour was assumed to be due to the differences in coal structure and functional groups composition. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, O.K.; Levasseur, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of advanced coal-cleaning technologies aimed at expanding the use of the nation`s vast coal reserves in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner. Because of the lack of practical experience with deeply beneficiated coal-based fuels, PETC has contracted Combustion Engineering, Inc. to perform a multi-year project on `Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.` The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels (BCs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs.

  11. Bed agglomeration characteristics of palm shell and corncob combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Sricharoon, Panchan; Tia, Suvit

    2011-01-01

    Bed particle agglomeration was studied experimentally in an atmospheric laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor using quartz sand as bed material. Palm shell and corncob were tested. The objectives of the study were (i) to describe the contributions of the biomass ash properties and the operating conditions on the bed agglomeration tendency in term of the bed defluidization time (t def ) and the extent of potassium accumulation in the bed (K/Bed) and (ii) to further elucidate the ash inorganic behaviors and the governing bed agglomeration mechanisms. Defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was experienced in all experiments during combustion of these biomasses, as a consequence of the presence of potassium in biomass. The experimental results indicated that biomass ash characteristics were the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The increasing bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decreasing fluidizing air velocity enhanced the bed agglomeration tendency. The SEM/EDS analyses on the agglomerates confirmed that the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of potassium silicate liquid enriched on the surface of quartz sand particles in conjunction with the high surface temperature of the burning biomass char particles. Thermodynamic examination based on the phase diagram analysis confirmed that the molten phase formation was responsible for the agglomeration. In this study, the high molten ash fraction resulting from the high potassium content in biomass promoted the agglomeration and thus defluidization. - Highlights: → Palm shell and corncob of Thailand are tested their bed agglomeration behaviors during fluidized bed combustion. → The increase of bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decrease of air velocity enhance bed agglomeration. → The formation of ash derived potassium silicate melts enriched on sand surface is the key process. → The collision between char and sand

  12. Prevention of spontaneous combustion in coal stockpiles : Experimental results in coal storage yard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fierro, V.; Miranda, J.L.; Romero, C.; Andrés, J.M.; Arriaga, A.; Schmal, D.; Visser, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    The spontaneous ignition of coal stockpiles is a serious economic and safety problem. This paper deals with oxidation and spontaneous combustion of coal piles laid in coal storage yard and the measures to avoid the heat losses produced. Investigations on self heating were carried out with five test

  13. NO formation during oxy-fuel combustion of coal and biomass chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ke; Jensen, Anker Degn; Glarborg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The yields of NO from combustion of bituminous coal, lignite, and biomass chars were investigated in O2/N2 and O2/CO 2 atmospheres. The experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range of 850-1150 °C. To minimize thermal deactivation during char preparat......The yields of NO from combustion of bituminous coal, lignite, and biomass chars were investigated in O2/N2 and O2/CO 2 atmospheres. The experiments were performed in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range of 850-1150 °C. To minimize thermal deactivation during char...

  14. Atmospheric emission of mercury due to combustion of steam coal and domestic coal in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli

    2017-08-01

    To study the mercury emission due to the combustion of steam coal and domestic coal in China, we analyzed the mercury contents of coal, fly ash, bottom ash and sluicing water in thermal power plants, steam boilers as well as domestic coal-stoves, in Shaanxi, Shanxi, Shandong and Yunnan Provinces. This study conduct an estimate of the Hg emission rates from steam coal and domestic coal combustion based on the method of mass distribution ratio of fly ash and bottom ash. The results show that the Hg emission rate of coal combustion in thermal power plants is about 50.21% (electrostatic precipitators + wet flue gas desulfurization), and that in heating boilers is about 67.23%, and 92.28% in industrial boilers without flue gas desulphurisation equipment. Furthermore, Hg emission rate is 83.61% due to domestic coal combustion in coal-stoves. The Hg emission amount into the atmosphere from power and heat generation, industrial boilers, domestic coal-stoves and spontaneous combustion of coal gangue is roughly estimated to be 133 ± 4, 100 ± 17, 11 ± 0.1 and 47 ± 26 tons in China in 2014, respectively, and the total Hg emission amount from this paper is estimated at 292 tons. The trends of Hg emission in China from 1991 to 2014 show an accelerating growth after 2002. The proportion of mercury emission due to thermal power, heating generation and industrial energy utilization continuously increased. The atmospheric emission of mercury due to combustion of steam coal, domestic coal and coal gangue accounts nearly 50% in total anthropogenic Hg emissions in China, indicating one of the largest sources of Hg emission in China which should draw more public and scientific attention in the future.

  15. Biodesulfurization of coals of different rank: Effect on combustion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Fuente, E.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Marteinz, O.; Moran, A. [Univ. de Leon (Spain). Escuela de Ingenieria Tecnica Minera

    1999-02-01

    The emission of sulfur oxides during the combustion of coal is one of the causes, among other air pollution problems, of acid rain. The contribution of coal as the mainstay of power production will be determined by whether its environmental performance is equal or superior to other supply options. In this context, desulfurization of coal before combustion by biological methods was studied. Four Spanish high-sulfur content coals of different rank were inoculated with bacteria isolated from mine-drainage waters and with naturally occurring bacteria inherent in the coals to be treated. Higher levels of desulfurization were obtained in the case of the samples treated with their own accompanying bacteria and when aeration was increased. All the samples were amenable to the biodepyritization processes. However, it is of little value to achieve large sulfur reductions if a decrease in coal combustion performance is obtained in the process. For this reason, a comparison was made between the combustibility characteristics of the original coals and those of the biodesulfurized samples. Results indicated that combustibility was not substantially modified by the overall biological treatment. The benefits of reduced sulfur emissions into the atmosphere ought to be taken into account as part of the general evaluation of the processes.

  16. Combustion and emissions characterization of pelletized coal fuels. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes

    1993-05-01

    The aim of this project is to demonstrate that sorbent-containing coal pellets made from low grade coal or coal wastes are viable clean burning fuels, and to compare their performance with that of standard run-of-mine coal. Fuels to be investigated are: (a) carbonated pellets containing calcium hydroxide sorbent, (b) coal fines-limestone pellets with cornstarch as binder, (c) pellets made from preparation plant recovered coal containing limestone sorbent and gasification tar as binder, and (d) a standard run-of-mine Illinois seam coal. The fuels will be tested in a laboratory scale 411 diameter circulating fluidized bed combustor. Progress this quarter has centered on the development of a hydraulic press based pellet mill capable of the high compaction pressures necessary to produce the gasification tar containing pellets outlined in (c) above. Limited quantities of the pellets have been made, and the process is being fine tuned before proceeding into the production mode. Tests show that the moisture content of the coal is an important parameter that needs to be fixed within narrow limits for a given coal and binder combination to produce acceptable pellets. Combustion tests with these pellet fuels and the standard coal are scheduled for the next quarter.

  17. Results concerning a clean co-combustion technology of waste biomass with fossil fuel, in a pilot fluidised bed combustion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, Ioana; Trif-Tordai, Gavril; Ungureanu, Corneliu; Popescu, Francisc; Lontis, Nicolae [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The research focuses on a facility, the experimental results, interpretation and future plans concerning a new developed technology of using waste renewable energy by applying the cocombustion of waste biomass with coal, in a fluidised bed system. The experimental facility is working entirely in accordance to the allowed limits for the exhaust flue gas concentration, with special concern for typical pollutants. The experiments conclude that the technology is cleaner, has as main advantage the possibility to reduce both the SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} exhaust in comparison to standard fossil fuel combustion, under comparable circumstances. The combustion is occurring in a stable fluidised bed. (orig.)

  18. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Second-Generation System Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Robertson; D. Horazak; R. Newby; H. Goldstein

    2002-11-01

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called a Second-Generation or Advanced Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (APCFB) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45% (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. The APCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design was previously prepared for this new type of plant and an economic analysis presented, all based on the use of a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine with projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data. Having tested these components at the pilot plant stage, the referenced conceptual design is being updated to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine and a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. steam turbine. This report describes the updated plant which is projected to have an HHV efficiency of 48% and identifies work completed for the October 2001 through September 2002 time period.

  19. The rheodynamics and combustion of coal-water mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdukov, A.P.; Popov, V.I.; Tomilov, V.G.; Fedosenko, V.D. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Thermophysics (Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Science)

    2002-05-01

    Investigation methods for characteristics of movement along the tubes, combustion dynamics and gasification of separate drops were developed for the coal-water mixtures (CWM). The following parameters were determined on the basis of laser heating: thermometric, pyrometric and concentration dynamics of single-drop combustion, complete combustion times, duration of temperature phases of combustion, as well as the moment and temperature of ignition. Information on the combustion mass velocity and gasification products was also obtained using laser heating. 6 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Gradual combustion - method for nitrogen oxide suppression during brown coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.P.; Verzakov, V.N.; Lobov, T.V.

    1990-10-01

    Discusses combustion of brown coal in BKZ-500-140-1 boilers and factors that influence emission of nitrogen oxides. Temperature distribution in the furnace was evaluated. Effects of burner position, burner number and burner type as well as air excess ratio on chemical reactions during brown coal combustion, formation of nitrogen oxides and their emission were comparatively evaluated. Analyses showed that by optimum arrangement of burners and selecting the optimum air excess ratio a part of nitrogen oxides formed during the initial phase of combustion was reduced to molecular nitrogen in the second phase. On the basis of evaluations the following recommendations for furnace design are made: use of straight-flow burners characterized by a reduced mixing ratio with secondary air, parallel arrangement of burners which guarantees mixing of the combustion products from the burners with stable and unstable combustion (products of incomplete coal combustion), reducing the air excess ratio to below 1.0. 5 refs.

  1. Potential health impacts of burning coal beds and waste banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Uncontrolled release of pollutants from burning coal beds and waste banks presents potential environmental and human health hazards. On a global scale, the emissions of large volumes of greenhouse gases from burning coal beds may contribute to climate change that alters ecosystems and patterns of disease occurrence. On regional and local scales, the emissions from burning coal beds and waste banks of acidic gases, particulates, organic compounds, and trace elements can contribute to a range of respiratory and other human health problems. Although there are few published reports of health problems caused by these emissions, the potential for problems can be significant. In India, large numbers of people have been displaced from their homes because of health problems caused by emissions from burning coal beds. Volatile elements such as arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are commonly enriched in coal deposits. Burning coal beds can volatilize these elements, which then can be inhaled, or adsorbed on crops and foods, taken up by livestock or bioaccumulated in birds and fish. Some of these elements can condense on dust particles that can be inhaled or ingested. In addition, selenium, arsenic, lead, tin, bismuth, fluorine, and other elements condense where the hot gaseous emissions come in contact with ambient air, forming mats of concentrated efflorescent minerals on the surface of the ground. These mats can be leached by rainwater and washed into local water bodies providing other potential routes of exposure. Although there are little data linking burning coal beds and waste banks to known health problems, a possibly analogous situation exists in rural China where mineralized coal burned in a residential environment has caused widespread and severe health problems such as fluorosis and arseniasis. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A new method to quantify fluidized bed agglomeration in the combustion of biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehman, M. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The present licentiate thesis is a summary and discussion of four papers, dealing with the development, evaluation and use of a new method to quantify bed agglomeration tendencies for biomass fuels. An increased utilization of biomass related fuels has many environmental benefits, but also requires careful studies of potential new problems associated with these fuels such as bed agglomeration/defluidization during combustion and gasification in fluidized beds. From a thorough literature survey, no suitable methods to determine bed agglomeration tendencies of different fuels, fuel combinations or fuels with additives appeared to be available. It therefore seemed of considerable interest to develop a new method for the quantification of fluidized bed agglomeration tendencies for different fuels. A bench scale fluidized bed reactor (5 kW), specially designed to obtain a homogeneous isothermal bed temperature, is used. The method is based on controlled increase of the bed temperature by applying external heat to the primary air and to the bed section walls. The initial agglomeration temperature is determined by on- or off-line principal component analysis of the variations in measured bed temperatures and differential pressures. Samples of ash and bed material for evaluation of agglomeration mechanisms may also be collected throughout the operation. To determine potential effects of all the process related variables on the determined fuel specific bed agglomeration temperature, an extensive sensitivity analysis was performed according to a statistical experimental design. The results showed that the process variables had only relatively small effects on the agglomeration temperature, which could be determined to 899 deg C with a reproducibility of {+-} 5 deg C (STD). The inaccuracy was determined to be {+-} 30 deg C (STD). The method was also used to study the mechanism of both bed agglomeration using two biomass fuels and prevention of bed agglomeration by co-combustion

  3. Diesel oil combustion in fluidized bed; Combustion de aceite diesel en lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Cazares, Mario [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-07-01

    The effect of the fluidized bed depth in the combustion in burning diesel oil in a fluidized bed, was analyzed. A self sustained combustion was achieved injecting the oil with an injector that utilized a principle similar to an automobile carburetor venturi. Three different depths were studied and it was found that the deeper the bed, the greater the combustion efficiency. Combustion efficiencies were attained from 82% for a 100mm bed depth, up to 96% for a 200mm bed depth. The diminution in the efficiency was mainly attributed to unburned hydrocarbons and to the carbon carried over, which was observed in the black smoke at the stack outlet. Other phenomena registered were the temperature gradient between the lower part of the bed and the upper part, caused by the fluidization velocity; additionally it was observed that the air employed for the oil injection (carbureting air) is the most important parameter to attain a complete combustion. [Espanol] Se analizo el efecto de la profundidad del lecho en la combustion al quemar aceite diesel en un lecho fluidizado experimental. Se logro combustion autosostenida inyectando el aceite con un inyector que utilizo un principio similar al venturi del carburador de automovil. Se estudiaron tres diferentes profundidades del lecho y se encontro que a mayor profundidad del lecho, mayor eficiencia de la combustion. Se lograron eficiencias de la combustion desde 82% para el lecho de 100 mm de profundidad hasta 96% para el de 200 mm. La disminucion de la eficiencia se atribuyo, principalmente, a los hidrocarburos no quemados y al carbon arrastrado, lo cual se observo en el humo negro a la salida de la chimenea. Otros fenomenos registrados fueron el gradiente de temperatura entre la parte baja del lecho y la parte superior causado por la velocidad de fluidizacion; ademas, se observo que el aire utilizado para inyectar el aceite (aire de carburacion) es el parametro mas importante para lograr una combustion completa.

  4. Reactor design and operation strategies for a large-scale packed-bed CLC power plant with coal syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spallina, V.; Chiesa, P.; Martelli, E; Gallucci, F.; Romano, M.C.; Lozza, G.; Sint Annaland, van M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and operation strategies of dynamically operated packed-bed reactors (PBRs) of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) system included in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) for electric power generation with low CO2 emission from coal. The CLC reactors,

  5. Production of fines during co-combustion of coal with biomass fuels by fragmentation and attrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Gulyurtlu; D. Boavida; H. Lopes (and others) [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-07-01

    Results are reported from a project funded by the RFCS Programme of the European Union. The aim is to investigate, experimentally and by modeling, the production of fine char and ash particles during co-combustion of coal with wastes and biofuels in circulating fluidized bed. Work was undertaken at installations of different scales. Polish and Colombian coals were base fuels. The additional fuels were two sewage sludges. Bed temperature, feeding system, sand particle size, devolatilisation behaviour and char burn-out were studied to verify their influence on the fine particle production. Modeling was also carried out to understand the mechanisms of fragmentation and attrition. Samples from bed and cyclone were collected to determine particle size distributions. 11 refs.

  6. Microbially-Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Strategies for Increased Biogenic Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K.; Barhart, E. P.; Schweitzer, H. D.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.; Hiebert, R.; Fields, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coal is the largest fossil fuel resource in the United States. Most of this coal is deep in the subsurface making it costly and potentially dangerous to extract. However, in many of these deep coal seams, methane, the main component of natural gas, has been discovered and successfully harvested. Coal bed methane (CBM) currently accounts for approximately 7.5% of the natural gas produced in the U.S. Combustion of natural gas produces substantially less CO2 and toxic emissions (e.g. heavy metals) than combustion of coal or oil thereby making it a cleaner energy source. In the large coal seams of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in southeast Montana and northeast Wyoming, CBM is produced almost entirely by biogenic processes. The in situ conversion of coal to CBM by the native microbial community is of particular interest for present and future natural gas sources as it provides the potential to harvest energy from coal seams with lesser environmental impacts than mining and burning coal. Research at Montana State University has shown the potential for enhancing the subsurface microbial processes that produce CBM. Long-term batch enrichments have investigated the methane enhancement potential of yeast extract as well as algal and cyanobacterial biomass additions with increased methane production observed with all three additions when compared to no addition. Future work includes quantification of CBM enhancement and normalization of additions. This presentation addresses the options thus far investigated for increasing CBM production and the next steps for developing the enhanced in situ conversion of coal to CBM.

  7. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  8. Temperature prediction in a coal fired boiler with a fixed bed by fuzzy logic based on numerical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyikoglu, A.; Akcayol, M.A.; Oezdemir, V.; Sivrioglu, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, steady state combustion in boilers with a fixed bed has been investigated. Temperature distributions in the combustion chamber of a coal fired boiler with a fixed bed are predicted using fuzzy logic based on data obtained from the numerical solution method for various coal and air feeding rates. The numerical solution method and the discretization of the governing equations of two dimensional turbulent flow in the combustion chamber and one dimensional coal combustion in the fixed bed are explained. Control Volume and Finite Difference Methods are used in the discretization of the equations in the combustion chamber and in the fixed bed, respectively. Results are presented as contours within the solution domain and compared with numerical ones. Comparison of the results shows that the difference between the numerical solution and fuzzy logic prediction throughout the computational domain is less than 1.5%. The statistical coefficient of multiple determinations for the investigated cases is about 0.9993 to 0.9998. This accuracy degree is acceptable in predicting the temperature values. So, it can be concluded that fuzzy logic provides a feasible method for defining the system properties

  9. Preparation and evaluation of coal-derived activated carbons for removal of mercury vapor from simulated coal combustion flue fases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, H.-C.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Richardson, C.F.; Carey, T.R.; Chang, R.

    1998-01-01

    Coal-derived activated carbons (CDACs) were tested for their suitability in removing trace amounts of vapor-phase mercury from simulated flue gases generated by coal combustion. CDACs were prepared in bench-scale and pilot-scale fluidized-bed reactors with a three-step process, including coal preoxidation, carbonization, and then steam activation. CDACs from high-organicsulfur Illinois coals had a greater equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity than activated carbons prepared from a low-organic-sulfur Illinois coal. When a low-organic-sulfur CDAC was impregnated with elemental sulfur at 600 ??C, its equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity was comparable to the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon prepared from the high-organicsulfur coal. X-ray diffraction and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure examinations showed that the sulfur in the CDACs was mainly in organic forms. These results suggested that a portion of the inherent organic sulfur in the starting coal, which remained in the CDACs, played an important role in adsorption of Hg0. Besides organic sulfur, the BET surface area and micropore area of the CDACs also influenced Hg0 adsorption capacity. The HgCl2 adsorption capacity was not as dependent on the surface area and concentration of sulfur in the CDACs as was adsorption of Hg0. The properties and mercury adsorption capacities of the CDACs were compared with those obtained for commercial Darco FGD carbon.

  10. Fluidized bed combustion bottom ash: A better and alternative geo-material resource for construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A K; Paramkusam, Bala Ramudu; Sinha, O P

    2018-04-01

    Though the majority of research on fly ash has proved its worth as a construction material, the utility of bottom ash is yet questionable due to its generation during the pulverized combustion process. The bottom ash produced during the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) process is attracting more attention due to the novelty of coal combustion technology. But, to establish its suitability as construction material, it is necessary to characterize it thoroughly with respect to the geotechnical as well as mineralogical points of view. For fulfilling these objectives, the present study mainly aims at characterizing the FBC bottom ash and its comparison with pulverized coal combustion (PCC) bottom ash, collected from the same origin of coal. Suitability of FBC bottom ash as a dike filter material in contrast to PCC bottom ash in replacing traditional filter material such as sand was also studied. The suitability criteria for utilization of both bottom ash and river sand as filter material on pond ash as a base material were evaluated, and both river sand and FBC bottom ash were found to be satisfactory. The study shows that FBC bottom ash is a better geo-material than PCC bottom ash, and it could be highly recommended as an alternative suitable filter material for constructing ash dikes in place of conventional sand.

  11. Mathematical model for solid fuel combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikj, Zvonimir; Noshpal, Aleksandar

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model for computation of the combustion process of solid fuel in fluidized bed is presented in this work. Only the combustor part of the plant (the fluidized bed and the free board) is treated with this model. In that manner, all principal, physical presumption and improvements (upon which this model is based) are given. Finally, the results of the numerical realisation of the mathematical model for combustion of minced straw as well as the results of the experimental investigation of a concrete physical model are presented. (author)

  12. Oxy-fuel combustion on circulating fluidized bed. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, E.J. [Canmet, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Hack, H. [Foster Wheeler North America Corporation (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper explores the developments and field tests carried out with oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion. This method has the advantage over the other options of emitting a pure stream of CO2 which thus does not need to be concentrated to be liquefied, transported and stored. In addition, pilot scale tests have shown that oxy-fired circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) results in low emission and fuel flexibility. This paper highlighted that oxy-fired CFBC might be a good option for CCS but tests performed so far have been on a small scale. To confirm the promising results of pilot tests, demonstration projects are underway and are presented herein.

  13. Experimental evaluation of main emissions during coal processing waste combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Legros, Jean C; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2018-02-01

    The total volume of the coal processing wastes (filter cakes) produced by Russia, China, and India is as high as dozens of millions of tons per year. The concentrations of CO and CO 2 in the emissions from the combustion of filter cakes have been measured directly for the first time. They are the biggest volume of coal processing wastes. There have been many discussions about using these wastes as primary or secondary components of coal-water slurries (CWS) and coal-water slurries containing petrochemicals (CWSP). Boilers have already been operationally tested in Russia for the combustion of CWSP based on filter cakes. In this work, the concentrations of hazardous emissions have been measured at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000°С. The produced CO and CO 2 concentrations are shown to be practically constant at high temperatures (over 900°С) for all the coal processing wastes under study. Experiments have shown the feasibility to lowering the combustion temperatures of coal processing wastes down to 750-850°С. This provides sustainable combustion and reduces the CO and CO 2 emissions 1.2-1.7 times. These relatively low temperatures ensure satisfactory environmental and energy performance of combustion. Using CWS and CWSP instead of conventional solid fuels significantly reduces NO x and SO x emissions but leaves CO and CO 2 emissions practically at the same level as coal powder combustion. Therefore, the environmentally friendly future (in terms of all the main atmospheric emissions: CO, CO 2 , NO x , and SO x ) of both CWS and CWSP technologies relies on low-temperature combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Formation of N{sub 2} during the fixed-bed pyrolysis of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiheng; Ohtsuka, Yasuo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Furimsky, E. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Research on the fate of the nitrogen in coal during pyrolysis has attracted increased attention, since it is related with the NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions during subsequent combustion. It has been reported that coal nitrogen is initially released as tar, which is then converted to HCN and NH{sub 3} through secondary decomposition reactions. However, little attention to N{sub 2} has been paid so far. We have recently found that N{sub 2} is the dominant product in slow heating rate pyrolysis of a subbituminous coal, and that the finely dispersed iron catalyst promotes drastically the formation of N{sub 2} from a brown coal. If coal nitrogen can be removed efficiently as N{sub 2} during pyrolysis, this method would contribute to the reduction of the NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O emissions, since such pollutants originate mostly from coal nitrogen. Therefore the present study aims at making clear the influence of coal type, pyrolysis conditions, demineralization, and iron catalyst on the formation of N{sub 2} during the fix-bed pyrolysis of several coals with different ranks.

  15. Numerical simulation of altitude impact on pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Xiaohui; He, Boshu; Ling, Ling; Wang, Lei [Beijing Jiaotong Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A drop-tube Furnace simulation model has been developed to investigate the pulverized coal combustion characteristics under different altitudes using the commercially available software Fluent. The altitude conditions of 0, 500, 1,000, 1,500 m have been discussed. The results included the fields of temperature, pressure, velocity, the coal burnout, CO burnout and NO emission in the tube furnace. The variation of these parameters with altitude has been analyzed. The coal combustion characteristics were affected by the altitude. The time and space for coal burnout should be increased with the rise of altitude. The valuable results could be referenced in the design of coal- fired furnaces for the high altitude areas.

  16. Status of Westinghouse coal-fueled combustion turbine programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalzo, A.J.; Amos, D.J.; Bannister, R.L.; Garland, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    Developing clean, efficient, cost effective coal utilization technologies for future power generation is an essential part of our National Energy Strategy. Westinghouse is actively developing power plants utilizing advanced gasification, atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds (PFB), and direct firing technology through programs sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE). The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is sponsoring the Direct Coal-Fired Turbine program. This paper presents the status of current and potential Westinghouse Power Generation Business Unit advanced coal-fueled power generation programs as well as commercial plans

  17. Investigation on the transient enthalpy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Pei-fang; Wang, Na; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huai-chun [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The transient enthalpy ({Delta}h) of coal/char combustion of the three different coals (including anthracite, bituminous, and lignite) during the process of combustion is determined as a function of burn-off degree by using thermo-gravimetric-differential scanning calorimeter (TG-DSC) simultaneous thermal analyzer, and The error of determining calorific values of coals/chars is less 5% compared the results of TG-DSC with that of an automatic isoperibol calorimeter. It is found that In the initial stage, all the {Delta}h of coals are greater than that of the char pyrolysized from parent coal for many of volatiles contained more a great deal of heat per unit mass oxidized at low temperature, it also imply that coal is more easily ignited than char corresponded; And in the middle stage, all the {Delta}h of coals is lower than that of the char pyrolysized, so the pyrolysized char oxidation can supply much more of thermo-energy per unit mass. {Delta}h are almost a constant when the burn-off degree is equal to between 0.35/0.15 and 0.95/0.85 for ZCY bituminous coal/char and JWY anthracite/char, between 0.35/0.35 and 0.75/0.9 for SLH lignite/char; In the later stage, the {Delta}h of the coal/char decreased with the burn-off degree, it imply that the activity of the coal/char decreases. Therefore, coal pyrolysis changes not only the structure of char, but also the property of release heat; the transient enthalpy of coal/char combustion has been in change with the burn-out degree.

  18. Comparative study of coal and biomass co-combustion with coal burning separately through emissions analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, M.; Asadullah, A.; Khan, G.; Soomro, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate eco-friendly methos to mitigate the problem of emissions from combustion of fossil fuel are highly demanded. The current study was focused on the effect of using coal and coal biomass co-combustion on the gaseous emissions. Different biomass were used along with coal. The coal used was lignite coal and the biomass' were tree waste, cow dung and banana tree leaves Various ratios of coal and biomass were used to investigate the combustion behavior of coal cow dung and 100% banana tree leaves emits less emission of CO, CO/sub 2/, NOx and SO/sub 2/ as compared to 100% coal, Maximum amount of CO emission were 1510.5 ppm for bannana tree waste and minimum amount obtained for lakhra coal and cow dung manure (70:30) of 684.667 leaves (90:10) and minimum amount of SO/sub 2/ present in samples is in lakhra coal-banana tree waste (80:20). The maximum amount of NO obtained for banana tree waste were 68 ppm whereas amount from cow dung manure (30.83 ppm). The study concludes that utilization of biomass with coal could make remedial action against environment pollution. (author)

  19. Some environmental aspects related to sulphur emissions during combustion of Bulgarian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, C.; Vassilev, S.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of S emissions and their capture during combustion of some Bulgarian coals (Maritza East, Maritza West, Sofia, Pernik, Bobov Dol, Balkan) was studied based on the phase-mineral transformations in the inorganic matter during gradual heating of these coals. It was found that: 1) the organic, elemental and sulphide S is released from coal at 200-700 0 C; 2) the volatile S is initially captured by intermediate Ca-, Mg-, K-, Na-, Fc-, and Ba-oxides (mainly from decomposed organic matter and carbonates) with formation of their sulphates at 200-1000 0 C; 3) the decomposition of original and newly-formed sulphates occurs at 800-1300 0 C and they are the major source of volatile SO 2 from stack emissions of thermoelectric power stations (TPSs). The described mechanism of S emissions and their capture indicates that the traditional pulverized combustion (1200-1600 0 C) of the high-sulphur Bulgarian coals in TPSs is inadequate from an environmental point of view and other alternatives should be applied. Some of them such as fluidized-bed combustion and selective blending of the coals are proposed

  20. Thermal Behavior of Coal Used in Rotary Kiln and Its Combustion Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis and combustion behaviors of three coals (A, B, and C coals were investigated and their combustion kinetics were calculated by the Freeman–Carroll method to obtain quantitative insight into their combustion behaviors. Moreover, the effects of coal size, air flow, oxygen content, and heating rate on coal combustion behaviors were analyzed. Results showed that the three coals have a similar trend of pyrolysis that occurs at about 670 K and this process continuously proceeds along with their combustion. Combustion characteristics and kinetic parameters can be applied to analyze coal combustion behaviors. Three coals having combustion characteristics of suitable ignition temperature (745–761 K, DTGmax (14.20–15.72%/min, and burnout time (7.45–8.10 min were analyzed in a rotary kiln. Combustion kinetic parameters provide quantitative insights into coal combustion behavior. The suitable particle size for coal combustion in a kiln is that the content of less than 74 μm is 60% to 80%. Low activation energy and reaction order make coal, especially C coal, have a simple combustion mechanism, great reactivity, be easily ignited, and a low peak temperature in the combustion state. Oxygen-enrichment and high heating rates enhance coal combustion, increasing combustion intensity and peak value, thus shortening burnout time.

  1. Mercury in coal and the impact of coal quality on mercury emissions from combustion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolker, Allan; Senior, Constance L.; Quick, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    The proportion of Hg in coal feedstock that is emitted by stack gases of utility power stations is a complex function of coal chemistry and properties, combustion conditions, and the positioning and type of air pollution control devices employed. Mercury in bituminous coal is found primarily within Fe-sulfides, whereas lower rank coal tends to have a greater proportion of organic-bound Hg. Preparation of bituminous coal to reduce S generally reduces input Hg relative to in-ground concentrations, but the amount of this reduction varies according to the fraction of Hg in sulfides and the efficiency of sulfide removal. The mode of occurrence of Hg in coal does not directly affect the speciation of Hg in the combustion flue gas. However, other constituents in the coal, notably Cl and S, and the combustion characteristics of the coal, influence the species of Hg that are formed in the flue gas and enter air pollution control devices. The formation of gaseous oxidized Hg or particulate-bound Hg occurs post-combustion; these forms of Hg can be in part captured in the air pollution control devices that exist on coal-fired boilers, without modification. For a given coal type, the capture efficiency of Hg by pollution control systems varies according to type of device and the conditions of its deployment. For bituminous coal, on average, more than 60% of Hg in flue gas is captured by fabric filter (FF) and flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Key variables affecting performance for Hg control include Cl and S content of the coal, the positioning (hot side vs. cold side) of the system, and the amount of unburned C in coal ash. Knowledge of coal quality parameters and their effect on the performance of air pollution control devices allows optimization of Hg capture co-benefit

  2. Combustion of poultry litter in a fluidised bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; D. Boavida; J. Seabra Barros; I. Cabrita; J. Leahy; B. Kelleher; M. Leahy [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2003-04-01

    Combustion studies of poultry litter alone or mixed with peat by 50% on weight basis were undertaken in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed. Because of high moisture content of poultry litter, there was some uncertainty whether the combustion could be sustained on 100% poultry litter and as peat is very available in Ireland, its presence was considered to help to improve the combustion. However, the results showed that, as long as the moisture content of poultry litter was kept below 25%, the combustion did not need the addition of peat. The main parameters that were investigated are (i) moisture content, (ii) air staging, and (iii) variations in excess air levels along the freeboard. The main conclusions of the results are (i) combustion was influenced very much by the conditions of the fuel supply, (ii) the steady fuel supply was strongly dependent on the moisture content of the poultry litter, (iii) temperature appeared to be still very influential in reducing the levels of unburned carbon and hydrocarbons released from residues, (iv) the air staging in the freeboard improved combustion efficiency by enhancing the combustion of volatiles released from residues in the riser and (vi) NOx emissions were influenced by air staging in the freeboard. Particles collected from the bed and the two cyclones were analysed to determine the levels of heavy metals and the leachability tests were carried out with ashes collected to verify whether or not they could safely be used in agricultural lands. 8 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  3. Co-firing coal and hospital waste in a circulating fluidized bed boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, E.J.; Korenberg, J.; Oswald, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center and the Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority are co-funding a project which will demonstrate the reduction of infectious hospital waste to an environmentally safe disposable ash by cofiring the waste with coal in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The main objective of this paper is increased utilization of coal but the project also provides a solution to a problem which has grown rapidly and become very visible in recent years (e.g., hospital waste washed up on beaches). The application of CFB boilers in hospitals introduces an economical clean coal technology into a size range and market dominated by gas and oil combustion systems. The use of CFB represents the utilization of state-of-the-art technology for burning coal in an environmentally benign manner. SO 2 , NO x , CO and particulate emissions lower than the latest New Source Performance Standards have proven to be achievable in CFB combustion systems. By processing the infectious waste in a steam generation system which operates continuously, the problem of creating excessive gaseous emissions during repeated start-ups (as is the case with current incinerator technology) is avoided. The operating conditions with respect to residence time, temperature and turbulence that are inherent to a CFB combustion system, provide an excellent environment for complete combustion and destruction of potentially hazardous solid and gaseous emissions (e.g., dioxins). The limestone, which is injected into the combustion system to reduce SO 2 emissions, will also react with chlorine. Thus chlorine compound emissions and the corrosive nature of the flue gas are reduced. The work efforts to date indicate that infectious waste thermal processing in a coal-fired CFB is a technically and economically viable on-site disposal option

  4. Modelling of Devolatilization in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Mette; Lin, Weigang; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the devolatilization process in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The model is a combination of two submodels: single particle devolatilization and fluid dynamics. The single particle model includes the influence of both chemical kinetics and hea...

  5. NOx emissions from the underfeed combustion of coal and biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, M.R.I.; Tadulan, E.L.; Tariq, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Underfeed stokers have an inherent ability to minimise smoke emissions, thus providing environmental benefits in the combustion of solid fuels, such as biomass materials, which have a high volatile matter content. An evaluation of this attribute requires comparisons of the performance of combustion equipment using these fuels against reference data for coals. However, the recent literature is virtually devoid of studies of coal combustion in underfeed stokers and, in particular, information on nitrogen oxide emissions. In the UK, this reflects a lack of commercial interest in small-scale coal firing due to the wide availability of inexpensive gas and oil fuels. An experimental investigation has been carried out into the combustion of bituminous coal, anthracite and a 50:50 blend by mass of anthracite and oak wood chips on a modified commercial underfeed stoker. The intention was to obtain operational experiences in burning the fuels and reference data for nitrogen oxide emissions. Problems in the combustion of the fuels are described and related to the determination of nitrogen oxide emission values found under optimised plant conditions. These values, expressed at 6% O 2 , were 265 ppm for bituminous coal, 90 ppm for anthracite and 106 ppm for the anthracite/wood chip blend. (Author)

  6. Experimental investigation on a 0.35 MWth coal-fired horizontal circulating fluidized bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Aihong; Li, Qinghai; Zhang, Yanguo; Wang, Zhaojun; Dang, Wenda [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The capacities of industrial coal-fired boilers are normally less than 20-30 MWe. And these coal-fired boilers of low capacity are facing the severe situation of low efficiency and heavy environmental pollution. Hence, an innovative horizontal circulating fluidized bed (HCFB) boiler was developed to enhance heat efficiency and reduce pollutant emission of industrial boilers in China. The chamber in the HCFB boiler consists of primary combustion chamber, secondary combustion chamber and burnout chamber, which were combined horizontally side by side. To verify the conception of horizontal fluidized circulation and to obtain the characteristic data, a 0.35 MWth coal-combustion HCFB boiler was designed and installed to perform some experiments of combustion and mass circulation. In the boiler there were two mass circulating paths, one is inner circulating through the inertia separator and another was external circulating through the cyclone separator. The connection bottom of the secondary chamber and the burnout chamber was designed as an inertia separator, in which separated and collected solid materials were returned to the primary combustion. In fact the secondary separator was a small cyclone separator connecting to the exit of the burnout chamber. Heat efficiency and separating efficiency of the experimental boiler were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, mass and temperature distribution along the chambers height were also investigated. The results showed that the heat efficiency of the bare boiler was 82%. The mass balance based on ash content was measured and analyzed. Separating efficiency of the inertia separator and cyclone separator was 60 and 99.9%, respectively. It showed that the two stage material separation and circulation enhanced coal combustion in the HCFB boiler and help to minimize the height of the furnace.

  7. Modelling of NO formation in the combustion of coal blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Backreedy, R.I.; Jones, J.M.; Pis, J.J.; Pourkashanian, M.; Rubiera, F.; Williams, A. [CSIC, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    Coal blending is becoming of increasing importance in power stations firing pulverised coal as a result of increasing competition, stricter emission legislation and is an attractive way of improving plant economic and combustion performance. Presently, the two general methods used by power station operators to assess or predict the performance of an unknown coal blend to be fired in power station boilers are by the use of experimental large scale rig tests or correlation indices derived from experience of firing other coal blends in the power station environment. The first is expensive and the second is of doubtful accuracy in some cases. This paper evaluates the application of mathematical modelling of the combustion of a series of binary coal blends in the test situation of a drop tube reactor to predict the NO emissions and degree of char burnout. Its applicability to low NOx burners used in power stations is discussed and it is concluded that present mathematical coal combustion models are not developed sufficiently to enable an adequate description of the binary blends and the physical and chemical processes, which may include interactions, during combustion of the blend. This means that accurate predictions cannot be made. 20 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Packed Bed Reactor Technology for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as an alternative for conventional power production processes to intrinsically integrate power production and CO2 capture. In this work a new reactor concept for CLC is proposed, based on dynamically operated packed bed reactors. With analytical

  9. Fluidized bed gasification of selected South African coals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, AD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available that due to the good heat and mass transfer properties of fluidised beds, coal with ash contents up to 70% can be utilised. The CSIR’s research and development work resulted in the installation of five bubbling fluidised bed combustors (BFBCs) between... 1989 and 1999. Other companies, such as Babcock and Scientific Design, also installed a number of BFBC plants during this time. It was realised during the development of BFBC technology that due to the low lateral dispersion coefficient of coal...

  10. Liquid hydrocarbons from coal beds – risk factor for the underground work environment - Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomescu Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrocarbons from the coal bed and surrounding rocks, besides the stored gases, methane, carbon dioxide, carbon oxide, generate the increase of the risk factor from the occupational health and safety point of view. If for reducing the gas concentrations level and the methane emissions in order to increase the safety in exploitation exist well-known solutions and methods, the oxidation or self-oxidation of the hydrocarbons from the coal bed generate a series of compounds, reaction products over maximum admitted concentrations which give birth to a toxic atmosphere and which is hazardous for workers, at the same time inducing an error in noting the occurrence of a spontaneous combustion phenomena, a major risk for the workers and for the mineral resource. This paper represents a case study performed in one underground mine unit from Jiu Valley and presents the analysis for underground environment factors monitoring and for solutions for diminishing the OHS risk factors.

  11. Combustion of palm oil solid waste in fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, I.; Shamsuddin, A.H.; Sopian, K.

    2000-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of fluidized bed combustion of palm oil wastes consisting of shell, fibre and empty fruit bunches high heating value of 17450 kJ/kg and low heating value of 14500 kJ/kg. The fluidized bed combuster used has a vessel size of 486 x 10 6 mm 3 , surface area of evaporation tubes and distribution air pipes of 500 mm 2 and 320 mm 2 respectively. It was found that a fuel feeding rate 160 kg/h is required to achieve a steam flow rate of 600 kg/h, with the combustion efficiency 96% and boiler efficiency of 72%, emission level of flue gas NO x at less than 180 ppm, SO 2 at less than 20 ppm are measured in the flue gas. (Author)

  12. Prospects for coal: technical developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, W G; Peirce, T J

    1983-07-01

    This article summarises the reasons for predicting an increase in the use of coal as an industrial energy source in the United Kingdom. The development of efficient and reliable coal-burning techniques is therefore of great importance. Various techniques are then discussed, including conventional combustion systems, fluidised bed combustion systems, fluidised bed boilers and furnaces, coal and ash handling, coal-liquid mixtures, coal gasification and coal liquefaction. (4 refs.)

  13. DOLOMITE DESULFURIZATION BEHAVIOR IN A BUBBLING FLUIDIZED BED PILOT PLANT FOR HIGH ASH COAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. F. Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Although fluidized bed in situ desulphurization from coal combustion has been widely studied, there are aspects that remain under investigation. Additionally, few publications address Brazilian coal desulphurization via fluidized beds. This study used a 250 kWth bubbling fluidized bed pilot plant to analyze different aspects of the dolomite desulphurization of two Brazilian coals. Superficial velocities of 0.38 and 0.46 m/s, flue gas recycling, Ca/S molar ratios and elutriation were assessed. Results confirmed the influence of the Ca/S molar ratio and superficial velocity - SO2 conversion up to 60.5% was achieved for one coal type, and 70.9% was achieved for the other type. A recycling ratio of 54.6% could increase SO2 conversion up to 86.1%. Elutriation and collection of ashes and Ca-containing products did not present the same behavior because a lower wt. % of CaO was collected by the gas controlled mechanism compared to the ash.

  14. Automated cost modeling for coal combustion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on cost information developed at AMAX R and D Center for coal-water slurry production implemented in an automated spreadsheet (Lotus 123) for personal computer use. The spreadsheet format allows the user toe valuate impacts of various process options, coal feedstock characteristics, fuel characteristics, plant location sites, and plant sizes on fuel cost. Model flexibility reduces time and labor required to determine fuel costs and provides a basis to compare fuels manufactured by different processes. The model input includes coal characteristics, plant flowsheet definition, plant size, and market location. Based on these inputs, selected unit operations are chosen for coal processing

  15. Combustion of cork waste in a circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Miranda, M.; Cabrita, I. [Dept. de Tecnologias de Combustao, ITE-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal); Abelha, P. [Coaltec e Ambiente, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-07-01

    There is currently an ongoing joint project between Portugal and Spain, which is being funded by the FAIR programme. The principal objective of the FAIR project is to investigate the application of the fluidised bed combustion (FBC) technology to burn cork wastes with the aim of overcoming the difficulties currently experienced in the cork processing industries. The combustion studies at INETI were carried out using the 300 kW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed facility. The combustor is square in cross section with each side being 0.3 m long. The combustor height is 5 m. The temperatures in the bed, the riser and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The combustion gases leaving the reactor passed through the recycling cyclone first to capture most of particulates elutriated out of the combustor. The solid particles were intermittently collected for analysis to determine the amount of carbon present, which helped the combustion efficiency to be calculated. Instantaneous measurements of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} present levels in the flue gases were also carried out. The combustion tests were done with both the cork waste dust and granular virgin cork. The difference is that cork dust gets contaminated during the process due to the use of various additives. Most of the combustion took place in the riser where the temperature was at times up to 523 K above that of the bed. The unburned carbon level was low ranging from about 1.5 to 2.% suggesting that most of the particles burned to completion in the riser. (orig.)

  16. Enrichment of trace elements in bottom ash from coal oxy-combustion: Effect of coal types

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the enrichment of trace elements in two coals under air and oxy-combustion conditions was studied. Twenty-one trace elements were evaluated. The two coal samples had a different concentration for the 21 trace elements, which was due...

  17. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  18. Comparative Study of Coal and Biomass Co-Combustion With Coal Burning Separately Through Emissions Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Siddique

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate eco-friendly methods to mitigate the problem of emissions from combustion of fossil fuel are highly demanded. The current study was focused on the effect of using coal & coal-biomass co-combustion on the gaseous emissions. Different biomass' were used along with coal. The coal used was lignite coal and the biomass' were tree waste, cow dung and banana tree leaves. Various ratios of coal and biomass were used to investigate the combustion behavior of coal-biomass blends and their emissions. The study revealed that the ratio of 80:20 of coal (lignite-cow dung and 100% banana tree leaves emits less emissions of CO, CO2, NOx and SO2 as compared to 100% coal. Maximum amount of CO emissions were 1510.5 ppm for banana tree waste and minimum amount obtained for lakhra coal and cow dung manure (70:30 of 684.667 ppm. Maximum percentage of SO2 (345.33 ppm was released from blend of lakhra coal and tree leaves (90:10 and minimum amount of SO2 present in samples is in lakhra coal-banana tree waste (80:20. The maximum amount of NO obtained for banana tree waste were 68 ppm whereas maximum amount of NOx was liberated from lakhra coal-tree leaves (60:40 and minimum amount from cow dung manure (30.83 ppm. The study concludes that utilization of biomass with coal could make remedial action against environment pollution.

  19. Hydrogeochemistry and coal-associated bacterial populations from a methanogenic coal bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Ritter, Daniel J.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Clark, Arthur C.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Vinson, David S.; Orem, William H.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), a microbially-generated source of natural gas trapped within coal beds, is an important energy resource in many countries. Specific bacterial populations and enzymes involved in coal degradation, the potential rate-limiting step of CBM formation, are relatively unknown. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established a field site, (Birney test site), in an undeveloped area of the Powder River Basin (PRB), with four wells completed in the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, one in the overlying sandstone formation, and four in overlying and underlying coal beds (Knoblach, Nance, and Terret). The nine wells were positioned to characterize the hydraulic conductivity of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed and were selectively cored to investigate the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology associated with CBM production at the Birney test site. Aquifer-test results indicated the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, in a zone from about 112 to 120 m below land surface at the test site, had very low hydraulic conductivity (0.005 m/d) compared to other PRB coal beds examined. Consistent with microbial methanogenesis, groundwater in the coal bed and overlying sandstone contain dissolved methane (46 mg/L average) with low δ13C values (−67‰ average), high alkalinity values (22 meq/kg average), relatively positive δ13C-DIC values (4‰ average), and no detectable higher chain hydrocarbons, NO3−, or SO42−. Bioassay methane production was greatest at the upper interface of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed near the overlying sandstone. Pyrotag analysis identified Aeribacillus as a dominant in situbacterial community member in the coal near the sandstone and statistical analysis indicated Actinobacteria predominated coal core samples compared to claystone or sandstone cores. These bacteria, which previously have been correlated with hydrocarbon-containing environments such as oil reservoirs, have demonstrated the ability to produce biosurfactants to break down

  20. Combustion of coal gas fuels in a staged combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.; Mcvey, J. B.; Sederquist, R. A.; Schultz, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Gaseous fuels produced from coal resources generally have heating values much lower than natural gas; the low heating value could result in unstable or inefficient combustion. Coal gas fuels may contain ammonia which if oxidized in an uncontrolled manner could result in unacceptable nitrogen oxide exhaust emission levels. Previous investigations indicate that staged, rich-lean combustion represents a desirable approach to achieve stable, efficient, low nitrogen oxide emission operation for coal-derived liquid fuels contaning up to 0.8-wt pct nitrogen. An experimental program was conducted to determine whether this fuel tolerance can be extended to include coal-derived gaseous fuels. The results of tests with three nitrogen-free fuels having heating values of 100, 250, and 350 Btu/scf and a 250 Btu/scf heating value doped to contain 0.7 pct ammonia are presented.

  1. Characterization, leachability and valorization through combustion of residual chars from gasification of coals with pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhetas, Margarida; Lopes, Helena; Freire, Márcia; Abelha, Pedro; Pinto, Filomena; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the study of the combustion of char residues produced during co-gasification of coal with pine with the aim of characterizing them for their potential use for energy. These residues are generally rich in carbon with the presence of other elements, with particular concern for heavy metals and pollutant precursors, depending on the original fuel used. The evaluation of environmental toxicity of the char residues was performed through application of different leaching tests (EN12457-2, US EPA-1311 TCLP and EA NEN 7371:2004). The results showed that the residues present quite low toxicity for some of pollutants. However, depending on the fuel used, possible presence of other pollutants may bring environmental risks. The utilization of these char residues for energy was in this study evaluated, by burning them as a first step pre-treatment prior to landfilling. The thermo-gravimetric analysis and ash fusibility studies revealed an adequate thermochemical behavior, without presenting any major operational risks. Fluidized bed combustion was applied to char residues. Above 700°C, very high carbon conversion ratios were obtained and it seemed that the thermal oxidation of char residues was easier than that of the coals. It was found that the char tendency for releasing SO(2) during its oxidation was lower than for the parent coal, while for NO(X) emissions, the trend was observed to increase NO(X) formation. However, for both pollutants the same control techniques might be applied during char combustion, as for coal. Furthermore, the leachability of ashes resulting from the combustion of char residues appeared to be lower than those produced from direct coal combustion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impacts of heavy metals and radioactivity from coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.

    1977-01-01

    Coal-fueled plants appear to have the potential for a slightly higher radiologic impact on the population than do nuclear-powered plants although in both cases the impact appears to be quite small. The additional impact from trace elements in and on respirable fly ash is of concern and should be factored into the total assessment of potential health consequences associated with a major increase in coal combustion. For some time the paucity of essential data will hamper realistic evaluations

  3. Characterising the combustion behaviour of New Zealand coals by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfell, K.E.; Beamish, B.B.; Rodgers, K.A. [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Geology

    1995-12-31

    Thirty-three New Zealand coals were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) to evaluate the techniques` applicability to New Zealand coals. Generally, New Zealand sub-bituminous coals have lower burnout temperatures than bituminous coals. However, local and regional differences occur, where some sub-bituminous coals show both higher and lower char burnout temperatures than may be otherwise expected from their rank and T{sub 6} values (the peak temperature where the rate of weight loss of the sample is the greatest). There is a sizeable variations in the char burnout temperature (T{sub 8}) (465 to 636{degree}C) in coals with volatile matter contents above 40%, whereas coals with lower volatile contents have T{sub 8} values around 646{degree}C. The temperature of char burnout gives a better indication of combustion efficiency than rank or volatile matter content alone. Industrial operators could use this technique to provide an indication of burnout performance before a coal is purchased, assisting evaluation of the coal`s suitability for a particular usage. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Reactivity and NO emissions of coal blends during combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Arias; R.I. Backreedy; A. Arenillas; J.M. Jones; F. Rubiera; M. Pourkashanian; A. Williams; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    This work is focussed on burnout and NO emissions during coal blend combustion. Two different approaches were used. In a first step, experimental work was carried out in a laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) and then computational techniques were applied to improve the burnout prediction of coals and blend during the experiments. A preliminary study on the combustibility of the samples was made using a thermogravimetric analyser. An entrained flow reactor was employed to study the behaviour of coals and blends at high heating rate and short residence times. Burnout and NO emissions were measured during these experiments. Two methods were used to modelling the combustion in the entrained flow reactor: a commercial CFD code and an advanced char burnout model. Experiments done in the EFR showed that burnout and NO emissions of some blends can be predicted from the weighted average of the values of individual coals, especially when blended coals have the same rank. When a blend is made with coals of different rank, some deviations were observed with respect to the averaged values in burnout and especially in NOx emissions. Burnouts predicted with a commercial CFD code were higher than the experimental values. The use of an advanced char burnout model improved greatly the results, showing the advantages of coupling these two mathematical techniques. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Coal combustion ashes: A radioactive Waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michetti, F.P.; Tocci, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive substances naturally hold in fossil fuels, such as Uranium and Thorium, after the combustion, are subjected to an increase of concentration in the residual combustion products as flying ashes or as firebox ashes. A significant percentage of the waste should be classified as radioactive waste, while the political strategies seems to be setted to declassify it as non-radioactive waste. (Author)

  6. Study of toxic metals during combustion of RDF in a fluidized bed pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crujeira, T.; Lopes, H.; Abelha, P.; Sargaco, C.; Goncalves, R.; Freire, M.; Cabrita, I.; Gulyurtlu, I. [DEECA, INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-04-01

    The study of the behavior of heavy metals during combustion of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) in a pilot fluidized bed was performed. The results of co-combustion were compared with coal combustion and RDF monocombustion. The amounts of heavy metals retained by the ash were different during co-firing in comparison with monocombustion due to the mechanisms leading to different partitioning of ash. It was verified that heavy metal emissions increased with introduction of RDF, but remained below regulated levels, with the exception of chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni). For RDF monocombustion the emissions were, however, more severe, especially for cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and copper (Cu). This seems to be related not only to larger input amounts, but also to higher volatilisation during monocombustion caused by the presence of higher chlorine and lower sulphur contents in the RDF. Hence, as far as heavy metals are concerned, the utilization of RDF as a co-firing combustible for coal seems to be more environmental favorable than when RDF is fired alone.

  7. Method and device for the combustion of pulverised coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoppe, F

    1977-01-13

    Until now, high combustion space loadings in pulverised coal firing were only obtained with melting combustion, where the ash is fluid. The disadvantage of this is that part of the heating surface is covered by liquid slack, and this type of combustion cannot operate in 'on-off operation', as the slack solidifies when the boiler is switched off. According to the invention, however, pulverised coal, which is reluctant to react, can be burnt at high combustion space loadings of over 2000 Mcal/cu. metre. hour. atm. with dry ash extraction, so that its use is possible for the combustion in central heating plants in detached houses and blocks of flats, with 'on-off operation'. For this purpose, the pulverised coal is heated under excess pressure in an atmosphere with a maximum of 10% of oxygen with a speed of heating of 1000/sup 0/C/sec up to 100 to 150/sup 0/C above its ignition temperature, and can be blown into the combustion air. Tangentially to the flame jet, a cold gas flow is guided so that burning particles thrown out at the sides are cooled below the ash melting temperature, before they reach the walls. The burning flame jet is accelerated, by using the excess pressure, via an injector, into a zone at less than the ash melting temperature, so that dry ash extraction is guaranteed.

  8. Development of pressurized internally circulating fluidized bed combustion technology; Kaatsu naibu junkan ryudosho boiler no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, I [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Nagato, S; Toyoda, S [Ebara Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The paper introduced support research on element technology needed for the design of hot models of the pressurized internally circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler in fiscal 1995 and specifications for testing facilities of 4MWt hot models after finishing the basic plan. The support research was conduced as follows: (a) In the test for analysis of cold model fluidization, it was confirmed that each characteristic value of hot models is higher than the target value. Further, calculation parameters required for computer simulation were measured and data on the design of air diffusion nozzle for 1 chamber wind box were sampled. (b) In the CWP conveyance characteristic survey, it was confirmed that it is possible to produce CWP having favorable properties. It was also confirmed that favorable conveyability can be maintained even if the piping size was reduced down to 25A. (c) In the gas pressure reducing test, basic data required for the design of gas pressure reducing equipment were sampled. Specifications for the fluidized bed combustion boiler of hot models are as follows: evaporation amount: 3070kg/h, steam pressure: 1.77MPa, fuel supply amount: 600kg-coal/h, boiler body: cylinder shape water tube internally circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. 40 CFR 147.52 - State-administered program-Hydraulic Fracturing of Coal Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Fracturing of Coal Beds. 147.52 Section 147.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Alabama § 147.52 State-administered program—Hydraulic Fracturing of Coal Beds. The UIC program for hydraulic fracturing of coal beds in the State of Alabama, except those on Indian lands, is the program...

  10. Pulverized coal vs. circulating fluidized bed: An economic comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    As the power industry looks to the 1990s for expanded steam generation capacity, boiler owners will continue on their long-standing assignment to evaluate and select the best, lowest cost alternative to meet their energy needs. For coal-fired plants, this evaluation process includes pulverized coal-fired boilers (PC) and circulating fluidized bed boilers (CFB). The cost difference between these products is site specific and depends on several variables, including: Boiler size, pressure, and temperature; Operating variables, such as the cost for fuel, auxiliary power, SO 2 reagent, and ash disposal; Capital cost; and Financial variables, such as evaluation period and interest rate. This paper provides a technical and economic comparison between a pulverized coal-fired boiler and circulating fluidized bed boiler

  11. Relation between the petrographic composition of coal and the morphology of pyrolysis char produced in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Valentim; M.J. Lemos de Sousa; P. Abelha; D. Boavida; I. Gulyurtlu [Centro de Geologia da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2004-06-01

    Several previous studies have already established, for pulverized coal combustion conditions, global correlations between petrographic composition of the coal and those of char produced from the same coal. However, for fluidized bed combustion, there has not been much new work since the eighties. The results presented in this paper include the petrographic characterization of seven different coals from several origins and also of their respective chars produced at 700, 800, 900, and 1000{sup o}C in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor. The results show a marked predominance of tenuispheres as the trial temperatures increase. While vitrinite-rich coals essentially produced highly porous chars, the inertinite-rich coals produced large amounts of medium- and low-porous chars. Semi-anthracite vitrinite produced high-porous chars and thermal affected coal particles originated low-porous and angular char morphotypes. The analysis of the data obtained revealed that vitrinite + liptinite related well with the high-porous char (sum of cenospheres and tenuinetworks), classified as Group 1. The same trend, but with a weaker relation, was also observed between vitrinite and liptinite rich microlithotypes and Group 1. 32 refs., 17 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. The relationship of fluidized bed technology to the U.S. Clean Coal Technology demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weth, G.; Geffken, J.; Huber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Combustion projects (both AFBCs and PFBCs) have a prominent role in the US DOE Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. This program has the successful commercialization of these technologies as its primary objective and this is the basic criterion for government funding and participation in the development and demonstration of the technologies. Under the CCT program the US DOE is actively involved in the development and operation of three Fluidized Bed Technology projects, NUCLA, TIDD, and SPORN, and is in the negotiation stage on others, Dairyland, Nichols and Tallahassee. All of these projects, along with the operating information on fluidized beds in the industrial sector, will provide a basis for evaluating future utilization of Fluidized Bed Technology in the market place. Impacting upon further utilization will be the time-frame and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper presents the results of a study to ascertain the commercial readiness of Fluidized Bed Technology to meet the emissions and time-frame requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Specifically addressed are: Commercialization criteria/factors which candidate and/or existing CCTs must achieve in order to gain market acceptance. The status of Fluidized Bed Technology in achieving these commercialization criteria for market acceptance (industrial and utility) consistent with the time frame of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Recommendations of commercialization criteria for future fluidized bed CCT demonstration projects

  13. Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology exchange workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1980-04-01

    The pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology exchange workshop was held June 5 and 6, 1979, at The Meadowlands Hilton Hotel, Secaucus, New Jersey. Eleven papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. The papers include reviews of the US DOE and EPRI programs in this area and papers by Swedish, West German, British and American organizations. The British papers concern the joint program of the USA, UK and FRG at Leatherhead. The key factor in several papers is the use of fluidized bed combustors, gas turbines, and steam turbines in combined-cycle power plants. One paper examines several combined-cycle alternatives. (LTN)

  14. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  15. Combustion and environmental performance of clean coal end products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Sakellaropoulos, G. [Centre for Research and Technology, Hellas, Ptolemaidas-Kozanis, Ptolemaida (Greece). Inst. for Solid Fuel Technolgy and Applications]|[Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering Lab]|[Chemical Process Engineering Research Inst., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Solid Fuels and Environment; Someus, E. [Thermal Desorption Technology Group (Greece); Grammelis, P.; Amarantos, P.S. [Centre for Research and Technology, Hellas, Ptolemaidas-Kozanis, Ptolemaida (Greece). Inst. for Solid Fuel Technolgy and Applications; Palladas, A.; Basinas, P.; Natas, P.; Prokopidou, M.; Diamantopoulou, I.; Sakellaropoulos, G. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering Lab

    2006-07-01

    Clean and affordable power production is needed in order to achieve sustainable economic development. This paper focused on clean coal technologies in which coal-fired power plants are used in conjunction with large amounts of renewable energy sources to offer a high level of process safety and long term management of all residual operation streams. Thermal Desorption Recycle-Reduce-Reuse Technology (TDT-3R) was described as being a promising solid fuel pretreatment process for clean energy production up to 300 MWe capacities. TDT-3R is based on low temperature carbonisation fuel pre-treatment principles, which produce cleansed anthracite type fuels from coal and other carbonaceous material such as biomass and organic wastes. The combustion efficiency of such clean coals and the environmental performance of the TDT-3R process were investigated in this study via pilot scale tests of clean fuel production. Tests included flue gas emissions monitoring, raw fuel and product characterisation and thermogravimetric tests, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-furans, and heavy metals analyses, and toxicity tests. Raw material included coal and biomass, such as willow, straw and demolition wood. The fuels were heated in a rotary kiln operating at 550 degrees C under slightly vacuum conditions. Clean coals were tested either alone or in conjunction with biomass fuels in a pilot scale combustion facility at Dresden, Germany. The clean coal samples were shown to have higher fixed carbon and ash content and lower volatiles compared to the respective raw coal samples. The major advantage of the TDT-3R process is the production of fuels with much lower pollutants content. Low nitrogen, sulphur, chlorine and heavy metal contents result in produced fuels that have excellent environmental performance, allow boiler operation in higher temperatures and overall better efficiency. Moreover, the use of clean fuels reduces deposition problems in the combustion chamber due to the

  16. Pilot-scale fluidized-bed combustor testing cofiring animal-tissue biomass with coal as a carcass disposal option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Elizabeth M. Fedorowicz; David W. Harlan; Linda A. Detwiler; Michelle L. Rossman [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

    2006-10-15

    This study was performed to demonstrate the technical viability of cofiring animal-tissue biomass (ATB) in a coal-fired fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) as an option for disposing of specified risk materials (SRMs) and carcasses. The purpose of this study was to assess the technical issues of feeding/combusting ATB and not to investigate prion deactivation/pathogen destruction. Overall, the project successfully demonstrated that carcasses and SRMs can be cofired with coal in a bubbling FBC. Feeding ATB into the FBC did, however, present several challenges. Specifically, handling/feeding issues resulting from the small scale of the equipment and the extremely heterogeneous nature of the ATB were encountered during the testing. Feeder modifications and an overbed firing system were necessary. Through statistical analysis, it was shown that the ATB feed location had a greater effect on CO emissions, which were used as an indication of combustion performance, than the fuel type due to the feeding difficulties. Baseline coal tests and tests cofiring ATB into the bed were statistically indistinguishable. Fuel feeding issues would not be expected at the full scale since full-scale units routinely handle low-quality fuels. In a full-scale unit, the disproportionate ratio of feed line size to unit diameter would be eliminated thereby eliminating feed slugging. Also, the ATB would either be injected into the bed, thereby ensuring uniform mixing and complete combustion, or be injected directly above the bed with overfire air ports used to ensure complete combustion. Therefore, it is anticipated that a demonstration at the full scale, which is the next activity in demonstrating this concept, should be successful. As the statistical analysis shows, emissions cofiring ATB with coal would be expected to be similar to that when firing coal only. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Limestone attrition under simulated oxyfiring Fluidized-Bed combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Limestone attrition by surface wear was studied during the flue gas desulfurization under simulated fluidized-bed (FB) oxyfiring conditions and hindered calcination. Bench-scale experimental tests were carried out using well-established techniques previously developed for the characterization of sulfation and attrition of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric FB combustors. The experimental limestone conversion and attrition results were compared with those previously obtained with the same limestone under simulated air-blown combustion conditions. The differences in the conversion and attrition extents and patterns associated with oxyfiring as compared to air-blown atmospheric combustion were highlighted and related to the different particle morphologies and thicknesses of the sulfate layer. It was noted that attrition could play an important role in practical circulating FB combustor operation, by effectively enhancing particle sulfation under both oxyfiring and air-blown combustion conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Coal chemistry and technology. Komur Kimyasi ve Teknolojisi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kural, O [ed.

    1988-01-01

    The 18 chapters cover the following topics: mining in Turkey; formation, petrography and classification of coal; chemical and physical properties of coal; mechanical properties of coal; spontaneous combustion of coal and the methods of prevention; sampling of coal; coal preparation and plants; desulfurization of coal; bituminous coal and its consumption; lignite and its consumption; world coal trade and transportation; other important carbon fuels; briquetting of coal; carbonization and coking formed coke; liquefaction of coal; gasification of coal; underground gasification of coal; and combustion models, fluidized-bed combustion, furnaces. An English-Turkish coal dictionary is included. 641 refs., 244 figs., 108 tabs.

  19. NO Reduction over Biomass and Coal Char during Simultaneous Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ke; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study of NO reduction over chars of straw, bark, bituminous coal, and lignite. The experiments were performed in a fixed bed reactor in the temperature range 850–1150 °C. The chars were generated by in situ pyrolysis at the reaction temperature to minimize further...

  20. Selective leaching of coal and coal combustion solid residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Keefe, C.A. [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1996-12-31

    Selective leaching of coal and fly ash were carried out in order to predict the potential for environmental impact as well as other properties related to the aqueous solubility of inorganic constituents. Chemical fractionation can help to identify the distribution of major, minor, and trace constituents. 35 refs., 10 tabs.

  1. Steam gasification of coal using a pressurized circulating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.F.J.

    1989-09-01

    Subject of this investigation is the process engineering of a coal gasification using nuclear heat. A special aspect is the efficiency. To this purpose a new method for calculating the kinetics of hard coal steam gasification in a fluidized bed is presented. It is used for evaluations of gasification kinetics in a large-scale process on the basis of laboratory-scale experiments. The method is verified by experimental data from a large-scale gasifier. The investment costs and the operating costs of the designed process are estimated. (orig.) [de

  2. Sulfur retention by ash during coal combustion. Part I. A model of char particle combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV GRUBOR

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A model for the combustion of porous char particles as a basis for modeling the process of sulfur retention by ash during coal combustion is developed in this paper. The model belongs to the microscopic intrinsic models and describes the dynamic behavior of a porous char particle during comustion, taking into account temporal and spatial changes of all important physical properties of the char particle and various combustion parameters. The parametric analysis of the enhanced model shows that the model represents a good basis for the development of a model for the process of sulfur retention by ash during coal combustion. The model enables the prediction of the values of all parameters necessary for the introduction of reactions between sulfur compounds and mineral components in ash, primarily calcium oxide.

  3. Disposal of coal combustion wastes in the hydraulic backfill process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzyna, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results of studies regarding the physical properties of selected combustion by-products (CCPs) currently produced in the energy production industry. These properties have been compared with the requirements of the technologies applied in the Polish underground mines. The article gives special consideration to the application of the products in the hydraulic backfill technology. The possibility of using bottom-ashes and slags was considered. The amount of CCPs disposed in Polish hard coal mines is approximately 1.1 million Mg and the tendency is decreasing. In the past two years, approximately 100-150 thousand Mg of CCPs was used in the hydraulic backfill technology. The percentage of the fraction smaller than 0.1 mm is determining for the possibility of using a given type of CCPs in the backfill material. This practically excludes the possibility of using any fly ashes in that technology. In slags from conventional boilers and bottom ashes from fluidized bed boilers the fraction below 0.1 mm constitutes 25% of the total at maximum, which allows for their use in the materials used in hydraulic backfill as a component comprising from 30% to 60%, respectively. Slags (10 01 01) are characterized by the lack of bonding properties, which, in case of open backfill systems that are exposed to atmospheric conditions, constitutes an advantage in comparison to bottom ashes (10 01 24), which in turn definitely exhibit bonding properties. The solution of the problem of using bottom ashes is their supply and application on a current basis.

  4. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  5. Reduction of SO sub 2 emission from a fluidized-bed under staged combustion by coarse limestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, W.Z.; Gibbbs, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate the effect of course limestone on the reduction of SO sub 2 emission from a fluidized-bed under staged combustion. The limestone of 1.2-2.5 mm size was premixed with fine coal of 1-3 mm size and fed under bed. The staging levels, bed height, and Ca/S ratio was fixed at 70:30, 30 cm and 3:1, respectively. A maximum of around 50% reduction in SO sub 2 emissions was achieved at both excess air of 20 and 40% and at 830 deg. C. bed temperature. The SO sub 2 emissions were very sensitive to bed temperature. The course limestone was found better in desulfurization efficiency at lower temperature than fine limestone. (author)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  7. A new model for coal gasification on pressurized bubbling fluidized bed gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Cristian; Arenas, Erika; Chejne, Farid; Londoño, Carlos A.; Cisneros, Sebastian; Quintana, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model was proposed for the simulation of fluidized bed reactors. • The model was validated against experimental data found in the literature. • The model was compared and found to be superior to other models reported in the literature. • Effects of pressure, temperature, steam/coal and air/coal ratios over gas composition were studied. - Abstract: Many industries have taken interest in the use of coal gasification for the production of chemicals and fuels. This gasification can be carried out inside a fluidized bed reactor. This non-ideal reactor is difficult to predict due to the complex physical phenomena and the different chemical changes that the feedstock undergoes. The lack of a good model to simulate the reactor’s behavior produces less efficient processes and plant designs. Various approaches to the proper simulation of such reactor have been proposed. In this paper, a new model is developed for the simulation of a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed (PBFB) gasifier that rigorously models the physical phenomena and the chemical changes of the feedstock inside the reactor. In the model, the reactor is divided into three sections; devolatilization, volatile reactions and combustion-gasification. The simulation is validated against experimental data reported in the literature and compared with other models proposed by different authors; once the model is validated, the dependence of the syngas composition on operational pressure, temperature, steam/coal and air/coal ratios are studied. The results of this article show how this model satisfactorily predicts the performance of PBFB gasifiers.

  8. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

  9. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus and boron in coals and combustion residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchill, P.; Howarth, O.W.; Richards, D.G.; Sword, B.J. (British Coal Corporation, Stoke Orchard (UK). Coal Research Establishment)

    1990-04-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS-n.m.r.) was used to study the occurrence of phosphorus and boron in coal, and their fate on combustion. These elements are only minor components of coal, but may significantly influence the utilization properties. {sup 31} P MAS-n.m.r. spectroscopy has confirmed that phosphorus is present in coal predominantly as apatite. This mineral is thermally stable under oxidizing conditions, and survives largely unaltered in high temperature ashes. However, under the semi-reducing bed conditions of certain stoker-fired boilers, it may be decomposed, volatilizing the phosphorus. The {sup 31}P MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show phosphorus in a markedly different coordination environment to that in apatite, the chemical shift suggesting aluminium phosphate or boron phosphate. {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of coals exhibit resonances due to both trigonal and tetrahedrally coordinated boron. Trigonal boron is probably present as tourmaline, but the nature of the tetrahedral boron is less certain; it may be held in tetrahedral sites within certain clay minerals. In common with phosphorus, boron may be volatilized during combustion. The {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show a tetrahedral resonance with a chemical shift quite consistent with that of boron phosphate. 39 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Coal bed methane: current status and outlook - Panorama 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world, there is growing interest in coal bed methane (CBM), which has been exploited for years in the United States. One reason is undoubtedly that some new gas producing countries, including India and China, are seeking to limit the level of their gas dependence. Another is the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, especially using mechanisms set up under the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, the increase in gas prices on international markets also encourages this trend

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  12. Grindability and combustion behavior of coal and torrefied biomass blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, M V; García, R; Pevida, C; Rubiera, F

    2015-09-01

    Biomass samples (pine, black poplar and chestnut woodchips) were torrefied to improve their grindability before being combusted in blends with coal. Torrefaction temperatures between 240 and 300 °C and residence times between 11 and 43 min were studied. The grindability of the torrefied biomass, evaluated from the particle size distribution of the ground sample, significantly improved compared to raw biomass. Higher temperatures increased the proportion of smaller-sized particles after grinding. Torrefied chestnut woodchips (280 °C, 22 min) showed the best grinding properties. This sample was blended with coal (5-55 wt.% biomass). The addition of torrefied biomass to coal up to 15 wt.% did not significantly increase the proportion of large-sized particles after grinding. No relevant differences in the burnout value were detected between the coal and coal/torrefied biomass blends due to the high reactivity of the coal. NO and SO2 emissions decreased as the percentage of torrefied biomass in the blend with coal increased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrafine ash aerosols from coal combustion: Characterization and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William P. Linak; Jong-Ik Yoo; Shirley J. Wasson; Weiyan Zhu; Jost O.L. Wendt; Frank E. Huggins; Yuanzhi Chen; Naresh Shah; Gerald P. Huffman; M. Ian Gilmour [US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Laboratory

    2007-07-01

    Ultrafine coal fly-ash particles withdiameters less than 0.5 {mu}m typically comprise less than 1% of the total fly-ash mass. This paper reports research focused on both characterization and health effects of primary ultrafine coal ash aerosols alone. Ultrafine, fine, and coarse ash particles were segregated and collected from a coal burned in a 20 kW laboratory combustor and two additional coals burned in an externally heated drop tube furnace. Extracted samples from both combustors were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence(WD-XRF) spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Pulmonary inflammation was characterized by albumin concentrations in mouse lung lavage fluid after instillation of collected particles in saline solutions and a single direct inhalation exposure. Results indicate that coal ultrafine ash sometimes contains significant amounts of carbon, probably soot originating from coal tar volatiles, depending on coal type and combustion device. Surprisingly, XAFS results revealed the presence of chromium and thiophenic sulfur in the ultrafine ash particles. The instillation results suggested potential lung injury, the severity of which could be correlated with the carbon (soot) content of the ultrafines. This increased toxicity is consistent with theories in which the presence of carbon mediates transition metal (i.e., Fe) complexes, as revealed in this work by TEM and XAFS spectroscopy, promoting reactive oxygenspecies, oxidation-reduction cycling, and oxidative stress. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Partitioning of elements during coal combustion and leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wen-feng; Qin Yong; Song Dang-yu; Wang Jun-yi [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). School of Resources and Earth Science

    2009-04-15

    The mineral component and content of sulfur and 42 major and trace elements of the feed coal, fly and bottom ashes collected from Shizuishan coal-fired power plant, Ningxia, China were analyzed using AFS, INAA, ICP-MS, ICP-AES, XRD. Based on the coal combustion and leaching experiments, the partitioning of these elements during coal combustion and the leaching behavior of the 11 potentially hazardous elements, including As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Th and U were investigated. The results show that the distribution of elements in the fly and bottom ashes is controlled by their volatilities and modes of occurrence in the coal. The degree of volatilization of elements may be mainly associated with boiling/melting points of these elements and their compounds. The elements easily volatilized, organically bound or associated with sub-micrometer and nano minerals (e.g. Al and Na) tend to be enriched in the fine fractions of fly ash, and most elements do not vaporize which are approximately equally partitioned in the fly and bottom ashes. The emission rates of As, Cr, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sb, and Zn are notably influenced by the temperature ranging from 877 to 1300{sup o}C. The leaching behavior of elements depend significantly on their geochemical properties and modes of occurrence. The elements with a low degree of volatilization are not easily leached, while volatile elements easily leached under the acid conditions. Arsenic, B Br, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, S, Sb and Se show a higher emission rate during coal combustion, and the leached concentrations of Cd, Co, Mo, Ni and U in the acid media exceed their limited concentrations recommended in relevant environment quality standards for water, which will harm the environment. 32 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Pressurized oxy-coal combustion: Ideally flexible to uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebian, Hussam; Mitsos, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous multi-variable gradient-based optimization with multi-start is performed on a 300 MWe wet-recycling pressurized oxy-coal combustion process with carbon capture and sequestration, subject to uncertainty in fuel, ambient conditions, and other input specifications. Two forms of flue gas thermal recovery are studied, a surface heat exchanger and a direct contact separation column. Optimization enables ideal flexibility in the processes: when changing the coal utilized, the performance is not compromised compared to the optimum performance of a process specifically designed for that coal. Similarly, the processes are immune to other uncertainties like ambient conditions, air flow, slurry water flow, atomizer stream flow and the oxidizer stream oxygen purity. Consequently, stochastic programming is shown to be unnecessary. Close to optimum design, the processes are also shown to be insensitive towards design variables such as the areas of the feedwater heaters. Recently proposed thermodynamic criteria are used as embedded design specifications in the optimization process, rendering it faster and more robust. - Highlights: • Proposed formulation to assess the flexibility of power generation processes facing uncertainties. • Obtained ideal flexibility of pressurized oxy-coal combustion with respect to coal type. • Performance of processes under uncertainty match performance of optimal processes for specific set of inputs. • Stochastic programming is not required and instead hierarchic optimization is utilized

  16. Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

  17. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  18. Variations in pore characteristics in high volatile bituminous coals: Implications for coal bed gas content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Strapoc, D.; Solano-Acosta, W.; Rupp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Seelyville Coal Member of the Linton Formation (Pennsylvanian) in Indiana was studied to: 1) understand variations in pore characteristics within a coal seam at a single location and compare these variations with changes occurring between the same coal at different locations, 2) elaborate on the influence of mineral-matter and maceral composition on mesopore and micropore characteristics, and 3) discuss implications of these variations for coal bed gas content. The coal is high volatile bituminous rank with R0 ranging from 0.57% to 0.60%. BET specific surface areas (determined by nitrogen adsorption) of the coals samples studied range from 1.8 to 22.9??m2/g, BJH adsorption mesopore volumes from 0.0041 to 0.0339??cm3/g, and micropore volumes (determined by carbon dioxide adsorption) from 0.0315 to 0.0540??cm3/g. The coals that had the largest specific surface areas and largest mesopore volumes occur at the shallowest depths, whereas the smallest values for these two parameters occur in the deepest coals. Micropore volumes, in contrast, are not depth-dependent. In the coal samples examined for this study, mineral-matter content influenced both specific surface area as well as mesopore and micropore volumes. It is especially clear in the case of micropores, where an increase in mineral-matter content parallels the decrease of micropore volume of the coal. No obvious relationships were observed between the total vitrinite content and pore characteristics but, after splitting vitrinite into individual macerals, we see that collotelinite influences both meso- and micropore volume positively, whereas collodetrinite contributes to the reduction of mesopore and micropore volumes. There are large variations in gas content within a single coal at a single location. Because of this variability, the entire thickness of the coal must be desorbed in order to determine gas content reliably and to accurately calculate the level of gas saturation. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All

  19. Effect of combustion characteristics on wall radiative heat flux in a 100 MWe oxy-coal combustion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Ryu, C. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Chae, T.Y. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering; Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Yang, W. [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Group; Kim, Y.; Lee, S.; Seo, S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Power Generation Lab.

    2013-07-01

    Oxy-coal combustion exhibits different reaction, flow and heat transfer characteristics from air-coal combustion due to different properties of oxidizer and flue gas composition. This study investigated the wall radiative heat flux (WRHF) of air- and oxy-coal combustion in a simple hexahedral furnace and in a 100 MWe single-wall-fired boiler using computational modeling. The hexahedral furnace had similar operation conditions with the boiler, but the coal combustion was ignored by prescribing the gas properties after complete combustion at the inlet. The concentrations of O{sub 2} in the oxidizers ranging between 26 and 30% and different flue gas recirculation (FGR) methods were considered in the furnace. In the hexahedral furnace, the oxy-coal case with 28% of O{sub 2} and wet FGR had a similar value of T{sub af} with the air-coal combustion case, but its WRHF was 12% higher. The mixed FGR case with about 27% O{sub 2} in the oxidizer exhibited the WRHF similar to the air-coal case. During the actual combustion in the 100 MWe boiler using mixed FGR, the reduced volumetric flow rates in the oxy-coal cases lowered the swirl strength of the burners. This stretched the flames and moved the high temperature region farther to the downstream. Due to this reason, the case with 30% O{sub 2} in the oxidizers achieved a WRHF close to that of air-coal combustion, although its adiabatic flame temperature (T{sub af}) and WHRF predicted in the simplified hexahedral furnace was 103 K and 10% higher, respectively. Therefore, the combustion characteristics and temperature distribution significantly influences the WRHF, which should be assessed to determine the ideal operating conditions of oxy- coal combustion. The choice of the weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGGM) was not critical in the large coal-fired boiler.

  20. Influence of the microwave irradiation dewatering on the combustion characteristics of Chinese brown coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lichao; Feng, Hongcui; Xu, Chang; Zhang, Yanwei; Wang, Zhihua

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of microwave irradiation on coal composition, pore structure, coal rank, and combustion characteristics of typical brown coals in China. Results show that the upgrading process significantly decreased the inherent moisture, and increased calorific value and fixed carbon content. After upgrading, pore distribution extended to micropore region, oxygen functional groups were reduced and destroyed, and the apparent aromaticity increased suggesting an improvement in the coal rank. Based on thermogravimetric analysis, the combustion processes of upgraded coals were delayed toward the high temperature region, and the temperatures of ignition, peak and burnout increased. Based on the average combustion rate and comprehensive combustion parameter, the upgraded coals performed better compared with raw brown coals and a high rank coal. In ignition and burnout segments, the activation energy increased but exhibited a decrease in the combustion stage.

  1. Speciation of arsenic in Canadian feed-coal and combustion by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Goodarzi; F.E. Huggins [Natural Resourses Canada (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division

    2003-07-01

    It is important to determine the oxidation state of arsenic in coal and coal combustion products, as this is generally the single most critical factor determining the toxicity of this element towards humans. However, the same factor is also important for understanding the volatility and reactions of arsenic forms in combustion and their leachability and mobility in ash-disposal situations. In this work, XAFS spectroscopy has been used to examine the speciation of arsenic in Canadian subbituminous and bituminous feed-coals and their combustion products. The concentration of arsenic in the feed-coals varied from < 2 ppm for subbituminous to 54 ppm for bituminous coals. Significant differences were noted in how arsenic occurs in subbituminous and bituminous coals, but, although such differences might influence the initial volatility and reactions of arsenic during coal combustion, arsenic is found almost entirely in the less toxic As{sup 5+} oxidation state in combustion products from both types of coal. (Abstract only)

  2. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Uranium-Rich Coals and Associated Coal Combustion Residues from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Nancy; Vengosh, Avner; Dai, Shifeng

    2017-11-21

    Most coals in China have uranium concentrations up to 3 ppm, yet several coal deposits are known to be enriched in uranium. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in these U-rich coals and associated coal combustion residues (CCRs) have not been well characterized. Here we measure NORM (Th, U, 228 Ra, 226 Ra, and 210 Pb) in coals from eight U-rich coal deposits in China and the associated CCRs from one of these deposits. We compared NORM in these U-rich coals and associated CCRs to CCRs collected from the Beijing area and natural loess sediments from northeastern China. We found elevated U concentrations (up to 476 ppm) that correspond to low 232 Th/ 238 U and 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratios (≪1) in the coal samples. 226 Ra and 228 Ra activities correlate with 238 U and 232 Th activities, respectively, and 226 Ra activities correlate well with 210 Pb activities across all coal samples. We used measured NORM activities and ash yields in coals to model the activities of CCRs from all U-rich coals analyzed in this study. The activities of measured and modeled CCRs derived from U-rich coals exceed the standards for radiation in building materials, particularly for CCRs originating from coals with U > 10 ppm. Since beneficial use of high-U Chinese CCRs in building materials is not a suitable option, careful consideration needs to be taken to limit potential air and water contamination upon disposal of U- and Ra-rich CCRs.

  3. Experiences in sulphur capture in a 30 MWth Circulating Fluidized Bed boiler under oxy-combustion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, M.; Fernández, A.; Llavona, I.; Kuivalainen, R.

    2014-01-01

    CO 2 and SO 2 from fossil fuel combustion are contributors to greenhouse effect and acid rain respectively. Oxy-combustion technology produces a highly concentrated CO 2 stream almost ready for capture. Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler technology allows in-situ injection of calcium-based sorbents for efficient SO 2 capture. CIUDEN's 30 MWth CFB boiler, supplied by Foster Wheeler and located at the Technology Development Centre for CO 2 Capture and Transport (es.CO 2 ) in Spain, is the first of its kind for executing test runs at large pilot scale under both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions. In this work, SO 2 emissions under different scenarios have been evaluated. Variables such as limestone composition, Ca/S molar ratio and bed temperature among others have been considered along different test runs in both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions to analyse its influence on SO 2 abatement. Fly and bottom ash, together with flue gas analysis have been carried-out. Desulphurization performance tests results are presented. - Highlights: •Sulphur capture efficiency (%) was higher in oxy-combustion compared to air-combustion in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. •For a Ca/S molar ratio higher than 2.6 there was barely any improvement on sulphur capture efficiency for both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. •Optimum temperature for sulphur capture at a fixed Ca/S molar ratio is around 880–890 °C under oxy-combustion conditions and for anthracite coal with limestone as sorbent in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler

  4. Experimental results of combustion and desulphurization in fluidized bed. Implementation opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, L.; Jinescu, G.; Scarlat, N.

    1996-01-01

    Possibilities of both stationary fluidized bed combustion (SFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) technologies for desulfurization of Romanian coal-fired power plants have been studied since the 70's. The results of research on a 2 MWh SFBC semi-industrial pilot hot water boiler and an 1 MWh CFBC pilot plant are presented. 4 sorts of lignite (3 Romanian and 1 Albanian) are used in the study. The combustion efficiencies for SFBC are between 82 - 84% and for CFBC - between 84 - 87%. The heat transfer coefficients for lignite and peat coal have been determined for different zones, different levels of ash recirculation rate and various operating loads. Experiments with 2 sorts of sorbents: dolomite and limestone, under different temperature conditions and at Ca/S molar ratio 0.5 - 3.5 have been carried out. The temperature range for the maximum values of desulfurization efficiency is 840-870 o C for limestone and 820-860 o C for dolomite. The following efficiency values are obtained for lignite in the SFBC pilot plant: 1) over 80%, when using dolomite as a sorbent and the Ca/S molar ratio is greater than 2.5; 2) 75 - 90%, when limestone has been used and the Ca/S molar ratio is in the range 2-3. Desulfurization efficiency in CFBC plant for lignite using limestone is 80-93% for Ca/S ratio between 2 and 3. The necessity to commission a demonstrative installation with low pollutant emissions is pointed out. The Comanesti Power Plant has been chosen for this purpose. An old 75 t/h steam boiler will be replaced with 45 MWh CFBC boiler for combined heat and steam production. The overall estimated investment costs for this plant are about 6 million $US. 1 tabs., 5 refs

  5. Coal at the crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaroni, A.W.; Davis, A.; Schobert, H.; Gordon, R.L.; Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Worldwide coal reserves are very large but coal suffers from an image of being an environmentally unfriendly and inconvenient fuel. Aspects discussed in the article include: coal's poor image; techniques for coal analysis, in particular instrumented techniques; developments in clean coal technology e.g. coal liquefaction, fluidized bed combustion, co-generation and fuel slurries; the environmental impact of mining and land reclamation; and health aspects. It is considered that coal's future depends on overcoming its poor image. 6 photos

  6. Role of coal combustion products in sustainable construction materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, T.R.; Siddique, R.; Vaniker, S. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (USA). UWM Center for Products Utilization, College of Engineering and Applied Science

    2003-07-01

    The paper describes various coal combustion products, CCPs produced in the process of power generation. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag and flue gas desulfurization products. Typical test protocol used for testing, analysis and evaluation of CCPs, as well as the current best recycling use options for these materials are discussed. Materials, productions, properties, and potential applications in the manufacture of emerging materials for sustainable construction, as well as environmental impact are also briefly discussed. 47 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Combustion characteristics of intensively cleaned coal fractions. Effect of mineral matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Fuente, E.; Pis, J.J. [Inst. Nacional de Carbon, Oviedo (Spain); Ivatt, S. [ETSU, Harwell, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this work has been to assess the effect that intensive coal cleaning exerts on the combustion behaviour of different density-separated coal fractions. Samples with ash contents varying from 39% for the raw coal, to 2% for the cleanest fraction were obtained after density separation. Temperature-programmed combustion and isothermal gasification in air were used to measure the reactivities of the parent coal and the cleaned fractions. Coal and char reactivities increased with increasing ash content of the samples. Thermal analysis-mass spectrometry of the low-temperature ashes was also carried out in order to study the reactions of coal minerals under combustion conditions. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of coal/solid recovered fuel (SRF) with coal/refuse derived fuel (RDF) in a fluidised bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagland, S.T.; Kilgallon, P.; Coveney, R.; Garg, A.; Smith, R.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Simms, N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to compare the differences between municipal solid waste (MSW) derived solid recovered fuel (SRF) (complying with CEN standards) and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Both fuels were co-combusted with coal in a 50 kW fluidised bed combustor and the metal emissions were compared. Synthetic SRF was prepared in the laboratory by grinding major constituents of MSW such as paper, plastic, textile and wood. RDF was obtained from a local mechanical treatment plant. Heavy metal emissions in flue gas and ash samples from the (coal + 10% SRF) fuel mixture were found to be within the acceptable range and were generally lower than that obtained for coal + 10% RDF fuel mixture. The relative distribution of heavy metals in ash components and the flue gas stream shows the presence of a large fraction (up to 98%) of most of the metals in the ash (except Hg and As). Thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis of SRF constituents was performed to understand the behaviour of fuel mixtures in the absence and presence of air. The results obtained from the experimental study will enhance the confidence of fuel users towards using MSW-derived SRF as an alternative fuel.

  9. A review of oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathekga, HI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is no detailed review that summarizes the current knowledge status on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustors. This paper reviewed the existing literature in heat transfer, char combustion and pollutant emissions oxy...

  10. Influence of Process Parameters on Coal Combustion Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der

    investigated experimentally in a 400 MWe corner fired boiler with over fire air, a 350 MWe opposed fired boiler, and in a 160 kWt pilot scale test rig. Three different coals were fired in each of the furnaces as part of the activities in group 3 of the European Union JOULE 2 Extension project "Atmospheric......The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of nitrogen oxide formation and carbon burnout during the combustion of pulverized coal, and to contribute to addressing the potential of chemical engineering models for the prediction of furnace temperatures, NO emissions and the amount...... of carbon in ash. To this purpose, the effect of coal quality on NO and burnout has been investigated experimentally, a radiation heat balance has been developed based on simple chemical engineering methodology, and a mixing study has been conducted in order to describe the near burner macro mixing in terms...

  11. Combustion studies of coal derived solid fuels by thermogravimetric analysis. III. Correlation between burnout temperature and carbon combustion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; DeBarr, J.A.; Chen, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    Burning profiles of 35-53 ??m size fractions of an Illinois coal and three partially devolatilized coals prepared from the original coal were obtained using a thermogravimetric analyzer. The burning profile burnout temperatures were higher for lower volatile fuels and correlated well with carbon combustion efficiencies of the fuels when burned in a laboratory-scale laminar flow reactor. Fuels with higher burnout temperatures had lower carbon combustion efficiencies under various time-temperature conditions in the laboratory-scale reactor. ?? 1990.

  12. Aspects of combustion behaviour of coals from some New Zealand lignite-coal regions determined by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfell, K.E.; Beamish, B.B.; Rodgers, K.A. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Geology

    1997-08-25

    The papers describes how thermogravimetric analysis of five Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic New Zealand lignites demonstrate that their combustion behaviour is distinct from that of subbituminous coals and may be characterised by peak temperature of 377-416{degree}C, maximum rate of combustion of 25-31 wt% min{sup -1}, and temperature of char burnout 421-497{degree}C. These parameters reflect variation in thermal behaviour associated with both the organic and inorganic constituents of the coal. The information obtained is additional to that provided by proximate analysis; the latter is insufficient to predict the combustion behaviour of the coals relative to one another. A post-combustion thermal event is seen among the lignites as in other low-rank coals combusting below 600{degree}C, which appears to be related to the organic sulphur content of the coal.

  13. Mercury stable isotope signatures of world coal deposits and historical coal combustion emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruoyu; Sonke, Jeroen E; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Belkin, Harvey E; Liu, Guijian; Shome, Debasish; Cukrowska, Ewa; Liousse, Catherine; Pokrovsky, Oleg S; Streets, David G

    2014-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) emissions from coal combustion contribute approximately half of anthropogenic Hg emissions to the atmosphere. With the implementation of the first legally binding UNEP treaty aimed at reducing anthropogenic Hg emissions, the identification and traceability of Hg emissions from different countries/regions are critically important. Here, we present a comprehensive world coal Hg stable isotope database including 108 new coal samples from major coal-producing deposits in South Africa, China, Europe, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, former USSR, and the U.S. A 4.7‰ range in δ(202)Hg (-3.9 to 0.8‰) and a 1‰ range in Δ(199)Hg (-0.6 to 0.4‰) are observed. Fourteen (p coal Hg emissions tracing. A revised coal combustion Hg isotope fractionation model is presented, and suggests that gaseous elemental coal Hg emissions are enriched in the heavier Hg isotopes relative to oxidized forms of emitted Hg. The model explains to first order the published δ(202)Hg observations on near-field Hg deposition from a power plant and global scale atmospheric gaseous Hg. Yet, model uncertainties appear too large at present to permit straightforward Hg isotope source identification of atmospheric forms of Hg. Finally, global historical (1850-2008) coal Hg isotope emission curves were modeled and indicate modern-day mean δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg values for bulk coal emissions of -1.2 ± 0.5‰ (1SD) and 0.05 ± 0.06‰ (1SD).

  14. Release of nitrogen precursors from coal and biomass residues in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    This work was undertaken with the aim of quantifying the relative amounts of NH{sub 3} and HCN released from different residues during their devolatilization under fluidized bed conditions. The results were compared with data collected for bituminous coals of different origin. The relation between amounts of HCN and NH{sub 3} released and the levels of NOX and N{sub 2}O formed during cocombustion was also addressed. The partitioning of nitrogen between volatiles and char was also quantified. The pyrolysis studies were undertaken in a small fluidized bed reactor of 80 mm of ID and 500 mm high using an inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}). The HCN and NH{sub 3} were quantified by bubbling the pyrolysis gases in absorbing solutions which were subsequently analyzed with selective electrodes. The combustion studies were carried out on a pilot installation. The fluidized bed combustor is square in cross section with each side being 300 mm long. There is secondary air supply to the freeboard at different heights to deal with high volatile fuels as almost all waste materials are. The temperatures in the bed and in the freeboard and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The results obtained suggest that, while coal releases nitrogen mostly as HCN, residues like RDF and sewage sludge give out fuel-N in greater quantities as NH{sub 3}. Residues at fluidized bed combustion (FBC) temperatures release more than 80% of the fuel-N with the volatiles. The NH{sub 3} evolved during pyrolysis acted as a reducing agent on NOX emissions. The presence of calcium significantly reduces the emission of N{sub 2}O probably by interfering with HCN chemistry. With high amounts of residues in the fuel mixture, the relative importance of char on the nitrogen chemistry substantially decreases. By using cocombustion, it is possible to reduce fuel-N conversion to NOX and N{sub 2}O, by tuning the amounts of coal and residue in the mixture. 29 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Numerical simulation of pulverized coal combustion to reduce pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Bagher Ayani; Behnam Rahmanian

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In this research, the numerical simulation of pollutant reduction and in a pulverized coal combustion at 2D combustion chamber have been studied. Finite volume method using structured grid arrangement was utilized for modeling the pulverized coal combustion. The pressure base algorithm and implicit solver has been employed to simulate non-premix combustion model. The air was diluted by some participative gaseous such as whose percentages varied from 0 % to 20 %. Participative gases and air were preheated by a high-temperature gas generator, and the preheated oxidizer temperature could achieve. The combustion simulation with the generalized finite rate chemistry model, referred to as the Magnussen model and the reacting flow with the mixture fraction PDF/ equilibrium chemistry model, referred to as the PDF model are studied. Quick scheme was adopted for the discretization of all convective terms of the advective transport equations. So, as a result of addition participative gases into oxidizer the rate of formation of pollutants as well as NO x suppressed. The addition only a few percent of halogen components can make some systems nonflammable. The effects of addition halogen components and non-reaction gaseous such as Helium and Argon are fuel dilution and its acts as catalysts in reducing the H atom concentration necessary for the chain branching reaction sequence. Moreover, they act like surface and they make the increment of surface ratio versus volume. Because of this, the number of radical conflicts and hence destruction them will be increase. Furthermore, the rate of formation of pollutants will be decreased if the halogen components and non-reaction gaseous injection will be increased. However, as a result of this research, in the case of injection in pulverized coal combustion the flame temperature is lower than Steam, Argon and Helium. So, the emission levels of carbon dioxide is significantly lower than other participative gases, but in this

  16. Partitioning of selected trace elements in coal combustion products from two coal-burning power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Engle, Mark A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Affolter, Ronald H.; Jones, Kevin B.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of feed coal (FC), bottom ash (BA), economizer fly ash (EFA), and fly ash (FA) were collected from power plants in the Central Appalachian basin and Colorado Plateau to determine the partitioning of As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in coal combustion products (CCPs). The Appalachian plant burns a high-sulfur (about 3.9 wt.%) bituminous coal from the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed and operates with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), with flue gas temperatures of about 163 °C in the ESPs. At this plant, As, Pb, Hg, and Se have the greatest median concentrations in FA samples, compared to BA and EFA. A mass balance (not including the FGD process) suggests that the following percentages of trace elements are captured in FA: As (48%), Cr (58%), Pb (54%), Se (20%), and Hg (2%). The relatively high temperatures of the flue gas in the ESPs and low amounts of unburned C in FA (0.5% loss-on-ignition for FA) may have led to the low amount of Hg captured in FA. The Colorado Plateau plant burns a blend of three low-S (about 0.74 wt.%) bituminous coals from the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation and operates with fabric filters (FFs). Flue gas temperatures in the baghouses are about 104 °C. The elements As, Cr, Pb, Hg, and Se have the greatest median concentrations in the fine-grained fly ash product (FAP) produced by cyclone separators, compared to the other CCPs at this plant. The median concentration of Hg in FA (0.0983 ppm) at the Colorado Plateau plant is significantly higher than that for the Appalachian plant (0.0315 ppm); this higher concentration is related to the efficiency of FFs in Hg capture, the relatively low temperatures of flue gas in the baghouses (particularly in downstream compartments), and the amount of unburned C in FA (0.29% loss-on-ignition for FA).

  17. CFD simulation of thermodynamic and temperature effects on spontaneous combustion of coal stockpiles and dumps

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kekana, J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available and energy conservation equations through the porous media. Combustion processes under consideration included physical absorption and desorption of atmospheric species in the coal matrix, formation of coal-oxygen complexes and oxygenated carbon species...

  18. Investigation of Adsorbed Gases Content in Coal Beds in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadadinovic, J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the gas fraction in coal beds in Bosnia & Herzegovina has been performed systematically since 1988. Gas in coal beds can be present in free or adsorbed form, and dissolved in water. Methods of investigation are based on the direct approach, according to which the gas fraction is determined in the undisturbed coal bed.The quantity of the adsorbed and free gas in the coal bed is directly proportional to the gas pressure. Dependence is hyperbolic. The quantity of the free gas in mining conditions is being determined by measurement of the desorption index (Δp2. The desorption index for the Srednjobosanski coal basin ranges to 1571 Pa, and the free gas pressure in this coal basin amounts up to 3.75 MPa. The desorption index for coal beds in “Kreka” and “Banoviće” coal basins has negative values, which means that the free gas fraction within the coal beds is negligible, while separation of adsorbed gases is diffuse. The free gas pressure in the mentioned coal basins is below 0.1 MPa. Adsorbed gases within the coal are connected by physical adsorption according to Langmuir’s isothermal adsorption curve. Langmuir’s quantities, for coal bed conditions, ranges as follows: am from 0.826 to 9.52 m3 t–1 pcs, and b from 6.65 10–3 to 0.247 MPa–1. Adsorbed gas within Miocene coal beds contains methane in amounts of 1.49 m3 t–1 čus CH4 andcarbon(IVoxide in amounts of 0.15 m3 t–1 čus CO2. Adsorbed gas within Pliocene coal beds, without methane, dominant is content of carbon(IVoxide.The investigation of the gas content in coal beds of BiH conducted in this article reveal that the coal beds primarily contain methane, while others hydrocarbons such as ethane, ethene, propane, propene and butane are present sporadically in fraction below φ/10–6. Based on the investigation results conducted in this article, simple mathematical forms were obtained for quick calculation of the free gas quantity by measurement of the

  19. Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pulverized bituminous coal was burned in a 10W externally heated entrained flow furnace under air-combustion and three oxy-combustion inlet oxygen conditions (28,...

  20. OxyFuel combustion of Coal and Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    The power and heat producing sector is facing a continuously increasing demand to reduce its emissions of CO2. Oxyfuel combustion combined with CO2 storage is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies which will enable the continuous use of the existing fleet of suspension-fired po......The power and heat producing sector is facing a continuously increasing demand to reduce its emissions of CO2. Oxyfuel combustion combined with CO2 storage is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies which will enable the continuous use of the existing fleet of suspension......-fired power plants burning coal or other fuels during the period of transition to renewable energy sources. The oxyfuel combustion process introduces several changes to the power plant configuration. Most important, the main part of the flue gas is recirculated to the boiler and mixed with pure oxygen....... The oxidant thus contains little or no nitrogen and a near-pure CO2 stream can be produced by cooling the flue gas to remove water. The change to the oxidant composition compared to combustion in air will induce significant changes to the combustion process. This Ph.D. thesis presents experimental...

  1. Applying Rock Engineering Systems (RES approach to Evaluate and Classify the Coal Spontaneous Combustion Potential in Eastern Alborz Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Saffari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Subject analysis of the potential of spontaneous combustion in coal layers with analytical and numerical methods has been always considered as a difficult task because of the complexity of the coal behavior and the number of factors influencing it. Empirical methods, due to accounting for certain and specific factors, have not accuracy and efficiency for all positions. The Rock Engineering Systems (RES approach as a systematic method for analyzing and classifying is proposed in engineering projects. The present study is concerned with employing the RES approach to categorize coal spontaneous combustion in coal regions. Using this approach, the interaction of parameters affecting each other in an equal scale on the coal spontaneous combustion was evaluated. The Intrinsic, geological and mining characteristics of coal seams were studied in order to identifying important parameters. Then, the main stages of implementation of the RES method i.e. interaction matrix formation, coding matrix and forming a list category were performed. Later, an index of Coal Spontaneous Combustion Potential (CSCPi was determined to format the mathematical equation. Then, the obtained data related to the intrinsic, geological and mining, and special index were calculated for each layer in the case study (Pashkalat coal region, Iran. So, the study offers a perfect and comprehensive classification of the layers. Finally, by using the event of spontaneous combustion occurred in Pashkalat coal region, an initial validation for this systematic approach in the study area was conducted, which suggested relatively good concordance in Pashkalat coal region.

  2. Properties of Controlled Low Strength Material with Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash and Recycled Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tsai-Lung; Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Hsu, Hui-Mi

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of adding circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) ash, desulfurization slag, air-cooled blast-furnace slag and coal bottom ash to the controlled low-strength material (CLSM). Test methods include slump flow test, ball drop test, water soluble chloride ion content measurement, compressive strength and length change measurement. The results show that (1) the use of CFBC hydration ash with desulfurization slag of slump flow is the best, and the use of CFBC hydration ash with coal bottom ash and slump flow is the worst; (2) CFBC hydration ash with desulfurization slag and chloride ion content is the highest; (3) 24 h ball drop test (diameter ≤ 76 mm), and test results are 70 mm to 76 mm; (4) CFBC hydration ash with desulfurization slag and compression strength is the highest, with the coal bottom ash being the lowest; increase of CFBC hydration ash can reduce compressive strength; and (5) the water-quenched blast furnace slag and CFBC hydration ash would expand, which results in length changes of CLSM specimens. PMID:29724055

  3. Casing drilling TM : a viable technology for coal bed methane?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Muqeem, M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper highlighted the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling more than 30 wells using only casings as the drill stem, suggesting that such technology could be advantageous for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) exploration and development. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig that is ideal to meet the great demand for CBM development in Canada. The Casing Drilling TM system, when used in conjunction with the drilling rig, could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of CBM reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead and wire line retrieval can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or coal beds under balanced with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while finding gas at the same time. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling TM could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  4. The effect of biomass on pollutant emission and burnout in co-combustion with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruczek, H.; Raczka, P.; Tatarek, A. [Wroclaw Technical University, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2006-08-15

    This paper presents experimental and numerical results on the co-combustion of different types of biomass with hard and brown coal. The main aim of this work was to assess the impact of the cocombustion of biomass in brown and hard coal-fired systems on the combustion process itself and on the level of pollutant formation and its dependence on combustion temperature stoichiometry. The experimental results obtained have shown that in general biomass addition leads to decreased NO and SO{sub 2} emissions, except with the hard coal Bogdanka. In addition, the biomass has a beneficial effect on the burnout of the coal/biomass mixture. To help to account for this effect, the behaviour of coal and biomass, the coal/biomass mixture and of fuel-N was studied by thermal analysis, in nitrogen and in air. The results obtained have shown that gas phase interactions are dominant in the combustion of biomass/coal mixtures.

  5. Thermo-optical properties of residential coals and combustion aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Máté; Ajtai, Tibor; Kiss-Albert, Gergely; Kiss, Diána; Utry, Noémi; Janovszky, Patrik; Palásti, Dávid; Smausz, Tomi; Kohut, Attila; Hopp, Béla; Galbács, Gábor; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Bozóki, Zoltán

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we present the inherent optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols generated from various coals (hard through bituminous to lignite) and their correlation with the thermochemical and energetic properties of the bulk coal samples. The nanoablation method provided a unique opportunity for the comprehensive investigation of the generated particles under well controlled laboratory circumstances. First, the wavelength dependent radiative features (optical absorption and scattering) and the size distribution (SD) of the generated particulate matter were measured in-situ in aerosol phase using in-house developed and customised state-of-the-art instrumentation. We also investigated the morphology and microstructure of the generated particles using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Diffraction (ED). The absorption spectra of the measured samples (quantified by Absorption Angström Exponent (AAE)) were observed to be distinctive. The correlation between the thermochemical features of bulk coal samples (fixed carbon (FC) to volatile matter (VM) ratio and calorific value (CV)) and the AAE of aerosol assembly were found to be (r2 = 0.97 and r2 = 0.97) respectively. Lignite was off the fitted curves in both cases most probably due to its high optically inactive volatile material content. Although more samples are necessary to be investigated to draw statistically relevant conclusion, the revealed correlation between CV and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) implies that climatic impact of coal combusted aerosol could depend on the thermal and energetic properties of the bulk material.

  6. Kinetics of coal combustion: Part 3, Mechanisms and kinetics of char combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavalas, G. R.; Flagan, R. C. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes a three-year research program aimed at developing this level of understanding of char combustion through a combination of detailed analysis of chars as produced during devolatilization and as they evolve during oxidation, and theoretical studies of the porous microstructures and of pore diffusion and reaction within the coal particles. A small number of coals have been studied in detail, namely a HVA bituminous (PSOC 1451), a sub-bituminous (PSOC 1488), and a lignite (PSOC 1443). Chars have been generated from size-classified samples of these coals by pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere in a drop tube furnace. The chars were then characterized both chemically and physically. Subsequent oxidation studies were performed on these chars. 42 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Experimental study of improvement on combustion control of fluidized bed combustion chamber; Ryudosho shokyakuro no nenshosei no kaizen ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumiya, T.; Baba, K.; Koshida, H.; Uetani, J.; Furuta, M.

    1998-10-29

    Nippon Steel Corporation has carried out an experimental study using the Yawata waste incinerator plant in order to improve combustion control of a fluidized bed combustion chamber. For controlling the forming of dioxin, combustion control is very important in addition to conventional methods. In this paper, we report two studies about improvements on combustion control. In the first study, we verified improvement on combustion control by modifying gas flow at the freeboard. The operational results of the experiments were studied using the numerical model of the combustion chamber. The modification of gas flow at freeboard was confirmed to be effective to obtain a compact design of fluidized bed combustion chamber for municipal waste. In the second, study we improved combustion control for sewage combustion with municipal waste. In burning municipal waste and sewage, it is especially required to take combustion control into careful consideration. In this experiment, we developed a new device for supplying sewage for the appropriate controlling combustion, and verified its effectiveness to combustion control and an effective reduction of dioxin. (author)

  8. NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiaxun; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Xiumin; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Superfine pulverized coal combustion in O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere is a new promising technology. • NO emissions of superfine pulverized coal combustion in O 2 /CO 2 mixture were focused. • Coal particle sizes have significant effects on NO emissions in O 2 /CO 2 combustion. - Abstract: The combination of O 2 /CO 2 combustion and superfine pulverized coal combustion technology can make full use of their respective merits, and solve certain inherent disadvantages of each technology. The technology of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere is easy and feasible to be retrofitted with few reconstructions on the existing devices. It will become a useful and promising method in the future. In this paper, a one-dimensional drop-tube furnace system was adopted to study the NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere. The effects of coal particle size, coal quality, furnace temperature, stoichiometric ratio, etc. were analyzed. It is important to note that coal particle sizes have significant influence on NO emissions in the O 2 /CO 2 combustion. For the homogeneous NO reduction, smaller coal particles can inhibit the homogeneous NO formations under fuel-rich combustion conditions, while it becomes disadvantageous for fuel-lean combustion. However, under any conditions, heterogeneous reduction is always more significant for smaller coal particle sizes, which have smoother pore surfaces and simpler pore structures. The results from this fundamental research will provide technical support for better understanding and developing this new combustion process

  9. Numerical investigation of heat transfer characteristics in utility boilers of oxy-coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yukun; Li, Hailong; Yan, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air-coal and oxy-coal combustion in an industrial scale PF boiler were simulated in ANSYS FLUENT. • The O 2 concentration of 33 vol% in the oxy-coal combustion case matches the air-coal combustion case most closely. • The moisture in the flue gas has little impact on flame temperature, but positive impact on surface incident radiation. - Abstract: Oxy-coal combustion has different flue gas composition from the conventional air-coal combustion. The different composition further results in different properties, such as the absorption coefficient, emissivity, and density, which can directly affect the heat transfer in both radiation and convection zones of utility boilers. This paper numerically studied a utility boiler of oxy-coal combustion and compares with air-coal combustion in terms of flame profile and heat transferred through boiler side walls in order to understand the effects of different operating conditions on oxy-coal boiler retrofitting and design. Based on the results, it was found that around 33 vol% of effective O 2 concentration ([O 2 ] effective ) the highest flame temperature and total heat transferred through boiler side walls in the oxy-coal combustion case match to those in the air-coal combustion case most; therefore, the 33 vol% of [O 2 ] effective could result in the minimal change for the oxy-coal combustion retrofitting of the existing boiler. In addition, the increase of the moisture content in the flue gas has little impact on the flame temperature, but results in a higher surface incident radiation on boiler side walls. The area of heat exchangers in the boiler was also investigated regarding retrofitting. If boiler operates under a higher [O 2 ] effective , to rebalance the load of each heat exchanger in the boiler, the feed water temperature after economizer can be reduced or part of superheating surfaces can be moved into the radiation zone to replace part of the evaporators

  10. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shim-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington

    1992-11-01

    This report contains the computer codes developed for the coal combustion project. In Subsection B.1 the FORTRAN code developed for the percolative fragmentation model (or the discrete model, since a char is expressed as a collection of discrete elements in a discrete space) is presented. In Subsection B.2 the code for the continuum model (thus named because mineral inclusions are distributed in a continuum space) is presented. A stereological model code developed to obtain the pore size distribution from a two-dimensional data is presented in Subsection B.3.

  11. Catalytic Unmixed Combustion of Coal with Zero Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Rizeq; Parag Kulkarni; Raul Subia; Wei Wei

    2005-12-01

    GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy-based technology for coal combustion with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Combustion of coal (UMC-Coal) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into two separate streams of high pressure CO{sub 2}-rich gas for sequestration, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air for producing electricity in gas turbine expanders. The UMC process utilizes an oxygen transfer material (OTM) and eliminates the need for an air separation unit (ASU) and a CO{sub 2} separation unit as compared to conventional gasification based processes. This is the final report for the two-year DOE-funded program (DE-FC26-03NT41842) on this technology that ended in September 30, 2005. The UMC technology development program encompassed lab- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UMC concept. The chemical feasibility of the individual UMC steps was established via lab-scale testing. A pilot plant, designed in a related DOE funded program (DE-FC26-00FT40974), was reconstructed and operated to demonstrate the chemistry of UMC process in a pilot-scale system. The risks associated with this promising technology including cost, lifetime and durability OTM and the impact of contaminants on turbine performance are currently being addressed in detail in a related ongoing DOE funded program (DE-FC26-00FT40974, Phase II). Results obtained to date suggest that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

  12. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  13. Co-firing option of palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends in a circulating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Hussain; Farid Nasir Ani

    2010-01-01

    Palm oil shell waste is one of the main agriculture wastes in Malaysia. In order to utilize these wastes efficiently, pyrolysis of oil-palm shell waste was first carried out using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effects of heating rate on the pyrolytic properties were investigated to evaluate its suitability for co-firing. The TGA analyses of oil palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends suggests that there is an obvious lateral shift in the thermo grams for different heating rate. Kinetics calculations were also done using integral method. For palm shell waste powder it was found that the activation energies ranged from 112-119 kJ/mole and for the Mukah coal blends it ranged from 93.3 -100.8 kJ/mole. Combustion studies for palm shell wastes and coal blends were done in a hot circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) test rig. This is the first practical experience of using this type of rig in Malaysia. The temperature dependence on the combustion and emission behaviour were identified. The effects of variation of primary air and feed rate have also been analyzed and their influence on emissions has been established. The combustion studies of palm shell wastes were done and it was found that the emission of NO x ranged from 20-164 ppm while the CO emissions were high for some operating conditions. For the co-firing studies, the NO x and CO deceased with the percentage increase in the blending ratio of coal with palm shell waste.. The optimum blending ratio was found to be in a ratio of 40 percent coal and 60 percent Mukah coal. It was also found that Mukah coal show agglomeration behaviour with when it is blended in 80% ratio. (author)

  14. Sustainable development with clean coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses the opportunities available with clean coal technologies. Applications include new power plants, retrofitting and repowering of existing power plants, steelmaking, cement making, paper manufacturing, cogeneration facilities, and district heating plants. An appendix describes the clean coal technologies. These include coal preparation (physical cleaning, low-rank upgrading, bituminous coal preparation); combustion technologies (fluidized-bed combustion and NOx control); post-combustion cleaning (particulate control, sulfur dioxide control, nitrogen oxide control); and conversion with the integrated gasification combined cycle.

  15. Influence of the hydrothermal dewatering on the combustion characteristics of Chinese low-rank coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Lichao; Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Chang; Wang, Zhihua; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hydrothermal dewatering performed at different temperatures on the combustion characteristics of Chinese low-rank coals with different coalification maturities. It was found that the upgrading process significantly decreased the inherent moisture and oxygen content, increased the calorific value and fixed carbon content, and promoted the damage of the hydrophilic oxygen functional groups. The results of oxygen/carbon atomic ratio indicated that the upgrading process converted the low-rank coals near to high-rank coals which can also be gained using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the combustion processes of upgraded coals were delayed toward the high temperature region, and the upgraded coals had higher ignition and burnout temperature. On the other hand, based on the higher average combustion rate and comprehensive combustion parameter, the upgraded coals performed better compared with raw brown coals and the Da Tong bituminous coal. In ignition segment, the activation energy increased after treatment but decreased in the combustion stage. The changes in coal compositions, microstructure, rank, and combustion characteristics were more notable as the temperature in hydrothermal dewatering increased from 250 to 300 °C or coals of lower ranks were used. - Highlights: • Typical Chinese lignites with various ranks are upgraded by hydrothermal dewatering. • Upgraded coals exhibit chemical compositions comparable with that of bituminous coal. • FTIR show the change of microstructure and improvement in coal rank after upgrading. • Upgraded coals exhibit difficulty in ignition but combust easily. • More evident effects are obtained for raw brown coal with relative lower rank.

  16. Coal-bed methane water: effects on soil properties and camelina productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every year the production of coal-bed natural gas in the Powder River Basin results in the discharge of large amounts of coal-bed methane water (CBMW) in Wyoming; however, no sustainable disposal methods for CBMW are currently available. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential to ...

  17. Mercury emission, control and measurement from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering; Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Cao, Yan [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Zhang, Kai [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Coal-fired electric power generation accounts for 65% of U.S. emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), 22% of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and 37% of mercury (Hg). The proposed Clear Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) will attempt to regulate these emissions using a cap-and-trade program to replace a number of existing regulatory requirements that will impact this industry over the next decade. Mercury emissions remain the largest source that has not yet been efficiently controlled, in part because this is one of the most expensive to control. Mercury is a toxic, persistent pollutant that accumulates in the food chain. During the coal combustion process, when both sampling and accurate measurements are challenging, we know that mercury is present in three species: elemental, oxidized and particulate. There are three basic types of mercury measurement methods: Ontario Hydro Method, mercury continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) and sorbent-based monitoring. Particulate mercury is best captured by electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Oxidized mercury is best captured in wet scrubbers. Elemental mercury is the most difficult to capture, but selective catalytic reduction units (SCRs) are able to convert elemental mercury to oxidized mercury allowing it to be captured by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This works well for eastern coals with high chlorine contents, but this does not work well on the Wyoming Powder River Basin (PRB) coals. However, no good explanation for its mechanism, correlations of chlorine content in coal with SCR performance, and impacts of higher chlorine content in coal on FGD re-emission are available. The combination of SCR and FGD affords more than an 80% reduction in mercury emissions in the case of high chlorine content coals. The mercury emission results from different coal ranks, boilers, and the air pollution control device (APCD) in power plant will be discussed. Based on this UAEPA new regulation, most power plants

  18. Combustion of peanut shells in a cone-shaped bubbling fluidized-bed combustor using alumina as the bed material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arromdee, Porametr; Kuprianov, Vladimir I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose burning of peanut shells in a conical fluidized bed using alumina sand. ► We examine hydrodynamic, combustion and emission characteristics of the reactor. ► High, over 99%, combustion efficiency is achievable. ► Emissions of CO and NO from the combustor meet the national emission limits. ► Composition of the bed material undergoes significant changes during the combustion. -- Abstract: This paper reports experimental studies on burning peanut shells in the conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the fluidizing agent. Prior to combustion tests, hydrodynamic regimes and characteristics of a conical alumina–biomass bed were investigated under cold-state conditions for variable percentage of peanut shells in the mixture and static bed height. With selected particle sizes (300–500 μm) and static bed height (30 cm), alumina ensured bubbling fluidization regime of the bed at operating conditions specified for firing biomass. Combustion tests were performed at 60 kg/h and 45 kg/h fuel feed rates, while ranging excess air from 20% to 80% at a fixed combustor load. Temperature and gas concentrations (O 2 , CO, C x H y as CH 4 , and NO) were measured along radial and axial directions inside the reactor as well as at stack in order to characterize combustion and emission performance of the combustor for the ranges of operating conditions. For firing 60 kg/h peanut shells, excess air of 40% can be selected as an appropriate value ensuring high, about 99%, combustion efficiency and rather low emissions of CO and NO: 520 ppm and 125 ppm, respectively (both on a dry basis and at 6% O 2 ). With reducing combustor load, the combustion efficiency and emission characteristics were improved to a little extent. No evidence of bed agglomeration was found during 30-h combustion tests on this conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the bed material. However, the timescale effect on the composition of the bed material was

  19. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M.

    1997-01-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  20. A Reduced Order Model for the Design of Oxy-Coal Combustion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Rowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-coal combustion is one of the more promising technologies currently under development for addressing the issues associated with greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. Oxy-coal combustion involves combusting the coal fuel in mixtures of pure oxygen and recycled flue gas (RFG consisting of mainly carbon dioxide (CO2. As a consequence, many researchers and power plant designers have turned to CFD simulations for the study and design of new oxy-coal combustion power plants, as well as refitting existing air-coal combustion facilities to oxy-coal combustion operations. While CFD is a powerful tool that can provide a vast amount of information, the simulations themselves can be quite expensive in terms of computational resources and time investment. As a remedy, a reduced order model (ROM for oxy-coal combustion has been developed to supplement the CFD simulations. With this model, it is possible to quickly estimate the average outlet temperature of combustion flue gases given a known set of mass flow rates of fuel and oxidant entering the power plant boiler as well as determine the required reactor inlet mass flow rates for a desired outlet temperature. Several cases have been examined with this model. The results compare quite favorably to full CFD simulation results.

  1. Soot, organics and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper is concerned with determining the effects of oxy-combustion of coal on the composition of the ultrafine fly ash. To this end, a 10 W externally heated entrained flow furnace was modified to allow the combustion of pulverized coal in flames under practically relevant s...

  2. Combustion behaviour of Sydney and Bowen Basin coals determined by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfell, K.E.; Beamish, B.B.; Rodgers, K.A.; Crosdale, P.J. [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Geology

    1996-08-01

    Assesses the suitability of thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) analysis techniques to characterise the combustion behaviour of Sydney and Bowen basin coals. Results indicate that the thermogravimetric technique is suitable for characterising the effects of rank, maceral, sub-maceral and seam variations on the combustion behaviour of these coals. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Environmental indicators of the combustion of prospective coal water slurry containing petrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Nyashina, Galina S; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2017-09-15

    Negative environmental impact of coal combustion has been known to humankind for a fairly long time. Sulfur and nitrogen oxides are considered the most dangerous anthropogenic emissions. A possible solution to this problem is replacing coal dust combustion with that of coal water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP). Coal processing wastes and used combustible liquids (oils, sludge, resins) are promising in terms of their economic and energy yield characteristics. However, no research has yet been conducted on the environmental indicators of fuels based on CWSP. The present work contains the findings of the research of CO, CO2, NOx, SOx emissions from the combustion of coals and CWSPs produced from coal processing waste (filter cakes). It is demonstrated for the first time that the concentrations of dangerous emissions from the combustion of CWSPs (carbon oxide and dioxide), even when combustible heavy liquid fractions are added, are not worse than those of coal. As for the concentration of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, it is significantly lower for CWSPs combustion as compared to coals. The presented research findings illustrate the prospects of the wide use of CWSPs as a fuel that is cheap and beneficial, in terms of both energy output and ecology, as compared to coal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies on nitrogen oxides (NOx and N2O) in pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the experimental studies of nitrogen oxide (NO, NO 2 , N 2 O) emissions in pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC). In the first part of the thesis the background and the objectives of this study are introduced. The second part summarizes the fundamental knowledge about the formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in coal combustion, particularly in the conditions of PFBC. The instrumentation of test facilities, measurement and data analysis is described in the third part. Then the most important experimental results follow in the next parts. The forth part describes the results from a PFBC test rig and an empirical modelling for predicting the emissions of NO x and N 2 O. Finally, the fundamental work on coal combustion and fuel nitrogen conversion in a PFBC batch reactor is presented. These studies clearly confirm the potential of PFBC technology in the control nitrogen of oxide emissions. The research in the test rig was concentrated on determining the effects of process parameters on the emissions of nitrogen oxides with different fuels. Another objective was to examine the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the control methods in PFBC conditions, including ammonia injection and air staging combustion for reducing NO, and high temperature operations for reducing N 2 0. The results indicate that pressurized operation suppresses the conversion of fuel-N to nitrogen oxides and favors with employing the reduction methods for further nitrogen oxide reduction, for instance the temperature window of NO reduction with ammonia injection has been found to be widened to even lower temperature range. Maximum reductions of 80-85 % with ammonia injection and 75-80 % with air staging combustion were achieved in the conditions examined. Considerably low emissions of N 2 O ( 2 O control, and thermal decomposition proved to be the laming pathway of N 2 O destruction in PFBC. In the examined pressure range, increasing pressure causes a decrease of NO

  5. Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) Extraction on Water Resources in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, David

    2017-04-01

    While extraction of methane from shale gas deposits has been the principal source of the recent expansion of the industry in the United States, in Australia extraction of methane from coal bed methane deposits (termed 'coal seam gas' in Australia) has been the focus to date. The two sources of methane share many of the same characteristics including the potential requirement for hydraulic fracturing. However, as coal seam gas deposits generally occur at shallower depths than shale gas, the potential impacts of extraction on surface and groundwater resources may be of even greater concern. In Australia, an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (IESC) has been established to provide scientific advice to federal and state government regulators on the impact that coal seam gas and large coal mining developments may have on water resources. This advice is provided to enable decisions to be informed by the best available science about the potential water-related impacts associated with these developments. To support this advice, the Australian Government Department of the Environment has implemented a programme of research termed 'bioregional assessments' to investigate these potential impacts. A bioregional assessment is defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are currently being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia underlain by coal reserves. Further details of the programme and results to date can be found at http://www.bioregionalassessments.gov.au. The bioregional assessment programme has modelled the impacts of coal seam gas development on surface and groundwater resources in three regions of eastern Australia, namely the Clarence-Moreton, Gloucester, and Namoi regions. This presentation will discuss the

  6. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia); Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat [Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Naser, Jamal, E-mail: jnaser@swin.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2016-07-12

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO{sub 2} emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can’t model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  7. The influence of fine char particles burnout on bed agglomeration during the fluidized bed combustion of a biomass fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Chirone, Riccardo [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy)

    2003-11-15

    The combustion of biomass char in a bubbling fluidized bed is hereby addressed, with specific reference to the influence that the combustion of fine char particles may exert on ash deposition and bed agglomeration phenomena. Experiments of steady fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of powdered biomass were carried out with the aim of mimicking the postcombustion of attrited char fines generated in the fluidized bed combustion of coarse char. Experimental results showed that the char elutriation rate is much smaller than expected on the basis of the average size of the biomass powder and of the carbon loading in the combustor. Samples of bed material collected after prolonged operation of the combustor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-EDX analysis and revealed the formation of relatively coarse sand-ash-carbon aggregates. The phenomenology is consistent with the establishment of a char phase attached to the bed material as a consequence of adhesion of char fines onto the sand particles. Combustion under sound-assisted fluidization conditions was also tested. As expected, enhancement of fines adhesion on bed material and further reduction of the elutriation rate were observed. Experimental results are interpreted in the light of a simple model which accounts for elutriation of free fines, adhesion of free fines onto bed material and detachment of attached fines by attrition of char-sand aggregates. Combustion of both free and attached char fines is considered. The parameters of the model are assessed on the basis of the measured carbon loadings and elutriation rates. Model computations are directed to estimate the effective size and the peak temperature of char-sand aggregates. The theoretical estimates of the effective aggregate size match fairly well those observed in the experiments.

  8. Effect of multiphase radiation on coal combustion in a pulverized coal jet flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bifen; Roy, Somesh P.; Zhao, Xinyu; Modest, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    The accurate modeling of coal combustion requires detailed radiative heat transfer models for both gaseous combustion products and solid coal particles. A multiphase Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) radiation solver is developed in this work to simulate a laboratory-scale pulverized coal flame. The MCRT solver considers radiative interactions between coal particles and three major combustion products (CO 2 , H 2 O, and CO). A line-by-line spectral database for the gas phase and a size-dependent nongray correlation for the solid phase are employed to account for the nongray effects. The flame structure is significantly altered by considering nongray radiation and the lift-off height of the flame increases by approximately 35%, compared to the simulation without radiation. Radiation is also found to affect the evolution of coal particles considerably as it takes over as the dominant mode of heat transfer for medium-to-large coal particles downstream of the flame. To investigate the respective effects of spectral models for the gas and solid phases, a Planck-mean-based gray gas model and a size-independent gray particle model are applied in a frozen-field analysis of a steady-state snapshot of the flame. The gray gas approximation considerably underestimates the radiative source terms for both the gas phase and the solid phase. The gray coal approximation also leads to under-prediction of the particle emission and absorption. However, the level of under-prediction is not as significant as that resulting from the employment of the gray gas model. Finally, the effect of the spectral property of ash on radiation is also investigated and found to be insignificant for the present target flame. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo–based nongray radiation solver is developed to study effects of radiation. • Radiation alters the lift-off height, and the distribution of temperature andspecies for the target flame. • Radiation alters the heat transfer mechanism of medium

  9. Influence of inorganic compounds on the combustion of coal. III. The effect of water of constitution of added compounds, moisture, and mineral matter in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newall, H F

    1939-01-01

    The effects on the combustion rate from excess moisture and the addition of selected inorganic substances to powdered coals were determined. The catalytic effect of 19 known inorganic ash constituents on combustion rates was also examined. Alumina and silica were found to inhibit combustion while ferric oxide accelerated it. Titanium, Ge, and B oxides, along with gypsum and calcium phosphate, decreased the rate of combusion, while Ca, Mg, Mn, and V oxides increased combustion rates. Although several of the ash constituents in coal directly affected combustion rates, the effect of adding them to the coal prior to combustion did not correlate with the effect of the mineral matter already in the coal.

  10. The synergistic effect in coal/biomass blend briquettes combustion on elements behavior in bottom ash using ICP-OES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaroiu, G.; Frentiu, T.; Maescu, L.; Mihaltan, A.; Ponta, M.; Frentiu, M.; Cordos, E. [Universitatea Politehnica din Bucuresti, Bucharest (Romania)

    2009-05-15

    This paper focuses on the study of the synergistic effect in coal/biomass blend briquettes combustion on behavior of Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co. Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Si, V, W, Zn, Zr and characterization of raw materials and bottom ashes. The manufacturing of coal/biomass briquettes although not commonly used is an attractive approach, as briquettes combustion is more technologically advantageous than the fluidized bed combustion. In the same time this technology is a way to render valuable materials of low calorific power and results in diminishing polluting emission. Raw materials and briquettes from different blends of pitcoal/sawdust were subjected to combustion in a 55 kW-boiler. The total content of elements after digestion in the HNO{sub 3} - HF mixture and the content in water leachate at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:2 were determined both in raw materials and bottom ash by ICP-OES. The total content of elements was higher in pitcoal than in sawdust. The synergistic effect depends both on coal/biomass ratio in blend and element nature. The water leachable fraction of elements from ash decreased along with the increase of sawdust weight excepting macronutrients (K, P) and Si.

  11. Next Generation Pressurized Oxy-Coal Combustion: High Efficiency and No Flue Gas Recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David

    2013-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has developed a pressurized oxy-coal fired molten bed boiler (MBB) concept, in which coal and oxygen are fired directly into a bed of molten coal slag through burners located on the bottom of the boiler and fired upward. Circulation of heat by the molten slag eliminates the need for a flue gas recirculation loop and provides excellent heat transfer to steam tubes in the boiler walls. Advantages of the MBB technology over other boilers include higher efficiency (from eliminating flue gas recirculation), a smaller and less expensive boiler, modular design leading to direct scalability, decreased fines carryover and handling costs, smaller exhaust duct size, and smaller emissions control equipment sizes. The objective of this project was to conduct techno-economic analyses and an engineering design of the MBB project and to support this work with thermodynamic analyses and oxy-coal burner testing. Techno-economic analyses of GTI’s pressurized oxy-coal fired MBB technology found that the overall plant with compressed CO2 has an efficiency of 31.6%. This is a significant increase over calculated 29.2% efficiency of first generation oxy-coal plants. Cost of electricity (COE) for the pressurized MBB supercritical steam power plant with CO2 capture and compression was calculated to be 134% of the COE for an air-coal supercritical steam power plant with no CO2 capture. This compares positively with a calculated COE for first generation oxy-coal supercritical steam power plants with CO2 capture and compression of 164%. The COE for the MBB power plant is found to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) target of 135%, before any plant optimization. The MBB power plant was also determined to be simpler than other oxy-coal power plants with a 17% lower capital cost. No other known combustion technology can produce higher efficiencies or lower COE when CO2 capture and compression are included. A thermodynamic enthalpy and exergy analysis

  12. Application of computer graphics to generate coal resources of the Cache coal bed, Recluse geologic model area, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G.B.; Crowley, S.S.; Carey, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Low-sulfur subbituminous coal resources have been calculated, using both manual and computer methods, for the Cache coal bed in the Recluse Model Area, which covers the White Tail Butte, Pitch Draw, Recluse, and Homestead Draw SW 7 1/2 minute quadrangles, Campbell County, Wyoming. Approximately 275 coal thickness measurements obtained from drill hole data are evenly distributed throughout the area. The Cache coal and associated beds are in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation. The depth from the surface to the Cache bed ranges from 269 to 1,257 feet. The thickness of the coal is as much as 31 feet, but in places the Cache coal bed is absent. Comparisons between hand-drawn and computer-generated isopach maps show minimal differences. Total coal resources calculated by computer show the bed to contain 2,316 million short tons or about 6.7 percent more than the hand-calculated figure of 2,160 million short tons.

  13. Low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion characteristics of upgraded low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.K.; Kim, S.D.; Yoo, J.H.; Chun, D.H.; Rhim, Y.J.; Lee, S.H. [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion characteristics of dried coal produced from low rank coal using the upgraded brown coal (UBC) process were investigated. To this end, proximate properties, crossing-point temperature (CPT), and isothermal oxidation characteristics of the coal were analyzed. The isothermal oxidation characteristics were estimated by considering the formation rates of CO and CO{sub 2} at low temperatures. The upgraded low rank coal had higher heating values than the raw coal. It also had less susceptibility to low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion. This seemed to result from the coating of the asphalt on the surface of the coal, which suppressed the active functional groups from reacting with oxygen in the air. The increasing upgrading pressure negatively affected the low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion.

  14. Recent advances in the use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Two major coal combustion problems are the formation and build-up of slag deposits on heat transfer surfaces and the production and control of toxic species in coal combustion emissions. The use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products can play a role in the better understanding of both these phenomena. An understanding of the chemical composition of such slags under boiler operating conditions and as a function of the mineral composition of various coals is one ultimate goal of this program. The principal constituents in the ash of many coals are the oxides of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, K, S, and Na. The analytical method required must be able to determine the functional forms of all these elements both in coal and in coal ash at elevated temperatures. One unique way of conducting these analyses is by x-ray spectroscopy.

  15. Combustion reactivity of chars from copyrolysis of coal with coke-oven gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Hongqiang; Sun Chenggong; Li Baoqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Conversion

    1997-12-31

    The combustion reactivity of char from pyrolysis of Xianfeng lignite with coke-oven gas (COG) is related to the pyrolysis pressure and heating rate. Decreasing pressure and increasing heating rate enhance the char yields and combustion reactivity. The combustion reactivities of char from coal pyrolysis with COG nearly reach to that of char from hydropyrolysis, but lower than those of char from coal pyrolysis under N{sub 2}. (orig.)

  16. Oxy-fuel combustion of millimeter-sized coal char: Particle temperatures and NO formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Navascués, Leyre Gómez; Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann

    2013-01-01

    In this work, differences in particle temperature and NO yield during char oxidation in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres, respectively, have been examined. A laboratory scale fixed bed reactor, operated isothermally at 1073 K, was used for combustion of millimeter-sized lignite and bituminous coal char...... increased with mass loading, by as much as 700 K above the furnace set point. The formation of NO from lignite char was not influenced by the change from N2 to CO2 whereas the NO yield from bituminous coal char was considerably lower in O2/CO2 compared O2/N2. For both chars the conversion to NO decreased...... as the O2 concentration or the particle size increased. However, for the bituminous coal char, a peak in NO yield was observed at an intermediate particle size of 0.1–0.2 g. The differences in the effect of gas atmosphere, O2 concentration, and particle mass on the NO yield from oxidation of bituminous...

  17. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O' Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the

  18. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  19. A depositional model for the Taylor coal bed, Martin and Johnson counties, eastern Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, W.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Evans, S.D.; Sirek, N.S.; Warrell, M.; Eble, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Taylor coal bed in Johnson and Martin counties, eastern Kentucky, using field and petrographic techniques to develop a depositional model of the coal bed. Petrography and chemistry of the coal bed were examined. Multiple benches of the Taylor coal bed were correlated over a 10 km distance. Three sites were studied in detail. The coal at the western and eastern sites were relatively thin and split by thick clastic partings. The coal at the central site was the thickest and unsplit. Two major clastic partings are included in the coal bed. Each represents a separate and distinct fluvial splay. The Taylor is interpreted to have developed on a coastal plain with periodic flooding from nearby, structurally-controlled fluvial systems. Doming is unlikely due to the petrographic and chemical trends, which are inconsistent with modern Indonesian models. The depositional history and structural and stratigraphic setting suggest contemporaneous structural influence on thickness and quality of the Taylor coal bed in this area.

  20. Sulphation of calcium-based sorbents in circulating fluidised beds under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayan; Margarita de las Obras-Loscertales; Aranzazu Rufas; Juan Adanez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. Energy and Environment

    2009-07-01

    Sulphur Retention (SR) by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. In circulating fluidised beds combustors (CFBC's) operating under oxy-fuel conditions, the sulphation process takes place in atmospheres enriched in CO{sub 2} with bed concentrations that can vary from 40 to 95%. Under so high CO{sub 2} concentrations, very different from that in conventional coal combustion atmosphere with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to optimise the SR process in the combustor. The objective of this work was to determine the SO{sub 2} retention capacity of a Spanish limestone at typical oxy-fuel conditions in CFBC's. Long term duration tests of sulphation (up to 24 h), to simulate the residence time of sorbents in CFBC's, were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Clear behaviour differences were found under calcining and non-calcining conditions. Especially relevant was the result obtained at calcining conditions but close to the thermodynamic temperature given for sorbent calcination. This situation must be avoided in CFBC's because the CO{sub 2} produced inside the particle during calcination can destroy the particles if a non-porous sulphate product layer has been formed around the particle. The effect of the main variables on the sorbent sulphation such as SO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and particle size were analysed in the long term TGA tests. These data were also used to determine the kinetic parameters for the sulphation under oxy-fuel combustion conditions, which were able to adequately predict the sulphation conversion values in a wide range of operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Dioxin emissions from coal combustion in domestic stove: Formation in the chimney and coal chlorine content influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradiz Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion experiments conducted in domestic stove burning hard coal demonstrated a predominant influence of the coal chlorine content on the PCDD/F emissions, together with a pronounced effect of the flue gas temperature. PCDD/F concentrations of over 100 ng TEQ/m3, three orders of magnitude higher than in a modern waste incinerator, were measured in the flue gases of a domestic stove when combusting high chlorine coal (0.31 %. The PCDD/F concentrations in the flue gases dropped below 0,5 ng TEQ/m3, when low chlorine coal (0.07 % was used. When low chlorine coal was impregnated with NaCl to obtain 0.38 % chlorine content, the emission of the PCDD/Fs increased by two orders of magnitude. Pronounced nonlinearity of the PCDD/F concentrations related to chlorine content in the coal was observed. The combustion of the high chlorine coal yielded PCDD/F concentrations in flue gases one order of magnitude lower in a fan cooled chimney when compared to an insulated one, thus indicating formation in the chimney. The influence of flue gas temperature on the PCDD/F emissions was less pronounced when burning low chlorine coal. The predominant pathway of the PCDD/F emissions is via flue gases, 99 % of the TEQ in the case of the high chlorine coal for insulated chimney.

  2. Brazilian experience on fluidized bed combustion; Experiencia brasileira em leito fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazan, David Turik [CIENTEC, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1988-12-31

    The aim of this work is to outline the evolution of the development of fluidized combustion in the main institutions which uses fluidized combustion of coal and other fossil fuels, industrial and agricultural wastes and biomass at industrial level in Brazil. (author) 1 fig.

  3. Importance of fragmentation on the steady state combustion of wood char in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, Carlos [Universidade do Porto (CEFT/FEUP), Porto (Portugal). Faculdade de Engenharia. Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte], E-mail: ctp@fe.up.pt

    2010-07-01

    A simple mathematical model for the analysis of the steady state behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed burner is presented, with the main intention of evaluating the importance of the primary fragmentation of fuel particles on the performance of this type of burners. This model has pedagogical advantages because of its simplicity and easiness of application to the analysis of realistic situations. The model is based upon the classical models used for the study of batch combustion processes in fluidized bed reactors. Experimental data from studies of fluidized bed combustion of portuguese vegetable chars are used to support the analysis of the performance of a 1 m diameter fluidized bed combustor. (author)

  4. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications. PMID:28788372

  5. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-10-31

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  6. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  7. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    The state of the art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems is examined. The instrumentation types studied include thermocouples, radiation pyrometers, and acoustical thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. A feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry is described. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible.

  8. Combustion Characteristics Of Agricultural Waste-Coal Char Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpabio, I. O; Danbature W

    2002-01-01

    Shortage of petroleum products, depletion of huge forest reserves for fuel purposes with its attendant erosion problems and other environmental considerations have necessitated investigations into other sources of fuel. In this wise. a set of seven types of briquettes were prepared from agricultural wastes such as rice husk, maize husk and saw-dust and blends of carbonized coal char. Strong and well-formed briquettes with good combustion characteristics were obtained. The results obtained from water boiling tests show that 2 litres of water could be boiled just under 23 minutes. Moisture contents and strengths of these briquettes were also determined and are discussed. The results show that wastes could be converted into useful fuel

  9. Studies of MHD generator performance with oxygen enriched coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Kolb, C. E.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    1980-07-01

    This paper presents calculations made using the Aerodyne PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics, and Generator Efficiency) computer code which bear on two questions which arise in connection with choices between oxygen enrichment and air preheating to attain the high combustion temperatures needed for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generation. The first question is which method produces the highest enthalpy extraction per unit channel length. The second is, in test facilities intended to study tradeoffs between oxygen enrichment and preheated air, can good generator performance be obtained from the same physical channel for different combustor compositions. The answer to the first question is found to depend on what combustor conditions are taken to be comparable. As for the second question, it is found that operation with channel input from off-design combustor conditions can cause serious problems, which can be partially alleviated by changing the channel load factors.

  10. Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

  11. The development of clean coal technology is the main way to control of atmospheric pollution in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Lixin; Xu Hong [Clean Coal Engineering & Research Center of Coal Industry (China)

    1999-11-01

    Atmospheric pollution in China and its causes are analysed. Power stations, industrial boilers and kilns and domestic coal combustion are the main pollution sources. Clean coal technologies are urgently needed. Main clean coal technologies which can improve the present situation of industrial coal combustion are coal cleaning, blending and briquetting; boiler retrofitting; advanced technologies to improve combustion efficiency and reduce pollution - fluidized bed combustion and pulverized coal desulfurization; and advanced desulfurization and dedusting technologies and equipment.

  12. 3D Geological Modeling of CoalBed Methane (CBM) Resources in the Taldykuduk Block Karaganda Coal Basin, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Raman; Kiponievich Ogay, Evgeniy; Royer, Jean-Jacques; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Panfilova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Coal Bed Methane (CBM) is gas stored in coal layers. It can be extracted from wells after hydraulic fracturing and/or solvent injection, and secondary recovery techniques such as CO2 injection. Karaganda Basin is a very favorable candidate region to develop CBM production for the following reasons: (i) Huge gas potential; (ii) Available technologies for extracting and commercializing the gas produced by CBM methods; (iii) Experience in degassing during underground mining operations for safety reasons; (iv) Local needs in energy for producing electricity for the industrial and domestic market. The objectives of this work are to model the Taldykuduk block coal layers and their properties focusing on Coal Bed Methane production. It is motivated by the availability of large coal bed methane resources in Karaganda coal basin which includes 4 300 Bm3 equivalent 2 billion tons of coal (B = billion = 109) with gas content 15-25 m3/t of coal (for comparison San Juan basin (USA) has production in a double porosity model considering two domains: the matrix (m) and the fracture (f) for which the initial and boundary conditions are different. The resulting comprehensive 3D models had helped in better understanding the tectonic structures of the region, especially the relationships between the fault systems.

  13. Drying kinetics characteristic of Indonesia lignite coal (IBC) using lab scale fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, TaeJin; Jeon, DoMan; Namkung, Hueon; Jang, DongHa; Jeon, Youngshin; Kim, Hyungtaek [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Energy Systems Research

    2013-07-01

    Recent instability of energy market arouse a lot of interest about coal which has a tremendous amount of proven coal reserves worldwide. South Korea hold the second rank by importing 80 million tons of coal in 2007 following by Japan. Among various coals, there is disused coal. It's called Low Rank Coal (LRC). Drying process has to be preceded before being utilized as power plant. In this study, drying kinetics of LRC is induced by using a fixed bed reactor. The drying kinetics was deduced from particle size, the inlet gas temperature, the drying time, the gas velocity, and the L/D ratio. The consideration on Reynold's number was taken for correction of gas velocity, particle size, and the L/D ratio was taken for correction packing height of coal. It can be found that active drying of free water and phase boundary reaction is suitable mechanism through the fixed bed reactor experiments.

  14. Characterization of products of combustion of mineral coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, H.S.; Albuquerque, J. S. V.; Sales, J.C.; Nogueira, R.E.F.Q.

    2011-01-01

    During the burning of coal in power plants, various types of waste or by products are generated. These materials have been the subject of several studies. They contain ashes and have many technological applications, such as in the production of various types of ceramic pieces. The objective of this work was to study the feasibility of adding the coal combustion products as filler for ceramics. X-ray fluorescence analysis was used to identify and quantify the proportions of the elements contained in the sample and x-ray diffraction to identify the phases present. The analysis by X-ray diffraction revealed a diffraction pattern of silicon sulfide, calcium silicate and sulfide phases of Aluminium, Potassium and Titanium. X-ray fluorescence analysis showed silica (37.14%), calcium (21.86%), aluminum (14.69%) and sulfur (8.70%). These results show characteristics of materials with potential for incorporation in ceramic bodies, provided that some processing is done to eliminate the sulfur. (author)

  15. Ash related bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion, further development of the classification method based on CCSEM; CCSEM-luokitusmenetelmaen jatkokehittaeminen tuhkan aiheuttaman agglomeroitumisen tutkimisessa leiju- ja kiertopetipoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, R; Patrikainen, T; Heikkinen, R; Tiainen, M; Virtanen, M [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Inst. of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The scope of this project is to use the information and experience gained from the development of classification method to predict ash related problems like bed agglomeration during fluidised combustion. If boilers have to be shut down due to slagging or agglomeration of the bed material may cause significant economic losses for the entire energy production chain. Mineral classification methods based on the scanning electron microscopy are commonly used for coal ash investigation. In this work different biomass, peat, and peat-wood ash, fluidised-bed materials, and bed agglomerates were analysed with SEM-EDS combined with automatic image analysis software. The properties of ash particles are different depending on the fuel type. If biomass like wood or bark are added to peat the resulting ash has different properties. Due to the low mineral content in the original peat and to the fact that the majority of inorganic material is bound to the organic matrix, the classification has turned out to be less informative than was hoped. However, good results are obtained the by use of quasiternary diagrams. With these diagrams the distribution of particle composition is easily illustrated and thus meaningful prediction can be made of the slagging and agglomerating properties of ash. The content of ten different elements are determined for each particle by SEM-EDS combined with Link AIA software. The composition of the diagram corners can be varied Freely within these ten elements. (orig.)

  16. Mercury emissions from coal combustion in Silesia, analysis using geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasina, Damian; Zawadzki, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    Data provided by the UNEP's report on mercury [1] shows that solid fuel combustion in significant source of mercury emission to air. Silesia, located in southwestern Poland, is notably affected by mercury emission due to being one of the most industrialized Polish regions: the place of coal mining, production of metals, stone mining, mineral quarrying and chemical industry. Moreover, Silesia is the region with high population density. People are exposed to severe risk of mercury emitted from both: industrial and domestic sources (i.e. small household furnaces). Small sources have significant contribution to total emission of mercury. Official and statistical analysis, including prepared for international purposes [2] did not provide data about spatial distribution of the mercury emitted to air, however number of analysis on Polish public power and energy sector had been prepared so far [3; 4]. The distribution of locations exposed for mercury emission from small domestic sources is interesting matter merging information from various sources: statistical, economical and environmental. This paper presents geostatistical approach to distibution of mercury emission from coal combustion. Analysed data organized in 2 independent levels: individual, bottom-up approach derived from national emission reporting system [5; 6] and top down - regional data calculated basing on official statistics [7]. Analysis, that will be presented, will include comparison of spatial distributions of mercury emission using data derived from sources mentioned above. Investigation will include three voivodeships of Poland: Lower Silesian, Opole (voivodeship) and Silesian using selected geostatistical methodologies including ordinary kriging [8]. References [1] UNEP. Global Mercury Assessment 2013: Sources, Emissions, Releases and Environmental Transport. UNEP Chemicals Branch, Geneva, Switzerland, 2013. [2] NCEM. Poland's Informative Inventory Report 2014. NCEM at the IEP-NRI, 2014. http

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of coal and carbon dioxide derived from laboratory coal combustion: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Peter D.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has dramatically increased from the start of the industrial revolution in the mid-1700s to present levels exceeding 400 ppm. Carbon dioxide derived from fossil fuel combustion is a greenhouse gas and a major contributor to on-going climate change. Carbon and oxygen stable isotope geochemistry is a useful tool to help model and predict the contributions of anthropogenic sources of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. Surprisingly few studies have addressed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 derived from coal combustion. The goal of this study is to document the relationships between the carbon and oxygen isotope signatures of coal and signatures of the CO2 produced from laboratory coal combustion in atmospheric conditions.Six coal samples were selected that represent various geologic ages (Carboniferous to Tertiary) and coal ranks (lignite to bituminous). Duplicate splits of the six coal samples were ignited and partially combusted in the laboratory at atmospheric conditions. The resulting coal-combustion gases were collected and the molecular composition of the collected gases and isotopic analyses of δ13C of CO2, δ13C of CH4, and δ18O of CO2 were analysed by a commercial laboratory. Splits (~ 1 g) of the un-combusted dried ground coal samples were analyzed for δ13C and δ18O by the U.S. Geological Survey Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory.The major findings of this preliminary work indicate that the isotopic signatures of δ13C (relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite scale, VPDB) of CO2 resulting from coal combustion are similar to the δ13CVPDB signature of the bulk coal (− 28.46 to − 23.86 ‰) and are not similar to atmospheric δ13CVPDB of CO2 (~ − 8 ‰, see http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/outreach/isotopes/c13tellsus.html). The δ18O values of bulk coal are strongly correlated to the coal dry ash yields and appear to have little or no influence on the δ18O values of CO2

  18. Factors affecting the amounts of emissions arising from fluidized bed combustion of solid fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbaj, P.

    1996-01-01

    The factors affecting the amounts of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulfur oxides (SO x , i.e. SO 2 + SO 3 ) formed during fluidized bed combustion of fossil fuels are analyzed using both theoretical concepts and experimental data. The factors treated include temperature, excess air, fuel parameters, pressure, degree of combustion gas recycling, combustion distribution along the combustion chamber height, and sulfur trapping processes for NO x , and the Ca/S ratio, fluidized layer height and fluidization rate, granulometry and absorbent type, fluidized layer temperature, and pressure during combustion for SO x . It is concluded that fluidized bed boilers are promising power generating facilities, mitigating the environmental burden arising from fossil fuel combustion. (P.A.). 12 figs., 9 refs

  19. Aqueous clay suspensions stabilized by alginate fluid gels for coal spontaneous combustion prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Botao; Ma, Dong; Li, Fanglei; Li, Yong

    2017-11-01

    We have developed aqueous clay suspensions stabilized by alginate fluid gels (AFG) for coal spontaneous combustion prevention and control. Specially, this study aimed to characterize the effect of AFG on the microstructure, static and dynamic stability, and coal fire inhibition performances of the prepared AFG-stabilized clay suspensions. Compared with aqueous clay suspensions, the AFG-stabilized clay suspensions manifest high static and dynamic stability, which can be ascribed to the formation of a robust three-dimensional gel network by AFG. The coal acceleration oxidation experimental results show that the prepared AFG-stabilized clay suspensions can improve the coal thermal stability and effectively inhibit the coal spontaneous oxidation process by increasing crossing point temperature (CPT) and reducing CO emission. The prepared low-cost and nontoxic AFG-stabilized clay suspensions, exhibiting excellent coal fire extinguishing performances, indicate great application potentials in coal spontaneous combustion prevention and control.

  20. A comparison of spontaneous combustion susceptibility of coal from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the CPT of Onyeama coal and Owukpa coal is identical to each other as they are the sub-bituminous, Owukpa coal has a lower initial oxidation temperature (IOT) and maximum oxidation temperature (MOT) than those of Onyeama coal. This means that although each coal has the same rank and CPT, spontaneous ...

  1. Low temperature combustion of organic coal-water fuel droplets containing petrochemicals while soaring in a combustion chamber model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the integral characteristics (minimum temperature, ignition delay times of stable combustion initiation of organic coal-water fuel droplets (initial radius is 0.3-1.5 mm in the oxidizer flow (the temperature and velocity varied in ranges 500-900 K, 0.5-3 m/s. The main components of organic coal-water fuel were: brown coal particles, filter-cakes obtained in coal processing, waste engine, and turbine oils. The different modes of soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel have been established. The conditions have been set under which it is possible to implement the sustainable soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel droplets. We have compared the ignition characteristics with those defined in the traditional approach (based on placing the droplets on a low-inertia thermocouple junction into the combustion chamber. The paper shows the scale of the influence of heat sink over the thermocouple junction on ignition inertia. An original technique for releasing organic coal-water fuel droplets to the combustion chamber was proposed and tested. The limitations of this technique and the prospects of experimental results for the optimization of energy equipment operation were also formulated.

  2. Agglomeration mechanism in biomass fluidized bed combustion – Reaction between potassium carbonate and silica sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anicic, Bozidar; Lin, Weigang; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Agglomeration is one of the operational problems in fluidized bed combustion of biomass, which is caused by interaction between bed materials (e.g. silica sand) and the biomass ash with a high content of potassium species. However, the contribution of different potassium species to agglomeration ...

  3. The influence of transport phenomena on the fluidized bed combustion of a single carbon particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1990-01-01

    The burning rate and temperature of the carbon particles are known to affect the efficiency of a fluidized bed combustor, and also the emission levels of undesired noxious components. The main results of an extensive study on the fluidized bed combustion behaviour of a single carbon particle [1] are

  4. Coal char combustion under a CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere: Implications for pulverized coal injection in a blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego, A.G.; Casal, M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC. P.O. Box 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Osorio, E.; Vilela, A.C.F. [Laboratorio de Siderurgia, DEMET/PPGEM - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. P.O. Box 15021, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) is employed in blast furnace tuyeres attempting to maximize the injection rate without increasing the amount of unburned char inside the stack of the blast furnace. When coal is injected with air through the injection lance, the resolidified char will burn in an atmosphere with a progressively lower oxygen content and higher CO{sub 2} concentration. In this study an experimental approach was followed to separate the combustion process into two distinct devolatilization and combustion steps. Initially coal was injected into a drop tube furnace (DTF) operating at 1300 C in an atmosphere with a low oxygen concentration to ensure the combustion of volatiles and prevent the formation of soot. Then the char was refired into the DTF at the same temperature under two different atmospheres O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (typical combustion) and O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} (oxy-combustion) with the same oxygen concentration. Coal injection was also performed under a higher oxygen concentration in atmospheres typical for both combustion and oxy-combustion. The fuels tested comprised a petroleum coke and coals currently used for PCI injection ranging from high volatile to low volatile bituminous rank. Thermogravimetric analyses and microscopy techniques were used to establish the reactivity and appearance of the chars. Overall similar burnouts were achieved with N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} for similar oxygen concentrations and therefore no loss in burnout should be expected as a result of enrichment in CO{sub 2} in the blast furnace gas. The advantage of increasing the amount of oxygen in a reacting atmosphere during burnout was found to be greater, the higher the rank of the coal. (author)

  5. The research and development of pressurized ash agglomerating fluidized bed coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Yitian; Wu Jinhu; Chen Hanshi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

    1999-11-01

    Coal gasification tests in a pressurized ash agglomeration fluidized bed coal gasifier were carried out. The effects of pressure and temperature on the gasification capacity, carbon conversion, carbon content in discharged ash and gas composition were investigated. Gasification capacity was shown to be in direct proportion to operation pressure. Tests of hot gas dedusting using a moving granular bed were also carried out. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  7. Coal Combustion Residual Beneficial Use Evaluation: Fly Ash Concrete and FGD Gypsum Wallboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains documents related to the evaluation of coal combustion residual beneficial use of fly ash concrete and FGD gypsum wallboard including the evaluation itself and the accompanying appendices

  8. Research on preventive technologies for bed-separation water hazard in China coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Herong; Tong, Shijie; Qiu, Weizhong; Lin, Manli

    2018-03-01

    Bed-separation water is one of the major water hazards in coal mines. Targeted researches on the preventive technologies are of paramount importance to safe mining. This article studied the restrictive effect of geological and mining factors, such as lithological properties of roof strata, coal seam inclination, water source to bed separations, roof management method, dimensions of mining working face, and mining progress, on the formation of bed-separation water hazard. The key techniques to prevent bed-separation water-related accidents include interception, diversion, destructing the buffer layer, grouting and backfilling, etc. The operation and efficiency of each technique are corroborated in field engineering cases. The results of this study will offer reference to countries with similar mining conditions in the researches on bed-separation water burst and hazard control in coal mines.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of flow and combustion for pulverised coal injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.Y.; Zulli, P.; Rogers, H.; Mathieson, J.G.; Yu, A.B. [BlueScope Steel Research, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of pulverised coal injection has been developed for simulating coal flow and combustion in the tuyere and raceway of a blast furnace. The model has been used to simulate previously reported combustion tests, which feature an inclined co-axial lance with an annular cooling gas. The predicted coal burnout agrees well with that measured for three coals with volatile contents and particle size ranging between 20.2-36.4% and particle sizes 1-200 {mu}m. Many important phenomena including flow asymmetry, recirculating flow and particle dispersion in the combustion chamber have been predicted. The current model can reproduce the experimental observations including the effects on burnout of coal flowrate and the introduction of methane for lance cooling.

  10. Avoidable and unavoidable exergy destructions of a fluidized bed coal combustor and a heat recovery steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callak, Meliha; Balkan, Firuz; Hepbasli, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Performing advanced exergy analysis of a fluidized-bed combustion for the first time. • Comparing conventional and modified exergy efficiencies of the subsystems. • Deducting inefficiencies of the system components for possible improvements. - Abstract: Advanced exergy analysis was performed using the actual operational data taken from a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBCC) and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) in a textile plant located at Torbalı, Izmir. First, the conventional exergy analysis of the units was carried out. The exergetic efficiencies of the units were found to be 44.2% and 46.2%, respectively. Advanced exergy analysis was then performed by splitting the exergy destructions of the units into avoidable and unavoidable parts. The avoidable exergy destruction rates of the FBCC and the HRSG were determined to be 2999 kW and 760 kW according to the measurements. Correspondingly, the exergy efficiencies were modified to 53.1% and 48.1%, respectively

  11. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Aixa; Navia, Rodrigo; Moreno, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  12. Distribution of volatile sulphur containing products during fixed bed pyrolysis and gasification of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1991-08-01

    Various coals were used to study the evolution of H{sub 2}S COS, and SO{sub 2} in a fixed bed reactor. For all types of coal, most of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} were released during the devolatilization stage. COS was formed only during the gasification stage in the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  13. Coal-bed methane water effects on dill and essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic way of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as coal-bed methane water (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In past 25 years, th...

  14. Effect of resinite on the combustion of New Zealand subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfell, K.E.; Beamish, B.B.; Rodgers, K.A. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Geology

    1997-09-01

    This paper shows that Oligocene resin from New Zealand`s Rotowaro coalfield displays DTA and DTG traces similar to those of other fossil resins. It modifies the thermal behaviour of low rank coal raising the peak combustion temperature and lowering its rate of combustion; this behaviour may be common among liptinite macerals. The effect is not additive and unlike other coal constituents the resinite component does not deteriorate with time.

  15. Coal. Fluidized bed, a world record; Charbon. Lit fluidise: record mondial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    In April 1996, the `Societe Provencale du Lit Fluidise`, a subsidiary of Electricite de France (EDF) has put into service in Gardanne, the most powerful circulating fluidized bed boiler in the world, producing 600 MWt; it was constructed by GEC Alsthom Stein Industrie, and will strongly reduce the SO{sub 2} emissions from the coal power plant of Gardanne, which use a highly sulfurous coal. New regulations concerning the French coal industry are also introduced

  16. Coal. Fluidized bed, a world record; Charbon. Lit fluidise: record mondial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    In April 1996, the `Societe Provencale du Lit Fluidise`, a subsidiary of Electricite de France (EDF) has put into service in Gardanne, the most powerful circulating fluidized bed boiler in the world, producing 600 MWt; it was constructed by GEC Alsthom Stein Industrie, and will strongly reduce the SO{sub 2} emissions from the coal power plant of Gardanne, which use a highly sulfurous coal. New regulations concerning the French coal industry are also introduced

  17. Experimental studies on combustion of composite biomass pellets in fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feihong; Zhong, Zhaoping

    2017-12-01

    This work presents studies on the combustion of Composite Biomass Pellets (CBP S ) in fluidized bed using bauxite particles as the bed material. Prior to the combustion experiment, cold-flow characterization and thermogravimetric analysis are performed to investigate the effect of air velocity and combustion mechanism of CBP S . The cold-state test shows that CBPs and bauxite particles fluidize well in the fluidized bed. However, because of the presence of large CBPs, optimization of the fluidization velocity is rather challenging. CBPs can gather at the bottom of the fluidized bed at lower gas velocities. On the contrary, when the velocity is too high, they accumulate in the upper section of the fluidized bed. The suitable fluidization velocity for the system in this study was found to be between 1.5-2.0m/s. At the same time, it is found that the critical fluidization velocity and the pressure fluctuation of the two-component system increase with the increase of CBPs mass concentration. The thermogravimetric experiment verifies that the combustion of CBPs is a first-order reaction, and it is divided into three stages: (i) dehydration, (ii) release and combustion of the volatile and (iii) the coke combustion. The combustion of CBPs is mainly based on the stage of volatile combustion, and its activation energy is greater than that of char combustion. During the combustion test, CBP S are burned at a 10kg/h feed rate, while the excess air is varied from 25% to 100%. Temperatures of the bed and flue gas concentrations (O 2 , CO, SO 2 and NO) are recorded. CBPs can be burnt stably, and the temperature of dense phase is maintained at 765-780°C. With the increase of the air velocity, the main combustion region has a tendency to move up. While the combustion is stable, O 2 and CO 2 concentrations are maintained at about 7%, and 12%, respectively. The concentration of SO 2 in the flue gas after the initial stage of combustion is nearly zero. Furthermore, NO concentration

  18. Fluidized combustion of beds of large, dense particles in reprocessing HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1977-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of graphite fuel elements and carbon external to fuel particles is required in reprocessing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) cores for recovery of uranium. This burning process requires combustion of beds containing both large particles and very dense particles as well as combustion of fine graphite particles which elutriate from the bed. Equipment must be designed for optimum simplicity and reliability as ultimate operation will occur in a limited access ''hot cell'' environment. Results reported in this paper indicate that successful long-term operation of fuel element burning with complete combustion of all graphite fines leading to a fuel particle product containing <1% external carbon can be performed on equipment developed in this program

  19. Inhibition Effect of Phosphorus Flame Retardants on the Fire Disasters Induced by Spontaneous Combustion of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal spontaneous combustion (CSC generally induces fire disasters in underground mines, thus causing serious casualties, environmental pollution, and property loss around the world. By using six P-containing additives to process three typical coal samples, this study investigated the variations of the self-ignition characteristics of the coal samples before and after treatment. The analysis was performed by combining thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR and low temperature oxidation. Experimental results showed that P-containing inhibitors could effectively restrain the heat emitted in the combustion of coal samples and therefore the ignition temperature of the coal samples was delayed at varying degrees. The combustion rate of the coal samples was reduced as well. At the temperatures ranging from 50°C to 150°C, the activation energy of the coal samples after the treatment was found to increase, which indicated that the coal samples were more difficult to be oxidized. After being treated with phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs, the content of several active groups represented by the C-O structure in the three coal samples was proved to be obviously changed. This suggested that PFRs could significantly inhibit the content of CO generated by the low temperature oxidation of coal, and the flame-retardant efficiency grew with the increasing temperature. At 200°C, the maximal inhibition efficiency reached approximately 85%.

  20. Predictions of the impurities in the CO2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Shao, Yingjuan

    2010-01-01

    Whilst all three main carbon capture technologies (post-combustion, pre-combustion and oxy-fuel combustion) can produce a CO 2 dominant stream, other impurities are expected to be present in the CO 2 stream. The impurities in the CO 2 stream can adversely affect other processes of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) chain including the purification, compression, transportation and storage of the CO 2 stream. Both the nature and the concentrations of potential impurities expected to be present in the CO 2 stream of a CCS-integrated power plant depend on not only the type of the power plant but also the carbon capture method used. The present paper focuses on the predictions of impurities expected to be present in the CO 2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant. The main gaseous impurities of the CO 2 stream of oxy-coal combustion are N 2 /Ar, O 2 and H 2 O. Even the air ingress to the boiler and its auxiliaries is small enough to be neglected, the N 2 /Ar concentration of the CO 2 stream can vary between ca. 1% and 6%, mainly depending on the O 2 purity of the air separation unit, and the O 2 concentration can vary between ca. 3% and 5%, mainly depending on the combustion stoichiometry of the boiler. The H 2 O concentration of the CO 2 stream can vary from ca. 10% to over 40%, mainly depending on the fuel moisture and the partitioning of recycling flue gas (RFG) between wet-RFG and dry-RFG. NO x and SO 2 are the two main polluting impurities of the CO 2 stream of an oxy-coal combustion plant and their concentrations are expected to be well above those found in the flue gas of an air-coal combustion plant. The concentration of NO x in the flue gas of an oxy-coal combustion plant can be up to ca. two times to that of an equivalent air-coal combustion plant. The amount of NO x emitted by the oxy-coal combustion plant, however, is expected to be much smaller than that of the air-coal combustion plant. The reductions of the recirculated NO x within the combustion

  1. Evaluation of coal combustion byproducts as soil liming materials - their influence on soil pH and enzyme activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, G W; Siddaramappa, R; Wright, R J; Codling, E E; Gao, G

    1994-03-01

    To evaluate coal combustion byproducts as liming materials and address issues related to soil quality, the authors compared the influence of different amounts of four combustion byproducts (fly ash and bed ash from a fluidized bed combustion furnace, lime-injected multistage burner residue, and spray dryer residue) and CaCO[sub 3] on soil pH and activities of urease, phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and dehydrogenase in an acidic soil. Studies comparing the influence of the combustion byproducts and CaCO[sub 3] on soil pH showed that on weight basis of application, substantial differences were observed in the ability of these materials to influence soil pH but that such differences decreased markedly after the data were transformed to a CaCO[sub 3] equivalent basis of application. Analysis of covariance for these transformed data indicated that whereas the liming abilities of fly ash and CaCO[sub 3] were not significantly different when compared on the CaCO[sub 3] equivalent basis, those of bed ash, multistage burner residue, and spray dryer residue were less than that of CaCO[sub 3]. Studies comparing the influence of the byproducts and CaCO[sub 3] on soil enzyme activities showed that the effect of these liming materials on the enzyme activities studied was largely due to their influence on soil pH. These studies showed that the combustion byproducts tested functioned as soil liming materials in a manner similar to that of CaCO[sub 3] and seemed to have little adverse effect on soil quality.

  2. Volatiles combustion in fluidized beds. Final technical report, 4 September 1992--4 June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, R.A. II; Raffensperger, C.; Hesketh, R.P.

    1996-02-29

    The goal of this project is to investigate the conditions in which volatiles will burn within both the dense and freeboard regions of fluidized beds. Experiments using a fluidized bed operated at incipient fluidization are being conducted to characterize the effect of particle surface area, initial fuel concentration, and particle type on the inhibition of volatiles within a fluidized bed. A review of the work conducted under this grant is presented in this Final Technical Report. Both experimental and theoretical work have been conducted to examine the inhibition of the combustion by the fluidized bed material, sand. It has been shown that particulate phase at incipient fluidization inhibits the combustion of propane by free radical destruction at the surface of sand particles within the particulate phase. The implications of these findings is that at bed temperatures lower than the critical temperatures, gas combustion can only occur in the bubble phase or at the top surface of a bubbling fluidized bed. In modeling fluidized bed combustion this inhibition by the particulate phase should be included.

  3. Coal facies evolution of the main minable coal-bed in the Heidaigou Mine, Jungar Coalfield, Inner Mongolia, northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, S.F.; Ren, D.Y.; Li, S.S.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

    2007-11-15

    The No. 6 Coal-bed from the Heidaigou Mine, Jungar Coalfield, Inner Mongolia is a super-large Ga deposit. The dominant carrier of Ga is boehmite in coal. The study of coal facies may provide genetic enrichment information of Ga and its carrier (boehmite) in the Ga deposit. On the basis of study on coal petrology and mineralogy, it was found that the No. 6 Coal-bed from the Heidaigou Mine of Jungar was enriched in inertinites and the microlithotypes were dominated by clarodurite. The maceral morphological features and association indicate that the coal-bed was formed in a dry sedimentary environment or in a periodic dry sedimentary environment caused by the alternating variations of groundwater level. The optimum conditions for the enrichment of Ga and its particular carrier (boehmite) were dominated by four transitional conditions: (1) the upper delta plain which was the transitional zone between alluvial and lower delta plains, (2) the transitional zone between the dry and wet forest swamps, being slightly apt to the dry one, (3) the transitional tree density between the thick and loose ones, and (4) the low moor that was the transitional zone between two high moors during peat accumulation.

  4. Reprint of “Experiences in sulphur capture in a 30 MWth Circulating Fluidized Bed boiler under oxy-combustion conditions”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, M.; Fernández, A.; Llavona, I.; Kuivalainen, R.

    2015-01-01

    CO 2 and SO 2 from fossil fuel combustion are contributors to greenhouse effect and acid rain respectively. Oxy-combustion technology produces a highly concentrated CO 2 stream almost ready for capture. Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler technology allows in-situ injection of calcium-based sorbents for efficient SO 2 capture. CIUDEN's 30 MWth CFB boiler, supplied by Foster Wheeler and located at the Technology Development Centre for CO 2 Capture and Transport (es.CO 2 ) in Spain, is the first of its kind for executing test runs at large pilot scale under both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions. In this work, SO 2 emissions under different scenarios have been evaluated. Variables such as limestone composition, Ca/S molar ratio and bed temperature among others have been considered along different test runs in both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions to analyse its influence on SO 2 abatement. Fly and bottom ash, together with flue gas analysis have been carried-out. Desulphurization performance tests results are presented. - Highlights: • Sulphur capture efficiency (%) was higher in oxy-combustion compared to air-combustion in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. • For a Ca/S molar ratio higher than 2.6 there was barely any improvement on sulphur capture efficiency for both air-combustion and oxy-combustion conditions in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler using anthracite and limestone as sulphur sorbent. • Optimum temperature for sulphur capture at a fixed Ca/S molar ratio is around 880–890 °C under oxy-combustion conditions and for anthracite coal with limestone as sorbent in a 30 MW thermal CFB boiler

  5. In Developping a Bench-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor to Burn High Ash Brazilian Coal-Dolomites Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Behainne, Jhon Jairo; Hory, Rogério Ishikawa; Goldstein, Leonardo; Bernárdez Pécora, Araí Augusta

    This work considers some of the questions in burning high ash Brazilian coal-dolomite mixtures in a bench-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). Experimental tests were performed with the CE4500 coal from Santa Catarina State, in southern Brazil, with a Sauter mean diameter d p =43 μm. The coal particles were mixed with dolomite particles of d p = 111 μm and this fuel mixture was fed into the circulating fluidized reactor, previously loaded with quartz sand particles of d p =353 μm. This inert material was previously heated by the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas up to the ignition temperature of the fuel mixture. The CFBC unit has a 100mm internal diameter riser, 4.0m high, as well as a 62.8mm internal diameter downcomer. The loop has a cyclone, a sampling valve to collect particles and a 62.8mm internal diameter L-valve to recirculate the particles in the loop. A screw feeder with a rotation control system was used to feed the fuel mixture to the reactor. The operational conditions were monitored by pressure taps and thermocouples installed along the loop. A data acquisition system showed the main operational conditions to control. Experimental tests performed put in evidence the problems found during bed operation, with special attention to the solids feed device, to the L-valve operation, to particle size, solids inventory, fluidized gas velocity, fuel mixture and recirculated solids feeding positions.

  6. Development and testing of synthetic riprap constructed from coal combustion products (CCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Even with an increase in the amount of coal combustion products (CCPs) used in concrete con-struction, soil stabilization, and other : applications, the coal power industry must dispose of a sig-nificant amount of fly ash and bottom ash. One potentia...

  7. Fluidized-bed-combustion ash for the solidification and stabilization of a metal-hydroxide sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, K L; Behr-Andres, C

    1998-01-01

    Fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) ash is a by-product from a developing technology for coal-fired power plants that will economically reduce air emissions to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act. FBC ash has physical and chemical properties similar to Portland cement, but only has moderate success as a pozzolan in concrete applications due to low compressive strengths. However, FBC ash has proven effective for use as a binder for the solidification and stabilization (S/S) of metal-bearing sludges. Physical and chemical characterization procedures were used to analyze FBC ash and a metal-bearing sludge obtained from a hazardous waste treatment facility to develop 12 different S/S mix designs. The mix designs consist of four binder designs to evaluate sludge-to-binder ratios of approximately 0, 0.5, and 1. Portland cement is used as a control binder to compare unconfined compressive strengths and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses from different ratios of the FBC ash streams: fly ash, char, and spent bed material (SBM). Compressive strengths ranging from 84 lbs per square inch (psi) to 298 psi were obtained from various mix designs containing different sludge-to-ash ratios cured for 28 days. All the mix designs passed the TCLP. Recoveries from leaching for each metal were less than 5% for most mix designs. Results of unconfined compressive strengths, TCLP, and percent recovery calculations indicate that the mix design containing approximately a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to char-and-sludge is the best mix design for the S/S of the metal-bearing sludge.

  8. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  9. Experimental study of gas combustion fluidized bed and radiation contribution to heat transfer inside the bed. Gas nensho ryudoso to sono sonai netsudentatsu ni okeru fukusha no kiyo ni tsuite no jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y; Takahashi, S [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Maki, H [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1992-11-25

    Fluidized bed as a coal combustion boiler has a practical application, but, there is not an example of which gas like helium as a cooling medium flow in a thin tube with diameter of 6 mm like a stirling engine and necessary data for selecting the medium of fluidized bed and estimating the heat transfer coefficient. Specially, it is difficult to correctly estimate the radiation effect concerned with the heat transfer coefficient in case of interposing the heat transfer tube at 800 [degree]C in the high-temperature fluidized bed at more than 900 [degree]C. Therefore, for investigating the thermal characteristics when the temperature of pipe itself is at high temperature, in the gas combustion fluidized bed in which alumina particle as fluidized medium is filled, the cooling tubes by using carbonic acid gas as a cooling medium was interposed, heat transfer coefficient was measured, radiation effect was clarified by experiment, and characteristics of the gas combustion and of the exhaust gas of fluidized bed when gas is used for a fuel was investigated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Mathematical model for the technological system of working a thin coal bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isayev, V V

    1979-01-01

    The principle for constructing a mathematical model of working a thin coal bed using the adaptation criterion is examined. Intersecting parameters of the medium and the unit are presented. Based on these parameters, dependences are presented for the adaptation criterion and its maximization. A general mathematical model is presented for the technological system of unmanned extraction of a thin bed D/sub 5/ under conditions of the mine ''Dolinskaya'' of the Karaganda Basin. The work results can be used to plan technological systems for working thin coal beds.

  11. Analysis of oxy-fuel combustion power cycle utilizing a pressurized coal combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzino, Marco; Hong, Jongsup; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Brisson II, John G; Field, Randall; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new technology in which fuels are burned in an environment of oxygen and recycled combustion gases. In this paper, an oxy-fuel combustion power cycle that utilizes a pressurized coal combustor is analyzed. We show that this approach recovers more thermal energy from the flue gases...

  12. Good news to use from the environmental front: coal combustion products as an environmental success story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.N. [ISG Resources, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2002-07-01

    ISG Resources in the USA's largest manager and marketer of coal combustion products, involved also in developing new technologies and applications for treatment and use of fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag and FGD by-products. The paper, outlined in a series of 14 overheads, describes the USA's successes and initiatives so far in coal combustion products utilization. Further opportunities for the coal industry were discussed. The industry is encouraged to become involved now in carbon trading mechanisms for fly ash utilization displacing cement production.

  13. Using X-ray methods to evaluate the combustion sulfur minerals and graphitic carbon in coals and ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertz, D.L.; Collins, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Coals are complex mixtures of vastly different materials whose combustion kinetics may well exhibit symbiotic effects. Although the sulfur oxide gases produced during the combustion of coals may have a variety of sources, they are frequently caused by the thermal degradation of inorganic minerals to produce ''acid rain''. Since many of the minerals involved either as reactants or products in coal combustion produce well defined x-ray power diffraction (XRPD) patterns, the fate of these minerals may be followed by measuring the XRPD patterns of combustion products. Coal 1368P, a coal with an unusually high pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) fraction, has been the subject materials in our investigations of the fate of the inorganic minerals during combustion. These studies include measuring the fate of pyrite and of graphitic carbon in coal 1368P under varying combustion conditions. The results discussed in this paper were obtained by standard XRPD methods

  14. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  15. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions)

  16. Low NO sub x heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Combustion technology generation coal gas fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    Combustion tests of two scaled burners using actual coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are described. The two combustor configurations studied were a ceramic lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannual swirl burner (MASB). The tests were conducted over a range of temperature and pressures representative of current industrial combustion turbine inlet conditions. Tests on the rich lean burner were conducted at three levels of product gas heating values: 104, 197 and 254 btu/scf. Corresponding levels of NOx emissions were 5, 20 and 70 ppmv. Nitrogen was added to the fuel in the form of ammonia, and conversion efficiencies of fuel nitrogen to NOx were on the order of 4 percent to 12 percent, which is somewhat lower than the 14 percent to 18 percent conversion efficiency when src-2 liquid fuel was used. The MASB was tested only on medium btu gas (220 to 270 btu/scf), and produced approximately 80 ppmv NOx at rated engine conditions. Both burners operated similarly on actual coal gas and erbs fuel, and all heating values tested can be successfully burned in current machines.

  17. Assessment of the content of arsenic in solid by-products from coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierońska Faustyna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The coal combustion processes constitute one of the major sources of heavy metals emission into the atmosphere. From the point of view of the reduction of the emission of heavy metals and the selection of the correct exhaust gas treatment system, it is important to monitor the amount of trace elements in the solid fuels and in the solid by-products from coal combustion. One of these highly toxic elements is arsenic. The average content of arsenic in Polish hard coals and lignites is 0 ÷ 40 mg/kg [1] and 5 ÷ 15 mg/kg [2], respectively. The world average content of arsenic in hard coals and lignites, is equal to 9.0 ± 0.8 and 7.4 ± 1.4 mg/kg [3], respectively. During coal combustion processes, a significant amount of arsenic enters the atmosphere through gases and fly ashes. The proportions in which those two forms of arsenic occur in exhaust gases depend on the conditions of combustion processes [4]. The aim of the research was to determine the content of arsenic in coal blends and by-products of their combustion (slag, fly ash, gypsum, filter cakes. The determination of the arsenic quantity was performed using the Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with the electrothermal atomization.

  18. Coal: the future in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-07-01

    The whole issue is devoted to the future of coal in South Africa, and includes articles on the Petrick report, coal conversion research in South Africa, the activities of the Fuel Research Institute (on beneficiation, briquetting, carbonization, fluidized bed combustion), Sasol's production of chemical feedstocks from coal, mining methods, and the coal requirements of the electric and chemical industries.

  19. Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-07-01

    The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

  20. Characteristics of fundamental combustion and NOx emission using various rank coals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Su; Kang, Youn Suk; Lee, Hyun Dong; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Hong, Sung Chang

    2011-03-01

    Eight types of coals of different rank were selected and their fundamental combustion characteristics were examined along with the conversion of volatile nitrogen (N) to nitrogen oxides (NOx)/fuel N to NOx. The activation energy, onset temperature, and burnout temperature were obtained from the differential thermogravimetry curve and Arrhenius plot, which were derived through thermo-gravimetric analysis. In addition, to derive the combustion of volatile N to NOx/fuel N to NOx, the coal sample, which was pretreated at various temperatures, was burned, and the results were compared with previously derived fundamental combustion characteristics. The authors' experimental results confirmed that coal rank was highly correlated with the combustion of volatile N to NOx/fuel N to NOx.

  1. Seismic modelling of coal bed methane strata, Willow Creek, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S.E.; Mayer, R.; Lawton, D.C.; Langenberg, W. [Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose is to determine the feasibility of applying high- resolution reflection seismic surveying to coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and development. Numerical reflection seismic methods are examined for measuring the mapping continuity and coherence of coal zones. Numerical modelling of a coal zone in Upper Cretaceous sediments near Willow Creek, Alberta indicates that seismic data that is predominantly of 100 Hz is required to map the coal zone and lateral facies variations within the deposit. For resolution of individual coal seams, a central frequency >150 Hz would be needed. 26 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Zinc isotopic composition of particulate matter generated during the combustion of coal and coal + tire-derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, D.M.; Gieré, R.; Ren, M.; Landa, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Zn emissions from the burning of coal and tire-derived fuel (TDF) for power generation can be considerable. In an effort to lay the foundation for tracking these contributions, we evaluated the Zn isotopes of coal, a mixture of 95 wt % coal + 5 wt % TDF, and the particulate matter (PM) derived from their combustion in a power-generating plant. The average Zn concentrations and δ(66)Zn were 36 mg/kg and 183 mg/kg and +0.24‰ and +0.13‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. The δ(66)Zn of the PM sequestered in the cyclone-type mechanical separator was the lightest measured, -0.48‰ for coal and -0.81‰ for coal+TDF. The δ(66)Zn of the PM from the electrostatic precipitator showed a slight enrichment in the heavier Zn isotopes relative to the starting material. PM collected from the stack had the heaviest δ(66)Zn in the system, +0.63‰ and +0.50‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. Initial fractionation during the generation of a Zn-rich vapor is followed by temperature-dependent fractionation as Zn condenses onto the PM. The isotopic changes of the two fuel types are similar, suggesting that their inherent chemical differences have only a secondary impact on the isotopic fractionation process.

  3. Effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid waste in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Johari; Mutahharah, M.M.; Abdul, A.; Salema, A.; Kalantarifard, A.; Rozainee, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid was in a fluidized bed was investigated. Simulated municipal solid waste was used a sample and it was formulated from major waste composition found in Malaysia which comprised of food waste, paper, plastic and vegetable waste. Proximate and ultimate analyses of the simulated were conducted and results showed its composition was similar to the actual Malaysian municipal solid waste composition. Combustion study was carried out in a rectangular fluidized bed with sand of mean particle size of 0.34 mm as a fluidising medium. The range of fluidization numbers investigated was 3 to 11 U mf . The combustion was carried out at stoichiometric condition (Air Factor = 1). Results showed that the best fluidization number was in the range of 5 to 7 U mf with 5 U mf being the most optimum in which the bed temperature was sustained in a much longer period. (author)

  4. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  5. Thermal effects from the release of selenium from a coal combustion during high-temperature processing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Sun, Qiang; He, Huan

    2018-04-11

    The release of selenium (Se) during coal combustion can have serious impacts on the ecological environment and human health. Therefore, it is very important to study the factors that concern the release of Se from coal combustion. In this paper, the characteristics of the release of Se from coal combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification of different coal species under different conditions are studied. The results show that the amount of released Se increases at higher combustion temperatures. There are obvious increases in the amount of released Se especially in the temperature range of 300 to 800 °C. In addition, more Se is released from the coal gasification than coal combustion process, but more Se is released from coal combustion than pyrolysis. The type of coal, rate of heating, type of mineral ions, and combustion atmosphere have different effects on the released percentage of Se. Therefore, having a good understanding of the factors that surround the release of Se during coal combustion, and then establishing the combustion conditions can reduce the impacts of this toxic element to humans and the environment.

  6. Enhanced coal bed methane production and sequestration of CO2 in unmineable coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, James [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States); Winschel, Richard [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The Marshall County Project was undertaken by CONSOL Energy Inc. (CONSOL) with partial funding from the U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP). The project, initiated in October 2001, was conducted to evaluate opportunities for carbon dioxide CO2 sequestration in an unmineable coal seam in the Northern Appalachian Basin with simultaneous enhanced coal bed methane recovery. This report details the final results from the project that established a pilot test in Marshall County, West Virginia, USA, where a series of coal bed methane (CBM) production wells were developed in an unmineable coal seam (Upper Freeport (UF)) and the overlying mineable Pittsburgh (PIT) seam. The initial wells were drilled beginning in 2003, using slant-hole drilling procedures with a single production leg, in a down-dip orientation that provided limited success. Improved well design, implemented in the remaining wells, allowed for greater CBM production. The nearly-square-shaped project area was bounded by the perimeter production wells in the UF and PIT seams encompassing an area of 206 acres. Two CBM wells were drilled into the UF at the center of the project site, and these were later converted to serve as CO2 injection wells through which, 20,000 short tons of CO2 were planned to be injected at a maximum rate of 27 tons per day. A CO2 injection system comprised of a 50-ton liquid CO2 storage tank, a cryogenic pump, and vaporization system was installed in the center of the site and, after obtaining a Class II underground injection permit (UIC) permit from the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP), CO2 injection, through the two center wells, into the UF was initiated in September 2009. Numerous complications limited CO2 injection continuity, but CO2 was injected until breakthrough was encountered in September 2013, at which point the project had achieved an injection total of 4,968 tons of CO2. During the injection and post

  7. Coal option. [Shell Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This paper notes the necessity of developing an international coal trade on a very large scale. The role of Shell in the coal industry is examined; the regions in which Shell companies are most active are Australia, Southern Africa, Indonesia; Europe and North America. Research is being carried out on marketing and transportation, especially via slurry pipelines; coal-oil emulsions; briquets; fluidized-bed combustion; recovery of coal from potential waste material; upgrading of low-rank coals; unconventional forms of mining; coal conversion (the Shell/Koppers high-pressure coal gasification process). Techniques for cleaning flue gas (the Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization process) are being examined.

  8. Production of Indigenous and Enriched Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Coal Briquettes: Combustion and Disintegration Strength Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, M.; Khan, A.U.; Habib, U.; Memon, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Khyber Pakhtun Khwa province of Pakistan has considerable amounts of low ranked coal. However, due to the absence of any centrally administered power generation system there is a need to explore indigenous methods for effectively using this valuable energy resource. In the present study an indigenous coal briquetting technology has been developed and evaluated in terms of combustion characteristics such as moisture content, volatile matter, ash, fixed carbon and calorific value of the resulting coal briquette and disintegration strength using polyvinyl acetate (PVA) in combination with calcium carbonate (sample no 3 with highest disintegration strength value of 2059N). Comparison of test samples with the commercially available coal briquettes revealed improved combustion characteristics for the PVA bonded (sample no 1 and 5) coal briquettes having higher fixed carbon content and calorific value, lower ash contents as well as lower initial ignition time. (author)

  9. Production of Indigenous and Enriched Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Coal Briquettes: Combustion and Disintegration Strength Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unsia Habib

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Khyber Pakhtun Khwa province of Pakistan has considerable amounts of low ranked coal. However, due to the absence of any centrally administered power generation system there is a need to explore indigenous methods for effectively using this valuable energy resource. In the present study an indigenous coal briquetting technology has been developed and evaluated in terms of combustion characteristics such as moisture content, volatile matter, ash, fixed carbon and calorific value of the resulting coal briquette and disintegration strength using polyvinyl acetate (PVA in combination with calcium carbonate (sample no 3 with highest disintegration strength value of 2059N. Comparison of test samples with the commercially available coal briquettes revealed improved combustion characteristics for the PVA bonded (sample no 1 and 5 coal briquettes having higher fixed carbon content and calorific value, lower ash contents as well as lower initial ignition time.

  10. Research report of FY 1997 on the environmentally acceptable coal utilization system introduction support project. Demonstration project of circulating fluidized bed boiler (Jinzhou Coal-Thermal Power Corporation); 1997 nendo seika hokokusho (kankyo chowagata sekitan riyo system donyu shien jigyo). Junkan ryudosho boiler ni kakawaru jissho jigyo (Jinzhou netsuden sokoji)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    To verify the clean coal technology to be diffused in China and consolidate its diffusion basis, demonstration project of circulating fluidized bed boiler was conducted through the cooperation with China which is positive in its introduction. This report describes its characteristics. Coal and limestone are supplied in a lower part of combustion chamber, and are mixed with circulating ash by fluidized air for combustion. Densely fluidized bed the same as the bubbling fluidized bed is formed in the lower part of combustion chamber, which provides excellent stability in ignition and combustion. Particles including ash, char and limestone formed during the combustion are discharged into the cyclone through the convection heat transfer part at the outlet of combustion chamber with the combustion gas flow. Since the gas temperature is lowered to 400 to 500degC at the convection heat transfer part, troubles of the ash circulating system can be prevented. The combustion gas separated from ash at the cyclone is discharged through the heat exchanger and precipitator, and the collected ash is returned to the lower part of combustion chamber. In FY 1997, design, fabrication, procurement/inspection, field survey/meeting, survey of visitors/meeting, and education were carried out. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Coal combustion by-product quality at two stoker boilers: Coal source vs. fly ash collection system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardon, Sarah M. [Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, Division of Water, Frankfort, KY 40601 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); O' Keefe, Jennifer M.K. [Morehead State University, Department of Physical Sciences, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States); Marks, Maria N. [Environmental Consulting Services, Lexington, KY 40508 (United States); Hedges, Daniel H. [University of Kentucky, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Fly ashes from two stoker boilers burning Pennsylvanian Eastern Kentucky high volatile A bituminous coal blends were examined for their petrology and chemistry. The source coals have similar trace element contents. One of the ash collection systems was retrofitted with a baghouse (fabric filter) system, collecting a finer fly ash at a cooler flue gas temperature than the plant that has not been reconfigured. The baghouse ash has a markedly higher trace element content than the coarser fly ash from the other plant. The enhanced trace element content is most notable in the As concentration, reaching nearly 9000 ppm (ash basis) for one of the collection units. Differences in the ash chemistry are not due to any substantial differences in the coal source, even though the coal sources were from different counties and from different coal beds, but rather to the improved pollution control system in the steam plant with the higher trace element contents. (author)

  12. Success of lime additives for controlling SO2 releases from fluidized bed combustion units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muezzinoglu, A.; Bayram, A.; Odabasi, M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose of this work was to study the desulfurization efficiencies of dry additives on the fluidized bed reactors fired with low quality lignites. In these tests selected initial SO 2 levels were in the order of 1000 ppm or less in the flue gases. Lime addition for desulfurization may either be made by mixing with the fuel or by injection into the combustion reactor. In fluidized bed combustion systems both methods are physically possible. In the fluidized combustion systems a third method of addition is also possible this, is by mixing dry additives with fluidizer sand. In this third method additives create a fluidizer effect as well as reacting with the sulfur oxides being formed during the combustion of fuel

  13. Boron availability to plants from coal combustion by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukier, U.; Sumner, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Agronomic use of coal combustion by-products is often associated with boron (B) excess in amended soils and subsequently in plants. A greenhouse study with corn (Zea mays L.) as test plant was conducted to determine safe application rates of five fly ashes and one flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FDG). All by-products increased soil and corn tissue B concentration, in some cases above toxicity levels which are 5 mg hot water soluble B (hwsB)kg -1 soil and 100 mg B kg -1 in corn tissue. Acceptable application rates varied from 4 to 100 Mg ha -1 for different by-products. Leaching and weathering of a high B fly ash under ponding conditions decreased its B content and that of corn grown in fly ash amended soil, while leaching of the same fly ash under laboratory conditions increased fly ash B availability to corn in comparison to the fresh fly ash. Hot water soluble B in fly ash or FDG amended soil correlated very well with corn tissue B. Hot water soluble B in fly ash amended soil could be predicted based on soil pH and B solubility in ash at different pH values but not so in the case of FDG. Another greenhouse study was conducted to compare the influence of FDG and Ca(OH 2 ) on B concentration in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves grown in soil amended with the high B fly ash. The Ca(OH) 2 significantly decreased tissue B content, while FDG did not affect B uptake from fly ash amended soil. 41 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Problem of formation of nitrogen oxides during coal combustion in power plant steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Kuvaev, Yu.V.

    1992-07-01

    Analyzes a study of physical and chemical processes of nitrogen oxide formation during coal combustion conducted at Stanford University (USA). Experimental installation, pulverized coal feeding as well as measuring techniques and equipment are described. Experiments were conducted with 55 micron particles of semibituminous coal. An equation for the percentage of coal carbon converted to gaseous products is given. Active formation of NO from nitrogen content in the fuel was observed when oxygen content was under 4%. Conversion of the fuel nitrogen to NO[sub x] in the 1,350-1,850 K temperature range did not depend on gas temperature but rather on oxygen content. 2 refs.

  15. Oxy-coal combustion in an entrained flow reactor: Application of specific char and volatile combustion and radiation models for oxy-firing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez, L.; Yin, Chungen; Riaza, J.

    2013-01-01

    The deployment of oxy-fuel combustion in utility boilers is one of the major options for CO2 capture. However, combustion under oxy-firing conditions differs from conventional air-firing combustion, e.g., in the aspect of radiative heat transfer, coal conversion and pollutants formation....... In this work, a numerical study on pulverised coal combustion was conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of several sub-models refined for oxy-fuel conditions, e.g., gaseous radiative property model, gas-phase combustion mechanism and heterogeneous char reaction model. The sub-models were...... implemented in CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations of combustion of three coals under air-firing and various oxy-firing (21-35% vol O2 in O2/CO2 mixture) conditions in an EFR (entrained flow reactor). The predicted coal burnouts and gaseous emissions were compared against experimental results...

  16. Behavior of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of poultry litter

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Deirdre; Low, Fiona; Henihan, Anne Marie; Garcia, Alberto; Kwapinski, Witold; Zhang, Lian; Leahy, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed In this study, we have examined the behavior of heavy metals during fluidized bed combustion of poultry litter. Heavy metals examined include As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn. Solid and gaseous streams were analyzed and compared with relevant guidelines to determine the potential environmental impact of combustion and subsequent land spreading or landfill of the resulting ash. The majority of heavy metals were associated with the solid ash fraction, with low ...

  17. Effect of secondary air injection on the combustion efficiency of sawdust in a fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. N. Srinivasa Rao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes like bagasse, paddy husks, sawdust and groundnut shells can be effectively used as fuels for fluidized bed combustion; otherwise these biomass fuels are difficult to handle due to high moisture and fines content. In the present work the possibility of using sawdust in the fluidized bed combustor, related combustion efficiencies and problems encountered in the combustion process are discussed. The temperature profiles for sawdust with an increase in fluidizing velocity along the vertical height above the distributor plate indicate that considerable burning of fuel particles is taking place in the freeboard zone rather than complete burning within the bed. Therefore, an enlarged disengagement section is provided to improve the combustion of fines. The temperature profiles along the bed height are observed at different feed rates. The feed rate of sawdust corresponding to the maximum possible temperature was observed to be 10.2 kg/h. It is observed that 50-60% excess air is optimal for reducing carbon loss during the burning of sawdust. The maximum possible combustion efficiency with sawdust is 99.2% and is observed with 65% excess air.

  18. Reduction of NOx and particulate emissions from coal-fired boilers by modification of coal nozzles and combustion tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, B.; Talanker, A.; Mugenstein, A.; Shpon, G.; Vikhansky, A.; Elperin, T.; Bar-Ziv, E.; Bockelie, M.; Eddings, E.; Sarofim, A.F. [Israel Electric Corporation, Haifa (Israel). Engineering Division

    2001-07-01

    In the present paper two issues are discussed: the effect of the burner replacement on boiler performance and NOx emissions and the effect of the burner replacement on performance and efficiency of electrostatic precipitators (ESP). We also have experimented with different coal types and found the coals that together with combustion tuning met commonly accepted emission limits for NOx (less than 600 mg/dNm{sup 3}) and levels of carbon in fly ash (LOI) (approximately 5-6%) for existing boilers without low NOx burners. Our measurements were accompanied by computer simulations of the combustion of the combustion process in the boiler. Special attention was paid to detailed simulation of the flow and ignition in the near-burner zone. 7 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Experimental on fly ash recirculation with bottom feeding to improve the performance of a circulating fluidized bed boiler co-burning coal sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lunbo; Xu, Guiling; Liu, Daoyin; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhao, Changsui [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    With the aim of reducing carbon content in fly ash, fly ash recirculation with bottom feeding (FARBF) technology was applied to a 75 t/h Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler burning mixture of coal and coal sludge. And industrial experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of FARBF technology on the combustion performance and pollutant emission characteristics of the CFB boiler. Results show that as the recirculation rate of fly ash increases, the CFB dense bed temperature decreases while the furnace outlet temperature increases, and the temperature distribution in the furnace becomes uniform. Compared with the conditions without fly ash recirculation, the combustion efficiency increases from 92 to 95% when the recirculation rate increases to 8 t/h, and the desulfurization efficiency also increases significantly. As the recirculation rate increases, the emissions of NO and CO decrease, but the particulate emission increases. The present study indicates that FARBF technology can improve the combustion performance and desulfurization efficiency for the CFB boilers burning coal sludge, and this can bring large economical and environmental benefits in China.

  20. The behavior of heavy metals in the process of desulfurization of Brazilian coal combustion gases by the addition of limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebag M.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of heavy metals in two kinds of Brazilian coals at 100° C (acid digestion and at 850° C were studied (ashes the obtained in muffle furnace with and without addition of limestone. Data were analyzed by flame atomic absorption, using the air acetylene flame. For Pb, Zn, Ni, Mn and Cu the metal concentration obtained the acid digestion were higher than metal concentration were obtained in tests in the muffle furnace. This behavior observed in the muffle furnace occurs because these metals are fixed in stable sulfated compounds in the ashes, which are difficult to dissociate at flame temperature, and also due to the volatile character of the metals, mainly Pb and Zn. There was a constant concentration in the ashes in of Cr the acid digestion and muffle furnace tests. Results from tests using an XRD apparatus indicated, he formation of sulfated compounds in the ashes for both. coals. The analysis using microprobe electronic showed retention of metals like Ni, Mn, Cu, Fe, Ti and Ca. For both coals, the low mobility of most of the metals studied occured due to the alkaline pH of sulfated ashes. These metals in the ash from coal combustion in fluidized bed reactor were also studied and showed similar results, enabling a scale-up to pilot scale.

  1. Combustion characteristics and retention-emission of selenium during co-firing of torrefied biomass and its blends with high ash coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Habib; Liu, Guijian; Yousaf, Balal; Ali, Muhammad Ubaid; Abbas, Qumber; Zhou, Chuncai

    2017-12-01

    The combustion characteristics, kinetic analysis and selenium retention-emission behavior during co-combustion of high ash coal (HAC) with pine wood (PW) biomass and torrefied pine wood (TPW) were investigated through a combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and laboratory-based circulating fluidized bed combustion experiment. Improved ignition behavior and thermal reactivity of HAC were observed through the addition of a suitable proportion of biomass and torrefied. During combustion of blends, higher values of relative enrichment factors in fly ash revealed the maximum content of condensing volatile selenium on fly ash particles, and depleted level in bottom ash. Selenium emission in blends decreased by the increasing ratio of both PW and TPW. Higher reductions in the total Se volatilization were found for HAC/TPW than individual HAC sample, recommending that TPW have the best potential of selenium retention. The interaction amongst selenium and fly ash particles may cause the retention of selenium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coal conversion. 1977 technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The status and progress in US DOE's projects in coal gasification, liquefaction, and fluidized-bed combustion are reviewed with financing, flowsheets, history, progress and status of each (57 projects). (LTN)

  3. Method of cutting steeply falling coal beds. [Bacteria, which only grow on methane, are injected into the coal bed and form low viscosity polysaccharides: as a result the coal collapses into the haulage gallery and is hauled away

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretsinger, B Ye; Chernyshenko, D V; Levin, A D; Malashenko, Yu R; Shinkovskiy, V A; Shurova, Z P; Volkov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to reduce outlays for collapse and output of coal by creating artificial cavities of sliding along the coal bed in the surrounding rocks. This goal is achieved because in the well drilled in the bed for the entire height of the level, a suspension of cells of methane-oxidizing microorganisms is injected. The methane-oxidizing microorganisms used are, for example, the thermophilic culture Methylococcus thermophilus of strains ShP which grow at 45-65/sup 0/ C, or the mesophilic culture Methanomonas rubna of strains 15 Sh growing at 20-37/sup 0/ C. As a result of the vital activity of these cultures, polysaccharides are formed with viscosity of 5-7 and 3-4 St respectively. The mine pressure disrupts the blocks between the wells, and the outline section of the steeply dropping coal bed, being destroyed, slides on the products of vital activity of the microorganisms to the haulage gallery. Then the coal drops on cross cuts to the field gallery through which it is transported. Studies established that the only coal substrate which is suitable for growth of these microorganism cultures is methane. The synthesis of one g of absolutely dry substance of these microorganism requires 1.78 g of methane and 4.7 g of oxygen. The cultures are resistant to hydrostatic pressure from 20 to 150 atm and short-term pressure of gradient drops which occur during injection of the cellular suspension into the coal bed. They are filtered through the coal with preservation of the oxidizing and reproductive properties and are cultivated on the methane contained in the bed and form considerable number of exopolysaccarides. The polysaccarides weaken the bond between the bed and the surrounding rocks and serve as a unique lubricant promoting the sliding towards the haulage gallery of the coal blocks destroyed by mine pressure.

  4. Particulate and PCDD/F emissions from coal co-firing with solid biofuels in a bubbling fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Lopes; I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; T. Crujeira; D. Salema; M. Freire; R. Pereira; I. Cabrita [INETI, Lisbon (Portugal). DEECA

    2009-12-15

    In the scope of the COPOWER project SES6-CT-2004 to investigate potential synergies of co-combustion of different biofuels with coal, a study of emissions of particulate matter and PCDD/F was carried out. The biofuels tested were meat and bone meal (MBM), sewage sludge biopellets (BP), straw pellets (SP), olive bagasse (OB) and wood pellets (WP). The tests performed include co-firing of 5%, 15% and 25% by weight of biofuels with coals of different origin. Both monocombustion and co-firing were carried out. Combustion tests were performed on a pilot fluidised bed, equipped with cyclones and air staging was used in order to achieve almost complete combustion of fuels with high volatile contents and to control gaseous emissions. Particulate matter emissions were isokinetically sampled in the stack and their particle size analysis was performed with a cascade impactor (Mark III). The results showed that most particles emitted were below 10 {mu}m (PM10) for all the tests, however, with the increasing share of biofuels and also during combustion of pure biofuels, especially olive bagasse, straw and MBM, very fine particles, below about 1 {mu}m were present. With the exception of sewage sludge, greater amounts of biofuels appeared to give rise to the decrease in particulate mean diameters and increase in PM percentages below 1 {mu}m. The formation of very fine particles could be related with the presence of aerosol forming elements such as K, Na (in the case of MBM) and Cl in biofuels, which even resulted in higher PM emissions when the ash content of fuels decreased. A correlation wasverified between the increase of PCDD/F with the decrease of PM mean diameter. This may be due to higher specific surface area and greater Cu concentration in the fly ashes. 33 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Burnout synergic or inhibiting effects in combustion assays of coal/sawdust blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ximena Garcia; Ximena Matus; Claudia Ulloa; Alfredo L. Gordon [University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Characterization of chars and charcoal and combustion assays of coal/ pine sawdust blends were carried on to evaluate the burnout, under conditions similar to those found in pulverized coal combustion. A drop tube furnace (DTF) was used to generate chars from three coals of different rank (Bitsch, a lignite; Lemington, a bituminous HV coal; and LD, a semianthracite) and charcoal from sawdust (S). Burning profiles, as well as morphological and optical characterization of these chars were obtained and discussed. Pulverized samples of pure constituents and sawdust/coal blends (5, 10 and 20%wt of S) were burned in the DTF reactor. Samples of combustion residues were collected for characterization. Depending on blend composition and the rank of the coal being blended, positive and negative deviations with respect to the expected weighted average value of the burnout were measured. This behavior is related both, to the duration of the step by which simultaneous burning of char and charcoal take place, and to the sawdust content in the blend. The optical analysis of combustion residues supports this conclusion. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Tracing the combustion of coal blends in a thermobalance by optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Osorio; M.L.F. Ghiggi; A.C.F. Vilela; W.D. Kalkreuth; D. Alvarez; A.G. Borrego [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil). Laboratorio de Siderurgia

    2007-07-01

    Combustion at programmed temperature in a thermobalance is a common test for the rapid assessment of coal combustibility. In this study two series of blends (low rank/medium rank coal-AB and low rank /petroleum coke-AC) with the low rank coal in three different proportions (1/4, 2/4 and 3/4) have been tested. Samples have been ground and sieved to 20-75 m prior to blend preparation. The combustion profiles indicated different behaviour for the two series of samples: the AB series showed wide curves with the presence of shoulders whereas the AC series showed two maxima corresponding to the component fuels. The comparison of the calculated and experimental curves indicated different effects of blending on the relevant temperatures and reactivity of the blends. In the AB blend both initial and peak temperatures were lower than expected and the higher the proportion of low rank coal, the larger the difference. In the AC series the burnout temperature was the parameter departing more from the expected values. In order to visualize relative combustibility of the coals the reaction was stopped at 50% conversion and the samples were examined through the microscope. The combustion of the particles followed a shrinking core pattern in which the core of the low rank particles remained isotropic whereas anisotropy development was observed in the medium rank coal. The reflectance of the coals increased with increasing the temperature at which the reaction was stopped regardless the rank of the parent coal following a linear trend. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Combustion characteristics of Malaysian oil palm biomass, sub-bituminous coal and their respective blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti Shawalliah; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Ismail, Khudzir

    2012-11-01

    The combustion characteristics of Malaysia oil palm biomass (palm kernel shell (PKS), palm mesocarp fibre (PMF) and empty fruit bunches (EFB)), sub-bituminous coal (Mukah Balingian) and coal/biomass blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were investigated. Six weight ratios of coal/biomass blends were prepared and oxidised under dynamic conditions from temperature 25 to 1100°C at four heating rates. The thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that the EFB and PKS evolved additional peak besides drying, devolatilisation and char oxidation steps during combustion. Ignition and burn out temperatures of blends were improved in comparison to coal. No interactions were observed between the coal and biomass during combustion. The apparent activation energy during this process was evaluated using iso-conversional model free kinetics which resulted in highest activation energy during combustion of PKS followed by PMF, EFB and MB coal. Blending oil palm biomass with coal reduces the apparent activation energy value. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement in equipment for initiating combustion of bituminous beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyev, A M; Galimov, R R; Smerkovich, Y S

    1981-01-01

    An experimental sample of a unit is developed based on the logging lifter PK-2 which was tested with initiation of intrabed combustion at the Sugushlinskiy field (viscosity of bitumen over 10/sup 3/ Pa.s) and Mordovo-Karmal'skiy field (viscosity of bitumen up to 3 Pa.s). Technical characteristics and operating principles of the unit are presented.

  9. Environmental impact assessment for steeply dipping coal beds: North Knobs site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-08

    The US Department of Energy is funding an underground coal gasification (UCG) project in steeply dipping coal beds (SDB), at North Knobs, about 8 miles west of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming. The project is being conducted to determine the technical, economic and environmental viability of such a technology. The development of SDB is an interesting target for UCG since such beds contain coals not normally mineable economically by ordinary techniques. Although the underground gasification of SDB has not been attempted in the US, Soviet experience and theoretical work indicate that the gasification of SDB in place offers all the advantages of underground gasification of horizontal coal seams plus some unique characteristics. The steep angle of dip helps to channel the produced gases up dip to offtake holes and permits the ash and rubble to fall away from the reaction zone helping to mitigate the blocking of the reaction zone in swelling coals. The intersection of SDB with the surface makes the seam accessible for drilling and other preparation. The tests at the North Knobs site will consist of three tests, lasting 20, 80 and 80 days, respectively. A total of 9590 tons of coal is expected to be gasified, with surface facilities utilizing 15 acres of the total section of land. The environmental effects of the experiment are expected to be very small. The key environmental impact is potential groundwater contamination by reaction products from coal gasification. There is good evidence that the surrounding coal effectively blocks the migration of these contaminants.

  10. Experiment and modeling of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhongqing; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Mingnv; Ran, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of 0.15~3 vol. % low concentration methane in a fluidized bed was studied. • A mathematical model was proposed on the basis of gas–solid flow theory. • A comparative analysis of the established model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models was carried out. • The axial methane profile along fluidized bed was predicted by using the mathematical model. • The bed temperature has greater impact on methane conversion than fluidized velocity. - Abstract: This study undertakes a theoretical analysis and an experimental investigation into the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor using 0.5 wt.% Pd/Al_2O_3 as catalytic particles. A mathematical model is established based on gas–solid flow theory and is used to study the effects of bed temperature and fluidized velocity on methane catalytic combustion, and predict the dimensionless methane concentration axial profile in reactor. It is shown that methane conversion increases with bed temperature, but decreases with increasing fluidized velocity. These theoretical results are found to correlate well with the experimental measurement, with a deviation within 5%. A comparative analysis of the developed model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models is also carried out, and this further verifies that the established model better reflects the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed. Using this reaction model, it was found that the difference in methane conversion between dense and freeboard zones gradually increases with bed temperature; the dense zone reaction levels off at 650 °C, thereby minimizing the difference between the dense and freeboard regions to around 15%. With an increase in bed temperature, the dimensionless methane concentration in the dense zone decreases exponentially, while in the splash zone, it varies from an exponential decay to a slow

  11. Emissions from carpet combustion in a pilot-scale rotary kiln: comparison with coal and particle-board combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Lucero Konopa; James A. Mulholland; Matthew J. Realff; Paul M. Lemieux [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-08-15

    The use of post-consumer carpet as a potential fuel substitute in cement kilns and other high-temperature processes is being considered to address the problem of huge volumes of carpet waste and the opportunity of waste-to-energy recovery. Carpet represents a high volume waste stream, provides high energy value, and contains other recoverable materials for the production of cement. This research studied the emission characteristics of burning 0.46-kg charges of chopped nylon carpet squares, pulverized coal, and particle-board pellets in a pilot-scale natural gas-fired rotary kiln. Carpet was tested with different amounts of water added. Emissions of oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide (NO), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and total hydrocarbons and temperatures were continuously monitored. It was found that carpet burned faster and more completely than coal and particle board, with a rapid volatile release that resulted in large and variable transient emission peaks. NO emissions from carpet combustion ranged from 0.06 to 0.15 g/MJ and were inversely related to CO emissions. Carpet combustion yielded higher NO emissions than coal and particleboard combustion, consistent with its higher nitrogen content. S{sub 2} emissions were highest for coal combustion, consistent with its higher sulfur content than carpet or particle board. Adding water to carpet slowed its burn time and reduced variability in the emission transients, reducing the CO peak but increasing NO emissions. Results of this study indicate that carpet waste can be used as an effective alternative fuel, with the caveats that it might be necessary to wet carpet or chop it finely to avoid excessive transient puff emissions due to its high volatility compared with other solid fuels, and that controlled mixing of combustion air might be used to control NO emissions from nylon carpet. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Determination of coal bed quality in wells by geophysical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.V.

    1974-01-01

    The dependence of the specific electric resistivity of coal and terrigenous material of the Donbass region on the degree of their metamorphism is discussed. From this dependence a method is derived to determine the metamorphism of coal from the effective specific resistivity of rocks by taking into account the self-polarisation and the density of the coal layers. The degree of metamorphism (from the coefficient of gas components in the heating mass of coal) is obtained with a standard deviation of 2.9%. Special physical properties of coal are related to its qualitative composition in a complex and very close way. With the whole complex of geophysical measurements the quality parameters can be estimated in more detail. For the Pavlogradsij-Petropavlovskij region of the Donbass non-linear mutli-dimensional relations between the quality parmaeters of coal are derived, and the measurements with standard geophysical methods (resistivity-, spontaneous-potential-, latero-, calibre- and gamma-gamma-log as well as cavernometry) are presented. The results obtained with these methods are tested by a comparison with 8 samples from mines. The standard deviation for the ash content is 3.73% (for core sampling 1.0%) and for the thickness of the plastic layer 3.63 mm (for core sampling 3.34mm)

  13. Co-firing of oil sludge with coal-water slurry in an industrial internal circulating fluidized bed boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Jiang, Xiumin; Zhou, Lingsheng; Wang, Hui; Han, Xiangxin

    2009-08-15

    Incineration has been proven to be an alternative for disposal of sludge with its unique characteristics to minimize the volume and recover energy. In this paper, a new fluidized bed (FB) incineration system for treating oil sludge is presented. Co-firing of oil sludge with coal-water slurry (CWS) was investigated in the new incineration system to study combustion characteristics, gaseous pollutant emissions and ash management. The study results show the co-firing of oil sludge with CWS in FB has good operating characteristic. CWS as an auxiliary fuel can flexibly control the dense bed temperatures by adjusting its feeding rate. All emissions met the local environmental requirements. The CO emission was less than 1 ppm or essentially zero; the emissions of SO(2) and NO(x) were 120-220 and 120-160 mg/Nm(3), respectively. The heavy metal analyses of the bottom ash and the fly ash by ICP/AES show that the combustion ashes could be recycled as soil for farming.

  14. Solid fuel feed system for a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1982-01-01

    A fluidized bed for the combustion of coal, with limestone, is replenished with crushed coal from a system discharging the coal laterally from a station below the surface level of the bed. A compartment, or feed box, is mounted at one side of the bed and its interior separated from the bed by a weir plate beneath which the coal flows laterally into the bed while bed material is received into the compartment above the plate to maintain a predetermined minimum level of material in the compartment.

  15. Faciologic characterization of coal beds in the Cerquilho region, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagalli, J.T.; Consoni, J.O.C.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1981, NUCLEBRAS, researches the Tubarao group in the state of Sao Paulo, in order to evaluate the uraniferous potential of carbonaceous sediments in the Parana Basin. This work discusses geologic information concerning the Cerquilho area, where, the faciologic and structural characterization of the coal beds (or seams) were analyzed, and the main targets for uranium concentration were identified. Such study was performed through detailed field observations, imagery and aerial photograph interpretation as well as well logging analysis. Results suggested that the uraniferous anomalies are controlled by fluvial channels cutting the coal beds, with periglacial influence. (Author) [pt

  16. A Model for Nitrogen Chemistry in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Pulverized Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Hansen, Stine; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    2011-01-01

    , heating and devolatilization of particles, and gas–solid reactions. The model is validated by comparison with entrained flow reactor results from the present work and from the literature on pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 and air, covering the effects of fuel, mixing conditions, temperature......In this work, a model for the nitrogen chemistry in the oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The model is a chemical reaction engineering type of model with a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry, together with a simplified description of the mixing of flows......, stoichiometry, and inlet NO level. In general, the model provides a satisfactory description of NO formation in air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal, but under some conditions, it underestimates the impact on NO of replacing N2 with CO2. According to the model, differences in the NO yield between the oxy...

  17. Mercury speciation and fine particle size distribution on combustion of Chinese coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering and State Key Joint Lab. of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control; Daukoru, Michael; Torkamani, Sarah; Biswas, Pratim [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Lab.

    2013-07-01

    Coal combustion is the dominant anthropogenic mercury emission source of the world. Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) can remove almost all the particulate mercury (Hg{sub p}), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) can retain a large part of the gaseous oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). Only a small percentage of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) can be abated by the air pollution control devices (APCDs). Therefore, the mercury behavior across APCDs largely depends on the mercury speciation in the flue gas exhausting from the coal combustor. To better understand the formation process of three mercury species, i.e. Hg{sup 0}, Hg{sup 2+} and Hg{sub p}, in gaseous phase and fine particles, bench-scale measurements for the flue gas exhausting from combustion of different types of coal in a drop-tube furnace set-up, were carried out. It was observed that with the limitation of reaction kinetics, higher mercury concentration in flue gas will lead to lower Hg{sup 2+} proportion. The concentration of chlorine has the opposite effect, not as significantly as that of mercury though. With the chlorine concentration increasing, the proportion of Hg{sup 2+} increases. Combusting the finer coal powder results in the formation of more Hg{sup 2+}. Mineral composition of coal and coal particle size has a great impact on fine particle formation. Al in coal is in favor of finer particle formation, while Fe in coal can benefit the formation of larger particles. The coexistence of Al and Si can strengthen the particle coagulation process. This process can also be improved by the feeding of more or finer coal powder. The oxy-coal condition can make for both the mercury oxidation process and the metal oxidation in the fine particle formation process.

  18. Wood Combustion Behaviour in a Fixed Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokit, Ernie Mat; Aziz, Azhar Abdul; Ghazali, Normah Mohd

    2010-06-01

    Waste wood is used as feedstock for Universiti Teknologi Malaysia's newly-developed two-stage incinerator system. The research goals are to optimize the operation of the thermal system to the primary chamber, to improve its combustion efficiency and to minimize its pollutants formation. The combustion process is evaluated with the variation of fuel's moisture content. For optimum operating condition, where the gasification efficiency is 95.53%, the moisture content of the fuel is best set at 17%; giving outlet operating temperature of 550°C and exhaust gas concentrations with 1213 ppm of CO, 6% of CO2 and 14% of O2 respectively. In line to the experimental work, a computational fluid dynamics software, Fluent is used to simulate the performance of the primary chamber. Here the predicted optimum gasification efficiency stands at 95.49% with CO, CO2 and O2 concentrations as 1301 ppm, 6.5% and 13.5% respectively.

  19. Plan for injection of coal combustion byproducts into the Omega Mine for the reduction of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, T.A.; Moran, T.C.; Broschart, D.W.; Smith, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Omega Mine Complex is located outside of Morgantown, West Virginia. The mine is in the Upper Freeport Coal, an acid-producing coal seam. The coal was mined in a manner that has resulted in acid mine drainage (AMD) discharges at multiple points. During the 1990's, the West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) assumed responsibility for operating a collection and treatment system for the AMD. Collection and treatment costs are approximately $300,000 per year. Injecting grout into the mine workings to reduce AMD (and thus reducing treatment costs) is proposed. The procedure involves injecting grout mixes composed primarily of coal combustion byproducts (CCB's) and water, with a small quantity of cement. The intention of the injection program is to fill the mine voids in the north lobe of the Omega Mine (an area where most of the acidity is believed to be generated) with the grout, thus reducing the contact of air and water with potentially acidic material. The grout mix design consists of an approximate 1:1 ratio of fly ash to byproducts from fluidized bed combustion. Approximately 100 gallons of water per cubic yard of grout is used to achieve flowability. Observation of the mine workings via subsurface borings and downhole video camera confirmed that first-mined areas were generally open while second-mined areas were generally partially collapsed. The injection program was developed to account for this by utilizing closer injection hole spacing in second-mined areas. Construction began in January 1998, with grout injection expected to commence in mid-April 1998

  20. The behavior of catalysts in hydrogasification of sub-bituminous coal in pressured fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Shuai; Bi, Jicheng; Qu, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •CCHG in a pressured fluidized bed achieved 77.3 wt.% of CH 4 yield in 30 min. •Co-Ca and Ni-Ca triggered catalytic coal pyrolysis and char hydrogasification. •The reason for better catalytic performance of 5%Co-1%Ca was elucidated. •Sintered catalyst blocked the reactive sites and suppressed coal conversion. •Co-Ca made the catalyzed coal char rich in mesopore structures and reactive sites. -- Abstract: The catalytic hydrogasification of the sub-bituminous coal was carried out in a lab-scale pressurized fluidized bed with the Co-Ca, Ni-Ca and Fe-Ca as catalysts at 850 °C and 3 MPa. The effect of different catalysts on the characteristics of gasification products was investigated, and the behavior of the catalysts was also explored by means of the X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), etc. Experiment results showed that all the catalysts promoted the carbon conversion in the coal catalytic hydrogasification (CCHG), and the catalytic activity was in the order: 5%Co-1%Ca > 5%Ni-1%Ca > 5%Fe-1%Ca. Compared with the raw coal hydrogasification, the carbon conversion increased from 43.4 wt.% to 91.3 wt.%, and the CH 4 yield increased from 23.7 wt.% to 77.3 wt.% within 30 min after adding the 5%Co-1%Ca catalyst into the coal. Co-Ca and Ni-Ca possessed catalytic effect on both processes of pyrolysis of coal and hydrogasification of coal char in CCHG, by which the graphitization of the coal was suppressed and methane formation rate was significantly accelerated. Fe/Co/Ni-Ca could penetrate into the interior of coal during CCHG, making the catalytic production of CH 4 conduct in the pore structures. The activity difference of the catalysts was owing to the different ability of rupturing the amorphous C−C bonds in coal structure. The incomplete carbon conversion of the 5%Co-1%Ca loaded coal was due to the agglomeration of the catalyst and the blockage of the reactive sites by the sintered catalyst. This work will provide

  1. a novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.M.C.; Janse, Arthur M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1999-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  2. A novel interconnected fluidised bed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of char.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Arthur M.C.; Janse, A.M.C.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A novel system of two adjacent fluidised beds operating in different gas atmospheres and exchanging solids was developed for the combined flash pyrolysis of biomass and combustion of the produced char. Fluidised sand particles (200 μm < dp < 400 μm) are transported from the pyrolysis reactor to the

  3. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, S M

    1994-12-31

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of `LPG` in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of 'LPG' in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Behaviour of Inorganic Constituents of Municipal Sewage Sludge during Fluidized-Bed Combustion.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Pohořelý, Michael; Trnka, Otakar

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3 (2007) , s. 181-185 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : sewage sludge * heavy metals * fluidized-bed combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.367, year: 2007

  6. Combustion of Liquid Bio-Fuels in an Internal Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miccio, F.; Kalisz, S.; Baxter, D.; Svoboda, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2008), s. 172-179 ISSN 1385-8947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : internal circulating fluidized bed * liquid fuel * combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2008

  7. Coal Combustion Behavior in New Ironmaking Process of Top Gas Recycling Oxygen Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenfeng; Xue, Qingguo; Tang, Huiqing; Wang, Guang; Wang, Jingsong

    2017-10-01

    The top gas recycling oxygen blast furnace (TGR-OBF) is a new ironmaking process which can significantly reduce the coke ratio and emissions of carbon dioxide. To better understand the coal combustion characteristics in the TGR-OBF, a three dimensional model was developed to simulate the lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway of a TGR-OBF. The combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in TGR-OBF were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of oxygen concentration and temperature were also analyzed. The simulation results show that the coal burnout increased by 16.23% compared to that of the TBF. The oxygen content has an obvious effect on the burnout. At 70% oxygen content, the coal burnout is only 21.64%, with a decrease of 50.14% compared to that of TBF. Moreover, the effect of oxygen temperature is also very obvious.

  8. [Inventories of atmospheric arsenic emissions from coal combustion in China, 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, He-Zhong; Qu, Yi-Ping

    2009-04-15

    Anthropogenic arsenic (As) emitted from coal combustion is one of key trace elements leading to negative air pollution and national economy loss. It is of great significance to estimate the atmospheric arsenic emission for proposing relevant laws or regulations and selecting proper pollution control technologies. The inventories of atmospheric arsenic emissions from coal combustion in China were evaluated by adopting the emission factor method based on fuel consumption. Arsenic emission sources were firstly classified into several categories by economic sectors, combustion types and pollution control technologies. Then, according to provincial coal consumption and averaged arsenic concentration in the feed fuel, the inventories of atmospheric arsenic emission from coal combustion in China in 2005 were established. Coal outputand consumption in China in 2005 were 2,119.8 and 2,099.8 Mt, respectively. The total emissions of arsenic released into the atmosphere in 2005 in China were estimated at about 1,564.4 t, and Shandong ranked the largest province with 144.4 t arsenic release, followed by Hunan (141.1 t), Hebei (108.5 t), Henan (77.7 t), and Jiangsu (77.0 t), which were mainly concentrated in the eastern and central provinces of China. The arsenic emissions were largely emitted by industry sector (818.8 t) and thermal power generation sector (303.4 t), contributing 52.3% and 19.4% of the totals, respectively. About 375.5 t arsenic was estimated to be released into the atmosphere in the form of gas phase in China in 2005, with a share of 24% of the totals. In general, arsenic pollution control from coal combustion should be highlighted for the power and industry sectors in the whole country. However, arsenic poisoning caused by residential coal burning should also be paid great attention in some areas such as Xinjiang, Gansu, Qinghai and Guishou.

  9. Post-combustion CO2 capture with activated carbons using fixed bed adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mesfer, Mohammed K.; Danish, Mohd; Fahmy, Yasser M.; Rashid, Md. Mamoon

    2018-03-01

    In the current work, the capturing of carbon dioxide from flue gases of post combustion emission using fixed bed adsorption has been carried out. Two grades of commercial activated carbon (sorbent-1 and sorbent-2) were used as adsorbent. Feed consisting of CO2 and N2 mixture was used for carrying out the adsorption. The influence of bed temperature, feed rate, equilibrium partial pressure and initial % CO2 in feed were considered for analyzing adsorption-desorption process. It was found that the total adsorption-desorption cycle time decreases with increased column temperature and feed rates. The time required to achieve the condition of bed saturation decreases with increased bed temperature and feed rates. The amount of CO2 adsorbed/Kg of the adsorbent declines with increased bed temperature with in studied range for sorbent-1 and sorbent-2. It was suggested that the adsorption capacity of the both the sorbents increases with increased partial pressure of the gas.

  10. Evaluation of coal bed methane potential of coal seams of Sawang ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This analysis shows that the maximum methane gas adsorbed in the coal sample CG-81 is 17 m3/t (Std. daf), at maximum pressure of 5.92 MPa ... vast coal reserves are ideal reservoirs for the gen- eration and accumulation of CBM. ... of gases in coal seams, such as, compression as free gas in the pore spaces, condensed ...

  11. Modeling coal combustion behavior in an ironmaking blast furnace raceway: model development and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, D.; Austin, P.R.; Zulli, P.; Guo B. [BlueScope Steel Research Laboratories, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    A numerical model has been developed and validated for the investigation of coal combustion phenomena under blast furnace operating conditions. The model is fully three-dimensional, with a broad capacity to analyze significant operational and equipment design changes. The model was used in a number of studies, including: Effect of cooling gas type in coaxial lance arrangements. It was found that oxygen cooling improves coal burnout by 7% compared with natural gas cooling under conditions that have the same amount of oxygen enrichment in the hot blast. Effect of coal particle size distribution. It was found that during two similar periods of operation at Port Kembla's BF6, a difference in PCI capability could be attributed to the difference in coal size distribution. Effect of longer tuyeres. Longer tuyeres were installed at Port Kembla's BF5, leading to its reline scheduled for March 2009. The model predicted an increase in blast velocity at the tuyere nose due to the combustion of volatiles within the tuyere, with implications for tuyere pressure drop and PCI capability. Effect of lance tip geometry. A number of alternate designs were studied, with the best-performing designs promoting the dispersion of the coal particles. It was also found that the base case design promoted size segregation of the coal particles, forcing smaller coal particles to one side of the plume, leaving larger coal particles on the other side. 11 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Method for the combustion of a gas, in fixed bed, with an oxidized solid and associated installation

    OpenAIRE

    Abanades García, Juan Carlos; Fernández García, José Ramón

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The present invention pertains to the field of the generation of energy from combustible gases, incorporating the capture of carbon dioxide for use or permanent storage and, specifically relates to cyclical methods of gas combustion with oxidized solids (chemical looping processes), in fixed bed, for solving the problem of controlling temperature in the combustion of gaseous fuels in fixed beds of metal oxides operating at high pressures, and also the associated installation.

  13. Fluidised bed gasification of high-ash South African coals: An experimental and modelling study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, AS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available model (CeSFaMB). The predictive capability of the model was analysed in terms of the degree of variation between experimental and simulated results for each test. The calibrated model was used to design a 15 MW fluidised bed coal gasifier...-scale BFBG are given in Figure 1 and Table 1. Process description Coal, air, oxygen and steam are the input streams to the process which produce the output streams: gas and char (ash). Coal is fed to the gasifier by means of a screw conveyor at a...

  14. Experimental kinetic parameters in the thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling of coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliavacca, G.; Perini, M.; Parodi, E.

    2001-01-01

    The designing and the optimisation of modern and efficient combustion systems are nowadays frequently based on calculation tools for mathematical modelling, which are able to predict the evolution of the process starting from the first principles of physics. Otherwise, in many cases, specific experimental parameters are needed to describe the specific nature of the materials considered in the calculations. It is especially true in the modelling of coal combustion, which is a complex process strongly dependent on the chemical and physical features of the fuel. This paper describes some experimental techniques used to estimate the fundamental kinetic parameters of coal combustion and shows how this data may be introduced in a model calculation to predict the pollutant emissions from a real scale combustion plant [it

  15. A Pulverized Coal-Fired Boiler Optimized for Oxyfuel Combustion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Dlouhý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study on modifying a pulverized coal-fired steam boiler in a 250 MWe power plant for oxygen combustion conditions. The entry point of the study is a boiler that was designed for standard air combustion. It has been proven that simply substituting air by oxygen as an oxidizer is not sufficient for maintaining a satisfactory operating mode, not even with flue gas recycling. Boiler design optimization aggregating modifications to the boiler’s dimensions, heating surfaces and recycled flue gas flow rate, and specification of a flue gas recycling extraction point is therefore necessary in order to achieve suitable conditions for oxygen combustion. Attention is given to reducing boiler leakage, to which external pre-combustion coal drying makes a major contribution. The optimization is carried out with regard to an overall power plant conception for which a decrease in efficiency due to CO2 separation is formulated.

  16. Geochemical database of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from five power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Ronald H.; Groves, Steve; Betterton, William J.; William, Benzel; Conrad, Kelly L.; Swanson, Sharon M.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Clough, James G.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Kolker, Allan; Hower, James C.

    2011-01-01

    The principal mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Resources Program (ERP) is to (1) understand the processes critical to the formation, accumulation, occurrence, and alteration of geologically based energy resources; (2) conduct scientifically robust assessments of those resources; and (3) study the impacts of energy resource occurrence and (or) their production and use on both the environment and human health. The ERP promotes and supports research resulting in original, geology-based, non-biased energy information products for policy and decision makers, land and resource managers, other Federal and State agencies, the domestic energy industry, foreign governments, non-governmental groups, and academia. Investigations include research on the geology of oil, gas, and coal, and the impacts associated with energy resource occurrence, production, quality, and utilization. The ERP's focus on coal is to support investigations into current issues pertaining to coal production, beneficiation and (or) conversion, and the environmental impact of the coal combustion process and coal combustion products (CCPs). To accomplish these studies, the USGS combines its activities with other organizations to address domestic and international issues that relate to the development and use of energy resources.

  17. Thermal stability in a newly designed columnar-conical fluidized bed for combustion of rice husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozainee, M.; Salema, A.A.; Ngo, S.P.; Chye, G.B. [Malaysian Technological Univ., Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The effects of fluidizing and liquid propane gas (LPG) flow rates on thermal stability of a fluidized bed were examined. The aim of the study was to hybridize a columnar and conical fluidized bed (CCFB) in order to encourage the combustion of low-calorific fuels such as rice husks. Experiments were conducted to examine the thermal stability of the CCFB. Premixed primary air and liquid propane gas (LPG) was fed into the bed in order to verify its thermal stability. Temperature profiles of the combustor and bed were measured. The impact of the fluidizing velocity and LPG flow rate on the temperature profile was examined in order to analyze the influence of the fluidizing velocity and LPG rate on combustion rates. Results of the study showed that the combustion of the CCFB was sustained at a fluidizing velocity of 1.5 U{sub mf} and at an LPG flow rate of 8 liters per minute. Results of the study showed that fluidizing velocity played an important role on the thermal stability of the bed. It was concluded that the thermal stability of the combustor is sufficient for the CCFB. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. The chemical transformation of calcium in Shenhua coal during combustion in a muffle furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Sida [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Condition Monitoring and Control for Power Plant Equipment; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering; Shu, Xinqian [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The chemical reaction characteristics of calcium in three samples of Shenhua coal, i.e. raw sample, hydrochloric acid washed sample and hydrochloric acid washed light fraction, during combustion in a muffle furnace have been investigated in this paper. Ca is bound by calcite and organic matter in Shenhua coal. X ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis has been conducted to these samples' combustion products obtained by heating at different temperatures. It has been found that the organically-bound calcium could easily react with clays and transform into gehlenite and anorthite partially if combusted under 815 C, whilst the excluded minerals promoted the conversion of gehlenite to anorthite. Calcite in Shenhua coal decomposed into calcium oxide and partially transformed into calcium sulfate under 815 C, and formed gehlenite and anorthite under 1,050 C. Calcite and other HCl-dissolved minerals in Shenhua coal were responsible mainly for the characteristic that the clay minerals in Shenhua coal hardly became mullite during combustion.

  19. Formation of the gaseous phase of impurity elements from coal combustion at a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizil'shtein, L.Ya.; Levchenko, S.V.; Peretyakt'ko, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Data are reported on the distribution of impurity elements in their principal carriers: organic matter, iron sulfides, and clays. Tests with high-temperature combustion of coals and argillites indicate that elements associated with clay minerals largely remain in ash and slag. They do not pass to the gas phase - a factor to be considered in assessment of environmental impact from thermal power plants and specification of toxic concentration levels of impurity elements in coal

  20. Study of flame combustion of off-design binary coal blends in steam boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustyanskii, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in the structure of the fuel consumption by the thermal power stations of Ukraine caused by failure in supplying anthracite from the Donets Basin are analyzed and the major tasks of maintaining the functioning of the coal industry are formulated. The possibility of using, in the near future, the flame combustion of off-design solid fuels in the power boilers of the thermal power plants and combined heat and power plants is studied. The article presents results of expert tests of the TPP-210A and TP-15 boilers under flame combustion of mixtures of anthracites, lean coal, and the coal from the RSA in various combinations. When combusting, such mixtures have higher values of the combustibles yield and the ash fusibility temperature. The existence of the synergetic effect in the flame combustion of binary coal blends with different degrees of metamorphism is discussed. A number of top-priority measures have been worked out that allow for switching over the boilers designed to be fired with anthracite to using blends of coals of different ranks. Zoned thermal analysis of the TP-15 boiler furnace was performed for numerical investigation of the temperature distribution between the furnace chamber zones and exploration of the possibility of the liquid slag disposal and the temperature conditions for realization of this process. A positive result was achieved by combusting anthracite culm (AC), the coal from the RSA, and their mixtures with lean coal within the entire range of the working loads of the boilers in question. The problems of normalization of the liquid slag flow were also successfully solved without closing the slag notch. The results obtained by balance experiments suggest that the characteristics of the flame combustion of a binary blend, i.e., the temperature conditions in the furnace, the support flame values, and the degree of the fuel burnout, are similar to the characteristics of the flame of the coal with a higher reactive capacity, which

  1. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. Modeling of carbon sequestration in coal-beds: A variable saturated simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoxiang; Smirnov, Andrei V.

    2008-01-01

    Storage of carbon dioxide in deep coal seams is a profitable method to reduce the concentration of green house gases in the atmosphere while the methane as a byproduct can be extracted during carbon dioxide injection into the coal seam. In this procedure, the key element is to keep carbon dioxide in the coal seam without escaping for a long term. It is depended on many factors such as properties of coal basin, fracture state, phase equilibrium, etc., especially the porosity, permeability and saturation of the coal seam. In this paper, a variable saturation model was developed to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide sequestration and coal-bed methane recovery. This variable saturation model can be used to track the saturation variability with the partial pressures change caused by carbon dioxide injection. Saturation variability is a key factor to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide storage and methane recovery. Based on this variable saturation model, a set of related variables including capillary pressure, relative permeability, porosity, coupled adsorption model, concentration and temperature equations were solved. From results of the simulation, historical data agree with the variable saturation model as well as the adsorption model constructed by Langmuir equations. The Appalachian basin, as an example, modeled the carbon dioxide sequestration in this paper. The results of the study and the developed models can provide the projections for the CO 2 sequestration and methane recovery in coal-beds within different regional specifics

  3. Thermal analysis and kinetics of coal during oxy-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika

    2017-08-01

    The pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of Polish bituminous coal were studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis tests showed that the mass loss profiles were almost similar up to 870°C in both N2 and CO2 atmospheres, while further mass loss occurred in CO2 atmosphere at higher temperatures due to char-CO2 gasification. Replacement of N2 in the combustion environment by CO2 delayed the combustion of bituminous coal. At elevated oxygen levels, TG/DTG profiles shifted through lower temperature zone, ignition and burnout temperatures decreased and mass loss rate significantly increased and complete combustion was achieved at lower temperatures and shorter times. Kinetic analysis for the tested coal was performed using Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method. The activation energies of bituminous coal combustion at the similar oxygen content in oxy-fuel with that of air were higher than that in air atmosphere. The results indicated that, with O2 concentration increasing, the activation energies decreased.

  4. Combustion characteristics and kinetic analysis of pulverized coal under different pressure grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei ZUO

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available By using thermo gravimetric balance, experimental research on combustion characteristics and dynamics parameters of the typical coal injection from some domestic steelworks are conducted with non-isothermal method. The combustion characteristic parameters of the sample pulverized coal such as ignition temperature, peak temperature at maximum weight loss rate, burnout temperature, general burn exponent(S, and maximum combustion rate are studied under pressure grades of 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, 3.1 and 4.1 MPa, the activation energy (E and pre-exponential factor in the combustion process are calculated. The results show that when the pressure increases from 0.1 to 4.1 MPa, ignition temperature decreases by 85.7 K at most, peak temperature at maximum weight loss rate decreases by 249.3 K at most, burnout temperature decreases by 375 K at most, maximum weight loss rate increases by 10 times, and S increases by 33.6 times at most. It is also shown that there exists a kinetic complementation between E and ln A from the view point of dynamics, and the critical pressure of pulverized coal reaction control requirement and combustion mode transform is 3.1 MPa for the pulverized coal.

  5. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2004-10-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  6. Emission performance and combustion efficiency of a conical fluidized-bed combustor firing various biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permchart, W.; Kouprianov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on combustion of three distinct biomass fuels (sawdust, rice husk and pre-dried sugar cane bagasse) in a single fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) with a conical bed using silica sand as the inert bed material. Temperature, CO, NO and O 2 concentrations along the combustor height as well as in flue (stack) gas were measured in the experimental tests. The effects of fuel properties and operating conditions (load and excess air) on these variables were investigated. Both CO and NO axial profiles were found to have a maximum whose location divides conventionally the combustor volume into formation (lower) and reduction (upper) regions for these pollutants. Based on CO emission and unburned carbon content in fly ash, the combustion efficiency of the conical FBC was quantified for the selected biomass fuels fired under different operating conditions. (Author)

  7. Fluidized-bed combustion of refuse-derived fuels; Verbrennung von Ersatzbrennstoff in der Wirbelschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrecht, D.; Wolff, H.-J.; Matzmohr, R. [Universitaet Rostock (Germany). Institut fuer Energie und Umwelttechnik

    2004-07-01

    The experiments in the SWSF DN 400 test facility were to prove that combustion in a stationary, bubbling fluidized bed is an economically and ecologically feasible technology for treating the high-calorific fractions of waste materials conditioned in a mechanical and biological treatment system. This comprised the following tasks: Proof of the long-term suitability and availability of the selected fluidized-bed process; Reduction or prevention of emissions by primary, in-process measures in accordance with the specifications of the German Nuisance Control Ordinance (17. BImSchV); No secondary (additive) off-gas purification stages apart from a mechanical dedusting stage. The combustion off-gas of the fluidized-bed combustor were used for heat and power generation in a steam generator connected in series with the furnace. (orig.)

  8. Occurrence of bromine in fluidised bed combustion of solid recovered fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainikka, P.

    2011-12-15

    Corrosive ash species are the single most important factor limiting the electric efficiency of steam boiler plants fired with waste or biomass. Chlorine has been found to have a central role in the chemistry involved as it reduces the melting temperature of ash, forms corrosive vapour and gas species in the furnace and halogenated deposits on boiler heat transfer surfaces. In this context chlorine has been extensively researched. At the time of writing this thesis there was hardly any published data available on the occurrence of bromine (Br) in the aforementioned context. The objective of this work was to review the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels and characterise the behaviour of bromine in full-scale fluidised bed combustion. The review on the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels revealed that in anthropogenic wastes bromine is mainly found in connection to flame retarded substances. Several weight percentages of bromine can be found in plastics treated with brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Bromine is typically found some 100-200 mg kg-1 in mixed municipal solid wastes (MSW). Bromine may be enriched in fuels with high share of plastics, such as solid recovered fuel (SRF) or refuse derived fuel (RDF). Up to 2000 mg kg-1 was found as a monthly average in SRF, typical levels being 20-200 mg kg-1. Wastewater sludge from paper mills may contain bromine 20-100 mg kg-1 due the use of bromine based biocides. In other fuels bromine may be found in significant amounts in marine influenced coal deposits and peat as well as in biomass treated with brominated pesticides. In the experimental part SRF, spruce bark and wastewater sludge from a paper mill were co-fired in a full- scale bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler, and the collected fuels, aerosols and waterwall deposits were analysed with the focus on the fate of bromine. Bromine was mainly found to form water soluble high vapour pressure alkali metal halides in the furnace - in the form of KBr(g) and NaBr(g) as

  9. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  10. Effects of catalysts on combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Xingxing; Liu, Ming; Ma, Chunyuan

    2018-04-01

    The effects of Fe2O3, CaO, and MnO2 on the combustion characteristics and kinetics of coal-char blends were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that catalysts exhibited positive effects on the combustion characteristics of coal-char blends, especially in the initial period of coal-char blends combustion. With catalysts addition (mass 1.5%), it could improves volatile matter release, and reduces ignition point, promotes char to begin burning under lower temperature. The ignition index (C) was increased, respectively, by 27% for Fe2O3, 6% for CaO, 11.3% for MnO2, and the combustion characteristic index ( S ) was increased respectively, by 29% for Fe2O3, 5% for CaO, 8.3% for MnO2. In addition, two kinetic models (R2 and F1) were adopted to calculate the kinetic parameters in different stage of combustion processes. The results showed that with Fe2O3 or CaO addition, the activation energy at second stage decreases from 86.0 KJ/mol to 76.92 KJ/mol and 75.12 KJ/mol, respectively. There are no obvious decreases at the third stage of samples combustion process.

  11. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m 3 internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h -1 was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO 2 , and NO x . Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion

  12. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-01

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO(sub x) pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  13. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  14. Chemical Processes Related to Combustion in Fluidised Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Lindqvist, Oliver [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry

    2002-12-01

    This report covers work that has been carried out in the combustion chemistry group at the Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers, within the STEM project 12859-1, during the period 2000-07-01 to 2002-06-30. The work was comprised of the following parts: Sulphur chemistry under pressurised and atmospheric conditions; Gas/solid reactions related to sintering and fouling; Chemistry of volatile metals in combustion; Ash leaching properties; Theoretical modelling of the interactions between ions in a solution and mineral surfaces; Some related issues and co-operations with other departments. The work on sulphur chemistry has been a central issue in our group and it has now been finalised with a PhD thesis discussing some aspects of the sulphation of limestone under pressurised conditions. The influence of a number of parameters on the sulphation efficiency was investigated and compared with similar studies under atmospheric conditions. In a special study it was shown that the influence of alternating calcining - non-calcining conditions on the conversion was substantial. In addition, the oxidation of CaS and sulphided limestone was studied and a regeneration method for the sulphide sorbent was proposed. In the project part concerning gas - solid reactions that are relevant to sintering and fouling, the application of an on-line measurement technique for the study of alkali metal capture by kaolin or other sorbents is described. A new reactor set-up has been constructed and the initial results from this set up are promising. The chemistry of cadmium in combustion of MSW and biomass is the object of a PhD project. This work has been concentrated on the task of identifying Cd-compounds in fly ash samples. It has now come to a point where enough data has been collected to make it possible to give an indication about the Cd speciation in some ash types. In MSW ash particles, cadmium seem to occur mainly as chloride, oxide and sulphate. The work will continue

  15. Integrated engineering and cost model for management of coal combustion byproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevim, H. [Department of Mining Engineering, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois (United States); Renninger, S. [US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States)

    1998-07-01

    An integrated engineering and cost model has been developed as a part of an overall research project for exploring the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of disposing coal combustion byproducts and flue gas desulfurisation products in underground coal mines in Illinois. The features of the model have been keyed in user-friendly software. In this paper, the purpose and the structure of the model are described. The capabilities of the software are illustrated through an example involving transportation of byproducts in containers from a power plant to a mine site, and subsequent placement of the byproducts in a abandoned underground coal mine using a hydraulic injection system. 3 refs.

  16. Strength and corrosion behavior of SiC - based ceramics in hot coal combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breder, K.; Parten, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, four SiC-based ceramics have been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale combustors. Initial results indicate that the laboratory experiments are valuable additions to more expensive pilot plant experiments. The results show increased corrosive attack with increased temperature, and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

  17. Carbon capture from coal fired power plant using pressurized fluid bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dennis; Christensen, Tor

    2010-09-15

    This presentation will discuss the use of a pressurized fluid bed boiler system and specialized carbon capture system to burn coal and generagte clean electricity. The paper will present the existing boiler and carbon capture technology and present economics, thermal performance and emissions reduction for a 100Mw module.

  18. Sage-Grouse and Coal-Bed Methane: Can They Coexist within the Powder River Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns are growing regarding the availability of sustainable energy sources due to a rapidly growing human population and a better understanding of climate change. In recent years, the United States has focused much attention on developing domestic energy sources, which include coal-bed methane (CBM). There are vast deposits of the natural gas…

  19. Thermodynamic evaluation of chemical looping combustion for combined cooling heating and power production driven by coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Junming; Hong, Hui; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Zefeng; Jin, Hongguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An ex-situ coal gasification chemical looping combustion integrated with CCHP process has been presented. • This novel process maintains a maximum energy efficiency of 60.34%. • The fossil energy saving ratio of this process is optimize to be 27.20%. - Abstract: This study carries out an investigation concerning on the benefits of ex-situ coal gasification chemical looping combustion integrated with combined cooling, heating and power generation (CCHP-CLC) by means of thermodynamic evaluation. The coal gasification syngas is introduced into chemical looping combustion for inherent separation of CO_2 without extra energy consumed. The combustion flue gases from both air reactor and fuel reactor are sequentially fed into gas turbines for electricity production, a heat recovery vapor generator unit for further electricity generation with driving a LiBr-H_2O absorption chiller for cooling production in summer and finally a heat exchanger for daily heat water production. A preliminary parameter analysis helps to obtain the optimum operating condition, as steam-to-coal ratio (S/C) of 0.05, oxygen-to-coal ratio (O/C) of 0.75, and operating pressure of chemical looping combustion process of 5 bar. The overall energy efficiency of the CCHP-CLC process is calculated equal to 58.20% in summer compared with that of 60.34% in winter. Importantly, by utilization of such process, the reduction potential of fossil fuel (coal) consumption has been demonstrated to be 23.36% in summer and 27.20% in winter.

  20. Depositional history of the Fire Clay coal bed (Late Duckmantian), Eastern Kentucky, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    More than 3800 coal thickness measurements, proximate analyses from 97 localities, and stratigraphic and sedimentological analyses from more than 300 outcrops and cores were used in conjunction with previously reported palynological and petrographic studies to map individual benches of the coal and document bench-scale variability in the Fire Clay (Hazard No. 4) coal bed across a 1860 km2 area of the Eastern Kentucky Coal Field. The bench architecture of the Fire Clay coal bed consists of uncommon leader benches, a persistent but variable lower bench, a widespread, and generally thick upper bench, and local, variable rider benches. Rheotrophic conditions are inferred for the leader benches and lower bench based on sedimentological associations, mixed palynomorph assemblages, locally common cannel coal layers, and generally high ash yields. The lower bench consistently exhibits vertical variability in petrography and palynology that reflects changing trophic conditions as topographic depressions infilled. Infilling also led to unconfined flooding and ultimately the drowning of the lower bench mire. The drowned mire was covered by an air-fall volcanic-ash deposit, which produced the characteristic flint clay parting. The extent and uniform thickness of the parting suggests that the ash layer was deposited in water on a relatively flat surface without a thick canopy or extensive standing vegetation across most of the study area. Ash deposits led to regional ponding and establishment of a second planar mire. Because the topography had become a broadly uniform, nutrient-rich surface, upper-bench peats became widespread with large areas of the mire distant to clastic sources. Vertical sections of thick (> 70 cm), low-ash yield, upper coal bench show a common palynomorph change from arborescent lycopod dominance upward to fern and densospore-producing, small lycopod dominance, inferred as a shift from planar to ombrotrophic mire phases. Domed mires appear to have been

  1. Process to improve combustion and coalescing characteristics of coal pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, T.E.; Marlowe, W.H.

    1980-10-23

    Baking types of coal, which occur mainly in the Midwestern States of the USA, tend to form solid layers when heated to remove tar. In order to prevent this, it is proposed to pulverize the coal, to form small pellets and to coat these pellets. A suitable coating material mentioned here is sodium carbonate. Variants of the coating process are given. The coated pellets are heated.

  2. Numerical modelling of biomass combustion: Solid conversion processes in a fixed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Naser, Jamal

    2017-06-01

    Increasing demand for energy and rising concerns over global warming has urged the use of renewable energy sources to carry a sustainable development of the world. Bio mass is a renewable energy which has become an important fuel to produce thermal energy or electricity. It is an eco-friendly source of energy as it reduces carbon dioxide emissions. Combustion of solid biomass is a complex phenomenon due to its large varieties and physical structures. Among various systems, fixed bed combustion is the most commonly used technique for thermal conversion of solid biomass. But inadequate knowledge on complex solid conversion processes has limited the development of such combustion system. Numerical modelling of this combustion system has some advantages over experimental analysis. Many important system parameters (e.g. temperature, density, solid fraction) can be estimated inside the entire domain under different working conditions. In this work, a complete numerical model is used for solid conversion processes of biomass combustion in a fixed bed furnace. The combustion system is divided in to solid and gas phase. This model includes several sub models to characterize the solid phase of the combustion with several variables. User defined subroutines are used to introduce solid phase variables in commercial CFD code. Gas phase of combustion is resolved using built-in module of CFD code. Heat transfer model is modified to predict the temperature of solid and gas phases with special radiation heat transfer solution for considering the high absorptivity of the medium. Considering all solid conversion processes the solid phase variables are evaluated. Results obtained are discussed with reference from an experimental burner.

  3. Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Andersen, Myrrha E.

    2016-10-19

    Pulverized bituminous coal was burned in a 10. W externally heated entrained flow furnace under air-combustion and three oxy-combustion inlet oxygen conditions (28, 32, and 36%). Experiments were designed to produce flames with practically relevant stoichiometric ratios (SR. =1.2-1.4) and constant residence times (2.3. s). Size-classified fly ash samples were collected, and measurements focused on the soot, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) composition of the total and ultrafine (<0.6. μm) fly ash. Results indicate that although the total fly ash carbon, as measured by loss on ignition, was always acceptably low (<2%) with all three oxy-combustion conditions lower than air-combustion, the ultrafine fly ash for both air-fired and oxy-fired combustion conditions consists primarily of carbonaceous material (50-95%). Carbonaceous components on particles <0.6. μm measured by a thermal optical method showed that large fractions (52-93%) consisted of OC rather than EC, as expected. This observation was supported by thermogravimetric analysis indicating that for the air, 28% oxy, and 32% oxy conditions, 14-71% of this material may be OC volatilizing between 100. C and 550. C with the remaining 29-86% being EC/soot. However, for the 36% oxy condition, OC may comprise over 90% of the ultrafine carbon with a much smaller EC/soot contribution. These data were interpreted by considering the effects of oxy-combustion on flame attachment, ignition delay, and soot oxidation of a bituminous coal, and the effects of these processes on OC and EC emissions. Flame aerodynamics and inlet oxidant composition may influence emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from a bituminous coal. During oxy-coal combustion, judicious control of inlet oxygen concentration and placement may be used to minimize organic HAP and soot emissions.

  4. Combustion of peanut and tamarind shells in a conical fluidized-bed combustor: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprianov, Vladimir I; Arromdee, Porametr

    2013-07-01

    Combustion of peanut and tamarind shells was studied in the conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the bed material to prevent bed agglomeration. Morphological, thermogravimetric and kinetic characteristics were investigated to compare thermal and combustion reactivity between the biomass fuels. The thermogravimetric kinetics of the biomasses was fitted using the Coats-Redfern method. Experimental tests on the combustor were performed at 60 and 45 kg/h fuel feed rates, with excess air within 20-80%. Temperature and gas concentrations were measured along radial and axial directions in the reactor and at stack. The axial temperature and gas concentration profiles inside the combustor exhibited sensible effects of fuel properties and operating conditions on combustion and emission performance. High (≈ 99%) combustion efficiency and acceptable levels of CO, CxHy, and NO emissions are achievable when firing peanut shells at excess air of about 40%, whereas 60% is more preferable for burning tamarind shells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gasification of Coal and PET in Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohořelý, Michael; Vosecký, Martin; Kameníková, Petra; Punčochář, Miroslav; Skoblia, Sergej; Staf, M.; Vošta, J.; Koutský, B.; Svoboda, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, 17-18 (2006), s. 2458-2468 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/0829 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : fludized bed * gasification * plastic waste Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2006

  6. An SEM/EDX study of bed agglomerates formed during fluidized bed combustion of three biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Chirone, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration behaviour of three biomass fuels (exhausted and virgin olive husk and pine seed shells) during fluidized bed combustion in a lab-scale reactor was studied by means of SEM/EDX analysis of bed agglomerate samples. The effect of the fuel ash composition, bed temperature and sand particle size on agglomeration was investigated. The study was focused on the main fuel ash components and on their interaction with the bed sand particles. Agglomeration was favoured by high temperature, small sand size, a high fraction of K and Na and a low fraction of Ca and Mg in the fuel ash. An initial fuel ash composition close to the low-melting point eutectic composition appears to enhance agglomeration. The agglomerates examined by SEM showed a hollow structure, with an internal region enriched in K and Na where extensive melting is evident and an external one where sand particles are only attached by a limited number of fused necks. Non-molten or partially molten ash structures deposited on the sand surface and enriched in Ca and Mg were also observed. These results support an ash deposition-melting mechanism: the ash released by burning char particles inside the agglomerates is quantitatively deposited on the sand surface and then gradually embedded in the melt. The low-melting point compounds in the ash migrate towards the sand surface enriching the outermost layer, while the ash structure is progressively depleted of these compounds

  7. Study of boron behaviour in two Spanish coal combustion power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-González, Raquel; Cuesta, Aida Fuente; Córdoba, Patricia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Font, Oriol; López-Antón, M Antonia; Querol, Xavier; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa; Giménez, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    A full-scale field study was carried out at two Spanish coal-fired power plants equipped with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of boron in coals, solid by-products, wastewater streams and flue gases. The results were obtained from the simultaneous sampling of solid, liquid and gaseous streams and their subsequent analysis in two different laboratories for purposes of comparison. Although the final aim of this study was to evaluate the partitioning of boron in a (co-)combustion power plant, special attention was paid to the analytical procedure for boron determination. A sample preparation procedure was optimised for coal and combustion by-products to overcome some specific shortcomings of the currently used acid digestion methods. In addition boron mass balances and removal efficiencies in ESP and FGD devices were calculated. Mass balance closures between 83 and 149% were obtained. During coal combustion, 95% of the incoming boron was collected in the fly ashes. The use of petroleum coke as co-combustible produced a decrease in the removal efficiency of the ESP (87%). Nevertheless, more than 90% of the remaining gaseous boron was eliminated via the FGD in the wastewater discharged from the scrubber, thereby causing environmental problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Influence of quality coal combustion and domestic stoves outbreaks steam generators and the environmental pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Petrilean, Dan Codrut

    2008-01-01

    It was drawn balance a steam generator. We determined the pollutant emissions from coal combustion in the furnace Jiu Valley steam generator with an output of 150 MW. As an example of the steam generator was considered the type BabkoK Hitachi with turbine Turbao + Atom, in cogeneration.

  10. The critical assessment of the carbon dioxide purification technologies after Oxyfuel combustion of coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovchev, M.; Gadjanov, P.; Tzvetkov, N.

    2012-01-01

    The critical assessment of the two carbon dioxide purification technologies after Oxyfuel - combustion of coals are discussed in the report. It is noticed that these technologies proposed by 'Foster Wheeler' and 'Air Products' companies are under development now (2012) and their presence in the international market is to be expected in the next years. (authors)

  11. Presentation of the health impact evaluation study of atmospheric emissions of a major coal combustion installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnard, R.

    2004-12-01

    In the framework of a working group on the major installations, a study has been realized on a today coal combustion installation. The direct risk by inhalation and the risks bond to indirect exposure of atmospheric releases were analyzed. The calculation method is explained and the uncertainties are discussed to present the results. (A.L.B.)

  12. Analysis of Index Gases of Coal Spontaneous Combustion Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the index gases of coal for the prevention of spontaneous combustion is of great importance for the enhancement of coal mine safety. In this work, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIRS is presented to be used to analyze the index gases of coal in real time to monitor spontaneous combustion conditions. Both the instrument parameters and the analysis method are introduced at first by combining characteristics of the absorption spectra of the target analyte with the analysis requirements. Next, more than ten sets of the gas mixture containing ten components (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, iso-C4H10, n-C4H10, C2H4, C3H6, C2H2, CO, and CO2 are included and analyzed with a Spectrum Two FTIRS made by Perkin Elmer. The testing results show that the detection limit of most analytes is less than 2×10-6. All the detection limits meet the monitoring requirements of coal spontaneous combustion in China, which means that FTIRS may be an ideal instrument and the analysis method used in this paper is sufficient for spontaneous combustion gas monitoring on-line and even in situ, since FTIRS has many advantages such as fast analysis, being maintenance-free, and good safety.

  13. Sulfur emission from Victorian brown coal under pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion and gasification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2013-02-05

    Sulfur emission from a Victorian brown coal was quantitatively determined through controlled experiments in a continuously fed drop-tube furnace under three different atmospheres: pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion, and carbon dioxide gasification conditions. The species measured were H(2)S, SO(2), COS, CS(2), and more importantly SO(3). The temperature (873-1273 K) and gas environment effects on the sulfur species emission were investigated. The effect of residence time on the emission of those species was also assessed under oxy-fuel condition. The emission of the sulfur species depended on the reaction environment. H(2)S, SO(2), and CS(2) are the major species during pyrolysis, oxy-fuel, and gasification. Up to 10% of coal sulfur was found to be converted to SO(3) under oxy-fuel combustion, whereas SO(3) was undetectable during pyrolysis and gasification. The trend of the experimental results was qualitatively matched by thermodynamic predictions. The residence time had little effect on the release of those species. The release of sulfur oxides, in particular both SO(2) and SO(3), is considerably high during oxy-fuel combustion even though the sulfur content in Morwell coal is only 0.80%. Therefore, for Morwell coal utilization during oxy-fuel combustion, additional sulfur removal, or polishing systems will be required in order to avoid corrosion in the boiler and in the CO(2) separation units of the CO(2) capture systems.

  14. Organic geochemical investigation and coal-bed methane characteristics of the Guasare coals (Paso Diablo mine, western Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, K.; Martinez, M.; Hackley, P.; Marquez, G.; Garban, G.; Esteves, I.; Escobar, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out a geochemical study of channel samples collected from six coal beds in the Marcelina Formation (Zulia State, western Venezuela) and to determine experimentally the gas content of the coals from the Paso Diablo mine. Organic geochemical analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and isotopic analyses on-line in coalbed gas samples were performed. The results suggest that the Guasare coals were deposited in a continental environment under highly dysoxic and low salinity conditions. The non-detection of 18??(H)-oleanane does not preclude that the organic facies that gave rise to the coals were dominated by angiosperms. In addition, the presence of the sesquiterpenoid cadalene may indicate the subordinate contribution of gymnosperms (conifers) in the Paleocene Guasare mire. The average coalbed gas content obtained was 0.6 cm3/g. ??13C and D values indicate that thermogenic gas is prevalent in the studied coals. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  15. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-03-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500°C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

  17. A model of the enhancement of coal combustion using high intensity acoustic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Ha, M.Y.; Koopmann, G.H.; Scaroni, A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a model for the enhancement of coal combustion in the presence of high intensity acoustics is developed. A high intensity acoustic field induces an oscillating velocity over pulverized coal particles otherwise entrained in the main gas stream, resulting in increased heat and mass transfer. The augmented heat and mass transfer coefficients, expressed as space- and time-averaged Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for the oscillating flow, were implemented in an existing computer code (PCGC-2) capable of predicting various aspects of pulverized coal combustion and gasification. Increases in the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers of about 45, 60 and 82.5% at sound pressure levels of 160, 165, and 170 dB for 100 μm coal particles were obtained due to increases in the acoustic slop velocity associated with the increased sound pressure levels. The main effect of the acoustic field was observed during the char combustion phase in a diffusionally controlled situation. A decrease in the char burnout length (time) of 15.7% at 160 dB and 30.2% at 170 dB was obtained compared to the case with no sound for the 100 μm coal particles

  18. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T; Aittoniemi, P [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E; Latva-Somppi, J; Kurkela, J [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  19. Toward an understanding of coal combustion in blast furnace tuyere injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John G. Mathieson; John S. Truelove; Harold Rogers [BlueScope Steel Research, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    The former Broken Hill Proprietary Company Limited, along with its successors BlueScope Steel and BHP Billiton, like many of their iron and steel making counterparts, has had a long history of investigating pulverised coal injection and combustion under the conditions of blast furnace tuyere injection. A succession of pilot scale hot models and combustion test rigs have been constructed and operated at the company's Newcastle Laboratories beginning with the pilot scale hot raceway model in 1981. Each successive generation of test rig has attempted to provide a closer approximation to the actual blast furnace situation with the current test rig (1998 to present) seeking to promote an 'expanding' combusting coal plume. Test rig configuration is demonstrated to have a significant effect on coal burnout at a nominal transit time of 20 ms. The development of the combustion test rigs has been supported through the co-development of a range of sampling and measuring techniques and the application of a number of numerical combustion models. This paper reviews some of the milestones along the path of these investigations, the current understandings and what the future potentially holds. It's not solved yet! 17 refs., 11 figs.