WorldWideScience

Sample records for beat heart rate

  1. Beat-to-beat heart rate detection in multi-lead abdominal fetal ECG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C H L; van Laar, J O E H; Vullings, R; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    Reliable monitoring of fetal condition often requires more information than is provided by cardiotocography, the standard technique for fetal monitoring. Abdominal recording of the fetal electrocardiogram may offer valuable additional information, but unfortunately is troubled by poor signal-to-noise ratios during certain parts of pregnancy. To increase the usability of abdominal fetal ECG recordings, an algorithm was developed that enhances fetal QRS complexes in these recordings and thereby provides a promising method for detecting the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate in recordings with poor signal-to-noise ratios. The method was evaluated on generated recordings with controlled signal-to-noise ratios and on actual recordings that were performed in clinical practice and were annotated by two independent experts. The evaluation on the generated signals demonstrated excellent results (sensitivity of 0.98 for SNR≥1.5). Only for SNRheart rate detection exceeded 2 ms, which may still suffice for cardiotocography but is unacceptable for analysis of the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the method in actual recordings were reduced to approximately 90% for SNR≤2.4, but were excellent for higher signal-to-noise ratios.

  2. Microwave radiation and heart-beat rate of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C K; Han, L F; Guy, A W

    1980-06-01

    Each of three adult New Zealand rabbits, 2 male and 1 female albinos, was exposed dorsally or ventrally, to 2450-MHz plane waves for 20 min under each of several field conditions: 1) to continuous waves (CW) at 5 mW/cm2; 2) to pulsed waves (PW) of 1-microsecond width that recurred 700 pps at an average of 5 mW/cm2 and at a peak of 7.1 W/cm2; 3) to PW of 10-microseconds width at a peak of 13.7 W/cm2 that were synchronized with and triggered by the R wave of the electrocardiogram (EKG) at various delay times (0, 100, and 200 ms; and 4) to CW at 80 mW/cm2. Carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes were used to record the EKG from forelimbs of an animal before, during, and after irradiation whilst it was maintained in a constant exposure geometry in a wooden squeeze box. Field induced changes in the heart-beat rate were observed at 80 mW/cm2 but not a lower average power densities, although a peak positive chronotropic effect might have been occasioned by PM introduced at 100 and 200 ms after the R wave peak. No cumulative effect was observed over a period of four months. Thermographic analysis revealed relatively little absorption of microwave energy by the myocardium irrespective of anatomical aspect of exposure.

  3. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia during anaesthesia: assessment of respiration related beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loula, P; Jäntti, V; Yli-Hankala, A

    1997-11-01

    Beat-to-beat heart rate variability analysis is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of neuropathy. Respiration-related heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) reflects the function of parasympathetic nervous system during spontaneous ventilation while awake. RSA is also claimed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. Power spectrum analysis or various averaging techniques of the heart rate variability are usually applied. The current literature, however, does not usually interpret the ground rules and limitations of the method used, and this may sometimes lead to erroneous conclusions on the data. The aim of our study was to compare and analyse critically the performance of different methods of evaluating RSA during anaesthesia and positive pressure ventilation. Power spectrum analysis, the root mean square of the successive RR-interval difference (RMSSD), and two respiration related methods, RSA index and average phase RSA, were included in the comparison. To test these methods, 11 patients were anaesthetised with isoflurane and their lungs were ventilated mechanically with a frequency of 6 cycles min-1. Each patient received a bolus dose of atropine (20 micrograms kg-1) during the trial. Electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram and tracheal pressure signal from respirator were recorded and analyses were performed off-line. We demonstrated that general indices, such as RMSSD, may be strongly affected by heart rate level and other non-respiration related variations in heart rate. We also showed that the effect of unwanted fluctuations on RSA can be reduced with respiration dependent beat-to-beat methods. Furthermore we confirmed that in addition to the amplitude, also the pattern of respiratory sinus arrhythmia is of interest: the pattern is reversed in phase compared to spontaneous breathing while awake, as we have shown earlier. To analyse RSA during anaesthesia, we recommend the use of an average phase RSA method based on beat-to-beat variability

  4. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, K C; Chou, C K; Guy, A W

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  5. Operative correction of judoists’ training loads on the base of on-line monitoring of heart beats rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: ensure increase of effectiveness of training process’s control by means of operative correction of training loads of different qualification judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate indicators. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Brest SCJSOR № 1. Judo wrestlers of different sport qualification (age 17-19 years old, n=15 participated in the research. Monitoring of judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate was carried out with the help of system “Polar”. Results: we have found factorial structure of functional fitness in every profile of sportsmen. Model characteristics of judo wrestlers were supplemented with the most important sides of functional fitness. Analysis of indicators of restoration effectiveness indicators (REI in both groups of judo wrestlers showed high level of organism’s responsiveness to training load of special and power orientation in comparison with speed power load. We have worked out algorithm of operative correction of training loads by indicators of heart beats rate in training process, depending on orientation and intensity of loads’ physiological influence on judo wrestler. Conclusions: Telemetric on-line monitoring of sportsman’s heart beats rate and calculation of REI permit to objectively assess effectiveness of training’s construction and of micro-cycle in total and detect in due time the trend to development of over-loading and failure of adaptation.

  6. Dynamic focusing in the zebrafish beating heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Delgado, L.; Peralta, M.; Mercader, N.; Ripoll, J.

    2016-03-01

    Of the large amount of the animal models available for cardiac research, the zebrafish is extremely valuable due to its transparency during early stages of development. In this work a dual illumination laser sheet microscope with simultaneous dual camera imaging is used to image the beating heart at 200 fps, dynamically and selectively focusing inside the beating heart through the use of a tunable lens. This dual color dynamic focusing enables imaging with cellular resolution at unprecedented high frame rates, allowing 3D imaging of the whole beating heart of embryonic zebrafish.

  7. Power Spectrum Analysis of Heart Rate Fluctuation: A Quantitative Probe of Beat-To-Beat Cardiovascular Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrod, Solange; Gordon, David; Ubel, F. Andrew; Shannon, Daniel C.; Barger, A. Clifford; Cohen, Richard J.

    1981-07-01

    Power spectrum analysis of heart rate fluctuations provides a quantitative noninvasive means of assessing the functioning of the short-term cardiovascular control systems. We show that sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activity make frequency-specific contributions to the heart rate power spectrum, and that renin-angiotensin system activity strongly modulates the amplitude of the spectral peak located at 0.04 hertz. Our data therefore provide evidence that the reninangiotensin system plays a significant role in short-term cardiovascular control on the time scale of seconds to minutes.

  8. An efficient method of addressing ectopic beats: new insight into data preprocessing of heart rate variability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; He, Fang-Tian

    2011-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is affected by ectopic beats. An efficient method was proposed to deal with the ectopic beats. The method was based on trend correlation of the heart timing signal. Predictor of R-R interval (RRI) value at ectopic beat time was constructed by the weight calculation and the slope estimation of preceding normal RRI. The type of ectopic beat was detected and replaced by the predictor of RRI. The performance of the simulated signal after ectopic correction was tested by the standard value using power spectrum density (PSD) estimation, whereas the results of clinical data with ectopic beats were compared with the adjacent ectopic-free data. The result showed the frequency indexes after ectopy corrected had less error than other methods with the test of simulated signal and clinical data. It indicated our method could improve the PSD estimation in HRV analysis. The method had advantages of high accuracy and real time properties to recover the sinus node modulation.

  9. An efficient method of addressing ectopic beats: new insight into data preprocessing of heart rate variability analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng WEN; Fang-tian HE

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is affected by ectopic beats.An efficient method was proposed to deal with the ectopic beats.The method was based on trend correlation of the heart timing signal.Predictor of R-R interval (RRI) value at ectopic beat time was constructed by the weight calculation and the slope estimation of preceding normal RRI.The type of ectopic beat was detected and replaced by the predictor of RRI.The performance of the simulated signal after ectopic correction was tested by the standard value using power spectrum density (PSD) estimation,whereas the results of clinical data with ectopic beats were compared with the adjacent ectopic-free data.The result showed the frequency indexes after ectopy corrected had less error than other methods with the test of simulated signal and clinical data.It indicated our method could improve the PSD estimation in HRV analysis.The method had advantages of high accuracy and real time properties to recover the sinus node modulation.

  10. Heart rate monitoring on the stroke unit. What does heart beat tell about prognosis? An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stypmann Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend maintaining the heart rate (HR of acute stroke patients within physiological limits; data on the frequency and predictors of significant deviations from these limits are scarce. Methods Demographical data, stroke risk factors, NIH stroke scale score, lesion size and location, and ECG parameters were prospectively assessed in 256 patients with ischemic stroke. Patients were continuously monitored for at least 24 hours on a certified stroke unit. Tachycardia (HR ≥120 bpm and bradycardia (HR Results HR ≥120 bpm occurred in 39 patients (15%. Stroke severity (larger lesion size/higher NIHSS-score on admission, atrial fibrillation and HR on admission predicted its occurrence. HR Conclusions Significant tachycardia and bradycardia are frequent phenomena in acute stroke; however they do not independently predict clinical course or outcome. Continuous monitoring allows detecting rhythm disturbances in stroke patients and allows deciding whether urgent medical treatment is necessary.

  11. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SA) node --- the heart's natural pacemaker - sends out electrical signals faster than usual. The heart rate is fast, but the heart beats properly. Causes of sinus tachycardia A rapid heartbeat may be your body's response to common conditions such as: Fever Anxiety ...

  12. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  13. Analysis of Scalp Potential Activity and Heart Rate Variability during Volitional Control of Heart Beat%意识控制心率过程中头皮脑电活动和心率变异性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于晓琳; 张建保; 王珏

    2009-01-01

    介绍了通过小波包能量和近似熵方法,研究了意识控制心率过程中头皮脑电活动和心率变异性的变化规律.实验结果表明,心率的减慢和加快可以通过意识活动对自主神经的主动调节进行控制,并且脑电活动的变化先于心率的变化.但是,这种控制与运动神经系统不同,因为不同的皮层位置分别与心率的减慢和加快相关联.中央前区与副交感神经活动相关,控制心率减慢,而中央后区与交感神经活动相关,控制心率加快.%In the study the changes of scalp potential and cardiac autonomic nervous system during volitional control of heart beat are explored with the wavelet packet parameters and approximate entropy (ApEn) of Electroencephalogram (EEG) and heart rate variability.The results show that volition can control heart beat and the changes of brain activity are earlier than that of autonomic activity.But its control of heart beat is very different from the motor nervous system because different cortical positions are respectively concerned during the quick and slow control of heart beat.The pre-central areas of brain are correlated with parasympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to slow down.The post-central areas of brain are correlated with sympathetic activity by which HR is controlled to accelerate.

  14. The beat of social cognition: exploring the role of Heart Rate Variability as marker of mentalizing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okruszek, Łukasz; Dolan, Kirsty; Lawrence, Megan; Cella, Matteo

    2016-10-04

    There is a long standing debate on the influence of physiological signals on social behavior. Recent studies suggested that heart rate variability (HRV) may be a marker of social cognitive processes. However, this evidence is preliminary and limited to laboratory studies. In this study 25 participants were assessed with a social cognition battery and asked to wear a wearable device measuring HRV for 6 consecutive days. The results showed that reduced HRV correlated with higher hostility attribution bias. However, no relationship was found between HRV and other social cognitive measures including facial emotion recognition, theory of mind or emotional intelligence. These results suggest that HRV may be linked to specific social cognitive processes requiring online emotional processing, in particular those related to social threat. These findings are discussed in the context of the neurovisceral integration model.

  15. How random is your heart beat?

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanowicz, K; Holyst, J A; Zebrowski, J J

    2006-01-01

    We measure the content of random uncorrelated noise in heart rate variability using a general method of noise level estimation using a coarse grained entropy. We show that usually - except for atrial fibrillation - the level of such noise is within 5 - 15% of the variance of the data and that the variability due to the linearly correlated processes is dominant in all cases analysed but atrial fibrillation. The nonlinear deterministic content of heart rate variability remains significant and may not be ignored.

  16. Heart rates during competitive orienteering.

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, S R; Bailey, R.; Lewis, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the heart rate profiles of 16 experienced, competitive orienteers (aged 15-62 years) during three competitive events. Each competitor was assessed over three different types of course which were classified as: fast run (FR), slow run (SR) and highly physical (HP). The results showed that all subjects recorded heart rates that were between 140 and 180 beats min-1 for the majority of each event (irrespective of age or course type). The heart rate data indicated that the ...

  17. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  18. Heart rate variability and heart rate recovery as prognostic factors

    OpenAIRE

    GRAD, COSMIN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Heart rate (HR) can appear static and regular at rest, during exercise or recovery after exercise. However, HR is constantly adjusted due to factors such as breathing, blood pressure control, thermoregulation and the renin-angiotensin system, leading to a more dynamic response that can be quantified using HRV (heart rate variability). HRV is defined as the deviation in time between successive normal heart beat and is a noninvasive method to measure the total variation in a ...

  19. Connection forms for beating the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mensch, Arthur; Piuze, Emmanuel; Lehnert, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    We combine recent work on modeling cardiac mechanics using a finite volume method with the insight that heart wall myofiber orientations exhibit a particular volumetric geometry. In our finite vol- ume mechanical simulation we use Maurer-Cartan one-forms to add a geometrical consistency term...... to control the rate at which myofiber ori- entation changes in the direction perpendicular to the heart wall. This allows us to estimate material properties related to both the passive and active parameters in our model. We have obtained preliminary results on the 4 canine datasets of the 2014 mechanics...... challenge using the FEBio software suite. In ongoing work we are validating and improving the model using rat heart (ex-vivo DTI and in-vivo tagging) MRI datasets, from which we have estimated strain tensors....

  20. Model for the heart beat-to-beat time series during meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, A.; Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a pacemaker, that simulates the membrane potential of the sinoatrial node, modulated by a periodic input signal plus correlated noise that simulates the respiratory input. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce in the phase space the trajectory of experimental heart beat-to-beat interval data. The data sets were recorded during meditation practices of the Chi and Kundalini Yoga techniques. Our study indicates that in the first case the respiratory signal has the shape of a smoothed square wave, and in the second case it has the shape of a smoothed triangular wave.

  1. Model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat time interval series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurro, Alberto; Diambra, Luis; Malta, C. P.

    2005-09-01

    In this study we present a model for the respiratory modulation of the heart beat-to-beat interval series. The model consists of a set of differential equations used to simulate the membrane potential of a single rabbit sinoatrial node cell, excited with a periodic input signal with added correlated noise. This signal, which simulates the input from the autonomous nervous system to the sinoatrial node, was included in the pacemaker equations as a modulation of the iNaK current pump and the potassium current iK. We focus at modeling the heart beat-to-beat time interval series from normal subjects during meditation of the Kundalini Yoga and Chi techniques. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that while the embedding of pre-meditation and control cases have a roughly circular shape, it acquires a polygonal shape during meditation, triangular for the Kundalini Yoga data and quadrangular in the case of Chi data. The model was used to assess the waveshape of the respiratory signals needed to reproduce the trajectory of the experimental data in the phase space. The embedding of the Chi data could be reproduced using a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a square wave. In the case of Kundalini Yoga data, the embedding was reproduced with a periodic signal obtained by smoothing a triangular wave having a rising branch of longer duration than the decreasing branch. Our study provides an estimation of the respiratory signal using only the heart beat-to-beat time interval series.

  2. Heart Motion Prediction Based on Adaptive Estimation Algorithms for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Franke, Timothy J.; Bebek, Özkan; Shiose, Akira; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Robotic assisted beating heart surgery aims to allow surgeons to operate on a beating heart without stabilizers as if the heart is stationary. The robot actively cancels heart motion by closely following a point of interest (POI) on the heart surface—a process called Active Relative Motion Canceling (ARMC). Due to the high bandwidth of the POI motion, it is necessary to supply the controller with an estimate of the immediate future of the POI motion over a prediction horizon in order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy. In this paper, two least-square based prediction algorithms, using an adaptive filter to generate future position estimates, are implemented and studied. The first method assumes a linear system relation between the consecutive samples in the prediction horizon. On the contrary, the second method performs this parametrization independently for each point over the whole the horizon. The effects of predictor parameters and variations in heart rate on tracking performance are studied with constant and varying heart rate data. The predictors are evaluated using a 3 degrees of freedom test-bed and prerecorded in-vivo motion data. Then, the one-step prediction and tracking performances of the presented approaches are compared with an Extended Kalman Filter predictor. Finally, the essential features of the proposed prediction algorithms are summarized. PMID:23976889

  3. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  4. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, A.; Barat, P.

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation ...

  5. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, A

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation is found to be more.

  6. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  7. Frequency Structure of Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    MUKHIN, V.

    2008-01-01

    Factor structure of heart rate periodogram has been detected with factor analysis. The results showed that there are at least four periodical phenomena of HRV. Two of them have not been discovered and physiologically explained yet. Their frequency ranges are 0.21 to 0.31 1/beat with the peak at 0.26 1/beat and 0.25 to 0.5 1/beat with the peak 0.35 1/beat. Despite of differences of the peak frequencies the frequency rages of the factors are overlapped. Therefore, power of spectral density with...

  8. Heart rates during competitive orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, S R; Bailey, R; Lewis, J

    1993-03-01

    This study investigated the heart rate profiles of 16 experienced, competitive orienteers (aged 15-62 years) during three competitive events. Each competitor was assessed over three different types of course which were classified as: fast run (FR), slow run (SR) and highly physical (HP). The results showed that all subjects recorded heart rates that were between 140 and 180 beats min-1 for the majority of each event (irrespective of age or course type). The heart rate data indicated that the activity was largely aerobic but varied in intensity, with phases of strenuous anaerobic work. The type of course was shown significantly (analysis of variance; P orienteer (FR = 160, HP = 158, SR = 150 beats min-1), with courses that required more technical skill and hence slower running producing lower mean heart rates; although the general physical demands were similar for all courses. The older orienteers (> 45 years) recorded heart rate profiles that were similar to those of the young orienteers with no correlation being found between age and mean heart rate while exercising.

  9. Enhancing Heart-Beat-Based Security for mHealth Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Sourdis, Ioannis; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    In heart-beat-based security, a security key is derived from the time difference between consecutive heart beats (the inter-pulse interval, IPI), which may, subsequently, be used to enable secure communication. While heart-beat-based security holds promise in mobile health (mHealth) applications, there currently exists no work that provides a detailed characterization of the delivered security in a real system. In this paper, we evaluate the strength of IPI-based security keys in the context of entity authentication. We investigate several aspects that should be considered in practice, including subjects with reduced heart-rate variability (HRV), different sensor-sampling frequencies, intersensor variability (i.e., how accurate each entity may measure heart beats) as well as average and worst-case-authentication time. Contrary to the current state of the art, our evaluation demonstrates that authentication using multiple, less-entropic keys may actually increase the key strength by reducing the effects of intersensor variability. Moreover, we find that the maximal key strength of a 60-bit key varies between 29.2 bits and only 5.7 bits, depending on the subject's HRV. To improve security, we introduce the inter-multi-pulse interval (ImPI), a novel method of extracting entropy from the heart by considering the time difference between nonconsecutive heart beats. Given the same authentication time, using the ImPI for key generation increases key strength by up to 3.4 × (+19.2 bits) for subjects with limited HRV, at the cost of an extended key-generation time of 4.8 × (+45 s).

  10. The effect of low-dose β-blocker on heart rate and heart rate variability in health subjects wth a resting heart rate of less than 65 beats per minute: Effect on the quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We assessed the effect of a low-dose β-blocker on heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and image quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in healthy subjects with low HR. CCTA was performed with a 64-slice CT in 75 subjects with a HR of less than 65 beats per minute (bpm). Subjects were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (G1), 35 with a low dose β-blocker; and Group 2 (G2), 40 without pre-medication. The image quality (IQ) of the CCTA was assessed on a 4-point grading scale (1, poor; 4, excellent). Initial HR (bpm) was not different between the 2 groups. HR during CCTA was lower in G1 than G2 (50.3 ± 5.6 vs. 53.3 ± 4.8, p = 0.016). HRV was not different between the 2 groups. Per-segment analysis showed better IQ at the mid-segment of the right coronary artery (3.0 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p = 0.039) and the first diagonal branch (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.024), in the G1 than the G2 group, respectively. The IQ was negatively correlated with HR, but no correlation was found between HRV and IQ. The IQs in the per-vessel analysis were not different between the 2 groups. Low-dose β-blocker reduced HR and improved the IQ of CCTA in a few segments, even at a HR of less than 65 bpm. However the effect was limited.

  11. Measuring Cosmic Distances with Stellar Heart Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    this particular type and bright enough to be easily seen with the unaided eye. In 1912, American astronomer Henrietta Leavitt observed 20 variable stars of the Cepheid-type in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), one of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way. For all purposes, these stars are all at the same distance (the size of the SMC is negligible compared to its much larger distance from us). Apparently brighter stars in this group are thus also intrinsically brighter (more luminous). Henrietta Leavitt discovered a basic relation between the intrinsic brightness and the pulsation period of Cepheid variable stars in the SMC and showed that intrinsically brighter Cepheids have longer periods. This relation is now known as the "Period-Luminosity relation" and is an important way to derive the distance to stars of this type. By measuring the period of a Cepheid star, its intrinsic brightness can be deduced and from the observed apparent brightness, the distance may then be calculated. In this way, Cepheid stars are used by astronomers as one of the "standard candles" in the Universe. They act either as distance indicators themselves or are used to calibrate other distance indicators. The Cepheid stars have taken on an even more important role since the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale relies completely on them for the calibration of distance indicators to reach cosmologically large distances. In other words, if the calibration of the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation were wrong, the entire extragalactic distance scale and with it, the rate of cosmic expansion and the related acceleration, as well as the estimated age of the Universe, would also be off. A main problem is thus to calibrate as accurately as possible the Period-Luminosity relation for nearby Cepheids. This requires measuring their distances with the utmost precision, a truly daunting task. And this is where interferometry now enters the picture. The Baade

  12. In vivo electroporation mediated gene delivery to the beating heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick L Ayuni

    Full Text Available Gene therapy may represent a promising alternative strategy for cardiac muscle regeneration. In vivo electroporation, a physical method of gene transfer, has recently evolved as an efficient method for gene transfer. In the current study, we investigated the efficiency and safety of a protocol involving in vivo electroporation for gene transfer to the beating heart. Adult male rats were anesthetised and the heart exposed through a left thoracotomy. Naked plasmid DNA was injected retrograde into the transiently occluded coronary sinus before the electric pulses were applied. Animals were sacrificed at specific time points and gene expression was detected. Results were compared to the group of animals where no electric pulses were applied. No post-procedure arrhythmia was observed. Left ventricular function was temporarily altered only in the group were high pulses were applied; CK-MB (Creatine kinase and TNT (Troponin T were also altered only in this group. Histology showed no signs of toxicity. Gene expression was highest at day one. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation with an optimized protocol is a safe and effective tool for nonviral gene delivery to the beating heart. This method may be promising for clinical settings especially for perioperative gene delivery.

  13. Peak misdetection in heart-beat-based security : Characterization and tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Sourdis, Ioannis; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-01

    The Inter-Pulse-Interval (IPI) of heart beats has previously been suggested for security in mobile health (mHealth) applications. In IPI-based security, secure communication is facilitated through a security key derived from the time difference between heart beats. However, there currently exists no

  14. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  15. Wearable sensor for heart rate detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Cong; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years heart and blood vessel diseases kill more people than everything else combined. The daily test of heart rate for the prevention and treatment of the heart head blood-vessel disease has the vital significance. In order to adapt the transformation of medical model and solve the low accuracy problem of the traditional method of heart rate measuring, we present a new method to monitor heart rate in this paper. The heart rate detection is designed for daily heart rate detection .The heart rate signal is collected by the heart rate sensor. The signal through signal processing circuits converts into sine wave and square wave in turn. And then the signal is transmitted to the computer by data collection card. Finally, we use LABVIEW and MATLAB to show the heart rate wave and calculate the heart rate. By doing contrast experiment with medical heart rate product, experimental results show that the system can realize rapidly and accurately measure the heart rate value. A measurement can be completed within 10 seconds and the error is less than 3beat/min. And the result shows that the method in this paper has a strong anti-interference ability. It can effectively suppress the movement interference. Beyond that the result is insensitive to light.

  16. Scale Invariant Properties in Heart Rate Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, D.; Dudkowska, A.; Zwierz, M.; Galaska, R.; Rynkiewicz, A.

    2006-05-01

    The rate of heart beat is controlled by autonomic nervous system: accelerated by the sympathetic system and slowed by the parasympathetic system. Scaling properties in heart rate are usually related to the intrinsic dynamics of this physiological regulatory system. The two packages calculating local exponent spectra: Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (accessible from Physionet home page http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/23/e215) are tested, and then used to investigate the spectrum of singularity exponents in series of heart rates obtained from patients suffering from reduced left ventricle systolic function. It occurs that this state of a heart could be connected to some perturbation in the regulatory system, because the heart rate appears to be less controlled than in a healthy human heart. The multifractality in the heart rate signal is weakened: the spectrum is narrower and moved to higher values what indicate the higher activity of the sympatethic nervous system.

  17. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serkan Cay; Goksel Cagirci; Ramazan Atak; Yucel Balbay; Ahmet Duran Demir; Sinan Aydogdu

    2010-01-01

    Background Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise.Methods A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed.Results Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrment of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P<0.05). The lower heart rate increment (<106 beats/min) and heart rate decrement (<95 beats/min) were significantly associated with the presence of early repolarization. After adjustment for age and sex, the multiple-adjusted OR of the risk of presence of early repolarization was 2.98 (95% CI 1.21-7.34) (P=0.018) and 7.73 (95% CI 2.84-21.03) (P <0.001) for the lower heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively.Conclusions Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  18. Frank-Starling mechanism retains recirculation fraction of myocardial Ca(2+) in the beating heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, J; Araki, J; Mohri, S; Minami, H; Doi, Y; Fujinaka, W; Miyaji, K; Kiyooka, T; Oshima, Y; Iribe, G; Hirakawa, M; Suga, H

    2001-12-01

    Myocardial Ca(2+) handling in excitation-contraction coupling is the second primary determinant of energy or O(2) demand in a working heart. The intracellular and extracellular routes remove myocardial Ca(2+) that was released into the sarcoplasma with different Ca(2+): ATP stoichiometries. The intracellular route is twice as economical as the extracellular route. Therefore the fraction of total Ca(2+) removed via the sarcoplasmic reticulum, i.e., the recirculation fraction of intracellular Ca(2+) (RF), determines the economy of myocardial Ca(2+) handling. RF has conventionally been estimated as the exponential decay rate of postextrasystolic potentiation (PESP). However, we have found that PESP usually decays in alternans, but not exponentially in the canine left ventricle beating above 100 beats/min. We have succeeded in estimating RF from the exponential decay component of an alternans PESP. We previously found that the Frank-Starling mechanism or varied ventricular preload did not affect the economy of myocardial Ca(2+) handling. Then, to account for this important finding, we hypothesized that the Frank-Starling mechanism would not affect RF at a constant heart rate. We tested this hypothesis and found its supportive evidence in 11 canine left ventricles. We conclude that RF at a constant heart rate would remain constant, independent of the Frank-Starling mechanism.

  19. Heart Rate Extraction from Vowel Speech Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelwadood Mesleh; Dmitriy Skopin; Sergey Baglikov; Anas Quteishat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel non-contact heart rate extraction method from vowel speech signals.The proposed method is based on modeling the relationship between speech production of vowel speech signals and heart activities for humans where it is observed that the moment of heart beat causes a short increment (evolution) of vowel speech formants.The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is used to detect the formant maximum peaks so as to accurately estimate the heart rate.Compared with traditional contact pulse oximeter,the average accuracy of the proposed non-contact heart rate extraction method exceeds 95%.The proposed non-contact heart rate extraction method is expected to play an important role in modern medical applications.

  20. HEART RATE DURING SLEEP: IMPLICATIONS FOR MONITORING TRAINING STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam R. Waldeck

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Resting heart rate has sometimes been used as a marker of training status. It is reasonable to assume that the relationship between heart rate and training status should be more evident during sleep when extraneous factors that may influence heart rate are reduced. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of monitoring heart rate during sleep when training status remained unchanged, to determine if this measurement had sufficient precision to be used as a marker of training status. The heart rate of ten female subjects was monitored for 24 hours on three occasions over three weeks whilst training status remained unchanged. Average, minimum and maximum heart rate during sleep was calculated. The average heart rate of the group during sleep was similar on each of the three tests (65 ± 9, 63 ± 6 and 67 ± 7 beats·min-1 respectively. The range in minimum heart rate variation during sleep for all subjects over the three testing sessions was from 0 to 10 beats·min-1 (mean = 5 ± 3 beats·min-1 and for maximum heart rate variation was 2 to 31 beats·min-1 (mean = 13 ± 9 beats·min-1. In summary it was found that on an individual basis the minimum heart rate during sleep varied by about 8 beats·min-1. This amount of intrinsic day-to-day variation needs to be considered when changes in heart rate that may occur with changes in training status are interpreted

  1. [Heart rate measurement algorithm based on artificial intelligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengxian, Cai; Wei, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the heart rate measurement method using time-lapse image of human cheek, this paper proposes a novel measurement algorithm based on Artificial Intelligence. The algorithm combining with fuzzy logic theory acquires the heart beat point by using the defined fuzzy membership function of each sampled point. As a result, it calculates the heart rate by counting the heart beat points in a certain time period. Experiment shows said algorithm satisfies in operability, accuracy and robustness, which leads to constant practical value.

  2. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Jan Pelgrim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques.

  3. BIOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE UNDER-APPRECIATED AND IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND HEART RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (beat-to-beat changes in the RR interval) has attracted considerable attention over the last 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17,000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in heart rate variability is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to foetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated heart rate variability parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published papers. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate. Using two biophysical models, we develop a theory for this, and confirm that heart rate variability is primarily dependent on heart rate and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in heart rate variability and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in heart rate. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many papers that have not adjusted properly or at all for heart rate differences when comparing heart rate variability in multiple circumstances. PMID:25225208

  4. Decreased beating rate variability of spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes after co-incubation with endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Saworski, Jana; Werdan, Karl; Müller-Werdan, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) in critically ill patients indicates a poor prognosis. In heart failure patients, there is an elevated sympathetic tone, reflected by a dominance of sympathetic parameters in HRV, whereas in critically ill patients sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation of heart rate is attenuated despite increased catecholamine blood levels. Thus, autonomic dysfunction in the critically ill cannot be causally related to an impairment at the level of neural transmission, but may be due to a derangement of signal transduction at the effector cell level. On the basis of our working hypothesis that endotoxin may be involved in this blunting of effector cell response to nerval input, we studied the spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes under the influence of endotoxin. Applying the clinically established indices of HRV to the analysis of beating rate variability (BRV) of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in serum-free medium, a narrowing of their BRV by endotoxin is demonstrated. We propose that the narrowing of HRV in critically ill patients does not only reflect the altered input from the central or peripheral neurons, but rather a remodeling of the cardiac pacemaker cells by endotoxin and inflammatory mediators.

  5. ZebraBeat: a flexible platform for the analysis of the cardiac rate in zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Elisa; Zaccaria, Gian Maria; Hadhoud, Marwa; Rizzo, Giovanna; Ponzini, Raffaele; Morbiducci, Umberto; Santoro, Massimo Mattia

    2014-05-01

    Heartbeat measurement is important in assesssing cardiac function because variations in heart rhythm can be the cause as well as an effect of hidden pathological heart conditions. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as one of the most useful model organisms for cardiac research. Indeed, the zebrafish heart is easily accessible for optical analyses without conducting invasive procedures and shows anatomical similarity to the human heart. In this study, we present a non-invasive, simple, cost-effective process to quantify the heartbeat in embryonic zebrafish. To achieve reproducibility, high throughput and flexibility (i.e., adaptability to any existing confocal microscope system and with a user-friendly interface that can be easily used by researchers), we implemented this method within a software program. We show here that this platform, called ZebraBeat, can successfully detect heart rate variations in embryonic zebrafish at various developmental stages, and it can record cardiac rate fluctuations induced by factors such as temperature and genetic- and chemical-induced alterations. Applications of this methodology may include the screening of chemical libraries affecting heart rhythm and the identification of heart rhythm variations in mutants from large-scale forward genetic screens.

  6. A Miniature Mobile Robot for Navigation and Positioning on the Beating Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patronik, Nicholas A.; Ota, Takeyoshi; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2010-01-01

    Robotic assistance enhances conventional endoscopy; yet, limitations have hindered its mainstream adoption for cardiac surgery. HeartLander is a miniature mobile robot that addresses several of these limitations by providing precise and stable access over the surface of the beating heart in a less-invasive manner. The robot adheres to the heart and navigates to any desired target in a semiautonomous fashion. The initial therapies considered for HeartLander generally require precise navigation to multiple surface targets for treatment. To balance speed and precision, we decompose any general target acquisition into navigation to the target region followed by fine positioning to each target. In closed-chest, beating-heart animal studies, we demonstrated navigation to targets located around the circumference of the heart, as well as acquisition of target patterns on the anterior and posterior surfaces with an average error of 1.7 mm. The average drift encountered during station-keeping was 0.7 mm. These preclinical results demonstrate the feasibility of precise semiautonomous delivery of therapy to the surface of the beating heart using HeartLander. PMID:20179783

  7. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.6...

  8. Lung Transplantation from Nonheparinized Category III Non-Heart-Beating Donors. A Single-Centre Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel E.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Nijkamp, Danielle M.; Vermeyden, J. Wytse; van der Bij, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Background. Despite the increasing use of extended lung donors, the shortage of lung donors remains. Usage of non-heart-beating (NHB) lung donors contributes to fight this shortage. We describe our experience in 21 consecutive adult lung transplantations using nonheparinized category III NHB donors

  9. A Quadratic Nonlinear Prediction-Based Heart Motion Model Following Control Algorithm in Robotic-Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Off‐pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery outperforms the traditional on‐pump surgery because the assisted robotic tools can cancel the relative motion between the beating heart and the robotic tools, which reduces post‐surgery complications for patients. The challenge for the robot assisted tool when tracking the beating heart is the abrupt change caused by the nonlinear nature of heart motion and high precision surgery requirements. A characteristic analysis of 3D heart motion data through bi‐spectral analysis demonstrates the quadratic nonlinearity in heart motion. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce nonlinear heart motion prediction into the motion tracking control procedures. In this paper, the heart motion tracking problem is transformed into a heart motion model following problem by including the adaptive heart motion model into the controller. Moreover, the model following algorithm with the nonlinear heart motion model embedded inside provides more accurate future reference by the quadratic term of sinusoid series, which could enhance the tracking accuracy of sharp change point and approximate the motion with sufficient detail. The experiment results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the linear prediction‐based model following controller in terms of tracking accuracy (root mean square.

  10. Smith predictor-based robot control for ultrasound-guided teleoperated beating-heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowthorpe, Meaghan; Tavakoli, Mahdi; Becher, Harald; Howe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Performing surgery on fast-moving heart structures while the heart is freely beating is next to impossible. Nevertheless, the ability to do this would greatly benefit patients. By controlling a teleoperated robot to continuously follow the heart's motion, the heart can be made to appear stationary. The surgeon will then be able to operate on a seemingly stationary heart when in reality it is freely beating. The heart's motion is measured from ultrasound images and thus involves a non-negligible delay due to image acquisition and processing, estimated to be 150 ms that, if not compensated for, can cause the teleoperated robot's end-effector (i.e., the surgical tool) to collide with and puncture the heart. This research proposes the use of a Smith predictor to compensate for this time delay in calculating the reference position for the teleoperated robot. The results suggest that heart motion tracking is improved as the introduction of the Smith predictor significantly decreases the mean absolute error, which is the error in making the distance between the robot's end-effector and the heart follow the surgeon's motion, and the mean integrated square error.

  11. K channel kinetics during the spontaneous heart beat in embryonic chick ventricle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzanti, M.; DeFelice, L J

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the current that passes through cell-attached patches on beating heart cells, while measuring action potentials with a whole-cell electrode, we were able to study K channels during beating. In 7-d chick ventricle in 1.3 mM K physiological solutions at room temperature, delayed-rectifier channels have three linear conductance states: 60, 30, and 15 pS. The 60 and 15 pS conductances can exist alone, but all three states may appear in the same patch as interconverting conductance le...

  12. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  13. Effect of myocardial protection during beating heart surgery with right sub-axiliary approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; LI Xin-hua; YAN Zi-xing; LIU Ai-jun; ZHANG Wen-kai; YANG Li-na

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac troponin-I (cTnl) is one of the three regulatory subunits of the cardiac troponin which has the high sensibility and specificity of responding to myocardial injury. Studies have demonstrated that cTnl is released into the blood stream within hours following acute myocardial reperfusion injury. The clinical utility of cTnl for the assessment of myocardial damage is that it is more specific than creatine kinase MB (CKMB). This study investigated cTnl as a sensitive marker of myocardial reperfusion injury and its clinical value on beating heart surgery with right sub-axiliary incision. Methods From December 2002 threugh December 2004,100 patients with atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect (ASD+VSD), and tetralogy of Fallot were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group (n=50) was operated on with a beating heart under extracorporeal circulation (ECC), and the control group (n=50) on an conventional arresting heart under ECC. The two groups both used a right sub-axillary incision. Blood samples from a central venous catheter (CVC) were collected before, at the end of aortic clamping, immediately after discontinue cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), 3, 6, 24, and 48 hours after operation. The Abbott Axsym system with hol-automation fluorescent immunity analyzer was used for the quantitative determination of cTnl. cTnl was detected to investigate the effect of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury and the clinical value of beating heart surgery with right sub-axillary incision. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups before operation. At the end of aortic clamping and thereafter, cTnl significantly increased in both groups, and reached the peak point at 6 hours after operation. At all the tested points, cTnl was significantly higher in the control group than the beating heart group (P <0.05), especially at 6 hours post operation (P <0.01). The

  14. Heart Rates of High School Physical Education Students during Team Sports, Individual Sports, and Fitness Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Brown, Dale D.; Cullen, Robert W.; Dennis, Karen K.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how activity type influenced heart rates and time spent in target heart rate zones of high school students participating in physical education classes. Significantly higher average heart rates existed for fitness (142 plus or minus 24 beats per minute [bpm]) compared to team (118 plus or minus 24 bpm) or individual (114 plus or…

  15. Neuro-adaptive control in beating heart surgery based on the viscoelastic tissue model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Rezakhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of 3D heart motion in beating heart surgery is resolved by proposing a parallel force-motion controller. Motion controller is designed based on neuro-adaptive approach to compensate 3D heart motion and deal with uncertainity in dynamic parameters, while an implicit force control is implemented by considering a viscoelastic tissue model. Stability analysis is proved through Lypanov’s stability theory and Barballet’s lemma. Simulation results, for D2M2 robot, which is done in nominal case and viscoelastic parameter mismatches demonstrate the robust performance of the controller.

  16. Heart rate variability in isolated rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, B; Heger, G; Mayer, C; Kiegler, B; Stöhr, H; Steurer, G

    1996-11-01

    The presence of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cardiac denervation after heart transplantation raised our interest in HRV of isolated, denervated hearts. Hearts from seven adult white ELCO rabbits were transferred to a perfusion apparatus. All hearts were perfused in the working mode and in the Langendorff mode for 20 minutes each. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain. A computer simulated test ECG at a constant rate of 2 Hz was used for error estimation of the system. In the isolated, denervated heart, HRV was of random, broadband fluctuations, different from the well-characterized oscillations at specific frequencies in intact animals. Mean NN was 423 +/- 51 ms in the Langendorff mode, 406 +/- 33 ms in the working heart mode, and 500 ms in the test ECG. Total power was 663 +/- 207 ms2, 817 +/- 318 ms2, and 3.7 ms2, respectively. There was no significant difference in any measure of HRV between Langendorff and working heart modes. The data provide evidence for the presence of HRV in isolated, denervated rabbit hearts. Left atrial and ventricular filling, i.e., the working heart mode, did not alter HRV, indicating that left atrial or ventricular stretch did not influence the sinus nodal discharge rate.

  17. Using Complexity Metrics With R-R Intervals and BPM Heart Rate Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallot, Sebastian; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    on variability of the data, different choices regarding the kind of measures can have a substantial impact on the results. In this article we compare linear and non-linear statistics on two prominent types of heart beat data, beat-to-beat intervals (R-R interval) and beats-per-minute (BPM). As a proof......-of-concept, we employ a simple rest-exercise-rest task and show that non-linear statistics – fractal (DFA) and recurrence (RQA) analyses – reveal information about heart beat activity above and beyond the simple level of heart rate. Non-linear statistics unveil sustained post-exercise effects on heart rate...... dynamics, but their power to do so critically depends on the type data that is employed: While R-R intervals are very susceptible to nonlinear analyses, the success of nonlinear methods for BPM data critically depends on their construction. Generally, ‘oversampled’ BPM time-series can be recommended...

  18. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  19. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  20. On-pump beating heart coronary surgery for high risk patients requiring emergency multiple coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Segesser Ludwig K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic arrest remains the method of choice for patients requiring standard myocardial revascularization. Therefore, very high-risk patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, onset of cardiac decompensation and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, can have a poor outcome. The on-pump beating heart technique can reduce the mortality and the morbidity in such a selected group of patients and this report describes our clinical experience. Methods Out of 290 patients operated for CABG from January 2005 to January 2006, 25 (8.6% selected high-risk patients suffering from life threatening coronary syndrome (mean age 69 ± 7 years and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, underwent on-pump beating heart surgery. The mean pre-operative left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was 27 ± 8%. The majority of them (88% suffered of tri-vessel coronary disease and 6 (24% had a left main stump disease. Nine patients (35% were on severe cardiac failure and seven among them (28% received a pre-operative intra-aortic balloon pump. The pre-operative EuroScore rate was equal or above 8 in 18 patients (73%. Results All patients underwent on-pump-beating heart coronary revascularization. The mean number of graft/patient was 2.9 ± 0.6 and the internal mammary artery was used in 23 patients (92%. The mean CPB time was 84 ± 19 minutes. Two patients died during the recovery stay in the intensive care unit, and there were no postoperative myocardial infarctions between the survivors. Eight patients suffered of transitorily renal failure and 1 patient developed a sternal wound infection. The mean hospital stay was 12 ± 7 days. The follow-up was complete for all 23 patients survived at surgery and the mean follow-up time was 14 ± 5 months. One patient died during the follow-up for cardiac arrest and 2 patients required an

  1. Cortisol release, heart rate and heart rate variability in the horse and its rider: different responses to training and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lewinski, Mareike; Biau, Sophie; Erber, Regina; Ille, Natascha; Aurich, Jörg; Faure, Jean-Michel; Möstl, Erich; Aurich, Christine

    2013-08-01

    Although some information exists on the stress response of horses in equestrian sports, the horse-rider team is much less well understood. In this study, salivary cortisol concentrations, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV), SDRR (standard deviation of beat-to-beat interval) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive beat-to-beat intervals) were analysed in horses and their riders (n=6 each) at a public performance and an identical rehearsal that was not open to the public. Cortisol concentrations increased in both horses and riders (Phorses and riders increased during the rehearsal and the public performance (Priders than in their horses during the public performance (from 91 ± 10 to 150 ± 15 beats/min) compared to the rehearsal (from 94 ± 10 to 118 ± 12 beats/min). The SDRR decreased significantly during the equestrian tasks in riders (Phorses. The RMSSD decreased in horses and riders (Priders was more pronounced (Priders than it did in their horses.

  2. Unobtrusive heart rate monitor based on a fiber specklegram sensor and a single-board computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Alessandro B.; Frizera, Anselmo; Cotrina, Anibal; Ribeiro, Moisés. R. N.; Segatto, Marcelo E. V.; Pontes, Maria José

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a portable and unobtrusive heart rate monitor based on fiber specklegram sensors. The proposed module uses the Raspberry Pi module to perform the image acquisition and the fiber specklegram sensor, which is based on multimode plastic optical fibers. The heart rate is obtained by welch power spectral density estimate and the heart beats are identified by means of a threshold analysis.

  3. Beat Rate Variability in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes: Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Niehoff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heart rate variability (HRV refers to the fluctuation of the time interval between consecutive heartbeats in humans. It has recently been discovered that cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells show beat rate variability (BRV that is similar to the HRV in humans. In the present study, clinical aspects of HRV were transferred to an in vitro model. The aims of the study were to explore the BRV in murine embryonic stem cell (mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and to demonstrate the influence of antiarrhythmic drugs on BRV as has been shown in clinical trials previously. Methods: The Microelectrode Array (MEA technique was used to perform short-term recordings of extracellular field potentials (FPs of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs (D3 cell line, αPig-44. Offline analysis was focused on time domain and nonlinear methods. Results: The Poincaré-Plot analysis of measurements without pharmacological intervention revealed that three different shapes of scatter plots occurred most frequently. Comparable shapes have been described in clinical studies before. The antiarrhythmic drugs Ivabradine, Verapamil and Sotalol augmented BRV, whereas Flecainide decreased BRV parameters at low concentrations (SDSD 79.0 ± 8.7% of control at 10-9 M, p -5 M, p Conclusions: Spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs showed BRV that appears to be similar to the HRV known from humans. Antiarrhythmic drugs affected BRV parameters similar to clinical observations. Therefore, our study demonstrates that this in vitro model can contribute to a better understanding of electrophysiological properties of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes and might serve as a valuable tool for drug safety screening.

  4. Exaggerated heart rate oscillations during two meditation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C K; Mietus, J E; Liu, Y; Khalsa, G; Douglas, P S; Benson, H; Goldberger, A L

    1999-07-31

    We report extremely prominent heart rate oscillations associated with slow breathing during specific traditional forms of Chinese Chi and Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques in healthy young adults. We applied both spectral analysis and a novel analytic technique based on the Hilbert transform to quantify these heart rate dynamics. The amplitude of these oscillations during meditation was significantly greater than in the pre-meditation control state and also in three non-meditation control groups: i) elite athletes during sleep, ii) healthy young adults during metronomic breathing, and iii) healthy young adults during spontaneous nocturnal breathing. This finding, along with the marked variability of the beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics during such profound meditative states, challenges the notion of meditation as only an autonomically quiescent state.

  5. Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Using Time-Varying Filtering of Heart Transplanted Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Laouini, Ghailen; Meste, Olivier; Meo, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we analyze the heart rate variability (HRV), obtained by using the time-varying integral pulse frequency modulation (TVIPFM) which is well adapted to the exercise stress testing. We consider that the mean heart period is varying function of time, during exercise. This technique allows the estimation of the autonomic nervous system modulation (ANS) from the beat occurrences. The estimated respiratory sinus arrhythmia is then filtered in the time-frequency...

  6. Effects of beating-heart and arrested heart intracardiac procedure on the inflammation induced by cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; XIAO Ying-Bin; CHEN Lin; WANG Xue-feng; ZHONG Qian-jin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of beating-heart and arrested heart intracardiac procedure on the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA in myocardium.Methods: Thirty congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD) patients aged from 5 to 10 years old were randomly divided into 2 groups equally. Group A underwent traditional arrested-heart intracardiac procedures; group B underwent beating-heart procedures. Specimens of myocardium were obtained at the onset (baseline) and the end of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for the determination of TNF-α mRNA. Concentration of TNF-α was respectively measured after anesthetic induction (T1), 20 min after the beginning of CPB (T2), at the end of CPB (T3) and 6, 12, 24 h after CPB (T4-6) in all patients. After separating polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN), we distilled nuclear protein and mensurated the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results:Compared with baseline, the expression of TNF-α mRNA significantly increased in both groups (P<0.05). TNF-α mRNA level of group A was significantly higher than that of group B at the end of CPB (P<0.05). The plasma concentration of TNF-α and neutrophil NF-κB activity in group A was significantly higher than that of group B at T4-6 (P<0.05). Conclusion:Compared with traditional arrested CPB, beating heart intracadiac procedure can effectively reduce the expression and release of TNF-α; it will benefit the protection of pediatric myocardial during CPB.

  7. Experience of valve replacement under mild hypothermia on pump-beating heart:an analysis of 800 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈柏成; 肖颖彬; 陈林; 钟前进; 王学锋; 周骐; 易广兵

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome of valve replacement under mild hypothermia on pump-beating heart and to discuss the risk factors of cardiac valve surgery. Methods: In the period from November 1997 to May 2003, a total of 800cases of valve replacement were carried out in our institute. The clinical data were reviewed and the technique of mild hypothermia and pump-beating heart to replace cardiac valve was described in detail. Results: 800 patients, 308 male and 492female, with age range from 8 to 66 years, weighing 19 to 88 kg, underwent operation. The average cardiopulmonary bypass time was (109.38 ± 40.64) min, the average clamping time of the vena cava was (77.87 ± 27.99) min and the average mechanical ventilation time was (17.78 ± 12.21) h. There were 17 patients died in the early postoperative stage with an early mortality rate of 2.13%. The causes of death were failure in the weaning of extracorporeal circulation in 2 cases, severe low output syndrome in 3 cases, ventricular fibrillation in 3 cases, obstruction of coronary ostium of mechanical prosthetic valve in 1 case, hepatic failure in 2 cases, pulmonary failure in 1 case, multiorgan failure in 4 cases, and prosthetic valve dysfunction in 1 case. Severe postopertive complications occurred in 51 cases (6.375%), which included reexploration because of excessive bleeding in 16 cases (2.0%), lavage of poststemal infection in 2 cases (0.25%), postoperative strike in 7 cases (0.875%), pulmonary failure in 5 cases (0.625%), hepatic failure in 4 cases (0.5%), multiorgan failure in 11 cases (1.375 % ), ventricular arrhythmia in 5 cases (0.625%) and peripheral circulation failure in 1 case(0. 125 % ). Conclusion: Mild hypothermia and pump-beating heart result in satisfying clinical outcome in patients undergoing valve replacement. The integrated sequenced deairing procedure ensures the avoidance of air embolism during operation.Pump-beating heart technique offers a safe and practical option especially in

  8. Comparison of plasma NSE, protein S-100b and EEG changes in traditional arrested-heart procedures and on-pump beating-heart procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王咏; 肖颖彬; 陈林; 王学锋; 钟前进

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the cerebral injury in on-pump beating-heart procedures under mild hypothermia in comparison with traditional on-pump arrested-heart procedures under moderate hypothermia. Methods: Forty patients, 20 with congenital heart disease (CHD) and 20 of rheumatic heart disease (RHD), were divided into 2 groups: Control group (group A, n=20) including 10 patients suffering from CHD as group A1 and the left 10 from RHD as group A2; and experiment group (group B, n=20) which consisting of group B1 (10 with CHD) and group B2 (10 of RHD). The patients in group A underwent traditional arrested-heart procedures, and those in group B were operated on with beating-heart procedures. Arterial blood samples were collected at preoperation (time A), 20 min after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) starting (time B), 1 h after CPB (time C) and 24 h postoperation (time D) respectively. Plasma contents of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein S-100b were measured with sensitive ELISA. All the patients received echoencephalography (EEG) before and 1 week after operation. Results: The plasma contents of protein S-100b were increased very significantly at time B, C and D in comparison with those at time A (P<0.01), and that of patients in group A1 was significantly higher than that in group B at time B (P<0.05). There was no significant difference at other time points. At time B, the plasma contents of NSE were significantly higher in group A than in group B, and in group A1 and B1 than in group A2 and B2. What's more, at time B, the former fell back to their preoperative levels, but the latter remained still higher levels than the preoperative ones (P<0.01). No significant difference was found in the abnormality rates of postoperative EEG between 2 groups. Conclusion: The perioperative plasma contents of NSE and protein S-100b are not significantly higher in group B than in group A. On-pump beating-heart procedures do not make more serious cerebral dysfunction than the

  9. Biophysical characterization of the underappreciated and important relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability (HRV; beat-to-beat changes in the R-wave to R-wave interval) has attracted considerable attention during the past 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17 000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in HRV is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to fetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated HRV parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart, and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published articles. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between HRV and HR. Using 2 biophysical models, we develop a theory for this and confirm that HRV is primarily dependent on HR and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in HRV and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in HR. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many articles that have not adjusted properly or at all for HR differences when comparing HRV in multiple circumstances.

  10. Comparative usefulness of beat-to-beat QT dispersion and QT interval fluctuations for identifying patients with organic heart disease at risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Erdulfo J; Yoshida, Akihiro; Ohnishi, Yoshio; Okajima, Katsunori; Ishida, Akihiko; Kitamura, Hidetsuna; Kubo, Shinya; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro

    2003-02-01

    The comparative usefulness of 10 min of beat-to-beat 12-lead QT dispersion (QTd) and QT interval variability index (QTVI) analysis for identifying patients with organic heart disease (OHD) at risk for ventricular arrhythmias was assessed in 86 subjects: 54 had OHD without a history of ventricular arrhythmias, 15 had OHD with documented ventricular tachycardia, and there were 17 controls. The following parameters were analyzed among the groups: (1) the average QTd (mean QTd), (2) the difference between the maximum and minimum QTd observed over the recording time (QTd variation), (3) the maximum difference of QTd between consecutive beats (QTd maximum), (4) the QTd standard deviation (QTd variability), and (5) QTVI, calculated in lead I or II according to an established formula: log 10 [(QTv/QTm2) / (HRv/HRm2)]. All the analyzed parameters were significantly increased in the patients with and without ventricular tachycardia when compared with the controls. QTd variation, QTd maximum and QTd variability were the only variables that remained significantly increased in the group of patients with documented ventricular tachycardia, compared with those without arrhythmia. Thus, beat-to-beat fluctuations of both the QT interval and QTd may be markers of temporal electrical instability in patients with OHD.

  11. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  12. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors For Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  13. Can compressed sensing beat the Nyquist sampling rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Yaroslavsky, L

    2015-01-01

    Data saving capability of "Compressed sensing (sampling)" in signal discretization is disputed and found to be far below the theoretical upper bound defined by the signal sparsity. On a simple and intuitive example, it is demonstrated that, in a realistic scenario for signals that are believed to be sparse, one can achieve a substantially larger saving than compressing sensing can. It is also shown that frequent assertions in the literature that "Compressed sensing" can beat the Nyquist sampling approach are misleading substitution of terms and are rooted in misinterpretation of the sampling theory.

  14. Beating Heart Mitral Valve Replacement Surgery without Aortic Cross-Clamping via Right Thoracotomy in a Patient with Compromised Left Ventricular Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Baris-Durukan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global myocardial ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential adverse events related with cardioplegic arrest. Beating heart surgery has avoided such complications and adapted to valve surgery following successful results published on myocardial revascularization. Difficulty in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass may be lessened by using on-pump beating heart surgery for mitral valve interventions. Here we describe a 64-year-old male patient with severe mitral regurgitation and dilated cardiomyopathy. Beating heart mitral valve replacement surgery was performed without aortic cross-clamping through a right thoracotomy approach. We believe that, particularly in patients with poor left ventricular functions, beating heart mitral valve surgery may be advantageous

  15. Circadian rhythm of heart rate and heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Massin, M; Maeyns, K.; Withofs, N.; Ravet, F.; Gerard, P.; Healy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) are increasingly used as markers of cardiac autonomic activity.
AIM—To examine circadian variation in heart rate and HRV in children.
SUBJECTS—A total of 57 healthy infants and children, aged 2 months to 15 years, underwent ambulatory 24 hour Holter recording. Monitoring was also performed on five teenagers with diabetes mellitus and subclinical vagal neuropathy in order to identify the origin of the circadian variat...

  16. First in vivo traveling wave magnetic particle imaging of a beating mouse heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, P.; Rückert, M. A.; Klauer, P.; Kullmann, W. H.; Jakob, P. M.; Behr, V. C.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a non-invasive imaging modality for direct detection of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles based on the nonlinear magnetization response of magnetic materials to alternating magnetic fields. This highly sensitive and rapid method allows both a quantitative and a qualitative analysis of the measured signal. Since the first publication of MPI in 2005 several different scanner concepts have been presented and in 2009 the first in vivo imaging results of a beating mouse heart were shown. However, since the field of view (FOV) of the first MPI-scanner only covers a small region several approaches and hardware enhancements were presented to overcome this issue and could increase the FOV on cost of acquisition speed. In 2014 an alternative scanner concept, the traveling wave MPI (TWMPI), was presented, which allows scanning an entire mouse-sized volume at once. In this paper the first in vivo imaging results using the TWMPI system are presented. By optimizing the trajectory the temporal resolution is sufficiently high to resolve the dynamic of a beating mouse heart.

  17. Surgical correction of ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva using on-pump beating-heart technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hui

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rupture of aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva results in abrupt onset of congestive heart failure. On-pump beating-heart surgery may reduce cardiac impairment by maintaining coronary blood flow and avoiding cardioplegia. Herein, we report the operative correction of thirty-one patients of ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva, using the on-pump beating-heart technique. Methods Thirty-one patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva underwent operative corrections using the on-pump beating-heart technique. In patients with fistula diameter less than 1 cm and no aortic regurgitation, the aorta was unclamped throughout cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB while receiving antegrade heart perfusion. In remainder of patients, retrograde perfusion was used. Results After intracardiac manipulation was complete and the nasopharyngeal temperature was raised to 36-37°C, the patients were smoothly weaned off CPB. There were no early or late postoperative deaths. All patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I at follow-up (range, 0.5-1 year. Mild-to-moderate aortic valve regurgitation was observed in one patient. No recurrence of the left-to-right shunt from ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva was observed. Conclusions Beating heart on pump allows adequate examination of the aortic lesion under near-physiologic conditions, allows decrease in ischemia-reperfusion injury and potentially decreases the risk of serious or fatal rhythm disturbances. On-pump beating-heart technique for repair of ruptured aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva is feasible and promising. Antegrade heart perfusion is suitable for patients with a fistula diameter

  18. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  19. Heart rate recovery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    KARAŞEN, Rıza Murat; ÇİFTÇİ, Bülent; Acar,Baran; YALÇIN, Ahmet Arif; GÜVEN, Selma FIRAT

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on baroregulatory function by using heart rate recovery (HRR) parameters. Materials and methods: Fifty-four moderate and severe OSAS patients were included in the study. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1 min later; a value of 18 beats/min was considered abnormal. OSAS patients were enrolled in the study as group 1 (normal HRR; n = 12) and group 2 (abnormal HRR, n = 42). Left ventr...

  20. Heart rate recovery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    KARAŞEN, Rıza Murat; ÇİFTÇİ, Bülent; Baran ACAR; YALÇIN, Ahmet Arif; GÜVEN, Selma FIRAT

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on baroregulatory function by using heart rate recovery (HRR) parameters. Materials and methods: Fifty-four moderate and severe OSAS patients were included in the study. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1 min later; a value of 18 beats/min was considered abnormal. OSAS patients were enrolled in the study as group 1 (normal HRR; n = 12) and group 2 (abnormal HRR, n = 42). Left ventr...

  1. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  2. HCN Channels and Heart Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dentamaro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization and Cyclic Nucleotide (HCN -gated channels represent the molecular correlates of the “funny” pacemaker current (If, a current activated by hyperpolarization and considered able to influence the sinus node function in generating cardiac impulses. HCN channels are a family of six transmembrane domain, single pore-loop, hyperpolarization activated, non-selective cation channels. This channel family comprises four members: HCN1-4, but there is a general agreement to consider HCN4 as the main isoform able to control heart rate. This review aims to summarize advanced insights into the structure, function and cellular regulation of HCN channels in order to better understand the role of such channels in regulating heart rate and heart function in normal and pathological conditions. Therefore, we evaluated the possible therapeutic application of the selective HCN channels blockers in heart rate control.

  3. Sudden cardiac death in dogs with remodeled hearts is associated with larger beat-to-beat variability of repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Truin, Michiel; van Opstal, Jurren M

    2005-01-01

    Increased proarrhythmia in dogs with chronic AV block (AVB) has been explained by ventricular remodeling causing a decrease in repolarization reserve. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) has been suggested to reflect repolarization reserve, in which high variability represents...... diminished reserve and larger propensity for repolarization-dependent ventricular arrhythmia. A subset of chronic AVB dogs (10%) suffers sudden cardiac death (SCD). With the assumption that repolarization defects constitute a potentially lethal proarrhythmic substrate, we hypothesized that BVR in SCD dogs...... are larger than in matched control chronic AVB dogs. From a population of 200 chronic AVB dogs, initially two groups were chosen retrospectively: 8 dogs that died suddenly (SCD) and 8 control dogs. Control dogs had a longer lifespan after AVB (10 to 18 weeks) than SCD dogs (5 to 10 weeks). All dogs had...

  4. Loss of lag-response curvilinearity of indices of heart rate variability in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Michael L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart rate variability (HRV is known to be impaired in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF. Time-domain analysis of ECG signals traditionally relies heavily on linear indices of an essentially non-linear phenomenon. Poincaré plots are commonly used to study non-linear behavior of physiologic signals. Lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information and analysis of Poincaré plots for various lags can provide interesting insights into the autonomic control of the heart. Methods Using Poincaré plot analysis, we assessed whether the relation of the lag between heart beats and HRV is altered in CHF. We studied the influence of lag on estimates of Poincaré plot indices for various lengths of beat sequence in a public domain data set (PhysioNet of 29 subjects with CHF and 54 subjects with normal sinus rhythm. Results A curvilinear association was observed between lag and Poincaré plot indices (SD1, SD2, SDLD and SD1/SD2 ratio in normal subjects even for a small sequence of 50 beats (p value for quadratic term 3 × 10-5, 0.002, 3.5 × 10-5 and 0.0003, respectively. This curvilinearity was lost in patients with CHF even after exploring sequences up to 50,000 beats (p values for quadratic term > 0.5. Conclusion Since lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information, these analyses provide insights into the autonomic control of heart rate that is influenced by the non-linearity of the signal. The differences in lag-response in CHF patients and normal subjects exist even in the face of the treatment received by the CHF patients.

  5. Discrete Scale Invariance in the Cascade Heart Rate Variability Of Healthy Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D C

    2004-01-01

    Evidence of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in daytime healthy heart rate variability (HRV) is presented based on the log-periodic power law scaling of the heart beat interval increment. Our analysis suggests multiple DSI groups and a dynamic cascading process. A cascade model is presented to simulate such a property.

  6. RF communication with implantable wireless device: effects of beating heart on performance of miniature antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Olive H; Borghi, Alessandro; Bahmanyar, Mohammad Reza; McLeod, Christopher N; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Yacoub, Magdi; Toumazou, Christofer

    2014-06-01

    The frequency response of an implantable antenna is key to the performance of a wireless implantable sensor. If the antenna detunes significantly, there are substantial power losses resulting in loss of accuracy. One reason for detuning is because of a change in the surrounding environment of an antenna. The pulsating anatomy of the human heart constitutes such a changing environment, so detuning is expected but this has not been quantified dynamically before. Four miniature implantable antennas are presented (two different geometries) along with which are placed within the heart of living swine the dynamic reflection coefficients. These antennas are designed to operate in the short range devices frequency band (863-870 MHz) and are compatible with a deeply implanted cardiovascular pressure sensor. The measurements recorded over 27 seconds capture the effects of the beating heart on the frequency tuning of the implantable antennas. When looked at in the time domain, these effects are clearly physiological and a combination of numerical study and posthumous autopsy proves this to be the case, while retrospective simulation confirms this hypothesis. The impact of pulsating anatomy on antenna design and the need for wideband implantable antennas is highlighted.

  7. Are we ready to utilize non-heart-beating donors for clinical allotransplantation in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Zhu, B; Yun, P; Wang, P; Wang, X; Xu, H

    2008-05-01

    The concept of brain death has not been accepted by the majority of Chinese. Importantly, it is not recognized as a legal entity. We have developed a non-heart-beating donation protocol based on literature searches (Medline, Ovid, and CNKI) and issues related to Chinese customs and ethics. The principles guiding protocol development included: separation of the decision to terminate life support from the donation decision, family-centered donation, freedom of conflict interest, and prohibition of organ sales. This protocol covers donation policy, potential donor identification and evaluation, family consent, determination of death, procurement, and special legal documents/organ distribution policy. A random survey was performed regarding donation. There have been several arguments about the development of this protocol. First, do donor family members have the right to make a decision to withdraw life support? Another issue is whether family members have the right to consent to donation without a will from the donor. Our survey found that over 96.1% of people do not have a will and have not discussed their interests in donation with family members. The last issue is whether the hospital can financially help for the funeral after donation. We have debated these issues nationwide with various opinions. We hope to find the right solutions through international debate. We believe that the use of non-heart-beating-donor organs has potential in China. We are hopeful that it will become a major organ source that is developed in such a way so as to be accepted internationally as well as in China.

  8. Heart rate recovery and heart rate variability are unchanged in patients with coronary artery disease following 12 weeks of high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity endurance exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Katharine D; Rosen, Lee M; Millar, Philip J; McKelvie, Robert S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2013-06-01

    Decreased heart rate variability and attenuated heart rate recovery following exercise are associated with an increased risk of mortality in cardiac patients. This study investigated the effects of 12 weeks of moderate-intensity endurance exercise (END) and a novel low-volume high-intensity interval exercise protocol (HIT) on measures of heart rate recovery and heart rate variability in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Fourteen males with CAD participated in 12 weeks of END or HIT training, each consisting of 2 supervised exercise sessions per week. END consisted of 30-50 min of continuous cycling at 60% peak power output (PPO). HIT involved ten 1-min intervals at 88% PPO separated by 1-min intervals at 10% PPO. Heart rate recovery at 1 min and 2 min was measured before and after training (pre- and post-training, respectively) using a submaximal exercise bout. Resting time and spectral and nonlinear domain measures of heart rate variability were calculated. Following 12 weeks of END and HIT, there was no change in heart rate recovery at 1 min (END, 40 ± 12 beats·min(-1) vs. 37 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 31 ± 8 beats·min(-1) vs. 35 ± 8 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training) or 2 min (END, 44 ± 18 beats·min(-1) vs. 43 ± 19 beats·min(-1); HIT, 42 ± 10 beats·min(-1) vs. 50 ± 6 beats·min(-1); p ≥ 0.05 for pre- vs. post-training). All heart rate variability indices were unchanged following END and HIT training. In conclusion, neither END nor HIT exercise programs elicited training-induced improvements in cardiac autonomic function in patients with CAD. The absence of improvements with training may be attributed to the optimal medical management and normative pretraining state of our sample.

  9. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  10. Early reperfusion hemodynamics predict recovery in rat hearts: a potential approach towards evaluating cardiac grafts from non-heart-beating donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dornbierer

    Full Text Available AIMS: Cardiac grafts from non-heartbeating donors (NHBDs could significantly increase organ availability and reduce waiting-list mortality. Reluctance to exploit hearts from NHBDs arises from obligatory delays in procurement leading to periods of warm ischemia and possible subsequent contractile dysfunction. Means for early prediction of graft suitability prior to transplantation are thus required for development of heart transplantation programs with NHBDs. METHODS AND RESULTS: Hearts (n = 31 isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer aerobically for 20 min, followed by global, no-flow ischemia (32°C for 30, 50, 55 or 60 min. Reperfusion was unloaded for 20 min, and then loaded, in working-mode, for 40 min. Left ventricular (LV pressure was monitored using a micro-tip pressure catheter introduced via the mitral valve. Several hemodynamic parameters measured during early, unloaded reperfusion correlated significantly with LV work after 60 min reperfusion (p<0.001. Coronary flow and the production of lactate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH also correlated significantly with outcomes after 60 min reperfusion (p<0.05. Based on early reperfusion hemodynamic measures, a composite, weighted predictive parameter, incorporating heart rate (HR, developed pressure (DP and end-diastolic pressure, was generated and evaluated against the HR-DP product after 60 min of reperfusion. Effective discriminating ability for this novel parameter was observed for four HR*DP cut-off values, particularly for ≥20 *10(3 mmHg*beats*min(-1 (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Upon reperfusion of a NHBD heart, early evaluation, at the time of organ procurement, of cardiac hemodynamic parameters, as well as easily accessible markers of metabolism and necrosis seem to accurately predict subsequent contractile recovery and could thus potentially be of use in guiding the decision of accepting the ischemic heart for transplantation.

  11. Early Reperfusion Hemodynamics Predict Recovery in Rat Hearts: A Potential Approach towards Evaluating Cardiac Grafts from Non-Heart-Beating Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbierer, Monika; Stadelmann, Mathieu; Sourdon, Joevin; Gahl, Brigitta; Cook, Stéphane; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai, Hendrik T.; Longnus, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac grafts from non-heartbeating donors (NHBDs) could significantly increase organ availability and reduce waiting-list mortality. Reluctance to exploit hearts from NHBDs arises from obligatory delays in procurement leading to periods of warm ischemia and possible subsequent contractile dysfunction. Means for early prediction of graft suitability prior to transplantation are thus required for development of heart transplantation programs with NHBDs. Methods and Results Hearts (n = 31) isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer aerobically for 20 min, followed by global, no-flow ischemia (32°C) for 30, 50, 55 or 60 min. Reperfusion was unloaded for 20 min, and then loaded, in working-mode, for 40 min. Left ventricular (LV) pressure was monitored using a micro-tip pressure catheter introduced via the mitral valve. Several hemodynamic parameters measured during early, unloaded reperfusion correlated significantly with LV work after 60 min reperfusion (p<0.001). Coronary flow and the production of lactate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) also correlated significantly with outcomes after 60 min reperfusion (p<0.05). Based on early reperfusion hemodynamic measures, a composite, weighted predictive parameter, incorporating heart rate (HR), developed pressure (DP) and end-diastolic pressure, was generated and evaluated against the HR-DP product after 60 min of reperfusion. Effective discriminating ability for this novel parameter was observed for four HR*DP cut-off values, particularly for ≥20 *103 mmHg*beats*min−1 (p<0.01). Conclusion Upon reperfusion of a NHBD heart, early evaluation, at the time of organ procurement, of cardiac hemodynamic parameters, as well as easily accessible markers of metabolism and necrosis seem to accurately predict subsequent contractile recovery and could thus potentially be of use in guiding the decision of accepting the ischemic heart for transplantation. PMID:22928009

  12. Heart rate and heart rate variability in pregnant dairy cows and their fetuses determined by fetomaternal electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenk, Lisa; Kuhl, Juliane; Aurich, Jörg; Aurich, Christine; Nagel, Christina

    2015-11-01

    In this study, fetomaternal electrocardiograms were recorded once weekly in cattle during the last 14 weeks of gestation. From the recorded beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR) and root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD) were calculated. To differentiate between effects of lactation and gestation, pregnant lactating (PL) cows (n = 7) and pregnant nonlactating (PNL) heifers (n = 8) were included. We hypothesized that lactation is associated with stress detectable by HRV analysis. We also followed the hypothesis that heart rate and HRV are influenced by growth and maturation of the fetus toward term. Maternal heart rate changed over time in both groups, and in PL cows, it decreased with drying-off. During the last 5 weeks of gestation, maternal heart rate increased in both groups but was lower in PL cows than in PNL heifers. Maternal HRV did not change over time, but SDRR was significantly higher in PL cows than in PNL heifers, and significant interactions of group × time existed. On the basis of HRV, undisturbed pregnancies are thus no stressor for the dam in cattle. Fetal heart rate decreased from week 14 to week 1 before birth with no difference between groups. Gestational age thus determines heart rate in the bovine fetus. The HRV variables SDRR and RMSSD increased toward the end of gestation in fetuses carried by cows but not in those carried by heifers. The increase in HRV indicates maturation of fetal cardiac regulation which may be overrun by high sympathoadrenal activity in fetuses carried by heifers as suggested by their low HRV.

  13. Simulation of the Beating Heart Based on Physically Modeling aDeformable Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-07-18

    The motion of the beating heart is complex and createsartifacts in SPECT and x-ray CT images. Phantoms such as the JaszczakDynamic Cardiac Phantom are used to simulate cardiac motion forevaluationof acquisition and data processing protocols used for cardiacimaging. Two concentric elastic membranes filled with water are connectedto tubing and pump apparatus for creating fluid flow in and out of theinner volume to simulate motion of the heart. In the present report, themovement of two concentric balloons is solved numerically in order tocreate a computer simulation of the motion of the moving membranes in theJaszczak Dynamic Cardiac Phantom. A system of differential equations,based on the physical properties, determine the motion. Two methods aretested for solving the system of differential equations. The results ofboth methods are similar providing a final shape that does not convergeto a trivial circular profile. Finally,a tomographic imaging simulationis performed by acquiring static projections of the moving shape andreconstructing the result to observe motion artifacts. Two cases aretaken into account: in one case each projection angle is sampled for ashort time interval and the other case is sampled for a longer timeinterval. The longer sampling acquisition shows a clear improvement indecreasing the tomographic streaking artifacts.

  14. Prototype Automated Equipment to Perform Poising and Beat Rate Operations on the M577 MTSQ Fuze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-30

    r 80 4 22 008 . ~ . j.- Il - -Acoes! ,, jr BULOVA SYTEMS A NSTRUMENTS CORPORATION uomae,± TABLE OF CONTENTS !Distr Flbtioo/ Paragraph Title [ 1, hiIt ...Wheel location is also established. The axial location of the weld location is chosen so as to cause the Timer to run approximately 1 to 1 1/2 beats per...Timer is running under the driving torque of its own mainspring. Standard M577 instrumentation for the detection and readout of the beat rate and the

  15. Potassium supplementation and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Molenberg, Famke; Bakker, S.J.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and resul

  16. Assessing Metabolic Syndrome Through Increased Heart Rate During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess changes in resting and maximum heart rates as primary indicators of cardiac autonomic function in metabolic syndrome (MetS patients and to determine their value for discriminating MetS from non-MetS. 468 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and assessed according to the updated adult treatment panel III (ATP-III definition of MetS. Resting and maximum heart rates were recorded following the Bruce protocol during an exercise. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to identify the best cutoff point for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state. 194 participants (41.5% were diagnosed as MetS. The mean resting heart rate (RHR was not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.078. However, the mean maximum heart (MHR rate was considerably higher in participants with MetS (142.37±14.84 beats per min compared to the non-MetS group (134.62±21.63 beats per min (P<0.001. In the MetS group, the MHR was positively correlated with the serum triglyceride level (β=0.185, P=0.033 and was inversely associated with age (β=-0.469, P<0.001. The MHR had a moderate value for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state (c=0.580, P=0.004 with the optimal cutoff point of 140 beats per min. In MetS patients, the MHR was significantly greater compared to non-MetS subjects and was directly correlated with serum triglyceride levels and inversely with advanced age. Moreover, MHR can be used as a suspicious indicator for identifying MetS.

  17. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  18. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. METHODS......: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean followup was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate...... heart rate and lower heart rate variability were associated with worse functional status and with higher risk of future functional decline in older adults...

  19. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  20. Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2010-06-01

    The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found, where the transition towards increased (decreased) HRV multifractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker) multifractal correlation between the central and autonomic nervous systems.

  1. Remote measurements of heart and respiration rates for telemedicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhao

    Full Text Available Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research.

  2. Remote measurements of heart and respiration rates for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Meng; Qian, Yi; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research.

  3. Episodic arterial oxygen desaturation and heart rate variations following major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Dirkes, W E; Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    In 20 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery, heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation were monitored continuously during the night 2 days before operation and during the first and second nights after operation (23:00 to 07:30). Mean heart rate increased by 16 beat min-1 (P less than...... arrhythmias on the morning of the third day after operation. In another patient the episodes of desaturation correlated with increases in heart rate. There was no correlation between administration of opioids and heart rate and saturation disturbances. The mechanism and clinical relevance of episodic...

  4. Microwave Doppler Radar for Heart Beat Detection Versus Electrocardiogram: A Validation Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Obeid, Dany; Sadek, Sawsan; Zaharia, Gheorghe; El Zein, Ghais

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper provides a validation approach for a microwave Doppler Radar system used for heartbeat detection. The proposed system is tested at 16 GHz with several transmitted power, simultaneously with a pc-based electrocardiogram. Obtained results show accurate detection for the heartbeat signal in terms of heartbeat rate and heart rate variability.

  5. Decreased heart rate variability responses during early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Øivind; Brinth, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating to postope......BACKGROUND: Intact orthostatic blood pressure regulation is essential for early mobilization after surgery. However, postoperative orthostatic hypotension and intolerance (OI) may delay early ambulation. The mechanisms of postoperative OI include impaired vasopressor responses relating...... to postoperative autonomic dysfunction. Thus, based on a previous study on haemodynamic responses during mobilization before and after elective total hip arthroplasty (THA), we performed secondary analyses of heart rate variability (HRV) and aimed to identify possible abnormal postoperative autonomic responses...... in relation to postural change. METHODS: A standardized mobilization protocol before, 6 and 24 h after surgery was performed in 23 patients scheduled for elective THA. Beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure was measured by photoplethysmography and HRV was derived from pulse wave interbeat intervals and analysed...

  6. The art equipment for measuring the horse’s heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper: Heart rate is a reliable indicator of the stress. Non-invasive methods have advantage over the methods that have a negative influence on the condition of an animal. When breeding sport horses, which undergo stressful training every day, it is required, from an ethical aspect, to monitor their capabilities by using most advanced electronic devices Polar Sport Tester and Polar Equine RS800cx G3.Design/methodology/approach: The original Polar ProTrainer 5 Equine edition software facilitates the analysis of individual training phases and gives the number of heart beats, average heart rate, average speed and distance covered in individual training phases.Findings: Heart rate increased, in warming up phase, from the value associated with a resting horse (30 to 40 bpm approximately in one minute, while, during the slow cooling down phase, ten minutes were required for the heart rate to reach the afore-mentioned value. During quick trotting heart rate are 112 heart beats per minute, while during steeplechase phase, it increased to the value of 160 to 170 heart beats per minute.Research limitations/implications: To receive heart rate without disturbances already we moisten the skin on the contact spots, using a mixture of water and electrolytes (Salvana Nutrilyt. Placing receiver on the saddle close by the T56H transmitter was the optimal choice.Practical implications: Modern equipment makes monitoring the horse’s heart rate accurately and to perform, safely and without disturbances, exercises required during training. It also checks the heart rate, which indicates the horse’s health.Originality/value: Polar Sport Tester and Polar Equine RS800cx G3 are state of the art products that facilitate the receipt of the horse’s heart rate signals. The accuracy of the acquired results can be compared with those obtained with ECG measurements.

  7. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-07

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co-stimulation.

  8. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of heart rate slowing drugs in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Tarlovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the efficacy and cost/effectiveness ratio of the original and generic bisoprolol in achieving target heart rate (HR in patients with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. Patients with ischemic heart disease (n=60; 36 males and 24 females aged from 35 to 75 years were included into the study. Patients were randomized into group A (received therapy based on the original bisoprolol or into group B (received therapy based on of generic bisoprolol. Ivabradine was added, if the effect was insufficient. The duration of follow-up was 6 weeks. The HR dynamics was assessed during the study period. Cost/effectiveness ratio was calculated.Results. Significant HR slowing was found in both groups by the end of observation. In group A baseline HR was 70.0±5.6 beats/min and in 6 weeks - 58.1±3.8 beats/min, while in group B - 69.5±5.2 and 60.5±3.9 beats/min respectively. HR slowing was significantly higher in group A than that in group B. Direct costs in order to achieve a target HR in 1 patient for 6 weeks of therapy in group A were 663.75 rubles, while this in group B - 1093.58 rubles. Direct costs for HR deceleration by 1 beat in group A were 48.46 rubles vs 69.40 rubles in group B. The effect of therapy based on the original bisoprolol, is superior to that when generic bisoprolol used.Conclusion. HR-slowing effect of therapy based on the original bisoprolol was superior to that when generic bisoprolol was used. Pharmacoeconomic analysis revealed that HR deceleration was more economically profitable in treatment based on the original bisoprolol.

  9. Evaluation on Effects of Donor Heart Preservation for On-Pump Beating-Heart Transplantation%体外循环下不停跳供心保存植入的效果评价▲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱蔚琳; 黄爱兰; 胡彦艳; 温红; 林辉; 莫安胜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of donor heart preserved with continuous on-pump beating-heart warm-blood perfusion and University of Wisconsin (UW) solution on hemodynamics and cardiac function after transplantation in pigs.Methods Twenty-four Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into two groups:In beating-heart group (n=12),donor hearts were stored by on-pump perfusion with warm blood;In cold UW storage group (n=12),donor hearts were stored in cold UW solution .There were six pigs for donors and six for recipients in each group .Donor hearts were stored for 8 hours after isolation,and then were implanted into recipient pigs by orthotopic heart transplantation . Automatically rebeating of implanted heart and the frequency of defibrillation in both groups were recorded two hours after the aortic cross-clamp released,left and right ventricular function were measured as well .The changes of hemodynamics were observed 30 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass.Results After being implanted into recipient pigs,6 donor hearts recovered automatic-beating 3 minutes after the aortic cross-clamp released in the beating-heart group;All of 6 donor hearts did not recovered automatic-beating in the cold UW storage group,and the frequency of defibrillation accounted for 12;Significant difference was found in the automatically rebeating rate of implanted heart between two groups (P<0.05).Two hours after the aortic cross-clamp released,left and right ventricular systolic pressure in the beating-heart group were significantly better than those in the cold UW storage group (all P<0.05);Thirty minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) in the beating-heart group were significantly lower than those in the cold UW storage group (all P<0.05);Cardiac output(CO) and cardiac index(CI) in the beating-heart group were significantly higher than those in the cold UW storage group (P<0.05),and the dosages of dopamine and

  10. Effects of Liraglutide on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Larsen, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    liraglutide on HRV and diurnal variation of HR in overweight patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Liraglutide or placebo was administrated to a backbone therapy of metformin in this double-blind, placebo-controlled 12 + 12......-week crossover study. SD of beat-to-beat (NN) intervals (SDNN) was assessed by 24-h Holter monitoring as a measure of HRV. Diurnal HR variation and sympathovagal balance analyzed by root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) in NN intervals and high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) power...

  11. Multifractality and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we participate to the discussion set forth by the editor of Chaos for the controversy, "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" Our objective was to debate the question, "Is there some more appropriate term to characterize the heart rate variability (HRV) fluctuations?" We focused on the ≈24 h RR series prepared for this topic and tried to verify with two different techniques, generalized structure functions and wavelet transform modulus maxima, if they might be described as being multifractal. For normal and congestive heart failure subjects, the hq exponents showed to be decreasing for increasing q with both methods, as it should be for multifractal signals. We then built 40 surrogate series to further verify such hypothesis. For most of the series (≈75%-80% of cases) multifractality stood the test of the surrogate data employed. On the other hand, series coming from patients in atrial fibrillation showed a small, if any, degree of multifractality. The population analyzed is too small for definite conclusions, but the study supports the use of multifractal series to model HRV. Also it suggests that the regulatory action of autonomous nervous system might play a role in the observed multifractality.

  12. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Non-contact and noise tolerant heart rate monitoring using microwave doppler sensor and range imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunag, Daichi; Izumi, Shintaro; Okuno, Keisuke; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a non-contact and noise-tolerant heart beat monitoring system. The proposed system comprises a microwave Doppler sensor and range imagery using Microsoft Kinect™. The possible application of the proposed system is a driver health monitoring. We introduce the sensor fusion approach to minimize the heart beat detection error. The proposed algorithm can subtract a body motion artifact from Doppler sensor output using time-frequency analysis. The body motion artifact is a crucially important problem for biosignal monitoring using microwave Doppler sensor. The body motion speed is obtainable from range imagery, which has 5-mm resolution at 30-cm distance. Measurement results show that the success rate of the heart beat detection is improved about 75% on average when the Doppler wave is degraded by the body motion artifact.

  14. Relation between heart beat fluctuations and cyclic alternating pattern during sleep in insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon-Lomeli, R; Murguia, J S; Chouvarda, I; Mendez, M O; Gonzalez-Galvan, E; Alba, A; Milioli, G; Grassi, A; Terzano, M G; Parrino, L

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia is a condition that affects the nervous and muscular system. Thirty percent of the population between 18 and 60 years suffers from insomnia. The effects of this disorder involve problems such as poor school or job performance and traffic accidents. In addition, patients with insomnia present changes in the cardiac function during sleep. Furthermore, the structure of electroencephalographic A-phases, which builds up the Cyclic Alternating Pattern during sleep, is related to the insomnia events. Therefore, the relationship between these brain activations (A-phases) and the autonomic nervous system would be of interest, revealing the interplay of central and autonomic activity during insomnia. With this goal, a study of the relationship between A-phases and heart rate fluctuations is presented. Polysomnography recording of five healthy subjects, five sleep misperception patients and five patients with psychophysiological insomnia were used in the study. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) was used in order to evaluate the heart rate dynamics and this was correlated with the number of A-phases. The results suggest that pathological patients present changes in the dynamics of the heart rate. This is reflected in the modification of A-phases dynamics, which seems to modify of heart rate dynamics.

  15. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  16. The effect of competition on heart rate during kart driving: A field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakoshi Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the act of competing, which can create a kind of mental stress, and participation in motor sports, which induces physical stress from intense g-forces, are known to increase heart rate dramatically. However, little is known about the specific effect of competition on heart rate during motor sports, particularly during four-wheel car driving. The goal of this preliminary study, therefore, was to investigate whether competition increases heart rate under such situations. Findings The participants drove an entry-level formula kart during two competitive races and during solo driving against the clock while heart rate and g-forces were measured. Analyses showed that heart rate values during the races (168.8 beats/min were significantly higher than those during solo driving (140.9 beats/min and rest (75.1 beats/min. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that competition heightens heart rate during four-wheel car driving. Kart drivers should be concerned about maintaining good health and developing physical strength.

  17. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy and presence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.In 40 pregnant women at the 36th week of gestation, 21 of whom exercised regularly, we acquired 18 min. RR interval time series obtained simultaneously in the mothers and their fetuses from magnetocardiographic recordings. The time series of the two groups were examined with respect to their heart rate variability, the maternal respiratory rate and the presence of synchronization epochs as determined on the basis of synchrograms. Surrogate data were used to assess whether the occurrence of synchronization was due to chance.In the original data, we found synchronization occurred less often in pregnancies in which the mothers had exercised regularly. These subjects also displayed higher combined fetal-maternal heart rate variability and lower maternal respiratory rates. Analysis of the surrogate data showed shorter epochs of synchronization and a lack of the phase coordination found between maternal and fetal beat timing in the original data.The results suggest that fetal-maternal heart rate coupling is present but generally weak. Maternal exercise has a damping effect on its occurrence, most likely due to an increase in beat-to-beat differences, higher vagal tone and slower breathing rates.

  18. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to standard endotracheal tube in securing upper airway in the patients undergoing beating-heart coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: ProSeal laryngeal mask airways (PLMAs are routinely used after failed tracheal intubation as airway rescue, facilitating tracheal intubation by acting as a conduit and to secure airway during emergencies. In long duration surgeries, use of endotracheal tube (ETT is associated with various hemodynamic complications, which are minimally affected during PLMA use. However, except for few studies, there are no significant data available that promote the use of laryngeal mask during cardiac surgery. This prospective study was conducted with the objective of demonstrating the advantages of PLMA over ETT in the patients undergoing beating-heart coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: This prospective, interventional study was carried out in 200 patients who underwent beating-heart CABG. Patients were randomized in equal numbers to either ETT group or PLMA group, and various hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were observed at different time points. Results: Patients in PLMA group had mean systolic blood pressure 126.10 ± 5.31 mmHg compared to the patients of ETT group 143.75 ± 6.02 mmHg. Pulse rate in the PLMA group was less (74.52 ± 10.79 per min (P < 0.05 compared to ETT group (81.72 ± 9.8. Thus, hemodynamic changes were significantly lower (P < 0.05 in PLMA than in ETT group. Respiratory parameters such as oxygen saturation, pressure CO 2 (pCO 2 , peak airway pressure, and lung compliance were similar to ETT group at all evaluation times. The incidence of adverse events was also lower in PLMA group. Conclusion: In experience hand, PLMA offers advantages over the ETT in airway management in the patients undergoing beating-heart CABG.

  19. A Successful Transplantation from Maastricht Category-4 Non-Heart Beating Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysi BAHADIR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of available organs is the limiting factor for kidney transplantation (Ktx. One of the strategies to increase access to Ktx is the use of non-heart beating (NHB donors. We herein present a successful Ktx from an NHB (Maastricht Category-4 donor. The donor was a 21-year-old woman who had brain death due to cerebrovascular accident. She had severe hypotension for three hours despite 30 μg/kg/min dopamine infusion, followed by cardio-pulmonary arrest just before the operation began. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation was consequently initiated and continued during the operation. Donor organ harvesting (hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy was performed after direct aortic cannulation. The warm ischemia time was 35 minutes. The recipient was a 54-year-old man who had undergone hemodialysis for four years. There were 3/6 mismatches, and the lymphocyte cross-match was negative. The induction immunosuppressive was anti-thymocyte globulin, followed by tacrolimus/ MMF/steroid after the 12th day. He had delayed graft function and hemodialysis was required at the third and sixth days. The urine output gradually increased and sCr slowly declined afterwards and he discharged with sCr 1.5 mg/dl on the 24th day. At the first year of transplantation, he is in good clinical condition with a stable baseline sCr of 1.5 mg/dl. NHB donors can be an alternative and important source to expand the kidney donation pool, and successful long-term outcomes favor this modality.

  20. Respiration and heart rate in exercising land crabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, C F; Lee, L W; Shah, G M

    1979-05-01

    Land Crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, were fitted with respiratory masks and E.C.G. electrodes and run for 10 or 20 min on a treadmill at speeds of 150 and 300 cm/min. Aerobic metabolism increased linearly with the speed of locomotion. The recovery period was characterized by a large oxygen debt. The primary respiratory adjustment to exercise was an increased ventilation volume; only a minor increase in oxygen extraction occurred. The respiratory exchange ratio increased during exercise and during recovery, presumably correlated with a metabolic acidosis. These results are similar to data collected for exercising vertebrates and the net cost of locomotion of crabs appears similar to quadrupeds. However, the heart rate in exercising crabs changed in an unexpected way: during moderate exercise no change was noted, but during heavy exercise a bradycardia developed. The reduction in rate resulted from an increase in interbeat interval and frequent pauses in the heart beat.

  1. Mouse heart rate in a human: diagnostic mystery of an extreme tachyarrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Lovely; Goel, Narender; Prajapat, Laxman; Spodick, David H; Goyal, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    We report telemetry recording of an extreme non-fatal tachyarrhythmia noted in a hospitalized quadriplegic male with history of atrial fibrillation where the average ventricular conduction rate was found to be about 600 beats per minute and was associated with transient syncope. A medical literature review suggests that the fastest human ventricular conduction rate reported to date in a tachyarrhythmia is 480 beats per minute. We therefore report the fastest human heart rate noted in a tachyarrhythmia and the most probable mechanism of this arrhythmia being a rapid atrial fibrillation with 1:1 conduction in the setting of probable co-existing multiple bypass tracts.

  2. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  3. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person.

  4. Periodic heart rate decelerations in premature infants

    OpenAIRE

    Flower, Abigail A.; Moorman, J. Randall; Lake, Douglas E.; Delos, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The pacemaking system of the heart is complex; a healthy heart constantly integrates and responds to extracardiac signals, resulting in highly complex heart rate patterns with a great deal of variability. In the laboratory and in some pathological or age-related states, however, dynamics can show reduced complexity that is more readily described and modeled. Reduced heart rate complexity has both clinical and dynamical significance – it may provide warning of impending illness or clues about ...

  5. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as percutaneous valves.

  6. Noisy fluctuation of heart rate indicates cardiovascular system instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Baum, Charlotte; Jeanguillaume, Christian; Custaud, Marc-Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Heart rate spontaneously fluctuates despite homeostatic regulatory mechanisms to stabilize it. Harmonic and fractal fluctuations have been described. Non-harmonic non-fractal fluctuation has not been studied because it is usually thought that it is caused by apparatus noise. We hypothesized that this fluctuation looking like apparatus noise (that we call "noisy fluctuation") is linked to challenged blood pressure stabilization and not to apparatus noise. We assessed noisy fluctuation by quantifying the small and fastest beat-to-beat fluctuation of RR-interval by means of spectral analysis (Nyquist power of heart rate variability: nyHRV) after filtering out its fractal component. We observed nyHRV in healthy supine subjects and in patients with vasovagal symptoms. We challenged stabilization of blood pressure by upright posture (by means of a head-up tilt table test). Head-up position on the tilt table dramatically decreased nyHRV (0.128 ± 0.063 vs. 0.004 ± 0.002, p system is challenged (upright posture). It also indicates cardiovascular instability because it does not disappear in upright patients before vasovagal syncope, a transient failure of cardiovascular regulation.

  7. Heart rate at rest, exercise capacity, and mortality risk in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaras, Andreas M; Faselis, Charles; Doumas, Michael; Myers, Jonathan; Kheirbek, Raya; Kokkinos, John Peter; Tsimploulis, Apostolos; Aiken, Monica; Kokkinos, Peter

    2013-11-15

    Heart rate (HR) at rest has been associated inversely with mortality risk. However, fitness is inversely associated with mortality risk and both increased fitness and β-blockade therapy affect HR at rest. Thus, both fitness and β-blockade therapy should be considered when HR at rest-mortality risk association is assessed. From 1986 to 2011, we assessed HR at rest, fitness, and mortality in 18,462 veterans (mean age = 58 ± 11 years) undergoing a stress test. During a median follow-up period of 10 years (211,398 person-years), 5,100 died, at an average annual mortality of 24.1 events/1,000 person-years. After adjusting for age, body mass index, cardiac risk factors, medication, and exercise capacity, we noted approximately 11% increase in risk for each 10 heart beats. To assess the risk in a wide and clinically relevant spectrum, we established 6 HR at rest categories per 10 heart beat intervals ranging from rest of ≥70 beats/min (hazard ratio 1.14, confidence interval 1.04 to 1.25; p rest of ≥100 beats/min. Similar trends were noted when for subjects aged rest-mortality risk association was direct and independent. A progressive increase in risk was noted >70 beats/min for the entire cohort, those treated with β blockers, and those aged <60 and ≥60 years. Mortality risk was overestimated slightly when fitness status was not considered.

  8. "Non Working Beating Heart": novo método de proteção miocárdica no transplante cardíaco Non Working Beating Heart: a new strategy of myocardial protection during heart transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas Jakson Dinkhuysen

    2011-12-01

    implantation of the donor heart in the bicaval bipulmonary orthotopic position using normothermic beating heart and thus, facilitate the transplanted heart adaptation to the recipient. This study presents a small experience about a new strategy of myocardial protection during heart transplant. METHODS: In cardiopulmonary bypass, the aorta anastomosis was done first, allowing the coronary arteries to receive blood flow and the recovering of the beats. The rest of the anastomosis is performed on a beating heart in sinus rhythm. The pulmonary anastomosis is the last to be done. This methodology was applied in 10 subjects: eight males, age 16-69 (mean 32.7 years, SPAo 90-100 mmHg (mean 96 mmHg, SPAP 25-65 mmHg (mean 46.1 mmHg, PVR 0.9 to 5.0 Wood (mean 3.17 Wood, GTP 4-13 mmHg (mean 7.9 mmHg, and eight male donors, age 15-48 years (mean 27.7 years, weight 65-114 kg (mean 83.1 kg. Causes of brain coma: encephalic trauma in five hemorrhagic stroke in four, and brain tumor in one. RESULTS: The ischemic time ranged from 58-90 minutes (mean 67.6 minutes and 8 donors were in hospitals of Sao Paulo and two in distant cities. All grafts assumed the cardiac output requiring low-dose inotropic therapy and maintained these conditions in the postoperative period. There were no deaths and all were discharged. The late evolution goes from 20 days to 10 months with one death occurred after 4 months due to sepsis. CONCLUSION: This method, besides reducing the ischemic time of the procedure, allows the donated organ to regain and maintain their beats without pre or after load during implantation entailing the physiological recovery of the graft.

  9. Numerical simulation of hemodynamic changes during beating-heart surgery : Analysis of the effects of cardiac position alteration in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; De Lazzari, Claudio; de Kroon, Thom L.; Elstrodt, Jan M.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Gu, Y. John

    2007-01-01

    Hemodynamic instability, mostly due to vertical lifting of the heart, is usually observed during beating-heart surgical procedures. However, some hemodynamic parameters, such as coronary blood flow, are not routinely measured. A digital computer model of the circulation able to simulate and analyze

  10. Induction of chagasic-like arrhythmias in the isolated beating hearts of healthy rats perfused with Trypanosoma cruzi-conditioned medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rodriguez-Angulo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' myocardiopathy, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is characterized by microvascular alterations, heart failure and arrhythmias. Ischemia and arrythmogenesis have been attributed to proteins shed by the parasite, although this has not been fully demonstrated. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of substances shed by T. cruzi on ischemia/reperfusion-induced arrhythmias. We performed a triple ischemia-reperfusion (I/R protocol whereby the isolated beating rat hearts were perfused with either Vero-control or Vero T. cruzi-infected conditioned medium during the different stages of ischemia and subsequently reperfused with Tyrode's solution. ECG and heart rate were recorded during the entire experiment. We observed that triple I/R-induced bradycardia was associated with the generation of auricular-ventricular blockade during ischemia and non-sustained nodal and ventricular tachycardia during reperfusion. Interestingly, perfusion with Vero-infected medium produced a delay in the reperfusion-induced recovery of heart rate, increased the frequency of tachycardic events and induced ventricular fibrillation. These results suggest that the presence of parasite-shed substances in conditioned media enhances the arrhythmogenic effects that occur during the I/R protocol.

  11. Heart Rate Variability Measures and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, M C; Jost, B M; Vibe-Rheymer, K; Heneghan, C; Teich, Malvin C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Jost, Bradley M.; Vibe-Rheymer, Karin; Heneghan, Conor

    2001-01-01

    We focus on various measures of the fluctuations of the sequence of intervals between beats of the human heart, and how such fluctuations can be used to assess the presence or likelihood of cardiovascular disease. We examine sixteen such measures and their suitability for correctly classifying heartbeat records of various lengths as normal or revealing the presence of cardiac dysfunction, particularly congestive heart failure. Using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis we demonstrate that scale-dependent measures prove substantially superior to scale-independent ones. The wavelet-transform standard deviation at a scale near 32 heartbeat intervals, and its spectral counterpart near 1/32 cycles/interval, turn out to provide reliable results using heartbeat records just minutes long. We further establish for all subjects that the human heartbeat has an underlying stochastic origin rather than arising from a chaotic attractor. Finally, we develop a mathematical point process that emulates the human heartbea...

  12. Detecting variations of blood volume shift due to heart beat from respiratory inductive plethysmography measurements in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecave-Jallon, J; Videlier, B; Baconnier, P; Tanguy, S; Calabrese, P; Guméry, P-Y

    2013-09-01

    The simultaneous study of the cardiac and respiratory activities and their interactions is of great physiological and clinical interest. For this purpose, we want to investigate if respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) can be used for cardiac functional exploration. We propose a system, based on RIP technology and time-scale approaches of signal processing, for the extraction of cardiac information. This study focuses on the monitoring of blood volume shift due to heart beat, noted ▵Vtr_c and investigates RIP for the detection of ▵Vtr_c variations by comparison to stroke volume (SV) variations estimated by impedance cardiography (IMP). We proposed a specific respiratory protocol assumed to induce significant variations of the SV. Fifteen healthy volunteers in the seated and supine positions were asked to alternate rest respiration and maneuvers, consisting in blowing into a manometer. A multi-step treatment including a variant of empirical mode decomposition was applied on RIP signals to extract cardiac volume signals and estimate beat-to-beat ▵Vtr_c. These were averaged in quasi-stationary states at rest and during the respiratory maneuvers, and analysed in view of SV estimations from IMP signals simultaneously acquired. Correlation and statistical tests over the data show that RIP can be used to detect variations of the cardiac blood shift in healthy young subjects.

  13. Multiscale analysis of heart beat interval increment series and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG XiaoLin; NING XinBao; WANG XinLong

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of multiscale entropy (MSE) and multiscale standard deviation (MSD) are performed for both the heart rate interval series and the interval increment series. For the interval series, it is found that, it is impractical to discriminate the diseases of atrial fibrillation (AF) and congestive heart failure (CHF) unambiguously from the healthy. A clear discrimination from the healthy, both young and old, however, can be made in the MSE analysis of the increment series where we find that both CHF and AF sufferers have significantly low MSE values in the whole range of time scales investigated, which reveals that there are common dynamic characteristics underlying these two different diseases. In addition, we propose the sample entropy (SE) corresponding to time scale factor 4 of increment series as a diag-nosis index of both AF and CHF, and the reference threshold is recommended. Further indication that this index can help discriminate sensitively the mild heart failure (cardiac function classes 1 and 2) from the healthy gives a clue to early clinic diagnosis of CHF.

  14. Heart rate responses of male orienteers aged 21-67 years during competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, S; George, M; Theakston, S; Balmer, J; Davison, R C R

    2003-03-01

    Orienteering is a sport in which it is common for most participants to be aged over 40 years, but research into the demands of the sport has focused almost exclusively on elite participants aged 21-35 years. The aim of the present study was to examine the heart rate responses of older male orienteers. Thirty-nine competitive male orienteers were divided into three groups: group 1 (international competitive standard, n = 11, age 21-67 years), group 2 (national competitive standard, n = 15, age 24-66 years) and group 3 (club competitive standard, n = 13, age 23-60 years). Each participant had his heart rate monitored during two orienteering races of contrasting technical difficulty. The results were analysed using analysis of covariance, with age as a covariate, and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients to determine whether age was related to the observed heart rate responses. The groups did not differ in their peak (175 +/- 12 beats x min(-1), P = 0.643) or mean (159 +/- 13 beats x min(-1), P = 0.171) heart rates during the races. There was a decline of 6 beats x min(-1) x decade(-1) (P = 0.001) for peak heart rate and 5 beats x min(-1) x decade(-1) (P orienteers in group 1 displayed a lower (P orienteers ran at a relative high intensity and the international competitive standard orienteers displayed a less variable heart rate, which may have been related to fewer instances of slowing down to relocate and being able to navigate while running at relatively high speeds.

  15. Heart rate variability in 1-day-old infants born at 4330 m altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, J P; León-Velarde, F; Aguero, L; Frappell, P B

    1999-02-01

    In fetuses and newborn infants heart rate variability changes in conditions of acute and chronic hypoxia; we therefore asked whether heart rate variability of infants born at high altitude differed from that of low-altitude infants. Short-term recordings (4-5 min) of inter-beat intervals were obtained in 19 infants in Lima (50 m altitude) and in 15 infants in Cerro de Pasco (4330 m, barometric pressure approximately 450 mmHg, inspired oxygen pressure approximately 94 mmHg) during quiet rest in warm conditions (ambient temperature, Ta, approximately 35 degrees C). In 12 infants from each group recordings were also obtained during cooling (Ta approximately 26 degrees C). Heart rate variability was evaluated from 512 consecutive inter-beat intervals, with analysis based on time-domain and frequency-domain methods. At warm Ta, heart rate variability did not differ between the two groups. During cooling, heart rate increased only in the low-altitude group. As in the warm, during cooling most parameters of heart rate variability did not differ between the two groups. The only exception was the inter-beat interval power of the high-frequency range of the spectrum (0.15-0.4 Hz), which, at least in adults, is believed to be a reflection of vagal activity, and was greater in the high-altitude group. It is concluded that gestation at high altitude, despite its blunting effects on fetal growth, does not have a major impact on heart rate variability of the newborn. Nevertheless, the possibility that differences in response to cooling may reflect some limitation in heart rate control needs to be examined further.

  16. Design and evaluation of a handheld impedance plethysmograph for measuring heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, N. K.; Fleischer, J.; Jensen, M. S.;

    2005-01-01

    as the reference method. Agreement between the two methods in measuring heart rate and root mean square of successive differences in the heart beat interval (RMSSD) was analysed using correlation coefficients (Pearson's R-2), mean differences with 95% confidence intervals and 95% limits of agreement, and Bland-Altman...... plots. The correlation between the two methods was R-2 = 1.00 and R-2 = 0.99 when heart rate and RMSSD were measured, respectively. The Bland-Altman plots showed suitable agreement between the novel device and standard 10 s ECGs, which was substantiated by 95% limits of agreement of the difference...

  17. Impact of age and basic heart rate on heart rate turbulence in healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jörg Otto; Eichner, Gerrit; Shlevkov, Nikolay; Schrickel, Jan; Yang, Alexander; Balta, Osman; Lewalter, Thorsten; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2005-01-01

    Postextrasystolic acceleration of heart rate (HR), known as HR turbulence (HRT) is attenuated in patients with coronary artery disease at increased risk of adverse events. The influence of age and basic HR on HRT have not been evaluated in a large cohort of persons. In 95 healthy individuals, HRT onset (TO) and slope (TS) were calculated from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms, as well as the turbulence timing (TT). Gender specific differences in TO and TS were compared in simple, linear, weighted regression model. The influence of age and the basic HR preceding ventricular premature contractions on HRT were examined. We found that, in men and women, TO decreases as basic HR increases (P men, TS decreased as basic HR increases, whereas in women, basic HR influenced TS only slightly (P linear regression model revealed a decrease in HRT with increasing age in men. In conclusion, physiological acceleration of the HR within the first 11 beats after premature ventricular complex (VPC) was observed in >75% of healthy individuals. An accelerating HR preceding the VPC influenced HRT in men. An increasing age was associated with a decrease in HRT in men and a decrease in TO in women. These results illustrate the importance of physiological modulations of HRT when used for risk stratification, especially in older populations.

  18. Heart rate variability (HRV) in kidney failure: measurement and consequences of reduced HRV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Chan, Chris T; Unruh, Mark

    2008-02-01

    A common cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on dialysis is sudden cardiac death (SCD). Compared to the general population, the percentage of cardiovascular deaths that are attributed to SCD is higher in patients treated by dialysis. While coronary artery disease (CAD) is the predominant cause of SCD in dialysis patients, reduced heart rate variability (HRV) may play a role in the higher risk of SCD among other risk factors. HRV refers to beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate as measured by periodic variation in the R-R interval. HRV provides a non-invasive method for investigating autonomic input into the heart. It quantifies the amount by which the R-R interval or heart rate changes from one cardiac cycle to the next. The autonomic nervous system transmits impulses from the central nervous system to peripheral organs and is responsible for controlling the heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory activity. In normal individuals, without cardiac disease, the heart rate has a high degree of beat-to-beat variability. HRV fluctuates with respiration: it increases with inspiration and decreases with expiration and is primarily mediated by parasympathetic activity. HRV has been used to evaluate and quantify the cardiac risk associated with a variety of conditions including cardiac disorders, stroke, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. In this narrative review, we will examine the association between HRV and SCD. This report explains the measurement of HRV and the consequences of reduced HRV in the general population and dialysis patients. Lastly, this review will outline the possible use of HRV as a clinical predictor for SCD in the dialysis population. The current understanding of SCD based on HRV findings among the ESRD population support the use of more aggressive treatment of CAD; greater use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers and more frequent and/or nocturnal haemodialysis

  19. Inhibitory stimulation of the ventral premotor cortex temporarily interferes with musical beat rate preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornysheva, Katja; von Anshelm-Schiffer, Anne-Marike; Schubotz, Ricarda I

    2011-08-01

    Behavioral studies suggest that preference for a beat rate (tempo) in auditory sequences is tightly linked to the motor system. However, from a neuroscientific perspective the contribution of motor-related brain regions to tempo preference in the auditory domain remains unclear. A recent fMRI study (Kornysheva et al. [2010]: Hum Brain Mapp 31:48-64) revealed that the activity increase in the left ventral premotor cortex (PMv) is associated with the preference for a tempo of a musical rhythm. The activity increase correlated with how strongly the subjects preferred a tempo. Despite this evidence, it remains uncertain whether an interference with activity in the left PMv affects tempo preference strength. Consequently, we conducted an offline repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) study, in which the cortical excitability in the left PMv was temporarily reduced. As hypothesized, 0.9 Hz rTMS over the left PMv temporarily affected individual tempo preference strength depending on the individual strength of tempo preference in the control session. Moreover, PMv stimulation temporarily interfered with the stability of individual tempo preference strength within and across sessions. These effects were specific to the preference for tempo in contrast to the preference for timbre, bound to the first half of the experiment following PMv stimulation and could not be explained by an impairment of tempo recognition. Our results corroborate preceding fMRI findings and suggest that activity in the left PMv is part of a network that affects the strength of beat rate preference.

  20. The effects of auditory stimulation with music on heart rate variability in healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano L. Roque

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: There are no data in the literature with regard to the acute effects of different styles of music on the geometric indices of heart rate variability. In this study, we evaluated the acute effects of relaxant baroque and excitatory heavy metal music on the geometric indices of heart rate variability in women. METHODS: We conducted this study in 21 healthy women ranging in age from 18 to 35 years. We excluded persons with previous experience with musical instruments and persons who had an affinity for the song styles. We evaluated two groups: Group 1 (n = 21, who were exposed to relaxant classical baroque musical and excitatory heavy metal auditory stimulation; and Group 2 (n = 19, who were exposed to both styles of music and white noise auditory stimulation. Using earphones, the volunteers were exposed to baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes. After the first music exposure to baroque or heavy metal music, they remained at rest for five minutes; subsequently, they were re-exposed to the opposite music (70-80 dB. A different group of women were exposed to the same music styles plus white noise auditory stimulation (90 dB. The sequence of the songs was randomized for each individual. We analyzed the following indices: triangular index, triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincaré plot (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability, standard deviation of the long-term RR interval, standard deviation of instantaneous beat-by-beat variability and standard deviation of the long-term RR interval ratio, low frequency, high frequency, low frequency/high frequency ratio, standard deviation of all the normal RR intervals, root-mean square of differences between the adjacent normal RR intervals and the percentage of adjacent RR intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms. Heart rate variability was recorded at rest for 10 minutes. RESULTS: The triangular index and the standard deviation of

  1. Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; West, Michael R.; Kalogera, Kent L.; Hanson, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required during exercise for crewmembers aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data is required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth® heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health on board ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) was worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_RHM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the two data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. REULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6%error), followed by CS4 (3.3%error), CS3 (6.4%error), and CS2 (9.2%error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to get the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an

  2. Periodic heart rate decelerations in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Abigail A; Moorman, J Randall; Lake, Douglas E; Delos, John B

    2010-04-01

    The pacemaking system of the heart is complex; a healthy heart constantly integrates and responds to extracardiac signals, resulting in highly complex heart rate patterns with a great deal of variability. In the laboratory and in some pathological or age-related states, however, dynamics can show reduced complexity that is more readily described and modeled. Reduced heart rate complexity has both clinical and dynamical significance - it may provide warning of impending illness or clues about the dynamics of the heart's pacemaking system. In this paper, we describe simple and interesting heart rate dynamics that we have observed in premature human infants - reversible transitions to large-amplitude periodic oscillations - and we show that the appearance and disappearance of these periodic oscillations can be described by a simple mathematical model, a Hopf bifurcation.

  3. Organ bath in detecting the effect of one-hour warm ischemia on pulmonic arteries and bronchi from non-heart-beating donor lungs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Song; WANG Jia-xiang; YANG Yang; HE Zhan-feng; LIAO Qiu-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-heart-beating donor lung has been a promising source of lung transplantation. Many studies on non-heart-beating donor lungs are based on animal lung transplantation. In this study, we assessed by organ bath the effect of one-hour warm ischemia on the non-heart-beating donor lung in terms of the integrity of contractile and relaxant functions and tissue structures of pulmonic arteries and bronchi.Methods Sixteen Swedish pigs were randomly classified into two groups: heart-beating donor group and 1-hour warm ischemia non-heart-beating donor group. Pulmonic and bronchial rings were taken from the isolated left lungs of the pigs. The pulmonic rings were stimulated by U-46619 (5.7 mol/L) and acetylcholine (10~(-4) mmol/L) to assess the contractile abilities of smooth muscle and the endothelium-dependent relaxation response, respectively. As such, acetylcholine (10~(-5) mmol/L) and natrium arachidonic acid (0.01%) were used to detect the contraction of bronchial smooth muscle and epithelium-dependent relaxation response. Meanwhile, the variances of precontraction tension of control groups were recorded to measure whether there was spontaneous relaxation during endothelium/epithelium-dependent relaxation course. Finally, papaverine solution (10~(-4) mmol/L) was used to detect the non-endothelium/epithelium-dependent relaxant abilities of pulmonic and bronchial smooth muscles.Results There was no significant difference in the tension values of precontraction of pulmonic rings (P>0.05), endothelium-dependent relaxation (P>0.05), precontraction of bronchial rings (P>0.05) and epithelium-dependent relaxation (P>0.05) between the heart-beating donor group and the 1-hour warm ischemia non-heart-beating donor group. And the pulmonic and bronchial rings of each subgroup B had no spontaneous relaxation. Finally, papaverine solution relaxed the smooth muscle of all the rings completely.Conclusions The results of this experiment suggest that the contractile

  4. Testing of Dhoulath's method to speed up diagnose by separating up crying sound of a baby from normal heart beats – ‘An innovative time saving technique’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dhoulath Beegum

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical world offers unforeseen ways and techniques in diagnosis of the rarest of rare diseases, of early detection, of prompt and speedy aid and treatment but, many are the hurdles to be overcome by doctors. The case undertaken precedes one such problem doctors confront during auscultation. The baby crying sound necessitates a pause – a pause to distract the baby and stop its cry without which diagnosis becomes impossible and erratic too, leading to time delay. An innovative time saving facility was pondered upon as the way out to gear up doctors to facilitate auscultation even when the baby continues to cry. Dhoulath's method is utilized for separation of the baby cry and normal heart beats. This time saving facility is highly effective during cardiac failures. The diagnosing time and the death rate is considered, while organizing the concept.

  5. Predictive value of casual ECG-based resting heart rate compared with resting heart rate obtained from Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Dixen, Ulrik; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    HRs recorded and mean HR calculated from all daytime HRs. Follow-up was recorded from public registers. Outcome measure was hazard rate for the combined endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal heart failure and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Comparison of casual RHR, Holter RHR...... rates of 1.02 (p = 0.079) for casual RHR, 1.04 (p = 0.036*) for Holter RHR, and 1.03 (p = 0.093) for mean HR for each 10 beat increment in HR. CONCLUSIONS: In a comparative analysis on the correlation and significance of differing RHR measurement modalities RHR measured by 24-hour Holter recording...... was found to be marginally superior as a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The results presented here do not however warrant the abandonment of a tested epidemiological variable....

  6. 先心病心脏不停跳下心内直视手术(附555例报告)%The open-heart operation of congenital heart disea se with beating heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林; 肖颖彬; 王学峰; 钟前进; 陈柏成; 陈进劲

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To introduce the experience of open-hear t operation of congenital heart disease in 555 cases on beating heart.Method:The operations were done under mild hypothermi c cardiopulmonary bypass .Cardiopulmonary bypass were initiated by cannulation of the aorta,and superior and inferior venae cavae,Only snailed the cava tapes without cross-clampping th e aorta.The perfusion rate was kept blood pressure at 60 mmHg and the body temp erature was around 32℃.The technique of repair the intracardiac malformation un der beating heart was just as same as under aorta cross-clamping.Result:There were eleven patients died(mortality rate 2.0%).Th e others were cured and followed-up for 1~13 months.The recovery were good.Conclusion:Our results shows that the technique i s a new good way for myocardial protection.It can reduce the complicationrate,si mp lify the operative procedure and shorten the mean cardiopulmonary bypass time.%目的:介绍浅低温体外循环心脏不停跳心内直视手 术治疗先天性心脏病心内畸形的应用体会。方法:555例先心病患者 采用该手术,常规建立体外循环,置左心房引流管,降温至32±1℃并维持,仅阻断上下腔 静脉,不阻断主动脉,维持灌注压在60 mmHg左右,心脏跳动下施行畸形矫正,方法同停跳 手术。结果:死亡11例(死亡率2.0%),其余均痊愈出院,随访1~13个月 ,恢复良好。结论:浅低温心脏不停跳心内直视手术,是一种有效的心肌保护方 法,能减少并发症的发生,缩短体外循环时间。

  7. Heart rate turbulence and variability in patients with ventricular arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Tarricone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the changes in autonomic neural control mechanisms before malignant ventricular arrhythmias, we measured heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in patients with ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (Group I; n=6, non sustained ventricular tachycardia (Group II; n=32, frequent premature ventricular beats (Group III; n=26 and with ICD implantation (Group IV; n=11. Methods: Time domain parameters of HRV and turbulence onset (TO and slope (TS were calculated on 24 hour Holter recordings. Normal values were: SDNN > 70 msec for HRV, TO <0% and TS >2.5 msec/RR-I for HRT. Results: Whereas SDNN was within normal range and similar in all study groups, HRT parameters were significantly different in patients who experienced VT/VF during Holter recording. Abnormal TO and/or TS were present in 100% of Group I patients and only in about 50% of Group II and IV. On the contrary, normal HRT parameters were present in 40-70% of Group II, III and IV patients and none of Group I. Conclusions: These data suggest that HRT analysis is more suitable than HRV to detect those transient alterations in autonomic control mechanisms that are likely to play a major trigger role in the genesis of malignant cardiac arrhythmias. (Heart International 2007; 3: 51-7

  8. Heart rate and respiratory rate influence on heart rate variability repeatability: effects of the correction for the prevailing heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Sławomir Gąsior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV is associated with average heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RespRate, alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate.Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations seven days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences – every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001, i.e. by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent.

  9. Heart Rate and Respiratory Rate Influence on Heart Rate Variability Repeatability: Effects of the Correction for the Prevailing Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsior, Jakub S.; Sacha, Jerzy; Jeleń, Piotr J.; Zieliński, Jakub; Przybylski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with average heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RespRate), alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate. Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations 7 days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences—every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001), i.e., by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent. PMID:27588006

  10. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-10-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  11. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate. A Meta-Analysis of 63 Randomized Controlled Trials Including 72 Study Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side......-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study...... populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p sodium reduction...

  12. Real time heart rate variability assessment from Android smartphone camera photoplethysmography: Postural and device influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guede-Fernandez, F; Ferrer-Mileo, V; Ramos-Castro, J; Fernandez-Chimeno, M; Garcia-Gonzalez, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a smartphone based system for real-time pulse-to-pulse (PP) interval time series acquisition by frame-to-frame camera image processing. The developed smartphone application acquires image frames from built-in rear-camera at the maximum available rate (30 Hz) and the smartphone GPU has been used by Renderscript API for high performance frame-by-frame image acquisition and computing in order to obtain PPG signal and PP interval time series. The relative error of mean heart rate is negligible. In addition, measurement posture and the employed smartphone model influences on the beat-to-beat error measurement of heart rate and HRV indices have been analyzed. Then, the standard deviation of the beat-to-beat error (SDE) was 7.81 ± 3.81 ms in the worst case. Furthermore, in supine measurement posture, significant device influence on the SDE has been found and the SDE is lower with Samsung S5 than Motorola X. This study can be applied to analyze the reliability of different smartphone models for HRV assessment from real-time Android camera frames processing.

  13. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA.

  14. Heart rate regulation and extreme bradycardia in diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Jessica U; Stockard, Torre K; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Katherine V; Ponganis, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the diving heart rate (f(H)) response of the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri), the consummate avian diver, birds diving at an isolated dive hole in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica were outfitted with digital electrocardiogram recorders, two-axis accelerometers and time depth recorders (TDRs). In contrast to any other freely diving bird, a true bradycardia (f(H) significantly emperor penguins. Maximum instantaneous surface interval f(H) in this study is the highest ever recorded for emperor penguins (256 beats min(-1)), equivalent to f(H) at V(O(2)) max., presumably facilitating oxygen loading and post-dive metabolism. The classic Scholander-Irving dive response in these emperor penguins contrasts with the absence of true bradycardia in diving ducks, cormorants, and other penguin species.

  15. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory pa

  16. "And the Beat Goes Ona... Building Artificial Hearts in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Among the many ideas and theories in anatomy and physiology, one particular topic provides all the potential benefits of learning about the human body: the circulatory system, specifically the heart. Describes a distinctive way to study circulation and the heart that allows students to explore the basic principles of vertebrate anatomy and…

  17. Beat-to-beat cycle length variability of spontaneously beating guinea pig sinoatrial cells: relative contributions of the membrane and calcium clocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Zaniboni

    Full Text Available The heartbeat arises rhythmically in the sino-atrial node (SAN and then spreads regularly throughout the heart. The molecular mechanism underlying SAN rhythm has been attributed by recent studies to the interplay between two clocks, one involving the hyperpolarization activated cation current If (the membrane clock, and the second attributable to activation of the electrogenic NaCa exchanger by spontaneous sarcoplasmic releases of calcium (the calcium clock. Both mechanisms contain, in principle, sources of beat-to-beat cycle length variability, which can determine the intrinsic variability of SAN firing and, in turn, contribute to the heart rate variability. In this work we have recorded long sequences of action potentials from patch clamped guinea pig SAN cells (SANCs perfused, in turn, with normal Tyrode solution, with the If inhibitor ivabradine (3 µM, then back to normal Tyrode, and again with the ryanodine channels inhibitor ryanodine (3 µM. We have found that, together with the expected increase in beating cycle length (+25%, the application of ivabradine brought about a significant and dramatic increase in beat-to-beat cycle length variability (+50%. Despite the similar effect on firing rate, ryanodine did not modify significantly beat-to-beat cycle length variability. Acetylcholine was also applied and led to a 131% increase of beating cycle length, with only a 70% increase in beat-to-beat cycle length variability. We conclude that the main source of inter-beat variability of SANCs firing rate is related to the mechanism of the calcium clock, whereas the membrane clock seems to act in stabilizing rate. Accordingly, when the membrane clock is silenced by application of ivabradine, stochastic variations of the calcium clock are free to make SANCs beating rhythm more variable.

  18. Early feasibility testing and engineering development of a sutureless beating heart connector for left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Steven C; Jimenez, Jorge H; West, Seth D; Sobieski, Michael A; Choi, Young; Monreal, Gretel; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Soucy, Kevin G; Slaughter, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    APK Advanced Medical Technologies (Atlanta, GA) is developing a sutureless beating heart (SBH) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) connector system consisting of anchoring titanium coil, titanium cannula with integrated silicone hemostatic valve, coring and delivery tool, and LVAD locking mechanism to facilitate LVAD inflow surgical procedures. Feasibility testing was completed in human cadavers (n = 4) under simulated normal and hypertensive conditions using saline to observe seal quality in degraded human tissue and assess anatomic fit; acutely in ischemic heart failure bovine model (n = 2) to investigate short-term performance and ease of use; and chronically for 30 days in healthy calves (n = 2) implanted with HeartWare HVAD to evaluate performance and biocompatibility. Complete hemostasis was achieved in human cadavers and animals at LV pressures up to 170 mm Hg. In animals, off-pump (no cardiopulmonary bypass) anchoring of the connector was accomplished in less than 1 minute with no residual bleeding after full delivery and locking of the LVAD; and implant of connector and LVAD were successfully completed in under 10 minutes with total procedure blood loss less than 100 ml. In chronic animals before necropsy, no signs of leakage or disruption at the attachment site were observed at systolic LV pressures >200 mm Hg.

  19. [The Study of the Measurement of Heart Rate Variability Using ECG and Photoplethysmographic Signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Buqing; Chai, Xiaoke; Zhang Zhengbo; Wang, Weidong

    2015-07-01

    In comparison with the measurement of heart rate variability from ECG and from photoplethysmographic signal from 46 healthy adults in their spontaneous breathing state. The beat-to-beat intervals in ECG and pulse-to-pulse intervals in photoplethysmographic signal are extracted, and then the parameters of heart rate variability are calculated. Three kinds of algorithms are chosen to get the pulse-to-pulse intervals, which are the intervals of maximum of second derivative, the maximum of PPG signal and the tangent intersection. The results show that the correlation coefficients of the HRV parameters in the two calculation methods are highly correlated. The Bland-Altman scattered plots show the relative bias results from the algorithm of the maximum of PPG signal are smallest and singular points that deviate from the consistent limits are the least compared with the other two algorithms.

  20. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Javorka M.; Zila I.; Balhárek T.; Javorka K

    2002-01-01

    Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. He...

  1. Effect of heart rate on zonal tension and ischaemia following coronary occlusion: optimal rate for Treppe versus ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenheimer, M M; Banka, V S; Helfant, R H

    1976-05-01

    The optimal heart rate in the immediate period following acute coronary occlusion has been controversial from the standpoint of arrhythmias and the extent of ischaemic injury. In the present study we have examined the effect of heart rate on both local myocardial contractile ability and ischaemia in 10 open chested dogs using strain gauge arches and epicardial electrograms. After sinus node destruction, atrial pacing was instituted for rate control at 100/min and increased randomly to 150, 175, and 200/min. Before coronary occlusion, total tension and rate of tension rise progressively increased at higher rates while ST segments demonstrated no significant changes. After coronary artery occlusion, total tension and rate of tension rise in the ischaemic zone decreased markedly and showed no significant change with increments in pacing rate. In the border zone, after the initial decrease in tension, pacing at 150 beats/min improved tension without a change in ST segments. However, when the rate was increased to 175 and 200 beats/min, although border zone tension increased further, ST segments rose significantly. Thus, a heart rate between 100-150/min provides the optimal range for increasing contractile ability in the nonischaemic and border zones without adversely affecting the degree of ischaemic injury.

  2. Evaluation of a strapless heart rate monitor during simulated flight tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Fu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Pilots are under high task demands during flight. Monitoring pilot's physiological status is very important in the evaluation of pilot's workload and flight safety. Recently, physiological status monitor (PSM) has been embedded into a watch that can be used without a conventional chest strap. This makes it possible to unobtrusively monitor, log and transmit pilot's physiological measurements such as heart rate (HR) during flight tasks. The purpose of this study is to validate HR recorded by a strapless heart rate watch against criterion ECG-derived HR. Ten commercial pilots (mean ± SD : age: 39.1 ± 7.8 years; total flight hours 7173.2 ± 5270.9 hr) performed three routinely trained flight tasks in a full flight simulator: wind shear go-around (WG), takeoff and climb (TC), and hydraulic failure (HF). For all tasks combined (overall) and for each task, differences between the heart rate watch measurements and the criterion data were small (mean difference [95% CI]: overall: -0.71 beats/min [-0.85, -0.57]; WG: -0.90 beats/min [-1.15, -0.65]; TC: -0.69 beats/min [-0.98, -0.40]; HF: -0.61 beats/min [-0.80, -0.42]). There were high correlations between the heart rate watch measurements and the ECG-derived HR for all tasks (r ≥ 0.97, SEE flight tasks and could be a useful tool for pilot workload evaluation.

  3. Elevated heart rate and nondipping heart rate as potential targets for melatonin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Fedor; Baka, Tomas; Paulis, Ludovit; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-09-01

    Elevated heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortalities in the general population and various cardiovascular pathologies. Insufficient heart rate decline during the night, that is, nondipping heart rate, also increases cardiovascular risk. Abnormal heart rate reflects an autonomic nervous system imbalance in terms of relative dominance of sympathetic tone. There are only a few prospective studies concerning the effect of heart rate reduction in coronary heart disease and heart failure. In hypertensive patients, retrospective analyses show no additional benefit of slowing down the heart rate by beta-blockade to blood pressure reduction. Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has several attributes, which predict melatonin to be a promising candidate in the struggle against elevated heart rate and its consequences in the hypertensive population. First, melatonin production depends on the sympathetic stimulation of the pineal gland. On the other hand, melatonin inhibits the sympathetic system in several ways representing potentially the counter-regulatory mechanism to normalize excessive sympathetic drive. Second, administration of melatonin reduces heart rate in animals and humans. Third, the chronobiological action of melatonin may normalize the insufficient nocturnal decline of heart rate. Moreover, melatonin reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which are considered a crucial pathophysiological disorder of increased heart rate and pulsatile blood flow. The antihypertensive and antiremodeling action of melatonin along with its beneficial effects on lipid profile and insulin resistance may be of additional benefit. A clinical trial investigating melatonin actions in hypertensive patients with increased heart rate is warranted.

  4. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  5. The Influence of Bearing-Down Technique on the Fetal Heart Rate during the Second Stage of Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Deborah Woolley

    This experimental study contrasted the effects of sustained bearing-down efforts with short bearing-down efforts during the first twelve contractions of the second stage of labor. A single subject design with intrasubject replication was used to compare the incidence, duration, and amplitude of fetal heart rate decelerations, as well as the beat-to-beat variability of those decelerations. Neonatal outcome was evaluated with umbilical arterial cord blood pH values and the one- and five-minute APGAR scores. Thirty -two nulliparous women alternated the use of vigorous, sustained Valsalva-style bearing-down efforts with shorter efforts called minipushes every three contractions during the second stage of labor. Sixteen women began the second stage using the Valsalva-style bearing-down technique; sixteen began the second stage using the minipush. The fetal heart rate was recorded by an internal fetal scalp electrode. Uterine contractility was measured by an internal uterine pressure catheter. A repeated-measures MANOVA showed a significant interaction between the order of implementation of the bearing-down techniques and the amplitude of the fetal heart rate decelerations. A similar comparison of the duration of the decelerations showed no significant differences between the two bearing-down techniques. Likewise, analysis of the incidence of fetal heart rate decelerations and the magnitude of the beat-to-beat variability revealed no significant differences between the two techniques.

  6. Excessive heart rate response to orthostatic stress in postural tachycardia syndrome is not caused by anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuki, Shizue; Eisenach, John H; Johnson, Christopher P; Dietz, Niki M; Benrud-Larson, Lisa M; Schrage, William G; Curry, Timothy B; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Joyner, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by excessive increases in heart rate (HR) without hypotension during orthostasis. The relationship between the tachycardia and anxiety is uncertain. Therefore, we tested whether the HR response to orthostatic stress in POTS is primarily related to psychological factors. POTS patients (n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 10) underwent graded venous pooling with lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to -40 mmHg while wearing deflated antishock trousers. "Sham" venous pooling was performed by 1) trouser inflation to 5 mmHg during LBNP and 2) vacuum pump activation without LBNP. HR responses to mental stress were also measured in both groups, and a questionnaire was used to measure psychological parameters. During LBNP, HR in POTS patients increased 39 +/- 5 beats/min vs. 19 +/- 3 beats/min in control subjects at -40 mmHg (P inflation markedly blunted the HR responses in the patients (9 +/- 2 beats/min) and controls (2 +/- 1 beats/min), and there was no HR increase during vacuum application without LBNP in either group. HR responses during mental stress were not different in the patients and controls (18 +/- 2 vs. 19 +/- 1 beats/min; P > 0.6). Anxiety, somatic vigilance, and catastrophic cognitions were significantly higher in the patients (P 0.1). These results suggest that the HR response to orthostatic stress in POTS patients is not caused by anxiety but that it is a physiological response that maintains arterial pressure during venous pooling.

  7. Clinical impact of evaluation of cardiovascular control by novel methods of heart rate dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huikuri, Heikki V; Perkiömäki, Juha S; Maestri, Roberto; Pinna, Gian Domenico

    2009-04-13

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been conventionally analysed with time- and frequency-domain methods, which measure the overall magnitude of RR interval fluctuations around its mean value or the magnitude of fluctuations in some predetermined frequencies. Analysis of heart rate dynamics by novel methods, such as heart rate turbulence after ventricular premature beats, deceleration capacity of heart rate and methods based on chaos theory and nonlinear system theory, have gained recent interest. Recent observational studies have suggested that some indices describing nonlinear heart rate dynamics, such as fractal scaling exponents, heart rate turbulence and deceleration capacity, may provide useful prognostic information in various clinical settings and their reproducibility may be better than that of traditional indices. For example, the short-term fractal scaling exponent measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis method has been shown to predict fatal cardiovascular events in various populations. Similarly, heart rate turbulence and deceleration capacity have performed better than traditional HRV measures in predicting mortality in post-infarction patients. Approximate entropy, a nonlinear index of heart rate dynamics, which describes the complexity of RR interval behaviour, has provided information on the vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. There are many other nonlinear indices which also give information on the characteristics of heart rate dynamics, but their clinical usefulness is not as well established. Although the concepts of nonlinear dynamics, fractal mathematics and complexity measures of heart rate behaviour, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity in relation to cardiovascular physiology or various cardiovascular events are still far away from clinical medicine, they are a fruitful area for research to expand our knowledge concerning the behaviour of cardiovascular oscillations in normal healthy conditions as well as in disease states.

  8. Heart rate modulates the slow enhancement of contraction due to sudden left ventricular dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, P J; Murad, N; Rossi, C L; Nogueira, R J; Santana, O

    2001-05-01

    In isovolumic blood-perfused dog hearts, left ventricular developed pressure (DP) was recorded while a sudden ventricular dilation was promoted at three heart rate (HR) levels: low (L: 52 +/- 1.7 beats/min), intermediate (M: 82 +/- 2.2 beats/min), and high (H: 117 +/- 3.5 beats/min). DP increased instantaneously with chamber expansion (Delta(1)DP), and another continuous increase occurred for several minutes (Delta(2)DP). HR elevation did not alter Delta(1)DP (32.8 +/- 1.6, 33.6 +/- 1.5, and 34.3 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), even though it intensified Delta(2)DP (17.3 +/- 0.9, 20.7 +/- 1.0, and 26.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), meaning that the treppe phenomenon enhances the length dependence of the contraction component related to changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Frequency increments reduced the half time of the slow response (82 +/- 3.6, 67 +/- 2.6, and 53 +/- 2.0 s for L, M, and H, respectively), while the number of beats included in half time increased (72 +/- 2.9, 95 +/- 2.9, and 111 +/- 3.2 beats for L, M, and H, respectively). HR modulation of the slow response suggests that L-type Ca(2+) channel currents and/or the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger plays a relevant role in the stretch-triggered Ca(2+) gain when HR increases in the canine heart.

  9. The heart rate variability when conducting anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khmel'nitskiy I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed on the base of 10 years of using different methods of analysis of heart rate variability as an indicator of direct and reverse connection of the sympatho-adrenal system in the preoperative diagnosis and anesthetic monitoring. The possibility of predicting the depth of anaesthesia was analyzed, for depending on significant amounts of external and internal conditions, the level of anesthesia changes significantly. In this regard the influence of drugs and technological means of influencing the condition of all life-supporting systems, and the autonomic nervous system in particular, before, during and after anesthesia is of great practical interest. The balance of the pharmacological protection of the vegetative balance in the surgical aggression is studied, as well as the use of heart rate variability as a non-specific method in relation to nosological forms of pathology, both under internal and external influences. A review of a number of sources confirms that heart rate is virtually the only high-speed method to present the sympatho-vagal regulation, the most accessible somatic parameter for estimation of the cardiovascular system functioning in anesthesiology. The heart rate variability serves as an indicator of functional condition of autonomous (vegetative nervous system. It is proposed to perform the continuous monitoring of the autonomic indices of the heart rhythm, which allows to register sympaho-vagal imbalance. Dynamic monitoring, timely interpretation of heart rate variability are constantly in the spotlight, but the approach and methodology of the domestic and foreign authors distinctly differ on the following points: heart rythmography as a visual method of assessing information about the dynamics of slow-wave processes, spectral analysis of the heart sinus rhythm as the best method of analysis of large and small wave activity, tests of functional diagnostics for subsequent measurement of the autonomic nervous

  10. Multiple capture locations for 3D ultrasound-guided robotic retrieval of moving bodies from a beating heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienphrapa, Paul; Ramachandran, Bharat; Elhawary, Haytham; Taylor, Russell H.; Popovic, Aleksandra

    2012-02-01

    Free moving bodies in the heart pose a serious health risk as they may be released in the arteries causing blood flow disruption. These bodies may be the result of various medical conditions and trauma. The conventional approach to removing these objects involves open surgery with sternotomy, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, and a wide resection of the heart muscle. We advocate a minimally invasive surgical approach using a flexible robotic end effector guided by 3D transesophageal echocardiography. In a phantom study, we track a moving body in a beating heart using a modified normalized cross-correlation method, with mean RMS errors of 2.3 mm. We previously found the foreign body motion to be fast and abrupt, rendering infeasible a retrieval method based on direct tracking. We proposed a strategy based on guiding a robot to the most spatially probable location of the fragment and securing it upon its reentry to said location. To improve efficacy in the context of a robotic retrieval system, we extend this approach by exploring multiple candidate capture locations. Salient locations are identified based on spatial probability, dwell time, and visit frequency; secondary locations are also examined. Aggregate results indicate that the location of highest spatial probability (50% occupancy) is distinct from the longest-dwelled location (0.84 seconds). Such metrics are vital in informing the design of a retrieval system and capture strategies, and they can be computed intraoperatively to select the best capture location based on constraints such as workspace, time, and device manipulability. Given the complex nature of fragment motion, the ability to analyze multiple capture locations is a desirable capability in an interventional system.

  11. Relationship between laboratory-measured variables and heart rate during an ultra-endurance triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Paul B; Knez, Wade L; Shing, Cecilia M; Langill, Robert H; Rhodes, Edward C; Jenkins, David G

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between the performance heart rate during an ultra-endurance triathlon and the heart rate corresponding to several demarcation points measured during laboratory-based progressive cycle ergometry and treadmill running. Less than one month before an ultra-endurance triathlon, 21 well-trained ultra-endurance triathletes (mean +/- s: age 35 +/- 6 years, height 1.77 +/- 0.05 m, mass 74.0 +/- 6.9 kg, = 4.75 +/- 0.42 l x min(-1)) performed progressive exercise tests of cycle ergometry and treadmill running for the determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), heart rate corresponding to the first and second ventilatory thresholds, as well as the heart rate deflection point. Portable telemetry units recorded heart rate at 60 s increments throughout the ultra-endurance triathlon. Heart rate during the cycle and run phases of the ultra-endurance triathlon (148 +/- 9 and 143 +/- 13 beats x min(-1) respectively) were significantly (P triathlon were significantly related to (r = 0.76 and 0.66; P triathlon and heart rate at the first ventilatory threshold was related to marathon run time (r = 0.61; P triathlon time (r = 0.45; P triathlon at an exercise intensity near their first ventilatory threshold.

  12. Heart-rate variability and SIDS. Examination of heart-rate patterns using an expert system generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, I A; Nieminen, T; Antila, K J; Southall, D P

    1988-01-01

    In a prospective, population-based study, HRV was analyzed from 24-hr tape recordings made on 16 full-term and one preterm infant who had subsequently suffered SIDS and compared to similar data on 23 control infants (n of recordings, 44). In the SIDS group, heart rate was higher, and overall and beat-to-beat HRV (CV, CVS, respectively) were lower, than in the controls, but not significantly. Respiratory rate and respiratory HRV (by spectral analysis) were similar in both groups. Assuming that cardiorespiratory mechanisms of SIDS are multifactorial, we expected that several subgroups would be detected in both test groups. Therefore, the average data for each recording were subsequently examined by means of an expert system generator (ExTran, Intelligent Terminals Ltd., Edinburgh, UK). By rules induced with 25 nodes, the following results were obtained: 16/44 recordings were diagnosed as SIDS on the basis of (1) respiratory rate (RR) less than 33 and CV less than 3.46% (n = 8); (2) RR greater than 33, CVS less than 2.18%, and BW greater than 3,520 g (n = 4); and (3) RR greater than 33, CVS less than 2.18%, BW less than 3,520 g, HR greater than 136, and CV greater than 1.89% (n = 4). Seventeen of 44 were considered as non-SIDS when (1) RR was 33-47.4, CVS greater than 2.18%, and RSA less than 74.3 and (2) RR greater than 33, CVS less than 2.18%, BW less than 3,520 g, and HR less than 142. The remaining 11 cases required more complicated rules in order to be classified. This study shows that although the trend of increased HR and decreased HRV in the SIDS cases was statistically non-significant, an expert system program may be helpful in defining decision rules to identify cases of SIDS on the basis of cardiorespiratory data.

  13. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L

    2001-01-01

    two consecutive maximal exercise tests, without and with oxygen supplementation respectively, at sea level and after 1, 3 and 5 days at altitude. On each study day, domperidone (30 mg; n=6) or no medication (n=6) was given 1 h before the first exercise session. Compared with sea level, hypoxia...... progressively decreased the maximal heart rate from day 1 and onwards; also, hypoxia by itself increased plasma noradrenaline levels after maximal exercise. Domperidone further increased maximal noradrenaline concentrations, but had no effect on maximal heart rate. On each study day at altitude, oxygen...... breathing completely reversed the decrease in maximal heart rate to values not different from those at sea level. In conclusion, dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade with domperidone demonstrates that hypoxic exercise in humans activates D(2)-receptors, resulting in a decrease in circulating levels...

  14. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  15. BioWatch: Estimation of Heart and Breathing Rates from Wrist Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Hernandez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Continued developments of sensor technology including hardware miniaturization and increased sensitivity have enabled the development of less intrusive methods to monitor physiological parameters during daily life. In this work, we present methods to recover cardiac and respiratory parameters using accelerometer and gyroscope sensors on the wrist. We demonstrate accurate measurements in a controlled laboratory study where participants (n = 12 held three different positions (standing up, sitting down and lying down under relaxed and aroused conditions. In particular, we show it is possible to achieve a mean absolute error of 1.27 beats per minute (STD: 3.37 for heart rate and 0.38 breaths per minute (STD: 1.19 for breathing rate when comparing performance with FDA-cleared sensors. Furthermore, we show comparable performance with a state-of-the-art wrist-worn heart rate monitor, and when monitoring heart rate of three individuals during two consecutive nights of in-situ sleep measurements.

  16. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Self-initiation of EEG-based brain computer communication using the heart rate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Pfurtscheller, G.

    2007-12-01

    Self-initiation, that is the ability of a brain-computer interface (BCI) user to autonomously switch on and off the system, is a very important issue. In this work we analyze whether the respiratory heart rate response, induced by brisk inspiration, can be used as an additional communication channel. After only 20 min of feedback training, ten healthy subjects were able to self-initiate and operate a 4-class steady-state visual evoked potential-based (SSVEP) BCI by using one bipolar ECG and one bipolar EEG channel only. Threshold detection was used to measure a beat-to-beat heart rate increase. Despite this simple method, during a 30 min evaluation period on average only 2.9 non-intentional switches (heart rate changes) were detected.

  17. Heart rate response to "off-road" running events in female athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, U.; Reilly, T.; Nevill, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the growing popularity of off-road running events, little information is available about the physiological stress of such activities. The demands of such events are unique in terms of the rough surface of the terrain encountered as well as the underfoot vegetation and the gradient. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological response of female athletes, as measured by heart rate, to three common off-road running events: cross country running (n = 15), fell running (n = 20), and orienteering (n = 25). METHODS: Heart rate responses were recorded during cross country and fell races, and orienteering by means of short range radiotelemetry. Road running (n = 21) was also studied as a reference. RESULTS: The mean heart rates for each event varied with the differing demands of the terrain. The highest (182 (10) beats/minute; mean (SD)) was for road running and the lowest (172 (10) beats/minute) for orienteering. Orienteering evoked a significantly more variable response than all other events (F4,100 = 112.4; prunning, which was not evident in the fell runners or the orienteers. The latter events demonstrated no consistent pattern. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that running off-road elicits a heart rate response that varies with the altering demands of surface, vegetation, and gradient. 


 PMID:9562161

  18. Behavioral correlates of heart rates of free-living Greater White-fronted Geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, C.R.; Ward, D.H.; Bollinger, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    We simultaneously monitored the heart rate and behavior of nine free-living Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) on their wintering grounds in northern California. Heart rates of wild geese were monitored via abdominally-implanted radio transmitters with electrodes that received electrical impulses of the heart and emitted a radio signal with each ventricular contraction. Post-operative birds appeared to behave normally, readily rejoining flocks and flying up to 15 km daily from night-time roost sites to feed in surrounding agricultural fields. Heart rates varied significantly among individuals and among behaviors, and ranged from less than 100 beats per minute (BPM) during resting, to over 400 BPM during flight. Heart rates varied from 80 to 140 BPM during non-strenuous activities such as walking, feeding, and maintenance activities, to about 180 BPM when birds became alert, and over 400 BPM when birds were startled, even if they did not take flight. Postflight heart rate recovery time averaged measures of physiological parameters, such as heart rate, are often better indicators of the degree of response to external stimuli than visual observations and can be used to improve estimates of energy expenditure based solely on activity data.

  19. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth;

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  20. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended.

  1. Heart rate variability in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Munkholm, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been suggested reduced in bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy individuals (HC). This meta-analysis investigated: HRV differences in BD compared with HC, major depressive disorder or schizophrenia; HRV differences between affective states; HRV...

  2. Heart rate control via vagus nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, Hendrik P.; Storm, Corstiaan J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Verdouw, Pieter D.; Aa, van der Hans E.; Kemp, van der Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: There is ample and well-established evidence that direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can change heart rate in animals and humans. Since tachyarrhythmias cannot always be controlled through medication, we sought, in this pilot study, to elucidate whether a clinical implantab

  3. Early detection of biliary complications and graft rejection in a non-RH Identitical liver transplant recipient from a non-heart-beating donor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiño-Luque, J; Zambudio-Carroll, N; Muffak-Granero, K; Villegas-Herrera, T; Garrote-Lara, D; Ferrón-Orihuela, J-A

    2012-09-01

    Because of a shortage of organs, non-heart-beating donors have been proposed to be a possible source of grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation. Herein, we have presented a blood group A+ patient with primary biliary cirrhosis, who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation from a non-heart-beating blood group A- donor. On day 5 after transplantation the patient displayed a low hemoglobin levels as well as an increased total bilirubin with progressive encephalopathy, hypotension, and oligoanuria on day 11. The patient responded to steroid treatment. We assume the main cause of organ dysfunction was a passenger lymphocyte syndrome (ABO-Rh incompatibility). Biliary complications were detected at a 6-month follow-up visit by increased hepatic enzymes. We thus concluded that it is useful to take Rh group into account.

  4. Interactions between heart rate variability and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Peter Y W; Webber, Matthew R; Galletly, Duncan C; Ainslie, Philip N; Brown, Stephen J; Willie, Chris K; Sasse, Alexander; Larsen, Peter D; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2010-07-01

    The respiratory component of heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) has been associated with improved pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans via the apparent clustering and scattering of heart beats in time with the inspiratory and expiratory phases of alveolar ventilation, respectively. However, since human RSA causes only marginal redistribution of heart beats to inspiration, we tested the hypothesis that any association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be indirect. In 11 patients with fixed-rate cardiac pacemakers and 10 healthy control subjects, we recorded R-R intervals, respiratory flow, end-tidal gas tension and the ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide and oxygen during 'fast' (0.25 Hz) and 'slow' paced breathing (0.10 Hz). Mean heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure fluctuations, tidal volume, end-tidal CO(2), and were similar between pacemaker and control groups in both the fast and slow breathing conditions. Although pacemaker patients had no RSA and slow breathing was associated with a 2.5-fold RSA amplitude increase in control subjects (39 +/- 21 versus 97 +/- 45 ms, P exchange efficiency during variable-frequency paced breathing observed in prior human work is not contingent on RSA being present. Therefore, whether RSA serves an intrinsic physiological function in optimizing pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans requires further experimental validation.

  5. Influence of basic heart rate and sex on heart rate turbulence in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jörg O; Eichner, Gerrit; Veit, Gudrun; Schmitt, Heiko; Lewalter, Thorsten; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2004-12-01

    Acceleration and deceleration of the heart rate after the occurrence of a ventricular premature complex is characterized as heart rate turbulence (HRT). Two parameters quantify heart rate turbulence: onset and slope. The physiological properties have not been clarified in a large cohort of persons yet. This study evaluated properties of HRT, and focused on the influence of basic heart rate and sex on HRT. Using a special protocol, 95 persons were studied prospectively. HRT and its physiological properties were determined in 95 persons using Holter ECGs. The authors found 24% with a turbulence onset 0% and 5% with a turbulence slope women and men (745 vs 817 ms, P linear, weighted regression model revealed that an increased heart rate before a ventricular premature complex is associated with a decreased turbulence onset (P men (P = 0.0022). On the contrary, the study detected no influence of the basic heart rate on turbulence slope in women (P = 0.0015 for the comparison between women and men). Basic heart rate and sex show an influence on HRT and should be considered when using HRT for noninvasive risk stratification.

  6. [IV Consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation (SETH) 2012. Liver transplant with non-conventional grafts: Split liver transplantation and non-heart beating donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abradelo, Manuel; Fondevila, Constantino

    2014-03-01

    The disbalance between the number of candidates to liver transplant and the number of liver grafts leads to waiting list mortality. Two potential ways of increasing the number of liver grafts are split liver transplantation and the transplantation of grafts from non-heart beating donors. Both of them were discussed in a consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation in October 2012. This paper outlines the conclusions of that meeting.

  7. Gaussian mixture model of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Costa

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters.

  8. Flight Modes in Migrating European Bee-Eaters: Heart Rate May Indicate Low Metabolic Rate during Soaring and Gliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; McCue, Marshall D.; Pinshow, Berry; Nathan, Ran

    2010-01-01

    Background Many avian species soar and glide over land. Evidence from large birds (mb>0.9 kg) suggests that soaring-gliding is considerably cheaper in terms of energy than flapping flight, and costs about two to three times the basal metabolic rate (BMR). Yet, soaring-gliding is considered unfavorable for small birds because migration speed in small birds during soaring-gliding is believed to be lower than that of flapping flight. Nevertheless, several small bird species routinely soar and glide. Methodology/Principal Findings To estimate the energetic cost of soaring-gliding flight in small birds, we measured heart beat frequencies of free-ranging migrating European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster, mb∼55 g) using radio telemetry, and established the relationship between heart beat frequency and metabolic rate (by indirect calorimetry) in the laboratory. Heart beat frequency during sustained soaring-gliding was 2.2 to 2.5 times lower than during flapping flight, but similar to, and not significantly different from, that measured in resting birds. We estimated that soaring-gliding metabolic rate of European bee-eaters is about twice their basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is similar to the value estimated in the black-browed albatross Thalassarche (previously Diomedea) melanophrys, mb∼4 kg). We found that soaring-gliding migration speed is not significantly different from flapping migration speed. Conclusions/Significance We found no evidence that soaring-gliding speed is slower than flapping flight in bee-eaters, contradicting earlier estimates that implied a migration speed penalty for using soaring-gliding rather than flapping flight. Moreover, we suggest that small birds soar and glide during migration, breeding, dispersal, and other stages in their annual cycle because it may entail a low energy cost of transport. We propose that the energy cost of soaring-gliding may be proportional to BMR regardless of bird size, as theoretically deduced by earlier studies

  9. Music determines heart rate variability of singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eVickhoff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below. In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1 hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2 sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3 sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-(3. We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and heart rate are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior.

  10. Association Between Heart Rate at Rest and Incident Atrial Fibrillation (from the Copenhagen Electrocardiographic Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Morten W.; Bachmann, Troels N.; Rasmussen, Peter V.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) at rest is a well-known marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results on the association between HR and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) have, however, been conflicting. Using digital electrocardiograms from 281,451 primary care patients, we aimed to describe the asso......Heart rate (HR) at rest is a well-known marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results on the association between HR and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) have, however, been conflicting. Using digital electrocardiograms from 281,451 primary care patients, we aimed to describe...... the association between HR at rest and the hazards of incident AF. Secondary end points were death from all causes and pacemaker implantation. Data on drug use, co-morbidity, and outcomes were collected from nationwide administrative health care registries. During a median follow-up time of 8.4 years, 15......,666 subjects were observed to develop AF, of which 1,631 were lone AF. A HR at rest from 30 to 51 beats/min was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.16 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.27) for AF compared with the reference group (66 to 72 beats/min). From 72 beats/min and upward, the hazard ratio of AF increased...

  11. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate: A Mendelian Randomisation Meta-Analysis in the CARTA Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K.; Skaaby, Tea; Taylor, Amy E.; Fluharty, Meg E.; Jeppesen, Jørgen L.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Kumari, Meena; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri; Palotie, Aarno; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Ford, Ian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Christiansen, Lene; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Kuh, Diana; Eriksson, Johan G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Mbarek, Hamdi; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jukema, J. Wouter; Power, Chris; Hyppönen, Elina; Preisig, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Vollenweider, Peter; Korhonen, Tellervo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H.; Hayward, Caroline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Sattar, Naveed; Morris, Richard W.; Romundstad, Pål R.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. Methods and Results Data on 141,317 participants (62,666 never, 40,669 former, 37,982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in observational and Mendelian randomisation (MR) meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the MR analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy for smoking heaviness in current smokers. In observational analyses, current as compared with never smoking was associated with lower SBP, DBP, and lower hypertension risk, but with higher resting heart rate. In observational analyses amongst current smokers, one cigarette/day higher level of smoking heaviness was associated with higher (0.21 beats/minute; 95% CI 0.19; 0.24) resting heart rate, and slightly higher DBP (0.05 mmHg; 95% CI 0.02; 0.08) and SBP (0.08 mmHg; 95% CI 0.03; 0.13). However, in MR analyses amongst current smokers, while each smoking increasing allele of rs16969968/rs1051730 was associated with higher resting heart rate (0.36 beats/minute/allele; 95% CI 0.18; 0.54), there was no strong association with DBP, SBP, or hypertension. This would suggest a 7 beats/minute higher heart rate in those who smoke 20 cigarettes/day. Conclusions This MR meta-analysis supports a causal association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate. PMID:26538566

  12. New Estimators and Guidelines for Better Use of Fetal Heart Rate Estimators with Doppler Ultrasound Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing fetal wellbeing with a Doppler ultrasound device requires computation of a score based on fetal parameters. In order to analyze the parameters derived from the fetal heart rate correctly, an accuracy of 0.25 beats per minute is needed. Simultaneously with the lowest false negative rate and the highest sensitivity, we investigated whether various Doppler techniques ensure this accuracy. We found that the accuracy was ensured if directional Doppler signals and autocorrelation estimation were used. Our best estimator provided sensitivity of 95.5%, corresponding to an improvement of 14% compared to the standard estimator.

  13. Heart rate recovery and heart rate complexity following resistance exercise training and detraining in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Fahs, Christopher A; Shinsako, Kevin K; Jae, Sae Young; Fernhall, Bo

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate recovery (HRR) and linear/nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) before and after resistance training. Fourteen young men (25.0 +/- 1.1 yr of age) completed a crossover design consisting of a 4-wk time-control period, 6 wk of resistance training (3 days/wk), and 4 wk of detraining. Linear HRV was spectrally decomposed using an autoregressive approach. Nonlinear dynamics of heart rate complexity included sample entropy (SampEn) and Lempel-Ziv entropy (LZEn). HRR was calculated from a graded maximal exercise test as maximal heart rate attained during the test minus heart rate at 1 min after exercise (HRR). There was no change in SampEn, LZEn, or HRR after the time-control portion of the study (P > 0.05). SampEn (P 0.05). These findings suggest that resistance exercise training increases heart rate complexity and HRR after exercise but has no effect on spectral measures of HRV in young healthy men. These autonomic changes regress shortly after cessation of training.

  14. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorka, M; Zila, I; Balhárek, T; Javorka, K

    2002-08-01

    Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. Heart rate was monitored in 17 healthy male subjects (mean age: 20 years) during the pre-exercise phase (25 min supine, 5 min standing), during exercise (8 min of the step test with an ascending frequency corresponding to 70% of individual maximal power output) and during the recovery phase (30 min supine). HRV analysis in the time and frequency domains and evaluation of a newly developed complexity measure - sample entropy - were performed on selected segments of heart rate time series. During recovery, heart rate decreased gradually but did not attain pre-exercise values within 30 min after exercise. On the other hand, HRV gradually increased, but did not regain rest values during the study period. Heart rate complexity was slightly reduced after exercise and attained rest values after 30-min recovery. The rate of cardiodeceleration did not correlate with pre-exercise HRV parameters, but positively correlated with HRV measures and sample entropy obtained from the early phases of recovery. In conclusion, the cardiodeceleration rate is independent of HRV measures during the rest period but it is related to early post-exercise recovery HRV measures, confirming a parasympathetic contribution to this phase.

  15. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javorka

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. Heart rate was monitored in 17 healthy male subjects (mean age: 20 years during the pre-exercise phase (25 min supine, 5 min standing, during exercise (8 min of the step test with an ascending frequency corresponding to 70% of individual maximal power output and during the recovery phase (30 min supine. HRV analysis in the time and frequency domains and evaluation of a newly developed complexity measure - sample entropy - were performed on selected segments of heart rate time series. During recovery, heart rate decreased gradually but did not attain pre-exercise values within 30 min after exercise. On the other hand, HRV gradually increased, but did not regain rest values during the study period. Heart rate complexity was slightly reduced after exercise and attained rest values after 30-min recovery. The rate of cardiodeceleration did not correlate with pre-exercise HRV parameters, but positively correlated with HRV measures and sample entropy obtained from the early phases of recovery. In conclusion, the cardiodeceleration rate is independent of HRV measures during the rest period but it is related to early post-exercise recovery HRV measures, confirming a parasympathetic contribution to this phase.

  16. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  17. Virtual spiders raise real heart rates

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Virtual realities (VR) give rise to feelings of presence in virtual environments and have been proven a useful medium when treating specific phobias. For validation of the usability of VR for exposure therapy it is critical to investigate the techs capacity of activating the user physiologically. An experiment was designed with the purpose of investigating if virtual spiders in a virtual environment could cause a heightening of heart rate in the participants (N = 24). The hypothesis was that ...

  18. Analysis of Non-stationary Data for Heart-Rate Fluctuations in Terms of Drift and Diffusion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, F; Peinke, J; Tabar, M R R; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    We describe a method for analyzing the stochasticity in the non-stationary data for the beat-to-beat fluctuations in the heart rates of healthy subjects, as well as those with congestive heart failure. The method analyzes the returns time series of the data as a Markov process, and computes the Markov time scale, i.e., the time scale over which the data are a Markov process. We also construct an effective stochastic continuum equation for the return series. We show that the drift and diffusion coefficients, as well as the amplitude of the returns time series for healthy subjects are distinct from those with CHF. Thus, the method may potentially provide a diagnostic tool for distinguishing healthy subjects from those with congestive heart failure, as it can distinguish small differences between the data for the two classes of subjects in terms of well-defined and physically-motivated quantities.

  19. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    Isolated activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) using post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) following handgrip partially maintains exercise-induced increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), while heart rate (HR......) declines towards resting values. Although masking of metaboreflex-mediated increases in cardiac SNA by parasympathetic reactivation during PEI has been suggested, this has not been directly tested in humans. In nine male subjects (23 +/- 5 years) the muscle metaboreflex was activated by PEI following...... moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously...

  20. Heart rate variability and heat sensation during CT coronary angiography: Low-osmolar versus iso-osmolar contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Anders; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Aspelin, Peter; Cederlund, Kerstin; Brismar, B. Torkel (Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Div. of Medical Imaging and Technology and Dept. of Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: anders.svensson@karolinska.se; Rueck, Andreas (Div. of Cardiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    Background: During computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) unexpected changes in heart rate while scanning may affect image quality. Purpose: To evaluate whether an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol) and a low-osmolar contrast medium (LOCM, iomeprol) affect heart rate and experienced heat sensation differently. Material and Methods: One hundred patients scheduled for CTCA were randomized to receive either iodixanol 320 mgI/ml or iomeprol 400 mgI/ml. Depending on their heart rate, the patients were assigned to one of five scanning protocols, each optimized for different heart rate ranges. During scanning the time between each heart beat (hb) was recorded, and the corresponding heart rate was calculated. For each contrast medium (CM) the average heart rate, the variation in heart rate from individual mean heart rate, and the mean deviation from the predefined scanning protocol were calculated. Experience of heat was obtained immediately after scanning by using a visual analog scale (VAS). Examination quality was rated by two radiologists on a three-point scale. Results: The mean variation in heart rate after IOCM was 1.4 hb/min and after LOCM it was 4.4 hb/min (NS). The mean deviations in heart rate from that in the predefined scanning protocol were 2.0 hb/min and 4.7 hb/min, respectively (NS). A greater number of arrhythmic hb were observed after LOCM compared with IOCM (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in image quality. The LOCM group reported a stronger heat sensation after CM injection than the IOCM group (VAS =36 mm and 18 mm, P<0.05). Conclusion: At clinically used concentrations the IOCM, iodixanol 320 mgI/ml, does not increase the heart rate during CTCA and causes less heart arrhythmia and less heat sensation than the LOCM, iomeprol 400 mgI/ml

  1. Aerobic Fitness, Heart Rate Recovery and Heart Rate Recovery Time in Indian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rajesh Jeniton; Ravichandran, K; Vaz, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Data on aerobic fitness and heart rate recovery in children are limited. This study was done to evaluate the relation between them in Indian school going children. Three hundred children of 7 to 10.5 years were recruited and their aerobic fitness was predicted using modified Harvard's step test (VO₂max) and 20 meter shuttle test (VO₂peak). The heart rate was monitored for 12 minutes post modified Harvard's step test. The difference between the maximum and the 1st minute HR was noted as HRR1 and the time taken to reach the resting heart rate was also recorded. VO₂max was inversely correlated with HRR1 (r = -0.64, precovery rate per unit time was 3% greater with increasing VO₂max (HR = 1.03, 95% CI:1.01 to 1.05, p = 0.013). The heart rate parameters did not show any associat with VO₂peak This study demonstrates that there is no relation between VO₂max and HRR1 after 3 minutes of modified Harvard's step test in Indian children of 7 to 10.5 years. However, aerobic fitness is a positive predictor of heart rate recovery time in this group.

  2. Association between Attention and Heart Rate Fluctuations in Pathological Worriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzellini, Simone; Dettori, Maria; Amadori, Francesca; Paoli, Barbara; Napolitano, Antonio; Mancini, Francesco; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recent data suggests that several psychopathological conditions are associated with alterations in the variability of behavioral and physiological responses. Pathological worry, defined as the cognitive representation of a potential threat, has been associated with reduced variability of heart beat oscillations (i.e., decreased heart rate variability; HRV) and lapses of attention indexed by reaction times (RTs). Clinical populations with attention deficit show RTs oscillation around 0.05 and 0.01 Hz when performing a sustained attention task. We tested the hypothesis that people who are prone to worry do it in a predictable oscillating pattern revealed through recurrent lapses in attention and concomitant oscillating HRV. Sixty healthy young adults (50% women) were recruited: 30 exceeded the clinical cut-off on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ; High-Worry, HW); the remaining 30 constituted the Low-Worry (LW) group. After a diagnostic assessment, participants performed two 15-min sustained attention tasks, interspersed by a standardized worry-induction procedure. RTs, HRV and moods were assessed. The analyses of the frequency spectrum showed that the HW group presents a significant higher and constant peak of RTs oscillation around 0.01 Hz (period 100 s) after the induction of worry, in comparison with their baseline and with the LW group that was not responsive to the induction procedure. Physiologically, the induction significantly reduced high-frequency HRV and such reduction was associated with levels of self-reported worry. Results are coherent with the oscillatory nature of the default mode network (DMN) and further confirm an association between cognitive rigidity and autonomic nervous system inflexibility. PMID:28082881

  3. Heart rate distribution and predictors of resting heart rate after initiation of beta-blocker treatment in patients with coronary artery disease: REsults of Sympathetic Evaluation And Research of China(RESEARCH) study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-xin; LI Yue-ping; GAO Fei; MA Han-ying; WANG Zhi-jian; HAN Hong-ya; SHEN Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of heart rate as secondary prevention strategies for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is emphasized by multiple guidelines.However,limited information is available on the heart rate distribution and the change patterns of resting heart rate when initiating beta-blocker therapy among Chinese patients with CAD.Methods The REsults of Sympathetic Evaluation And Research of China (RESEARCH) study is a multi-centre,prospective,observational study involving 147 centers in 23 cities across China.All eligible beta-blocker naive patients were prescribed with metroprolol succinate.Initial dosage and target heart rate were selected at the discretion of their physicians in charge according to their usual institutional practice.The heart rate distribution and the change patterns of resting heart rate after initiation of beta-blocker therapy were observed.Results The majority of patients (63.6%) were prescribed with 47.5 mg metroprolol succinate.At baseline,there were only 17.4% of patients whose heart rate was less than 70 beats per minute,and the proportion reached 42.5% and 79.1%,one month and two months after initiation of beta-blockers,respectively.Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that baseline heart rate (B=0.900,SE=0.006,t=141.787,P<0.0001) and the dosage (B=-0.007,SE=0.002,t=-3.242,P=0.001) were independent predictors of resting heart rate 2 months after beta-blocker therapy.Conclusions Resting heart rate is not optimally controlled in a broadly representative cohort of Chinese outpatients with CAD even after initiation of β-blocker therapy,and baseline heart rate and the dosage of beta-blocker are both independent predictors of resting heart rate after β-blocker therapy.

  4. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  5. SVM-Based Spectral Analysis for Heart Rate from Multi-Channel WPPG Sensor Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jiping; Cai, Lisang; Wang, Fei; He, Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    Although wrist-type photoplethysmographic (hereafter referred to as WPPG) sensor signals can measure heart rate quite conveniently, the subjects’ hand movements can cause strong motion artifacts, and then the motion artifacts will heavily contaminate WPPG signals. Hence, it is challenging for us to accurately estimate heart rate from WPPG signals during intense physical activities. The WWPG method has attracted more attention thanks to the popularity of wrist-worn wearable devices. In this paper, a mixed approach called Mix-SVM is proposed, it can use multi-channel WPPG sensor signals and simultaneous acceleration signals to measurement heart rate. Firstly, we combine the principle component analysis and adaptive filter to remove a part of the motion artifacts. Due to the strong relativity between motion artifacts and acceleration signals, the further denoising problem is regarded as a sparse signals reconstruction problem. Then, we use a spectrum subtraction method to eliminate motion artifacts effectively. Finally, the spectral peak corresponding to heart rate is sought by an SVM-based spectral analysis method. Through the public PPG database in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup, we acquire the experimental results, i.e., the average absolute error was 1.01 beat per minute, and the Pearson correlation was 0.9972. These results also confirm that the proposed Mix-SVM approach has potential for multi-channel WPPG-based heart rate estimation in the presence of intense physical exercise. PMID:28273818

  6. SVM-Based Spectral Analysis for Heart Rate from Multi-Channel WPPG Sensor Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Xiong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although wrist-type photoplethysmographic (hereafter referred to as WPPG sensor signals can measure heart rate quite conveniently, the subjects’ hand movements can cause strong motion artifacts, and then the motion artifacts will heavily contaminate WPPG signals. Hence, it is challenging for us to accurately estimate heart rate from WPPG signals during intense physical activities. The WWPG method has attracted more attention thanks to the popularity of wrist-worn wearable devices. In this paper, a mixed approach called Mix-SVM is proposed, it can use multi-channel WPPG sensor signals and simultaneous acceleration signals to measurement heart rate. Firstly, we combine the principle component analysis and adaptive filter to remove a part of the motion artifacts. Due to the strong relativity between motion artifacts and acceleration signals, the further denoising problem is regarded as a sparse signals reconstruction problem. Then, we use a spectrum subtraction method to eliminate motion artifacts effectively. Finally, the spectral peak corresponding to heart rate is sought by an SVM-based spectral analysis method. Through the public PPG database in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup, we acquire the experimental results, i.e., the average absolute error was 1.01 beat per minute, and the Pearson correlation was 0.9972. These results also confirm that the proposed Mix-SVM approach has potential for multi-channel WPPG-based heart rate estimation in the presence of intense physical exercise.

  7. SVM-Based Spectral Analysis for Heart Rate from Multi-Channel WPPG Sensor Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jiping; Cai, Lisang; Wang, Fei; He, Xiaowei

    2017-03-03

    Although wrist-type photoplethysmographic (hereafter referred to as WPPG) sensor signals can measure heart rate quite conveniently, the subjects' hand movements can cause strong motion artifacts, and then the motion artifacts will heavily contaminate WPPG signals. Hence, it is challenging for us to accurately estimate heart rate from WPPG signals during intense physical activities. The WWPG method has attracted more attention thanks to the popularity of wrist-worn wearable devices. In this paper, a mixed approach called Mix-SVM is proposed, it can use multi-channel WPPG sensor signals and simultaneous acceleration signals to measurement heart rate. Firstly, we combine the principle component analysis and adaptive filter to remove a part of the motion artifacts. Due to the strong relativity between motion artifacts and acceleration signals, the further denoising problem is regarded as a sparse signals reconstruction problem. Then, we use a spectrum subtraction method to eliminate motion artifacts effectively. Finally, the spectral peak corresponding to heart rate is sought by an SVM-based spectral analysis method. Through the public PPG database in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup, we acquire the experimental results, i.e., the average absolute error was 1.01 beat per minute, and the Pearson correlation was 0.9972. These results also confirm that the proposed Mix-SVM approach has potential for multi-channel WPPG-based heart rate estimation in the presence of intense physical exercise.

  8. Heart rate variability in the assessment and biofeedback training of common mental health problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Pop-Jordanova

    2009-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the beat-to-beat variations in heart rate related to the work of autonomic nervous system. It may serve as a psychophysiological indicator for arousal, emotional state and stress level. We used this parameter in both the assessment and biofeedback training, for dealing with five groups of common mental health problem in school children (anxious-phobic, somatoform, obsessive-compulsive, attention deficit hyperactivity and conduct disorders). The obtained results were compared with healthy children at the same age. In order to define the four main characteristics of personality (extroversion/introversion, neuroticism/stability, psychopathological traits and honesty) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was applied. Results showed significantly higher psychopathological traits in ADHD and somatoform group, lower extroversion in somatoform, higher neurotism in OCD and lower lie scores in ADHD and OCD groups. As HRV instrument we used Heart Math Freeze-Framer System. After 15 sessions of training, children from nearby all groups showed improved high and medium HRV which corresponded to the improved clinical outcome. Hereby, the best results were obtained for conduct and anxiety disorder, and the worst for ADHD.

  9. Beating Heart of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelin, Daniel A., II

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a critical and comparative look at how two theatre programs help young people develop an artistic voice and sense of self as an artist. Each program begins with art. Individuals explore basic tenets of dramatic expression through foundational activities. As they play and experiment, the individuals discover their capacity for…

  10. The effect of diazepam administration during pregnancy or labor on the heart rate variability of the newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geijn, H P; Jongsma, H W; Doesburg, W H; Lemmens, W A; de Haan, J; Eskes, T K

    1980-03-01

    Maternal diazepam medication during labor reduces beat-to-beat variability of the fetal heart rate. In this study, the prolongation of the effect was examined in the newborn. The mother received diazepam: (A) during labor as a tranquilizer, (B) daily in low doses at the end of pregnancy, or (C) in high doses i.v. for (pre-)eclampsia. A control group had no analgesic or sedative during pregnancy or labor. The electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded daily from each newborn during the first 6 days after birth. After preprocessing of the ECG, the median R-R interval, the long-term irregularity index (LTI index) and the interval difference index (ID index) were calculated. A cubic spline interpolation method was applied to compare the various groups with respect to these heart rate parameters. The median R-R interval showed no particular differences in trend for all groups. The LTI index was decreased in the first days after birth in the chronic diazepam (B), and in the diazepam infusion groups (C), but statistical significance was not reached. The ID index was significantly decreased in the first 1-2 days in the newborns of the acute and chronic diazepam group. In the diazepam infusion group, an even longer lasting effect was observed. Maternal diazepam medication affects the beat-to-beat variability in the newborn. The duration of the effect is dependent on dosage and route of administration.

  11. Origin of heart rate variability and turbulence: an appraisal of autonomic modulation of cardiovascular function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLombardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of autonomic modulation of sinus node by non-invasive techniques has provided relevant clinical information in patients with several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases and has facilitated the appraisal of neural regulatory mechanisms in normal and diseased subjects. The finding that even during resting conditions the heart period changes on a beat to beat basis and that after a premature ventricular beat there are small variations in RR interval whose measurements may be utilised to evaluate the autonomic modulation of sinus node, has provided unprecedented clinical and pathophysiological information. Heart rate variability (HRV and Heart Rate Turbulence (HRT have been extensively utilised in the clinical setting. To explain the negative predictive value of a reduced HRV it was determined that overall HRV was largely dependent on vagal mechanisms and that a reduction in HRV could reflect an increased sympathetic and a reduced vagal modulation of sinus node; i.e. an autonomic alteration favouring cardiac electrical instability. This initial interpretation was challenged by several findings indicating a greater complexity of the relationship between neural input and sinus node responsiveness as well as the possible interference with non-neural mechanisms.Under controlled conditions, however, the computation of low and high frequency components and of their ratio seems capable of providing adequate information on sympatho-vagal balance in normal subjects as well as in most patients with a preserved left ventricular function, thus providing a unique tool to investigate neural control mechanisms. Analysis on non-linear dynamics of HRV has also been utilised to describe the fractal like characteristic of the variability signal and proven effective to identify patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. A reduction on HRT parameters reflecting reduced baroreflex sensitivity as a likely result of a reduced vagal and of an increased sympathetic

  12. Multiscale multifractal analysis of heart rate variability recordings with a large number of occurrences of arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierałtowski, J.; Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2012-02-01

    Human heart rate variability, in the form of time series of intervals between heart beats, shows complex, fractal properties. Recently, it was demonstrated many times that the fractal properties vary from point to point along the series, leading to multifractality. In this paper, we concentrate not only on the fact that the human heart rate has multifractal properties but also that these properties depend on the time scale in which the multifractality is measured. This time scale is related to the frequency band of the signal. We find that human heart rate variability appears to be far more complex than hitherto reported in the studies using a fixed time scale. We introduce a method called multiscale multifractal analysis (MMA), which allows us to extend the description of heart rate variability to include the dependence on the magnitude of the variability and time scale (or frequency band). MMA is relatively immune to additive noise and nonstationarity, including the nonstationarity due to inclusions into the time series of events of a different dynamics (e.g., arrhythmic events in sinus rhythm). The MMA method may provide new ways of measuring the nonlinearity of a signal, and it may help to develop new methods of medical diagnostics.

  13. Ex Vivo Rehabilitation of Non-Heart-Beating Donor Lungs in a Preclinical Porcine Model: Delayed Perfusion Results in Superior Lung Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Crosby, Ivan K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Webb, David V.; Lau, Christine L.; Laubach, Victor E.; Kron, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a promising modality for the evaluation and treatment of marginal donor lungs. The optimal timing of EVLP initiation and potential for rehabilitation of donor lungs with extended warm-ischemic times is unknown. This study compares the efficacy of different treatment strategies for uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs. Methods Mature swine underwent hypoxic arrest followed by 60 minutes of no-touch warm-ischemia. Lungs were harvested and flushed with 4°C Perfadex®. Three groups (n=5/group) were stratified according to preservation method: cold-static preservation (CSP: 4 hrs 4°C storage), immediate EVLP (I-EVLP: 4 hrs EVLP at 37°C), and delayed EVLP (D-EVLP: 4 hrs cold storage followed by 4 hrs EVLP). EVLP groups were perfused with Steen solution™ supplemented with heparin, methylprednisolone, cefazolin, and an adenosine 2A receptor agonist. Lungs then underwent allotransplantation and four hours of recipient reperfusion prior to allograft assessment for resultant ischemia-reperfusion injury. Results Donor blood oxygenation (PO2:FiO2) prior to euthanasia was not different between groups. Oxygenation after transplantation was significantly higher in the D-EVLP group compared to the I-EVLP or CSP groups. Mean airway pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, and expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α were all significantly reduced in the D-EVLP group. Importantly, post-transplant oxygenation exceeded acceptable clinical levels only in D-EVLP lungs. Conclusions Uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs with extended warm-ischemia can be reconditioned for successful transplantation. The combination of CSP and EVLP present in the D-EVLP group was necessary to obtain optimal post-transplant function. This finding, if confirmed clinically, will allow expanded use of non-heart-beating donor lungs. PMID:22944084

  14. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Unplanned Conversion from Off-Pump to On-Pump Beating Heart Coronary Artery Revascularization in Patients with Compromised Left Ventricular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Tsaousi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To comparably assess the perioperative risk factors that differentiate off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB grafting cases from those sustaining unplanned conversion to on-pump beating heart (ONCAB/BH approach, in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 2 days (P=0.007. Conclusions. Patients with LVEF < 40% undergoing ONCAB/BH are subjected to more preoperative comorbidities and implicated ICU stay than their OPCAB counterparts, which influences adversely short-term morbidity, while operative mortality remains unaffected.

  15. Atrial fibrillation detection by heart rate variability in Poincare plot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Moongu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AFib is one of the prominent causes of stroke, and its risk increases with age. We need to detect AFib correctly as early as possible to avoid medical disaster because it is likely to proceed into a more serious form in short time. If we can make a portable AFib monitoring system, it will be helpful to many old people because we cannot predict when a patient will have a spasm of AFib. Methods We analyzed heart beat variability from inter-beat intervals obtained by a wavelet-based detector. We made a Poincare plot using the inter-beat intervals. By analyzing the plot, we extracted three feature measures characterizing AFib and non-AFib: the number of clusters, mean stepping increment of inter-beat intervals, and dispersion of the points around a diagonal line in the plot. We divided distribution of the number of clusters into two and calculated mean value of the lower part by k-means clustering method. We classified data whose number of clusters is more than one and less than this mean value as non-AFib data. In the other case, we tried to discriminate AFib from non-AFib using support vector machine with the other feature measures: the mean stepping increment and dispersion of the points in the Poincare plot. Results We found that Poincare plot from non-AFib data showed some pattern, while the plot from AFib data showed irregularly irregular shape. In case of non-AFib data, the definite pattern in the plot manifested itself with some limited number of clusters or closely packed one cluster. In case of AFib data, the number of clusters in the plot was one or too many. We evaluated the accuracy using leave-one-out cross-validation. Mean sensitivity and mean specificity were 91.4% and 92.9% respectively. Conclusions Because pulse beats of ventricles are less likely to be influenced by baseline wandering and noise, we used the inter-beat intervals to diagnose AFib. We visually displayed regularity of the inter-beat

  16. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    1994-01-01

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  17. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate. A Meta-Analysis of 63 Randomized Controlled Trials Including 72 Study Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p sodium reduction increases heart rate by as much (2.4%) as it decreases blood pressure (2.5%). This side-effect, which may cause harmful health effects, contributes to the need for a revision of the present dietary guidelines.

  18. Short-term versus long-term heart rate variability in ischemic cardiomyopathy risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eVoss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries with aging populations, heart failure affects 0.3%-2% of the general population. The investigation of 24h-ECG recordings revealed the potential of nonlinear indices of heart rate variability (HRV for enhanced risk stratification in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF. However, long-term analyses are time-consuming, expensive and delay the initial diagnosis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether 30min short-term HRV analysis is sufficient for comparable risk stratification in IHF in comparison to 24h-HRV analysis. From 256 IHF patients (221 at low risk (IHFLR and 35 at high risk (IHFHR a 24h beat-to-beat time series b the first 30min segment c the 30min most stationary day segment and d the 30min most stationary night segment were investigated. We calculated linear (time and frequency domain and nonlinear HRV analysis indices. Optimal parameter sets for risk stratification in IHF were determined for 24 hours and for each 30min segment by applying discriminant analysis on significant clinical and non-clinical indices. Long- and short-term HRV indices from frequency domain and particularly from nonlinear dynamics revealed high univariate significances (p

  19. Non-Heart-Beating Donor Kidney Transplantation Survival Is Similar to Donation After Brain Death: Comparative Study With Controls in a Regional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, M A; Castro de la Nuez, P; Gonzalez-Corvillo, C; de Gracia, M C; Cabello, M; Mazuecos, M A; Rodriguez-Benot, A; Ballesteros, L; Osuna, A; Alonso, M

    2016-11-01

    Non-heart-beating donors (NHBD) are an increasing source of organs for kidney transplantation (KT) compared with donation after brain death (DBD), but the results in each regional transplantation program require local analysis. We compared 164 KT from NHBD (83 Maastrich type II A-B [T2] and 81 type III [T3]) with 328 DBD controls. NHBD kidneys were implanted with less cold ischemia, mean time on renal replacement therapy for NHBD recipients before transplantation was less too, and a higher proportion of thymoglobulin was also used. Besides NHBD-T2 more frequently showing the A group and patients being younger (48.9 ± 11 vs DBD 55.2 ± 15 years old; P DBD 4.3 and 26.9% (P DBD; P DBD, respectively (not significant [NS]). Graft survival rates censored by death were 91% and 89% (1st and 3rd years, respectively) versus 95% and 94% for DBD, respectively (NS). We did not find significant differences about survival between NHBD-T2 and T3. In the multivariable survival study (Cox, covariables with statistical significance demonstrated previously in our region), NHBD is not a prognosis factor for recipient or graft survival. Regarding current criteria for choosing donors and the graft allocation applied in Andalusia, short-term survival for NHBD transplantation is similar to DBD. Renal function in the short term is slightly worse, which is why it is important to monitor results over a long term, especially those from NHBD-T2.

  20. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  1. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during an instrument flight rules proficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, Heikki; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Simola, Petteri

    2016-09-01

    Increased task demand will increase the pilot mental workload (PMWL). When PMWL is increased, mental overload may occur resulting in degraded performance. During pilots' instrument flight rules (IFR) proficiency test, PMWL is typically not measured. Therefore, little is known about workload during the proficiency test and pilots' potential to cope with higher task demands than those experienced during the test. In this study, fighter pilots' performance and PMWL was measured during a real IFR proficiency test in an F/A-18 simulator. PMWL was measured using heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV). Performance was rated using Finnish Air Force's official rating scales. Results indicated that HR and HRV differentiate varying task demands in situations where variations in performance are insignificant. It was concluded that during a proficiency test, PMWL should be measured together with the task performance measurement.

  2. U.S. Heart Failure Rates on the Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163266.html U.S. Heart Failure Rates on the Rise And heart ... Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health ...

  3. Relationship between diabetic autonomic dysfunction and heart rate variability assessed by recurrence plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestivier, D; Chau, N P; Chanudet, X; Bauduceau, B; Larroque, P

    1997-03-01

    Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were measured by the Finapres system in 44 healthy and 64 diabetic subjects in the at-rest condition. Autonomic control in diabetic subjects was assessed by the Ewing test. HR variability was explored by both linear and nonlinear methods. Linear methods used HR standard deviation and power spectrum. The percentage of the spectrum in the low frequencies was used to assess the sympathetic tone of the autonomic control. The nonlinear method used the "recurrence plot." This method explored long parallel subsequences in the HR time series. These sequences characterize the dependence of the HR dynamics on initial values. The HR standard deviation was reduced in the diabetic subjects compared with the healthy subjects (2.80 +/- 1.17 vs. 3.64 +/- 1.45 beats/min; P 0.10). In contrast, the longest length index was very strongly correlated to the Ewing score (r = -0.60; P < 0.0001). The results suggest that nonlinear methods might be powerful to explore the autonomic dysfunction in diabetic subjects.

  4. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar;

    2015-01-01

    of anxiety and depression were present in 13.6% and 13.8%, respectively (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score ≥ 8). Twelve months following discharge, 483 persons (56%) were readmitted. Readmission was associated with lower self-reported health (SF-36 PCS: 46.5 vs. 43.9, and MCS 52.2 vs. 50.7). Higher...... after surgery (3.2 (1.2-8.9)) predicted mortality. CONCLUSIONS: 6-12 months after heart valve surgery the readmission rate is high and the self-reported health status is low. Readmission is associated with low self-reported health. Therefore, targeted follow-up strategies post-surgery are needed....

  5. Association between resting heart rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community-based population study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruihua Cao, Yongyi Bai, Ruyi Xu, Ping Ye Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is associated with an increased risk of cardiac insufficiency, which possibly leads to heart failure. However, the relationship between resting heart rate and NT-proBNP is unclear.Objective: This study focuses on this relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP levels in a surveyed community-based population.Methods: We evaluated the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma levels of NT-proBNP in 1,567 participants (mean age 61.0 years, range 21–96 years from a community-based population in Beijing, People’s Republic of China.Results: In patients with high resting heart rate (≥75 beats/min, NT-proBNP was higher than in those having low resting heart rate (<75 beats/min. In multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, plasma NT-proBNP was associated with resting heart rate (partial correlation coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–1.51; P=0.011. A subsequent subgroup analysis revealed that the association between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was strengthened in subjects over 60 years old (partial correlation coefficient 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–2.36; P=0.031; while the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was not emerged in the younger subgroup (<60 years old.Conclusions: Resting heart rate was associated with plasma NT-proBNP in the elderly, which indicated a relationship between resting heart rate and cardiac function damage. Keywords: resting heart rate, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, epidemiology, cardiac function, relationship

  6. Opuntia ficus indica's effect on heart-rate variability in high-level athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Laurent; Fouillot, Jean-Pierre; Nicolet, Gerard; Midol, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Opuntia ficus indica (OFI) has many physiological effects, but a relationship between OFI and heart-rate variability (HRV) has never been established. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a diet supplement of OFI on HRV in athletes. The first day, heart rate (HR) was measured at rest in supine (SU) and standing (ST) positions to analyze HRV in 10 athletes, followed by a randomized assignment to an OFI (5) or placebo (5) group. The next day, the athletes repeated the HRV test. One month later the crossover protocol was applied. In OFI, the high-frequency-activity HF(SU) (1,773 +/- 2,927 vs. 5,856 +/- 8,326 ms(2), p < .05), HF(ST) (295 +/- 313 vs. 560 +/- 515 ms(2), p < .05), and low-frequency LF(SU) (1,621 +/- 1,795 vs. 6,029 +/- 9,007 ms(2), p < .01) increased. HR(SU) (66 +/- 13 vs. 57 +/- 11 beats/min, p < .01) and HR(ST) (87 +/- 11 vs. 76 +/- 9 beats/min, p < .01) decreased. A diet supplement of OFI increases HF and LF activities and decreases HR.

  7. Heart rate during conflicts predicts post-conflict stress-related behavior in greylag geese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A F Wascher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Social stressors are known to be among the most potent stressors in group-living animals. This is not only manifested in individual physiology (heart rate, glucocorticoids, but also in how individuals behave directly after a conflict. Certain 'stress-related behaviors' such as autopreening, body shaking, scratching and vigilance have been suggested to indicate an individual's emotional state. Such behaviors may also alleviate stress, but the behavioral context and physiological basis of those behaviors is still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded beat-to-beat heart rates (HR of 22 greylag geese in response to agonistic encounters using fully implanted sensor-transmitter packages. Additionally, for 143 major events we analyzed the behavior shown by our focal animals in the first two minutes after an interaction. Our results show that the HR during encounters and characteristics of the interaction predicted the frequency and duration of behaviors shown after a conflict. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge this is the first study to quantify the physiological and behavioral responses to single agonistic encounters and to link this to post conflict behavior. Our results demonstrate that 'stress-related behaviors' are flexibly modulated by the characteristics of the preceding aggressive interaction and reflect the individual's emotional strain, which is linked to autonomic arousal. We found no support for the stress-alleviating hypothesis, but we propose that stress-related behaviors may play a role in communication with other group members, particularly with pair-partners.

  8. Comparison of heart rate variability in supine, and left and right lateral positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A D; Larsen, P D; Galletly, D C

    2003-05-01

    In order to determine whether differences exist in cardiac autonomic tone between different body positions that may be used in unconscious subjects, we examined beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV) in volunteers lying supine, and in left lateral and right lateral positions. We studied 24 subjects, aged 20-35 years in each of the three positions on one study day, and 6 subjects in each of the three positions on each of six different study days. In both groups of subjects we observed no difference in heart rate, respiratory frequency, total power (0.02-0.45 Hz) of HRV or the proportion of power in the high (0.15-0.45 Hz), low (0.08-0.15 Hz) or very low (0.02-0.08 Hz) frequency bands among the three positions. These results suggest that there are no cardiac autonomic tone advantages to be gained by placing a person in the recovery position on one side compared with the other.

  9. Is baroreflex control of sympathetic activity and heart rate active in the preterm fetal sheep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2009-03-01

    The arterial baroreflex is a fundamental reflex that buffers rapid changes in arterial blood pressure (BP) via regulation of the heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity to the vasculature. In adults a sigmoidal relationship between BP and both heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity is well documented. Its role in blood pressure control before birth is unclear. Preterm babies have a high incidence of low BP, especially in the first few days of life, which could be related, in part, to immaturity of the baroreflex. In the present study, we investigated the baroreflex control of fetal heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in preterm fetal sheep in utero (102 +/- 1 days of gestation; term 140 days). Phenylephrine was associated with a significant increase in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 58 +/- 3 mmHg and a decrease in heart rate (HR) from 177 +/- 4 to 116 +/- 8 beats per minute (bpm). Sodium nitroprusside was associated with a significant fall in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 26 +/- 1 mmHg and an increase in HR from 182 +/- 4 to 274 +/- 8 bpm. However, the time between the 50% changes in BP and HR was significantly greater after hypotension than hypertension (31 +/- 8 s vs. 14 +/- 5 s, P < 0.05). No significant changes in RSNA occurred with either stimulus. This suggests that there are different maturational tempos for the components of the central autonomic response to altered blood pressure.

  10. Results of beating heart mitral valve surgery via the trans-septal approach Resultados da abordagem transeptal para a valva mitral com coração batendo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas A Salerno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mitral valve surgery can be performed through the trans-atrial or the trans-septal approach. Although the trans-atrial is the preferred method, the trans-septal approach has also been used recently and has a particular value in beating-heart mitral valve surgery. Herein we report our experience with beating-heart mitral valve surgery via trans-septal approach, and discuss its advantages and pitfalls. METHODS: Between 2000 and 2007, 214 consecutive patients were operated upon utilizing beating heart technique for mitral valve surgery. The operation was performed via transseptal approach with the aorta unclamped, the heart beating, with normal electrocardiogram and in sinus rhythm. RESULTS: Mean age was 56.03 ± 13.93 years (range: 19-86 years; median: 56 years. There were 131 (61.2% males and 83 (38.8% females. Of the prostheses used, 108 (50.5% were biological, and 39 (18.2% were mechanical. Mitral repairs were performed in 67 (31.3% patients. Mean hospital stay was 17.4 ± 20.0 days (range: 3-135 days; median: 11 days. Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP utilization was required in 12 (5.6% of 214 patients. One-month mortality was 7.4%, and re-operation for bleeding was needed in 15 (7% patients. CONCLUSIONS: Beating-heart mitral valve surgery is an option for myocardial protection in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery. This technique is facilitated by the trans-septal approach due to reduced aortic insufficiency and improved visualization of the mitral apparatus.OBJETIVO: A cirurgia da valva mitral pode ser feita via transatrial ou transeptal. Embora a transatrial seja a preferida, a via transeptal tem sido utilizada mais recentemente e tido um grande valor nas operações com o coração batendo. Mostramos a nossa experiência na cirurgia da valva mitral via transeptal com coração batendo e discutimos seus benefícios e problemas. MÉTODOS: Entre 2000 e 2007, 214 pacientes consecutivos foram operados com o coração batendo. A

  11. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  12. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John (CT and MRI Dept., Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece)), e-mail: fotisdimi@yahoo.gr; Tsantioti, Dimitra (Statistician, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    2011-04-15

    Background: Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Material and Methods: Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Results: Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR =65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Conclusion: Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure

  13. Respiration and heart rate complexity: effects of age and gender assessed by band-limited transfer entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Shamim; Edwards, Bradley A; Lee, Joon; Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin; Butler, James P; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-10-01

    Aging and disease are accompanied with a reduction of complex variability in the temporal patterns of heart rate. This reduction has been attributed to a break down of the underlying regulatory feedback mechanisms that maintain a homeodynamic state. Previous work has established the utility of entropy as an index of disorder, for quantification of changes in heart rate complexity. However, questions remain regarding the origin of heart rate complexity and the mechanisms involved in its reduction with aging and disease. In this work we use a newly developed technique based on the concept of band-limited transfer entropy to assess the aging-related changes in contribution of respiration and blood pressure to entropy of heart rate at different frequency bands. Noninvasive measurements of heart beat interval, respiration, and systolic blood pressure were recorded from 20 young (21-34 years) and 20 older (68-85 years) healthy adults. Band-limited transfer entropy analysis revealed a reduction in high-frequency contribution of respiration to heart rate complexity (p<0.001) with normal aging, particularly in men. These results have the potential for dissecting the relative contributions of respiration and blood pressure-related reflexes to heart rate complexity and their degeneration with normal aging.

  14. Adaptation of the QT interval to heart rate changes in isolated perfused guinea pig heart: influence of amiodarone and D-sotalol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrini, R; Speranza, G; Nollo, G; Bova, S; Piovan, D; Antolini, R; Ferrari, M

    1997-05-01

    The inadequacy of the QT interval to shorten following heart rate increase is a feature of the inherited long QT syndrome and may have a role in the genesis of the typical arrhythmias associated with this syndrome (torsade des pointes). The aim of our study was to evaluate whether drugs that prolong the QT interval, such as amiodarone and D-sotalol, may also impair the ability of the QT interval to adapt to sudden heart rate changes. Experiments were carried out on isolated perfused guinea pig hearts (Langendorff preparation). Driving frequency was changed, in steps, every two minutes (Hz: 2.5-3-2.5-3.75-2.5-5-2.5), while epicardial ECG was continuously recorded on magnetic tape. QT interval was automatically measured by means of a beat-by-beat analysis program. D-sotalol was added to the perfusion medium at a concentration of 4 micrograms ml-1, while amiodarone was administered, before in vitro evaluation, for seven days (50 mg kg-1 per day, intraperitoneally). In control experiments two phases of QT adaptation were identified: an abrupt QT shortening at the first beat after frequency change (QT1), followed by a gradual, exponential QT shortening that reached a new steady state in about 1 min (half life: 13 sec). The electrical restitution curve (the relation between QT1 and the corresponding diastolic interval) had a rate constant of 57 +/- 8 ms. Neither drug changed the slow component of QT adaptation. However, both drugs increased the ability of QT to shorten upon premature stimulation: D-sotalol by increasing the rate constant of the restitution curve and amiodarone by decreasing the y-intercept. Our results indicate that D-sotalol and amiodarone do not impair QT shortening during tachycardia but, on the contrary, they may favour QT adaptation, thus reducing the likelihood of the potentially lethal 'R on T phenomenon'. This may be an additional mechanism by which these drugs can exert their antifibrillatory action.

  15. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  16. Influence of heavy cigarette smoking on heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagirci, Goksel; Cay, Serkan; Karakurt, Ozlem;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular events related with several mechanisms. The most suggested mechanism is increased activity of sympathetic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been shown to be independent and powerful...... predictors of mortality in a specific group of cardiac patients. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of heavy cigarette smoking on cardiac autonomic function using HRV and HRT analyses. METHODS: Heavy cigarette smoking was defined as more than 20 cigarettes smoked per day. Heavy cigarette smokers......, 69 subjects and nonsmokers 74 subjects (control group) were enrolled in this study. HRV and HRT analyses [turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS)] were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings. RESULTS: The values of TO were significantly higher in heavy cigarette smokers than control group...

  17. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Lake Conder; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated ...

  18. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli.

  19. Ivabradine: Cardioprotection By and Beyond Heart Rate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-05-01

    Ivabradine inhibits hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the sinus node, thereby reducing heart rate, and heart rate reduction improves regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium. Accordingly, ivabradine reduces anginal symptoms in patients with stable coronary artery disease but does not improve their clinical outcome. Heart rate reduction with ivabradine in patients with symptomatic heart failure reduces symptoms, attenuates remodeling, and improves clinical outcome. In pigs and mice, ivabradine reduces infarct size from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, even when heart rate reduction is abrogated by atrial pacing. Improved viability is also observed in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. These beneficial effects are attributed to reduced reactive oxygen species formation from the mitochondria. There is also evidence for a heart rate-independent benefit from ivabradine in the vasculature of mice and humans, and in left ventricular contractile function of pigs. Finally, in mice, ivabradine also has anti-aging potential.

  20. Heart rate variability and suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott T; Chesin, Megan; Fertuck, Eric; Keilp, John; Brodsky, Beth; Mann, J John; Sönmez, Cemile Ceren; Benjamin-Phillips, Christopher; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-06-30

    Identification of biological indicators of suicide risk is important given advantages of biomarker-based models. Decreased high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV) may be a biomarker of suicide risk. The aim of this research was to determine whether HF HRV differs between suicide attempters and non-attempters. Using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), we compared HF HRV between females with and without a history of suicide attempt, all with a lifetime diagnosis of a mood disorder. To investigate a potential mechanism explaining association between HF HRV and suicide, we examined the association between self-reported anger and HF HRV. Results of an Area under the Curve (AUC) analysis showed attempters had a lower cumulative HF HRV during the TSST than non-attempters. In addition, while there was no difference in self-reported anger at baseline, the increase in anger was greater in attempters, and negatively associated with HF HRV. Results suggest that suicide attempters have a reduced capacity to regulate their response to stress, and that reduced capacity to regulate anger may be a mechanism through which decreased HF HRV can lead to an increase in suicide risk. Our results have implications for the prevention of suicidal behavior in at-risk populations.

  1. Investigation of determinism in heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. E. D.; Souza, A. V. P.; Guimarães, H. N.; Aguirre, L. A.

    2000-06-01

    The article searches for the possible presence of determinism in heart rate variability (HRV) signals by using a new approach based on NARMA (nonlinear autoregressive moving average) modeling and free-run prediction. Thirty-three 256-point HRV time series obtained from Wistar rats submitted to different autonomic blockade protocols are considered, and a collection of surrogate data sets are generated from each one of them. These surrogate sequences are assumed to be nondeterministic and therefore they may not be predictable. The original HRV time series and related surrogates are submitted to NARMA modeling and prediction. Special attention has been paid to the problem of stationarity. The results consistently show that the surrogate data sets cannot be predicted better than the trivial predictor—the mean—while most of the HRV control sequences are predictable to a certain degree. This suggests that the normal HRV signals have a deterministic signature. The HRV time series derived from the autonomic blockade segments of the experimental protocols do not show the same predictability performance, albeit the physiological interpretation is not obvious. These results have important implications to the methodology of HRV analysis, indicating that techniques from nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos may be applied to elicit more information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  2. Depression and heart rate variability in firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Liao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression has been found to increase the risk of mortality in patients with coronary artery disease through a mechanism of changing cardiac autonomic tone which is reflected by alteration of heart rate variability indices. This study investigated whether such mechanism existed in firefighters who were at high risk of depression and sudden cardiac death. Methods and results: In total, 107 firefighters were recruited. All completed Beck Depression Inventory and underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. The root-mean-square of successive differences, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals index, and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals >50 ms were significantly lower in depressed than in non-depressed firefighters after controlling for hypertension, age, and body mass index (40.1 ± 18.8 vs 62.5 ± 77.4, p < 0.01; 63.0 ± 19.2 vs 72.1 ± 34.8, p < 0.01; 8.4 ± 7.2 vs 12.7 ± 10.9, p < 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Decreased vagal tone is a possible mechanism linking depression and sudden cardiac death in firefighters.

  3. Drowsiness detection using heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, José; Laguna, Pablo; Bartra, Ariadna; Bailón, Raquel

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that 10-30 % of road fatalities are related to drowsy driving. Driver's drowsiness detection based on biological and vehicle signals is being studied in preventive car safety. Autonomous nervous system activity, which can be measured noninvasively from the heart rate variability (HRV) signal obtained from surface electrocardiogram, presents alterations during stress, extreme fatigue and drowsiness episodes. We hypothesized that these alterations manifest on HRV and thus could be used to detect driver's drowsiness. We analyzed three driving databases in which drivers presented different sleep-deprivation levels, and in which each driving minute was annotated as drowsy or awake. We developed two different drowsiness detectors based on HRV. While the drowsiness episodes detector assessed each minute of driving as "awake" or "drowsy" with seven HRV derived features (positive predictive value 0.96, sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.98 on 3475 min of driving), the sleep-deprivation detector discerned if a driver was suitable for driving or not, at driving onset, as function of his sleep-deprivation state. Sleep-deprivation state was estimated from the first three minutes of driving using only one HRV feature (positive predictive value 0.80, sensitivity 0.62, specificity 0.88 on 30 drivers). Incorporating drowsiness assessment based on HRV signal may add significant improvements to existing car safety systems.

  4. Sleep problems and heart rate variability over the working day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Marta; Dockray, Samantha; Endrighi, Romano; Hendrickx, Hilde; Steptoe, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether greater sleep problems are associated with reduced heart rate variability during working hours and at night, and to determine whether this association is in part mediated by experienced affective states. This study involved 199 working women with a mean age of 33.8years. Sleep problems were assessed with the Jenkins Sleep Problems Scale, and the Day Reconstruction Method was used to measure positive affect and stress on the evening before and during the working day. Heart rate variability was indexed by the mean square root of the successive standard difference in heart period. Disturbed sleep was inversely related to heart rate variability during the working day (P=0.022), independently of demographic and behavioural confounders. Additional adjustment for positive affect and stress did not lead to further reductions in the association between sleep problems and reduced heart rate variability over the work day. Sleep problems were not predictive of reduced night-time heart rate variability. This report extends the findings from experimental studies and clinical samples, and suggests that disturbed sleep might impair heart rate variability in real life settings, in particular during working hours. Reduced heart rate variability might be a potential pathway linking sleep problems with cardiovascular disease. Based on the current data there was little evidence that the inverse associations between sleep problems and heart rate variability were mediated by experienced affective states.

  5. Comparative study of myocardial protection in cardiac arrest and beating heart surgery%心脏停跳与不停跳手术心肌保护的临床对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建堂; 马增山; 董铭峰; 马胜军

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价心脏停跳与不停跳手术对先天性心脏病患者的心肌保护效果.方法 房间隔缺损(ASD)、室间隔缺损(VSD)、肺动脉瓣狭窄(PS)患者共116例,随机分为实验组(不停跳组)和对照组(停跳组).实验组在体外循环(CPB)心脏跳动状态下手术,对照组在CPB心脏停跳下手术,分别于术前及术后2、6、24、48 h采集血标本,检测血清肌酸激酶同工酶(CK-MB)、肌钙蛋白Ⅰ(cTnⅠ)、天冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)、乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)含量;记录CPB时间、术后48 h心律失常发生率、残余分流发生率、呼吸机支持时间、ICU滞留时间、术后住院天数.结果 两组术后各时点血清CK-MB、cTnⅠ、AST、LDH含量均显著高于术前(P<0.01),但两组间各时点比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);实验组CPB时间较对照组短(P<0.01),其他临床观察指标与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 体外循环心脏不停跳心内直视手术能缩短CPB时间,但手术效果与停跳手术比较差异无统计学意义.%Objective To evaluate the protective effects of cardiac arrest and beating heart on patients with congenital heart disease (CHD).Methods One hundred and sixteen CHD patients were randomly divided into experimental group (beating heart group) and control group (cardioplegia group).The experimental group received surgery on beating heart with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB),cardiac arrest operation under CPB in the control group,respectively.Blood samples were taken and the serum levels of creatine kinase MB (CK-MB),troponin Ⅰ(cTnⅠ),aspartate aminotransferase (AST),lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were detected before operation and 2,6,24,48 hours after operation.The clinical parameters including CPB times,incidence of arrhythmia,residual shunt occurred rate,duration of mechanical ventilation,ICU stay time and postoperative hospital stay were detected respectively.Results Postoperatively,the CK

  6. The low frequency power of heart rate variability is neither a measure of cardiac sympathetic tone nor of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Davide; Silvani, Alessandro; McAllen, Robin M; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    The lack of noninvasive approaches to measure cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) has driven the development of indirect estimates such as the low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability (HRV). Recently, it has been suggested that LF HRV can be used to estimate the baroreflex modulation of heart period (HP) rather than cardiac sympathetic tone. To test this hypothesis, we measured CSNA, HP, blood pressure (BP), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) of HP, estimated with the modified Oxford technique, in conscious sheep with pacing-induced heart failure and in healthy control sheep. We found that CSNA was higher and systolic BP and HP were lower in sheep with heart failure than in control sheep. Cross-correlation analysis showed that in each group, the beat-to-beat changes in HP correlated with those in CSNA and in BP, but LF HRV did not correlate significantly with either CSNA or BRS. However, when control sheep and sheep with heart failure were considered together, CSNA correlated negatively with HP and BRS. There was also a negative correlation between CSNA and BRS in control sheep when considered alone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in conscious sheep, LF HRV is neither a robust index of CSNA nor of BRS and is outperformed by HP and BRS in tracking CSNA. These results do not support the use of LF HRV as a noninvasive estimate of either CSNA or baroreflex function, but they highlight a link between CSNA and BRS.

  7. Heart Rate and Cardiovascular Disease: An Alternative to Beta Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivabradine, an If inhibitor, acts primarily on the sinoatrial node and is used to reduce the heart rate with minimal effect on myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and intracardiac conduction. Heart rate reduction is an important aspect of care in patients with chronic stable angina and heart failure. Many patients with coronary artery disease have coexisting asthma or chronic obstructive airway disease, and most of them are unable to tolerate beta blockers. Ivabradine may thus be a useful medicine in therapeutic heart rate management especially in patients who are intolerant of beta-blockers.

  8. Use of beat-to-beat cardiovascular variability data to determine the validity of sham therapy as the placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Charles E; Wilson, Thad E

    2014-11-01

    Osteopathic manipulative medicine researchers often use sham therapy as the placebo control during clinical trials. Optimally, the sham therapy should be a hands-on procedure that is perceptually indistinguishable from osteopathic manipulative treatment, does not create an effect on its own, and is not a treatment intervention. However, the sham therapy itself may often influence the outcome. The use of cardiovascular variability (eg, beat-to-beat heart rate variability) as a surrogate for the autonomic nervous system is one objective method by which to identify such an effect. By monitoring cardiovascular variability, investigators can assess autonomic nervous system activity as a response to the sham therapy and quickly determine whether or not the selected sham therapy is a true placebo control. The authors provide evidence for assessment of beat-to-beat heart rate variability as one method for assuring objectivity of sham therapy as a placebo control in osteopathic manipulative medicine research.

  9. Monty Roberts’ Public Demonstrations: Preliminary Report on the Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability of Horses Undergoing Training during Live Audience Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Loftus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analysis of beat-to-beat (RR intervals and heart rate variability (HRV of ten horses being used in Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations within the United Kingdom. RR and HRV was measured in the stable before training and during training. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR, root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD, geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1 and 2 (SD2, along with the low and high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio were calculated. The minimum, average and maximum RR intervals were significantly lower in training (indicative of an increase in heart rate as measured in beats-per-minute than in the stable ( p = 0.0006; p = 0.01; p = 0.03. SDRR, RMSSD, SD1, SD2 and the LF/HF ratio were all significantly lower in training than in the stable ( p = 0.001; p = 0.049; p = 0.049; p = 0.001; p = 0.01. When comparing the HR and HRV of horses during Join-up ® to overall training, there were no significant differences in any variable with the exception of maximum RR which was significantly lower ( p = 0.007 during Join-up ® , indicative of short increases in physical exertion (canter associated with this training exercise. In conclusion, training of horses during public demonstrations is a low-moderate physiological, rather than psychological stressor for horses. The physiological stress responses observed within this study were comparable or less to those previously reported in the literature for horses being trained outside of public audience events. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the use of Join-up ® alters HR and HRV in a way to suggest that this training method negatively affects the psychological welfare

  10. Monty Roberts' Public Demonstrations: Preliminary Report on the Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability of Horses Undergoing Training during Live Audience Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L; Fowler, Veronica L

    2016-09-09

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer's awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analysis of beat-to-beat (RR) intervals and heart rate variability (HRV) of ten horses being used in Monty Roberts' public demonstrations within the United Kingdom. RR and HRV was measured in the stable before training and during training. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR), root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD), geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1) and 2 (SD2), along with the low and high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio) were calculated. The minimum, average and maximum RR intervals were significantly lower in training (indicative of an increase in heart rate as measured in beats-per-minute) than in the stable ( p = 0.0006; p = 0.01; p = 0.03). SDRR, RMSSD, SD1, SD2 and the LF/HF ratio were all significantly lower in training than in the stable ( p = 0.001; p = 0.049; p = 0.049; p = 0.001; p = 0.01). When comparing the HR and HRV of horses during Join-up (®) to overall training, there were no significant differences in any variable with the exception of maximum RR which was significantly lower ( p = 0.007) during Join-up (®) , indicative of short increases in physical exertion (canter) associated with this training exercise. In conclusion, training of horses during public demonstrations is a low-moderate physiological, rather than psychological stressor for horses. The physiological stress responses observed within this study were comparable or less to those previously reported in the literature for horses being trained outside of public audience events. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the use of Join-up (®) alters HR and HRV in a way to suggest that this training method negatively affects the psychological welfare of

  11. Fetal Behavior and Heart Rate in Twin Pregnancy : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendais, Iva; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Figueiredo, Barbara; Montenegro, Nuno; Mulder, Eduard J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal movements and fetal heart rate (FHR) are well-established markers of fetal well-being and maturation of the fetal central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the available knowledge on fetal movements and heart rate patterns in twin pregnancies. There is some evi

  12. Using photoplethysmography in heart rate monitoring of patients with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Judith; Ungureanu, Constantin; Aarts, Ronald; Leijten, Frans; Arends, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate is a useful neurophysiological sign when monitoring seizures in patients with epilepsy. In an ambulatory setting, heart rate is measured with ECG involving electrodes on the skin. This method is uncomfortable which is burdensome for patients and is sensitive to motion artifacts, which dec

  13. Fast rate (≥ 250 beats/min) right ventricular burst stimulation is useful for ventricular tachycardia induction in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Min WU; Jing-Ru BAO; Yan YAO; Bing-Bo HOU; Li-Hui ZHENG; Shu ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) ablation is ventricular tachy-cardia (VT) non-inducibility. The study aimed to assess whether fast rate (≥ 250 beats/min) right ventricular burst stimulation was useful for VT induction in patients with ARVC.Methods Ninety-one consecutive ARVC patients with clinical sustained VT that underwent electro-physiological study were enrolled. The stimulation protocol was implemented at both right ventricular apex and outflow tract as follows: Step A, up to double extra-stimuli; Step B, incremental stimulation with low rate (< 250 beats/min); Step C, burst stimulation with fast rate (≥ 250 beats/min); Step D, repeated all steps above with intravenous infusion of isoproterenol.Results A total of 76 patients had inducible VT (83.5%), among which 49 were induced by Step C, 15 were induced by Step B, 8 and 4 by Step A and D, respectively. Clinical VTs were induced in 60 patients (65.9%). Only two spontaneously ceased ventricular fibrillations were induced by Step C. Multivariate analysis showed that a narrower baseline QRS duration under sinus rhythm was independently associated with VT non-inducibility (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.0–1.1;P = 0.019).ConclusionFast rate (≥ 250 beats/min) right ventricular burst stimulation provides a useful supplemental method for VT induction in ARVC patients.

  14. The role of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in modulation of heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roham Mazloom

    Full Text Available Previous reports have indicated that artificial stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces systemic inflammation in experimental models of sepsis. This phenomenon is a part of a broader cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway which activates the vagus nerve to modulate inflammation through activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nACHR. Heart rate variability represents the complex interplay between autonomic nervous system and cardiac pacemaker cells. Reduced heart rate variability and increased cardiac cycle regularity is a hallmark of clinical conditions that are associated with systemic inflammation (e.g. endotoxemia and sepsis. The present study was aimed to assess the role of α7nACHR in modulation of heart rate dynamics during systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation was induced by injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide in rats. Electrocardiogram and body temperature were recorded in conscious animals using a telemetric system. Linear and non-linear indices of heart rate variability (e.g. sample entropy and fractal-like temporal structure were assessed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed that α7nACHR is expressed in rat atrium and is mainly localized at the endothelial layer. Systemic administration of an α7nACHR antagonist (methyllycaconitine did not show a significant effect on body temperature or heart rate dynamics in naïve rats. However, α7nACHR blockade could further reduce heart rate variability and elicit a febrile response in endotoxemic rats. Pre-treatment of endotoxemic animals with an α7nACHR agonist (PHA-543613 was unable to modulate heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats but could prevent the effect of endotoxin on body temperature within 24 h experiment. Neither methyllycaconitine nor PHA-543613 could affect cardiac beating variability of isolated perfused hearts taken from control or endotoxemic rats. Based on our observations we suggest a tonic role for nicotinic acetylcholine

  15. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Aimee R; Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-05-01

    Tai Chi is a callisthenic exercise form that incorporates aerobic exercise with diaphragmatic breathing. These two aspects alone have been shown to enhance the heart rate variability, warranting research into the effects of Tai Chi on autonomic nervous system modulation and heart rate variability. A low heart rate variability has been shown to be indicative of compromised health. Any methods to enhance the heart rate variability, in particular, non-pharmacological methods, are therefore seen as beneficial to health and are sought after. The aim of this review was to comprehensively summarize the currently published studies regarding the effects of Tai Chi on heart rate variability. Both consistent and inconsistent findings are presented and discussed, and an overall conclusion attained which could benefit future clinical studies.

  16. The clinical significance of detection to heart rate deceleration capacity and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-rong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the change of heart rate deceleration capacity ( DC and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and its relationship with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods: DC, LVEF, time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were measured in 66 patients with CHF and 34 healthy adults (control group by using 24h Holter recordings and Echocardiography. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals( SDNN, squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals ( RMSSD,low frequency power( LFn and high frequency power( HFn and the changes of LVEF were compared between  the two groups,the relationship between DC,LVEF and HRV were studied in patients with CHF. Results: The median value of DC in the patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group( 3.1 ± 2.4 ms vs 7.2 ± 1.3 ms,P <0.01.Incidence of abnormal DC in the CHF group was 57.5%,which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0.01.The HRV index, including SDNN、RMSSD、LFn、HFn, in the CHF group was significantly lower than that in normal control group (P < 0.01. Significant positive correlation between HRV index and LVEF were confirmed (P < 0.01. Conclusions: DC and HRV index are lower in patients with CHF and have a good correlation with the left ventricular ejection fraction.

  17. Emperor penguin oxygen consumption, heart rate and plasma lactate levels during graded swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, G L; Ponganis, P J

    1994-10-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate and blood chemistry were measured in four emperor penguins, Aptenodytes forsteri (Gray), during graded swimming exercise. The maximum VO2 obtained, 52 ml O2 kg-1 min-1, was 7.8 times the measured resting VO2 of 6.7 ml O2 kg-1 min-1 and 9.1 times the predicted resting VO2. As the swimming effort rose, a linear increase in surface and submerged heart rates (fH) occurred. The highest average maximum surface and submersion heart rates of any bird were 213 and 210 beats min-1, respectively. No increase in plasma lactate concentrations occurred until VO2 was greater than 25 ml O2 kg-1 min-1. At the highest VO2 values measured, plasma lactate concentration reached 9.4 mmol l-1. In comparison with other animals of approximately the same mass, the aerobic capacity of the emperor penguin is less than those of the emu and dog but about the same as those of the seal, sea lion and domestic goat. For aquatic animals, a low aerobic capacity seems to be consistent with the needs of parsimonious oxygen utilization while breath-holding.

  18. Modest weight loss in moderately overweight postmenopausal women improves heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Astrup, Arne;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of weight loss on heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in overweight postmenopausal women. Design and Methods: Forty-nine overweight postmenopausal women with an average body mass index of 28.8 1.9 kg/m2 underwent a 12-week dietary weight......-slice MRI at L3. Results: The weight loss of 3.9 2.0 kg was accompanied by an improvement of HRV. SDNN increased by 9.2% (p ¼ 0.003) and SDNNindex increased by 11.4% (p ¼ 0.0003). MeanNN increased by 2.4%, reflecting a decrease in mean heart rate from 74.1 to 72.3 beats/min (p ¼ 0.033). Systolic blood....... IAAT and the IAAT/SCAT-ratio were found to be negatively associated with HRV parameters but changes in body composition were not associated with changes in HRV. Conclusions: The observed improvement of HRV seems to be facilitated by weight loss. IAAT and the IAAT/SCAT ratio were found to be associated...

  19. Individually Coded Telemetry: a Tool for Studying Heart Rate and Behaviour in Reindeer Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudas T

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to test the performance of a silver wire modified version of the coded telemetric heart rate monitor Polar Vantage NV™ (PVNV and to measure heart rate (HR in a group of captive reindeer calves during different behaviour. The technical performance of PVNV HR monitors was tested in cold conditions (-30°C using a pulse generator and the correlation between generated pulse and PVNV values was high (r = 0.9957. The accuracy was tested by comparing the HR obtained with the PVNV monitor with the standard ECG, and the correlation was significant (r = 0.9965. Both circadian HR and HR related to behavioural pattern were recorded. A circadian rhythm was observed in the HR in reindeer with a minimum during night and early morning hours and maximum at noon and during the afternoon, the average HR of the reindeer calves studied being 42.5 beats/min in February. The behaviour was recorded by focal individual observations and the data was synchronized with the output of the HR monitors. Running differed from all other behavioural categories in HR. Inter-individual differences were seen expressing individual responses to external and internal stimuli. The silver wire modified Polar Vantage NV™ provides a suitable and reliable tool for measuring heart rate in reindeer, also in natural conditions.

  20. A point-process model of human heartbeat intervals: new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Matten, Eric C; Alabi, Abdulrasheed A; Brown, Emery N

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate is a vital sign, whereas heart rate variability is an important quantitative measure of cardiovascular regulation by the autonomic nervous system. Although the design of algorithms to compute heart rate and assess heart rate variability is an active area of research, none of the approaches considers the natural point-process structure of human heartbeats, and none gives instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability. We model the stochastic structure of heartbeat intervals as a history-dependent inverse Gaussian process and derive from it an explicit probability density that gives new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability: instantaneous R-R interval and heart rate standard deviations. We estimate the time-varying parameters of the inverse Gaussian model by local maximum likelihood and assess model goodness-of-fit by Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests based on the time-rescaling theorem. We illustrate our new definitions in an analysis of human heartbeat intervals from 10 healthy subjects undergoing a tilt-table experiment. Although several studies have identified deterministic, nonlinear dynamical features in human heartbeat intervals, our analysis shows that a highly accurate description of these series at rest and in extreme physiological conditions may be given by an elementary, physiologically based, stochastic model.

  1. Job strain in relation to ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability among female nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Houtman, I.L.D.; Geus, E.J.C. de

    2004-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the effects of exposure to job strain on independent predictors of cardiovascular disease (ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability). Methods. The participants comprised a homogeneous group of 159 healthy female nurses [mean age 35.9 (SD 8.5) y

  2. Population characteristics and impact on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure of passive smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the basic characteristics of passive smoking population,and the impact of passive smoking on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure.Methods Eighty-six passive smokers[mean age: (52.4±7.6) years]were recruited from patients

  3. Heart rate turbulence and clinical prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Azuma, Akihiro; Asada, Satoshi; Hadase, Mitsuyoshi; Kamitani, Tadaaki; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kuribayashi, Toshiro; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2003-07-01

    Short-term fluctuations in sinus cycle length after a single ventricular premature complex (VPC) have attracted considerable interest and has been termed heart rate turbulence (HRT). The onset and slope of HRT have each been reported to be independent and powerful predictors of clinical prognosis in patients with myocardial infarction (MI), but there are no data available for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Thus the present study analyzed the 2 HRT variables to determine their prognostic value in HCM patients. Holter monitoring data were obtained from 104 HCM patients, 44 MI patients and 56 normal controls, from which singular VPCs followed by >or=20 normal sinus beats were isolated and the HRT onset and slope were automatically calculated. HRT onset and slope were abnormal in MI patients, but not in HCM patients, as compared with normal control subjects (onset -1.1+/-2.9, -2.1+/-3.4, -1.4+/-5.1%; slope 10.6 +/-8.6, 18.0+/-13.9, 16.6+/-9.7 ms/beat, respectively). During the follow-up period of 27+/-10 months, 7 HCM patients and 10 MI patients either died from cardiac death or were hospitalized for congestive heart failure. In MI patients, HRT onset was higher and the HRT slope was lower in patients with cardiac events than in patients without (onset 1.1+/-2.7 vs -1.7+/-2.7%, p=0.011; slope 5.7+/-4.3 vs 12.0+/-9.0 ms/beat, p=0.028). In HCM patients, however, the HRT onset and slope were similar between patients with and without cardiac events (onset -2.0+/-2.0 vs -2.1 +/-3.5%, p=0.98; slope 18.1+/-10.9 vs 18.0+/-14.0 ms/beat, p=0.68). In conclusion, unlike MI patients, the HRT variables in selected HCM patients were not abnormal and failed to predict the clinical prognosis.

  4. Clinical comparison of beating-heart and arrested-heart intracardiac procedure in pediatrics%婴幼儿心脏不停跳和停跳心内直视手术的临床对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 何巍; 冯旭

    2011-01-01

    Objective;To compare the effects of mild hypothermia beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with those of moderate hypothermia arrested-heat CPB in pediatric intracardiac procedure. Methods;56 patients whose age were under 3 years underwent open heart surgery. They were divided to group 1, 26 patients underwent arrested-heart operation, and group 2,30 patients underwent beating-heart operations. Duration of CPB and surgery,postoperative mechanical respiratory assistance duration and incidence of low cardiac output, ect,were compared between the tow groups. Results: Duration of CPB and operative duration in group 2 were shorter than those in group 1 ( P < 0.01), and postoperative mechanical respiratory assistance duration was shorter in group 2. The incidence of low cardiac output syndrome and serious cardiac arrhythmia in group 2 was lower than those in group 1, and postoperative residential duration was shorter in group 2. Conclusion:The mild hypothermia beating-heart CPB is a safe abd effective technique applied to pediatric cardiac surgery.%目的:比较浅低温心脏不停跳和中低温停跳技术,在婴幼儿心内直视手术的应用.方法:分析56例3岁以下心脏手术患者,将其分为停跳组(组Ⅰ)26例和不停跳组(组Ⅱ)30例.比较2组患者的体外循环(CPB)时间、手术时间、术后呼吸机辅助时间、术后低心排出量综合征(低心排)发生率等指标.结果:不停跳组患者的体外循环时间和手术时间均较停跳组短(P<0.01),并且术后呼吸机辅助时间、术后住院时间较停跳组短(P<0.05);不停跳组患者术后低心排发生率和严重心律失常发生率,均较停跳组低(P<0.05).结论:表明浅低温体外循环心脏不停跳,可作为一项安全、有效的技术应用于婴幼儿先天性心脏畸形的矫治.

  5. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during instrument approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, Heikki; Simola, Petteri; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Oksama, Lauri

    2016-10-01

    Fighter pilots' heart rate (HR), heart rate variation (HRV) and performance during instrument approaches were examined. The subjects were required to fly instrument approaches in a high-fidelity simulator under various levels of task demand. The task demand was manipulated by increasing the load on the subjects by reducing the range at which they commenced the approach. HR and the time domain components of HRV were used as measures of pilot mental workload (PMWL). The findings of this study indicate that HR and HRV are sensitive to varying task demands. HR and HRV were able to distinguish the level of PMWL after which the subjects were no longer able to cope with the increasing task demands and their instrument landing system performance fell to a sub-standard level. The major finding was the HR/HRV's ability to differentiate the sub-standard performance approaches from the high-performance approaches. Practitioner Summary: This paper examined if HR and HRV were sensitive to varying task demands in a fighter aviation environment and if these measures were related to variations in pilot's performance.

  6. Heart rate and heart rate variability modification in chronic insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Dittoni, Serena; Colicchio, Salvatore; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Brunetti, Riccardo; Contardi, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly prevalent in the general population, provoking personal distress and increased risk for psychiatric and medical disorders. Autonomic hyper-arousal could be a pathogenic mechanism of chronic primary insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic activity in patients with chronic primary insomnia by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Eighty-five consecutive patients affected by chronic primary insomnia were enrolled (38 men and 47 women; mean age: 53.2 ± 13.6). Patients were compared with a control group composed of 55 healthy participants matched for age and gender (23 men and 32 women; mean age: 54.2 ± 13.9). Patients underwent an insomnia study protocol that included subjective sleep evaluation, psychometric measures, and home-based polysomnography with evaluation of HRV in wake before sleep, in all sleep stages, and in wake after final awakening. Patients showed modifications of heart rate and HRV parameters, consistent with increased sympathetic activity, while awake before sleep and during Stage-2 non-REM sleep. No significant differences between insomniacs and controls could be detected during slow-wave sleep, REM sleep, and post-sleep wake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that autonomic hyper-arousal is a major pathogenic mechanism in primary insomnia, and confirm that this condition is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  7. [Pulmonary artery wedge pressure and heart rate measurement during pharmacological stress induction for left cardial function diagnosis in horses with and without heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlen, H; Groner, U; Rohn, K; Stadler, P

    2006-07-01

    In 18 horses, the pulmonary artery wedge pressure and the heart rate were measured during pharmacological stress load. 12 horses were healthy (4 trained, 8 untrained) and 6 horses had a heart disease (3 trained, 3 untrained). Pharmacological stress induction was carried out with the sympathomimetic drug dobutamine at a dosage rate of 7.5 microg/kg/min over 10 minutes of infusion. At the fourth minute, the parasympatholytic drug atropine was administered (5 microg/kg bw), and the heart rate and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure were continuously measured over 26 minutes. During sole dobutamine infusion, a significant decrease in heart rate and a significant increase in pulmonary artery wedge pressure were observed. After the application of atropine in the fourth minute, a significant increase in heart rate (from 35.7 +/- 6 up to 106 +/- 38/ min) and in pulmonary artery wedge pressure (from 15.7 +/- 3 up to 24 +/- 8.6 mmHg) were visible in the group of healthy horses. The horses with heart diseases had a significantly higher increase in both parameters (heart rate and pulmonary artery wedge pressure) with a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.7). The heart rate increased in the horses with heart diseases from 35.2 +/- 2,8 beats/min up to 132 +/- 45.7 beats/min and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure increased from 17.3 +/- 3,2 mmHg up to 32.7 +/- 13 mmHg. The cardiac status (healthy or heart disease) as well as the training level of the horses (untrained or trained) had a significant influence on the heart rate and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. The untrained horses (healthy and heart disease) showed significantly higher values over a longer period of time than did the trained horses with the same cardiac status. Additionally the influence of pharmacological stress induction on echocardiographic parameters was investigated. The left atrial size (p = 0.015) and left ventricular diameter were significanly different in the systole (p = 0.008) and in the

  8. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring from Phonocardiograph Signal Using Repetition Frequency of Heart Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a passive, harmless, and low-cost diagnosis tool, fetal heart rate (FHR monitoring based on fetal phonocardiography (fPCG signal is alternative to ultrasonographic cardiotocography. Previous fPCG-based methods commonly relied on the time difference of detected heart sound bursts. However, the performance is unavoidable to degrade due to missed heart sounds in very low signal-to-noise ratio environments. This paper proposes a FHR monitoring method using repetition frequency of heart sounds. The proposed method can track time-varying heart rate without both heart sound burst identification and denoising. The average accuracy rate comparison to benchmark is 88.3% as the SNR ranges from −4.4 dB to −26.7 dB.

  9. Minimally invasive robotic coronary bypass on the beating heart using da Vinci S system%机器人非体外循环冠状动脉旁路移植术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高长青; 杨明; 王刚; 吴扬; 赵悦; 李丽霞; 王加利; 肖苍松; 周琪

    2009-01-01

    Objective To summarize the experience of minimally invasive robotic caronary bypass on beating heart using da Vinci S in China. Methods Fifty-six patients underwent selected robotic coronary bypass on beating heart from April 2007 to December 2008. All the patients had history of angina and the coronary arteriography showed severe stenosis in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), of which 10 cases had right coronary artery or left circumflex coronary (LCX) stenosis. The age was 33 to 74 years old, with a mean of (55.8±9. 4) years old. The weight was (71.4 ± 13.2) kg, All the patients had good lung function and had no medical history of pleurisy and thoracic surgery. CT scan of double internal thoracic artery (ITA) was routinely checked preoperatively. The procedures included : (1) The robotically assisted endoscopic atranmatic coronary artery bypass surgery. The approach was via a small left anterior thoracotomy (6 to 8 cm) after robotic ITA was taken down. The ITA was manually anastomosed to the LAD or LCX on beating heart. (2) Totally endoscopic coronary bypass graft on beating heart. After ITA harvesting, the endostabilizer was inserted via the fourth pert in the xiphoid area under endoscopic vision. The left ITA to the LAD grafting was done using U-clips on beating heart in a totally endoscopic manner using da Vinci S system through 4 ports. For all patients the ITA flow was checked by the Doppler flowmeter after anastomosis was completed. After the surgery was completed, the thoracic port was checked carefully to avoid bleeding, The operating procedures and a variety of clinical parameters were recorded and analyzed. (3) Stent placement after robotic surgery in a hybrid manner. The graft pateney rate was evaluated by CT or orteriography. Results All patients successfully accepted robotic minimally invasive coronary bypass on the beating heart using da Vinci S surgical system without complications. The mean graft flow was (23.2 ± 16. 7) mL/min. And

  10. Fractal and complexity measures of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkiömäki, Juha S; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate variability has been analyzed conventionally with time and frequency domain methods, which measure the overall magnitude of RR interval fluctuations around its mean value or the magnitude of fluctuations in some predetermined frequencies. Analysis of heart rate dynamics by methods based on chaos theory and nonlinear system theory has gained recent interest. This interest is based on observations suggesting that the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation likely interact with each other in a nonlinear way. Furthermore, recent observational studies suggest that some indexes describing nonlinear heart rate dynamics, such as fractal scaling exponents, may provide more powerful prognostic information than the traditional heart rate variability indexes. In particular, the short-term fractal scaling exponent measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis method has predicted fatal cardiovascular events in various populations. Approximate entropy, a nonlinear index of heart rate dynamics, that describes the complexity of RR interval behavior, has provided information on the vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. Many other nonlinear indexes, e.g., Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimensions, also give information on the characteristics of heart rate dynamics, but their clinical utility is not well established. Although concepts of chaos theory, fractal mathematics, and complexity measures of heart rate behavior in relation to cardiovascular physiology or various cardiovascular events are still far away from clinical medicine, they are a fruitful area for future research to expand our knowledge concerning the behavior of cardiovascular oscillations in normal healthy conditions as well as in disease states.

  11. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M; Prompers, Jeanine J; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. Key to our approach is that we exploit the stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme to produce an undersampled and random k-t space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction and acceleration. As a standard, a self-gated FLASH sequence with a total acquisition time of 10 min was used to produce single-slice Cine movies of seven mouse hearts with 90 frames per cardiac cycle. Two times (2×) and three times (3×) k-t space undersampled Cine movies were produced from 2.5- and 1.5-min data acquisitions, respectively. The accelerated 90-frame Cine movies of mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. The movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters, i.e. end-systolic and end-diastolic lumen surface areas and early-to-late filling rate ratio as a parameter to evaluate diastolic function, derived from the standard and accelerated Cine movies, were nearly identical.

  12. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  13. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shi-Min; PENG Hu; YANG Hui-Jie; ZHOU Tao; ZHOU Pei-Ling; WANG Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  14. Heart Rate Unreliability during Interval Training Recovery in Middle Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Filippo; Sanna, Irene; Mulliri, Gabriele; Magnani, Sara; Todde, Francesco; Mura, Roberto; Ghiani, Giovanna; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) was tested as a reliable index for recovery management during interval training (IT), considering its relationship with the several factors involved in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Thirteen runners underwent two different IT sessions: at 80% and 120% of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Throughout both sessions HR, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and pulmonary ventilation (VE), were measured by means of a portable gas analyzer. Carbon dioxide production excess (CO2excess), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), oxygen pulse (OP) and oxygen debt (O2debt) were also estimated. A significant increase in HR values (144 versus 150 beats·min(-1) between the first recovery and the last, p recovery to the last (p recovery at 80% at the VT2 speed (18.3 versus 16.4 mL·beats(-1), p recovery in tests performed at 120% of the VT2 speed (17.8 versus 16.3 mL·beats(-1), p recovery is inaccurate and unfit for training. The phenomenon of cardiac drift to set the restart timing after the repetitions, i.e. by progressively increasing HR values, should be taken into account by coaches. Key pointsDuring an IT session, if recovery time after repetitions is fixed, HR supplies a different indication compared to all the respiratory parameters: HR indicates an incomplete recovery while the other parameters do not.The use of fixed HR values as a reliable index of the established recovery during IT is inaccurate and it may be the cause of under-training.To set the restart timing after repetitions the phenomenon of cardiac drift should be taken into account by coaches.HR drift during recoveries did not appear linked to the CO2excess.

  15. Assesment of Autonomic Function in Metabolic Syndrome using Combination Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Aydın

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is described as a group of various abnormal metabolic risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, increased blood pressure, increased plasma glucose levels, prothrombotic condition and proinflammatory state. These parameters are related to decreased parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activity. We aimed to evaluate autonomic function using a combination with heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in metabolic syndrome to compare non-metabolic syndrome(non-MetS. METHODS: We selected consecutive 50 patients with MetS and 50 patients with healthy non-MetS individuals. All patients underwent 24 hours holter monitoring to evaluate HRT and HRV parameters. RESULTS: Age of patients was not different in two groups. Mean age of MetS patients was 57,50±12,13 and 54,6±10,25 in non- MetS individuals. Sex of patients was non different in MetS compared to non-MetS (37 female and 13 male vs. 22 female, 28 male p<0,05 respectively. SDNN and RMSSD was lower in MetS compared to those without MetS (131,96±49,12 vs 179,59±85,83 p=0,03 and 78,64±35,22 vs 112,73±81,24 p=0,08 respectively. SDANN, pNN50,Mean RR, mean heart rate, count of ventricular premature complex(VPC were not different between two groups. Turbulence Slope(TS was not different in two groups. Turbulence Onset(TO was higher in MetS compared to non-MetS (2,01±15,29 and -6,21±13,5 p=0,005. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We showed that autonomic function in MetS was impaired using a combination with HRT and HRV. These patients should be followed closely for adverse cardiovascular outcome especially including cardiac arrhythmia.

  16. Exposure to Discrimination and Heart Rate Variability Reactivity to Acute Stress among Women with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Lampert, Rachel; Tennen, Howard; Feinn, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to racial discrimination has been linked to physiological reactivity. This study investigated self-reported exposure to racial discrimination and parasympathetic [high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV)] and sympathetic (norepinephrine and cortisol) activity at baseline and then again after acute laboratory stress. Lifetime exposure to racial discrimination was measured with the Schedule of Racist Events scale. Thirty-two women (16 Black and 16 White) with type 2 diabetes performed a public speaking stressor. Beat-to-beat intervals were recorded on electrocardiograph recorders, and HF-HRV was calculated using spectral analysis and natural log transformed. Norepinephrine and cortisol were measured in blood. Higher discrimination predicted lower stressor HF-HRV, even after controlling for baseline HF-HRV. When race, age, A1c and baseline systolic blood pressure were also controlled, racial discrimination remained a significant independent predictor of stressor HF-HRV. There was no association between lifetime discrimination and sympathetic markers. In conclusion, preliminary data suggest that among women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), exposure to racial discrimination is adversely associated with parasympathetic, but not sympathetic, reactivity.

  17. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclara Michel-Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective: To determine the variability of heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods: The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results: In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD, and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50. In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions: There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  18. Consciously controlled breathing decreases the high-frequency component of heart rate variability by inhibiting cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Konosuke; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate, comprises sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities of the heart. HRV analysis is used to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. Since respiration could be a confounding factor in HRV evaluation, some studies recommend consciously controlled breathing to standardize the method. However, it remains unclear whether controlled breathing affects HRV measurement. We compared the effects of controlled breathing on HRV with those of spontaneous breathing. In 20 healthy volunteers, we measured respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume, and blood pressure (BP) and recorded electrocardiograms during spontaneous breathing (14.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min) and controlled breathing at 15 (0.25 Hz) and 6 (0.10 Hz) breaths/min. Compared to spontaneous breathing, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz showed a higher heart rate and a lower high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, although the f was the same. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, the ratio of the low frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, increased greatly and HF decreased, while heart rate and BP remained almost unchanged. Thus, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz, which requires mental concentration, might inhibit parasympathetic nerve activity. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, LF/HF increases because some HF subcomponents are synchronized with f and probably move into the LF band. This increment leads to misinterpretation of the true autonomic nervous regulation. We recommend that the respiratory pattern of participants should be evaluated before spectral HRV analysis to correctly understand changes in autonomic nervous regulation.

  19. A particle filter framework for the estimation of heart rate from ECG signals corrupted by motion artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Viswam; Akkaya, Ilge; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe a methodology to probabilistically estimate the R-peak locations of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal using a particle filter. This is useful for heart rate estimation, which is an important metric for medical diagnostics. Some scenarios require constant in-home monitoring using a wearable device. This poses a particularly challenging environment for heart rate detection, due to the susceptibility of ECG signals to motion artifacts. In this work, we show how the particle filter can effectively track the true R-peak locations amidst the motion artifacts, given appropriate heart rate and R-peak observation models. A particle filter based framework has several advantages due to its freedom from strict assumptions on signal and noise models, as well as its ability to simultaneously track multiple possible heart rate hypotheses. Moreover, the proposed framework is not exclusive to ECG signals and could easily be leveraged for tracking other physiological parameters. We describe the implementation of the particle filter and validate our approach on real ECG data affected by motion artifacts from the MIT-BIH noise stress test database. The average heart rate estimation error is about 5 beats per minute for signal streams contaminated with noisy segments with SNR as low as -6 dB.

  20. A System for 3D Ultrasound-Guided Robotic Retrieval of Foreign Bodies from a Beating Heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienphrapa, P.; Ramachandran, B.; Taylor, R.H.T.; Popovic, A.

    2012-01-01

    By way of the venous system or direct penetration, particles such asthrombi, bullet fragments, and shrapnel can become trapped in the heart and disrupt cardiac function. The severity of disruption can range from asymptomatic to fatal. Injuries of this nature are common in both civilian and military

  1. Electron-conformational transformations in nanoscopic RyR channels govern both the heart's contraction and beating

    CERN Document Server

    Moskvin, A S; Solovyova, O E; Markhasin, V S

    2011-01-01

    We show that a simple biophysically based electron-conformational model of RyR channel is able to explain and describe on equal footing the oscillatory regime of the heart's cell release unit both in sinoatrial node (pacemaker) cells under normal physiological conditions and in ventricular myocytes under Ca$^{2+}$ SR overload.

  2. ′Fire of Life′ analysis of heart rate variability during alpine skiing in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Litscher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Skiing is a very popular sport in Austria. Nevertheless, there is little information concerning online monitoring of bio-signals during alpine skiing in the mountains. Within the last years innovative scientific monitoring tools for evaluating features of neurocardial fitness have been developed. Aims : The goal of this study was to demonstrate the new ′Fire of Life′ heart rate variability analysis for the first time during alpine skiing. Volunteers and Methods : Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring over a period of 12 hours was performed simultaneously in two healthy volunteers using the same type of equipment (medilog AR12 systems. Two healthy volunteers (female, 20 years, and male, 51 years, both hobby skiers, were monitored simultaneously and continuously during two resting periods before and after active sport and also during alpine skiing. Altogether each participant covered 9,084 meters altitude difference within a time period of 6:14 hours. Total length of the downhill skiing was 45 kilometers. Results : Data acquisition was performed without any technical problems in both subjects. Poincaré plots of sequential R-R intervals (beat to beat variability show two ellipses of different shape and magnitude. During resting periods respiratory sinus arrhythmia and blood pressure effects can be clearly seen in the young female. The same effects, however markedly reduced, are obvious in the older volunteer. Conclusions : The present investigations during alpine skiing highlight the potential value of the ′Fire of Life′ heart rate variability monitoring even under difficult environmental conditions. The innovative kind of analysis helps to show how well the human body reacts to sport, stress and recovery.

  3. ‘Fire of Life’ analysis of heart rate variability during alpine skiing in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Litscher

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skiing is a very popular sport in Austria. Nevertheless, there is little information concerning online monitoring of bio-signals during alpine skiing in the mountains. Within the last years innovative scientific monitoring tools for evaluating features of neurocardial fitness have been developed. Aims: The goal of this study was to demonstrate the new ‘Fire of Life’ heart rate variability analysis for the first time during alpine skiing. Volunteers and Methods: Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring over a period of 12 hours was performed simultaneously in two healthy volunteers using the same type of equipment (medilog AR12 systems. Two healthy volunteers (female, 20 years, and male, 51 years, both hobby skiers, were monitored simultaneously and continuously during two resting periods before and after active sport and also during alpine skiing. Altogether each participant covered 9,084 meters altitude difference within a time period of 6:14 hours. Total length of the downhill skiing was 45 kilometers. Results: Data acquisition was performed without any technical problems in both subjects. Poincaré plots of sequential R-R intervals (beat to beat variability show two ellipses of different shape and magnitude. During resting periods respiratory sinus arrhythmia and blood pressure effects can be clearly seen in the young female. The same effects, however markedly reduced, are obvious in the older volunteer. Conclusions: The present investigations during alpine skiing highlight the potential value of the ‘Fire of Life’ heart rate variability monitoring even under difficult environmental conditions. The innovative kind of analysis helps to show how well the human body reacts to sport, stress and recovery.

  4. Autonomic nervous activities assessed by heart rate variability in pre- and post-adolescent Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Hironori; Sakiyama, Tomomi; Yamaoka Endo, Masako; Yamada, Masako; Ueoka, Hatsumi; Miura, Akira; Koga, Shunsaku

    2009-11-01

    There are many studies with respect to the age-related change of the characteristics of beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV), reflected by cardiac autonomic control, especially focusing on adulthood (i.e., aging related to the incidence of metabolic syndrome) in Japanese individuals. However, it is not still clear how basic control matures during childhood. This study was, therefore, designed to explore the HRV characteristics of pre- and post-adolescent Japanese, in a cross-sectional manner. Resting HRV data was recorded in a relaxing supine position from 136 healthy individuals between 8 and 20 years (48 boys between 8 and 14 years; 88 girls between 8 and 20 years) who were instructed to breathe periodically (0.25 Hz). Frequency-domain analysis (i.e., the spectral analysis based on an autoregressive model) of short-term, stationary R-R intervals was performed to evaluate the low- (LF; below 0.15 Hz) and high- (HF; 0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency powers. The HF to total power represents the vagal control of heart rate (PNS indicator), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) is considered to relate to the sympathetic modulations (SNS indicator). Both PNS and SNS indices had substantially no effect from age and/or gender in the range between 8 and 20 years. In conclusion, the control of the cardiac autonomic nervous system in Japanese seems already to be compatible with that in adulthood before approximately 10 years. In other word, the cardiac autonomic modulation would presumably be maturated before the age of approximately 7-8 years, though further research is awaited.

  5. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriy A Dimitriev

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate.A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA.Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE, and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2, and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1 during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2, and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure, entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA.The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation.

  6. Behaviour, heart rate, and heart rate variability in pigs exposed to novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Zupan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we investigated behavioural responses and determined parameters of heart rate variability (HRV to elucidate a relative activation of autonomic nervous system (ANS during baseline (10 min and in response to potentially stressful situations (10 min in two pig breeds and sexes. Gilts (n = 21 and barrows (n = 9 of the Landrace × Yorkshire (LY; n = 15 and Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc (LYLD; n = 15 breeds were subjected to a novel object test (NOT and a novel arena test (NAT. Basal ANS state differed in pigs across breeds but not sexes. Landrace × Yorkshire pigs had a significantly lower basal heart rate (HR and low-frequency band (LF with a higher root mean square of successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD and high-frequency band (HF than LYLD pigs. In the NOT, despite having similar cardiac responses, gilts had a longer duration of contact with a novel object, higher lying and standing duration, and a lower duration of walking compared with barrows. In the NAT, we found similar behaviour across sexes but a different degree of ANS state, with barrows having a significantly higher increase in LF/HF (power of the low frequency component divided by the power of the high-frequency band compared with gilts. Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc pigs showed longer duration of contact with a novel object in the NOT accompanied by less lying and standing than LY pigs in both tests. No difference in ANS activation between breeds was found in the NOT. In the NAT, HR increased more from baseline to testing in LY pigs than in LYLD pigs. There is a complex and often contradictory nature of relationships between behaviour and cardiac responses to novelty in pigs of different breeds and sexes.

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Heart Rate Dynamics during Meditation: An ECG Based Study with Multi-Fractality and Visibility Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Anirban; Ghosh, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac dynamics during meditation is explored quantitatively with two chaos-based non-linear techniques viz. multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis and visibility network analysis techniques. The data used are the instantaneous heart rate (in beats/minute) of subjects performing Kundalini Yoga and Chi meditation from PhysioNet. The results show consistent differences between the quantitative parameters obtained by both the analysis techniques. This indicates an interesting phenomenon of change in the complexity of the cardiac dynamics during meditation supported with quantitative parameters. The results also produce a preliminary evidence that these techniques can be used as a measure of physiological impact on subjects performing meditation.

  8. Variability of the human heart rate as a diagnostic instrument obtained by mean of a wireless monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas Mauricio, Sánchez; Hernández González, Martha Alicia; Figueroa Vega, Nicte; Malacara Hernández, Juan Manuel; Fraga Teodoro, Córdova

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: Heart rate variability (HRV) is the cyclic measurement of RR intervals between normal beats. Aim: To determine the VFC via a wireless Polar monitor. Material and methods: 100 symptomatic menopausal women were studied for measurements of HRV were I post a Polar RS400 Watch four hrs. Results: Obtained through the fast Fourier transform, the frequency domain HRV low frequency (LF) 0.04-0.15 Hz, high frequency (HF) 0.15-0.4Hz and the ratio LF / HF. Conclusion: obtaining HRV is important for cardiovascular autonomic assessment in menopausal women.

  9. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  10. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  11. Heart rate responses induced by acoustic tempo and its interaction with basal heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Since previous studies focused on the effects of acoustic tempo on the ANS, and humans have their own physiological oscillations such as the heart rate (HR), the effects of acoustic tempo might depend on the HR. Here we show the relationship between HR elevation induced by acoustic tempo and individual basal HR. Since high tempo-induced HR elevation requires fast respiration, which is based on sympatho-respiratory coupling, we controlled the participants’ respiration at a faster rate (20 CPM) than usual (15 CPM). We found that sound stimuli with a faster tempo than the individual basal HR increased the HR. However, the HR increased following a gradual increase in the acoustic tempo only when the extent of the gradual increase in tempo was within a specific range (around + 2%/min). The HR did not follow the increase in acoustic tempo when the rate of the increase in the acoustic tempo exceeded 3% per minute. These results suggest that the effect of the sympatho-respiratory coupling underlying the HR elevation caused by a high acoustic tempo depends on the basal HR, and the strength and the temporal dynamics of the tempo. PMID:28266647

  12. Clinical efficacy of efonidipine hydrochloride, a T-type calcium channel inhibitor, on sympathetic activities. Examination using spectral analysis of heart rate/blood pressure variabilities and {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Kenji; Nomura, Masahiro; Nishikado, Akiyoshi; Uehara, Kouzoh; Nakaya, Yutaka; Ito, Susumu [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    Dihydropyridine Ca antagonists cause reflex tachycardia related to their hypotensive effects. Efonidipine hydrochloride has inhibitory effects on T-type Ca channels, even as it inhibits reflex tachycardia. In the present study, the influence of efonidipine hydrochloride on heart rate and autonomic nervous function was investigated. Using an electrocardiogram and a tonometric blood pressure measurement, autonomic nervous activity was evaluated using spectral analysis of heart rate/systolic blood pressure variability. Three protocols were used: a single dose of efonidipine hydrochloride was administered orally to healthy subjects with resting heart rate values of 75 beats/min or more (high-heart rate (HR) group) and to healthy subjects with resting heart rate values less than 75 beats/min (low-HR group); efonidipine hydrochloride was newly administered to untreated patients with essential hypertension, and autonomic nervous activity was investigated after a 4-week treatment period; and patients with high heart rate values ({>=}75 beats/min) who had been treated with a dihydropyridine L-type Ca channel inhibitor for 1 month or more were switched to efonidipine hydrochloride and any changes in autonomic nervous activity were investigated. In all protocols, administration of efonidipine hydrochloride decreased the heart rate in patients with a high heart rate, reduced sympathetic nervous activity, and enhanced parasympathetic nervous activity. In addition, myocardial scintigraphy with {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine showed significant improvement in the washout rate and heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio of patients who were switched from other dihydropyridine Ca antagonists to efonidipine hydrochloride. Efonidipine hydrochloride inhibits increases in heart rate and has effects on the autonomic nervous system. It may be useful for treating hypertension and angina pectoris, and may also have a cardiac protective function. (author)

  13. Accuracy of Heart Rate Watches: Implications for Weight Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wallen

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn monitors claim to provide accurate measures of heart rate and energy expenditure. People wishing to lose weight use these devices to monitor energy balance, however the accuracy of these devices to measure such parameters has not been established.To determine the accuracy of four wrist-worn devices (Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, Samsung Gear S and Mio Alpha to measure heart rate and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise.Twenty-two healthy volunteers (50% female; aged 24 ± 5.6 years completed ~1-hr protocols involving supine and seated rest, walking and running on a treadmill and cycling on an ergometer. Data from the devices collected during the protocol were compared with reference methods: electrocardiography (heart rate and indirect calorimetry (energy expenditure.None of the devices performed significantly better overall, however heart rate was consistently more accurate than energy expenditure across all four devices. Correlations between the devices and reference methods were moderate to strong for heart rate (0.67-0.95 [0.35 to 0.98] and weak to strong for energy expenditure (0.16-0.86 [-0.25 to 0.95]. All devices underestimated both outcomes compared to reference methods. The percentage error for heart rate was small across the devices (range: 1-9% but greater for energy expenditure (9-43%. Similarly, limits of agreement were considerably narrower for heart rate (ranging from -27.3 to 13.1 bpm than energy expenditure (ranging from -266.7 to 65.7 kcals across devices.These devices accurately measure heart rate. However, estimates of energy expenditure are poor and would have implications for people using these devices for weight loss.

  14. Heart rate and activity profile for young female soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The physical and physiological demands of high-level male soccer have been studied extensively, while few studies have investigated the demands placed on females during match-play, however, there is no information available about the heart rate and activity profile of young female soccer players during match play. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine cardiovascular (heart-rates HR) and physical demands of young female soccer players during a match. Players were observed during a fr...

  15. Changes in cortisol release and heart rate and heart rate variability during the initial training of 3-year-old sport horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alice; Aurich, Jörg; Möstl, Erich; Müller, Jürgen; Aurich, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Based on cortisol release, a variety of situations to which domestic horses are exposed have been classified as stressors but studies on the stress during equestrian training are limited. In the present study, Warmblood stallions (n=9) and mares (n=7) were followed through a 9 respective 12-week initial training program in order to determine potentially stressful training steps. Salivary cortisol concentrations, beat-to-beat (RR) interval and heart rate variability (HRV) were determined. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR), RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR differences) and the geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1) and 2 (SD2) were calculated. Nearly each training unit was associated with an increase in salivary cortisol concentrations (pCortisol release varied between training units and occasionally was more pronounced in mares than in stallions (p<0.05). The RR interval decreased slightly in response to lunging before mounting of the rider. A pronounced decrease occurred when the rider was mounting, but before the horse showed physical activity (p<0.001). The HRV variables SDRR, RMSSD and SD1 decreased in response to training and lowest values were reached during mounting of a rider (p<0.001). Thereafter RR interval and HRV variables increased again. In contrast, SD2 increased with the beginning of lunging (p<0.05) and no changes in response to mounting were detectable. In conclusion, initial training is a stressor for horses. The most pronounced reaction occurred in response to mounting by a rider, a situation resembling a potentially lethal threat under natural conditions.

  16. Fiber optic sensor based on reflectivity configurations to detect heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Marzuki, A.; Riyatun, R.; Lestari, D.

    2016-11-01

    Research of optical fiber-based heart rate detection sensor has been conducted using the reflection configurationon the thorax motion modified. Optical fiber used in this research was Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) with a diameter of 0.5. Optical fiber system is made with two pieces of fiber, the first fiber is to serve as a transmitter transmitting light from the source to the reflector membrane, the second fiber serves as a receiver. One of the endsfrom the two fibersis pressed and positioned perpendicular of reflector membrane which is placed on the surface of the chest. The sensor works on the principle of intensity changes captured by the receiver fiber when the reflector membrane gets the vibe from the heart. The light source used is in the form of Light Emitting Diode (LED) and Light Dependent Resistor (LDR) as a light sensor. Variations are performed on the reflector membrane diameter. The light intensity received by the detector increases along with the increasing width of the reflector membrane diameter. The results show that this sensor can detect the harmonic peak at a frequency of 1.5 Hz; 7.5 Hz; 10.5 Hz; and 22.5 Hz in a healthy human heart with an average value of Beat Per Minute (BPM) by 78 times, a prototype sensor that is made can work and function properly.

  17. Inadequate control of heart rate in patients with stable angina: results from the European heart survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.A.; Clemens, F.; Sendon, J.L.; Tavazzi, L.; Boersma, E.; Danchin, N.; Delahaye, F.; Gitt, A.; Julian, D.; Mulcahy, D.; Ruzyllo, W.; Thygesen, K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Fox, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To examine resting heart rate (HR) in a population presenting with stable angina in relation to prior and subsequent pharmacological treatment, comorbid conditions and clinical outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The European Heart Survey was a prospective, observational, cohort study of 3779 patien

  18. HEART RATE-LOWERING THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of heart rate-lowering therapy in patients with chronic heart failure using If-channel blocker ivabradine are discussed. The evidence-based data on ivabradine use reveal its advantages, disadvantages and place in the treatment of cardiac patients.

  19. HEART RATE-LOWERING THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of heart rate-lowering therapy in patients with chronic heart failure using If-channel blocker ivabradine are discussed. The evidence-based data on ivabradine use reveal its advantages, disadvantages and place in the treatment of cardiac patients.

  20. Heart rate variability in natural time and 1/f "noise"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Varotsos, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    Several studies have shown that heart rate fluctuations exhibit the ubiquitous 1/f behavior which is altered in desease. Furthermore, the analysis of electrocardiograms in natural time reveals that important malfunctions in the complex system of the human heart can be identified. Here, we present a simple evolution model in natural time that exhibits the 1/fa behavior with a close to unity. The results of this model are consistent with a progressive modification of heart rate variability in healthy children and adolescents. The model results in complexity measures that separate healthy dynamics from patients as well as from sudden cardiac death individuals.

  1. 高龄老年人心率状况及变异性特点%Heart rate condition and variability of very elderly people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 刘德平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the heart rate condition and variability of very elderly people.Methods A total of 149 very elderly people (≥80 years old) and 188 subjects aged from 60 to 79 years old with Holter Data,including average heart rate,maximum heart rate,minimum heart rate of 24 bours,SDNN and SDANN,were retrospectively reviewed and compared.Results Compared with the subjects aged from 60 to 79 years old,average heart rate [(68.9 ± 8.4) beat/min vs.(71.7 ± 8.3) beat/min],maximum heart rate [(103.2 ± 18.8) beat/min vs.(114.7 ± 17.7) beat/min],SDNN [(116.7 ± 36.8)ms vs.(131.3 ±40.7) ms] andSDANN [(36.7±10.2)msvs.(42.5±13.1) ms] of very elderly people were significantly decreased (all P < 0.05),and minimum heart rate was similar [(52.2 ± 7.0) beat/min vs.(52.1 ± 6.2) beat/min,P > 0.05)].Conclusions The average heart rate,maximum heart rate and heart rate variability of very elderly people are significantly decreased than those of general old people,but the minimum heart rate has no significant difference between the two groups.%目的 了解高龄老年人的心率状况及心率变异性特点.方法 调查149例年龄≥80岁的高龄老年人的动态心电图(Holter)数据,包括24 h平均心率、最快心率、最慢心率及心率变异性指标正常R-R间期的标准差(SDNN)和每5 min正常R-R间期平均值的标准差(SDANN),与同期行Holter检查的188例年龄60 ~ 79岁的老年人的相应指标进行比较.结果 高龄老年人与60 ~ 79岁老年人相比较,24 h平均心率降低[(68.9±8.4)次/min比(71.7±8.3)次/min,P<0.05],最快心率降低[(103.2±18.8)次/min比(114.7±17.7)次/min,P<0.05],最慢心率差异无统计学意义[(52.2±7.0)次/min比(52.1±6.2)次/min,P>0.05],两组SDNN[(116.7±36.8)ms比(131.3±40.7)ms]和SDANN[(36.7±10.2) ms比(42.5±13.1)ms]比较,差异均有统计学意义(均为P<0.05).结论 高龄老年人的平均心率、最快心率较60~79岁老年人轻度下降,心率变异性降低.

  2. A comparison of the indirect estimate of mean arterial pressure calculated by the conventional equation and calculated to compensate for a change in heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, G; Oosthuyse, T

    2000-02-01

    The standard equation used to calculate mean arterial pressure (MAP) assumes that diastole persists for 2/3 and systole for 1/3 of each cardiac cycle. This ratio is altered when heart rate increases, and therefore we investigated the efficacy of predicting MAP during exercise using non-invasive indirect methods. Eight subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer for 3 minute intervals to elicit heart rates between 100-110, 120-130, 140-150, 160-170, and 180-190 beats/min. In the last minute of each 3 min interval an ECG recording was taken and systolic (SP) and diastolic (DP) blood pressure was measured by manual auscultation. MAP was calculated for each heart rate interval by: MAP=DP+1/3(SP-DP) (method A), and MAP= DP + Fs(SP- DP) (method B), where Fs is the fraction of the cardiac cycle comprising systole, measured from the ECG. Fs increased from 0.35+/-0.049 at rest to 0.47+/-0.039 at a heart rate of 180-190 beats/min. MAP measured by method B was consistently greater than MAP calculated by method A at all heart rates greater than resting heart rate (pequation (method A) to derive MAP during exercise (measured as the percentage difference between method A and B) increased linearly with heart rate (r=0.98). The standard MAP equation should not be applied during exercise, as it does not account for the change in the systolic: diastolic period ratio as heart rate increases.

  3. Heart rate, heart rate variability and behaviour of horses during air transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsters, C C B M; de Gooijer, J-W; van den Broek, J; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M Sloet

    2013-01-05

    Heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and behaviour score (BS) of nine horses were evaluated during an eight-hour air transport between The Netherlands and New York. HR and HRV parameters were calculated every five minutes during the air transport. Compared with transit (40±3), mean HRs were higher during loading into the jet stall (67±21, Phorses showed differences in mean HR (P=0.005) and peak HR (Phorses. BS was highest during turbulence (3.2±0.4). However, behaviour did not always correspond with HR measurements: the least responsive horse had the highest HR. Loading into the jet stall caused the highest increase in HR and was considered the most stressful event. During transit, HR was generally comparable with resting rates. Previous studies have shown that loading and transporting by road caused more elevation in HR than during loading and transporting by air. HRV data were not found to be useful, and caution is needed when interpreting HRV data. Not every horse exhibited stress through visible (evasive) behaviour, and HR measurements may provide an additional tool to assess stress in horses.

  4. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  5. Resting and Postexercise Heart Rate Detection From Fingertip and Facial Photoplethysmography Using a Smartphone Camera: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christy KY; Li, Christien KH; To, Olivia TL; Lai, William HS; Tse, Gary; Poh, Yukkee C; Poh, Ming-Zher

    2017-01-01

    Background Modern smartphones allow measurement of heart rate (HR) by detecting pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals with built-in cameras from the fingertips or the face, without physical contact, by extracting subtle beat-to-beat variations of skin color. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of HR measurements at rest and after exercise using a smartphone-based PPG detection app. Methods A total of 40 healthy participants (20 men; mean age 24.7, SD 5.2 years; von Luschan skin color range 14-27) underwent treadmill exercise using the Bruce protocol. We recorded simultaneous PPG signals for each participant by having them (1) facing the front camera and (2) placing their index fingertip over an iPhone’s back camera. We analyzed the PPG signals from the Cardiio-Heart Rate Monitor + 7 Minute Workout (Cardiio) smartphone app for HR measurements compared with a continuous 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) as the reference. Recordings of 20 seconds’ duration each were acquired at rest, and immediately after moderate- (50%-70% maximum HR) and vigorous- (70%-85% maximum HR) intensity exercise, and repeated successively until return to resting HR. We used Bland-Altman plots to examine agreement between ECG and PPG-estimated HR. The accuracy criterion was root mean square error (RMSE) ≤5 beats/min or ≤10%, whichever was greater, according to the American National Standards Institute/Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation EC-13 standard. Results We analyzed a total of 631 fingertip and 626 facial PPG measurements. Fingertip PPG-estimated HRs were strongly correlated with resting ECG HR (r=.997, RMSE=1.03 beats/min or 1.40%), postmoderate-intensity exercise (r=.994, RMSE=2.15 beats/min or 2.53%), and postvigorous-intensity exercise HR (r=.995, RMSE=2.01 beats/min or 1.93%). The correlation of facial PPG-estimated HR was stronger with resting ECG HR (r=.997, RMSE=1.02 beats/min or 1.44%) than with postmoderate

  6. DETECTING CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE USING HEART RATE SEQUENTIAL TREND ANALYSIS PLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRINIVAS KUNTAMALLA,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability analysis is gaining acceptance as a potential non-invasive means of autonomic nervous system assessment in research as well as clinical domains. In this study, a nonlinear analysis method is developed to detect congestive heart failure. The data obtained from an online and widely used public database (i.e., MIT/BIH physionet database, is used for testing the performance of the method. The method developed is based on the sequential trend analysis plot of heart rate variability and correlates well with the characteristic autonomic nervous system regulations in congestive heart failure. The proposed method can be used for screening as well as diagnosing the heart failure patients. The algorithm is computationally simple and can be implemented in a real time processing hardware. This method classifies 31 out of 32 subjects and has the highest discrimination power in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  7. Effect of energy drink dose on exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise

    OpenAIRE

    An, Sang Min; Park, Jong Suk; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise on caffeine concentration of energy drink. [Methods] The volunteers for this study were 15 male university student. 15 subjects were taken basic physical examinations such as height, weight and BMI before the experiment. Primary tests were examined of VO2max per weight of each subjects by graded exercise test using Bruce proto...

  8. Beat Dreams?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Two of the founding members of the Beat Generation of the 1950s wrote dream books with almost identical titles: Jack Kerouac's Book of Dreams (1961) and William Burroughs' My Education: A Book of Dreams (1995). This paper queries the function of such dream books, both from a perspective of seeing...... dream writing as a confessional genre, and from the perspective of didacticism implicit in sharing one's dream life with one's readers. What role does memory, politics, fantasies and reality play in communicating with and via dreams?...

  9. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY IN LEFT-VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION AND HEART-FAILURE - EFFECTS AND IMPLICATIONS OF DRUG-TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TUININGA, YS; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; BROUWER, J; HAAKSMA, J; CRIJNS, HJGM; MANINTVELD, AJ; LIE, KI

    1994-01-01

    Objective-To review the importance of heart rate variability analysis in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure and to assess the effects of drug treatment. In patients with left: ventricular dysfunction or heart failure, a low heart rate variability is a strong predictor of a low probabilit

  10. Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Umuttan; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Gok, Hasan

    2013-11-01

    Increased sympathetic activity and endothelial dysfunction are the proposed mechanisms underlying exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR). However, data regarding heart rate behavior in patients with EBPR are lacking. We hypothesized that heart rate recovery (HRR) could be impaired in patients with EBPR. A total of 75 normotensive subjects who were referred for exercise treadmill test examination and experienced EBPR were included to this cross-sectional case-control study. The control group consisted of 75 age- and gender-matched normotensive subjects without EBPR. EBPR was defined as a peak exercise systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥210 mmHg in men and ≥190 mmHg in women. HRR was defined as the difference in HR from peak exercise to 1 min in recovery; abnormal HRR was defined as ≤12 beats/min. These parameters were compared with respect to occurrence of EBPR. Mean values of systolic and diastolic BP at baseline, peak exercise, and the first minute of the recovery were significantly higher in the subjects with EBPR. Mean HRR values were significantly lower (P recovery and degree of HRR in individuals without EBPR (r = 0.42, P recovery period. However, such a correlation was not found in subjects with EBPR. Our data suggest that mechanisms underlying the blunting of the HRR might be associated with the genesis of EBPR. The association between the extent of HRR and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with EBPR needs to be investigated in detail in future research.

  11. Heart Rate Variability Monitoring during Sleep Based on Capacitively Coupled Textile Electrodes on a Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ji Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed and tested a capacitively coupled electrocardiogram (ECG measurement system using conductive textiles on a bed, for long-term healthcare monitoring. The system, which was designed to measure ECG in a bed with no constraints of sleep position and posture, included a foam layer to increase the contact region with the curvature of the body and a cover to ensure durability and easy installation. Nine healthy subjects participated in the experiment during polysomnography (PSG, and the heart rate (HR coverage and heart rate variability (HRV parameters were analyzed to evaluate the system. The experimental results showed that the mean of R-peak coverage was 98.0% (95.5%–99.7%, and the normalized errors of HRV time and spectral measures between the Ag/AgCl system and our system ranged from 0.15% to 4.20%. The root mean square errors for inter-beat (RR intervals and HR were 1.36 ms and 0.09 bpm, respectively. We also showed the potential of our developed system for rapid eye movement (REM sleep and wake detection as well as for recording of abnormal states.

  12. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  13. Noninvasive coronary angiography using 64-slice spiral computed tomography in an unselected patient collective: Effect of heart rate, heart rate variability and coronary calcifications on image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodoefel, H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: h.brodoefel@t-online.de; Reimann, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Burgstahler, C. [Department of Cardiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schumacher, F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Herberts, T. [Department of Medical Biometry, Westbahnhofstr. 55, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Tsiflikas, I. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schroeder, S. [Department of Cardiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Mueller-Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, C.D.; Kopp, A.F.; Heuschmid, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of heart rate, heart rate variability and calcification on image quality and diagnostic accuracy in an unselected patient collective. Subjects and methods: One hundred and two consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent both 64-MSCT and invasive coronary angiography. Image quality (IQ) was assessed by independent observers using a 4-point scale from excellent (1) to non-diagnostic (4). Accuracy of MSCT regarding detection or exclusion of significant stenosis (>50%) was evaluated on a per segment basis in a modified AHA 13-segment model. Effects of heart rate, heart rate variability, calcification and body mass index (BMI) on IQ and accuracy were evaluated by multivariate regression. IQ and accuracy were further analysed in subgroups of significant predictor variables and simple regression performed to calculate thresholds for adequate IQ. Results: Mean heart rate was 68.2 {+-} 13.3 bpm, mean heart rate variability 11.5 {+-} 16.0 beats per CT-examination (bpct) and median Agatston score 226.5. Average IQ score was 2 {+-} 0.6 whilst diagnostic quality was obtained in 89% of segments. Overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV or NPV was 91.2%, 99.2%, 95.3% or 98.3%. According to multivariate regression, overall IQ was significantly related to heart rate and calcification (P = 0.0038; P < 0.0001). The effect of heart rate variability was limited to IQ of RCA segments (P = 0.018); BMI was not related to IQ (P = 0.52). Calcification was the only predictor variable with significant effect on the number of non-diagnostic segments (P < 0.0001). In a multivariate regression, calcification was also the single factor with impact on diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.0049). Conclusion: Whilst heart rate, heart rate variability and calcification all show an inverse correlation to IQ, severe calcium burden remains the single factor with translation of such effect into decrease of diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Scaling analysis of heart beat fluctuations data and its relationship with cyclic alternating pattern data during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Lomelí, R.; Murguía, J. S.; Chouvarda, I.; Méndez, M. O.; González-Galván, E.; Alba, A.

    2016-01-01

    During sleep there exists a nonlinear dynamic phenomenon, which is called cyclic alternating pattern. This phenomenon is generated in the brain and is composed of a series of events of short duration known as A-phases. It has been shown that A-phases can be found in other physiological systems such as the cardiovascular. However, there is no evidence that shows the temporal influence of the A-phases with the cardiovascular system. For this purpose, we consider the scaling method known as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The analysis was carried out in well sleepers and insomnia people, and the numerical results show an increment in the scaling parameter for the insomnia subjects compared with the normal ones. In addition, the results of the heart dynamics suggests a persistent behavior toward the 1/f-noise.

  15. Heart Rate Variability in Male Sexual Arousal and Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-22

    Ali Weinstein has provided much assistance with statistics and conceptual ideas. Current and past members of the Sbrocco lab (Laurel Cofell, Andrew ...1995; Stein, Bosner, Kleiger, & Conger , 1994; Task Force, 1996). Time Domain Analyses of HRV There are two methods of time domain analysis (Cohen...Bosner, M. S., Kleiger, R. E., & Conger , B. M. (1994). Heart rate variability: A measure of cardiac autonomic tone. Am Heart J, 127(5), 1376-1381

  16. Short duration of music modify the heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Upadhayay

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are contradictory findings regarding the effect of music on heart rate variability. Reports mention that the music increases the parasympathetic markers of heart rate variability. While some report no change in it. Method: We set out to study the acute effect of music on heart rate variability in 15 healthy male medical students of age 20-36 years. Their resting heart rate variability in eyes closed state for five minutes was recorded thrice: once without listening music, secondly during listening instrumental music for five minutes and thirdly after listening it. Their subjective feeling regarding music and its influence on the brain were documented. Data was compared using the Friedman test followed by Wilcoxon-signed rank test, considering P significant at ≤ 0.05. Results: The mean respiratory rate was significantly higher during music as compared to before listening it. There was a significantly higher HF power after listening to music than during listening it [703.5 (247.25-1195 > 529 (213-699, p=0.026]. As well as, the total power of heart rate variability was significantly higher after music listening as compared to before listening it [2472.5 (1351-4178.75 > 2147.5 (1072.5-3208.25, p=0.035]. All participants felt that they were relaxed during and after the short music session. Conclusions: The instrumental-soft relaxing music for short duration (five minutes can increase the parasympathetic activity of the heart. The effect of music on vagus supply to the heart remains in higher level even after over of music. It makes people feel relaxed and helps to minimize their stress instantly in their working place.

  17. Comparison of pulse rate variability with heart rate variability during obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Karmakar, Chandan K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate whether pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from finger photo-plethysmography (Pleth) waveforms can be the substitute of heart rate variability (HRV) from RR intervals of ECG signals during obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Simultaneous measurements (ECG and Pleth) were taken from 29 healthy subjects during normal (undisturbed sleep) breathing and 22 patients with OSA during OSA events. Highly significant (pr>0.95) were found between heart rate (HR) and pulse rate (PR). Bland-Altman plot of HR and PR shows good agreement (pulse variability to measure heart rate variability under normal breathing in sleep but does not precisely reflect HRV in sleep disordered breathing.

  18. Effect of Loss of Heart Rate Variability on T-Wave Heterogeneity and QT Variability in Heart Failure Patients: Implications in Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Sachin; Hasan, Muhammad A; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Sullivan, Thomas; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-03-03

    Heart rate variability (HRV) modulates dynamics of ventricular repolarization. A diminishing value of HRV is associated with increased vulnerability to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, however the causal relationship is not well-defined. We evaluated if fixed-rate atrial pacing that abolishes the effect of physiological HRV, will alter ventricular repolarization wavefronts and is relevant to ventricular arrhythmogenesis. The study was performed in 16 subjects: 8 heart failure patients with spontaneous ventricular tachycardia [HFVT], and 8 subjects with structurally normal hearts (H Norm). The T-wave heterogeneity descriptors [total cosine angle between QRS and T-wave loop vectors (TCRT, negative value corresponds to large difference in the 2 loops), T-wave morphology dispersion, T-wave loop dispersion] and QT intervals were analyzed in a beat-to-beat manner on 3-min records of 12-lead surface ECG at baseline and during atrial pacing at 80 and 100 bpm. The global T-wave heterogeneity was expressed as mean values of each of the T-wave morphology descriptors and variability in QT intervals (QTV) as standard deviation of QT intervals. Baseline T-wave morphology dispersion and QTV were higher in HFVT compared to H Norm subjects (p ≤ 0.02). While group differences in T-wave morphology dispersion and T-wave loop dispersion remained unaltered with atrial pacing, TCRT tended to fall more in HFVT patients compared to H Norm subjects (interaction p value = 0.086). Atrial pacing failed to reduce QTV in both groups, however group differences were augmented (p < 0.0001). Atrial pacing and consequent loss of HRV appears to introduce unfavorable changes in ventricular repolarization in HFVT subjects. It widens the spatial relationship between wavefronts of ventricular depolarization and repolarization. This may partly explain the concerning relation between poorer HRV and the risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

  19. Heart rate-based lactate minimum test: a reproducible method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strupler, M.; Muller, G.; Perret, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find the individual intensity for aerobic endurance training, the lactate minimum test (LMT) seems to be a promising method. LMTs described in the literature consist of speed or work rate-based protocols, but for training prescription in daily practice mostly heart rate is used. The ai

  20. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    . The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...

  1. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  2. Lack of circadian variation and reduction of heart rate variability in women with breast cancer undergoing lumpectomy: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Melissa V; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the autonomic nervous system with increased sympathetic tone may be a cause of postoperative short-, and long-term cardiovascular complications. Heart rate variability (HRV) is assessed by Holter monitoring as a measure of autonomic tone and has not been investigated in patients with breast cancer undergoing surgery. We aimed to investigate evening- and night-time HRV after lumpectomy. Twelve patients were included in this descriptive study. HRV was measured the night before surgery (PREOP), the night after surgery (PO1) and 14 days after surgery (PO14) from 1900 to 0700 h. For calculation of HRV, time domain parameters (SDNN-standard deviation of all normal-to-normal (NN) intervals around the mean NN for the period of measurement, pNN50-percentage of beats where the change from one beat to the next is more than 50 ms, rMSSD-root mean square of successive differences) were used. We analyzed the variation of the overall time period and the circadian variation between evening and night (sympathetic vs. parasympathetic tonus). Mean heart rate increased from PREOP to PO1 (p parasympathetic activity and lack of circadian variation 14 days after lumpectomy.

  3. Effect of acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition in the modulation of heart rate in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Fellet

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition with N G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME on chronotropic and pressor responses was studied in anesthetized intact rats and rats submitted to partial and complete autonomic blockade. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored intra-arterially. Intravenous L-NAME injection (7.5 mg/kg elicited the same hypertensive response in intact rats and in rats with partial (ganglionic and parasympathetic blockade and complete autonomic blockade (38 ± 3, 55 ± 6, 54 ± 5, 45 ± 5 mmHg, respectively; N = 9, P = NS. L-NAME-induced bradycardia at the time when blood pressure reached the peak plateau was similar in intact rats and in rats with partial autonomic blockade (43 ± 8, 38 ± 5, 46 ± 6 bpm, respectively; N = 9, P = NS. Rats with combined autonomic blockade showed a tachycardic response to L-NAME (10 ± 3 bpm, P<0.05 vs intact animals, N = 9. Increasing doses of L-NAME (5.0, 7.5 and 10 mg/kg, N = 9 caused a similar increase in blood pressure (45 ± 5, 38 ± 3, 44 ± 9 mmHg, respectively; P = NS and heart rate (31 ± 4, 34 ± 3, 35 ± 4 bpm, respectively; P = NS. Addition of L-NAME (500 µM to isolated atria from rats killed by cervical dislocation and rats previously subjected to complete autonomic blockade did not affect spontaneous beating or contractile strength (N = 9. In vivo results showed that L-NAME promoted a tachycardic response in rats with complete autonomic blockade, whereas the in vitro experiments showed no effect on intrinsic heart rate, suggesting that humoral mechanisms may be involved in the L-NAME-induced cardiac response.

  4. Do lambs perceive regular human stroking as pleasant? Behavior and heart rate variability analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Coulon

    Full Text Available Stroking by humans is beneficial to the human-animal relationship and improves welfare in many species that express intraspecific allogrooming, but very few studies have looked at species like sheep that do not express such contact except around parturition. This study investigated the way lambs perceive regular human tactile contact using behavioral and physiological responses. Twenty-four lambs were reared and bucket-fed in groups of four. All were stroked daily by their familiar caregiver. At 8 weeks of age, the lambs were individually tested in their home pen but in a 1×1m open-barred pen after a 15 h period of habituation to physical separation from peers while remaining in visual and auditory contact. Half of the lambs received stroking by their caregiver for 8 min and half were exposed to their caregiver's immobile presence. Heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded and analyzed by 2-min slots over the same interval based on three measures: mean heart rate value (HR, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD and standard deviation of all intervals measured between consecutive sinus beats (SDNN. Behavioral responses (ear postures of the lamb and time spent in contact with the familiar caregiver, on the knees of the familiar caregiver, and moving were recorded throughout the test. Lamb HR decreased continuously while in the presence of their caregiver. Lambs being stroked showed slower HR and higher RMSSD which reflected positive emotional states compared to lambs left unstroked. All behavioral variables were highly correlated with the main component axis of the PCA analyses: the more the animals stayed in contact with their caregiver, the less they moved and the more their ears were hanging. This first component clearly differentiates lambs being stroked or not. Behavioral and physiological observations support the hypothesis that gentle physical contact with the caregiver is perceived positively by lambs.

  5. Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Chronic Stress Caused by Lameness in Dairy Cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Kovács

    Full Text Available Most experimental studies on animal stress physiology have focused on acute stress, while chronic stress, which is also encountered in intensive dairy cattle farming--e.g. in case of lameness--, has received little attention. We investigated heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV as indicators of the autonomic nervous system activity and fecal glucocorticoid concentrations as the indicator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in lame (with locomotion scores 4 and 5; n = 51 and non-lame (with locomotion scores 1 and 2; n = 52 Holstein-Friesian cows. Data recorded during the periods of undisturbed lying--representing baseline cardiac activity--were involved in the analysis. Besides linear analysis methods of the cardiac inter-beat interval (time-domain geometric, frequency domain and Poincaré analyses non-linear HRV parameters were also evaluated. With the exception of standard deviation 1 (SD1, all HRV indices were affected by lameness. Heart rate was lower in lame cows than in non-lame ones. Vagal tone parameters were higher in lame cows than in non-lame animals, while indices of the sympathovagal balance reflected on a decreased sympathetic activity in lame cows. All geometric and non-linear HRV measures were lower in lame cows compared to non-lame ones suggesting that chronic stress influenced linear and non-linear characteristics of cardiac function. Lameness had no effect on fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. Our results demonstrate that HRV analysis is a reliable method in the assessment of chronic stress, however, it requires further studies to fully understand the elevated parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone in lame animals.

  6. Kramers-Moyal Expansion of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelczyc, M.; Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2009-05-01

    The first six Kramers-Moyal coefficients were extracted from human heart rate variability recordings. The method requires the determination of the Markov time and of the proper conditional probability densities. We analyzed heart rate data recorded in a group of ten young, healthy subjects. We obtained non-negligible higher order Kramers-Moyal (K-M) terms in 6 h nighttime parts of the 24 h recordings. This indicates that the data is a non-Gaussian process and probably a correlated signal. The analysis yielded important new insights into the character and distribution of the stochastic processes measured in healthy group. In the night hours, the dominant oscillation in the heart rate is the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) -- a physiological phenomenon in which respiration acts as a drive for the heart rate. Certain kinds of pathology may disrupt RSA. We compared nighttime recordings of the healthy group with those recorded in six patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). HCM is generally a pathology of heart cells but abnormalities in autonomic regulation are also observed. Using the higher order Kramers-Moyal coefficients, we analyzed the skewness and kurtosis in the nighttime recordings for the normal subjects.

  7. QT measurement and heart rate correction during hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Folke; Randløv, Jette; Christensen, Leif Engmann;

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia...... induced by intravenous injection of two insulin types in a cross-over design. QT measurements were done using the slope-intersect (SI) and manual annotation (MA) methods. Heart rate correction was done using Bazett's (QTcB) and Fridericia's (QTcF) formulas. Results. The SI method showed significant...... a significant impact on the prolongation of QT during hypoglycemia. Heart rate correction may also influence the QT during hypoglycemia while the type of insulin is insignificant. Prolongation of QTc in this study did not reach pathologic values suggesting that QTc prolongation cannot fully explain the dead...

  8. Effect of oxygen treatment on heart rate after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Lie, C; Bernhard, A;

    1999-01-01

    . METHODS: The authors studied the effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in 100 consecutive unselected patients randomly and double blindly allocated to receive air or oxygen therapy between the first and fourth day after major abdominal surgery. RESULTS: The median arterial...... supplementation were found between patients with or without an epidural catheter or between the postoperative day studied. CONCLUSION: Postoperative oxygen therapy increased arterial oxygen saturation and decreased heart rate after uncomplicated abdominal surgery in a consecutive unselected group of patients who......BACKGROUND: Cardiac complications are common during the postoperative period and may be associated with hypoxemia and tachycardia. Preliminary studies in high-risk patients after operation have shown a possible beneficial effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate...

  9. Freqüência cardíaca e risco cardiovascular Heart rate and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Machado César

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A freqüência cardíaca (FC também está no centro das determinantes do tempo de vida dos seres vivos animais. Há quase uma constante quando se multiplica a FC pelo número de anos que, em média, vive um animal. O ser humano também tem correlações interessantes de tempo de vida e FC, com estudos epidemiológicos demonstrando maior sobrevivência naqueles com menor FC em repouso, hipertensos, com doença coronariana e na população geral. Neste artigo, revemos estes estudos epidemiológicos e a perspectiva de se, de fato reduzindo a FC, poderemos aumentar o tempo de vida, no caso dos pacientes com doença cardiovascular, de forma independente de outros fatores.Heart rate (HR is known to be one of the factors that in the animal world are related to mortality. When one multiplies resting HR by the average life time, for each animal species, the result is almost the same number, similar to a constant. Apparently, each class of living beings has its "maximal number of heart beats for a life". Herein considerations are made about the relationship between HR and survival in human beings. Some epidemiological studies are reviewed, especially those related to cardiovascular and coronary diseases correlated to deaths and discussions are directed towards the perspective of living longer by lowering the HR.

  10. Nonlinear Methods to Assess Changes in Heart Rate Variability in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar, Roy, E-mail: imbhaskarall@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Technology (India); University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT (United States); Ghatak, Sobhendu [Indian Institute of Technology (India)

    2013-10-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an important indicator of autonomic modulation of cardiovascular function. Diabetes can alter cardiac autonomic modulation by damaging afferent inputs, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. We applied nonlinear analytical methods to identify parameters associated with HRV that are indicative of changes in autonomic modulation of heart function in diabetic patients. We analyzed differences in HRV patterns between diabetic and age-matched healthy control subjects using nonlinear methods. Lagged Poincaré plot, autocorrelation, and detrended fluctuation analysis were applied to analyze HRV in electrocardiography (ECG) recordings. Lagged Poincare plot analysis revealed significant changes in some parameters, suggestive of decreased parasympathetic modulation. The detrended fluctuation exponent derived from long-term fitting was higher than the short-term one in the diabetic population, which was also consistent with decreased parasympathetic input. The autocorrelation function of the deviation of inter-beat intervals exhibited a highly correlated pattern in the diabetic group compared with the control group. The HRV pattern significantly differs between diabetic patients and healthy subjects. All three statistical methods employed in the study may prove useful to detect the onset and extent of autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients.

  11. Nonlinearity degree of short-term heart rate variability signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Chunhua; NING Xinbao

    2004-01-01

    A nonlinear autoregressive (NAR) model is built to model the heartbeat interval time series and the optimum model degree is proposed to be taken to evaluate the nonlinearity degree of heart rate variability (HRV). A group of healthy persons are studied and the results indicate that this method can effectively get nonlinear information from short (6-7 min) heartbeat series and consequently reflect the degree of heart rate variability, which supplies convenience in clinical application. Finally, a comparison with the traditional time domain method shows that the NAR model method can reflect the complexity of the whole signal and lessen the influence of noise and instability in the signal.

  12. Diminished baroreflex control of heart rate responses in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi head tilt mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Skala, Karl; Jones, Timothy A; Hay, Meredith

    2004-08-01

    The maintenance of stable blood pressure during postural changes is known to involve integration of vestibular and cardiovascular central regulatory mechanisms. Sensory activity in the vestibular system plays an important role in cardiovascular regulation. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of vestibular gravity receptors in normal baroreflex function. Baroreflex heart rate (HR) responses to changes in blood pressure (BP) in otoconia-deficient head tilt (het) mice (n = 8) were compared with their wild-type littermates (n = 12). The study was carried out in conscious male mice chronically implanted with arterial and venous catheters for recording BP and HR and for the infusion of vasoactive drugs. Resting HR was higher in the het mice (661 +/- 13 beats/min) than in the wild-type mice (579 +/- 20 beats/min). BP was comparable in the het (113 +/- 4 mmHg) and wild-type mice (104 +/- 4 mmHg). The slopes of reflex decreases in HR in response to phenylephrine (PE) were blunted in the het mice (-5.5 +/- 1.5 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) compared with the wild-type mice (-8.5 +/- 0.9 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Likewise, reflex tachycardic responses to decreases in BP with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were significantly blunted in the het mice (-0.8 +/- 0.3 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) versus the wild-type mice (-2.2 +/- 0.6 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Frequency-domain analysis of the HR variability suggests that under resting conditions, parasympathetic contribution was lower in the het versus wild-type mice. Mapping of the expression of immediate-early gene product, c-Fos, in forebrain and brain stem nuclei in response to a BP challenge showed no differences between the wild-type and het mice. These results suggest that tonic activity of gravity receptors modulates and is required for normal function of the cardiac baroreflexes.

  13. Target heart rate to determine the normal value of coronary flow reserve during dobutamine stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousse Maria G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The determination of coronary flow reserve (CFR is an essential concept at the moment of decision-making in ischemic heart disease. There are several direct and indirect tests to evaluate this parameter. In this sense, dobutamine stress echocardiography is one of the pharmacological method most commonly used worldwide. It has been previously demonstrated that CFR can be determined by this technique. Despite our wide experience with dobutamine stress echocardiography, we ignored the necessary heart rate to consider sufficient the test for the analysis of CFR. For this reason, our main goal was to determine the velocity of coronary flow in each stage of dobutamine stress echocardiography and the heart rate value necessary to double the baseline values of coronary flow velocity in the territory of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery. Methods A total of 33 consecutive patients were analyzed. The patients included had low risk for coronary artery disease. All the participants underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography and coronary artery flow velocity was evaluated in the distal segment of LAD coronary artery using transthoracic color-Doppler echocardiography. Results The feasibility of determining CFR in the territory of the LAD during dobutamine stress echocardiography was high: 31/33 patients (94%. Mean CFR was 2.67 at de end of dobutamine test. There was an excellent concordance between delta HR (difference between baseline HR and maximum HR and the increase in the CFR (correlation coefficient 0.84. In this sense, we found that when HR increased by 50 beats, CFR was ≥ 2 (CI 93-99.2%. In addition, 96.4% of patients reached a CFR ≥ 2 (IC 91.1 - 99% at 75% of their predicted maximum heart rate. Conclusions We found that the feasibility of dobutamine stress echocardiography to determine CFR in the territory of the LAD coronary artery was high. In this study, it was necessary to achieve a difference of 50 bpm

  14. Influence of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Co-morbidities on Outcomes and Treatment Effect of Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine in Stable Heart Failure (from the SHIFT Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Robertson, Michele; Ford, Ian; Borer, Jeffrey S; Komajda, Michel; Kindermann, Ingrid; Maack, Christoph; Lainscak, Mitja; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-12-15

    Incidence of chronic heart failure (HF) increases with age and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity. Co-morbidities increase hospitalization and mortality in HF, and non-CV co-morbidities may lead to preventable hospitalizations. We studied the impact of co-morbidities on mortality and morbidity in Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, and investigated whether the impact of ivabradine was affected by co-morbidities. We analyzed the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the I(f) Inhibitor Ivabradine Trialpopulation, with moderate-to-severe HF and left ventricular dysfunction (in sinus rhythm with heart rate at rest ≥70 beats/min), according to co-morbidity: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, anemia, stroke, impaired renal function, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and peripheral artery disease. Co-morbidity load was classed as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4+ or 1 to 2 co-morbidities, or 3+ co-morbidities. Co-morbidities were evenly distributed between the placebo and ivabradine groups. Patients with more co-morbidities were likely to be older, women, had more advanced HF, were less likely to be on β blockers, with an even distribution on ivabradine 2.5, 5, or 7.5 mg bid and placebo at all co-morbidity loads. Number of co-morbidities was related to outcomes. Cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization events significantly increased (p 3 co-morbidities for both, ivabradine and placebo. There was no interaction between co-morbidity load and the treatment effects of ivabradine. Hospitalization rate was lower at all co-morbidity loads for ivabradine. In conclusion, cardiac and noncardiac co-morbidities significantly affect CV outcomes, particularly if there are >3 co-morbidities. The effect of heart rate reduction with ivabradine is maintained at all co-morbidity loads.

  15. The Correlation Analysis of 64-slice Coronary CT Angiography: Effect of Average Heart rate, Heart Rate Range and Heart Rate Variability on Image Quality%平均心率、心率波动和心率变异性对64层螺旋CT冠脉成像质量的相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉春; 王建良; 吴志娟; 沈纪芳; 王伟伟; 刘丽华; 朱晟超; 张臻

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of average heart rate,heart rate range and heart rate variability on the image quality with 64-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Methods 200 patients underwent 64-slice coronary CT angiogra-phy ,which were suspected coronary artery diseases. Image quality was performed using five score method. The detailed analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of average heart rate,heart rate range and heart rate variability on the image quality. Results 600 coronary angiography were analyzed in 200 patients. The average heart rate was 69.20 ± 8.80 beat per minute(heart rate rang , l~38bmp), with a variability of 8.50 ±6.75%. Image quality was sufficient for diagnosis for 94.3%(566/600)of arterial segment at the best reconstruction interval. A significan correlation (P<0.05) between overall image quality was found for average heart rate, heart rate range and heart rate variability. The lower average heart rate,the less heart rate range and variability, the better coronary image quality. Conclusion Coronary angiography with 64-slice spiral CT can provides best diagnostic image quality within a wide range of heart rates, and reducing average heart rate and heart rate variability in patients is beneficial in improving image quality.%目的 探讨平均心率、心率波动和心率变异性对64层螺旋CT冠脉造影成像质量的影响.方法 200例患者因怀疑存在冠心病进行64层螺旋CT冠状动脉造影检查,以5分法评定系统进行影像质量评价,着重分析平均心率、心率波动和心率变异性与冠状动脉图像质量的相关性.结果 200例患者,共纳入分析血管为600支,平均心率为69.20±8.80bmp,心率波动范围 1-38bmp,平均心率变异性8.50±6.75 %,共有94.3%(566/600)冠状动脉图像质量满足诊断需要.平均心率,心率波动和心率变异性与冠脉图像质量均有显著相关性.平均心率越慢,心率波动范围越小,心率

  16. [Bundle-branch block depending on the heart rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, L

    1975-01-01

    Five patients are reported, admitted to the hospital, with diseases predominantly of the cardio-vascular system. During the electrocardiographic examinations bundle branch block was established, depending on heart rate. It fluctuated within the physiological limits from 50 to 90/min. In three of the patients, the bundle branch block appeared with the quickening of the heart rate (tachycardia-depending bundle branch block) and in two of the patients--the bundle branch block appeared during the slowing down of the heart action and disappeared with its quickening (bradicardia-depending bundle branch block). A brief literature review is presented and attention is paid to the possible diagnostic errors and the treatment mode of those patients with cardiac tonic and antiarrhythmic medicaments.

  17. Dynamical changing patterns of histological structure and ultrastructure of liver graft undergoing warm ischemia injury from non-heart-beating donor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ma; Guo-Dong Wang; Lin-Wei Wu; Rui-De Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the histological and ultra-structural characteristics of liver graft during different of warm ischemia time (WIT) in rats and to predict the maximum limitation of liver graft to warm ischemia. METHODS: The rats were randomized into 7 groups undergoing warm ischemia injury for 0, 10, 15, 20, 30,45 and 60 min, respectively. All specimens having undergone warm ischemia injury were investigated dynamically by light and electron microscopy, and histochemistry staining. After orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), the recovery of morphology of liver grafts after 6, 24 and 48 h was observed. RESULTS: The donor liver from non-heart-beating donors (NHBD) underwent ischemia injury both in the warm ischemia period and in the reperfusion period. Morphological changes were positively related to warm ischemia injury in a time-dependent manner during the reperfusion period. The results demonstrated that different degrees of histocyte degeneration were observed when WIT was within 30 min, and became more severe with the prolongation of WIT, no obvious hepatocyte necrosis was noted in any specimen. In the group undergolng warm ischemia injury for 45 min, small focal necrosis occurred in the central area of hepatic lobule first. In the group undergoing warm ischemia injury for 60 min, patchy or diffused necrosis was observed and the area was gradually extended, while hepatic sinusoid endothe lial cells were obviously swollen. Hepatic sinusoid was obstructed and microcirculation was in disorder. CONCLUSION: The rat liver graft undergoing warm ischemia injury is in the reversible stage when the WIT is within 30 min. The 45 min WIT may be a critical point of rat liver graft to endure warm ischemia injury. When the WIT is over 60 min, the damage is irreversible.

  18. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  19. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  20. Individual variability in heart rate recovery after standardized submaximal exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, H.T.D. van der; Brink, M.S.; Visscher, C.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    To optimize performance, coaches and athletes are always looking for the right balance between training load and recovery. Therefore, closely monitoring of athletes is important. Heart rate recovery (HRR) after standardized sub maximal exercise has been proposed as a useful variable to monitor (Lamb

  1. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lake Conder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain. It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory Post Concussive Syndrome (PCS. This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced heart rate variability on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation.

  2. Gonadal hormones and heart rate as an emotional response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Loos, Wolter Statius

    1988-01-01

    Animai experiments may give information on the physiology of hormones under stress conditions. The model for the investigation of acute emotional stress in animals that has been chosen permits the study of heart rate in freely moving laboratory rats as a sensitive psychophysiological parameter, This

  3. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    1974-01-01

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at th

  4. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  5. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  6. Fetal heart rate changes associated with general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorkow, D M; Stewart, T J; Parboosingh, J

    1989-07-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability was noted 90 seconds after the induction of general anesthesia with sodium thiopentone and fentanyl in a patient undergoing basket extraction of a renal calculus at 30 weeks' gestation. The fetal sleep pattern lasted for 105 minutes after the anesthetic was discontinued, 45 minutes after the mother was fully awake.

  7. Transfer entropy analysis of maternal and fetal heart rate coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Endo, Miyuki; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous model-based studies, knowledge about the mechanism and patterns of the coupling during gestation is still limited. In this study, a model-free method based on Transfer Entropy (TE) was applied to quantify the maternal-fetal heart rate couplings in both directions. Furthermore, analysis of the lag at which TE was maximum and its changes throughout gestation, provided more information about the mechanism of coupling and its latency. Experimental results based on fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) and maternal ECG showed the evidence of coupling for 62 out of 65 healthy mothers and fetuses in each direction, by statistically validating against the surrogate pairs. The fetuses were divided into three gestational age groups: early (16-25 weeks), mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation. The maximum TE from maternal to fetal heart rate significantly increased from early to mid gestation, while the coupling delay on both directions decreased significantly from mid to late gestation. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information about the changes in fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being.

  8. Role of feedback in voluntary control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, S B; Levenson, R W; Hinrichsen, J J; Gryll, S L

    1975-06-01

    The relative effectiveness of biofeedback techniques on the voluntary control of heart rate was examined by randomly assigning 32 Ss to one of four feedback conditions in a bi-directional heart-rate control task: (1) no feedback, (2) binary feedback--S was signaled when an interbeat interval had changed in the correct direction, (3) "real-time," proportional feedback--S was provided information about the relative duration of successive interbeat intervals, and (4) numerical, proportional feedback--each interbeat interval was represented as a numeral indicating its relationship to pre-trial mean by direction and magnitude. Significant over-all heart-rate changes were evidenced for both increase and decrease directions, but no differences were found between the feedback conditions. While these data suggest that feedback may be a relatively insignificant factor in voluntary heart-rate control, it was recommended that further investigation examine the role of feedback within the context of other training, mediating and motivational variables.

  9. Relationship between SCR, heart rate and information processing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, de J.H.; Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the amount of information processing in concept learning (CL) and autonomic physiological activity as measured by skin conductance response (SCR). Heart rate (HR) was also measured. Two conceptual rules were used: a conjunctive and an i

  10. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  11. High-intensity intermittent exercise and its effects on heart rate variability and subsequent strength performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Leme Gonçalves Panissa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PRUPOSE: To investigate the effects of a 5-km high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE on heart rate variability (HRV and subsequent strength performance. METHODS: nine trained males performed a control session composed of a half-squat strength exercise (4 x 80% of one repetition maximum – 1RM in isolation and 30-min, 1-, 4-, 8- and 24-h after an HIIE (1-min at the velocity peak:1-min passive recovery. All experimental sessions were performed on different days. The maximum number of repetitions and total weight lifted during the strength exercise were registered in all conditions; in addition, prior to each session, HRV were assessed [beat-to-beat intervals (RR and log-transformed of root means square of successive differences in the normal-to-normal intervals (lnRMSSD]. RESULTS: Performance in the strength exercise dropped at 30-min (31% and 1-h (19% post-HIIE concomitantly with lower values of RR (781±79 ms; 799±134 ms, respectively in the same recovery intervals compared to the control (1015±197 ms. Inferential analysis did not detect any effect of condition on lnRMSSD, however, values were lower after 30-min (3.5±0.4 ms and 1-h (3.3±0.5 ms with moderate and large effect sizes (0.9 and 1.2, respectively compared with the control condition (3.9±0.4 ms. CONCLUSION: Both RR and lnRMSSD seem to be associated with deleterious effects on strength performance, although further studies should be conducted to clarify this association.

  12. Heart rate running speed relationships-during exhaustive bouts in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, Gil; Albuisson, Elianne; Bedu, Mario; Chamoux, Alain

    2004-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the heart rate-running speed (HR-RS) relationship while exercising continuously, at high intensities, on a treadmill. The purpose was to precisely measure the magnitude of drop in RS necessary to maintain HR during intense exhaustive exercises, and to determine whether the magnitude of drop in RS is directly dependent on exercise intensity. Sixteen male endurance athletes performed five treadmill tests: an incremental test for maximal O2 uptake and maximum aerobic velocity (VMA), and four exhaustive tests: at 82, 86, 89, and 92 % VMA. After an adaptation period of 3 min, the objective was to stabilise HR by adjusting the treadmill speed continuously by +/- 0.5 km x h(-1) every 30 sec. Attained intensities were: 82 % (+/-6), 84 % +/- (6), 89 % (+/-3), and 90 % (+/-6) VMA, respectively [L1, L2] vs. [L3, L4], p speed showed three phases: an increasing adaptive (AB) phase 0-165 sec with an averaging maximal level of 1.67 m x beat(-1) at 165 sec, a transitional period 170-245 sec, and a decreasing (BC) phase 250-1800 sec with a lower level of 1.29 m .beat(-1) at 1800 sec. In our experimental conditions, for high intensities 82 to 90 % VMA, cardiac drift which disturbed the RS-HR relationship with duration was evaluated: -0.143 km x h(-1) per minute for HR stabilisation. This cardiac drift is a linear function of time. Results suggest that HR and RS are not interchangeable variables for this kind of exercises, and it seems more reliable to gauge exercise intensity using RS than HR.

  13. Effects of functional training on geometric indices of heart rate variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayme Netto Júnior; Bruna M. Cassemiro; Aline Fernanda B. Bernardo; Anne K. França da Silva; Franciele M. Vanderlei; Carlos Marcelo Pastre; Luiz Carlos M. Vanderlei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Geometric methods provide an analysis of autonomic modulation using the geometric properties of the resulting pattern, and represent an interesting tool in the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of functional training on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy young women using the geometric indices of HRV. Methods: Data were analyzed from 29 women, and were stratified into a functional training group (FTG, n = 13; 23.00 ± 2.51 years;21.90 ± 2.82 kg/m2) and a control group (CG, n=16;20.56 ± 1.03 years;22.12 ± 3.86 kg/m2). The FTG received periodized functional training for 12 weeks. The cardiac autonomic modulation of both groups was evaluated before and after this training, and a qualitative analysis was performed using the Poincaré plot. Results: There was a significant increase in the difference of the triangular index (RRTri), SD1, SD2, and RR intervals in the FTG as compared to the CG, and the qualitative analysis from the Poincaré plot showed an increase in the dispersion of beat-to-beat and long-term RR intervals in the functional group after training. No changes were observed in the triangular interpolation of RR interval histogram (TINN) or SD1/SD2. Conclusion: Functional training had a beneficial impact on autonomic modulation, as characterized by increased parasympathetic activity and overall variability, thus highlighting the clinical usefulness of this type of training.

  14. Heart rate circadian profile in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilleri, Manuela; Levedianos, Giorgio; Weis, Luca; Gasparoli, Elisabetta; Facchini, Silvia; Biundo, Roberta; Formento-Dojot, Patrizia; Antonini, Angelo

    2014-02-01

    Clinical diagnostic criteria indicate presence of autonomic features as the primary hallmark of Multiple System Atrophy (MSA). However involvement of the autonomic system is also a recognized feature of Parkinson's Disease (PD), yielding a broad clinical overlap between the two diseases. Laboratory assessments may help in the differential diagnosis between PD and MSA. Ambulatory Monitoring of Blood Pressure (AMBP) is a suitable tool to study the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Different studies reported a reduction of physiological BP nocturnal dipping in PD and MSA patients, but failed to identify a distinctive pattern discriminating the two diseases. On the other hand, HR nocturnal behavior has not been exhaustively analyzed. In the present study we compared the profiles of HR circadian rhythm in 61 PD and 19 MSA patients who underwent 24 h AMBP. We found higher nocturnal HR (nHR) (71.5 beats/min ± 7.4) in MSA compared with PD (63.8 beats/min ± 9.6) as well as significantly lower nocturnal decline of HR (ndHR) in MSA (7.3% ± 8.2) vs. PD (14% ± 7.5). At a Receiver Operating Curve analysis nHR and ndHR significantly discriminated MSA from PD. nHR showed a sensitivity of 84.2% and a specificity of 62.3% (AUC 0.76; 95% IC 0.65-0.85); ndHR showed a sensitivity of 68% of and a specificity of 77% (AUC 0.72; 95% IC 0.61-0.82). According to our findings, nHR is increased and ndHR is reduced in MSA compared to PD. Moreover, these two indices discriminate between the two diseases with acceptable accuracy.

  15. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability in the Time Domain in Patients with Recent and Long-Standing Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leonor Rivera

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM affects the cardiovascular response of patients. To study this effect, interbeat intervals (IBI and beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP variability of patients during supine, standing and controlled breathing tests were analyzed in the time domain. Simultaneous noninvasive measurements of IBI and SBP for 30 recently diagnosed and 15 long-standing DM patients were compared with the results for 30 rigorously screened healthy subjects (control. A statistically significant distinction between control and diabetic subjects was provided by the standard deviation and the higher moments of the distributions (skewness, and kurtosis with respect to the median. To compare IBI and SBP for different populations, we define a parameter, α, that combines the variability of the heart rate and the blood pressure, as the ratio of the radius of the moments for IBI and the same radius for SBP. As diabetes evolves, α decreases, standard deviation of the IBI detrended signal diminishes (heart rate signal becomes more "rigid", skewness with respect to the median approaches zero (signal fluctuations gain symmetry, and kurtosis increases (fluctuations concentrate around the median. Diabetes produces not only a rigid heart rate, but also increases symmetry and has leptokurtic distributions. SBP time series exhibit the most variable behavior for recently diagnosed DM with platykurtic distributions. Under controlled breathing, SBP has symmetric distributions for DM patients, while control subjects have non-zero skewness. This may be due to a progressive decrease of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity to the heart and blood vessels as diabetes evolves.

  16. Accuracy of Heart Rate Measurement Using Smartphones During Treadmill Exercise in Male Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of a smartphone application measuring heart rates (HRs), during an exercise and discussed clinical potential of the smartphone application for cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs. Methods Patients with heart disease (14 with myocardial infarction, 2 with angina pectoris) were recruited. Exercise protocol was comprised of a resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and a recovery stage. To measure HR, subjects held smartphone in their hands and put the tip of their index finger on the built-in camera for 1 minute at each exercise stage such as resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage. The smartphones recorded photoplethysmography signal and HR was calculated every heart beat. HR data obtained from the smartphone during the exercise protocol was compared with the HR data obtained from a Holter electrocardiography monitor (control). Results In each exercise protocol stage (resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and the recovery stage), the HR averages obtained from a Holter monitor were 76.40±12.73, 113.09±14.52, 115.64±15.15, and 81.53±13.08 bpm, respectively. The simultaneously measured HR averages obtained from a smartphone were 76.41±12.82, 112.38±15.06, 115.83±15.36, and 81.53±13 bpm, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) was 1.00 (1.00–1.00), 0.99 (0.98–0.99), 0.94 (0.83–0.98), and 1.00 (0.99–1.00) in resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the HRs measured by either device at each stage (p>0.05). Conclusion The accuracy of measured HR from a smartphone was almost overlapped with the measurement from the Holter monitor in resting stage and recovery stage. However, we observed that the measurement error increased as the exercise intensity increased. PMID:28289645

  17. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD). The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV) can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arr...

  18. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Åström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1–3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  19. Heart rate variability in infants with West syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michelle Mai; Høgenhaven, Hans; Uldall, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    with WS the heart rate variability (HRV) was investigated by examining time- and frequency-domain parameters of HRV at the time of the diagnosis of hypsarrhythmia and compared to 22 age-matched controls. For the WS patients the same dataset was obtained and compared again at the end of the study period......PURPOSE: West syndrome (WS) is a severe age-related acute epileptic encephalopathy of infancy characterized by infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia and psychomotor delay. The aim of this study was to investigate if patients with WS had an altered autonomic output to the heart. METHODS: In 23 patients......-Whitney's U-Test) in the awake state, indicating an abnormal autonomic output to the heart. Comparing the initial to the final examination demonstrated a significant increase in the HRV parameters SDNN (31.3ms) and total power (757ms(2); p=0.001 and p=0.013, Wilcoxon Signed Ranked Test). In addition...

  20. Association of Diabetes Related Complications with Heart Rate Variability among a Diabetic Population in the UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Al-Angari, Haitham M.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Safar, Habiba S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular, macrovascular and neurological complications are the key causes of morbidity and mortality among type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of cardiac autonomic function of diabetic patients in relation to three types of diabetes-related complications. ECG recordings were collected and analyzed from 169 T2DM patients in supine position who were diagnosed with nephropathy (n = 55), peripheral neuropathy (n = 64) and retinopathy (n = 106) at two hospitals in the UAE. Comparison between combinations of patients with complications and a control diabetic group (CONT) with no complication (n = 34) was performed using time, frequency and multi-lag entropy measures of heart rate variability (HRV). The results show that these measures decreased significantly (p<0.05) depending on the presence and type of diabetic complications. Entropy, (median, 1st- 3rd interquartile range) for the group combining all complications (1.74,1.37–2.09) was significantly lower than the corresponding values for the CONT group (1.77, 1.39–2.24) with lag-1 for sequential beat-to-beat changes. Odds ratios (OR) from the entropy analysis further demonstrated a significantly higher association with the combination of retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy versus CONT (OR: 1.42 at lag 8) and an even OR for the combination of retinopathy and nephropathy (OR: 2.46 at lag 8) compared to the other groups with complications. Also, the OR of low frequency power to high frequency power ratio (LF/HF) showed a higher association with these diabetic-related complications compared to CONT, especially for the patient group combining all complications (OR: 4.92). This study confirms that the type of microvascular or peripheral neuropathy complication present in T2DM patients have different effects on heart rate entropy, implying disorders of multi-organ connectivity are directly associated with autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Clinical

  1. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  2. Clinical study of acupuncture combined with medicine in the treatment of coronary heart disease complicated with ven-tricular premature beat%针药结合治疗冠心病复杂性室性早搏的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莘桃; 谭小华; 周全; 马俐; 朱文红; 陆青研; 谢月萍; 吴曙粤

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of acupuncture and medicine combined treatment on coronary heart disease (CHD)complicated with complex ventricular premature beat,and thus provide a new way of significant effect,safe,convenient operation and no adverse reactions for the clinical treatment of coronary heart disease complicated with ventricular premature beat. Methods Ninety-nine coronary heart disease patients complicated with complex ventricular premature beat were divided into Wenxin granule plus acupuncture treatment group,Wenxin granule group and acupuncture group. Patients were all deactivated other antiarrhythmic drugs,but still accepted treatment for primary disease drugs. The three groups were treated for 1 month,the clinical symptoms,electrocardiogram and dynamic electrocardiogram,liver and kidney function were observed. Results The treatment effect of Wenxin granule plus acupuncture treatment group was significantly better than that of Wenxin granule group and acupuncture group,the total effective rate was 90. 9% ;the effect of Wenxin granule group was better than that of acupuncture group,and the effective rate was 63. 6% . Before and after treatment,the effect had significant difference in the Wenxin granule plus acupuncture treatment group and Wenxin granule group(P 0. 05). After treatment,the 24 h dynamic electrocardiogram of ventricular premature beat reduce number of Wenxin granule plus acupuncture treatment group was better than that of Wenxin granule group(P 0.05)。治疗后,24 h 动态心电图室性早搏减少数针药组大于稳心组( P <0.05)及针刺组(P <0.01),且稳心组治疗后24 h 动态心电图室性早搏减少数大于针刺组(P <0.01)。结论针药结合治疗冠心病复杂性室性早搏的效果优于单用药物治疗或针刺治疗,单用药物治疗的结果优于单用针刺治疗。

  3. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen facilitation of baroreflex heart rate responses in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Xue, Baojian; Newton, Leslie G; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen facilitates baroreflex heart rate responses evoked by intravenous infusion of ANG II and phenylephrine (PE) in ovariectomized female mice. The present study aims to identify the estrogen receptor subtype involved in mediating these effects of estrogen. Baroreflex responses to PE, ANG II, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were tested in intact and ovariectomized estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) with (OvxE+) or without (OvxE-) estrogen replacement. Wild-type (WT) females homozygous for the ERalpha(+/+) were used as controls. Basal mean arterial pressures (MAP) and heart rates were comparable in all the groups except the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. This group had significantly smaller resting MAP, suggesting an effect of estrogen on resting vascular tone possibly mediated by the ERbeta subtype. Unlike the WT females, estrogen did not facilitate baroreflex heart rate responses to either PE or ANG II in the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. The slope of the line relating baroreflex heart rate decreases with increases in MAP evoked by PE was comparable in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-6.97 +/- 1.4 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1)) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+ (-6.18 +/- 1.3) mice. Likewise, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardic responses to ANG II was similar in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-3.87 +/- 0.5) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+(-2.60 +/- 0.5) females. Data suggest that estrogen facilitation of baroreflex responses to PE and ANG II is predominantly mediated by ERalpha subtype. A second important observation in the present study is that the slope of ANG II-induced baroreflex bradycardia is significantly blunted compared with PE in the intact as well as the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ females. We have previously reported that this ANG II-mediated blunting of cardiac baroreflexes is observed only in WT males and not in ovariectomized WT females independent of their estrogen replacement status. The present data suggest that in females lacking ERalpha, ANG II causes blunting of cardiac baroreflexes similar to males and may be

  4. Management of cardiopulmonary bypass for open heart surgery with beating heart%心脏跳动下心内直视手术的体外循环管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宗英; 马瑞彦; 肖颖彬; 刘梅; 彭莉; 胡卫

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the management melhods of cardiopulmonary bypass ( CPB) for palienls underwent open heart surgery with healing heart. Methods The CPB management melhods for 2 290 palienls underwenl open heart surgery with healing heart were summed-up. The left heart venling was established during the surgery and inlegraled sequelial de-airing procedure was conducted al the end of the surgery. The temperalure of nasopharynx was mainlained between 30 ~32 ℃, hemalocril was kept between 20% ~30% and the flow was controlled belween 2.4 ~3. 2 L·m-1· min-2 . Α-stat blood gas strategies were applied, meanwhile conventional ullrafilltration or modified ul-trafillralion was performed according to the condition. Results CPB went sucessful in all cases, the CPB time was 22 ~ 179 minules. Ventricular fibrillation was occurred in 256 cases and 181 cases experienced automatic recovery to healing. There were 22 cases died including 15 cases of complex congenital heart disease and 7 cases of severe valvular heart disease. No complication correlated wilh perfusion was oberved. Conclusion Open heart sugery wilh beating heart under mild hypothermia by cardiopulmonary bypass is safe and feasible, meanwhile it is easy for management and il can effectively prevenl ischemia reperfusion injury.%目的 探讨心脏跳动下心内直视手术中体外循环的管理方法.方法 总结分析2 290例心脏跳动下行心内直视手术的体外循环管理方法.术中均常规建立左心引流,术毕采用综合序贯排气技术.转流中鼻咽温维持在30~32 ℃,红细胞压积维持在20%~30%,流量控制在2.4~3.2 L·m-1·min-2,采用α稳态血气管理方法,术中酌情行常规超滤或改良超滤.结果 全组体外循环均顺利停机,转流时间22~179 min.术中室颤256例,其中181例自动复跳.全组死亡22例,其中复杂先天性心脏病15例,重症瓣膜病7例.全组无体外循环气栓并发症.结论 浅低温体外循环方法在心脏跳动

  5. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate...

  6. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were dete

  7. Heart rate reduction for 36 months with ivabradine reduces left ventricular mass in cardiac allograft recipients: a long-term follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doesch AO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Andreas O Doesch,1 Susanne Mueller,1 Christian Erbel,1 Christian A Gleissner,1 Lutz Frankenstein,1 Stefan Hardt,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Thomas Dengler,3 Hugo A Katus1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 3SLK Plattenwald Hospital, Bad Friedrichshall, Germany Background: Due to graft denervation, sinus tachycardia is a common problem after heart transplantation, underlining the importance of heart rate control without peripheral effects. However, long-term data regarding the effects of ivabradine, a novel If channel antagonist, are limited in patients after heart transplantation. Methods: In this follow-up analysis, the resting heart rate, left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area (LVMI, tolerability, and safety of ivabradine therapy were evaluated at baseline and after 36 months in 30 heart transplant recipients with symptomatic sinus tachycardia versus a matched control group. Results: During the study period, ivabradine medication was stopped in three patients (10% of total. Further analysis was based on 27 patients with 36 months of drug intake. The mean patient age was 53.3±11.3 years and mean time after heart transplantation was 5.0±4.8 years. After 36 months, the mean ivabradine dose was 12.0±3.4 mg/day. Resting heart rate was reduced from 91.0±10.7 beats per minute before initiation of ivabradine therapy (ie, baseline to 81.2±9.8 beats per minute at follow-up (P=0.0006. After 36 months of ivabradine therapy, a statistically significant reduction of LVMI was observed (104.3±22.7 g at baseline versus 93.4±18.4 g at follow-up, P=0.002. Hematologic, renal, and liver function parameters remained stable during ivabradine therapy. Except for a lower mycophenolate mofetil dose at follow-up (P=0.02, no statistically significant changes in immunosuppressive drug dosage or blood levels were detected. No phosphenes were observed during 36 months of

  8. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Wearable Device for Monitoring Heart Rates in Hospital Inpatients: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Ryan R; Boyd, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Background As the sensing capabilities of wearable devices improve, there is increasing interest in their application in medical settings. Capabilities such as heart rate monitoring may be useful in hospitalized patients as a means of enhancing routine monitoring or as part of an early warning system to detect clinical deterioration. Objective To evaluate the accuracy of heart rate monitoring by a personal fitness tracker (PFT) among hospital inpatients. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 stable patients in the intensive care unit who each completed 24 hours of heart rate monitoring using a wrist-worn PFT. Accuracy of heart rate recordings was compared with gold standard measurements derived from continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring. The accuracy of heart rates measured by pulse oximetry (Spo2.R) was also measured as a positive control. Results On a per-patient basis, PFT-derived heart rate values were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring (average bias of −1.14 beats per minute [bpm], with limits of agreement of 24 bpm). By comparison, Spo2.R recordings produced more accurate values (average bias of +0.15 bpm, limits of agreement of 13 bpm, P<.001 as compared with PFT). Personal fitness tracker device performance was significantly better in patients in sinus rhythm than in those who were not (average bias −0.99 bpm vs −5.02 bpm, P=.02). Conclusions Personal fitness tracker–derived heart rates were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring in real-world testing and not as accurate as Spo2.R-derived heart rates. Performance was worse among patients who were not in sinus rhythm. Further clinical evaluation is indicated to see if PFTs can augment early warning systems in hospitals. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02527408; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02527408 (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6kOFez3on) PMID:27651304

  9. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose–response relation. Results: We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01–1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02–1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12–1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06–1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17–1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate ( 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93–1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19–1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98–1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98–1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93–1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94–1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12–1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39–1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Interpretation: Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies concerning general populations, resting

  10. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Furthermore, we investigated whether autonomic mechanisms stimulated by chronic baroreflex activation and renal denervation-current therapies in patients with resistant hypertension, who are commonly obese-restore cardiovascular dynamic control. Increases in body weight to ∼150% of control led to a gradual increase in mean arterial pressure to 17 ± 3 mmHg above control (100 ± 2 mmHg) after 4 wk on the high-fat diet. In contrast to the gradual increase in arterial pressure, tachycardia, attenuated chronotropic baroreflex responses, and reduced heart rate variability were manifest within 1-4 days on high-fat intake, reaching 130 ± 4 beats per minute (bpm) (control = 86 ± 3 bpm) and ∼45% and therapy may reduce the risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias as well as lower arterial pressure.

  11. Protective effects of L-arginine against ischemia-reper fusion injur y in non-heart beating rat liver graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Gong; Xue-Jun Lao; Shui-Jun Zhang; Shi Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the use of non-heart beating donors (NHBDs) could bridge the widening gap between organ demand and supply, its application to liver transplantation is limited due to the high incidence of primary graft loss. Prevention of liver injury in NHBDs will beneift the results of transplantation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of L-arginine on liver grafts from NHBDs. METHODS: One hundred and four Wistar rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: normal control (n=8), controls 1, 2 and 3 (C1, C2, C3, n=16), and experimental 1, 2 and 3 (E1, E2, E3, n=16). For groups C1 and E1, C2 and E2, and C3 and E3, the warm ischemia time was 0, 30, and 45 minutes, respectively. Liver grafts were lfushed with and preserved in 4 ℃ Euro-collins solution containing 1 mmol/L L-arginine for 1 hour in each experimental group. Recipients of each experimental group were injected with L-arginine (10 mg/kg body weight) by tail vein 10 minutes before portal vein reperfusion. Donors and recipients of each experimental control group were treated with normal saline. Then transplantation was performed. At 1, 3, and 24 hours after portal vein reperfusion, blood samples were obtained to determine the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), nitric oxide (NO) and plasma endothelin (ET). At 3 hours after portal vein reperfusion, grafts samples were ifxed in 2.5%glutaraldehyde for electron microscopic observation. RESULTS: At 1 hour after portal vein reperfusion, the levels of NO in groups E1, E2, E3 and C1, C2, C3 were lower, while the levels of plasma ET, serum ALT and AST were higher than those in the normal control group (P CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance between NO and ET plays an important role in the development of ischemia-reperfusion injury of liver grafts from NHBDs. L-arginine can attenuate injury in liver grafts from NHBDs by improving the balance between NO and ET.

  12. Low Cost Heart Rate Monitor Using Led-Led Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mahrous Ragib

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A high sensitivity, low power and low cost sensor has been developed for photoplethysmography (PPG measurement. The PPG principle was applied to follow the dilatation and contraction of skin blood vessels during the cardiac cycle. A standard light emitting diodes (LEDs has been used as a light emitter and detector, and in order to reduce the space, cost and power, the classical analogue-to-digital converters (ADCs replaced by the pulse-based signal conversion techniques. A general purpose microcontroller has been used for the implementation of measurement protocol. The proposed approach leads to better spectral sensitivity, increased resolution, reduction in cost, dimensions and power consumption. The basic sensing configuration presented is capable of detecting the PPG signal from a finger or toe, and it is very simple to extract the heart rate and heart rate variability from such a signal.

  13. Qigong Effects on Heart Rate Variability and Peripheral Vasomotor Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Ying

    2015-11-01

    Population aging is occurring worldwide, and preventing cardiovascular event in older people is a unique challenge. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 12-week qigong (eight-form moving meditation) training program on the heart rate variability and peripheral vasomotor response of middle-aged and elderly people in the community. This was a quasi-experimental study that included the pre-test, post-test, and nonequivalent control group designs. Seventy-seven participants (experimental group = 47; control group = 30) were recruited. The experimental group performed 30 min of eight-form moving meditation 3 times per week for 12 weeks, and the control group continued their normal daily activities. After 12 weeks, the interaction effects indicated that compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited significantly improved heart rate variability and peripheral vasomotor responses.

  14. Linear and Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability Indexes in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buccelletti Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological organisms have intrinsic control systems that act in response to internal and external stimuli maintaining homeostasis. Human heart rate is not regular and varies in time and such variability, also known as heart rate variability (HRV, is not random. HRV depends upon organism's physiologic and/or pathologic state. Physicians are always interested in predicting patient's risk of developing major and life-threatening complications. Understanding biological signals behavior helps to characterize patient's state and might represent a step toward a better care. The main advantage of signals such as HRV indexes is that it can be calculated in real time in noninvasive manner, while all current biomarkers used in clinical practice are discrete and imply blood sample analysis. In this paper HRV linear and nonlinear indexes are reviewed and data from real patients are provided to show how these indexes might be used in clinical practice.

  15. Association between oral variables and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; de Souza, Ana Cecilia Amorim; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2013-12-27

    The heart rate variability is a useful method to assess cardiac autonomic modulation in patients undergoing dental procedures, because knowledge of physiological conditions provides greater security to the professional as well as the possibility of a better plan treatment to patient benefit. The aim of our study was to describe the association between cardiac autonomic control and dental variables. We consulted the databases Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane, using the terms "autonomic", "dentistry", "heart rate variability", "cardiovascular physiology." The selected studies indicated a strong relationship between dental variables and HRV. There was an association between malocclusion, TMD, dental procedures cirugia and low HRV. Thus, they become more studies that relate to HRV in dental science, especially in clinical practice.

  16. An open source tool for heart rate variability spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Liñares, L; Méndez, A J; Lado, M J; Olivieri, D N; Vila, X A; Gómez-Conde, I

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we describe a software package for developing heart rate variability analysis. This package, called RHRV, is a third party extension for the open source statistical environment R, and can be freely downloaded from the R-CRAN repository. We review the state of the art of software related to the analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Based upon this review, we motivate the development of an open source software platform which can be used for developing new algorithms for studying HRV or for performing clinical experiments. In particular, we show how the RHRV package greatly simplifies and accelerates the work of the computer scientist or medical specialist in the HRV field. We illustrate the utility of our package with practical examples.

  17. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrer, Paul M.; Richard eGevirtz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer ...

  18. Heart rate variability is reduced during acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chenxi; Alamili, Mahdi; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to report the trajectory of heart rate variability (HRV) indices during a low-grade acute inflammation and their associations to biomarkers for infection. METHODS: Twelve patients with uncomplicated acute diverticulitis completed this observational study...... inflammatory involvement in the observed HRV alterations. CONCLUSION: We found substantial HRV depression in relation to acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, and this was associated with the elevated CRP levels....

  19. The effects of hypnosis on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Ramazan; Ozcan, Osman; Dane, Senol

    2013-01-01

    Uslu et al. (2012 ) suggested that hypnotic status can modulate cerebral blood flow. The authors investigated the effects of hypnosis on heart rate variability (HRV). In women, HRV decreased during hypnosis. Posthypnotic values were higher compared to prehypnotic and hypnotic values. Women had highest HRV parameters in the posthypnotic condition. It appears that hypnosis can produce cardiac and cognitive activations. Hypnotherapy may be useful in some cardiac clinical conditions characterized by an autonomic imbalance or some cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. Stress Detection Using Low Cost Heart Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Salai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The automated detection of stress is a central problem for ambient assisted living solutions. The paper presents the concepts and results of two studies targeted at stress detection with a low cost heart rate sensor, a chest belt. In the device validation study (n=5, we compared heart rate data and other features from the belt to those measured by a gold standard device to assess the reliability of the sensor. With simple synchronization and data cleaning algorithm, we were able to select highly (>97% correlated, low average error (2.2% data segments of considerable length from the chest data for further processing. The protocol for the clinical study (n=46 included a relax phase followed by a phase with provoked mental stress, 10 minutes each. We developed a simple method for the detection of the stress using only three time-domain features of the heart rate signal. The method produced accuracy of 74.6%, sensitivity of 75.0%, and specificity of 74.2%, which is impressive compared to the performance of two state-of-the-art methods run on the same data. Since the proposed method uses only time-domain features, it can be efficiently implemented on mobile devices.

  1. Characteristics of resonance in heart rate variability stimulated by biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschillo, Evgeny G; Vaschillo, Bronya; Lehrer, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    As we previously reported, resonant frequency heart rate variability biofeedback increases baroreflex gain and peak expiratory flow in healthy individuals and has positive effects in treatment of asthma patients. Biofeedback readily produces large oscillations in heart rate, blood pressure, vascular tone, and pulse amplitude via paced breathing at the specific natural resonant frequency of the cardiovascular system for each individual. This paper describes how resonance properties of the cardiovascular system mediate the effects of heart rate variability biofeedback. There is evidence that resonant oscillations can train autonomic reflexes to provide therapeutic effect. The paper is based on studies described in previous papers. Here, we discuss the origin of the resonance phenomenon, describe our procedure for determining an individual's resonant frequency, and report data from 32 adult asthma patients and 24 healthy adult subjects, showing a negative relationship between resonant frequency and height, and a lower resonant frequency in men than women, but no relationship between resonant frequency and age, weight, or presence of asthma. Resonant frequency remains constant across 10 sessions of biofeedback training. It appears to be related to blood volume.

  2. Poincare indices for analyzing meditative heart rate signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Goshvarpour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poincare plots are commonly used to study the nonlinear behavior of physiologic signals. The aim of this study is to evaluate the Poincare plot indices of human heart rate signals during meditation. Methods: For this purpose, heart rate time series of eight Chi meditators available in Physionet database were used. Poincare plots with lags of 1 and 6 were constructed, and the ratio of the minor axis to major axis (SD1/SD2 and the area of Poincare plots were calculated for each lag. Results: The results show that the SD1/SD2 ratio increased significantly during meditation compared to that before meditation, especially the index measured from Poincare plots reconstructed with a lag of 6 (p < 0.05. In addition, in both lags, the area of Poincare plots decreased significantly during meditation compared to before meditation (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The comparative dynamic measures of the Poincare plot indices during and before meditation give more insight of the heart rate signals in a specific psychophysiological state.

  3. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  4. Assessing heart rate variability through wavelet-based statistical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowiak, Mark P; Hay, Dean C; Johnson, Michel J

    2016-10-01

    Because of its utility in the investigation and diagnosis of clinical abnormalities, heart rate variability (HRV) has been quantified with both time and frequency analysis tools. Recently, time-frequency methods, especially wavelet transforms, have been applied to HRV. In the current study, a complementary computational approach is proposed wherein continuous wavelet transforms are applied directly to ECG signals to quantify time-varying frequency changes in the lower bands. Such variations are compared for resting and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) conditions using statistical and information-theoretic measures, and compared with standard HRV metrics. The latter confirm the expected lower variability in the LBNP condition due to sympathetic nerve activity (e.g. RMSSD: p=0.023; SDSD: p=0.023; LF/HF: p=0.018). Conversely, using the standard Morlet wavelet and a new transform based on windowed complex sinusoids, wavelet analysis of the ECG within the observed range of heart rate (0.5-1.25Hz) exhibits significantly higher variability, as measured by frequency band roughness (Morlet CWT: p=0.041), entropy (Morlet CWT: p=0.001), and approximate entropy (Morlet CWT: p=0.004). Consequently, this paper proposes that, when used with well-established HRV approaches, time-frequency analysis of ECG can provide additional insights into the complex phenomenon of heart rate variability.

  5. Experimental heart rate regulation in cycle-ergometer exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Michele; Pietrosanti, Stefano; Scalzi, Stefano; Tomei, Patrizio; Verrelli, Cristiano Maria

    2013-01-01

    The heart rate can be effectively used as a measure of the exercise intensity during long duration cycle-ergometer exercises: precisely controlling the heart rate (HR) becomes crucial especially for athletes or patients with cardiovascular/obesity problems. The aim of this letter is to experimentally show how the nonlocal and nonswitching nonlinear control that has been recently proposed in the literature for the HR regulation in treadmill exercises can be effectively applied to cycle-ergometer exercises at constant cycling speed. The structure of the involved nonlinear model for the HR dynamics in cycle-ergometer exercises is mathematically inspired by the structure of a recently identified and experimentally validated nonlinear model for the HR dynamics in treadmill exercises: the role played by the treadmill speed is played here by the work load while the zero speed case for the treadmill exercise is here translated into the cycling operation under zero work load. Experimental results not only validate the aforementioned nonlinear model but also demonstrate the effectiveness--in terms of precise HR regulation--of an approach which simply generalizes to the nonlinear framework the classical proportional-integral control design. The possibility of online modifying the HR reference on the basis of the heart rate variability (HRV) is also suggested and experimentally motivated.

  6. Introducing a novel mechanism to control heart rate in the ancestral Pacific hagfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher M; Roa, Jinae N; Cox, Georgina K; Tresguerres, Martin; Farrell, Anthony P

    2016-10-15

    Although neural modulation of heart rate is well established among chordate animals, the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) lacks any cardiac innervation, yet it can increase its heart rate from the steady, depressed heart rate seen in prolonged anoxia to almost double its normal normoxic heart rate, an almost fourfold overall change during the 1-h recovery from anoxia. The present study sought mechanistic explanations for these regulatory changes in heart rate. We provide evidence for a bicarbonate-activated, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC)-dependent mechanism to control heart rate, a mechanism never previously implicated in chordate cardiac control.

  7. Aerobic and anaerobic profiles, heart rate and match analysis in older soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Antonio; Meeusen, Romain; Tiberi, Monica; Cortis, Cristina; Pagano, Rita; Capranica, Laura

    The aim of the present study was to provide aerobic (maximal oxygen consumption--VO2max) and anaerobic [jump tests: counter-movement jump (CMJ) and bounce jump (BJ); and running tests: 10 m sprint and 10 m dribbling the ball (10 mDB)] profiles of older soccer players (n = 12), and heart rate (HR), blood lactate accumulation (La) and match analysis (individual motor activity and team behaviour) aspects of a soccer match. The maximal aerobic test values were: HRmax, 154 +/- 14 beat min(-1); maximal power, 160 +/- 24 W; VO2peak, 36.3 +/- 11.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1); peak La, 8.2 +/- 1.8 mM. Jump test values were: CMJ, 21.2 +/- 4.5 cm; BJ, 17.3 +/- 4.8 cm. Running performances were: 10 m sprint, 2.06 +/- 0.36 s; 10 mDB, 2.17 +/- 0.21 s. Running showed similar values in the two halves (first half, 82%; second half, 88%), while walking lasted longer during the second half. Regarding the technical aspects of the match, 42% of the consecutive passes made in possession of the ball exceeded three passes, indicating that their play was structured in a cooperative manner. Older soccer players succeeded in maintaining good aerobic and anaerobic physical capability.

  8. Abnormal heart rate recovery and chronotropic incompetence on exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mansi; Bansal, Vishal; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2013-08-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI; failure to reach the targeted heart rate (HR) on exercise) and a delayed HR recovery (HRR; ≤12 beats decline within the first minute after cessation) reflect autonomic dysfunction (AD) and predict adverse cardiac prognosis. As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is known to be associated with AD, we hypothesized that these patients may manifest these responses on exercise. The prevalence and predictors of these responses in COPD and their association with its severity have not been evaluated. Normoxemic, stable male patients with COPD (n = 39) and 11 healthy controls underwent lung function testing and incremental leg ergometry. HR responses were monitored during exercise and recovery to compute the HRR and CI. Of all the patients, 33 (84.6%) had at least one of the two exercise responses as abnormal, with the majority (23, 58.9%) having both an abnormal HRR and CI. The frequency of abnormal responses increased with increasing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage and body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity index. After adjusting for smoking history and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second, only a reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide predicted abnormal HRR, though weakly. We concluded that abnormal HRR and CI are common in patients with COPD. These responses are observed with increasing frequency as the severity of disease increases.

  9. Heart rate dynamics in patients with stable angina pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Ristimae, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic analysis techniques may uncover abnormalities in heart rate (HR) behavior that are not easily detectable with conventional statistical measures. However, the applicability of these new methods for detecting possible abnormalities in HR behavior in various cardiovascular disorders is not well established. Conventional measures of HR variability were compared with short-term ( 11 beats, alpha2) fractal correlation properties and with approximate entropy of RR interval data in 38 patients with stable angina pectoris without previous myocardial infarction or cardiac medication at the time of the study and 38 age-matched healthy controls. The short- and long-term fractal scaling exponents (alpha1, alpha2) were significantly higher in the coronary patients than in the healthy controls (1.34 +/- 0.15 vs 1.11 +/- 0.12 [p angina pectoris have altered fractal properties and reduced complexity in their RR interval dynamics relative to age-matched healthy subjects. Dynamic analysis may complement traditional analyses in detecting altered HR behavior in patients with stable angina pectoris.

  10. Heart rate and oxygen demand of powered exoskeleton–assisted walking in persons with paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Asselin, MS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, persons with paralysis have limited options for overground ambulation. Recently, powered exoskeletons, which are systems that translate the user’s body movements to activate motors that move the lower limbs through a predetermined gait pattern, have become available. As part of an ongoing clinical study (NCT01454570, eight nonambulatory persons with paraplegia were trained to ambulate with a powered exoskeleton. Measurements of oxygen uptake (VO2 and heart rate (HR were recorded for 6 min each during each maneuver while sitting, standing, and walking. The average value of VO2 during walking (11.2 +/– 1.7 mL/kg/min was significantly higher than for sitting and standing (3.5 +/– 0.4 and 4.3 +/– 0.9 mL/kg/min, respectively; p < 0.001. The HR response during walking was significantly greater than that of either sitting or standing (118 +/– 21 vs 70 +/– 10 and 81 +/– 12 beats per minute, respectively; p < 0.001. Persons with paraplegia were able to ambulate efficiently using the powered exoskeleton for overground ambulation, providing the potential for functional gain and improved fitness.

  11. Measures of skin conductance and heart rate in alcoholic men and women during memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayle S. Sawyer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined abnormalities in physiological responses to emotional stimuli associated with long-term chronic alcoholism. Skin conductance responses (SCR and heart rate (HR responses were measured in 32 abstinent alcoholic (ALC and 30 healthy nonalcoholic (NC men and women undergoing an emotional memory task in an MRI scanner. The task required participants to remember the identity of two emotionally-valenced faces presented at the onset of each trial during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scanning. After viewing the faces, participants saw a distractor image (an alcoholic beverage, nonalcoholic beverage, or scrambled image followed by a single probe face. The task was to decide whether the probe face matched one of the two encoded faces. Skin conductance measurements (before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe were obtained from electrodes on the index and middle fingers on the left hand. HR measurements (beats per minute before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe were obtained by a pulse oximeter placed on the little finger on the left hand. We expected that, relative to NC participants, the ALC participants would show reduced SCR and HR responses to the face stimuli, and that we would identify greater reactivity to the alcoholic beverage stimuli than to the distractor stimuli unrelated to alcohol. While the beverage type did not differentiate the groups, the ALC group did have reduced skin conductance and HR responses to elements of the task, as compared to the NC group.

  12. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasermann Hans P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation.

  13. Skinfold thickness is related to cardiovascular autonomic control as assessed by heart rate variability and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Williford, Henry N; Olson, Michele S

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) are related to maximal aerobic fitness and selected body composition measurements. Fifty men (age = 21.9 ± 3.0 years, height = 180.8 ± 7.2 cm, weight = 80.4 ± 9.1 kg, volunteered to participate in this study. For each subject, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the sum of skinfolds across the chest, abdomen, and thigh regions (SUMSF) were recorded. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed during a 5-minute period while the subjects rested in a supine position. The following frequency domain parameters of HRV were recorded: normalized high-frequency power (HFnu), and low-frequency to high-frequency power ratio (LF:HF). To determine maximal aerobic fitness (i.e., VO2max), each subject performed a maximal graded exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate recovery was recorded 1 (HRR1) and 2 (HRR2) minutes during a cool-down period. Mean VO2max and BMI for all the subjects were 49.5 ± 7.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) and 24.7 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2), respectively. Although VO2max, WC, and SUMSF was each significantly correlated to HRR and HRV, only SUMSF had a significant independent correlation to HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of the regression procedure showed that SUMSF accounted for the greatest variance in HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, and LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of this study suggest that cardiovascular autonomic modulation is significantly related to maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. However, SUMSF appears to have the strongest independent relationship with HRR and HRV, compared to other body composition parameters and VO2max.

  14. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your heart pumps blood when it beats. Doppler Ultrasound A Doppler ultrasound uses sound waves to measure ... when your heart is working hard and beating fast. During stress testing , you exercise to make your ...

  15. Heart rate variability in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyshlaeva О.М.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to estimate the status of autonomic nervous system in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia by means of the analysis of heart rate variability at various stages of disease. 120 patients with chronic cerebral ischemia aged from 45 to 65 took part in the research. The comparison group included 30 patients with an arterial hypertension and without chronic cerebral ischemia. Heart rate variability analisis included time-domain and frequency-domain methods of five-minute sequence of the electrocardiographic intervals registered in at rest and in or-thostatic probe. The results of research have shown, that autonomic disorders with prevalence of sympathetic nervous system accompany initial implications of chronic cerebral ischemia. The second stage of disease is characterized by depression of activity of both autonomic, and central regulation. The expressed depression of autonomic maintenance of regulation of heart rhythm of both from sympathetic, and from parasympathetic nervous system was observed at the third stage of chronic cerebral ischemia

  16. Ivabradine in acute coronary syndromes: Protection beyond heart rate lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Vetrugno, Vincenzo; Camici, Paolo G; Crea, Filippo

    2017-02-22

    Ivabradine is a heart rate reducing agent that exhibits anti-ischemic effects through the inhibition of funny electrical current in the sinus node resulting in heart rate reduction, thus enabling longer diastolic perfusion time, and reduced myocardial oxygen consumption without detrimental changes in arterial blood pressure, coronary vasomotion, and ventricular contractility. The current guideline-based clinical use of Ivabradine is reserved for patients with stable angina pectoris who cannot tolerate or whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with beta blockers. In patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, Ivabradine has demonstrated beneficial effects in improving clinical outcomes when added to conventional therapy. However, the role of Ivabradine in acute coronary syndromes has not been established. Based on the results from some relevant preclinical studies and a limited amount of clinical data that were reported recently, the role of Ivabradine in acute ischemic events warrants further investigation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the available literature on the potential role of Ivabradine in the clinical context of acute coronary syndromes.

  17. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  18. Autonomic control of heart rate in the adult, aquatic Notophthalmus viridescens viridescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, R B; Bonnet, K M

    1990-01-01

    1. We investigated the role of the autonomic nervous system in the control of the heart rate using an isolated heart preparation. 2. Addition of the parasympathetic blocker, atropine, to the organ bath resulted in an increase in heart rate as expected. 3. Addition of the sympathetic blocker, ergotamine, to the organ bath showed no change in the heart rate. 4. Addition of the sympathetic blocker, propranolol, to the organ bath resulted in the expected decrease in heart rate. 5. Both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems appear to play a role in the control of the heart rate.

  19. Quantitative assessment of Heart Rate Dynamics during meditation: An ECG based study with Multi-fractality and visibility graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban eBhaduri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Abstract: The cardiac dynamics during meditation is explored quantitatively with two chaos-based non-linear techniques viz. multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis and visibility network analysis techniques. The data used are the instantaneous heart rate (in beats/minute of subjects performing Kundalini Yoga and Chi meditation from PhysioNet. The results show consistent differences between the quantitative parameters obtained by both the analysis techniques. This indicates an interesting phenomenon of change in the complexity of the cardiac dynamics during meditation supported with quantitative parameters.The results also produce a preliminary evidence that these techniques can be used as a measure of physiological impact on subjects performing meditation.

  20. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  1. Heart dimensions may influence the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point in highly trained cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, A.; Carvajal, A.; Boraita, A.; Serratosa, L.; Hoyos, J.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the heart rate (HR) response to exercise in 21 highly trained cyclists (mean (SD) age 25 (3) years) was related to their heart dimensions. METHODS: Before performing an incremental exercise test involving a ramp protocol with workload increases of 25 W/min, each subject underwent echocardiographic evaluation of the following variables: left ventricular end diastolic internal diameter (LVIDd), left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end diastole (LVPWTd), interventricular septal wall thickness at end diastole (IVSTd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left atrial dimension (LAD), longitudinal left atrial (LLAD) and right atrial (LRAD) dimensions, and the ratio of early to late (E/A) diastolic flow velocity. RESULTS: The HR response showed a deflection point (HRd) at about 85% VO2MAX in 66.7% of subjects (D group; n = 14) and was linear in 33.3% (NoD group; n = 7). Several echocardiographic variables (LVMI, LAD, LLAD, LRAD) indicative of heart dimensions were similar in each group. However, mean LPWTd (p<0.01) and IVSTd (p<0.05) values were significantly higher in the D group. Finally, no significant difference between groups was found with respect to the E/A. CONCLUSIONS: The HR response is curvilinear during incremental exercise in a considerable number of highly trained endurance athletes-that is, top level cyclists. The departure of HR increase from linearity may predominantly occur in athletes with thicker heart walls. 


 PMID:10597846

  2. The normal range and determinants of the intrinsic heart rate in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opthof, T

    2000-01-01

    Jose and Collison published a study on the normal range and the determinants of intrinsic heart rate in man in Cardiovascular Research in 1970 [Jose AD, Collison D. The normal range and determinants of the intrinsic heart rate in man. Cardiovasc Res 1970; 4: 160-167)]. The intrinsic heart rate is the heart rate under complete pharmacological blockade. They showed that (i) the resting heart rate is lower than the intrinsic heart rate and that (ii) the intrinsic heart rate declines with age. They also established that the variability in intrinsic heart rate between individuals of the same age is of the same order as the effect of ageing at the population level. This update discusses the relevance of these data with emphasis on sinus node function and autonomic balance. The paper of Jose and Collison was cited more than 200 times. The frequency of citation started to increase more than 10 years after publication.

  3. Assessment of image quality of 64-row Dual Source versus Single Source CT coronary angiography on heart rate: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikkers, R. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: r.dikkers@rad.umcg.nl; Greuter, M.J.W. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.w.greuter@rad.umcg.nl; Kristanto, W. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: w.kristanto@rad.umcg.nl; Ooijen, P.M.A. van [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.m.a.van.ooyen@rad.umcg.nl; Sijens, P.E. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.e.sijens@rad.umcg.nl; Willems, T.P. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: t.p.willems@rad.umcg.nl; Oudkerk, M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.oudkerk@rad.umcg.nl

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of temporal resolution on image quality of computed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography by comparing 64-row Dual Source CT (DSCT) and Single Source CT (SSCT) at different heart rates. Methods: An anthropomorphic moving heart phantom was scanned at rest, and at 50 beats per minute (bpm) up to 110 bpm, with intervals of 10 bpm. 3D volume rendered images and curved multi-planar reconstructions (MPRs) were acquired and image quality of the coronary arteries was rated on a 5-points scale (1 = poor image quality with many artefacts, 5 = excellent image quality) for each heart rate and each scanner by 3 observers. Paired sample t-test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test were used to assess clinically relevant differences between both modalities. Results: The mean image quality scores at 70, 100 and 110 bpm were significantly higher for DSCT compared to SSCT. The overall mean image quality scores for DSCT (4.2 {+-} 0.6) and SSCT (3.0 {+-} 1.1) also differed significantly (p < 0.001). Conclusion: These initial results show a clinically relevant overall higher image quality for DSCT compared to SSCT, especially at heart rates of 70, 100 and 110 bpm. With its comparatively high image quality and low radiation dose, DSCT appears to be the method of choice in CT coronary angiography at heart rates above 70 bpm.

  4. Auditory stimulation with music influences the geometric indices of heart rate variability in response to the postural change maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca C. R. de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is poor in the literature the behavior of the geometric indices of heart rate variability (HRV during the musical auditory stimulation. The objective is to investigate the acute effects of classic musical auditory stimulation on the geometric indexes of HRV in women in response to the postural change maneuver (PCM. We evaluated 11 healthy women between 18 and 25 years old. We analyzed the following indices: Triangular index, Triangular interpolation of RR intervals and Poincarι plot (standard deviation of the instantaneous variability of the beat-to beat heart rate [SD1], standard deviation of long-term continuous RR interval variability and Ratio between the short - and long-term variations of RR intervals [SD1/SD2] ratio. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 min. The women quickly stood up from a seated position in up to 3 s and remained standing still for 15 min. HRV was recorded at the following periods: Rest, 0-5 min, 5-10 min and 10-15 min during standing. In the second protocol, the subject was exposed to auditory musical stimulation (Pachelbel-Canon in D for 10 min at seated position before standing position. Shapiro-Wilk to verify normality of data and ANOVA for repeated measures followed by the Bonferroni test for parametric variables and Friedman′s followed by the Dunn′s posttest for non-parametric distributions. In the first protocol, all indices were reduced at 10-15 min after the volunteers stood up. In the protocol musical auditory stimulation, the SD1 index was reduced at 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up compared with the music period. The SD1/SD2 ratio was decreased at control and music period compared with 5-10 min after the volunteers stood up. Musical auditory stimulation attenuates the cardiac autonomic responses to the PCM.

  5. Relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production in Nellore steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, A S; Nascimento, M L; Tullio, R R; Rosa, A N; Alencar, M M; Lanna, D P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production (EHP) in Nellore steers. Eighteen steers were individually lot-fed diets of 2.7 Mcal ME/kg DM for 84 d. Estimated heat production was determined using oxygen pulse (OP) methodology, in which heart rate (HR) was monitored for 4 consecutive days. Oxygen pulse was obtained by simultaneously measuring HR and oxygen consumption during a 10- to 15-min period. Efficiency traits studied were feed efficiency (G:F) and residual feed intake (RFI) obtained by regression of DMI in relation to ADG and midtest metabolic BW (RFI). Alternatively, RFI was also obtained based on equations reported by the NRC's to estimate individual requirement and DMI (RFI calculated by the NRC [1996] equation [RFI]). The slope of the regression equation and its significance was used to evaluate the effect of efficiency indices (RFI, RFI, or G:F) on the traits studied. A mixed model was used considering RFI, RFI, or G:F and pen type as fixed effects and initial age as a covariate. For HR and EHP variables, day was included as a random effect. There was no relationship between efficiency indices and back fat depth measured by ultrasound or daily HR and EHP ( > 0.05). Because G:F is obtained in relation to BW, the slope of G:F was positive and significant ( consumption per beat was not related to G:F; however, it was lower for RFI- and RFI-efficient steers, and consequently, oxygen volume (mL·min·kg) and OP (μL O·beat·kg) were also lower ( 0.05); however, G:F-efficient steers showed lower hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations ( consumption and OP were detected, indicating that the OP methodology may be useful to predict growth efficiency.

  6. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Heart Rate Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mahdavi Anari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested that the autonomic system function and the metabolic syndrome can significantly affect patients' survival. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of the cardiac rehabilitation program on the autonomic system balance in patients with coronary artery disease.Methods: Patients with a previous diagnosis of coronary artery disease who were referred to the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Center of Afshar Hospital (Yazd, Iran between March and November 2011 were enrolled. All the patients participated in rehabilitation sessions 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Heart rate recovery (HRR was measured as an indicator of the autonomic system balance. In order to calculate HRR, the maximum heart rate during the exercise test was recorded. At the end of the exercise test, the patients were asked to sit down without having a cooldown period and their heart rate was recorded again after 1 minute. The difference between these 2 measurements was considered as HRR.Results: A total of 108 patients, including 86 (79.6% men and 22 (20.4% women, completed the rehabilitation course. The mean age of the study participants was 58.25 ± 9.83 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in HRR (p value = 0.040. Significant declines were also observed in the patients' waist circumference (p value < 0.001 and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p value = 0.018 and 0.003, respectively. A decreasing trend was observed in the patients' body mass index, but it failed to reach statistical significance (p value = 0.063. No statistically meaningful changes were noted in fasting blood glucose (p value = 0.171, high-density lipoprotein (p value = 0.070, or triglyceride concentrations (p value = 0.149. Conclusion: The cardiac rehabilitation program may help to improve HRR and several components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease.

  7. A three-lead, programmable, and microcontroller-based electrocardiogram generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying-Chieh; Wei, Ying-Yu; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Young, Ming-Shing

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to design and develop a programmable electrocardiogram (ECG) generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) which can be used to test the efficiency of ECG algorithms and to calibrate and maintain ECG equipment. We simplified and modified the three coupled ordinary differential equations in McSharry's model to a single differential equation to obtain the ECG signal. This system not only allows the signal amplitude, heart rate, QRS-complex slopes, and P- and T-wave position parameters to be adjusted, but can also be used to adjust the very low frequency, low frequency, and high frequency components of HRV frequency domain characteristics. The system can be tuned to function with HRV or not. When the HRV function is on, the average heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 122 beats per minute (BPM) with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. When the HRV function is off, the heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 139 BPM with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. The amplitude of the ECG signal can be set from 0.0 to 330 mV at a resolution of 0.005 mV. These parameters can be adjusted either via input through a keyboard or through a graphical user interface (GUI) control panel that was developed using LABVIEW. The GUI control panel depicts a preview of the ECG signal such that the user can adjust the parameters to establish a desired ECG morphology. A complete set of parameters can be stored in the flash memory of the system via a USB 2.0 interface. Our system can generate three different types of synthetic ECG signals for testing the efficiency of an ECG algorithm or calibrating and maintaining ECG equipment.

  8. A three-lead, programmable, and microcontroller-based electrocardiogram generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying-Chieh; Wei, Ying-Yu; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Young, Ming-Shing

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to design and develop a programmable electrocardiogram (ECG) generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) which can be used to test the efficiency of ECG algorithms and to calibrate and maintain ECG equipment. We simplified and modified the three coupled ordinary differential equations in McSharry's model to a single differential equation to obtain the ECG signal. This system not only allows the signal amplitude, heart rate, QRS-complex slopes, and P- and T-wave position parameters to be adjusted, but can also be used to adjust the very low frequency, low frequency, and high frequency components of HRV frequency domain characteristics. The system can be tuned to function with HRV or not. When the HRV function is on, the average heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 122 beats per minute (BPM) with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. When the HRV function is off, the heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 139 BPM with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. The amplitude of the ECG signal can be set from 0.0 to 330 mV at a resolution of 0.005 mV. These parameters can be adjusted either via input through a keyboard or through a graphical user interface (GUI) control panel that was developed using LABVIEW. The GUI control panel depicts a preview of the ECG signal such that the user can adjust the parameters to establish a desired ECG morphology. A complete set of parameters can be stored in the flash memory of the system via a USB 2.0 interface. Our system can generate three different types of synthetic ECG signals for testing the efficiency of an ECG algorithm or calibrating and maintaining ECG equipment.

  9. Assessing the interaction of respiration and heart rate in heart failure and controls using ambulatory Holter recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigney, Mark; Zareba, Wojceich; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Grasso, Ian; Mortara, David

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a critical component of cardiopulmonary function, but few tools exist to evaluate respiration in ambulatory patients. Holter monitoring allows accurate diagnosis of a host of cardiac issues, and several investigators have demonstrated the ability to detect respiratory effort on the electrocardiogram. In this study we introduce a myogram signal derived from 12-lead, high frequency Holter as a means of detecting respiratory effort. Using the combined myogram and ECG signal, four novel variables were created: total number of Cheyne-Stokes episodes; the BWRatio, the ratio of power (above baseline) measured one second after peak-to-peak respiratory power, an assessment of the "shape" of the respiratory effort; DRR, the change in RR interval centering around peak inspiration; and minutes of synchronized breathing, a fixed ratio of heart beats to respiratory cycles. These variables were assessed in 24-hour recordings from three cohorts: healthy volunteers (n=33), heart failure subjects from the GISSI HF trial (n=383), and subjects receiving implantable defibrillators with severely depressed left ventricular function enrolled in the M2Risk trial (n=470). We observed a statistically significant 6-fold increase in the number of Cheyne-Stokes episodes (p=0.01 by ANOVA), decreases in BWRatio (pHolter-derived respiration can distinguish healthy subjects from heart failure. The utility of these variables for predicting heart failure, arrhythmia, and death risk in prospective studies needs to be assessed.

  10. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  11. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  12. Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013). Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor (Vaschillo et al., 2002; Lehrer et al., 2003). Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  13. Transient suppression of heart rate complexity in concussed athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fountaine, Michael F; Heffernan, Kevin S; Gossett, James D; Bauman, William A; De Meersman, Ronald E

    2009-06-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity (HRC) were calculated at rest and during an isometric hand grip test (IHGT) within 48-hours (48 h) and two weeks (Week Two) of a concussion in athletes (CG) and control subjects. No differences were present at rest or in HRV during IGHT. HRC was significantly lower in the CG compared to controls at 48 h during IHGT. In CG at Week Two during IHGT, HRC was significantly greater than 48 h observations and not significantly different than controls. The findings suggest that HRC may have utility in detecting efferent cardiac autonomic anomalies within two weeks of concussion.

  14. Mechanisms of high heart rate variability: a fresh look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Lukyanchenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is being given herein to some mechanisms of high heart rate variability (high HRV, which cannot be attributed to sports exercise loading. The mechanism responsible for high HRV is explained as that resulted from the continuous performance (opening and closure of arteriovenous anastomoses in different organs and systems in a human organism. An assessment of this phenomenon is given herein from the point of view of a practicing physician who treats regularly patients with already established clinical diagnoses and those without an established nosological profile according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision.

  15. Heart rate variability biofeedback: How and why does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Lehrer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been substantial support for Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement (Gevirtz, 2013. Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the barorecptor (Vashillo, et al, 2002; Lehrer, et al, 2003. Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

  16. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to…

  17. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Trombetta, Ivani Credidio [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE) (Brazil); Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Arap, Marco Antônio [Faculdade de medicina da Universidade de São Paulo - Urologia (Brazil); Negrão, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Escola de Educação Física e Esporte da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Middlekauff, Holly R. [Division of Cardiology - David Geffen School of Medicine - University of California (United States); Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes, E-mail: janieire.alves@incor.usp.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT.

  18. A comparative study of pulse rate variability and heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jih-Sen; Lu, Wan-An; Wu, Kung-Tai; Liu, Margaret; Chen, Gau-Yang; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2012-04-01

    Both heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse rate variability (PRV) are noninvasive means for the assessment of autonomic nervous control of the heart. However, it is not settled whether or not the PRV obtained from either hand can be the surrogate of HRV. The HRV measures obtained from electrocardiographic signals and the PRV measures obtained from the pulse waves recorded from the index fingers of both hands were compared in normal subjects by using linear regression analysis and Bland and Altman method. Highly significant correlations (P < 0.001, 0.89 < r < 1.0) were found between all HRV measures and the corresponding PRV measures of both hands. However, there were insufficient agreements in some measures between pairwise comparisons among HRV, right PRV and left PRV except heart rate and ultra-low frequency power (ULFP). The PRV of either hand is close to, but not the same as the HRV in healthy subjects. The HRV, right PRV and left PRV are not surrogates of one another in normal subjects except heart rate and ULFP. Since HRV is generally accepted as the standard method for the assessment of the autonomic nervous modulation of a subject, the PRV of either hand may not be suitable for the assessment of the cardiac autonomic nervous modulation of the subject.

  19. Extract Multiple Scaling in Long-Term Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    interval record (r(s) (sec) vs. s (x10 3 beat)), (b) the power spectral density function of r(s) (in log-log scale). (c) histogram of Ar(t), t = 4 (in...global methods, such as the power spectral density function or DFA, may be obtained. It should be noted that the current methodology is not able to extract

  20. Effect of methamphetamine dependence on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2012-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use.

  1. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  2. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  3. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Balsamo Gardim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior.DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS. Articles published from January 2003 to February 2013 that enrolled children with 9-12 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus were included in the review.DATA SYNTHESIS: The electronic search resulted in four articles that approached the heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, showing that, in general, these children present decreased global heart rate variability and vagal activity. The practice of physical activity promoted benefits for these individuals.CONCLUSIONS: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus present changes on autonomic modulation, indicating the need for early attention to avoid future complications in this group.

  4. Power Spectral Analysis of Heart Rate Variability of Driver Fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Kun; LI Zeng-yong; CHEN Ming; WANG Cheng-tao

    2005-01-01

    This investigation was to evaluate the driving fatigue based on power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) under vertical vibration. Forty healthy male subjects (29.7±3.5 years) were randomly divided into two groups, Group A (28.8±4.3 years) and Group B (30.6±2.7 years). Group A (experiment group) was required to perform the simulated driving and Group B (control group) kept calm for 90min. The frequency domain indices of HRV such as low frequency (0.040.15 Hz, LF), high frequency (0.15-0.4Hz, HF), LF/HF together with the indices of hemodynamics such as blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) of the subjects between both groups were calculated and analyzed after the simulated driving. There were significances of the former indices between both groups (P<0.05). All the data collected after experiment of Group A was observed the remarkable linear correlation (P<0.05) and parameters and errors of their linear regression equation were stated (α=0.05, P<0.001) in this paper, respectively. The present study investigated that sympathetic activity of the subjects enhanced after the simulated driving while parasympathetic activities decreased. The sympathovagal balance was also improved. As autonomic function indictors of HRV reflected fatigue level, quantitative evaluation of driving mental fatigue from physiological reaction could be possible.

  5. Physiological thermoregulation in a crustacean? Heart rate hysteresis in the freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudkamp, Jacqueline E; Seebacher, Frank; Ahern, Mark; Franklin, Craig E

    2004-07-01

    Differential heart rates during heating and cooling (heart rate hysteresis) are an important thermoregulatory mechanism in ectothermic reptiles. We speculate that heart rate hysteresis has evolved alongside vascularisation, and to determine whether this phenomenon occurs in a lineage with vascularised circulatory systems that is phylogenetically distant from reptiles, we measured the response of heart rate to convective heat transfer in the Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax destructor. Heart rate during convective heating (from 20 to 30 degrees C) was significantly faster than during cooling for any given body temperature. Heart rate declined rapidly immediately following the removal of the heat source, despite only negligible losses in body temperature. This heart rate 'hysteresis' is similar to the pattern reported in many reptiles and, by varying peripheral blood flow, it is presumed to confer thermoregulatory benefits particularly given the thermal sensitivity of many physiological rate functions in crustaceans.

  6. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  7. Contact-free heart rate measurement using multiple video data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pang-Chan; Lee, Kual-Zheng; Tsai, Luo-Wei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a contact-free heart rate measurement method by analyzing sequential images of multiple video data. In the proposed method, skin-like pixels are firstly detected from multiple video data for extracting the color features. These color features are synchronized and analyzed by independent component analysis. A representative component is finally selected among these independent component candidates to measure the HR, which achieves under 2% deviation on average compared with a pulse oximeter in the controllable environment. The advantages of the proposed method include: 1) it uses low cost and high accessibility camera device; 2) it eases users' discomfort by utilizing contact-free measurement; and 3) it achieves the low error rate and the high stability by integrating multiple video data.

  8. A method to detect heart rate based on electrical bio-impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kun-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basic health indicator, heart rate has been widely used in clinical measurement and daily health care. Electrical bio-impedance (EBI measurement provides non-invasive method for heart rate detection. Therefore, this paper proposed a method to detect heart rate based on EBI. With the BIOPAC EBI module, the signal can be de-noised in real-time. Finally, the de-noised EBI signal is used to compute heart rate. Four electrodes are located at radial artery of left upper limb in this method. The result proves that this method has high accuracy on heart rate measurement.

  9. Oxygen Kinetics and Heart Rate Response during Early Recovery from Exercise in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos D. Kriatselis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the post-exercise O2 uptake and heart rate response in patients with heart failure (HF in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods and Results. Exercise testing of all subjects was conducted according to the RITE-protocol. The study subjects were classified according to their peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2 in four groups: healthy individuals with a peak VO2 >22 mL/kg/min (group 1, : 50, and patients with HF and a peak VO2 of 18–22 mL/kg/min, (group 2, : 48, 14–18 mL/kg/min (group 3, : 57, and <14 mL/kg/min (group 4, : 31. Both peak VO2 and HR declined more slowly in the patients with HF than in the normal subjects. Recovery of VO2 and HR followed monoexponential kinetics in the early post-recovery phase. This enabled the determination of a time constant for both HR and VO2 (TC VO2 and TC HR. From group 1 to 4 there was a prolongation of the time constant for VO2 and HR: TC VO2 (group 1: 110±34, group 2: 197±43, group 3: 238±80, and group 4: 278±50 sec, and TC HR (group 1: 148±82, group 2: 290±65, group 3: 320±58, and group 4: 376±55 sec. Conclusion. The rate of decline of VO2 and HR in the early post-exercise phase is inversely related to the peak VO2. The time constant for oxygen uptake (TC VO2 and heart rate (TC HR might prove a useful parameter for more precise monitoring and grading of HF.

  10. A role for BK channels in heart rate regulation in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy L Imlach

    Full Text Available The heart generates and propagates action potentials through synchronized activation of ion channels allowing inward Na(+ and Ca(2+ and outward K(+ currents. There are a number of K(+ channel types expressed in the heart that play key roles in regulating the cardiac cycle. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK ion channels are not thought to be directly involved in heart function. Here we present evidence that heart rate can be significantly reduced by inhibiting the activity of BK channels. Agents that specifically inhibit BK channel activity, including paxilline and lolitrem B, slowed heart rate in conscious wild-type mice by 30% and 42%, respectively. Heart rate of BK channel knock-out mice (Kcnma1(-/- was not affected by these BK channel inhibitors, suggesting that the changes to heart rate were specifically mediated through BK channels. The possibility that these effects were mediated through BK channels peripheral to the heart was ruled out with experiments using isolated, perfused rat hearts, which showed a significant reduction in heart rate when treated with the BK channel inhibitors paxilline (1 microM, lolitrem B (1 microM, and iberiotoxin (0.23 microM, of 34%, 60%, and 42%, respectively. Furthermore, paxilline was shown to decrease heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. These results implicate BK channels located in the heart to be directly involved in the regulation of heart rate.

  11. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M A; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2015-12-23

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  12. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M. A. Salehizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA. The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1 training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2 test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3 Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability

  13. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M. A.; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  14. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  15. A new approach to the assessment of lumen visibility of coronary artery stent at various heart rates using 64-slice MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groen, J.M.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Oudkerk, M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2007-07-15

    Coronary artery stent lumen visibility was assessed as a function of cardiac movement and temporal resolution with an automated objective method using an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom. Nine different coronary stents filled with contrast fluid and surrounded by fat were scanned using 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) at 50-100 beats/min with the moving heart phantom. Image quality was assessed by measuring in-stent CT attenuation and by a dedicated tool in the longitudinal and axial plane. Images were scored by CT attenuation and lumen visibility and compared with theoretical scoring to analyse the effect of multi-segment reconstruction (MSR). An average increase in CT attenuation of 144 {+-} 59 HU and average diminished lumen visibility of 29 {+-} 12% was observed at higher heart rates in both planes. A negative correlation between image quality and heart rate was non-significant for the majority of measurements (P > 0.06). No improvement of image quality was observed in using MSR. In conclusion, in-stent CT attenuation increases and lumen visibility decreases at increasing heart rate. Results obtained with the automated tool show similar behaviour compared with attenuation measurements. Cardiac movement during data acquisition causes approximately twice as much blurring compared with the influence of temporal resolution on image quality. (orig.)

  16. Separating the effect of respiration from the heart rate variability for cases of constant harmonic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kircher Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart Rate Variability studies are a known measure for the autonomous control of the heart rate. In special situations, its interpretation can be ambiguous, since the respiration has a major influence on the heart rate variability. For this reason it has often been proposed to measure Heart Rate Variability, while the subjects are breathing at a constant respiration rate. That way the spectral influence of the respiration is known. In this work we propose to remove this constant respiratory influence from the heart rate and the Heart Rate Variability parameters to gain respiration free autonomous controlled heart rate signal. The spectral respiratory component in the heart rate signal is detected and characterized. Subsequently the respiratory effect on Heart Rate Variability is removed using spectral filtering approaches, such as the Notch filter or the Raised Cosine filter. As a result new decoupled Heart Variability parameters are gained, which could lead to new additional interpretations of the autonomous control of the heart rate.

  17. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of Natricine snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-11-29

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits.

  18. Heart rates increase after hatching in two species of natricine snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown heart rates to decrease from embryo to hatchling stage in turtles, remain steady in skinks, and increase in birds. However, no snake species has been studied in this regard. I recorded heart rate evolution trajectories from embryo to juvenile stage in 78 eggs from two species of European Natricine snakes. Unexpectedly, snakes behaved more like birds than turtles or lizards: heart rates increased after hatching in both N. maura and N. natrix, respectively by 43.92 ± 22.84% and 35.92 ± 24.52%. Heart rate shift was not related to an abrupt elevation of metabolism per se (snakes that increased their heart rates the most sharply grew the least after birth), but rather due to a number of smaller eggs that experienced lower than normal heart rates throughout the incubation and recovered a normal heart rate post-birth. This finding is discussed in the light of hatching synchrony benefits. PMID:24287712

  19. Chemical sympathectomy restores baroreceptor-heart rate reflex and heart rate variability in rats with chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, M; Das, S; Prasad, J; Katyal, A; Fahim, M

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role not only in regulation of blood pressure but also in maintenance of cardiac autonomic tone and its deficiency induced hypertension is accompanied by cardiac autonomic dysfunction. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly defined. We hypothesized that sympathetic activation mediates hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic changes consequent to deficient NO synthesis. We used chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine to examine the influence of sympathetic innervation on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and heart rate variability (HRV) of chronic N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treated adult Wistar rats. BRS was determined from heart rate responses to changes in systolic arterial pressure achieved by intravenous administration of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Time and frequency domain measures of HRV were calculated from 5-min electrocardiogram recordings. Chronic L-NAME administration (50 mg/kg per day for 7 days orally through gavage) in control rats produced significant elevation of blood pressure, tachycardia, attenuation of BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex and fall in time as well as frequency domain parameters of HRV. Sympathectomy completely abolished the pressor as well as tachycardic effect of chronic L-NAME. In addition, BRS and HRV improved after removal of sympathetic influence in chronic L-NAME treated rats. These results support the concept that an exaggerated sympathetic activity is the principal mechanism of chronic L-NAME hypertension and associated autonomic dysfunction.

  20. Pulse pressure and heart rate in patients with metabolic syndrome across Europe: insights from the GOOD survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlini, S; Naditch-Brule, L; Farsang, C; Zidek, W; Kjeldsen, S E

    2013-07-01

    The Global Cardiometabolic Risk Profile in Patients with hypertension disease (GOOD) survey investigated the global cardiometabolic risk profile in 3464 adult outpatients with hypertension across 289 sites in 12 European countries. The pulse pressure and heart rate profile of the survey population was evaluated according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus. History and treatment of hypertension were not counted as criteria for metabolic syndrome as they applied to all patients. Out of the 3370 recruited patients, 1033 had metabolic syndrome and 1177 had neither metabolic syndrome nor diabetes. When compared with patients with no metabolic syndrome or diabetes, patients with metabolic syndrome had higher pulse pressure (59±14 vs. 55±14 mm Hg) and heart rate (75.2±11.0 vs. 72.5±10.0 beats per min) (Ppulse pressure, which may at least in part reflect increased arterial stiffness and increased sympathetic tone. This may contribute, to some extent, to explaining the increased cardiovascular risk attributed to the presence of metabolic syndrome.

  1. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pacemaker can be used for patients with heart failure. It has three leads to help the heart beat in a more coordinated manner. Some pacemakers also can deliver electric shocks to the heart that can stop life-threatening ...

  2. Can geometric indices of heart rate variability predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Alice Soares Dos; Ricci-Vitor, Ana Laura; Bragatto, Vanessa Santa Rosa; Santos, Ana Paula Soares Dos; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with autonomic dysfunctions that can be evaluated through heart rate variability (HRV). Resistance training promotes improvement in autonomic modulation; however, studies that evaluate this scenario using geometric indices, which include nonlinear evaluation, thus providing more accurate information for physiological interpretation of HRV, are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of resistance training on autonomic modulation, using geometric indices of HRV, and peripheral muscle strength in individuals with COPD. Fourteen volunteers with COPD were submitted to resistance training consisting of 24 sessions lasting 60 min each, with a frequency of three times a week. The intensity was determined as 60% of one maximum repetition and was progressively increased until 80% for the upper and lower limbs. The HRV and dynamometry were performed at two moments, the beginning and the end of the experimental protocol. Significant increases were observed in the RRtri (4·81 ± 1·60 versus 6·55 ± 2·69, P = 0·033), TINN (65·36 ± 35·49 versus 101·07 ± 63·34, P = 0·028), SD1 (7·48 ± 3·17 versus 11·04 ± 6·45, P = 0·038) and SD2 (22·30 ± 8·56 versus 32·92 ± 18·78, P = 0·022) indices after the resistance training. Visual analysis of the Poincare plot demonstrated greater dispersion beat-to-beat and in the long-term interval between consecutive heart beats. Regarding muscle strength, there was a significant increase in the shoulder abduction and knee flexion. In conclusion, geometric indices of HRV can predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in individuals with COPD; improvement in peripheral muscle strength in patients with COPD was also observed.

  3. Comparing the effects of two in-flight aerobic exercise protocols on standing heart rates and VO(2peak) before and after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, S. F.; Charles, J. B.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Barrows, L. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of regular aerobic exercise on orthostatic tolerance have been the subject of a long-standing controversy that will influence the use of exercise during space flight. To examine these effects, astronauts performed continuous (CE) aerobic exercise (n = 8), interval (IE) aerobic exercise (n = 4), or no (NE) exercise (n = 5) during flights of 7 to 11 days. Heart rate (HR) responses to an orthostatic challenge (stand test) were measured 10 days before flight and on landing day. VO(2peak) (graded treadmill exercise) was measured 7 to 21 days before and 2 days after flight. No significant differences across the groups were observed in standing HRs before or after flight. However, the within-group mean HRs significantly increased in the NE (71-89 beats/min) and CE (60-85 beats/min) groups after space flight. The HRs for the IE group did not significantly increase (75-86 beats/min) after space flight. VO(2peak) decreased (P < .05) in the NE (-9.5%) group, but did not change in the CE (-2.4%) and IE (1%) groups. The relationship (r = 0.237) between the delta HR and delta VO(2peak) was not significant. These preliminary results indicate that: (1) continuous exercise does not affect the orthostatic HR response after space flight; (2) interval exercise may minimize an increase in the postflight orthostatic HR; and (3) both exercise protocols can maintain VO(2peak).

  4. Usefulness of heart rate to predict one-year mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation and acute myocardial infarction (from the OMEGA trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Becker, Ruediger; Rauch, Bernhard; Schiele, Rudolf; Schneider, Steffen; Riemer, Thomas; Diller, Frank; Gohlke, Helmut; Gottwik, Martin; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Sabin, Georg; Katus, Hugo A; Senges, Jochen

    2013-03-15

    In the setting of acute myocardial infarction and sinus rhythm, the heart rate (HR) has been demonstrated to correlate closely with mortality. In patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation (AF) on admission, however, the prognostic relevance of the HR has not yet been systematically addressed. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the data from the OMEGA trial was conducted to analyze whether the admission HR determines the 1-year mortality in patients presenting with AF in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Of 3,851 patients enrolled in the OMEGA study, 211 (6%) presented with AF on admission. This subgroup was dichotomized according to the admission HR (cutoff 95 beats/min). Multiple regression analysis revealed that an admission HR of ≥95 beats/min independently determined the 1-year mortality in patients with AF (odds ratio 4.69, 95% confidence interval 1.47 to 15.01; p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating that a high HR (≥95 beats/min) on admission in patients with AF and acute myocardial infarction is associated with an almost fivefold mortality risk.

  5. Autonomic Mechanisms Associated with Heart Rate and Vasoconstrictor Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    beat basis using the pulse contour method as pre- viously outlined [29]. Changes in the measurement of baseline thoracic electrical bioimpedance (Z0...were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) designed to induce pre-syncope. Subjects with tolerance B60 mmHg LBNP were classified as LT...stroke volume during LBNP as representative of the magnitude of central blood volume because of the relationship between SV and measured blood volume [5

  6. Robustness and perturbation in the modeled cascade heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.

    2003-03-01

    In this study, numerical experiments are conducted to examine the robustness of using cascade to describe the multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) by perturbing the hierarchical time scale structure and the multiplicative rule of the cascade. It is shown that a rigid structure of the multiple time scales is not essential for the multifractal scaling in healthy HRV. So long as there exists a tree structure for the multiplication to take place, a multifractal HRV and related properties can be captured by using the cascade. But the perturbation of the multiplicative rule can lead to a qualitative change. In particular, a multifractal to monofractal HRV transition can result after the product law is perturbed to an additive one at the fast time scale. We suggest that this explains the similar HRV scaling transition in the parasympathetic nervous system blockade.

  7. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  8. Heart Rate Variability Analysis Using Threshold of Wavelet Package Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Kheder, G; Massoued, M Ben; Samet, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new efficient feature extraction method based on the adaptive threshold of wavelet package coefficients is presented. This paper especially deals with the assessment of autonomic nervous system using the background variation of the signal Heart Rate Variability HRV extracted from the wavelet package coefficients. The application of a wavelet package transform allows us to obtain a time-frequency representation of the signal, which provides better insight in the frequency distribution of the signal with time. A 6 level decomposition of HRV was achieved with db4 as mother wavelet, and the above two bands LF and HF were combined in 12 specialized frequencies sub-bands obtained in wavelet package transform. Features extracted from these coefficients can efficiently represent the characteristics of the original signal. ANOVA statistical test is used for the evaluation of proposed algorithm.

  9. Effect of atrioventricular conduction on heart rate variability

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Talha Jamal

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses the effect of atrioventricular conduction time (AVCT) on the short-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) by computing HRV parameters using intervals between the onsets of successive P waves (PP time series) for three groups: normal, arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) patients. A very precise wavelet transform based ECG delineator was developed to detect PP, PR and RR time series. Mean PR variation in arrhythmia and SCD group was found to be significantly high as compared to the normal group. It was observed that when PR variations in arrhythmia and SCD cases crossed a certain threshold, RR variability no longer provided a very accurate estimate of HRV. In such cases, PP variability was able to provide a better assessment of HRV. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. Proarrhythmic electrical remodelling is associated with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Oros, Avram; Schoenmakers, Marieke;

    2007-01-01

    Acquired long-QT syndrome in combination with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation duration (BVR) is associated with lethal torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) in dogs with remodelled heart after atrioventricular block (AVB). We evaluated the relative contributions of bradycardi...... and ventricular remodelling to proarrhythmic BVR with and without pharmacological I(Kr) block in order to identify the individual at risk....

  11. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability in the Time Domain in Patients with Recent and Long-Standing Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Estañol, Bruno; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Mendoza-Temis, Joel; Morales, Irving O.; Landa, Emmanuel; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Moreno, Rene; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects the cardiovascular response of patients. To study this effect, interbeat intervals (IBI) and beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability of patients during supine, standing and controlled breathing tests were analyzed in the time domain. Simultaneous noninvasive measurements of IBI and SBP for 30 recently diagnosed and 15 long-standing DM patients were compared with the results for 30 rigorously screened healthy subjects (control). A statistically significant distinction between control and diabetic subjects was provided by the standard deviation and the higher moments of the distributions (skewness, and kurtosis) with respect to the median. To compare IBI and SBP for different populations, we define a parameter, α, that combines the variability of the heart rate and the blood pressure, as the ratio of the radius of the moments for IBI and the same radius for SBP. As diabetes evolves, α decreases, standard deviation of the IBI detrended signal diminishes (heart rate signal becomes more “rigid”), skewness with respect to the median approaches zero (signal fluctuations gain symmetry), and kurtosis increases (fluctuations concentrate around the median). Diabetes produces not only a rigid heart rate, but also increases symmetry and has leptokurtic distributions. SBP time series exhibit the most variable behavior for recently diagnosed DM with platykurtic distributions. Under controlled breathing, SBP has symmetric distributions for DM patients, while control subjects have non-zero skewness. This may be due to a progressive decrease of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity to the heart and blood vessels as diabetes evolves. PMID:26849653

  12. Relationship between non -dipper heart rate and morbidity of coronary heart disease in patients with hypertension%高血压患者非杓型心率与冠心病发病率的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张苏明; 郭冠军; 彭钰; 孙步高

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the relationship between non -dipper heart rate and morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with hypertension .Methods :According to Holter monitored results ,a total of 130 pa‐tients with essential hypertension were divided into dipper heart rate group (n= 77 ) and non -dipper heart rate group (n=53) .Ambulatory blood pressure and dynamic ECG were monitored in two groups ,and CHD was diag‐nosed according to coronary angiography results .Ambulatory blood pressure ,ambulatory heart rate and incidence rate of CHD were compared and analyzed between two groups .Results:Compared with dipper heart rate group , there was significant reduction in daytime mean heart rate [ (73.45 ± 9.57) beats/min vs .(68.77 ± 12.61) beats/min] ,but significant rise in nighttime mean heart rate [ (61.30 ± 7.62) beats/min vs .(65.49 ± 12.97) beats/min] , P0.05);.Morbidity rate of CHD in non -dipper heart rate group was significantly higher than that of dipper heart rate group (71.70% vs .29.87% ,P=0.001) .Conclusion:Compared with dipper heart rate pa‐tients ,morbidity rate of CHD significantly rises in patients with hypertension and non -dipper heart rate .It may help to reduce occurrence of CHD by monitoring circadian changes of heart rate and recover circadian heart rate rhythm while treating hypertension .%目的:观察高血压患者非杓型心率与冠心病发病率的关系。方法:根据Holter监测结果,130例原发性高血压患者被分为杓型心率组(77例)和非杓型心率组(53例)。监测两组动态血压和动态心电图,根据冠脉造影结果诊断冠心病。比较分析两组患者动态血压、动态心率以及冠心病的发生率。结果:与杓型心率组比较,非杓型心率组白天平均心率[(73.45±9.57)次/min比(68.77±12.61)次/min ]显著降低,而夜间平均心率[(61.30±7.62)次/min比(65.49±12.97)次/min]显著升高(P均<0.05);24h

  13. Heart Rate Distribution and Cause-specific Death in General Population of South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoqing; Rao Xuxu; Mai Jinzhuang; Wu Yong; Guo Chenye; Shi Meiling; Gao Xiangmin; Deng Mulan; Lian Zibing

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To analyses heart rate (HR) distribution of healthy adults in the south China community and evaluate relative risk of HR to total cause of death and cardiac cerebral vascular death. Methods Analytical data come from the baseline survey and follow-up visits in the PRC-USA Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Epidemiology in urban and rural samples of Guangzhou. The baseline survey was initiated in 1983 and 1984, and rescanned in 1987 and 1988. Since 1991 Follow-up visits for endpoint events were carried once every two years.Average follow-up year was 16.2 from baseline to 2000.People excluded from cardiac cerebral vascular disease, diabetes and other various chronic diseases were regarded as "healthy adults". Heart rates of these subjects were measured on resting electrocardiogram.Endpoint evens include: total cause of death, first attack of coronary disease and cerebral vascular events.SAS software was used for analysis. Cox Proportional Hazards model was used to evaluate the impact of HR on total death and cardiac cerebral vascular disease.Results A total of 4570 men and women aged 35-55years from urban and rural Guangzhou were investigated. 3493 healthy subjects were enrolled in the analysis, including 1694 men and 1799 women. Mean of theHRis (67.9±10.6) beats/min (bpm) in the whole population, ( 66.3 ± 10.7 ) bpm in men and (69.3 ±10.4) in women. The 5th percentile of the HR was 51 in men and 54 in women. The 95th percentile of the HR was 85 in men and 88 in women. Single correlation analysis showed there was negative relationship between age and HR, but it was only statistical significant in female. Analysis with Cox Proportional Hazards model show that HR < 50 bpm tops the risk of total causes of death (1.725)and HR 50-59 bpm decreased the risk of total causes of death (0.843).Relative risk of cardiac cerebral vascular events exceeds 1 when HR < 50 and >90 bpm (1.486 and 7.008 respectively). It was less than 1 in other groups but there was

  14. Heart Rate Variability for Preclinical Detection of Secondary Complications after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. Michael; Sow, Daby; Crimmins, Michael; Albers, David; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E. Sander; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Hripcsak, George; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) would enable preclinical detection of secondary complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods We studied 236 SAH patients admitted within the first 48 hours of bleed onset, discharged after SAH day 5, and had continuous electrocardiogram records available. The diagnosis and date of onset of infections and DCI events were prospectively adjudicated and documented by the clinical team. Continuous ECG was collected at 240 Hz using a high-resolution data acquisition system. The Tompkins Hamilton algorithm was used to identify R-R intervals excluding ectopic and abnormal beats. Time, frequency, and regularity domain calculations of HRV were generated over the first 48 hours of ICU admission and 24 hours prior to the onset of each patient's first complication, or SAH day 6 for control patients. Clinical prediction rules to identify infection and DCI events were developed using bootstrap aggregation and cost sensitive meta-classifiers. Results The combined infection and DCI model predicted events 24 hours prior to clinical onset with high sensitivity (87%) and moderate specificity (66%), and was more sensitive than models that predicted either infection or DCI. Models including clinical and HRV variables together substantially improved diagnostic accuracy (AUC 0.83) compared to models with only HRV variables (AUC 0.61). Conclusions Changes in HRV after SAH reflect both delayed ischemic and infectious complications. Incorporation of concurrent disease severity measures substantially improves prediction compared to using HRV alone. Further research is needed to refine and prospectively evaluate real-time bedside HRV monitoring after SAH. PMID:24610353

  15. Determination of anaerobic threshold through heart rate and near infrared spectroscopy in elderly healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel S. Reis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aging leads to low functional capacity and this can be reversed by safe and adequate exercise prescription. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the anaerobic threshold (AT obtained from the V-slope method as well as visual inspection of oxyhemoglobin ( O2Hb and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb curves and compare findings with the heteroscedastic (HS method applied to carbon dioxide production ( CO2, heart rate (HR, and HHb data in healthy elderly men. A secondary aim was to assess the degree of agreement between methods for AT determination. METHOD: Fourteen healthy men (61.4±6.3 years underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX on a cycle ergometer until physical exhaustion. Biological signals collected during CPX included: ventilatory and metabolic variables; spectroscopy quasi-infrared rays - NIRS; and HR through a cardio-frequency meter. RESULTS: We observed temporal equivalence and similar values of power (W, absolute oxygen consumption (O2 - mL/min, relative O2 ( mL.Kg - 1.min -1, and HR at AT by the detection methods performed. In addition, by the Bland-Altman plot, HR confirmed good agreement between the methods with biases between -1.3 and 3.5 beats per minute. CONCLUSIONS: (i all detection methods were sensitive in identifying AT, including the HS applied to HR and (ii the methods showed a good correlation in the identification of AT. Thus, these results support HR as valid and readily available parameter in determining AT in healthy elderly men.

  16. Atrial systole enhances intraventricular filling flow propagation during increasing heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Okafor, Ikechukwu; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Diastolic fluid dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) has been examined in multiple clinical studies for understanding cardiac function in healthy humans and developing diagnostic measures in disease conditions. The question of how intraventricular filling vortex flow pattern is affected by increasing heart rate (HR) is still unanswered. Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown a correlation between increasing HR and diminished E/A ratio of transmitral peak velocities during early filling (E-wave) to atrial systole (A-wave). We hypothesize that with increasing HR under constant E/A ratio, E-wave contribution to intraventricular vortex propagation is diminished. A physiologic in vitro flow phantom consisting of a LV physical model was used for this study. HR was varied across 70, 100 and 120 beats per minute (bpm) with E/A of 1.1–1.2. Intraventricular flow patterns were characterized using 2D particle image velocimetry measured across three parallel longitudinal (apical-basal) planes in the LV. A pair of counter-rotating vortices was observed during E-wave across all HRs. With increasing HR, diminished vortex propagation occurred during E-wave and atrial systole was found to amplify secondary vorticity production. The diastolic time point where peak vortex circulation occurred was delayed with increasing HR, with peak circulation for 120 bpm occurring as late as 90% into diastole near the end of A-wave. The role of atrial systole is elevated for higher HR due to the limited time available for filling. Our baseline findings and analysis approach can be applied to studies of clinical conditions where impaired exercise tolerance is observed. PMID:26895781

  17. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; YEN, CHENG-FANG

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rate...

  18. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  19. Rate Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation: May a Mathematical Model Suggest an Ideal Heart Rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmino, Matteo; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. Methods. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Results. Left ventricular pressure increased by 56.7%, from 33.92+-37.56 mmHg to 53.15+-47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27.4%, from 82.66+-14.04 mmHg to 105.29+-7.63 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45+-8.5 to 39.09+-8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.1+-4.4 to 39.32+-5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88+-0.04 to 0.58+-0.09 J) decreased by 49.5, 35.6 and 34.2%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen co...

  20. A new method for change-point detection developed for on-line analysis of the heart beat variability during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudacher, M.; Telser, S.; Amann, A.; Hinterhuber, H.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2005-04-01

    We present a novel scaling-dependent measure for times series analysis, the progressive detrended fluctuation analysis (PDFA). Since this method progressively includes and analyzes all data points of the time series, it is suitable for on-line change-point detection: Sudden changes in the statistics of the data points, in the type of correlation or in the statistical variance, or both, are reliably indicated and localized in time. This is first shown for numerous artificially generated data sets of Gaussian random numbers. Also time series with various non-stationarities, such as non-polynomial trends and “spiking”, are included as examples. Although generally applicable, our method was specifically developed as a tool for numerical sleep evaluation based on heart rate variability in the ECG-channel of polysomnographic whole night recordings. It is demonstrated that PDFA can detect specific sleep stage transitions, typically ascending transitions involving sympathetic activation as for example short episodes of wakefulness, and that the method is capable to discern between NREM sleep and REM sleep.

  1. Up-Beat UK: A programme of research into the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariante Carmine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease and depression are both common health problems and by 2020 will be the two leading causes of disability worldwide. Depression has been found to be more common in patients with coronary heart disease but the nature of this relationship is uncertain. In the United Kingdom general practitioners are now being remunerated for case-finding for depression in patients with coronary heart disease, however it is unclear how general practitioners should manage these patients. We aim to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in a primary care population and to develop an intervention for patients with coronary heart disease and depression. Methods/design This programme of research will consist of 4 inter-related studies. A 4 year prospective cohort study of primary care patients with coronary heart disease will be conducted to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Within this, a nested case-control biological study will investigate genetic and blood-biomarkers as predictors of depression in this sample. Two qualitative studies, one of patients' perspectives of treatments for coronary heart disease and co-morbid depression and one of primary care professionals' views on the management of patients with coronary heart disease and depression will inform the development of an intervention for this patient group. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial will then be conducted. Discussion This study will provide information on the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression that will allow health services to determine the efficiency of case-finding for depression in this patient group. The results of the cohort study will also provide information on risk factors for depression. The study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of a joint patient and professional led intervention and data necessary to plan a

  2. Association between Resting Heart Rate and Inflammatory Markers (White Blood Cell Count and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein) in Healthy Korean People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo-Chul; Seo, Inho; Kim, Shin-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and an elevated resting heart rate underlies the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. We hypothesized an association between resting heart rate and subclinical inflammation. Methods Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the KoGES-ARIRANG (Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population) cohort study, and was then divided into quartiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured by white blood cell count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for muscle mass, body fat proportion, and adiponectin in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables, using the clinical cut point of the highest quartile of white blood cell count (≥7,900/mm3) and ≥3 mg/dL for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Results Participants had a mean age of 56.3±8.1 years and a mean resting heart rate of 71.4±10.7 beats/min; 39.1% were men. In a fully adjusted model, an increased resting heart rate was significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count and higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both continuous (P for trend <0.001) and categorical (P for trend <0.001) models. Conclusion An increased resting heart rate is associated with a higher level of subclinical inflammation among healthy Korean people.

  3. The Effect of Valsartan on Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Mild to Moderate Mitral Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Metin Esen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Atrial fibrillation (AF is known to be one of the most important complications of mitral stenosis (MS. It has been reported that autonomic nervous system (ANS had an effect on AF development, heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate recovery (HRR were under the control of ANS, and their disorders were present in MS. We studied the effect of Valsartan on HRV and HRT, and thus its effect on ANS. Methods: Eleven patients (39±8 years, 10 females with mild to moderate MS were included in the study. Sixteen volunteers (38±8 years, 14 females matched for age and sex were selected for control group. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE, symptom-limited treadmill test and 24 hour Holter monitorization.The patients were administered 160 mg of Valsartan daily for 14 weeks. TTE, treadmill test and Holter monitorization were repeated at the end of treatment period. In Holter monitorization, the time and frequency domain analysis of HRV and in exercise test, HRR at first and third minutes (HRR1 and HRR3 were examined. Results: Before Valsartan treatment, no significant difference was found in HRR and HRV parameters between the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and also HRR1values were significantly decreased after treatment of Valsartan (117±6 vs. 107±4 mmHg p<0.002, 76±6 vs. 69±9 mmHg p<0.044, 44±14 vs. 33±12 p< 0.014, respectively, while the exercise time was significantly increased (786±114 vs. 846±95 sn p< 0.044. In Holter analysis neither time nor frequency domain of HRV parameters showed a meaningful change. Conclusion: In moderate MS, treatment with Valsartan improved the effort capacity, while autonomic function parameters have been defined on the base of HRV and HRR were not significantly different.

  4. Helping from the heart: Voluntary upregulation of heart rate variability predicts altruistic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Boris; Kok, Bethany E; Böckler, Anne; Singer, Tania

    2016-09-01

    Our various daily activities continually require regulation of our internal state. These regulatory processes covary with changes in High Frequency Heart Rate Variability (HF-HRV), a marker of parasympathetic activity. Specifically, incidental increases in HF-HRV accompany positive social engagement behavior and prosocial action. Little is known about deliberate regulation of HF-HRV and the role of voluntary parasympathetic regulation in prosocial behavior. Here, we present a novel biofeedback task that measures the ability to deliberately increase HF-HRV. In two large samples, we find that a) participants are able to voluntarily upregulate HF-HRV, and b) variation in this ability predicts individual differences in altruistic prosocial behavior, but not non-altruistic forms of prosociality, assessed through 14 different measures. Our findings suggest that self-induction of parasympathetic states is involved in altruistic action. The biofeedback task may provide a measure of deliberate parasympathetic regulation, with implications for the study of attention, emotion, and social behavior.

  5. Heart Rate Variability for Quantification of Autonomic Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Hong, Seok Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Choi, Byoong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify autonomic dysfunction in fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls using heart rate variability (HRV). Methods Sixteen patients with fibromyalgia and 16 healthy controls were recruited in this case control study. HRV was measured using the time-domain method incorporating the following parameters: total heartbeats, the mean of intervals between consecutive heartbeats (R-R intervals), the standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (RMSSD), ratio of SDNN to RMSSD (SDNN/RMSSD), and difference between the longest and shortest R-R interval under different three conditions including normal quiet breathing, rate controlled breathing, and Valsalva maneuver. The severity of autonomic symptoms in the group of patients with fibromyalgia was measured by Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale 31 (COMPASS 31). Then we analyzed the difference between the fibromyalgia and control groups and the correlation between the COMPASS 31 and aforementioned HRV parameters in the study groups. Results Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly higher SDNN/RMSSD values under both normal quiet breathing and rate controlled breathing compared to controls. Differences between the longest and shortest R-R interval under Valsalva maneuver were also significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia than in controls. COMPASS 31 score was negatively correlated with SDNN/RMSSD values under rate controlled breathing. Conclusion SDNN/RMSSD is a valuable parameter for autonomic nervous system function and can be used to quantify subjective autonomic symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:27152281

  6. Heart rate variability biofeedback improves cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Masahito; Hayano, Junichiro; Oikawa, Leo O; Katsamanis, Maria; Lehrer, Paul

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on the cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep in daily life. Forty-five healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: HRV biofeedback, Autogenic Training(AT), and no-treatment control. Participants in the HRV biofeedback were instructed to use a handheld HRV biofeedback device before their habitual bedtime, those in the AT were asked to listen to an audiotaped instruction before bedtime,and those in the control were asked to engage in their habitual activity before bedtime. Pulse wave signal during sleep at their own residences was measured continuously with a wrist watch-type transdermal photoelectric sensor for three time points. Baseline data were collected on the first night of measurements, followed by two successive nights for HRV biofeedback, AT, or control. Cardiorespiratory resting function was assessed quantitatively as the amplitude of high frequency(HF) component of pulse rate variability, a surrogate measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. HF component increased during sleep in the HRV biofeedback group,although it remained unchanged in the AT and control groups. These results suggest that HRV biofeedback before sleep may improve cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

  7. The integral pulse frequency modulation model with time-varying threshold: application to heart rate variability analysis during exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailón, Raquel; Laouini, Ghailen; Grao, César; Orini, Michele; Laguna, Pablo; Meste, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, an approach for heart rate variability analysis during exercise stress testing is proposed based on the integral pulse frequency modulation (IPFM) model, where a time-varying threshold is included to account for the nonstationary mean heart rate. The proposed technique allows the estimation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulating signal using the methods derived for the IPFM model with constant threshold plus a correction, which is shown to be needed to take into account the time-varying mean heart rate. On simulations, this technique allows the estimation of the ANS modulation on the heart from the beat occurrence time series with lower errors than the IPFM model with constant threshold (1.1% ± 1.3% versus 15.0% ± 14.9%). On an exercise stress testing database, the ANS modulation estimated by the proposed technique is closer to physiology than that obtained from the IPFM model with constant threshold, which tends to overestimate the ANS modulation during the recovery and underestimate it during the initial rest.

  8. Ecological assessment of heart rate complexity: Differences between high- and low-anxious adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornas, Xavier; Balle, Maria; De la Torre-Luque, Alejandro; Fiol-Veny, Aina; Llabrés, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear measures can capture the complex structure of the heart beating, and recordings taken while the individual performs daily activities may help to understand the cardiac system's output in natural conditions. As healthy systems are characterized by having highly complex outputs, we hypothesized that the cardiac output from high anxious adolescents should be less complex than the output from their low anxious counterparts. In this study ECG was recorded for two hours in 50 adolescents while they performed regular school activities. Fractal dimension (FD), scaling exponents and multiscale entropy were calculated on the interbeat intervals time series. Both FD and entropy were significantly lower in the high-anxious group than the low-anxious group. These results suggest different heart-related regulation in adolescents who suffered from high anxious symptomatology.

  9. Approximate entropy and point correlation dimension of heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storella, R J; Wood, H W; Mills, K M;

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of nonlinear dynamics to heart rate variability in healthy humans was examined using surrogate data analysis. Several measures of heart rate variability were used and compared. Heart rates were recorded for three hours and original data sets of 8192 R-R intervals created. For each...... original data set (n = 34), three surrogate data sets were made by shuffling the order of the R-R intervals while retaining their linear correlations. The difference in heart rate variability between the original and surrogate data sets reflects the amount of nonlinear structure in the original data set....... Heart rate variability was analyzed by two different nonlinear methods, point correlation dimension and approximate entropy. Nonlinearity, though under 10 percent, could be detected with both types of heart rate variability measures. More importantly, not only were the correlations between...

  10. Heart rates of elementary physical education students during the dancing classrooms program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-06-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4 bpm), in which 47% of class time was spent above a 60% maximal heart rate threshold. The swing dance in particular (M = 143.4 bpm) stimulated a much higher heart rate level than all other dances in the program, with a mean heart rate change of 52.6 bpm. Girls (127.3 bpm) achieved marginally higher heart rates (p = .059) than boys (121.1 bpm).

  11. [Design of Oxygen Saturation, Heart Rate, Respiration Rate Detection System Based on Smartphone of Android Operating System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingshan; Zeng, Bixin

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we designed an oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate monitoring system based on smartphone of android operating system, physiological signal acquired by MSP430 microcontroller and transmitted by Bluetooth module.

  12. Detection of anomalous diffusion using confidence intervals of the scaling exponent with application to preterm neonatal heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, David R.; Verklan, M. Terese; Moon, Jon

    1998-11-01

    The scaling exponent of the root mean square (rms) displacement quantifies the roughness of fractal or multifractal time series; it is equivalent to other second-order measures of scaling, such as the power-law exponents of the spectral density and autocorrelation function. For self-similar time series, the rms scaling exponent equals the Hurst parameter, which is related to the fractal dimension. A scaling exponent of 0.5 implies that the process is normal diffusion, which is equivalent to an uncorrelated random walk; otherwise, the process can be modeled as anomalous diffusion. Higher exponents indicate that the increments of the signal have positive correlations, while exponents below 0.5 imply that they have negative correlations. Scaling exponent estimates of successive segments of the increments of a signal are used to test the null hypothesis that the signal is normal diffusion, with the alternate hypothesis that the diffusion is anomalous. Dispersional analysis, a simple technique which does not require long signals, is used to estimate the scaling exponent from the slope of the linear regression of the logarithm of the standard deviation of binned data points on the logarithm of the number of points per bin. Computing the standard error of the scaling exponent using successive segments of the signal is superior to previous methods of obtaining the standard error, such as that based on the sum of squared errors used in the regression; the regression error is more of a measure of the deviation from power-law scaling than of the uncertainty of the scaling exponent estimate. Applying this test to preterm neonate heart rate data, it is found that time intervals between heart beats can be modeled as anomalous diffusion with negatively correlated increments. This corresponds to power spectra between 1/f2 and 1/f, whereas healthy adults are usually reported to have 1/f spectra, suggesting that the immaturity of the neonatal nervous system affects the scaling

  13. Evidence for a respiratory component, similar to mammalian respiratory sinus arrhythmia, in the heart rate variability signal from the rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Hamish A; Leite, Cleo A C; Wang, Tobias; Skals, Marianne; Abe, Augusto S; Egginton, Stuart; Rantin, F Tadeu; Bishop, Charles M; Taylor, Edwin W

    2006-07-01

    Autonomic control of heart rate variability and the central location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) were examined in the rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus), in order to determine whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) occurred in a similar manner to that described for mammals. Resting ECG signals were recorded in undisturbed snakes using miniature datalogging devices, and the presence of oscillations in heart rate (fh) was assessed by power spectral analysis (PSA). This mathematical technique provides a graphical output that enables the estimation of cardiac autonomic control by measuring periodic changes in the heart beat interval. At fh above 19 min(-1) spectra were mainly characterised by low frequency components, reflecting mainly adrenergic tonus on the heart. By contrast, at fh below 19 min(-1) spectra typically contained high frequency components, demonstrated to be cholinergic in origin. Snakes with a fh >19 min(-1) may therefore have insufficient cholinergic tonus and/or too high an adrenergic tonus acting upon the heart for respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) to develop. A parallel study monitored fh simultaneously with the intraperitoneal pressures associated with lung inflation. Snakes with a fhrate (fv). Adrenergic blockade by propranolol infusion increased the variability of the ventilation cycle, and the oscillatory component of the fh spectrum broadened accordingly. Infusion of atropine to effect cholinergic blockade abolished this HF component, confirming a role for vagal control of the heart in matching fh and fv in the rattlesnake. A neuroanatomical study of the brainstem revealed two locations for vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN). This is consistent with the suggestion that generation of ventilatory components in the heart rate variability (HRV) signal are dependent on spatially distinct loci for cardiac VPN. Therefore, this study has demonstrated the presence of RSA in the HRV signal and a dual location for VPN in the

  14. Variability in heart rate recovery measurements over 1 year in healthy, middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellis, M G; Ingle, L; Carroll, S

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the longer-term (12-month) variability in post-exercise heart rate recovery following a submaximal exercise test. Longitudinal data was analysed for 97 healthy middle-aged adults (74 male, 23 female) from 2 occasions, 12 months apart. Participants were retrospectively selected if they had stable physical activity habits, submaximal treadmill fitness and anthropometric measurements between the 2 assessment visits. A submaximal Bruce treadmill test was performed to at least 85% age-predicted maximum heart rate. Absolute heart rate and Δ heart rate recovery (change from peak exercise heart rate) were recorded for 1 and 2 min post-exercise in an immediate supine position. Heart rate recovery at both time-points was shown to be reliable with intra-class correlation coefficient values ≥ 0.714. Absolute heart rate 1-min post-exercise showed the strongest agreement between repeat tests (r = 0.867, P rate values rather than Δ heart rate recovery, and for 1-min rather than 2-min post-exercise recovery time points. Log-transformed values generated better variability with acceptable coefficient of variation for all measures (2.2-10%). Overall, 1 min post-exercise heart rate recovery data had least variability over the 12-month period in apparently healthy middle-aged adults.

  15. Influence of the heart rate on mean circumferential shortening velocity: echocardiographic study of 183 normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, R; Martinotti, R; Monzani, V; Sardella, F; Pierini, A; Pastori, M; Randazzo, A

    1986-01-01

    Echocardiography was used to explore the influence of independent variables (age, body surface area and heart rate) on the mean circumferential shortening velocity (MVCF) in 183 healthy subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis shows that heart rate is the only variable of the three just mentioned that influences MVCF. A regression equation is evolved and proposed as an index of MVCF correction for varying heart rates.

  16. Using complexity metrics with R-R intervals and BPM heart rate measures

    OpenAIRE

    Wallot, Sebastian; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Jegindø, Else-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Lately, growing attention in the health sciences has been paid to the dynamics of heart