WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam loss calibration

  1. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  2. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  3. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  4. Overview of LHC Beam Loss Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Fadakis, E; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kruk, G; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Priebe, A; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M; Zamantzas, C; Grishin, V; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring system provides measurements with an update rate of 1 Hz and high time resolution data by event triggering. These informations are used for the initiation of beam aborts, fixed displays and the off line analysis. The analysis of fast and localized loss events resulted in the determination of its rate, duration, peak amplitudes, its scaling with intensity, number of bunches and beam energy. The calibration of the secondary shower beam loss signal in respect to the needed beam energy deposition to quench the magnet coil is addressed at 450GeV and 3.5T eV . The adjustment of collimators is checked my measuring the loss pattern and its variation in the collimation regions of the LHC. Loss pattern changes during a fill allow the observation of non typical fill parameters.

  5. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  6. Detection of Equipment Faults Before Beam Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Galambos, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-power hadron accelerators have strict limits on fractional beam loss. In principle, once a high-quality beam is set up in an acceptable state, beam loss should remain steady. However, in practice, there are many trips in operational machines, owing to excessive beam loss. This paper deals with monitoring equipment health to identify precursor signals that indicate an issue with equipment that will lead to unacceptable beam loss. To this end, a variety of equipment and beam signal measurements are described. In particular, several operational examples from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of deteriorating equipment functionality leading to beam loss are reported.

  7. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria [Brandenburgische Technische Univ. Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Baer, Tobias [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Castro Carballo, Elena Maria [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Lohmann, Wolfgang [Brandenburgische Technische Univ. Cottbus (Germany); DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schmidt, Ruediger [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    The LHC has an operational stored energy of 130MJ per beam. Only a small percentage of beam losses in the LHC equipment can damage material or lead to magnet quenches. Therefore, it is important to monitor different types of beam losses, e.g. scattering on residual gas particles, UFOs, collisions and injection losses. A detailed understanding of beam loss mechanisms is necessary to reduce them and ensure save operation. Two different beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC tunnel: ionization chambers and diamond sensors. Ionization chambers trigger a beam dump if beam losses exceed a certain threshold. They have a time resolution of 40um (half LHC turn) which is not sufficient to resolve bunch-by-bunch beam losses. Diamond sensors have a nanosecond time resolution and can therefore detect bunch-by-bunch beam losses. This time resolution allows an analysis of various types of beam losses and an understanding of the mechanisms. For the first time beam loss intensities were measured bunch-by-bunch caused by different origins of losses. Beam loss measurements using diamond sensors will be presented. The results are compared to simulations and good qualitative agreement was found. The potential of diamond sensors for LHC and experiment applications are discussed.

  8. Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main functions of the LHC beam loss measurement system is the protection of equipment against damage caused by impacting particles creating secondary showers and their energy dissipation in the matter. Reliability requirements are scaled according to the acceptable consequences and the frequency of particle impact events on equipment. Increasing reliability often leads to more complex systems. The downside of complexity is a reduction of availability; therefore, an optimum has to be found for these conflicting requirements. A detailed review of selected concepts and solutions for the LHC system will be given to show approaches used in various parts of the system from the sensors, signal processing, and software implementations to the requirements for operation and documentation.

  9. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo; Kadi, Y; Vlachoudis, V

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more ...

  10. Improved beam-energy calibration technique for heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, A.M.J.; Garcia, A.; Gil, Salvador

    1989-01-01

    A simple technique for beam energy calibration of heavy-ion accelerators is presented. A thin hydrogenous target was bombarded with 12 C and 19 F, and the energies of the protons knocked out, elastically were measured at several angles using two detectors placed at equal angles on opposite sides of the beam. The use of these two detectors cancels the largest errors due to uncertainties in the angle and position at which the beam hits the target. An application of this energy calibration method to an electrostatic accelerator is described and the calibration constant of the analyzing magnet was obtained with an estimated error of 0.4 (Author) [es

  11. Bench calibration of INDUS-2 beam position indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Y.; Banerji, Anil; Kotaiah, S.

    2005-01-01

    A third generation synchrotron radiation source of energy 2.5 GeV named INDUS-2 at Centre for Advanced Technology (C.A.T), Indore (M.P) is in the advanced stage of construction. Accurate determination and correction of beam closed orbit in INDUS-2 machine within 100 of microns is a very desirable goal. Bench based calibration of Beam Position Indicators (BPI) play a very important and useful role during initial commissioning of electron machines. To precisely measure transverse position of electron beam in the Indus-2 storage ring, 56 Beam Position Indicators (BPI) will be installed in INDUS-2 machine. Out of 56 Beam Position Indicators 40 are of individual type whereas 16 are integrated with dipole vacuum chamber. The Beam Position Indicators are required to be calibrated before they can be installed. The calibration is done to determine electrical offset with respect to defined mechanical centre, to determine displacement sensitivities as well as non linearity's of BPI. Ideally when beam passes through the geometrical center of BPI's, all electrodes should have same signal strength. However due to different capacitance of electrodes and offset and drift in electronics, the electrical centre (mechanical x, y where all electrodes shows same signal strength) differs from mechanical centre of BPI. A fully automatic calibration system has been developed to carry out the calibration of Beam Position Indicators. A calibration software has been developed which has necessary utilities to process and display calibration data and results. This paper describes the calibration results of Indus-2 BPM. (author)

  12. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitoring for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Sapinski, M

    A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system was installed on the outside surface of the LHC magnet cryostats to protect the accelerator equipment from beam losses. The protection is achieved by extracting the beam from the ring in case thresholds imposed on measured radiation levels are exceeded. Close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the present BLM system is sensitive to particle showers generated in the interaction region of the two beams. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The particle showers measured by the present BLM configuration are partly shielded by the cryostat and the iron yoke of the magnets. The system can hence be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the protected element, i. e. the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass of the magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. T...

  13. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  14. Measuring beam losses in the THI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Duneau, P.; Lecorche, E.; Lermine, P.; Lemaitre, E.; Ulrich, M.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the THI project (High Intensity Transport) is to upgrade the GANIL facilities by increasing the beam by a factor of 15, at least for light ions. This higher intensity is required by the radioactive beam facility SPIRAL starting in September 1997, to generate the new nuclear species in the solid target-source (ISOL method). For the control system, the most important issues are now to tune the accelerators while minimizing the beam losses at each stage of acceleration and when not possible, to have a fast beam loss detection signal. This system is composed of probes which deliver a signal to stop the beam when there's too much intensity lost and when not, a logarithmic value of the beam intensity. These probes are linked to a front end VME crate on the network, and in the control room, on the workstations, a graphical user interface program displays the beam variations using logarithmic scales. This program is also used to center the beam while injecting in or ejecting from the main cyclotrons by tuning the steerers, the magnetic elements inside, and the electrostatic deflector to be able to separate and extract the last beam turn. (author)

  15. Geometry calibration method for a cone-beam CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongkai; Kang, Kejun; Xing, Yuxiang

    2017-05-01

    The positioning accuracy of each component is important to ensure the image quality of cone-beam CT. However, accurate positioning is not easy and requires experience and time. The option is to calibrate the geometric parameters and then plug them into a reconstruction algorithm which is the preferred solution in practice. In this case, the image quality is determined by the accuracy and precision of the calibration method. This work describes a method to independently calibrate an imaging system in each pose (projection angle) for a cone-beam CT with a nonideal circular trajectory. The calibration method uses a phantom with 12 beads on 2 planes that are observed on the radiographic images. This pose-independent calibration method (PIC) can decorrelate the relationships among the geometric parameters so that the parameters can be estimated one-by-one. This simplifies the calibration process. Besides the pose-independent calibration method, this paper also describes an extended calibration method with additional constraints on the system geometry. Both methods are validated with numerical simulations and then experimentally on a practical system with a scanning object loosely supported by rotating wheels. The object rotates during the CT data acquisition. The angular and pose information of the CT system are not accurately known a priori in this case. The numerical simulations and the experiments both provide satisfactory results. The relative error of the calibrated source-to-detector distance in the simulation is less than 0.1%. The errors in the calibrated roll, pitch, and yaw angles are less than 0.04°. A sensitivity study using various bead position uncertainties in random directions shows that the pose-independent calibration method is robust to measurement errors. Tests were also done with a nonideal circular trajectory for further validation. Images reconstructed using the geometric parameters from both the pose-independent and the extended calibration

  16. Absolute Current Calibrations of 1$\\mu$A CW Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Freyberger, A; Day, A R; Degtiarenko, P; Saha, A; Slachtouski, S

    2005-01-01

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1$\\mu\\A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy losses due to electromagnetic and hadronic losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and GEANT simulations will be presented.

  17. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H 0 and 2 MW D 0 neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed

  18. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented

  19. How to calibrate Grenz-beams in clinical practice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeken, B. [Algemeen Ziekenhius Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium); Bressers, E. [Virga jesse Ziekenhius, Hasselt (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, considerable efforts have been spent improving the precision and consistency in the whole process of calibration of high energy photon and electron beams (national protocols, primary calibration facilities ....). The reading in air of 5 different ionisation chambers (NE2532, NE2536, NE2571, PTWM23342, Markus) in an X-ray beam (RT50, HVL=0.35 mm Al) has been compared. Ali NE chambers were provided with a calibration factor Nk, the PTW chamber was directly calibrated in dose water ND,W. The polarisation and recombination effects were measured. In our reference field (ssd=4cm, field diameter 40 mm), the readings in air for the dedicated plan parallel chambers deviated by not more than 8%. The measurements with the NE2571 chamber did not correspond very well with the other measurements. For the equipment in our hospital, the dose rate in air for the reference field was measured from 1971 on and found to be very stable: 17.36 Gy/min (0.48) (1sd). An attempt was made to measure the BSF for the field defining cones used in clinical practice using a Markus plane parallel chamber, but the resulting BSF did not correspond to those reported in BJR/suppl. 17. Special attention has been be paid to the calibration of beams with field size comparable to the dimension of the chamber window- chamber body.

  20. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation...

  1. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident...

  2. Design, test, and calibration of an electrostatic beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Cohen-Solal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The low beta of proton or ion beams favors an electrostatic pickup to measure the transverse beam centroid position. Often papers on beam position monitors (BPM are focused on a particular aspect of the problem; however, it is important to consider all various issues of a position measurement system. Based on our experience at the IPHI (high intensity injector proton facility at CEA-Saclay, this paper will address all aspects to design, test, and calibrate a BPM for proton linear accelerators, while emphasizing the determination of the absolute beam position. We present details of the readout electronics, and describe the calibration of the BPM using a test station. For calculation and simulation of the electrical signals we developed a Mathematica script. The error analysis presented, on the basis of six BPMs installed in the high energy section of IPHI, demonstrates the expected accuracy of the position measurement. These studies also identify the parameters that could improve the performance of the beam position control. The experience from these developments is currently being used for the BPM design and test stand dedicated to the Spiral2 accelerator at Ganil-Caen which will deliver heavy ion beams.

  3. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  4. Simultaneous calibration phantom commission and geometry calibration in cone beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Yang, Shuai; Ma, Jianhui; Li, Bin; Wu, Shuyu; Qi, Hongliang; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-08-09

    Geometry calibration is a vital step for describing the geometry of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and is a prerequisite for CBCT reconstruction. In current methods, calibration phantom commission and geometry calibration are divided into two independent tasks. Small errors in ball-bearing (BB) positioning in the phantom-making step will severely degrade the quality of phantom calibration. To solve this problem, we propose an integrated method to simultaneously realize geometry phantom commission and geometry calibration. Instead of assuming the accuracy of the geometry phantom, the integrated method considers BB centers in the phantom as an optimized parameter in the workflow. Specifically, an evaluation phantom and the corresponding evaluation contrast index are used to evaluate geometry artifacts for optimizing the BB coordinates in the geometry phantom. After utilizing particle swarm optimization, the CBCT geometry and BB coordinates in the geometry phantom are calibrated accurately and are then directly used for the next geometry calibration task in other CBCT systems. To evaluate the proposed method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on simulated and realistic CBCT data. The spatial resolution of reconstructed images using dental CBCT can reach up to 15 line pair cm -1 . The proposed method is also superior to the Wiesent method in experiments. This paper shows that the proposed method is attractive for simultaneous and accurate geometry phantom commission and geometry calibration.

  5. Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-03-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in diffraction studies are discussed.

  6. AIP Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in di ff raction studies are discussed.

  7. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 x 10 13 protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 x 10 9 ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs

  8. The space telescope NINA: results of a beam test calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Bidoli, V; Pascale, M P D; Morselli, A; Furano, G; Picozza, P; Scoscini, A; Sparvoli, R; Barbiellini, G; Bonvicini, W; Cirami, R; Schiavon, Paolo; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Ambriola, M; Bellotti, R; Cafagna, F; Ciacio, F; Castellano, M; Circella, M; Marzo, C D; Bartalucci, S; Giuntoli, S; Ricci, M; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Bakaldin, A; Batishev, A; Galper, A M; Koldashov, S; Korotkov, M; Mikhailov, V; Murashov, A; Voronov, S; Boezio, M

    1999-01-01

    In June 1998 the telescope NINA will be launched in space on board of the Russian satellite Resource-01 n.4. The main scientific objective of the mission is the study of the anomalous, galactic and solar components of the cosmic rays in the energy interval 10-200 MeV/n. The core of the instrument is a silicon detector whose performances have been tested with a particle beam at the GSI Laboratory in Germany in 1997; we report here on the results obtained during the beam calibration.

  9. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolò; Fabbri, Franco L; Finkel, Alexey; Orfanelli, Stella; Loos, R; Montanari, Alessandro; Rusack, R; Stickland, David P

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the cavern of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of...

  10. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, “Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,” Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242–3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, “A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,” Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695–1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the

  11. Radiochromic film calibration for the RQT9 quality beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K. C.; Gomez, A. M. L.; Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.

    2017-11-01

    When ionizing radiation interacts with matter it generates energy deposition. Radiation dosimetry is important for medical applications of ionizing radiation due to the increasing demand for diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy. Different dosimetry methods are used and each one has its advantages and disadvantages. The film is a dose measurement method that records the energy deposition by the darkening of its emulsion. Radiochromic films have a little visible light sensitivity and respond better to ionizing radiation exposure. The aim of this study is to obtain the resulting calibration curve by the irradiation of radiochromic film strips, making it possible to relate the darkening of the film with the absorbed dose, in order to measure doses in experiments with X-ray beam of 120 kV, in computed tomography (CT). Film strips of GAFCHROMIC XR-QA2 were exposed according to RQT9 reference radiation, which defines an X-ray beam generated from a voltage of 120 kV. Strips were irradiated in "Laboratório de Calibração de Dosímetros do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear" (LCD / CDTN) at a dose range of 5-30 mGy, corresponding to the range values commonly used in CT scans. Digital images of the irradiated films were analyzed by using the ImageJ software. The darkening responses on film strips according to the doses were observed and they allowed obtaining the corresponding numeric values to the darkening for each specific dose value. From the numerical values of darkening, a calibration curve was obtained, which correlates the darkening of the film strip with dose values in mGy. The calibration curve equation is a simplified method for obtaining absorbed dose values using digital images of radiochromic films irradiated. With the calibration curve, radiochromic films may be applied on dosimetry in experiments on CT scans using X-ray beam of 120 kV, in order to improve CT acquisition image processes.

  12. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  13. Calibration free method for measurement of the AC magnetization loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souc, Jan [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 842 39 Bratislava (Slovakia); Goemoery, Fedor [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 842 39 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vojenciak, Michal [Department of Power Electrical Systems, University of Zilina, Vel' ky diel, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2005-05-01

    A calibration free measurement method for determination of the magnetization loss of superconducting samples exposed to the external AC magnetic field is presented. The idea is based on the measurement of the part of the power which is supplied by the AC source to the AC magnet generating the magnetic field, in which the sample is located. It uses a coil wound in parallel to the AC field magnet as the measurement coil. To achieve the necessary sensitivity, two identical systems are used, each consisting of an AC magnet and a measurement coil, one of them containing the sample and the other left empty. No measurement and/or calculation of the calibration constant is required. To confirm the suitability of this method, the loss of a Cu sample with known dissipation was measured. The applicability to the AC magnetization loss measurements of superconducting tapes is presented.

  14. A Layer Correlation Technique for ATLAS Calorimetry Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, T; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P

    2008-01-01

    A method for calibrating the response of a segmented calorimeter to hadrons is developed. The ansatz is that information on longitudinal shower fluctuations gained from a principal component analysis of the layer energy depositions can improve energy resolution by correcting for hadronic invisible energy and dead material losses: projections along the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix are used as input for the calibration. The technique is used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the ATLAS calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. Simulated Monte Carlo events are used to derive corrections for invisible energy lost in nuclear reactions and in dead material in front and in between the calorimeters. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the resolution is improved by about 20%.

  15. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - III. Phase-only calibration and primary beam correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, T. L.; Stewart, A. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Kenyon, J. S.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-09-01

    This is the third installment in a series of papers in which we investigate calibration artefacts. Calibration artefacts (also known as ghosts or spurious sources) are created when we calibrate with an incomplete model. In the first two papers of this series, we developed a mathematical framework which enabled us to study the ghosting mechanism itself. An interesting concomitant of the second paper was that ghosts appear in symmetrical pairs. This could possibly account for spurious symmetrization. Spurious symmetrization refers to the appearance of a spurious source (the antighost) symmetrically opposite an unmodelled source around a modelled source. The analysis in the first two papers indicates that the antighost is usually very faint, in particular, when a large number of antennas are used. This suggests that spurious symmetrization will mainly occur at an almost undetectable flux level. In this paper, we show that phase-only calibration produces an antighost that is N-times (where N denotes the number of antennas in the array) as bright as the one produced by phase and amplitude calibration and that this already bright ghost can be further amplified by the primary beam correction.

  16. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Seryi, Andrei; Sramek, Christopher K

    2005-01-01

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ‘banana effect'). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  17. Electronics and Calibration system for the CMS Beam Halo Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Nicolo

    2014-01-01

    In the context of increasing luminosity of LHC, it will be important to accurately measure the Machine Induced Background. A new monitoring system will be installed in the CMS cavern for measuring the beam background at high radius. This detector is composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators, coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The readout chain of this detector will make use of many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadron Calorimeter electronics, with a dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal will be digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing.The backend electronics will record bunch-by-bunch histograms, which will be published to CMS and the LHC using the newly designed CMS beam instrumentation specific DAQ. A calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the sys...

  18. Mitigation of numerical noise for beam loss simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kesting, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Numerical noise emerges in self-consistent simulations of charged particles, and its mitigation is investigated since the first numerical studies in plasma physics. In accelerator physics, recent studies find an artificial diffusion of the particle beam due to numerical noise in particle-in-cell tracking, which is of particular importance for high intensity machines with a long storage time, as the SIS100 at FAIR or in context of the LIU upgrade at CERN. In beam loss simulations for these projects artificial effects must be distinguished from physical beam loss. Therefore, it is important to relate artificial diffusion to artificial beam loss, and to choose simulation parameters such that physical beam loss is well resolved. As a practical tool, we therefore suggest a scaling law to find optimal simulation parameters for a given maximum percentage of acceptable artificial beam loss.

  19. Polarisation and precise calibration of the LEP beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    We report in this article on two issues of precision accelerator physics, performed at the LEP collider, that challenged international collaborations. The first result is an increase of the polarisation degree from an almost vanishing natural level to 50%, opening the way to energy calibration by resonant depolarisation. The second result is a systematic and precise determination of the collider centre-of- mass energy correcting for subtle effects such as the azimuthal variation of the beam energy, the magnet temperature, the effects of parasitic earth currents and terrestrial tides. It resulted in an extremely accurate test of the standard model and set significant constraints on the top quark and Higgs masses. (16 refs).

  20. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-01-01

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  1. LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System Verification Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Zamantzas, C; Jackson, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Mon­i­tor­ing (BLM) sys­tem is one of the most com­plex in­stru­men­ta­tion sys­tems de­ployed in the LHC. In ad­di­tion to protecting the col­lid­er, the sys­tem also needs to pro­vide a means of di­ag­nos­ing ma­chine faults and de­liv­er a feed­back of loss­es to the control room as well as to sev­er­al sys­tems for their setup and analysis. It has to trans­mit and pro­cess sig­nals from al­most 4’000 mon­i­tors, and has near­ly 3 mil­lion con­fig­urable pa­ram­e­ters. The system was de­signed with re­li­a­bil­i­ty and avail­abil­i­ty in mind. The spec­i­fied op­er­a­tion and the fail-safe­ty stan­dards must be guar­an­teed for the sys­tem to per­form its func­tion in pre­vent­ing su­per­con­duc­tive mag­net de­struc­tion caused by par­ti­cle flux. Main­tain­ing the ex­pect­ed re­li­a­bil­i­ty re­quires ex­ten­sive test­ing and ver­i­fi­ca­tion. In this paper we re­port our most re­cent ad­di­t...

  2. Losses on SPS flat bottom and beam loading with LHC beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, H; Cettour Cave, S; Cornelis, K; Damerau, H; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lasheen, A; Rumolo, G; Shaposhnikova, E; Timko, H

    2017-01-01

    Losses at SPS flat bottom with the LHC proton beams hadbeen studied since the earliest days the LHC beams becameavailable in the SPS. Some of the loss mechanisms involvedcould be identified and over the years of operation with thenominal 25ns LHC beam, the losses could be gradually re-duced. Nevertheless, in machine studies with high intensity25ns LHC beams it is still observed that the transmissiondegrades with intensity. As summarised in this paper, a se-ries of studies have been performed in 2016 with the aim offurther characterising the loss mechanisms and eventuallyfinding mitigation measures in view of the LHC injectorupgrade project (LIU)

  3. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  4. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  5. A self-calibrating ionisation chamber for the precise intensity calibration of high-energy heavy-ion beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghans, A.

    1996-01-01

    The intensity of a 136 Xe(600 A MeV) beam has been determined by simultaneously measuring the particle rate and the corresponding ionisation current with an ionisation chamber. The ionisation current of this self-calibrating device was compared at higher intensities with the current of a secondary-electron monitor and a calibration of the secondary-electron current was achieved with a precision of 2%. This method can be applied to all high-energy heavy-ion beams. (orig.)

  6. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  7. Theory of suppression of loss cone instabilities by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.; Sinha, M.

    1981-01-01

    A new mechanism for the suppression of Drift Cyclotron Loss Cone instabilities by electron beams injected along the field lines is given. The mechanism explains some of the recent observations. (author)

  8. Correlation of beam loss to residual activation in the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of beam loss and activation at the AGS have provided a better understanding of measurements of beam loss and how they may be used to predict activation. Studies have been done in which first order correlations have been made between measured beam losses on the distributed ionization chamber system in the AGS and the health physics recorded residual activation. These studies have provided important insight into the ionization chamber system, its limitations, and its usefulness in the prediction of activation based on monitored beam loss. In recent years the AGS has run high intensity protons primarily for rare kaon decay experiments. In this mode of running the AGS typically accelerates beam from an injection momentum of 0.644 GeV/c up to a slow extracted beam (SEB) momentum of 24.2 GeV/c. The beam intensities are on the order of 4.5 x 10 13 protons per AGS cycle at injection to as high as 1.9 x 10 13 protons per AGS cycle at extraction. Residual activation varies around the AGS ring from the order of 5 mR/hour to levels of the order at 5 R/hour. The highest levels occur around the AGS beam catcher and the extraction equipment

  9. Correlation of beam loss to residual activation in the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of beam loss and activation at the AGS have provided a better understanding of measurements of beam loss and how they may be used to predict activation. Studies have been done in which first order correlations have been made between measured beam losses on the distributed ionization chamber system in the AGS and the health physics recorded residual activation. These studies have provided important insight into the ionization chamber system, its limitations, and its usefulness in the prediction of activation based on monitored beam loss. In recent years the AGS has run high intensity protons primarily for rare known decay experiments. In this mode of running the AGS typically accelerates beam from an injection momentum of 0.644 GeV/c up to a slow extracted beam (SEB) momentum of 24.2 GeV/c. The beam intensities are on the order of 4.5 x 10 13 protons per AGS cycle at injection to as high as 1.9 x 10 13 protons per AGS cycle at extraction. Residual activation varies around the AGS ring from the order of 5 mR/hour to levels of the order at 5 R/hour. The highest levels occur around the AGS beam catcher and the extraction equipment. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Dependence of bunch energy loss in cavities on beam velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S. Kurennoy

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam energy loss in a cavity can be easily computed for a relativistic bunch using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for nonrelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the cavity loss factors for a bunch in frequency domain as a function of its velocity and compare results with the relativistic case.

  11. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  12. Self-calibrating magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which we call ''static'' and ''dynamic.'' A detailed analysis shows that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarization analyzers are installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of complete static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. The main merit of this scheme relies on the fact that it is self-calibrating with respect to both the characteristics of the mirror and the transmission of the different polarization channels, the latter item implying that it is uniquely based on relative measurements of spectra. Further advantages are a greater flexibility with regard to different kinds of diagnostics and the circumstance that the technical equipment is less involved. The above scheme is based on a detection system of moderate etendue exploiting a large spectral domain, which is the regime where static polarimetry usually operates. It is also possible, however, to work with large etendue and a small spectral domain, such as commonly adopted in dynamic polarimetry. Using such a regime, static polarimetry loses the advantages mentioned above but gains, as a new advantage, the benefit of a comparatively lower level of photon noise. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus(ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments to study the questions: ''What is mass?'', ''What is the universe made of?'' and ''Why is there no antimatter?''. The four experiments take data of the collision products and try to answer the fundamental questions of physics. The two larger detectors, CMS and ATLAS, are looking for the Higgs boson to study the electroweak symmetry breaking. Both detectors were built with contrasting concepts to exclude potential error sources and to rea rm the results. The smaller experiment LHCb studies the matter-antimatter asymmetry with a focus of the beauty quark. Another smaller experiment is ALICE that studies the conditions right after the Big Bang by colliding heavy ions. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150 km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due to deviations of the beam parameters. Several systems called beam loss monitors (BLMs) can measure beam losses. This thesis concentrates on two of them, ionization chambers and diamond detectors. Over 3600 ionization chambers are installed in the LHC, especially near each quadrupole and next to

  14. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria

    2013-04-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus(ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments to study the questions: ''What is mass?'', ''What is the universe made of?'' and ''Why is there no antimatter?''. The four experiments take data of the collision products and try to answer the fundamental questions of physics. The two larger detectors, CMS and ATLAS, are looking for the Higgs boson to study the electroweak symmetry breaking. Both detectors were built with contrasting concepts to exclude potential error sources and to rea rm the results. The smaller experiment LHCb studies the matter-antimatter asymmetry with a focus of the beauty quark. Another smaller experiment is ALICE that studies the conditions right after the Big Bang by colliding heavy ions. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150 km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due to deviations of the beam parameters. Several systems called beam loss monitors (BLMs) can measure beam losses. This thesis concentrates on two of them, ionization chambers and diamond detectors. Over 3600 ionization chambers are installed in

  15. Automatic Phase Calibration for RF Cavities using Beam-Loading Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Chase, B. E. [Fermilab

    2017-10-01

    Precise calibration of the cavity phase signals is necessary for the operation of any particle accelerator. For many systems this requires human in the loop adjustments based on measurements of the beam parameters downstream. Some recent work has developed a scheme for the calibration of the cavity phase using beam measurements and beam-loading however this scheme is still a multi-step process that requires heavy automation or human in the loop. In this paper we analyze a new scheme that uses only RF signals reacting to beam-loading to calculate the phase of the beam relative to the cavity. This technique could be used in slow control loops to provide real-time adjustment of the cavity phase calibration without human intervention thereby increasing the stability and reliability of the accelerator.

  16. Modelling and calibration of the laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.Y.; Zheng, Bing; Li, Xin; Houkes, Z.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present an approach of modelling and calibration of an active laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system. The system works with the pattern of two-dimensional beam-scanning illumination and one-dimensional slit-scanning detection with a photo-multiplier tube instead of a CCD camera. By

  17. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  18. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peřina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ondřej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell' Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  19. 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Document Server

    JAS - Joint US-CERN-Japan-Russia Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    Many particle accelerators operate with very high beam power and very high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, the beam power in high intensity accelerators will further increase. The protection of the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of the energy is essential. This was the motivation for organizing a first school on beam losses and accelerator protection (in general referred to as machine protection). During the school the methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy were presented. At the completion of the school the participants should have been able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and to analyze an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and the corresponding risk mitigation and management strategie...

  20. Loss management in the beta-beam decay ring

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the beta-beams is to produce pure electron neutrino and anti-neutrino highly energetic beams, coming from β-decay of the 18Ne10+ and 6He2+, both at γ = 100, directed towards experimental halls situated in the Fréjus tunnel [1], [2]. The high intensity ion beams are stored in a ring, until the ions decay. Consequently, all the injected particles will be lost anywhere around the ring generating a high level of irradiation. In order to keep a constant neutrino flux, the losses due to the decay of the radioactive ions are compensated with regular injections. The new ion beam is then merged with the stored beam with a specific RF program [3]. We have to consider two sources of losses: – The β-decay products: their magnetic rigidity being different from the reference one, they are bent differently and lost. – The losses during the injection merging process. The first one needs a particular ring design in order to insert appropriate beam stoppers at the right place. The second one needs a specific...

  1. SPS transverse beam scraping and LHC injection losses

    CERN Document Server

    Drosdal, L; Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Cornelis, K; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Veyrunes, E

    2012-01-01

    Machine protection sets strict requirements for the quality of the injected beam, in particular in the transverse plane. Losses at aperture restrictions and protection elements have to be kept at a minimum. Particles in the beam tails are lost at the tight transfer line collimators and can trigger the LHC beam abort system. These particles have to be removed by scrapers in the vertical and horizontal plane in the SPS. Scraping has become vital for high intensity LHC operation. This paper shows the dependence of injection quality on the SPS scraping and discusses an improved scraper setting up strategy for better reproducibility with the current scraper system.

  2. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  3. Accurate technique for complete geometric calibration of cone-beam computed tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho Youngbin; Moseley, Douglas J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography systems have been developed to provide in situ imaging for the purpose of guiding radiation therapy. Clinical systems have been constructed using this approach, a clinical linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy RP) and an iso-centric C-arm. Geometric calibration involves the estimation of a set of parameters that describes the geometry of such systems, and is essential for accurate image reconstruction. We have developed a general analytic algorithm and corresponding calibration phantom for estimating these geometric parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) systems. The performance of the calibration algorithm is evaluated and its application is discussed. The algorithm makes use of a calibration phantom to estimate the geometric parameters of the system. The phantom consists of 24 steel ball bearings (BBs) in a known geometry. Twelve BBs are spaced evenly at 30 deg in two plane-parallel circles separated by a given distance along the tube axis. The detector (e.g., a flat panel detector) is assumed to have no spatial distortion. The method estimates geometric parameters including the position of the x-ray source, position, and rotation of the detector, and gantry angle, and can describe complex source-detector trajectories. The accuracy and sensitivity of the calibration algorithm was analyzed. The calibration algorithm estimates geometric parameters in a high level of accuracy such that the quality of CT reconstruction is not degraded by the error of estimation. Sensitivity analysis shows uncertainty of 0.01 deg. (around beam direction) to 0.3 deg. (normal to the beam direction) in rotation, and 0.2 mm (orthogonal to the beam direction) to 4.9 mm (beam direction) in position for the medical linear accelerator geometry. Experimental measurements using a laboratory bench Cone-beam CT system of known geometry demonstrate the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in the imaging geometry with an uncertainty of 0.1 mm in

  4. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  5. Simulation and Measurements of Beam Losses on LHC Collimators During Beam Abort Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bruce, R; Goddard, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Faus-Golfe, A

    2013-01-01

    One of the main purposes of tracking simulations for collimation studies is to produce loss maps along the LHC ring, in order to identify the level of local beam losses during nominal and abnormal operation scenarios. The SixTrack program is the standard tracking tool used at CERN to perform these studies. Recently, it was expanded in order to evaluate the proton load on different collimators in case of fast beam failures. Simulations are compared with beam measurements at 4 TeV. Combined failures are assumed which provide worst-case scenarios of the load on tungsten tertiary collimators.

  6. CT calibration for two-dimensional scaling of proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, Hanitra; Oelfke, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    For proton dose calculations in heterogeneous media, it was shown in a previous work that the conventional pencil beam approach based on pathlength scaling does not properly account for scattering effects in nonwater media (Szymanowski and Oelfke 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3313-30). A two-dimensional scaling method was therefore introduced, which is able to predict with high accuracy the propagation of proton pencil beams both along the depth and the lateral directions in inhomogeneous media. In order to integrate this improved pencil beam algorithm in a CT based treatment planning system, two CT calibration curves are needed. The first one relates the Hounsfield numbers to the relative stopping powers, as for the conventional pencil beam approach. The second curve is to relate the Hounsfield numbers to the material-specific lateral scaling factors. The purpose of this work is to provide the CT calibration curves needed for the integration of the pencil beam algorithm featuring the two-dimensional scaling method. Similarly to as suggested by Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) for the calibration curve in terms of stopping powers, we follow a stoichiometric procedure to get the calibration curve in terms of material-specific lateral scaling factors. The calibration curves for a CT scanner of the type Siemens Somatom Plus 4 are obtained from the analytical calculation of the CT Hounsfield numbers, relative stopping powers and material-specific lateral scaling factors for human biological tissues

  7. Beam Loss Monitoring for Run 2 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliokoski, Matti; Dehning, Bernd; Domingues Sousa, Fernando; Effinger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Jackson, Stephen; Kolad, Blazej; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Picha, Ondrej; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Sobieszek, Marcin; Zamantzas, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the LHC consists of over 3600 ionization chambers. The main task of the system is to prevent the superconducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage, as a result of critical beam losses. The BLM system therefore requests a beam abort when the measured dose in the chambers exceeds a threshold value. During Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) a series of modifications were made to the system. Based on the experience from Run 1 and from improved simulation models, all the threshold settings were revised, and modified where required. This was done to improve the machine safety at 7 TeV, and to reduce beam abort requests when neither a magnet quench or damage to machine components is expected. In addition to the updates of the threshold values, about 800 monitors were relocated. This improves the response to unforeseen beam losses in the millisecond time scale due to micron size dust particles present in the vacuum chamber. This contribution will discuss...

  8. Update on beam loss monitoring at CTF3 for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, L J; Effinger, E; Holzer, E B; del Busto, E N; Mallows, S; Branger, E

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system for the compact linear collider (CLIC) study is to work within the machine protection system. Due to the size of the CLIC facility, a BLM that covers large distances along the beam line is highly desirable, in particular for the CLIC drive beam decelerators, which would alternatively require some ~40,000 localised monitors. Therefore, an optical fibre BLM system is currently under investigation which can cover large sections of beam line at a time. A multimode fibre has been installed along the Test Beam Line at the CLIC test facility (CTF3) where the detection principle is based on the production of Cherenkov photons within the fibre resulting from beam loss and their subsequent transport along the fibre where they are then detected at the fibre ends using silicon photomultipliers. Several additional monitors including ACEMs, PEP-II and diamond detectors have also been installed. In this contribution the first results from the BLMs are presented, comp...

  9. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Loss and Tune Measurements (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  10. Identification of LHC beam loss mechanism: a deterministic treatment of loss patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work was to identify patterns in the beam loss profiles, both in their spatial distribution and time evolution. CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest device ever built, with a total circumference of 26.7 km; and it is the most powerful accelerator ever, both in beam energy and beam intensity. The main magnets are superconducting, and contain the particles into two counter circulating beams which collide in four interaction points. CERN and the LHC will be described in chapter 1. The superconducting magnets of the LHC have to be protected against particle losses. Depending on the number of lost particles, the coils of the magnets could become normal conducting and/or will be damaged. To avoid these events a beam loss monitoring (BLM) system was installed to measure the particle loss rates. If the predefined safe thresholds of loss rates are exceeded, the beams are directed out of the accelerator ring towards the beam dump. The detectors of the BLM system are mainly ionization chambers located outside of the cryostats. In total, about 3600 ionisation chambers are installed. Further challenges include the high dynamical range of losses (chamber currents ranging between 2 pA and 1 mA). The BLM system will be further described in chapter 2. The subject of this thesis is to study the loss patterns and nd the origin of the losses in a deterministic way, by comparing measured losses to well understood loss scenarios. This is done through a case study: different techniques were used on a restrained set of loss scenarios, as a proof of concept of the possibility to extract information from a loss profile. Finding the origin of the losses should allow acting in response. A justification of the doctoral work will be given at the end of chapter 2. This thesis will then focus on the theoretical understanding and the implementation of the decomposition of a measured loss profile as a linear combination of the reference scenarios; and the evaluation of

  11. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described.

  12. Long radiation detector system for beam loss monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balsamo, J.; Fewell, N.M.; Klein, J.D.; Witkover, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Long Radiation Monitor (LRM) system installed at the 200 MeV linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. This system allows observation of both the spatial and temporal character of the losses in the linac and its transport lines. An array of large diameter gas filled coaxial cables are used as extended ion chambers to detect the losses. The output signals are available as a histogram, video waveforms, and numerical data via the computer. A fast beam interrupt is also provided. The detector characteristics and details of the processing electronics are presented. Results of studies of longitudinal, steering and focusing losses are described

  13. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, R. M., E-mail: rmagee@trialphaenergy.com; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 10{sup 7} n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  14. Bowtie filter and water calibration in the improvement of cone beam CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minghui; Dai Jianrong; Zhang Ke

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the improvement of cone beam CT (CBCT) image quality by using bewtie filter (F 1 ) and water calibration. Methods: First the multi-level gain calibration of the detector panel with the method of Cal 2 calibration was performed, and the CT images of CATPHAN503 with F 0 and bowtie filter were collected, respectively. Then the detector panel using water calibration kit was calibrated, and images were acquired again. Finally, the change of image quality after using F 1 and (or) water calibration method was observed. The observed indexes included low contrast visibility, spatial uniformity, ring artifact, spatial resolution and geometric accuracy. Results: Comparing with the traditional combination of F 0 filter and Cal 2 calibration, the combination of bowtie filter F 1 and water calibration improves low contrast visibility by 13.71%, and spatial uniformity by 54. 42%. Water calibration removes ring artifacts effectively. However, none of them improves spatial resolution and geometric accuracy. Conclusions: The combination of F 1 and water calibration improves CBCT image quality effectively. This improvement is aid to the registration of CBCT images and localization images. (authors)

  15. Identification of LHC beam loss mechanism : a deterministic treatment of loss patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Marsili, Aurélien

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest machine ever built, with a total circumference of 26.7 km; and it is the most powerful accelerator ever, both in beam energy and beam intensity. The main magnets are superconducting, keeping the particles into two counter circulating beams, which collide in four interaction points. CERN and the LHC will be described in chap. 1. The superconducting magnets of the LHC have to be protected against particle losses. Depending on the number of lost particles, the coils of the magnets will become normal conducting and/or will be damaged. To avoid these events a beam loss monitoring (BLM) system was installed to measure the particle loss rates. If the predefined safe thresholds of loss rates are exceeded, the beams are directed out of the accelerator ring towards the beam dump. The detectors of the BLM system are mainly ionization chambers located outside of the cryostats. In total, about 3500 ionisation chambers are installed. Further challenges include the high dyna...

  16. Beam loss control on the ISIS synchrotron simulations, measurements, upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Warsop, C M

    2003-01-01

    The ISIS 800 MeV proton synchrotron presently provides 2.5*10/sup 13/ protons per pulse at 50 Hz, corresponding to a mean power of 160 kW. A dual harmonic RF system upgrade, now being installed, is expected to increase the intensity and power to about 3.75*10/sup 13/ ppp and 240 kW respectively. This paper describes work presently underway to understand and optimise beam loss control, which is a dominant factor determining operational performance. The main features of the collimation system are described, and Monte Carlo simulations of the loss control process are used to understand variations of efficiency with beam loss mode (growth rate, plane). Results of simulations are compared with measurements and operational data. Improvements to measurements are also outlined.

  17. Application of Diamond Based Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080642; Lohmann, W; Rüdiger, S

    2013-05-14

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due...

  18. Performance and perspectives of the diamond based Beam Condition Monitor for beam loss monitoring at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080862

    2015-01-01

    At CMS, a beam loss monitoring system is operated to protect the silicon detectors from high particle rates, arising from intense beam loss events. As detectors, poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are placed around the beam pipe at several locations inside CMS. In case of extremely high detector currents, the LHC beams are automatically extracted from the LHC rings.Diamond is the detector material of choice due to its radiation hardness. Predictions of the detector lifetime were made based on FLUKA monte-carlo simulations and irradiation test results from the RD42 collaboration, which attested no significant radiation damage over several years.During the LHC operational Run1 (2010 â?? 2013), the detector efficiencies were monitored. A signal decrease of about 50 times stronger than expectations was observed in the in-situ radiation environment. Electric field deformations due to charge carriers, trapped in radiation induced lattice defects, are responsible for this signal decrease. This so-called polarizat...

  19. Ionization Chambers for the LHC Beam Loss Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E; Kain, V

    2003-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be used to prevent and protect superconducting magnets against coil quenches and coil damages. Ionisation chambers will be mounted outside the cryostat to measure the secondary shower particles caused by lost beam particles. Since the stored particle beam intensity is eight orders of magnitude larger than the lowest quench level and the losses should be detected with a relative error of two, the design and the location of the detectors have to be optimised. For that purpose a two-fold simulation was carried out. The longitudinal loss locations of the tertiary halo is investigated by tracking the halo through several magnet elements. These loss distributions are combined with simulations of the particle fluence outside the cryostat, which is induced by lost protons at the vacuum pipe. The base-line ionisation chamber has been tested at the PS Booster in order to determine the detector response at the high end of the dynamic range.

  20. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  1. RFQ Designs and Beam-Loss Distributions for IFMIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, Robert A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The IFMIF 125 mA cw 40 MeV accelerators will set an intensity record. Minimization of particle loss along the accelerator is a top-level requirement and requires sophisticated design intimately relating the accelerated beam and the accelerator structure. Such design technique, based on the space-charge physics of linear accelerators (linacs), is used in this report in the development of conceptual designs for the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) section of the IFMIF accelerators. Design comparisons are given for the IFMIF CDR Equipartitioned RFQ, a CDR Alternative RFQ, and new IFMIF Post-CDR Equipartitioned RFQ designs. Design strategies are illustrated for combining several desirable characteristics, prioritized as minimum beam loss at energies above ~ 1 MeV, low rf power, low peak field, short length, high percentage of accelerated particles. The CDR design has ~0.073% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7,is 12.3 m long, and accelerates ~89.6% of the input beam. A new Post-CDR design has ~0.077% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7 and ~8 m length, and accelerates ~97% of the input beam. A complete background for the designs is given, and comparisons are made. Beam-loss distributions are used as input for nuclear physics simulations of radioactivity effects in the IFMIF accelerator hall, to give information for shielding, radiation safety and maintenance design. Beam-loss distributions resulting from a ~1M particle input distribution representative of the IFMIF ECR ion source are presented. The simulations reported were performed with a consistent family of codes. Relevant comparison with other codes has not been possible as their source code is not available. Certain differences have been noted but are not consistent over a broad range of designs and parameter range. The exact transmission found by any of these codes should be treated as indicative, as each has various sensitivities in

  2. Beam Losses and Lifetime of the LHC Beam in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bohl, T; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Tückmantel, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Studies of the LHC beam loss in the SPS started in 2003 [1], [2] and continued in 2004. The flat bottom losses strongly depend on the batch intensity and the RF voltage. For beam with the 75 ns spacing at the same bunch intensity they are smaller than for the 25 ns spaced bunches. Large voltage on the flat bottom together with some optimum voltage at injection helps to reduce losses. Analysis of data from 2003 has shown that observations are compatible with a diffusion like process on the flat bottom. Therefore significant time during 2004 was devoted to studies of possible RF noise sources. However the main improvement in beam lifetime on the flat bottom was observed after a change in the working point in the transverse plane (MD on 1.09.2004). In this Note we present measurements of beam loss and lifetime done during several dedicated SPS MDs for different conditions in the ring. Analysis of beam coasts will be presented separately.

  3. SU-F-E-19: A Novel Method for TrueBeam Jaw Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corns, R; Zhao, Y; Huang, V [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre - BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, BC (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A simple jaw calibration method is proposed for Varian TrueBeam using an EPID-Encoder combination that gives accurate fields sizes and a homogeneous junction dose. This benefits clinical applications such as mono-isocentric half-beam block breast cancer or head and neck cancer treatment with junction/field matching. Methods: We use EPID imager with pixel size 0.392 mm × 0.392 mm to determine the radiation jaw position as measured from radio-opaque markers aligned with the crosshair. We acquire two images with different symmetric field sizes and record each individual jaw encoder values. A linear relationship between each jaw’s position and its encoder value is established, from which we predict the encoder values that produce the jaw positions required by TrueBeam’s calibration procedure. During TrueBeam’s jaw calibration procedure, we move the jaw with the pendant to set the jaw into position using the predicted encoder value. The overall accuracy is under 0.1 mm. Results: Our in-house software analyses images and provides sub-pixel accuracy to determine field centre and radiation edges (50% dose of the profile). We verified the TrueBeam encoder provides a reliable linear relationship for each individual jaw position (R{sup 2}>0.9999) from which the encoder values necessary to set jaw calibration points (1 cm and 19 cm) are predicted. Junction matching dose inhomogeneities were improved from >±20% to <±6% using this new calibration protocol. However, one technical challenge exists for junction matching, if the collimator walkout is large. Conclusion: Our new TrueBeam jaw calibration method can systematically calibrate the jaws to crosshair within sub-pixel accuracy and provides both good junction doses and field sizes. This method does not compensate for a larger collimator walkout, but can be used as the underlying foundation for addressing the walkout issue.

  4. Calibration of Eringen's small length scale coefficient for initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beams based on microstructured beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C M; Zhang, Z; Challamel, N; Duan, W H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we calibrate Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 for an initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beam via a microstructured beam modelled by some repetitive cells comprising finite rigid segments and elastic rotational springs. By adopting the pseudo-differential operator and Padé's approximation, an analytical solution for the vibration frequency in terms of initial stress may be developed for the microstructured beam model. When comparing this analytical solution with the established exact vibration solution from the nonlocal beam theory, one finds that the calibrated Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 is given by e 0 = √(1/6)-(1/12)(σ 0 /σ-breve m ) where σ 0 is the initial stress and σ-breve m is the mth mode buckling stress of the corresponding local Euler beam. It is shown that e 0 varies with respect to the initial axial stress, from 1/√(12)∼0.289 at the buckling compressive stress to 1/√6∼0.408 when the axial stress is zero and it monotonically increases with increasing initial tensile stress. The small length scale coefficient e 0 , however, does not depend on the vibration/buckling mode considered. (paper)

  5. UDOT calibration of AASHTO's new prestress loss design equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In the next edition of the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications the procedure to calculate prestress losses will change dramatically. The new equations are empirically based on high performance concrete from four states (Nebraska, New Hampshire, ...

  6. UDOT's calibration of AASHTO's new prestress loss design equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In the next edition of the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications the procedure to calculate prestress losses will change dramatically. The new equations are empirically based on high performance concrete from four states (Nebraska, New Hampshire, ...

  7. Quality assurance network in central Europe. External audit on output calibration for photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izewska, J. [Radiotherapy Dept., Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Novotny, J. [Radiotherapy Dept., Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Gwiazdowska, B. [Medical Physics Dept., Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Kindlova, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Univ. Hospital Vinohrady, Prague (Czech Republic); Kontra, G. [National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dam, J. van [Radiotherapy Dept., Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Dutreix, A. [Radiotherapy Dept., Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Schueren, E. van der [Radiotherapy Dept., Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    1995-12-31

    The EROPAQ project for TLD monitoring of photon beams started in June 1994 with the set-up of the TLD system: calibration, reading and evaluation procedures. The acceptance level of {+-}3% was set for the TLD intercomparisons. The policy of the project was to check all beams in 47 participating radiotherapy centres and to recheck all the beams in those centres, where a deviation exceeding {+-}3% occurred in one or more of the beams. Out of 129 beams checked, 100 beams (78%) were found within the {+-}3% limit. Eleven beams show deviations larger than {+-}6%, and immediate corrective action was undertaken. Out of 47 centres checked, 22 did not participate in any external audit in a preceding 5 years. In these centres 68% (34/50) of the total number of {gamma} and X-ray beams checked but only 59% (20/34) of {gamma} beams were within the acceptance level, while in the 25 centres, which participated in an external audit before, these figures were 84% (66/79) and 88% (35/40) respectively. The sources of discrepancies were thoroughly investigated, discussed with the participants and the errors corrected. Poor results were in several cases associated with very old design of radiotherapy units and old dosimetry systems, equipped with inadequate ionization chambers. In several centres, an insufficient training of the physicists in clinical dosimetry was observed. Thanks to the corrective action, a great improvement of calibration of the beams was achieved. Standard deviation of the distribution of the results for all x and {gamma} beams checked decreased from SD = 7.4% at the first check to SD = 2.5% at the second check. (orig.).

  8. Absolute spectral calibration of an intensified CCD camera using twin beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haderka, O.; Peřina Jr., J.; Michálek, Václav; Hamar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2014), B1-B7 ISSN 0740-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spectral calibration * intensified CCD camera * twin beams * photon pairs Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.970, year: 2014

  9. Calibration methodology for instruments utilized in X radiation beams, diagnostic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penha, M. da; Potiens, A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. The established qualities are recommended by the international standards IEC 1267 and ISO 4037-3. Two ionization chambers were used as reference systems, one with a volume of 30 cm{sup 3} for radiation protection measurements, and the other with a volume of 1 cm{sup 3} for direct beam measurements. Both are traceable to the German Primary Laboratory of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In the case of calibration of quality control instruments, a non-invasive method using the measurement of the spectrum endpoint was established with a portable gamma and X-ray Intertechnique spectrometer system. The methods were applied to survey meters (radiation protection measurements), ionization chambers (direct beam measurements) and k Vp meters (invasive and non-invasive instruments). (Author)

  10. The Effect of a New Calibration Procedure on the Measurement Accuracy of Scintec's Displaced-Beam Laser Scintillometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesteren, van A.J.H.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Kroonenberg, van den A.C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new calibration procedure included in the production process of Scintec’s displaced-beam laser scintillometers (SLS-20/40) and its effect on their measurement accuracy. The calibration procedure determines the factual displacement distances of the laser beams at the receiver and

  11. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam loss

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, C D

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing to beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At CERN, the design of the CLIC drive beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found using the electron gamma shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis program ANSYS, which was able to find t...

  12. Calibrating and validating a FE model for long-term behavior of RC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošić Nikola D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the research carried out in finding an optimal finite element (FE model for calculating the long-term behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams. A multi-purpose finite element software DIANA was used. A benchmark test in the form of a simply supported beam loaded in four point bending was selected for model calibration. The result was the choice of 3-node beam elements, a multi-directional fixed crack model with constant stress cut-off, nonlinear tension softening and constant shear retention and a creep and shrinkage model according to CEB-FIP Model Code 1990. The model was then validated on 14 simply supported beams and 6 continuous beams. Good agreement was found with experimental results (within ±15%.

  13. Scenario for Precision Beam Energy Calibration in FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Koop, I A

    2015-01-01

    The resonance depolarization method was very successfully used in the experiments at LEP, where the mass of the Z-boson was determined with the relative uncertainty [1, 2]. In the future FCC-ee circular electron-positron collider the luminosity at Z-peak (beam energy 45.5 GeV) is expected be 4-5 orders of magnitude higher and one goal is to perform the same experiments as at LEP, but with much greater accuracy, approaching the level of [3]. Obviously this can be done only by measuring the spin precession frequency. But there are many problems which still need to be solved on the way towards a complete design. The first one: the self-polarization takes too long a time. The Sokolov-Ternov polarization time is about 250 hours at Z-peak. One approach is to install the special field-asymmetric polarizing wigglers to make the self-polarization time much shorter [4, 5] and to utilize only few percent of the polarization degree to measure the resonance spin precession frequency. But these very strong wigglers substan...

  14. Measurement of Beam Loss at the Australian Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, EB; Kastriotou, M; Boland, MJ; Jackson, PD; Rasool, RP; Schmidt, J; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented requirements that new machines are setting on their diagnostic systems is leading to the development of new generation of devices with large dynamic range, sensitivity and time resolution. Beam loss detection is particularly challenging due to the large extension of new facilities that need to be covered with localized detector. Candidates to mitigate this problem consist of systems in which the sensitive part of the radiation detectors can be extended over long distance of beam lines. In this document we study the feasibility of a BLM system based on optical fiber as an active detector for an electron storage ring. The Australian Synchrotron (AS) comprises a 216m ring that stores electrons up to 3GeV. The Accelerator has recently claimed the world record ultra low transverse emittance (below pm rad) and its surroundings are rich in synchrotron radiation. Therefore, the AS provides beam conditions very similar to those expected in the CLIC/ILC damping rings. A qualitative benchmark of beam l...

  15. SU-E-T-377: Inaccurate Positioning Might Introduce Significant MapCheck Calibration Error in Flatten Filter Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S; Chao, C; Chang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the calibration error of detector sensitivity for MapCheck due to inaccurate positioning of the device, which is not taken into account by the current commercial iterative calibration algorithm. We hypothesize the calibration is more vulnerable to the positioning error for the flatten filter free (FFF) beams than the conventional flatten filter flattened beams. Methods: MapCheck2 was calibrated with 10MV conventional and FFF beams, with careful alignment and with 1cm positioning error during calibration, respectively. Open fields of 37cmx37cm were delivered to gauge the impact of resultant calibration errors. The local calibration error was modeled as a detector independent multiplication factor, with which propagation error was estimated with positioning error from 1mm to 1cm. The calibrated sensitivities, without positioning error, were compared between the conventional and FFF beams to evaluate the dependence on the beam type. Results: The 1cm positioning error leads to 0.39% and 5.24% local calibration error in the conventional and FFF beams respectively. After propagating to the edges of MapCheck, the calibration errors become 6.5% and 57.7%, respectively. The propagation error increases almost linearly with respect to the positioning error. The difference of sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams was small (0.11 ± 0.49%). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the positioning error is not handled by the current commercial calibration algorithm of MapCheck. Particularly, the calibration errors for the FFF beams are ~9 times greater than those for the conventional beams with identical positioning error, and a small 1mm positioning error might lead to up to 8% calibration error. Since the sensitivities are only slightly dependent of the beam type and the conventional beam is less affected by the positioning error, it is advisable to cross-check the sensitivities between the conventional and FFF beams to detect

  16. Calibration method of parallel projection beams for 3D profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shuo-Jen; Fan, Tienjung

    1996-10-01

    3D profile measurement of work-piece by non-contact optical methods has been studied extensively because of its importance in the automated manufacturing processes and quality control of components. In this paper, a projection method and its calibration algorithm of parallel projection means for 3D profile measurement system was presented. The proposed method used the pin-hole theory. An arc light which was assumed to be a point light source was positioned in the focal point of a parabolic mirror. After it was reflected by the parabolic mirror, uniform parallel light beams were projected. Using alignment collimator and telescope, the best positions of all of the optical elements in the system can be adjusted. Parameters of CCD lens, image center, arc light source and their relative positional relationship were also calibrated. This ensures the overall accuracy of the projection system. For most of the structured light optical methods, the size and shape of the dot laser beam or the length and width of a line laser beam of the projected slits were functions of the measurement range. A lot of efforts and caution have been conducted int he calibration process and mathematical manipulations are required to assure the measurement accuracy. The proposed parallel projection beam method eliminates above mentioned difficulty. It could be a robust and efficient non-contact optical method for the measurement of 3D profile.

  17. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The US-CERN-JAPAN-RUSSIA Joint International Accelerator School is organising a course on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection to be held in Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November, 2014.    This school is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design, construction, and/or operation of accelerators with high power photon or particle beams and/or accelerator sub-systems with large stored energy. Application deadlines are 15 August and 4 September. Further information on this Joint School can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/JAS/Newport%20Beach%202014/NPBadvert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/287647/ http://uspas.fnal.gov/programs/JAS/JAS14.shtml

  18. Comparison of two methods of therapy level calibration at 60Co gamma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, H.; Jaervinen, H.; Grimbergen, T.W.M.; Grindborg, J.E.; Chauvenet, B.; Czap, L.; Ennow, K.; Moretti, C.; Rocha, P.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy and traceability of the calibration of radiotherapy dosimeters is of great concern to those involved in the delivery of radiotherapy. It has been proposed that calibration should be carried out directly in terms of absorbed dose to water, instead of using the conventional and widely applied quantity of air kerma. In this study, the faithfulness in disseminating standards of both air kerma and absorbed dose to water were evaluated, through comparison of both types of calibration for three types of commonly used radiotherapy dosimeters at 60 Co gamma beams at a few secondary and primary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs and PSDLs). A supplementary aim was to demonstrate the impact which the change in the method of calibration would have on clinical dose measurements at the reference point. Within the estimated uncertainties, both the air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors obtained at different laboratories were regarded as consistent. As might be expected, between the SSDLs traceable to the same PSDL the observed differences were smaller (less than 0.5%) than between PSDLs or SSDLs traceable to different PSDLs (up to 1.5%). This can mainly be attributed to the reported differences between the primary standards. The calibration factors obtained by the two methods differed by up to about 1.5% depending on the primary standards involved and on the parameters of calculation used for 60 Co gamma radiation. It is concluded that this discrepancy should be settled before the new method of calibration at 60 Co gamma beams in terms of absorbed dose to water is taken into routine use. (author)

  19. Comparison of two methods of therapy level calibration at 60Co gamma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, H; Jaervinen, H; Grimbergen, T W M; Grindborg, J-E; Chauvenet, B; Czap, L; Ennow, K; Moretti, C; Rocha, P

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy and traceability of the calibration of radiotherapy dosimeters is of great concern to those involved in the delivery of radiotherapy. It has been proposed that calibration should be carried out directly in terms of absorbed dose to water, instead of using the conventional and widely applied quantity of air kerma. In this study, the faithfulness in disseminating standards of both air kerma and absorbed dose to water were evaluated, through comparison of both types of calibration for three types of commonly used radiotherapy dosimeters at 60 Co gamma beams at a few secondary and primary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs and PSDLs). A supplementary aim was to demonstrate the impact which the change in the method of calibration would have on clinical dose measurements at the reference point. Within the estimated uncertainties, both the air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors obtained at different laboratories were regarded as consistent. As might be expected, between the SSDLs traceable to the same PSDL the observed differences were smaller (less than 0.5%) than between PSDLs or SSDLs traceable to different PSDLs (up to 1.5%). This can mainly be attributed to the reported differences between the primary standards. The calibration factors obtained by the two methods differed by up to about 1.5% depending on the primary standards involved and on the parameters of calculation used for 60 Co gamma radiation. It is concluded that this discrepancy should be settled before the new method of calibration at 60 Co gamma beams in terms of absorbed dose to water is taken into routine use

  20. Prompt loss of beam ions in KSTAR plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Young Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For a toroidal plasma facility to realize fusion energy, researching the transport of fast ions is important not only due to its close relation to the heating and current drive efficiencies but also to determine the heat load on the plasma-facing components. We present a theoretical analysis and orbit simulation for the origin of lost fast-ions during neutral beam injection (NBI heating in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR device. We adopted a two-dimensional phase diagram of the toroidal momentum and magnetic moment and describe detectable momentums at the fast-ion loss detector (FILD position as a quadratic line. This simple method was used to model birth ions deposited by NBI and drawn as points in the momentum phase space. A Lorentz orbit code was used to calculate the fast-ion orbits and present the prompt loss characteristics of the KSTAR NBI. The scrape-off layer deposition of fast ions produces a significant prompt loss, and the model and experimental results closely agreed on the pitch-angle range of the NBI prompt loss. Our approach can provide wall load information from the fast ion loss.

  1. Gas flow and related beam losses in the ITER neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, A.; Hemsworth, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    The gas flow in the ITER neutral beam injectors has been studied using a 3D Monte-Carlo code to define a number of key parameters affecting the design and operation of the injector. This paper presents the results of calculations of the gas density in the two accelerator concepts presently considered as options for the ITER injectors, and the resultant stripping losses of the negative ions during their acceleration to 1 MeV. The sensitivity of the model to various parameters has been studied, including the gas temperature in the ion source and the subsequent accommodation by collisions with the accelerator structure, and the degree of dissociation of the D 2 or H 2 in the ion source, and subsequent recombination during collisions with the accelerator structure. Additionally the sensitivity of the losses to details of the beam source design and operating parameters are examined for the both accelerator concepts. (author)

  2. A three-dimensional laser vibration measurement technology realized on five laser beam and its calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Ke; Zhang, Shen-Feng

    2018-03-01

    Put forward a kind of three-dimensional vibration information technology of vibrating object by the mean of five laser beam of He-Ne laser, and with the help of three-way sensor, measure the three-dimensional laser vibration developed by above mentioned technology. The technology based on the Doppler principle of interference and signal demodulation technology, get the vibration information of the object, through the algorithm processing, extract the three-dimensional vibration information of space objects, and can achieve the function of angle calibration of five beam in the space, which avoid the effects of the mechanical installation error, greatly improve the accuracy of measurement. With the help of a & B K4527 contact three axis sensor, measure and calibrate three-dimensional laser vibrometer, which ensure the accuracy of the measurement data. Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of contact and non-contact sensor, and analysis the future development trends of the sensor industry.

  3. A low energy ion beam facility for mass spectrometer calibration: First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of habitable environments around the gas giants in the Solar System is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of the European Space Agency (ESA), which will characterise Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats. The NIM, Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer, is part of the PEP experiment and will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. We designed and developed a calibration facility (SATANS, Supersonic cATion and ANion Source), especially for use with the NIM instrument. In a first step, we established a low energy ion beam for positive ions in the range of 0.01-30 eV. Then we conducted beam velocity calibrations with a velocity uncertainty mission conditions, i.e., for velocities from 1 up to 7 km/s and even more.

  4. An optimized calibration method for surface measurements with MOSFETs in shaped-beam radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sors, A; Cassol, E; Latorzeff, I; Duthil, P; Sabatier, J; Lotterie, J A; Redon, A; Berry, I; Franceries, X

    2014-02-01

    Nowadays MOSFET dosimeters are widely used for dose verification in radiotherapy procedures. Although their sensitive area satisfies size requirements for small field dosimetry, their use in radiosurgery has rarely been reported. The aim of this study is to propose and optimize a calibration method to perform surface measurements in 6 MV shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes down to 18 × 18 mm(2). The effect of different parameters such as recovery time between 2 readings, batch uniformity and build-up cap attenuation was studied. Batch uniformity was found to be within 2% and isocenter dose attenuation due to the build-up cap over the MOSFET was near 2% irrespective of field size. Two sets of sensitivity coefficients (SC) were determined for TN-502RD MOSFET dosimeters using experimental and calculated calibration; the latter being developed using an inverse square law model. Validation measurements were performed on a realistic head phantom in irregular fields. MOSFET dose values obtained by applying either measured or calculated SC were compared. For calibration, optimal results were obtained for an inter-measurement time lapse of 5 min. We also found that fitting the SC values with the inverse square law reduced the number of measurements required for calibration. The study demonstrated that combining inverse square law and Sterling-Worthley formula resulted in an underestimation of up to 4% of the dose measured by MOSFETs for complex beam geometries. With the inverse square law, it is possible to reduce the number of measurements required for calibration for multiple field-SSD combinations. Our results suggested that MOSFETs are suitable sensors for dosimetry when used at the surface in shaped-beam radiosurgery down to 18 × 18 mm(2). Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic calibration and signal switching system for the particle beam fusion research data acquisition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1979-09-01

    This report describes both the hardware and software components of an automatic calibration and signal system (Autocal) for the data acquisition system for the Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators Hydra, Proto I, and Proto II. The Autocal hardware consists of off-the-shelf commercial equipment. The various hardware components, special modifications and overall system configuration are described. Special software has been developed to support the Autocal hardware. Software operation and maintenance are described.

  6. Automatic calibration and signal switching system for the particle beam fusion research data acquisition facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1979-09-01

    This report describes both the hardware and software components of an automatic calibration and signal system (Autocal) for the data acquisition system for the Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators Hydra, Proto I, and Proto II. The Autocal hardware consists of off-the-shelf commercial equipment. The various hardware components, special modifications and overall system configuration are described. Special software has been developed to support the Autocal hardware. Software operation and maintenance are described

  7. Study of the alignment of X radiation beam for calibration of chambers used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The activities developed in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation safety, require that the metrological parameters involving these activities have on its results a high degree of reliability, to ensure traceability. To meet the existing demand in Brazil, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying a new tube X-ray beams used in the calibration of the standard rooms, which serve to quality control in hospitals, clinics and industry. (author)

  8. Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a vital part of the active protection of the LHC accelerators' elements. It should provide the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. The LHC BLM system will use ionization chambers as standard detectors but in the areas where very high dose rates are expected, the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) chambers will be employed because of their high linearity, low sensitivity and fast response. The SEM needs a high vacuum for proper operation and has to be functional for up to 20 years, therefore all the components were designed according to the UHV requirements and a getter pump was included. The SEM electrodes are made of Ti because of its Secondary Emission Yield (SEY) stability. The sensitivity of the SEM was modeled in Geant4 via the Photo-Absorption Ionization module together with custom parameterization of the very low energy secondary electron production. ...

  9. Calibration of a multi-beam Laser System by using a TLS-generated Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gordon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotating multi-beam LIDARs mounted on moving platforms have become very successful for many applications such as autonomous navigation, obstacle avoidance or mobile mapping. To obtain accurate point coordinates, a precise calibration of such a LIDAR system is required. For the determination of the corresponding parameters we propose a calibration scheme which exploits the information of 3D reference point clouds captured by a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS device. It is assumed that the accuracy of this point clouds is considerably higher than that from the multi-beam LIDAR and that the data represent faces of man-made objects at different distances. After extracting planes in the reference data sets, the point-plane-incidences of the measured points and the reference planes are used to formulate the implicit constraints. We inspect the Velodyne HDL-64E S2 system as the best-known representative for this kind of sensor system. The usability and feasibility of the calibration procedure is demonstrated with real data sets representing building faces (walls, roof planes and ground. Beside the improvement of the point accuracy by considering the calibration results, we test the significance of the parameters related to the sensor model and consider the uncertainty of measurements w.r.t. the measured distances. The Velodyne returns two kinds of measurements – distances and encoder angles. To account for this, we perform a variance component estimation to obtain realistic standard deviations for the observations.

  10. Determination of absorbed dose calibration factors for therapy level electron beam ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, M R; Williams, A J; DuSautoy, A R

    2001-03-01

    Over several years the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has been developing an absorbed dose calibration service for electron beam radiotherapy. To test this service, a number of trial calibrations of therapy level electron beam ionization chambers have been carried out during the last 3 years. These trials involved 17 UK radiotherapy centres supplying a total of 46 chambers of the NACP, Markus, Roos and Farmer types. Calibration factors were derived from the primary standard calorimeter at seven energies in the range 4 to 19 MeV with an estimated uncertainty of +/-1.5% at the 95% confidence level. Investigations were also carried out into chamber perturbation, polarity effects, ion recombination and repeatability of the calibration process. The instruments were returned to the radiotherapy centres for measurements to be carried out comparing the NPL direct calibration with the 1996 IPEMB air kerma based Code of Practice. It was found that, in general, all chambers of a particular type showed the same energy response. However, it was found that polarity and recombination corrections were quite variable for Markus chambers-differences in the polarity correction of up to 1% were seen. Perturbation corrections were obtained and were found to agree well with the standard data used in the IPEMB Code. The results of the comparison between the NPL calibration and IPEMB Code show agreement between the two methods at the +/-1% level for the NACP and Farmer chambers, but there is a significant difference for the Markus chambers of around 2%. This difference between chamber types is most likely to be due to the design of the Markus chamber.

  11. Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greacen, E.L.; Correll, R.L.; Cunningham, R.B.; Johns, G.G.; Nicolls, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures common to different methods of calibration of neutron moisture meters are outlined and laboratory and field calibration methods compared. Gross errors which arise from faulty calibration techniques are described. The count rate can be affected by the dry bulk density of the soil, the volumetric content of constitutional hydrogen and other chemical components of the soil and soil solution. Calibration is further complicated by the fact that the neutron meter responds more strongly to the soil properties close to the detector and source. The differences in slope of calibration curves for different soils can be as much as 40%

  12. A low energy ion beam facility for mass spectrometer calibration: First results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The exploration of habitable environments around the gas giants in the Solar System is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of the European Space Agency (ESA), which will characterise Ganymede, Europa, and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats. The NIM, Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer, is part of the PEP experiment and will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. We designed and developed a calibration facility (SATANS, Supersonic cATion and ANion Source), especially for use with the NIM instrument. In a first step, we established a low energy ion beam for positive ions in the range of 0.01-30 eV. Then we conducted beam velocity calibrations with a velocity uncertainty <5%, which provided exact settings and formulas for the cation beam velocity of different gas mixtures in the range of 1-15 km/s. In addition, first results are obtained by using the NIM prototype for direct ion beam measurements under realistic JUICE mission conditions, i.e., for velocities from 1 up to 7 km/s and even more.

  13. Accounting for polarization in the calibration of a donut beam axial optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2018-01-01

    Advances in light shaping techniques are leading to new tools for optical trapping and micromanipulation. For example, optical tweezers made from Laguerre-Gaussian or donut beams display an increased axial trap strength and can impart angular momentum to rotate a specimen. However, the application of donut beam optical tweezers to precision, biophysical measurements remains limited due to a lack of methods for calibrating such devices sufficiently. For instance, one notable complication, not present when trapping with a Gaussian beam, is that the polarization of the trap light can significantly affect the tweezers' strength as well as the location of the trap. In this article, we show how to precisely calibrate the axial trap strength as a function of height above the coverslip surface while accounting for focal shifts in the trap position arising from radiation pressure, mismatches in the index of refraction, and polarization induced intensity variations. This provides a foundation for implementing a donut beam optical tweezers capable of applying precise axial forces.

  14. Characteristic parameters analysis on diagnostic X-ray beams for dosemeter calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation metrology is the base to achieve reliable dose measurements in ali areas; it is also part of the framework that is established to assure radiation protection procedures in order to avoid or minimize the harmful biological effect that may be caused by ionizing radiation. A well done metrology means the use of reliable instruments that comply with standard performance requirements worldwide accepted. Those instruments are expected to be calibrated by Metrology Laboratories under well defined conditions. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Standard 61267 established the reference radiations for medical diagnostic x-ray equipment that are recommended to be used for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic dosimetry. In this work, X-ray beam qualities were established in a Calibration Laboratory and their characteristics were analyzed through the measurement of beam parameters like inherent tube filtration, beam uniformity and field size, energy spectra and peak voltage for additional filtration with 94.425 por cent and 99.999 por cent purity filters. Also, the first half-value layer and the homogeneity coefficient were measured for the three RQR 2, RQR 6 and RQR 10 IEC beam qualities and they were analyzed according to the IEC standard. Air-kerma measurements were carried out with an ionization chamber that had its reliability confirmed through repetition and reproducibility reading tests. In 50 sets of measurements the maximum standard deviation found of 10 successive readings was 0.19 %; the maximum shift of the reading mean value at a fixed geometry condition was 0.80 % with an overall standard deviation of 0.23 %. Results showed that the use of different purity filters did not cause a relevant influence on the beam energy spectra. An ionization chamber was also calibrated against a standard dosimeter in ali implemented reference radiations and the relevant sources of uncertainties were estimated. Calibration could be done

  15. Application of methodology for calibration of instruments utilized in dosimetry of high energy beams, for radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiens, Maria P.A.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation qualities recommended by the IEC 1267 standard for the calibration of instruments used in diagnostic radiology measurements were established using a neo-diagnomax X-ray system (125 kV). The RQR radiation qualities are recommended to test ionization chambers used in non attenuated beams, and the RQA radiation qualities in attenuated beams (behind a phantom). To apply the methodology, 6 ionization chambers commonly used in diagnostic radiology were tested. The higher energy dependence (17%) was obtained for an ionization chamber recommended for mammography beams, that is not the case of the X radiation system used in this work. The other ionization chambers presented good performance in terms of energy (maximum of 5%), therefore within the limits of the international recommendations for this kind of instrument. (author)

  16. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-06-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  17. Beam loss due to the aperture limitation resulting from intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Diffusion equation is used to evaluate the beam loss in the presence of aperture limitation resulting from the intrabeam scattering. We discuss the effect of different boundary conditions. Satisfactory beam intensity can be maintained within the proposed RHIC operation time

  18. Loss of Energy Concentration in Nonlinear Evolution Beam Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrione, Maurizio; Gazzola, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the oscillations that were seen at the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, we introduce the notion of solutions with a prevailing mode for the nonlinear evolution beam equation u_{tt} + u_{xxxx} + f(u)= g(x, t) in bounded space-time intervals. We give a new definition of instability for these particular solutions, based on the loss of energy concentration on their prevailing mode. We distinguish between two different forms of energy transfer, one physiological (unavoidable and depending on the nonlinearity) and one due to the insurgence of instability. We then prove a theoretical result allowing to reduce the study of this kind of infinite-dimensional stability to that of a finite-dimensional approximation. With this background, we study the occurrence of instability for three different kinds of nonlinearities f and for some forcing terms g, highlighting some of their structural properties and performing some numerical simulations.

  19. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  20. Transient beam losses in the LHC injection kickers from micron scale dust particles

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Baer, T; Barnes, M J; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Garrel, N; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Lechner, A; Masi, A; Mertens, V; Morón Ballester, R; Redaelli, S; Uythoven, J; Vlachoudis, V; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    Transient beam losses on a time scale of a few ms have been observed in the LHC injection kickers, occurring mainly shortly after beam injection with a strong correlation in time to the kicker pulsing. The beam losses, which have at times affected LHC availability, are attributed to micron scale ceramic dust particles detached from the alumina beam pipe and accelerated into the beam. The beam related observations are described, together with laboratory measurements of beam pipe contamination and kicker vibration, simulations of electric field in the beam pipe and the basic dynamic model. Energy deposition simulations modelling the beam losses are presented and compared to measurement. Extrapolations to future LHC operation at higher intensities and energies are made, and prospects for mitigation are discussed.

  1. An analytical geometric calibration method for circular cone-beam geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2013-09-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous work on geometric calibration in the circular cone-beam geometry. It is well known that seven parameters completely describe such a geometry in either flat-panel X-ray computed tomography or single pinhole SPECT imaging. Previously we developed a graphical procedure to determine the detector in-plane rotation angle independently of the other six parameters. Using the discovered geometrical relationships, in this paper we determine the remaining six parameters using the cone-beam projections of a minimum of three point objects. Our method is analytical. It makes use of the parameters of the fitted ellipse from the calibration data. The parameter estimation is accurate in the noise-free case or when there is moderate projection data truncation or shorter calibration scan range ( ≤ 360°). We perform numerical evaluations to study the robustness of the proposed method under different projection noise levels and using different data acquisition ranges. Using a full 360° scan range, the estimation accuracy and precision of our method are comparable or superior to previous methods. Using a shorter acquisition range, there may be bias in the ellipse parameters obtained by simple algebraic fitting methods. This bias will propagate to the estimated geometric parameters. Such bias can be mostly eliminated by using a more sophisticated fitting algorithm. At the same noise level, the geometric parameter estimation accuracies are comparable, but the estimation precision degrades, as the acquisition range becomes shorter.

  2. Heavy ion beams from an Alphatross source for use in calibration and testing of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. J.; Brown, G. M.; Ho, D.; Stockler, B. F. O. F.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Ion beams from the 1.7 MV Pelletron Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo have been used to test and calibrate many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) diagnostics and high energy density physics (HEDP) diagnostics used at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The ion source on this accelerator, a radio-frequency (RF) alkali-metal charge exchange source called an Alphatross, is designed to produce beams of hydrogen and helium isotopes. There is interest in accelerating beams of carbon, oxygen, argon, and other heavy ions for use in testing several diagnostics, including the Time Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TRTF). The feasibility of generating these heavy ion beams using the Alphatross source will be reported. Small amounts of various gases are mixed into the helium plasma in the ion source bottle. A velocity selector is used to allow the desired ions to pass into the accelerator. As the heavy ions pass through the stripper canal of the accelerator, they emerge in a variety of charge states. The energy of the ion beam at the high-energy end of the accelerator will vary as a function of the charge state, however the maximum energy deliverable to target is limited by the maximum achievable magnetic field produced by the accelerator's steering magnet. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Emissivity-corrected power loss calibration for lock-in thermography measurements on silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasemann, Martin; Walter, Benjamin; Meinhardt, Christoph; Ebser, Jan; Kwapil, Wolfram; Warta, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes power loss calibration procedures with implemented emissivity correction. The determination of our emissivity correction matrix does neither rely on blackbody reference measurements nor on the knowledge of any sample temperatures. To describe the emissivity-corrected power calibration procedures in detail, we review the theory behind lock-in thermography and show experimentally that the lock-in signal is proportional to the power dissipation in the solar cell. Experiments show the successful application of our emissivity correction procedure, which significantly improves the informative value of lock-in thermography images and the reliability of the conclusions drawn from these images

  4. Characterization of a Cs-137 radiation beam for dosimeter calibrations in the CRCN-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista Neto, Annibal T.; Soares, Carlos M. de A.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Correa, Rosangela da S.

    2009-01-01

    The Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO) has played an important role in the environmental radiation monitoring program in Goiania city. The reduce its dependence of others monitoring laboratories, the CRCN-CO acquired a model 28 JL Shepherd and Associates irradiation system with a 137 Cs source for calibrations and frequent quality control checks of radiation dosimeters. A characterization of the irradiation system was carried out with the reference standard dosimeters that are maintained by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The laboratory surrounding areas were monitored to demonstrate the adequate radiation protection conditions and parameters as the radiation field size, beam uniformity and the level of the scatter radiation were investigated. Dosimetry of the 137 Cs radiation beam in terms of air kerma rate was carried out at many source-detector distances with 4 (four) different beam lead attenuators. Results demonstrated that in spite of the radiation shutter automation is strongly recommended, the irradiation system is adequate and it complies with the requirements to be used for dosimeter irradiations and calibrations for the purpose of radiation protection. (author)

  5. Reliability Tests of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring FPGA Firmware

    CERN Document Server

    Hajdu, C F; Dehning, B; Jackson, S

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. In addition to protecting the collider, the system also needs to provide a means of diagnosing machine faults and deliver a feedback of losses to the control room as well as to several systems for their setup and analysis. It has to transmit and process signals from almost 4’000 monitors, and has nearly 3 million configurable parameters. In a system of such complexity, firmware reliability is a critical issue. The integrity of the signal chain of the LHC BLM system and its ability to correctly detect unwanted scenarios and thus provide the required protection level must be ensured. In order to analyze the reliability and functionality, an advanced verification environment has been developed to evaluate the performance and response of the FPGA-based data analysis firmware. This paper will report on the numerous tests that have been performed and on how the results are used to quantify the reliabi...

  6. Calibration of an advanced photon source linac beam position monitor used for positron position measurement of a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereno, Nicholas S.

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam position monitors can be used to monitor the position of a beam containing both positrons and electrons. To accomplish this task, both the signal at the bunching frequency of 2856 MHz and the signal at 2x2856 MHz are acquired and processed for each stripline. The positron beam position is obtained by forming a linear combination of both 2856 and 5712 MHz signals for each stripline and then performing the standard difference over sum computation. The required linear combination of the 2856 and 5712 MHz signals depends on the electrical calibration of each stripline/cable combination. In this paper, the calibration constants for both 2856 MHz and 5712 MHz signals for each stripline are determined using a pure beam of electrons. The calibration constants are obtained by measuring the 2856 and 5712 MHz stripline signals at various electron beam currents and positions. Finally, the calibration constants measured using electrons are used to determine positron beam position for the mixed beam case

  7. Geometric Parameters Estimation and Calibration in Cone-Beam Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of Computed Tomography (CT images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scanner geometry. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate and calibrate the misalignments before image acquisition. In this paper, a Two-Piece-Ball (TPB phantom is used to estimate a set of parameters that describe the geometry of a cone-beam CT system. Only multiple projections of the TPB phantom at one position are required, which can avoid the rotation errors when acquiring multi-angle projections. Also, a corresponding algorithm is derived. The performance of the method is evaluated through simulation and experimental data. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is valid and easy to implement. Furthermore, the experimental results from the Micro-CT system demonstrate the ability to reduce artifacts and improve image quality through geometric parameter calibration.

  8. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors for the Superconducting Magnets of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, MR; Sapinski, M; Kurfuerst, C; Griesmayer, E; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E

    2014-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor detectors close to the interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider are currently located outside the cryostat, far from the superconducting coils of the magnets. In addition to their sensitivity to lost beam particles, they also detect particles coming from the experimental collisions, which do not contribute significantly to the heat deposition in the superconducting coils. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and dangerous quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The system can be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass in a superfluid helium environment, at 1.9 K. The dose then measured by such Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors would more precisely correspond to the real dose deposited in the coil. The candidates under investigation for such detectors are based on p+-n-n+ si...

  9. A Layer Correlation Technique for Pion Energy Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, Karl-Johan

    2009-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the ATLAS calorimeters were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by about 20% compared to the electromagnetic scale.

  10. Low-emittance tuning of storage rings using normal mode beam position monitor calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wolski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new technique for low-emittance tuning of electron and positron storage rings. This technique is based on calibration of the beam position monitors (BPMs using excitation of the normal modes of the beam motion, and has benefits over conventional methods. It is relatively fast and straightforward to apply, it can be as easily applied to a large ring as to a small ring, and the tuning for low emittance becomes completely insensitive to BPM gain and alignment errors that can be difficult to determine accurately. We discuss the theory behind the technique, present some simulation results illustrating that it is highly effective and robust for low-emittance tuning, and describe the results of some initial experimental tests on the CesrTA storage ring.

  11. Calibration and Stokes Imaging with Full Embedded Element Primary Beam Model for the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, M.; Colegate, T.; Sutinjo, A. T.; Ung, D.; Wayth, R.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Lenc, E.; Pindor, B.; Morgan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-11-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science programme, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programmes for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20% in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 × 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen, and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200-231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.

  12. Beam Based Calibration of Slow Orbit Bump in the NSLS Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.; Shaftan, T.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The orbit bumps in NSLS booster are used to move the beam orbit within 2mm of the extraction septum aperture on a time scale of millisecond at extraction in order to reduce the requirement on the amplitude of the fast extraction kicker. This may cause charge losses since before extraction, the beam stays on the distorted orbit for thousands of revolutions. In order to find the optimal orbit bump setpoint, which brings the maximum distortion at the extraction position and minimum distortions everywhere else, we developed an extraction model and performed an experiment to validate it. Afterwards, the model was applied to optimize the extraction process.

  13. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  14. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J B

    2011-01-01

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron ( PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with bett...

  15. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Pospelov, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The three Atlas calorimeter systems in the region of the forward crack at |eta| = 3.2 in the nominal Atlas setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at |eta| = 0.45 of Atlas have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap test beam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested on the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to MC simulations are presented.

  16. Beam Loss Simulation Studies for ALS Top-Off Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Robin, David; Steier, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The ALS is planning to operate with top-off injection at higher beam currents and smaller vertical beam size. As part of a radiation safety study for top-off, we carried out two kinds of tracking studies: (1) to confirm that the injected beam cannot go into users' photon beam lines, and (2) to control the location of beam dump when the storage ring RF is tripped. (1) is done by tracking electrons from a photon beam line to the injection sector inversely by including the magnetic field profiles, varying the field strength with geometric aperture limits to conclude that it is impossible. (2) is done by tracking an electron with radiation in the 6-dim space for different combinations of vertical scrapers for the realistic lattice with errors.

  17. Risk finance for catastrophe losses with Pareto-calibrated Lévy-stable severities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael R; Powers, Thomas Y; Gao, Siwei

    2012-11-01

    For catastrophe losses, the conventional risk finance paradigm of enterprise risk management identifies transfer, as opposed to pooling or avoidance, as the preferred solution. However, this analysis does not necessarily account for differences between light- and heavy-tailed characteristics of loss portfolios. Of particular concern are the decreasing benefits of diversification (through pooling) as the tails of severity distributions become heavier. In the present article, we study a loss portfolio characterized by nonstochastic frequency and a class of Lévy-stable severity distributions calibrated to match the parameters of the Pareto II distribution. We then propose a conservative risk finance paradigm that can be used to prepare the firm for worst-case scenarios with regard to both (1) the firm's intrinsic sensitivity to risk and (2) the heaviness of the severity's tail. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A., E-mail: antonioanastasi89@gmail.com [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento MIFT, Università di Messina, Messina (Italy); Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Cantatore, G. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Cauz, D. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Udine, Udine (Italy); Corradi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lebedev Physical Institute and NRNU MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Di Sciascio, G. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Di Stefano, R. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Università di Cassino, Cassino (Italy); Driutti, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Udine, Udine (Italy); Escalante, O. [Università di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Ferrari, C. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del C.N.R., UOS Pisa, via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Fienberg, A.T. [University of Washington, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del C.N.R., UOS Pisa, via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Gioiosa, A. [INFN, Sezione di Lecce (Italy); Università del Molise, Pesche (Italy); Hampai, D. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Hertzog, D.W. [University of Washington, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

    2017-01-11

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  19. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Driutti, A.; Escalante, O.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Gioiosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Liedl, A.; Lusiani, A.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Piacentino, G. M.; Raha, N.; Rossi, E.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  20. Calibration of the ISOLDE acceleration voltage using a high-precision voltage divider and applying collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A.; Catherall, R.; Hochschulz, F.; Kramer, J.; Neugart, R.; Rosendahl, S.; Schipper, J.; Siesling, E.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Yordanov, D.T.; Nortershauser, W.

    2011-01-01

    A high-voltage divider with accuracy at the ppm level and collinear laser spectroscopy were used to calibrate the highvoltage installation at the radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. The accurate knowledge of this voltage is particularly important for collinear laser spectroscopy measurements. Beam velocity measurements using frequencycomb based collinear laser spectroscopy agree with the new calibration. Applying this, one obtains consistent results for isotope shifts of stable magnesium isotopes measured using collinear spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy on laser-cooled ions in a trap. The long-term stability and the transient behavior during recovery from a voltage dropout were investigated for the different power supplies currently applied at ISOLDE.

  1. Beam-Based Calibration of the Electron Energy in the Fermilab Electron Cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Seletsky, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab's Recycler ring requires precise matching of electron and antiproton velocities. While the final match can be done by optimization of the cooling process, for the very first cooling one should rely on the knowledge of absolute values of electron and antiproton energies. The upper limit for the energy uncertainty of both beams is determined by the Recycler's momentum aperture and is equal to 0.3%. The paper discusses a method of the electron energy calibration that is based on the measurement of the electron's Larmor wavelength in the field of the cooling section solenoid. The method was tested in an 18 m long cooling section prototype with 3.5 MeV electrons. An accuracy of 0.3% was demonstrated.

  2. Calibration procedure for focal plane array cameras and noise equivalent material loss for quantitative thermographic NDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinetti, S.; Maldague, X. [Univ. Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.; Prystay, M. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, a complete procedure is proposed for the calibration of a focal plane array in quantitative infrared nondestructive testing (NDT). This procedure includes vignetting correction and gray level conversion into temperature. A noise analysis is also presented in the context of pulsed infrared thermography applied to NDT. In this analysis, the authors introduce a new parameter, the noise equivalent material loss (NEML). The NEML is a global figure of merit which allows the comparison of different experimental set-ups for infrared pulsed thermography. Theory, experimental validation of the proposed concepts, and comparison with a few infrared scanning thermal imagers are presented as well.

  3. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collamati, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Faccini, R., E-mail: riccardo.faccini@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ferrari, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lanza, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mancini-Terracciano, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ortega, P.G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Patera, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Piersanti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Russomando, A. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Sala, P.R. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  4. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, F.; Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Lanza, L.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P.G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Russomando, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported

  5. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, F.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum.This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is report...

  6. POINT CLOUD REFINEMENT WITH A TARGET-FREE INTRINSIC CALIBRATION OF A MOBILE MULTI-BEAM LIDAR SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nouiraa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available LIDAR sensors are widely used in mobile mapping systems. The mobile mapping platforms allow to have fast acquisition in cities for example, which would take much longer with static mapping systems. The LIDAR sensors provide reliable and precise 3D information, which can be used in various applications: mapping of the environment; localization of objects; detection of changes. Also, with the recent developments, multi-beam LIDAR sensors have appeared, and are able to provide a high amount of data with a high level of detail. A mono-beam LIDAR sensor mounted on a mobile platform will have an extrinsic calibration to be done, so the data acquired and registered in the sensor reference frame can be represented in the body reference frame, modeling the mobile system. For a multibeam LIDAR sensor, we can separate its calibration into two distinct parts: on one hand, we have an extrinsic calibration, in common with mono-beam LIDAR sensors, which gives the transformation between the sensor cartesian reference frame and the body reference frame. On the other hand, there is an intrinsic calibration, which gives the relations between the beams of the multi-beam sensor. This calibration depends on a model given by the constructor, but the model can be non optimal, which would bring errors and noise into the acquired point clouds. In the litterature, some optimizations of the calibration parameters are proposed, but need a specific routine or environment, which can be constraining and time-consuming. In this article, we present an automatic method for improving the intrinsic calibration of a multi-beam LIDAR sensor, the Velodyne HDL-32E. The proposed approach does not need any calibration target, and only uses information from the acquired point clouds, which makes it simple and fast to use. Also, a corrected model for the Velodyne sensor is proposed. An energy function which penalizes points far from local planar surfaces is used to optimize the different

  7. TCDQ-TCT retraction and losses during asynchronous beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Quaranta, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the β* reach.

  8. Angular scattering in electron capture and loss D- beam formation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.; Hodges, R.V.; Huestis, D.L.; Peterson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of high energy (> 150 keV) neutral beams for heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices depends on the ability to produce well-collimated negative ion beams. The double capture charge-exchange technique is a known, scalable method. In order to maximize the overall efficiency of the process and to achieve the desired beam characteristics, it is necessary to examine the optical qualities of the beams as well as the total efficiency of beam production. A combined modeling and experimental study of the angular scattering effects in negative ion formation and loss processes has therefore been undertaken

  9. Radiochromic film sensitivity calibrations using ion beams from a Pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ward, R. J.; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is a transparent detector film that permanently changes color following exposure to ionizing radiation. The optical density of the film increases with increasing absorbed dose. RCF is convenient to use because it requires no chemical processing and can be scanned using commercially available document scanners. RCF is used frequently in medical applications, but is also used in a variety of diagnostics in high energy density physics. The film consists of a single or double layer of radiation-sensitive organic microcrystal monomers placed onto a polyester backing. GafchromicTM manufactures a large number of different types of RCF, and new types of film frequently replace older products. In this study, the sensitivity of several types of RCF to ion beams of different energies was measured. Ion beams produced by the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator were directed into a target chamber where they scattered off of a gold foil. A sample of RCF was exposed to the scattered ions. The fluence of incident particles on the film was measured using a surface barrier detector. Results of these calibrations will be presented. This work was funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  10. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer using proton beams from a pelletron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Michael; Lombardo, Andrew; Graeper, Gavin; Stillman, Collin; Freeman, Charles; Fiksel, Gennady; Stoeckl, Christian; Sinenian, Nareg

    2010-11-01

    The position-to-energy calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS) was measured using proton beams from the 1.7 MV tandem pelletron accelerator at SUNY Geneseo. The TPIS was designed for use on the multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The TPIS implements parallel electric and magnetic fields to separate ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. The position of the ions along the parabola is used to determine the ions' energy. Monoenergetic proton beams with energies between approximately 1 and 3 MeV were directed into the TPIS. Both radiochromic film (RCF) and Fujifilm imaging plates (IP) were placed at the rear of the TPIS and were used to detect the protons. The horizontal deflection due to the electrostatic plates and the vertical deflection due to the permanent magnetic field were studied as a function of the proton energy. This research was funded in part by DOE.

  11. Tests of Local Hadron Calibration Approaches in ATLAS Combined Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, KJ; The ATLAS collaboration; Pospelov, G

    2010-01-01

    Three ATLAS calorimeters in the region of the forward crack at $|eta| = 3.2$ in the nominal ATLAS setup and a typical section of the two barrel calorimeters at $|eta| = 0.45$ of ATLAS have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented for the endcap testbeam. The local hadronic calibration approach as used in the full Atlas setup has been applied to the endcap testbeam data. An extension of it using layer correlations has been tested with the barrel test beam data. Both methods utilize modular correction steps based on shower shape variables to correct for invisible energy inside the reconstructed clusters in the calorimeters (compensation) and for lost energy deposits outside of the reconstructed clusters (dead material and out-of-cluster deposits). Results for both methods and comparisons to Monte-Carlo simulations are presented.

  12. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D.C.; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  13. Geometric calibration of a mobile C-arm for intraoperative cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M J; Siewerdsen, J H; Cho, Y B; Jaffray, D A; Irish, J C

    2008-05-01

    A geometric calibration method that determines a complete description of source-detector geometry was adapted to a mobile C-arm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The non-iterative calibration algorithm calculates a unique solution for the positions of the source (X(s), Y(s), Z(s)), detector (X(d), Y(d), Z(d)), piercing point (U(o), V(o)), and detector rotation angles (phi, theta, eta) based on projections of a phantom consisting of two plane-parallel circles of ball bearings encased in a cylindrical acrylic tube. The prototype C-arm system was based on a Siemens PowerMobil modified to provide flat-panel CBCT for image-guided interventions. The magnitude of geometric nonidealities in the source-detector orbit was measured, and the short-term (approximately 4 h) and long-term (approximately 6 months) reproducibility of the calibration was evaluated. The C-arm exhibits large geometric nonidealities due to mechanical flex, with maximum departures from the average semicircular orbit of deltaU(o) = 15.8 mm and deltaV(o) = 9.8 mm (for the piercing point), deltaX and deltaY = 6-8 mm and deltaZ = 1 mm (for the source and detector), and deltaphi approximately 2.9 degrees, deltatheta approximately 1.9 degrees, and delta eta approximately 0.8 degrees (for the detector tilt/rotation). Despite such significant departures from a semicircular orbit, these system parameters were found to be reproducible, and therefore correctable by geometric calibration. Short-term reproducibility was < 0.16 mm (subpixel) for the piercing point coordinates, < 0.25 mm for the source-detector X and Y, < 0.035 mm for the source-detector Z, and < 0.02 degrees for the detector angles. Long-term reproducibility was similarly high, demonstrated by image quality and spatial resolution measurements over a period of 6 months. For example, the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) in axial images of a thin steel wire increased slightly as a function of the time (delta) between calibration and image

  14. Energy Deposition Simulations and Measurements in an LHC Collimator and Beam Loss Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, Till; Bracco, C; Dehning, B; Redaelli, S; Weiler, T; Zamantzas, C

    2010-01-01

    The LHC collimators are protected against beam-caused damages by measuring the secondary particle showers with beam loss monitors. Downstream of every collimator an ionisation chamber and a secondary emission monitor are installed to determine the energy deposition in the collimator. The relation between the energy deposition in the beam loss monitor and the collimator jaw is based on secondary shower simulations. To verify the FLUKA simulations, the prototype LHC collimator installed in the SPS was equipped with beam loss monitors. The results of the measurements of the direct impact of a 26 GeV proton beam injected in the SPS onto the collimator are compared with the predictions by FLUKA simulations. In addition, simulation results from parameter scans for mean and peak energy deposition with its dependencies are shown.

  15. Analog front end circuit design of CSNS beam loss monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Shuai; Guo Xian; Tian Jianmin; Zeng Lei; Xu Taoguang; Fu Shinian

    2013-01-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) beam loss monitor system uses gas ionization chamber to detect beam losses. The output signals from ionization chamber need to be processed in the analog front end circuit, which has been designed and developed independently. The way of transimpedance amplifier was used to achieve current-voltage (I-V) conversion measurement of signal with low repetition rate, low duty cycle and low amplitude. The analog front end circuit also realized rapid response to the larger beam loss in order to protect the safe operation of the accelerator equipment. The testing results show that the analog front end circuit meets the requirements of beam loss monitor system. (authors)

  16. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang, E-mail: d.yu@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  17. Linear coupling, loss and gain of counterpropagating beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřinová, V.; Lukš, A.; Křepelka, Jaromír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 9 (2006), s. 2267-2284 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC P11.003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : linear coupling * counterpropagating beams Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.024, year: 2006

  18. Simulations and Measurements of Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitors for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Daniel; Holzer, E B; Ferioli, G; Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) is a part of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring system, which is providing the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. SEM detectors will be used in the high dose rate environments of LHC because of their low sensitivity and excellent linearity. The design of SEM consists of two bias electrodes separating the produced secondary electrons from the Ti signal electrode placed in a vacuum steel cylinder. The response of the chamber was tested with bunched and continuous proton beams and compared with a reference detector and GEANT4 simulations.

  19. Energy loss of a high charge bunched electron beam in plasma: Simulations, scaling, and accelerating wakefields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy loss and gain of a beam in the nonlinear, “blowout” regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator, which features ultrahigh accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion, has been asserted, through previous observations in simulations, to scale linearly with beam charge. Additionally, from a recent analysis by Barov et al., it has been concluded that for an infinitesimally short beam, the energy loss is indeed predicted to scale linearly with beam charge for arbitrarily large beam charge. This scaling is predicted to hold despite the onset of a relativistic, nonlinear response by the plasma, when the number of beam particles occupying a cubic plasma skin depth exceeds that of plasma electrons within the same volume. This paper is intended to explore the deviations from linear energy loss using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that arise in the case of experimentally relevant finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind the finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude into the nonlinear regime. At large enough normalized charge, the linear scaling of both decelerating and accelerating fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. Using the results of parametric particle-in-cell studies, the implications of these results for observing severe deviations from linear scaling in present and planned experiments are discussed.

  20. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.

    2011-01-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  1. EBT-XD Radiochromic Film Sensitivity Calibrations Using Proton Beams from a Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockler, Barak; Grun, Alexander; Brown, Gunnar; Klein, Matthew; Wood, Jacob; Cooper, Anthony; Ward, Ryan; Freeman, Charlie; Padalino, Stephen; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2017-10-01

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is a transparent detector film that permanently changes color following exposure to ionizing radiation. RCF is used frequently in medical applications, but also has been used in a variety of high energy density physics diagnostics. RCF is convenient to use because it requires no chemical processing and can be scanned using commercially available document scanners. In this study, the sensitivity of Gafchromic™ EBT-XD RCF to protons and x-rays was measured. Proton beams produced by the SUNY Geneseo Pelletron accelerator were directed into an evacuated target chamber where they scattered off a thin gold foil. The scattered protons were incident on a sample of RCF which subtended a range of angles around the scattering center. A new analysis method, which relies on the variation in scattered proton fluence as a function of scattering angle in accordance with the Rutherford scattering law, is currently being developed to speed up the proton calibrations. Samples of RCF were also exposed to x-ray radiation using an X-RAD 160 x-ray irradiator, allowing the sensitivity of RCF to X-rays to be measured. This work was funded in part by a Grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics as well as the NSF.

  2. Beam Loss Simulation and Collimator System Configurations for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, A.; Borland, M.

    2017-06-25

    The proposed multi-bend achromat lattice for the Advanced Photon Source upgrade (APS-U) has a design emittance of less than 70 pm. The Touschek loss rate is high: compared with the current APS ring, which has an average beam lifetime ~ 10 h, the simulated beam lifetime for APS-U is only ~2 h when operated in the high flux mode (I=200 mA in 48 bunches). An additional consequence of the short lifetime is that injection must be more frequent, which provides another potential source of particle loss. In order to provide information for the radiation shielding system evaluation and to avoid particle loss in sensitive locations around the ring (for example, insertion device straight sections), simulations of the detailed beam loss distribution have been performed. Several possible collimation configurations have been simulated and compared.

  3. An approach to fundamental study of beam loss minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The accelerator design rules involving rms matching, developed at CERN in the 1970's, are discussed. An additional rule, for equipartitioning the beam energy among its degrees of freedom, may be added to insure an rms equilibrium conditions. If the strong stochasticity threshold is avoided, as it is in realistic accelerator designs, the dynamics is characterized by extremely long transient settling times, making the role of equipartitioning hard to explain. An approach to systematic study using the RFQ accelerator as a simulation testbed is discussed. New methods are available from recent advances in research on complexity, nonlinear dynamics, and chaos

  4. Magnetic field shielding by vacuum chambers of magnetic material for beam loss reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Hayashi, Naoki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons of a beam loss in a high power accelerator is leakage magnetic field from a magnet at a close beam line, which distorts the beam orbit and makes the beam hit the wall of the beam pipe. The most effective way to shield such leakage field is to cover the beam by the magnetic materials at the nearest space. This means that beam pipes and bellows be made of the magnetic materials. We plan to apply this method to the vacuum chambers of the beam extraction section of the J-PARC 3 GeV synchrotron, where the effect of the leakage magnetic field to the beam orbit is evident. However, there is few proven evidence of the vacuum chambers made of magnetic materials. Therefore we clarify the problems in producing beam pipes and bellows, which satisfy the magnetic and vacuum performance. In this article, we deliver the over view of the magnetic shielding project and our approaches to the problems in producing the vacuum chambers of magnetic materials. (author)

  5. Prestress Loss of CFL in a Prestressing Process for Strengthening RC Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyan Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A prestressing system was designed to strengthen reinforced concrete (RC beams with prestressed carbon fiber laminate (CFL. During different prestressing processes, prestress loss was measured using strain gauges attached on the surface of CFL along the length direction. The prestress loss was 50–68% of the whole prestress loss, which is typically associated with CFL slipping between the grip anchors. Approximately 20–27% of the prestress loss was caused by the elastic shortening of the RC beam. An analytical model using linear-elastic theory was constructed to calculate the prestress loss caused by CFL slipping between the anchors and the elastic shortening of the strengthened beams. The compared results showed that the analytical model of prestress loss can describe the experimental data well. Methods of reducing the prestress loss were also suggested. Compared to other experiments, the prestressing system proposed by this research group was effective because the maximum percentage of prestress loss was 14.9% and the average prestress loss was 12.5%.

  6. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental shielding to the NSLS-II accelerators and the lessons learned from this process are presented.

  7. Off-momentum loss maps with one beam

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Morales, Hector; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this MD is the benchmarking of simulation of off-momentum loss maps. This will help us to further understand the dynamics of the off-momentum collimation cleaning and give input to the determination of the operational settings of the off-momentum cleaning insertion. The MD was carried out during different end-of-fills of other MDs. In this note we summarize the procedures and the measurements taken during the MD week.

  8. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.

    2015-01-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  9. Simulation study on beam loss in the alpha bucket regime during SIS-100 proton operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, S.

    2018-02-01

    Crossing the transition energy γt in synchrotrons for high intensity proton beams requires well tuned jump schemes and is usually accompanied by longitudinal emittance growth. In order to avoid γt crossing during proton operation in the projected SIS-100 synchrotron special high-γt lattice settings have been developed, in order to keep γt above the beam extraction energy. A further advantage of this scheme is the formation of alpha buckets which naturally lead to short proton bunches, required for the foreseen production and storage of antiprotons for the FAIR facility. Special attention is turned on the imperfections of the superconducting SIS-100 magnets because together with the high-γt lattice settings, they could potentially lead to enhanced beam loss. The aim of the present work is to estimate the beam loss by means of particle tracking simulations.

  10. Study of Acquisition Electronics with a High Dynamic Range for a Beam Loss Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Venturini, G; Dehning, B; Effinger, E

    2010-01-01

    The particles accelerated in CERN accelerator chain reach high energies, topped by the particle energy at collision in the LHC, 7 GeV. During the operation, an amount of particles is inevitably lost from the beam. Depending on the extent of the losses, physical damage to machine components may be caused and the shower of secondary emission particles deposits energy in the surrounding equipment constituting the accelerator. The hadronic cascade also activates their materials, representing a hazard to the workers at CERN. In the LHC, the superconducting magnets that constitute the synchrotron lattice are kept at an operating temperature of 1:9K through a cryogenic facility employing superliquid helium, the increase in their temperature potentially initiates a quench. In the SPS, the damage due to a lost beam is also visible. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has been developed to reliably protect the machines composing CERN’s accelerator chain and additionally provide information about the beam status: th...

  11. Comparison of measurements and modeling of beam ion loss during TAE avalanches in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Douglass; Crocker, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Gorelenkov, N.; Podesta, M.; Shi, L.; White, R.

    2011-10-01

    Brief `avalanches' of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) are observed in NSTX plasmas having several different n numbers simultaneously present. All are accompanied by a drop in the neutron rate, indicating likely loss of beam ions. However, the scintillator fast ion loss detector at the wall on NSTX registers losses only for some avalanches and not others. When losses are seen, they cover a wide range of pitch angles, suggesting that the modes cause stochasticity in the beam ion phase space. A 16 channel array of microwave reflectometers provides a radial profile of the structure of each n TAE, which can then be used to produce an absolute amplitude for a TAE mode structure computed by the NOVA code for the plasma at the time of interest. Using the equilibrium plus the TAE modes structures in the guiding center code ORBIT then allows modeling of the effect of the avalanches on beam ion orbits. The modeling does reveal stochastic behavior and loss of some classes of orbits that are populated by the neutral beams on NSTX, with an amplitude threshold for loss that is close to that observed in the experiments. This work supported by US DoE contract DE-ACO2-09CH11466 and the China Scholarship Council.

  12. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  13. System Architecture for measuring and monitoring Beam Losses in the Injector Complex at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B; Jackson, S; Kwiatkowski, M; Vigano, W

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for beam setup and machine protection of the accelerators at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is mainly based on its Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) systems. For their upgrade to higher beam energies and intensities, a new BLM system is under development with the aim of providing faster measurement updates with higher dynamic range and the ability to accept more types of detectors as input compared to its predecessors. In this paper, the architecture of the complete system is explored giving an insight to the design choices made to provide a highly reconfigurable system that is able to fulfil the different requirements of each accelerator using reprogrammable devices.

  14. Design for low beam loss in accelerators for intense neutron source applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Control of beam loss in intense ion linacs involves keeping beam spill below parts in 10 -5 --10 -8 /m by preventing total beam size from extending to the limiting apertures. Starting from good rms design practices, new analysis of the machine architecture is described in terms of the effects of the machine tune with space-charge, free-energy constraint, and halo-producing mechanisms. It is shown that halos are produced by the time- (or position-) varying nature of common linac aspects (such as misalignment, mismatching, acceleration, and construction techniques) through collective core/single-particle interaction dynamics plus resonances

  15. Comparison of measured and computed loss to parasitic modes in cylindrical cavities with beam ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.; Styles, J.B.; Bane, K.L.F.

    1977-03-01

    Good agreement was obtained between computed values and results from a bench measurement technique for the total loss to parasitic modes in several cylindrical cavities with beam ports. The measurement of loss as a function of time within the current pulse also gives results which are in good agreement with computed functions, especially considering the fact that there are questionable points concerning both the theory and the measurement technique. Within measurement errors, there is also agreement in a few cases where a comparison is possible between a bench measurement result and the heating produced directly in a component by the SPEAR beam

  16. Cavity loss factors of non-relativistic beams for Project X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Kazakov, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Cavity loss factor calculation is an important part of the total cryolosses estimation for the super conductive (SC) accelerating structures. There are two approaches how to calculate cavity loss factors, the integration of a wake potential over the bunch profile and the addition of loss factors for individual cavity modes. We applied both methods in order to get reliable results for non-relativistic beam. The time domain CST solver was used for a wake potential calculation and the frequency domain HFSS code was used for the cavity eigenmodes spectrum findings. Finally we present the results of cavity loss factors simulations for a non-relativistic part of the ProjectX and analyze it for various beam parameters.

  17. Very Fast Losses of the Circulating LHC Beam, their Mitigation and Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Tobias; Elsen, Eckhard

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a nominal energy of 362MJ stored in each of its two counter-rotating beams - over two orders of magnitude more than any previous accelerator and enough to melt 880kg of copper. Therefore, in case of abnormal conditions comprehensive machine protection systems extract the beams safely from the LHC within not more than three turns $\\approx$270$\\mu$s. The first years of LHC operation demonstrated a remarkable reliability of the major machine protection systems. However, they also showed that the LHC is vulnerable to losses of the circulating beams on very fast timescales, which are too fast to ensure an active protection. Very fast equipment failures, in particular of normal-conducting dipole magnets and the transverse damper can lead to such beam losses. Whereas these failures were already studied in the past, other unexpected beam loss mechanisms were observed after the LHC start-up: so-called (un)identified falling objects (UFOs), which are believed to be micrometer-sized m...

  18. Design and Development of a Diagnostics Client for a Beam Loss Measurement System at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Angelogiannopoulos, Emmanouil; Jackson, Stephen

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, is one of the biggest research centers in the field of particle physics. Its main function is to provide particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high energy physics research. Particles are accelerated through a complex of accelerators and are brought into collision, in order to study the fundamental elements of matter and the forces acting between them. Of course, such complex and expensive machines need control and protection. For that purpose, a variety of different systems -hardware and/or software- is needed. One such system is the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of an accelerator. This kind of system is designed for measuring beam losses around an accelerator. An appropriate design of the BLM system and an appropriate location of the monitors enable a wide field of very useful beam diagnostics and machine protection possibilities. This thesis focuses on the design and development of a client application, which is realized ...

  19. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy nuclei. We calculate the cross sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross sections, 28–56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times 10^{32}/cm^{2}/s.

  20. Empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) for the precorrection of beam hardening and scatter for flat panel CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, Rainer; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Scatter and beam hardening are prominent artifacts in x-ray CT. Currently, there is no precorrection method that inherently accounts for tube voltage modulation and shaped prefiltration. A method for self-calibration based on binary tomography of homogeneous objects, which was proposed by B. Li et al. ["A novel beam hardening correction method for computed tomography," in Proceedings of the IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering CME 2007, pp. 891-895, 23-27 May 2007], has been generalized in order to use this information to preprocess scans of other, nonbinary objects, e.g., to reduce artifacts in medical CT applications. Further on, the method was extended to handle scatter besides beam hardening and to allow for detector pixel-specific and ray-specific precorrections. This implies that the empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) technique is sensitive to spectral effects as they are induced by the heel effect, by shaped prefiltration, or by scanners with tube voltage modulation. The presented method models the beam hardening correction by using a rational function, while the scatter component is modeled using the pep model of B. Ohnesorge et al. ["Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners," Eur. Radiol. 9(3), 563-569 (1999)]. A smoothness constraint is applied to the parameter space to regularize the underdetermined system of nonlinear equations. The parameters determined are then used to precorrect CT scans. EBTC was evaluated using simulated data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner with tube voltage modulation and bow-tie prefiltration and using real data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner. In simulation studies, where the ground truth is known, the authors' correction model proved to be highly accurate and was able to reduce beam hardening by 97% and scatter by about 75%. Reconstructions of measured data showed significantly less artifacts than the standard reconstruction

  1. Electron Beam Design and Calibration for the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Michael; Flauta, R.; Gray, T. K.; Kim, J.; Lau, C. Y.; Lee, M. B.; Neumann, M. J.; Surla, V.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-11-01

    An electron beam has been developed as part of the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment (SLiDE) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The purpose of the SLiDE apparatus is to examine the motion of liquid lithium under fusion relevant heat loads and magnetic fields. To mimic the heat fluxes present in the divertor of a fusion machine, a linear sheet beam is utilized which can operate over a range of applied magnetic fields and power levels. With steady state operation up to 15kW input power, the beam can produce peak heat fluxes of 10 MW/m^2 and heat flux gradients comparable to those found in fusion experiments. The design of the electron beam was developed using commercial beam transport codes and the final design is diagnosed with a two-lead Faraday cup. Beam performance and characteristics are presented.

  2. Closed-chamber transepidermal water loss measurement: microclimate, calibration and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, R E; De Jesus, M E P; Xiao, P; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2009-04-01

    The importance of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as a measure of the skin barrier is well recognized. Currently, the open-chamber method is dominant, but it is increasingly challenged by newer closed-chamber technologies. Whilst there is familiarity with open-chamber characteristics, there is uncertainty about the capabilities of the challengers. The main issues are related to how microclimate affects TEWL measurements. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for understanding the effects of microclimate on TEWL measurement. Part of the problem is that TEWL measurement is indirect. TEWL is the diffusion of condensed water through the stratum corneum (SC), whereas TEWL methods measure water vapour flux in the air above the SC. This vapour flux depends on (i) the rate of supply of water to the skin surface and (ii) the rate of evaporation of water from the skin surface. Rate (i) is a skin property (TEWL), rate (ii) is a microclimate property. The controlling rate for the combined process is the lower of the above two rates. Therefore, TEWL instruments measure TEWL only when TEWL is the rate-limiting process. Another problem is that SC barrier property and SC hydration are affected by the microclimate adjacent to the skin surface. This is discussed insofar as it affects the measurement of TEWL. The conclusion is that such changes occur on a timescale that is long compared with TEWL measurement times. An important aspect of TEWL measurement is calibration. We present an analysis of the traditional wet-cup method and a new droplet method that is traceable and has been independently verified by a standards laboratory. Finally, we review performance indicators of commercial closed-chamber instruments with reference to open-chamber instruments. The main findings are that TEWL readings correlate well, but there are significant differences in the other aspects of performance.

  3. The LHC beam loss monitoring system's real-time data analysis card

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Guaglio, G; Leitner, R; Zamantzas, C

    2005-01-01

    The BLM (Beam Loss Monitoring) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from being quenched and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. The complete system consists of 3600 detectors, placed at various locations around the ring, tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitizing, and transmitting the data, and surface electronics, which receive the data via 2km optical data links, process, analyze, store, and issue warning and abort triggers. At those surface units, named BLMTCs, the backbone on each of them is an FPGA (field programmable gate array) which treats the loss signals collected from 16 detectors. It takes into account the beam energy and keeps 192 running sums giving loss durations of up to the last 84 seconds before it compares them with thresholds uniquely programmable for each detector. In this paper, the BLMTC's design is explored giving emphasis to the strategies followed in combining t...

  4. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  5. Calibration and monitoring of the MEG experiment by a proton beam from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Bai, X.; Baldini, A.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Cerri, C.; Corbo, M.; Curalli, N.; Bari, A. de; De Gerone, M.; Doke, T.; Dussoni, S.; Egger, J.

    2011-01-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI searches for the decay μ→eγ at a level of ∼10 -13 on the branching ratio BR(μ→eγ/μ→tot), well beyond the present experimental limit (BR≤1.2x10 -11 ) and is sensitive to the predictions of SUSY-GUT theories. To reach this goal the experiment uses one of the most intense continuous surface muon beams available (∼10 8 μ/s) and relies on advanced technology (LXe calorimetry, a gradient-field superconducting spectrometer as well as flexible and powerful trigger and acquisition systems). In order to maintain the highest possible energy, time and spatial resolutions for such detector, frequent calibration and monitoring, using a Cockcroft-Walton proton accelerator, are required. The proton beam is brought to the centre of MEG by a special bellows insertion system and travels in a direction opposite to the one of the normal μ-beam. Protons interact with a lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) nuclear target and produce one γ (17.6 MeV) from the reaction 7 3 Li(p,γ) 8 4 Be or two coincident γs (11.67 and 4.4 MeV) from the reaction 11 5 B(p,γ 1 ) 12 6 C * . The 17.6 MeV γ is used for calibrating and monitoring the LXe calorimeter (σ E γ /E γ =3.85±0.15% at 17.6 MeV) while the coincident 11.67 and 4.4 MeV γs are used to measure the relative timing of the calorimeter and the spectrometer timing counters (σ Δt =0.450±0.015ns). - Highlights: →Experiments that search for rare phenomena need to be constantly monitor and calibrated. →We show that proton induced nuclear reactions generate γ-rays useful for calibrating and monitoring the MEG experiment. →We describe the design, assembly and test of the calibration and monitoring accelerator for the MEG experiment.

  6. Analysis and calibration of the noise voltage between the damper plates used for beam diffusion during the crystal extraction experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel; Klem, J T; Louwerse, R; Milstead, I

    1995-01-01

    The analogue noise signal produced by a WAVETEK function generator, which is used to excite one of the horizontal dampers BDH 21437 or BDH 21451 for blowing up the beam during the crystal extraction MDs, has been analysed to determine its r.m.s. value as a function of the selected attenuation. The input/output characteristics of damper Nº 2 (BDH 21451) has been measured in order to calibrate the r.m.s. kicks (diffusion speed) which a particle experiences on its passage through the damper.

  7. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Strašík

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1 a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2 a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200  MeV/u up to 1  GeV/u.

  8. A Layer Correlation Technique for Pion Energy Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test (Conference record)

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, K-J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the ATLAS calorimeters were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by about 20% compared to the electromagnetic scale.

  9. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT barrel module response to LHC beam loss scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2014-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beam line may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth in the sensors which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than ...

  10. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  11. Evaluation of Beam Losses and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Keller, L; Mauri, M; Redaelli, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can ...

  12. Duration of memory loss due to electron beam exposure. Final report Jan-May 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, T.G.; Tilton, B.M.

    1983-08-01

    Electron beam exposure has been shown to produce retrograde amnesia (RA). The objective of this study was to determine the duration of memory loss upon electron beam exposure. It is important to know if exposure produces a memory loss of the events which occurred in the preceding 1 sec or memory loss of the preceding minute's events. The task was a single-trial avoidance paradigm. The animal was placed in a small aversive chamber. After a 90-sec adaptation period, a door opened that provided access to a large, dark, preferred chamber. The time required for the animal to enter the preferred chamber was the measure of interest (T). Once inside the preferred chamber, a 1-sec footshock was delivered. Following the footshock by some preset delay (delta T), the animal was exposed to a 10-microsec, 10-rad electron beam (or X-ray). A second trial on the task was run 2 hr postexposure. The second trial consisted of placing the animal in the aversive chamber and monitoring the time (T') required to enter the preferred chamber. If the electron beam exposure interfered with the animal's ability to recall the shock, T' would be greatly reduced as compared with the sham controls. The exposure delay times used were delta T = 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec.

  13. Low-beam-loss design of a compact, high-current deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhang

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A 201.5 MHz, 50 mA, 2.0 MeV deuteron radio frequency quadrupole accelerator is proposed as the neutron generator for the neutron experiment facility project at Peking University, China. Based on better understanding of beam losses, some new optimization procedures concerning both longitudinal and transverse dynamics are adopted. Accordingly, the beam transmission efficiency is improved from 91.2% to 98.3% and the electrode length is shortened from 2.91 to 2.71 m. The fundamental physical analyses are performed to look inside the new design recipe and explain why it works.

  14. Allotropic effects on the energy loss of swift H+ and He+ ion beams through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical treatment and a simulation code to study the energy loss of swift H + and He + ion beams interacting with thin foils of different carbon allotropes. The former is based on the dielectric formalism, and the latter combines Monte Carlo with the numerical solution of the motion equation for each projectile to describe its trajectory and interactions through the target. The capabilities of both methods are assessed by the reasonably good agreement between their predictions and the experimental results, for a wide range of projectile energies and target characteristics. Firstly, we apply the theoretical procedure to calculate the stopping cross sections for H + and He + beams in foils of different allotropic forms of carbon (such as diamond, graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C 60 -fullerite), as a function of the projectile energy. We take into account the electronic structure of the projectile, as well as the different charge states it can acquire, the energy loss associated to the electronic capture and loss processes, the polarization of the projectile, and a realistic description of the target. On the other hand, the simulation code is used to evaluate the energy distributions of swift H + and He + ion beams when traversing several foils of the above mentioned allotropic forms of carbon, in order to analyze the influence of the chemical and physical state of the target in the projectile energy loss. These allotropic effects are found to become more important around the maximum of the stopping cross-section

  15. Calibration of Monte Carlo simulation code to low voltage electron beams through radiachromic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.E.; Kalweit, H.W.; Kensek, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    A simple multilayer slab model of an electron beam using the ITS/TIGER code can consistently account for about 80% of the actual dose delivered by a low voltage electron beam. The difference in calculated values is principally due to the 3D hibachi structure which blocks 22% of the beam. A 3D model was constructed using the ITS/ACCEPT code to improve upon the TIGER simulations. A rectangular source description update to the code and reproduction of all key geometric elements involved, including the hibachi, accounted for 90-95% of the dose received by routine dosimetry

  16. Propagation and Loss-Cone Properties of Relativistic Electron Beams in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, E. R.; Powis, A.; Greklek, M.; Porazik, P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2017-12-01

    One of the main obstacles for achieving closure of several key outstanding questions in magnetospheric physics has been the lack of accurate magnetic field mapping between processes or regions in the magnetosphere and their ionospheric foot-points. Accurate correspondence between magnetospheric processes or regions and their ionospheric foot-points can be achieved with beams of MeV electrons that propagate along magnetic-field lines in fractions of a second, emitted by compact linear accelerators under controlled conditions at specified points in the magnetosphere, while the atmospheric imprint created by their precipitation is detected by an array of ground-based optical imagers, radars, riometers or X-ray detectors. To prove that successful magnetic field mapping is possible, we must ensure that the beam can be injected into the loss cone, that the spacecraft potentials induced by the beam emission are manageable, that the beam propagates all the way into the topside ionosphere, and that the beam produces a signature detectable from the ground or from low altitude. In this work, we present the latest results of calculations of beam injection and propagation for a wide range of injection distances in the magnetotail equator and geomagnetic conditions to determine under what conditions beams emitted from the magnetosphere would be able to propagate to the topside ionosphere with enough intensity to be detected by ground-based or low-altitude instrumentation. Using ballistic simulations of charged particle motion, we demonstrate that relativistic electron beams can be successfully injected into the loss cone under both ideal (analytic dipole) and realistic (MHD modeled) magnetosphere conditions from a wide range of injection positions. For identical injection coordinates, the impact location on the top of the atmosphere is dependent on the current magnetosphere conditions, demonstrating that this technique can distinguish between the phases of a geomagnetic storm

  17. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A.; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  treatment plans for a non-small cell lung cancer patient. The change in stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  18. Controlled Transverse Blow-up of Highenergy Proton Beams for Aperture Measurements and Loss Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Hӧfle, W; Redaelli, S; Schmidt, R; Valuch, D; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    A technique was developed to blow-up transversely in a controlled way high energy proton beams in the LHC. The technique is based on band limited white noise excitation that is injected into the transverse damper feedback loop. The injected signal can be gated to selectively blow-up individual trains of bunches. The speed of transverse blow-up can be precisely controlled. This opens the possibility to perform safely and efficiently aperture measurements and loss maps with high intensity bunch trains well above stored beam energies that are considered to be safe. In particular, lengthy procedures for measurements at top energy, otherwise requiring multiple fills of individual bunches, can be avoided. In this paper, the method is presented and results from beam measurements are discussed and compared with alternative blowup methods.

  19. Measurements of the relative sensitivities between some beam-loss monitors, PART II

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1998-01-01

    We measured the relative sensitivity of various types of classical beam-loss monitors following on from and in the spirit of a previous work. The detectors were tested in one of the SPS extraction l ines. The particles passing through the line consist of 2/3 protons and 1/3 pions at 120 Gev/c. The low extracted (spill time 2.5 s) beam intensity can be adjusted. Upstream of the detectors a copp er target (diameter: 7 cm, length: 50 cm) can be placed on the beam axis. First we proceed with linearity and sensitivity measurements of various types of detectors used in counting or analog mode. Next, with a view to increasing the dynamic range we pursue out tests with a dedicated type of electronics. Finally, measurements have been made in order to determine, in the frame of our experiment , the minimum detection level of some monitors.

  20. FESA class for off-momentum lossmaps and decomposition of beam losses at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wyszynski, Michal Jakub; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Valentino, Gianluca; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The project consisted of two main parts. The first part was to build a FESA class which would serve as lossmap feedback controller for off-momentum lossmaps, capable of handling 100 Hz BLM data, contrary to existing controller. Thanks to the efficient management RF frequency, beam dumps during this procedure would be avoided and machine availability would improve by shortening the duration of machine validation after technical stops. The second part concerned identification of beam losses at the LHC. It was a continuation of author’s work done as Summer Student project. The aim was to identify issues with the existing losses decomposition matrix for flat top, apply necessary corrections and construct analogous matrix for injection.

  1. Accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators: Simulations, consequences of accidents and protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Parker, B.

    1994-02-01

    The consequences of an accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators and colliders of the next generation range from the mundane to rather dramatic, i.e., from superconducting magnet quench, to overheating of critical components, to a total destruction of some units via explosion. Specific measures are required to minimize and eliminate such events as much as practical. In this paper we study such accidents taking the Superconducting Supercollider complex as an example. Particle tracking, beam loss and energy deposition calculations were done using the realistic machine simulation with the Monte-Carlo codes MARS 12 and STRUCT. Protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of prefire and misfire of injection and extraction kicker magnets are proposed here

  2. Functional and Linearity test system for the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring data acquisition card

    CERN Document Server

    Emery, Jonathan; Effinger, E; Leitner, R; Zamantzas, C

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of the design and development of the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a flexible test system has been developed to qualify and verify during design and production the BLM LHC data acquisition card. It permits to test completely the functionalities of the board as well as realizing analog input signal generation to the acquisition card. The system utilize two optical receivers, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), eights flexible current sources and a Universal Serial Bus (USB) to link it to a PC where a software written in LabWindows/CVI© (National Instruments) runs. It includes an important part of the measurement processing developed for the BLM in the future LHC accelerator. It is called Beam Loss Electronic Current to Frequency Tester (BLECFT).

  3. A line fiducial method for geometric calibration of cone-beam CT systems with diverse scan trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M. W.; Ketcha, M. D.; Capostagno, S.; Martin, A.; Uneri, A.; Goerres, J.; De Silva, T.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Han, R.; Manbachi, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Modern cone-beam CT systems, especially C-arms, are capable of diverse source-detector orbits. However, geometric calibration of these systems using conventional configurations of spherical fiducials (BBs) may be challenged for novel source-detector orbits and system geometries. In part, this is because the BB configurations are designed with careful forethought regarding the intended orbit so that BB marker projections do not overlap in projection views. Examples include helical arrangements of BBs (Rougee et al 1993 Proc. SPIE 1897 161-9) such that markers do not overlap in projections acquired from a circular orbit and circular arrangements of BBs (Cho et al 2005 Med. Phys. 32 968-83). As a more general alternative, this work proposes a calibration method based on an array of line-shaped, radio-opaque wire segments. With this method, geometric parameter estimation is accomplished by relating the 3D line equations representing the wires to the 2D line equations of their projections. The use of line fiducials simplifies many challenges with fiducial recognition and extraction in an orbit-independent manner. For example, their projections can overlap only mildly, for any gantry pose, as long as the wires are mutually non-coplanar in 3D. The method was tested in application to circular and non-circular trajectories in simulation and in real orbits executed using a mobile C-arm prototype for cone-beam CT. Results indicated high calibration accuracy, as measured by forward and backprojection/triangulation error metrics. Triangulation errors on the order of microns and backprojected ray deviations uniformly less than 0.2 mm were observed in both real and simulated orbits. Mean forward projection errors less than 0.1 mm were observed in a comprehensive sweep of different C-arm gantry angulations. Finally, successful integration of the method into a CT imaging chain was demonstrated in head phantom scans.

  4. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  5. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio

  6. Instrumentation for EXELFS measurements using convergent beam diffraction coupling to the electron energy loss spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zou Wei; Csillag, S.; Tafreshi, M.A.

    1993-08-01

    Convergent beam diffraction coupling between a JEOL-100C scanning transmission microscope and an electron energy loss spectrometer is realised for the purpose of Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure (EXELFS) measurements. The working principle, the instrumentation for this coupling mode and some specific details, such as condenser system, shadow image, focusing conditions and measurement of convergent angles are described and discussed. The combination of a quadrupole and cylindrical lens for magnifying the image and increasing the dispersion of spectrum, together with a new type of compensation circuit for stray magnetic fields and the arrangement of the parallel recording system are also reported

  7. Simulation of the ATLAS SCT Barrel Module Response to LHC Beam Loss Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Fadeyev, V; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Domingo, M

    2013-01-01

    In the event of beam loss at the LHC, ATLAS Inner Detector components nearest the beamline may be subjected to unusually large amounts of radiation. Understanding their behavior in such an event is important in determining whether they would still function properly. We built a SPICE model of the silicon strip module electrical system to determine the behavior of its elements during a realistic beam loss scenario. We found that the power supply and bias filter characteristics strongly affect the module response in such scenarios. In particular, the following self-limiting phenomena were observed: there is a finite amount of charge initially available on the bias filter capacitors for collection by the strips; the power supply current limit reduces the rate at which the bias filter capacitors' charge can be replenished; the reduced bias voltage leads to a smaller depletion depth which results in less collected charge. These effects provide a larger measure of safety during beam loss events than we have previous...

  8. Validation of the Local Hadronic Calibration Scheme of ATLAS with Combined Beam Test Data in the End-Cap and Forward Regions of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kiryunin, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The three Atlas calorimeter systems in the region of the forward crack at |eta| = 3.2 in the nominal Atlas setup have been exposed to combined beam tests with single electrons and pions. Detailed shower shape studies of electrons and pions with comparisons to various Geant4 based simulations utilizing different physics lists are presented. The Local Hadron Calibration developed for the energy reconstruction and the calibration of jets and missing transverse energy in ATLAS, has been validated using data obtained during these beam tests. The analysis has been carried out by using special sets of calibration weights and corrections obtained with the Geant4 simulation of a detailed beam test set-up. The validation itself has been performed by careful studying specific calorimeter performance parameters such as e.g. energy response, energy resolution, shower shapes, cluster energy density as well as different physics lists of the Geant4 simulation.

  9. Quench Tests of LHC Magnets with Beam: Studies on Beam Loss development and determination of Quench levels

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Sapinski, M

    The application of superconducting materials in the field of high energy accelerator physics not only opens the doors to the generation of the magnetic fields unattainable to normal conductors but also demands facing new challenges. A transition fromthe superconducting state, which is characterized by a resistance-free flow of the electric current, to the normal conducting state is called quenching. This process might be extremely dangerous and even lead to destruction of amagnet superconducting coil if no protecting actions are taken. Therefore, the knowledge of a magnet quench level, i.e. amount of energy which causes the transition to the resistive state, is crucial for the safety and operational efficiency of the accelerator. Regarding that, specific thresholds are incorporated to dedicated quench prevention systems in order to suppress the origin of detected energy perturbation, for example beam losses, or mitigate the consequences of the quenching process by dissipating the energy stored in the magnetic...

  10. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.M.; Addy, T.N.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Němeček, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2010), P06001/1-P06001/28 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * calorimeter methods * calorimeter s * detector modelling and simulations * pattern recognition * cluster finding * calibration and fitting methods Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2010

  11. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2014), "041113-1"-"041113-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon- number resolving detector * twin beams * photon fields Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  12. Construction and calibration of a fast superconducting bolometer for molecular beams detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallinaro, G.; Varone, R.

    1975-01-01

    A tin bolometer evaporated on an anodized aluminum block is described. The noise equivalent power of the bolometer is of 10 -13 watt Hzsup(-1/2) and the time constant is 3μ sec. The bolometer is a suitable fast molecular beam detector

  13. Prestress Loss and Bending Capacity of Pre-cracked 40 Year-Old PC Beams Exposed to Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasar Amry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Six prestressed concrete beams (PC beam were used for evaluation, consist of four post-tension beams (PC-O and two pre-tension beams (PC-R. In order to investigate the effect of crack on prestress loss and bending capacity after long-term exposed, prestressed concrete beams were pre-crack and then exposed to marine environment. Experimental work was carried out to evaluate PC beams performance after long-term exposed. In addition, visual observations and load bearing capacity test was carried out. Furthermore, evaluation of prestress loss conducted using three-point loading bending test and the remaining tendon forces in the beam were determined using Crack Re-opening Method. The experimental results revealed that prestress loss was increased due to corrosion of strand/wire which affected by the pre-crack on the prestressed beams. Approximately a prestress loss around 26% and 30% was recorded for post-tension and pre-tension beams respectively.

  14. Development of the Readout Electronics for the Beam Loss Monitors of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Friesenbichler, W

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the European Laboratory for Particle Physics will be the largest particle accelerator in the world. It requires a large number of installations for its operation. One of these installations are the beam loss monitors which measure the particle losses. If these losses exceed a certain level, the beam must be extracted, otherwise the superconducting magnets could be damaged. For this reason, ionization chambers are installed outside the cryostat to transform the losses into an electric current. A wide dynamic range front end was developed to measure this current. The circuit consists of a current-to-frequency converter that works on the principle of balanced charge. Its output frequency is evaluated by counters and the data is serially transmitted from the tunnel to the surface, where the final data processing is performed. The data transmission suffers from the long cabling distance of up to 2 km. Using Manchester Code and line equalizers enables a data rate of 2 Mbit/s over ...

  15. Reliability of the beam loss monitors system for the large hadron collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaglio, G.

    2005-12-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out. The reliability figures of the BLMS have been calculated using a commercial software package (Isograph.). The effect of the variation of the parameters on the obtained results has been evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. The reliability model has been extended by the results of radiation tests. Design improvements, like redundant optical transmission, have been implemented in an iterative process. The proposed system is compliant with the reliability requirements. The model uncertainties are given by the limited knowledge of the thresholds levels of the superconductive magnets and of the locations of the losses along the ring. The implemented model allows modifications of the system, following the measuring of the hazard rates during the LHC life. It can also provide reference numbers to other accelerators which will implement similar technologies. (author)

  16. Calibrated delivery drape versus indirect gravimetric technique for the measurement of blood loss after delivery: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Shubha; Shochet, Tara; Bracken, Hillary; Coyaji, Kurus; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-08-15

    Trials of interventions for PPH prevention and treatment rely on different measurement methods for the quantification of blood loss and identification of PPH. This study's objective was to compare measures of blood loss obtained from two different measurement protocols frequently used in studies. Nine hundred women presenting for vaginal delivery were randomized to a direct method (a calibrated delivery drape) or an indirect method (a shallow bedpan placed below the buttocks and weighing the collected blood and blood-soaked gauze/pads). Blood loss was measured from immediately after delivery for at least one hour or until active bleeding stopped. Significantly greater mean blood loss was recorded by the direct than by the indirect measurement technique (253.9 mL and 195.3 mL, respectively; difference = 58.6 mL (95% CI: 31-86); p 500 mL (8.7% vs. 4.7%, p = 0.02). The study suggests a real and significant difference in blood loss measurement between these methods. Research using blood loss measurement as an endpoint needs to be interpreted taking measurement technique into consideration. This study has been registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01885845.

  17. External audit on output calibration for photon beams (Polish participation in pan-European Radiation Oncology Project for Assurance of Treatment Quality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izewska, J.; Rostkowska, J.; Kania, M.; Gwiazdowska, B.; Hliniak, A. [Instytut Onkologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    TLD audit of photon beams in radiotherapy centres started in June 1994 within the frame of the EROPAQ project. All 55 photon beams in Polish departments have been checked and 18 beams rechecked in the centres , where deviations out of 3% were detected. Out of 55 beams checked in the first run, 87% were found within 3% acceptance limit and 13% showed deviations larger than 3%. No deviations out of 6% have been detected. The results of the national intercomparison for photon beams (90-92) compared to the results of the EROPAQ audit (94-95) show an improvement of the beam calibrations in Poland and illustrate the usefulness of external audits. (author). 15 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  18. Electron beam dosimetry. Calibration and use of plane parallel chambers following IAEA TRS-381 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizuain, M.C.; Linero, D.; Picon, C.; Saldana, O.

    2000-01-01

    Using different plane parallel chamber types (NACP-02, PTW Roos and PTW Markus), and a cylindrical chamber NE-2571 as reference, the IAEA TRS-381 Code of Practice has been compared with the AAPM TG-39 dosimetry protocol for plane parallel chambers. N D,air pp was determined following the 60 Co in-phantom method and the electron beam method described in TRS-381, using water, PMMA and RMI-457 Solid Water phantoms. Differences were smaller than 0.5% between the two methods except for the PTW Roos chamber where the discrepancy was about 1.5%. The absorbed dose to water was determined according to the procedures and data of each protocol for electron beams between 4 and 18 MeV. Differences in absorbed dose were less than 1% when measurements were made in water, but a deviation of up to 2% was found between TRS-381 and TG-39 when PMMA phantoms were used. To validate the results obtained and to investigate differences between plastic and water phantoms in electron beam dosimetry, the scaling factor C pl and the fluence correction factor h m for PMMA and solid water RMI-457 were measured and compared to the data in TRS-381. Good agreement was found for C pl , but only when the plastics density were taken into account. The experimental values of h m have a large uncertainty but for PMMA a trend for h m being lower than in TRS-381 has been obtained. (author)

  19. A Study of Hadronic Calibration Schemes for Pion Test Beam Data in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Thomas G

    The ATLAS forward calorimeters constitute a small though important fraction of the detector's calorimeter system, designed in part to accurately and precisely measure the energy of particles and jets of particles originating from the collisions of high-energy protons at the detector's centre. The application of hadronic weights, a practice common in high-energy calorimetry, provides a means of compensation for the fraction of energy which is deposited by particles in the detector, but which is invisible to the detector due to the nature of hadronic showers. Explored here are various schemes of extracting hadronic weights, as well as the application of such weights, based on pion data from the 2003 ATLAS forward calorimeter test beam. During the collection of test beam data, beams of both pions and electrons of known energy, ranging from 10 to 200 GeV, were fired at specific points of an isolated detector in order to understand its response. The improvement in noise-subtracted energy resolution with respect to...

  20. Calibration of a silicon semiconductor detecter using a 2 MeV electron accelerator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleurot, N.; Gouard, P.; Mazataud, E.; Nail, M.; Savy, C.; Bayer, C.; Cauchois, Y.; Kherouf, R.; Mathieu, D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the current mode calibration, carried out on a 2 MeV electron accelerator, of PIN detectors involved in electron spectrum measurements for laser-matter interaction experiments. A theoretical analysis simulating the interaction between the incident electrons and the irradiated medium has been carried out using the FOTELEC code. It accounts well for the experimental results giving a reasonable value for the mean electron-hole pair formation energy when back-scattering corrections are included. This work provides the transfer function data required for a plasma diagnostic spectrometer. (orig.)

  1. Calibration of activation detectors in a monoenergetic neutron beam. Contribution to criticality dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoutie, Martine.

    1981-05-01

    Activation detectors have been calibrated for critical dosimetry applications. Measurements are made using a monoenergetic neutron flux. 14 MeV neutrons obtained par (D-T) reaction are produced by 150 kV accelerator. Neutron flux determined by different methods leads us to obtain an accuracy better than 6%. The present dosimetric system (Activation Neutron Spectrometer - SNAC) gives few informations in the (10 keV - 2 MeV) energetic range. The system has been improved and modified so that SNAC detectors must be read out by gamma spectrometer [fr

  2. SU-C-202-07: Protocol and Hardware for Improved Flood Field Calibration of TrueBeam FFF Cine Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Faught, A; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free photon energies are commonly used for high dose treatments such as SBRT, where localization accuracy is essential. Often, MV cine imaging may be employed to verify correct localization. TrueBeam Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) equipped with the 40×30cm{sup 2} Image Detection Unit (IDU) are prone to image saturation at the image center especially for higher dose rates. While saturation often does not occur for cine imaging during treatment because the beam is attenuated by the patient, the flood field calibration is affected when the standard calibration procedure is followed. Here we describe the hardware and protocol to achieve improved image quality for this model of TrueBeam EPID. Methods: A stainless steel filter of uniform thickness was designed to have sufficient attenuation to avoid panel saturation for both 6XFFF and 10XFFF at the maximum dose rates (1400 MU/min & 2400 MU/min, respectively). The cine imaging flood field calibration was then acquired with the filter in place for the FFF energies under the standard calibration geometry (SDD=150cm). Image quality during MV cine was assessed with & without the modified flood field calibration using a low contrast resolution phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: When the flood field is acquired using the standard procedure (no filter in place), a pixel gain artifact is clearly present in the image center (r=3cm for 10XFFF at 2400 MU/min) which appears similar to and may be mis-attributed to panel saturation in the subject image. The artifact obscured all low contrast inserts at the image center and was also visible on the anthropomorphic phantom. Using the filter for flood field calibration eliminated the artifact. Conclusion: Use of a modified flood field calibration procedure improves image quality for cine MV imaging with TrueBeams equipped with the 40×30cm{sup 2} IDU.

  3. Comparison of the absorbed dose at calibration depth of photon beams using the Japan society of medical physics 12 beam quality conversion factor in the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Naoki; Kita, Akinobu; Murai, Emi; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Toi, Akiko; Shimada, Masato; Sasamoto, Kouhei; Adachi, Toshiki; Takemura, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    In standard external beam radiotherapy dosimetry, which is based on absorbed dose by water, the absorbed dose at any calibration depth is calculated using the same beam quality conversion factor, regardless of the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve. In this study, we evaluated whether there were differences between absorbed doses at calibration depths calculated using a beam quality conversion factor including a wall correction factor that corresponds to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, and without a waterproofing sleeve. The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) has reported that the uncertainty of the results using a beam quality conversion factor that included a wall correction factor corresponding to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, regardless of the presence or absence of the sleeve, was 0.2%. This uncertainty proved to be in agreement with the reported range.(author)

  4. Prediction of dissolved reactive phosphorus losses from small agricultural catchments: calibration and validation of a parsimonious model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hahn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication of surface waters due to diffuse phosphorus (P losses continues to be a severe water quality problem worldwide, causing the loss of ecosystem functions of the respective water bodies. Phosphorus in runoff often originates from a small fraction of a catchment only. Targeting mitigation measures to these critical source areas (CSAs is expected to be most efficient and cost-effective, but requires suitable tools. Here we investigated the capability of the parsimonious Rainfall-Runoff-Phosphorus (RRP model to identify CSAs in grassland-dominated catchments based on readily available soil and topographic data. After simultaneous calibration on runoff data from four small hilly catchments on the Swiss Plateau, the model was validated on a different catchment in the same region without further calibration. The RRP model adequately simulated the discharge and dissolved reactive P (DRP export from the validation catchment. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model predictions were robust with respect to the classification of soils into "poorly drained" and "well drained", based on the available soil map. Comparing spatial hydrological model predictions with field data from the validation catchment provided further evidence that the assumptions underlying the model are valid and that the model adequately accounts for the dominant P export processes in the target region. Thus, the parsimonious RRP model is a valuable tool that can be used to determine CSAs. Despite the considerable predictive uncertainty regarding the spatial extent of CSAs, the RRP can provide guidance for the implementation of mitigation measures. The model helps to identify those parts of a catchment where high DRP losses are expected or can be excluded with high confidence. Legacy P was predicted to be the dominant source for DRP losses and thus, in combination with hydrologic active areas, a high risk for water quality.

  5. Evaluation of support loss in micro-beam resonators: A revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. Y.; Liu, J. Z.; Guo, F. L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical study on evaluation of support loss in micromechanical resonators undergoing in-plane flexural vibrations. Two-dimensional elastic wave theory is used to determine the energy transmission from the vibrating resonator to the support. Fourier transform and Green's function technique are adopted to solve the problem of wave motions on the surface of the support excited by the forces transmitted by the resonator onto the support. Analytical expressions of support loss in terms of quality factor, taking into account distributed normal stress and shear stress in the attachment region, and coupling between the normal stress and shear stress as well as material disparity between the support and the resonator, have been derived. Effects of geometry of micro-beam resonators, and material dissimilarity between support and resonator on support loss are examined. Numerical results show that 'harder resonator' and 'softer support' combination leads to larger support loss. In addition, the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) numerical simulation technique is employed for validation of the proposed analytical model. Comparing with results of quality factor obtained by PML technique, we find that the present model agrees well with the results of PML technique and the pure-shear model overestimates support loss noticeably, especially for resonators with small aspect ratio and large material dissimilarity between the support and resonator.

  6. Comparison of LHC Beam Loss Maps Using the Transverse Damper Blow Up and Tune Resonance Crossing Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Moens, V; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G

    2013-01-01

    The LHC collimator settings are qualified regularly via beam loss maps. In this procedure, the beam is artificially excited to create abnormal loss rates. The transverse damper blow up (ADT) and tune resonance crossing methods (QT) are used to increase the betatron amplitude of particles and verify the efficiency of the collimation cleaning hierarchy in IR7. This paper presents a quantitative comparison of the methods, for the qualification of the collimator settings at different operating points in the LHC machine cycle. The analysis is done using Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) with integration times of 1.3 s and 80 ms, the latter being available as from the 2012 run onwards. We present here the use of the faster BLM data (80 ms) to study the time evolution of the losses in IR3 and IR7 during offmomentum loss maps.

  7. A modified and calibrated drift-diffusion-reaction model for time-domain analysis of charging phenomena in electron-beam irradiated insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftari, Behrouz; Budko, Neil; Vuik, Kees

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a modified self-consistent drift-diffusion-reaction model suitable for the analysis of electron-beam irradiated insulators at both short and long time scales. A novel boundary condition is employed that takes into account the reverse electron current and a fully dynamic trap-assisted generation-recombination mechanism is implemented. Sensitivity of the model with respect to material parameters is investigated and a calibration procedure is developed that reproduces experimental yield-energy curves for uncharged insulators. Long-time charging and yield variations are analyzed for stationary defocused and focused beams as well as moving beams dynamically scanning composite insulators.

  8. Absolute calibration of a cold and thermal neutron detector using monochromatic neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Ha; Cude-Woods, Christopher; Ito, Takeyasu; Young, Albert

    2017-09-01

    Time of flight spectra for cold neutrons exiting the moderator volume of the LANSCE UCN source has been obtained using a commercial neutron scintillator, EJ-426, coupled to a Hamamatsu R1355. The absolute efficiency for this detector system was determined using a 37.4 meV (monochromatic) neutron beam from the Neutron Powder Diffraction Facility (NPDF) at North Carolina State University's PULSTAR reactor. We measured the absolute neutron flux at the NPDF through thin foil activation and explored threshold effects through analysis of the measured pulse height distribution for effectively pure neutron signals from the NPDF beam. Non-uniformity of the flux profile across the detector and the detection efficiency as a function of the point of incidence of neutrons on the scintillator was explored using a X-Y translation system to perform scans using either fixed or movable apertures. The results are generally consistent with our expectations for this system, and provide a quantitative assessment of the sensitivity of this system to cold and thermal neutrons. This project was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  9. Beam loss problems and acceleration of proton currents of 300 mA in the Fermilab 200-MeV linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of proton beam-loss problems that must be managed are discussed. A fast loss of the beam happens usually when a sudden malfunction of a component or system occurs. Slow loss of beam occurs when components deviate slightly from their ideal values, when misalignments occur, when high-intensity effects cause a growth in beam size, when extraneous resonance effects occur, or in any of a large number of other ways. The loss of beam is gradual and if the loss of beam is allowed to continue large levels of residual radioactivity can build up. Beam losses in the 500-GeV Main Ring Synchrotron and in the Fermilab 200-MeV Linear Accelerator are discussed, and the experience acquired for the latter is generalized for other linear accelerators. Production of 300 mA proton beams in the Fermilab Linac is described

  10. A Compactrio-Based Beam Loss Monitor For The SNS RF Test Cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  11. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; D. Liu; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-03-25

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (I{sub p} {approx} 0.5 MA) and electron density (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented.

  12. Experimental investigation of the ripple induced losses of perpendicularly injected beam ions in the low aspect ratio helical system CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, M.; Sasao, M.; Okamura, S.; Murakami, S.; Minami, T.; Kado, S.; Ida, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Takahashi, C.; Nishimura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Kondo, T.; Shimizu, A.; Yavorskij, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Confinement of perpendicularly injected beam ions has been investigated experimentally both in the standard configuration and in the drift optimized configuration of the CHS heliotron/torsatron by means of the neutron technique. The experimental results indicate that the confinement of trapped beam ions is poor in both configurations. The observed loss rate of trapped beam ions was very high and this high rate is not explained by losses due to charge exchange or collisional scattering from the timescale perspective. Full gyro-motion following orbit calculations showed that in the peripheral region of CHS plasmas, trapped beam ions are promptly lost because they immediately intersect the vacuum chamber wall due to their large Larmor radii. It also suggested that in the core domain the collisionless transition behaviour is the key to understanding the rapid loss of beam ions. It was shown that the magnetic moment of perpendicularly injected beam ions is not well conserved in CHS. The rapid losses of perpendicularly injected beam ions are probably due to non-adiabatic effects resulting in the transition behaviour of energetic ions. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation of the ripple induced losses of perpendicularly injected beam ions in the low aspect ratio helical system CHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, M.; Sasao, M.; Okamura, S.; Kondo, T.; Murakami, S.; Minami, T.; Kado, S.; Ida, K.; Shimizu, A.; Osakabe, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Takahashi, C.; Nishimura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; CHS Group; Yavorskij, V. A.

    2001-09-01

    Confinement of perpendicularly injected beam ions has been investigated experimentally both in the standard configuration and in the drift optimized configuration of the CHS heliotron/torsatron by means of the neutron technique. The experimental results indicate that the confinement of trapped beam ions is poor in both configurations. The observed loss rate of trapped beam ions was very high and this high rate is not explained by losses due to charge exchange or collisional scattering from the timescale perspective. Full gyro-motion following orbit calculations showed that in the peripheral region of CHS plasmas, trapped beam ions are promptly lost because they immediately intersect the vacuum chamber wall due to their large Larmor radii. It also suggested that in the core domain the collisionless transition behaviour is the key to understanding the rapid loss of beam ions. It was shown that the magnetic moment of perpendicularly injected beam ions is not well conserved in CHS. The rapid losses of perpendicularly injected beam ions are probably due to non-adiabatic effects resulting in the transition behaviour of energetic ions.

  14. Seafloor multibeam backscatter calibration experiment: comparing 45°-tilted 38-kHz split-beam echosounder and 30-kHz multibeam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladroit, Yoann; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Pallentin, Arne

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining absolute seafloor backscatter measurements from hydrographic multibeam echosounders is yet to be achieved. We propose a low-cost experiment to calibrate the various acquisition modes of a 30-kHz Kongsberg EM 302 multibeam echosounder in a range of water depths. We use a 38-kHz Simrad EK60 calibrated fisheries split-beam echosounder mounted at 45° angle on the vessel's hull as a reference for the calibration. The processing to extract seafloor backscatter from the EK60 requires bottom detection, ray tracing and motion compensation to obtain acceptable geo-referenced backscatter measurements from this non-hydrographic system. Our experiment was run in Cook Strait, New Zealand, on well-known seafloor patches in shallow, mid, and deep-water depths. Despite acquisition issues due to weather, our results demonstrate the strong potential of such an approach to obtain system's absolute calibration which is required for quantitative use of backscatter strength data.

  15. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  16. Calibration of the Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) at a polarized hard X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloser, P.F.; Legere, J.S.; McConnell, M.L.; Macri, J.R.; Bancroft, C.M.; Connor, T.P.; Ryan, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50-500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module containing a single CsI(Na) calorimeter element, at the center of the MAPMT, surrounded by 60 plastic elements. The prototype has been combined with custom readout electronics and software to create a complete 'engineering model' of the GRAPE instrument. This engineering model has been calibrated using a nearly 100% polarized hard X-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We find modulation factors of 0.46±0.06 and 0.48±0.03 at 69.5 and 129.5 keV, respectively, in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present details of the beam test, data analysis, and simulations, and discuss the implications of our results for the further development of the GRAPE concept.

  17. Effects of risk factors on periodontal disease defined by calibrated community periodontal index and loss of attachment scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C-W; Yen, Am-F; Lai, H; Lee, Y; Chen, H-H; Chen, Sl-S

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated whether and how the effects of risk factors on periodontal disease (PD) were modified by measurement errors using community periodontal index (CPI) and loss attachment (LA) in the community-based survey. A pilot validation study was performed to estimate the rates of false negative and false positive for both CPI and LA in 31 subjects from different regions using measurements from 12 well-trained dentists and a senior periodontist as a gold standard. Afterward, a Taiwanese nationwide survey was conducted by enrolling 3,860 participants to estimate the effect of each risk factor on PD calibrated with both sensitivity and specificity of two indices. The values obtained for the sensitivity to false-positive ratio for CPI ranged widely from 1.12 to 7.71, indicating regional variation in both errors. The calibrated adjusted odds ratio for smoking vs non-smoking was higher than the uncalibrated odds ratio for PD defined by CPI (2.75 (2.01, 3.77) vs 2.02 (1.63, 2.52)) and LA (3.85 (2.44, 6.13) vs 1.93 (1.47, 2.54)) scores. Similar underestimation was noted for other risk factors. The effects of risk factors on PD measured using CPI and LA in a large population-based survey were underestimated without correcting for measurement errors. © 2017 The Authors. Oral Diseases Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preliminary design of the beam loss monitor system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary design of the beam loss monitor for the ANL Advanced Photon Source is based on the use of an air dielectric coaxial cable as a long ionization chamber. Each coaxial cable section uses a high sensitivity DC current-to-voltage converter with both linear and integrating ranges. Pulse timing circuits determine the positions of individual losses by measuring the time at which the resulting voltage pulses arrive at the beginning of the coaxial ionization chamber. A possible timing ambiguity can be removed by correlating the particle bunch timing with the resulting voltage pulse timing. Measurements have shown that pulse rise times less than 15 nanoseconds can be obtained, so that determining loss locations to better than 7 feet may be possible. Best performance may be obtained when 500 VDC is applied to a 50-ohm, 7/8-inch air dielectric coaxial cable filled with approximately 8 psig of a 95% argon, 5% carbon dioxide gas mixture. Cable lengths will be between 100 and 300 feet long, depending on the part of the accelerator being monitored

  19. SU-F-T-215: An Investigation Of Multi-Scanner CT Hounsfield Unit Calibration for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Using 3D Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Liu, Q; Liang, J; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compare and investigate the dosimetric impacts on pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton treatment plans generated with CT calibration curves from four different CT scanners and one averaged ‘global’ CT calibration curve. Methods: The four CT scanners are located at three different hospital locations within the same health system. CT density calibration curves were collected from these scanners using the same CT calibration phantom and acquisition parameters. Mass density to HU value tables were then commissioned in a commercial treatment planning system. Five disease sites were chosen for dosimetric comparisons at brain, lung, head and neck, adrenal, and prostate. Three types of PBS plans were generated at each treatment site using SFUD, IMPT, and robustness optimized IMPT techniques. 3D dose differences were investigated using 3D Gamma analysis. Results: The CT calibration curves for all four scanners display very similar shapes. Large HU differences were observed at both the high HU and low HU regions of the curves. Large dose differences were generally observed at the distal edges of the beams and they are beam angle dependent. Out of the five treatment sites, lung plans exhibits the most overall range uncertainties and prostate plans have the greatest dose discrepancy. There are no significant differences between the SFUD, IMPT, and the RO-IMPT methods. 3D gamma analysis with 3%, 3 mm criteria showed all plans with greater than 95% passing rate. Two of the scanners with close HU values have negligible dose difference except for lung. Conclusion: Our study shows that there are more than 5% dosimetric differences between different CT calibration curves. PBS treatment plans generated with SFUD, IMPT, and the robustness optimized IMPT has similar sensitivity to the CT density uncertainty. More patient data and tighter gamma criteria based on structure location and size will be used for further investigation.

  20. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10 4 dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-μsec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10 6 rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10 6 rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli

  1. Energy deposition in TEVATRON magnets from beam losses in interaction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginneken, A.V.

    1988-10-01

    In addition to interacting in the detector, particles produced at an interaction region also deposit energy, with less desirable consequences, in magnets and other components of the accelerator. This note briefly assesses the damage potential of these (essentially unavoidable) beam losses from the viewpoint of quenching of superconducting magnets in an upgraded Tevatron, specifically for the 1 TeV p-/ovrreverse arrowstring/p option with a luminosity of 10 31 cm/sup - 2/ sec -1 , through the results carry more generality. Related issues such as radiation damage to detector electronics or other components are not addressed here. These are thought to be less problematic at the Tevatron, as in thus far supported by operational experience. 8 refs., 10 figs

  2. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Claytor, N.; Dinneen, T.; Gould, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.

    1997-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. The authors report measurements of this process at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s AGS using 10.8 GeV/nucleon Au{sup 79+} projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions results in the production of an electron-positron pair with the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory and to previous experiments at 1 GeV/nucleon. The implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented.

  3. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10/sup 4/ dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-..mu..sec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10/sup 6/ rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10/sup 6/ rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  4. Ion and electron beam effects on kinetic Alfven wave with general loss-cone distribution function-kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Nidhi; Mishra, Ruchi; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S

    2008-01-01

    This work studies the effect of ion and electron beam on kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) with general loss-cone distribution function. The kinetic theory has been adopted to evaluate the dispersion relation and damping rate of the wave in the presence of loss-cone distribution indices J. The variations in wave frequency ω and damping rate with perpendicular wave number k perpendicular ρ i (k perpendicular is perpendicular wave number and ρ i is ion gyroradius) and parallel wave number k parallel are studied. It is found that the distribution index J and ion beam velocity enhance the wave frequency at lower k perpendicular ρ i , whereas the electron beam velocity enhances the wave frequency at higher k perpendicular ρ i . The calculated values of frequency correspond to the observed values in the range 0.1-4 Hz. Increase in damping rate due to higher distribution indices J and ion beam velocity is observed. The effect of electron beam is to reduce the damping rate at higher k perpendicular ρ i . The plasma parameters appropriate to plasma sheet boundary layer are used. The results may explain the transfer of Poynting flux from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. It is also found that in the presence of the loss-cone distribution function the ion beam becomes a sensitive parameter to reduce the Poynting flux of KAW propagating towards the ionosphere

  5. Commissioning and first operational experience of the ATLAS beam conditions and loss monitors based on pCVD diamond sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorišek, A.; Atlas Bcm Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Primary goal of ATLAS Beam Condition and Beam Loss Monitors based on polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds is to protect the ATLAS inner silicon detectors from beam incidents. The sensor material was chosen due to its radiation hardness. The first one, ATLAS Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) utilizes fast front end amplifiers and processing electronics capable of handling events in real time and storing data in circular buffer thousand LHC turns deep for post-mortem analysis. There are eight detectors installed, four on each side of interaction point (IP) of ATLAS spectrometer. Due to fast timing and high efficiency for detecting single particles BCM will also provide valuable information on instantaneous luminosity. The second system, ATLAS Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) is adopted after similar system developed in the LHC beam instrumentation group with detectors replaced with the pCVD diamonds, with six of such detectors on each side of the IP. In this contribution the design and commissioning of the above two systems will be presented and results of the first operational experience will be shown as obtained in combined ATLAS framework both with the first LHC beam and commissioning cosmic ray runs.

  6. A Cherenkov-based Beam Loss Scintillator system for beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R

    2013-01-01

    The installation of a scintillator-based system in the LHCb cavern was initially proposed in order to observe injection problems around the LHCb interaction region. Thanks to the fact that LHCb had already developed a custom-made electronics board (BPIM) for the LHCb beam pickups and global LHCb timing monitoring, a complete, inexpensive but flexible and robust system was quickly developed and installed few cm from the beam pipe just in front of the LHCb VELO detector in time for the very first beams injected in the LHC. The current and final system – commonly referred to as Beam Loss Scintillator (BLS) system - ultimately played a central role in the fast beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at LHCb. In this paper, the features of the detector – based on quartz radiator and Cherenkov light - are described, including the functionalities that the system acquired during the proton-proton physics programmes in 2009- 2013 thanks to its flexibility, reliability and sensitivity to beam hal...

  7. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  8. New data acquisition system for beam loss monitor used in J-PARC main ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, K.; Toyama, T.; Kamikubota, N.; Yoshida, S.; Matsushita, J.; Wakita, T.; Sugiyama, M.; Morino, T.

    2018-04-01

    A new data acquisition system has been developed continually as a part of the development of a new beam loss monitor (BLM) system for the J-PARC main ring. This development includes a newly designed front-end isolation amp that uses photo-couplers and a VME-based new analog-to-digital converter (ADC) system. Compared to the old amp, the new amp has a 10 times higher conversion impedance for the input current to the output voltage; this value is 1 M Ω. Moreover, the bandwidth was improved to from DC to 50 kHz, which is about two orders of magnitude greater than the previously used bandwidth. The theoretical estimations made in this study roughly agree with the frequency response obtained for the new system. The new ADC system uses an on-board field-programmable gate array chip for signal processing. By replacing the firmware of this chip, changes pertaining to future accelerator upgrade plans may be introduced into the new ADC system; in addition, the ADC system can be used in other applications. The sampling speed of the system is 1 MS/s, and it exhibits a 95 dBc spurious-free dynamic range and 16.5 effective number of bits. The obtained waveform and integrated charge data are compared with two reference levels in the ADC system. If the data exceeds the reference level, the system generates an alarm to dump the beams. By using the new data acquisition system, it was proved that the new BLM system shows a wide dynamic range of 160 dB. In this study, the details of the new data acquisition system are described.

  9. Characteristic parameters analysis on diagnostic X-ray beams for dosemeter calibration; Analise de parametros caracteristicos de feixes de raios-X diagnostico para calibracao de dosimetros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de

    2008-07-01

    Ionizing radiation metrology is the base to achieve reliable dose measurements in ali areas; it is also part of the framework that is established to assure radiation protection procedures in order to avoid or minimize the harmful biological effect that may be caused by ionizing radiation. A well done metrology means the use of reliable instruments that comply with standard performance requirements worldwide accepted. Those instruments are expected to be calibrated by Metrology Laboratories under well defined conditions. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Standard 61267 established the reference radiations for medical diagnostic x-ray equipment that are recommended to be used for calibrating dosimetric systems for diagnostic dosimetry. In this work, X-ray beam qualities were established in a Calibration Laboratory and their characteristics were analyzed through the measurement of beam parameters like inherent tube filtration, beam uniformity and field size, energy spectra and peak voltage for additional filtration with 94.425 por cent and 99.999 por cent purity filters. Also, the first half-value layer and the homogeneity coefficient were measured for the three RQR 2, RQR 6 and RQR 10 IEC beam qualities and they were analyzed according to the IEC standard. Air-kerma measurements were carried out with an ionization chamber that had its reliability confirmed through repetition and reproducibility reading tests. In 50 sets of measurements the maximum standard deviation found of 10 successive readings was 0.19 %; the maximum shift of the reading mean value at a fixed geometry condition was 0.80 % with an overall standard deviation of 0.23 %. Results showed that the use of different purity filters did not cause a relevant influence on the beam energy spectra. An ionization chamber was also calibrated against a standard dosimeter in ali implemented reference radiations and the relevant sources of uncertainties were estimated. Calibration could be done

  10. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  11. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, T.H.; Cho, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  12. Bias Impact Analysis and Calibration of UAV-Based Mobile LiDAR System with Spinning Multi-Beam Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR is a technology that uses laser beams to measure ranges and generates precise 3D information about the scanned area. It is rapidly gaining popularity due to its contribution to a variety of applications such as Digital Building Model (DBM generation, telecommunications, infrastructure monitoring, transportation corridor asset management and crash/accident scene reconstruction. To derive point clouds with high positional accuracy, estimation of mounting parameters relating the laser scanners to the onboard Global Navigation Satellite System/Inertial Navigation System (GNSS/INS unit, i.e., the lever-arm and boresight angles, is the foremost and necessary step. This paper proposes a LiDAR system calibration strategy for a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV-based mobile mapping system that can directly estimate the mounting parameters for spinning multi-beam laser scanners through an outdoor calibration procedure. This approach is based on the use of conjugate planar/linear features in overlapping point clouds derived from different flight lines. Designing an optimal configuration for calibration is the first and foremost step in order to ensure the most accurate estimates of mounting parameters. This is achieved by conducting a rigorous theoretical analysis of the potential impact of bias in mounting parameters of a LiDAR unit on the resultant point cloud. The dependency of the impact on the orientation of target primitives and relative flight line configuration would help in deducing the configuration that would maximize as well as decouple the impact of bias in each mounting parameter so as to ensure their accurate estimation. Finally, the proposed analysis and calibration strategy are validated by calibrating a UAV-based LiDAR system using two different datasets—one acquired with flight lines at a single flying height and the other with flight lines at two different flying heights. The calibration performance is

  13. Bending, longitudinal and torsional wave transmission on Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams with high propagation losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Hopkins, C

    2016-10-01

    Advanced Statistical Energy Analysis (ASEA) is used to predict vibration transmission across coupled beams which support multiple wave types up to high frequencies where Timoshenko theory is valid. Bending-longitudinal and bending-torsional models are considered for an L-junction and rectangular beam frame. Comparisons are made with measurements, Finite Element Methods (FEM) and Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). When beams support at least two local modes for each wave type in a frequency band and the modal overlap factor is at least 0.1, measurements and FEM have relatively smooth curves. Agreement between measurements, FEM, and ASEA demonstrates that ASEA is able to predict high propagation losses which are not accounted for with SEA. These propagation losses tend to become more important at high frequencies with relatively high internal loss factors and can occur when there is more than one wave type. At such high frequencies, Timoshenko theory, rather than Euler-Bernoulli theory, is often required. Timoshenko theory is incorporated in ASEA and SEA using wave theory transmission coefficients derived assuming Euler-Bernoulli theory, but using Timoshenko group velocity when calculating coupling loss factors. The changeover between theories is appropriate above the frequency where there is a 26% difference between Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko group velocities.

  14. Comparison of three different concepts of high dynamic range and dependability optimised current measurement digitisers for beam loss systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, W; Effinger, E; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    Three Different Concepts of High Dynamic Range and Dependability Optimised Current Measurement Digitisers for Beam Loss Systems will be compared on this paper. The first concept is based on Current to Frequency Conversion, enhanced with an ADC for extending the dynamic range and decreasing the response time. A summary of 3 years’ worth of operational experience with such a system for LHC beam loss monitoring will be given. The second principle is based on an Adaptive Current to Frequency Converter implemented in an ASIC. The basic parameters of the circuit are discussed and compared with measurements. Several measures are taken to harden both circuits against single event effects and to make them tolerant for operation in radioactive environments. The third circuit is based on a Fully Differential Integrator for enhanced dynamic range, where laboratory and test installation measurements will be presented. All circuits are designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and have reliability and fail safe...

  15. Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

  16. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, S.; Mori, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Hattori, T.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Haraguchi, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchiyama, K.; Ishikawa, M.

    2016-01-01

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management.

  17. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, S., E-mail: smatsui@gpi.ac.jp; Mori, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Nonaka, T.; Hattori, T.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Haraguchi, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchiyama, K.; Ishikawa, M. [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Electron Tube Division, 314-5 Shimokanzo, Iwata, Shizuoka 438-0193 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management.

  18. Beam-Loss Driven Design Optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes three-state design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.)

  19. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, EJ; Bettiol, AA; Yang, P; Breese, MBH; Xiong, BQ; Mashanovich, GZ; Headley, WR; Reed, GT

    2009-01-01

    we have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1 x 10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1 +/- 0.4 dB/cm and 1.2 +/- 0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowe...

  20. Analysis of sub-bandgap losses in TiO2 coating deposited via single and dual ion beam deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žídek, Karel; Hlubuček, Jiří; Horodyská, Petra; Budasz, Jiří; Václavík, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 626, March (2017), s. 60-65 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ion beam deposition * Titanium dioxide * Optical coating * Sub-bandgap losses * Urbach tail Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040609017301256

  1. aSi-EPID transit signal calibration for dynamic beams: a needful step for the IMRT in vivo dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesca; Piermattei, Angelo; Azario, Luigi; Placidi, Lorenzo; Cilla, Savino; Caivano, Rocchina; Fusco, Vincenzo; Fidanzio, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    This work reports a method based on correlation functions to convert EPID transit signals into in vivo dose values at the isocenter point, D iso, of dynamic IMRT beams supplied by Varian linac. Dose reconstruction for intensity-modulated beams required significant corrections of EPID response, due to the X-ray component transmitted through multileaf collimator. The algorithm was formulated using a set of simulated IMRT beams. The beams were parameterized by means of a fluence inhomogeneity index, FI, introduced to describe the degree of beam modulation with respect to open beams. This way, all dosimetric parameters involved in D iso reconstruction algorithm, such as the correlation functions, the correction factor for EPID to phantom distance and the modulated tissue maximum ratios, were determined as a function of the FI index. Clinical IMRT beams were used to irradiate a homogeneous phantom, and for each beam, the agreement between the reconstructed dose, D iso, and the dose computed by TPS, D iso,TPS, was well within 5 %. Moreover, the average ratios, R, between the D iso, and D iso,TPS, resulted equal to 1.002 ± 0.030. Thirty-five IMRT fields of 5 different patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-neck tumors were tested and the results were displayed on a computer screen after 2 min from the end of the treatment. However, 350 in vivo tests supplied an average ratio R equal to 1.004 ± 0.040. The in vivo dosimetry procedure here presented is among the objectives of a National Project financially supported by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare for the development of in vivo dosimetry procedures (Piermattei et al. in Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 274:42-50, 2012) connected to the Record-Verify system of the radiotherapy center.

  2. Fabrication of low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon strip waveguide using focused proton-beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, E J; Bettiol, A A; Yang, P; Breese, M B H; Xiong, B Q; Mashanovich, G Z; Headley, W R; Reed, G T

    2009-03-01

    We have successfully fabricated low-loss silicon-on-oxidized-porous-silicon (SOPS) strip waveguides with high-index contrast using focused proton-beam irradiation and electrochemical etching. Smooth surface quality with rms roughness of 3.1 nm is achieved for a fluence of 1x10(15)/cm(2) after postoxidation treatment. Optical characterization at a wavelength of 1550 nm shows a loss of 1.1+/-0.4 dB/cm and 1.2+/-0.4 dB/cm in TE and TM polarization respectively, which we believe is the lowest reported loss for SOPS waveguides. This opens up new opportunities for all-silicon-based optoelectronics applications.

  3. An FPGA Based Implementation for Real-Time Processing of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System's Data

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Emery, J; Ferioli, G; Zamantzas, C

    2006-01-01

    The strategy for machine protection and quench prevention of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is mainly based on the Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system. At each turn, there will be several thousands of data to record and process in order to decide if the beams should be permitted to continue circulating or their safe extraction is necessary to be triggered. The processing involves a proper analysis of the loss pattern in time and for the decision the energy of the beam needs to be accounted. This complexity needs to be minimized by all means to maximize the reliability of the BLM system and allow a feasible implementation. In this paper, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based implementation is explored for the real-time processing of the LHC BLM data. It gives emphasis on the highly efficient Successive Running Sums (SRS) technique used that allows many and long integration periods to be maintained for each detector's data with relatively small leng...

  4. Evaluation of Safety Index and Calibration of Load and Resistance Factors for Reinforced Concrete Beams under Bending, Shear and Torsion Demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Jafari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of designing of the structural members is withstanding the members or structures against the different loading conditions such that the safety of the system could be preserved. The conventional method for designing of reinforced concrete members in Iranian concrete code is based on load and resistance factor. Although, load and resistance parameters are random variables, and in the mentioned Code the constant values have been designated for them during the designing procedure. Accounting these factors as the constants parameters will ultimately be led to the unsafe and uneconomical designs. The main purpose of this paper is probability-based designing of reinforcement concrete beams under simultaneous effects of bending, shear and torsion actions. For this purpose, analytical relations of the limit states for combination of bending, shear and torsion have been developed. Using the method, the structural designers could be fulfilled the designing of the RC beams based on the importance of structures and the required safety indexes of the owners.  The next goal of this investigation is evaluation and calibration of load and resistance factors for desired safety index. The economic and fully probabilistic designing of concrete beams for simultaneous effects of bending, shear and torsion are available by implementing the proposed design procedures. In order to calculate the safety indexes a computer program has been written in the MATLAB environment, and the Monte Carlo simulation technique has been utilized.

  5. A Novel Millimeter-Wave, Low-Loss, Electronically Controlled Phase Shifter for Monolithic, Beam-Steering Phased-Array Antenna Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the accomplishments made on the project entitled "A Novel Millimeter-Wave, Low-Loss, Electronically Controlled Phase Shifter for Monolithic, Beam-Steering...

  6. Calibration of GafChromic EBT3 for absorbed dose measurements in 5 MeV proton beam and 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadrucci, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Marracino, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Picardi, L.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Esposito, G.; De Angelis, C.; Cherubini, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study EBT3 GafChromic film in low-energy protons, and for comparison purposes, in a reference 60 Co beam in order to use it as a calibrated dosimetry system in the proton irradiation facility under construction within the framework of the Oncological Therapy with Protons (TOP)-Intensity Modulated Proton Linear Accelerator for RadioTherapy (IMPLART) Project at ENEA-Frascati, Italy. Methods: EBT3 film samples were irradiated at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, with a 5 MeV proton beam generated by a 7 MV Van de Graaff CN accelerator. The nominal dose rates used were 2.1 Gy/min and 40 Gy/min. The delivered dose was determined by measuring the particle fluence and the energy spectrum in air with silicon surface barrier detector monitors. A preliminary study of the EBT3 film beam quality dependence in low-energy protons was conducted by passively degrading the beam energy. EBT3 films were also irradiated at ENEA-National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology with gamma radiation produced by a 60 Co source characterized by an absorbed dose to water rate of 0.26 Gy/min as measured by a calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber. EBT3 film calibration curves were determined by means of a set of 40 film pieces irradiated to various doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 30 Gy absorbed dose to water. An EPSON Expression 11000XL color scanner in transmission mode was used for film analysis. Scanner response stability, intrafilm uniformity, and interfilm reproducibility were verified. Optical absorption spectra measurements were performed on unirradiated and irradiated EBT3 films to choose the most sensitive color channel to the dose range used. Results: EBT3 GafChromic films show an under response up to about 33% for low-energy protons with respect to 60 Co gamma radiation, which is consistent with the linear energy transfer dependence already observed with higher energy protons, and a negligible dose-rate dependence in

  7. Two-step calibration method for multi-algorithm score-based face recognition systems by minimizing discrimination loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susyanto, N.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Klaassen, C.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method for combining multi-algorithm score-based face recognition systems, which we call the two-step calibration method. Typically, algorithms for face recognition systems produce dependent scores. The two-step method is based on parametric copulas to handle this dependence. Its

  8. Characterization of a wide dynamic-range, radiation-tolerant charge-digitizer asic for monitoring of Beam losses

    CERN Document Server

    Guido Venturini, G G; Dehning, B; Kayal, M

    2012-01-01

    An Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) has been designed and fabricated to provide a compact solution to digitize current signals from ionization chambers and diamond detectors, employed as beam loss monitors at CERN and several other high energy physics facilities. The circuit topology has been devised to accept positive and negative currents, to have a wide dynamic range (above 120 dB), withstand radiation levels over 10 Mrad and offer different modes of operation, covering a broad range of applications. Furthermore, an internal conversion reference is employed in the digitization, to provide an accurate absolute measurement. This paper discusses the detailed characterization of the first prototype: linearity, radiation tolerance and temperature dependence of the conversion, as well as implications and system-level considerations regarding its use for beam instrumentation applications in a high energy physics facility.

  9. Fullerene-assisted electron-beam lithography for pattern improvement and loss reduction in InP membrane waveguide devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuqing; Pello, Josselin; Mejia, Alonso Millan; Shen, Longfei; Smalbrugge, Barry; Geluk, Erik Jan; Smit, Meint; van der Tol, Jos

    2014-03-15

    In this Letter, we present a method to prepare a mixed electron-beam resist composed of a positive resist (ZEP520A) and C60 fullerene. The addition of C60 to the ZEP resist changes the material properties under electron beam exposure significantly. An improvement in the thermal resistance of the mixed material has been demonstrated by fabricating multimode interference couplers and coupling regions of microring resonators. The fabrication of distributed Bragg reflector structures has shown improvement in terms of pattern definition accuracy with respect to the same structures fabricated with normal ZEP resist. Straight InP membrane waveguides with different lengths have been fabricated using this mixed resist. A decrease of the propagation loss from 6.6 to 3.3  dB/cm has been demonstrated.

  10. Very Fast Losses of the Circulating LHC Beam, their Mitigation and Machine Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Baer, Tobias; Wenninger, Jorg; Elsen, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a nominal energy of 362MJ stored in each of its two counter-rotating beams - over two orders of magnitude more than any previous accelerator and enough to melt 880kg of copper. Therefore, in case of abnormal conditions comprehensive machine protection systems extract the beams safely from the LHC within not more than three turns $\\approx$270$\\mu$s. The first years of LHC operation demonstrated a remarkable reliability of the major machine protection systems...

  11. Beam loss reduction by injection painting in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hotchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex was commissioned in October 2007. Via the initial beam tuning and a series of underlying beam studies with low-intensity beams, since December 2009, we have intermittently been performing beam tuning experiments with higher-intensity beams including the injection painting technique. By optimizing the injection painting parameters, we have successfully achieved a 420 kW-equivalent output intensity at a low-level intensity loss of less than 1%. Also the corresponding numerical simulation well reproduced the observed painting parameter dependence on the beam loss, and captured a characteristic behavior of the high-intensity beam in the injection painting process. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained in the course of the RCS beam power ramp-up, especially on the beam loss reduction achieved by employing the injection painting, together with the numerical simulation results.

  12. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated...... by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain...

  13. Exercise for laboratory comparison of calibration coefficient in {sup 137}Cs beam, radiation protection - 2013/2014; Exercicio de comparacao laboratorial do coeficiente de calibracao em feixe de Cesio-137, radioprotecao - 2013/2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, T.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: tschirn@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Soares, C.M.A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silveira, R.R. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Khoury, H. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernandes, E. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Cardoso, W.F. [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (Eletronuclear), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work deals with the preliminary results of the second exercise of comparing the radiation monitors calibration laboratories in Brazil. The exercise involved eight laboratories and the measured quantity is the air kerma in a beam of {sup 137}Cs for radioprotection. The exercise was conducted by the LNMRI/IRD, in a star shaped arrangement from October 2013 to July 2015. The largest deviation was 2% of the calibration coefficient that is acceptable for applications in radioprotection. (author)

  14. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-01-01

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia's 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10 -3 , 10 -4 and 10 -5 torr)

  15. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  16. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb -1 corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the CCE in

  17. Monitoring Dosimetric Impact of Weight Loss With Kilovoltage (KV) Cone Beam CT (CBCT) During Parotid-Sparing IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kean Fatt, E-mail: hokeanfatt@hotmail.com [Academic Radiation Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Marchant, Tom; Moore, Chris; Webster, Gareth; Rowbottom, Carl [North Western Medical Physics, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Penington, Hazel [Wade Radiotherapy Research Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lee, Lip; Yap, Beng; Sykes, Andrew; Slevin, Nick [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Parotid-sparing head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce long-term xerostomia. However, patients frequently experience weight loss and tumor shrinkage during treatment. We evaluate the use of kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for dose monitoring and examine if the dosimetric impact of such changes on the parotid and critical neural structures warrants replanning during treatment. Methods and materials: Ten patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were treated with contralateral parotid-sparing IMRT concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy. Mean doses of 65 Gy and 54 Gy were delivered to clinical target volume (CTV)1 and CTV2, respectively, in 30 daily fractions. CBCT was prospectively acquired weekly. Each CBCT was coregistered with the planned isocenter. The spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, larynx, and oral cavity were outlined on each CBCT. Dose distributions were recalculated on the CBCT after correcting the gray scale to provide accurate Hounsfield calibration, using the original IMRT plan configuration. Results: Planned contralateral parotid mean doses were not significantly different to those delivered during treatment (p > 0.1). Ipsilateral and contralateral parotids showed a mean reduction in volume of 29.7% and 28.4%, respectively. There was no significant difference between planned and delivered maximum dose to the brainstem (p = 0.6) or spinal cord (p = 0.2), mean dose to larynx (p = 0.5) and oral cavity (p = 0.8). End-of-treatment mean weight loss was 7.5 kg (8.8% of baseline weight). Despite a {>=}10% weight loss in 5 patients, there was no significant dosimetric change affecting the contralateral parotid and neural structures. Conclusions: Although patient weight loss and parotid volume shrinkage was observed, overall, there was no significant excess dose to the organs at risk. No replanning was felt necessary for this patient cohort, but a larger patient sample will be investigated

  18. Challenges of arbitrary waveform signal detection by Silicon Photomultipliers as readout for Cherenkov fibre based beam loss monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vinogradov, Sergey; Nebot del Busto, Eduardo; Kastriotou, Maria; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are well recognised as very competitive photodetectors due to their exceptional photon number and time resolution, room-temperature low-voltage operation, insensitivity to magnetic fields, compactness, and robustness. Detection of weak light pulses of nanosecond time scale appears to be the best area for SiPM applications because in this case most of the SiPM drawbacks have a rather limited effect on its performance. In contrast to the more typical scintillation and Cherenkov detection applications, which demand information on the number of photons and/or the arrival time of the light pulse only, beam loss monitoring (BLM) systems utilising Cherenkov fibres with photodetector readout have to precisely reconstruct the temporal profile of the light pulse. This is a rather challenging task for any photon detector especially taking into account the high dynamic range of incident signals (100K – 1M) from a few photons to a few percents of destructive losses in a beam line and pre...

  19. Submicron beam X-ray diffraction of nanoheteroepitaxily grown GaN: Experimental challenges and calibration procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanno, P.L.; Gautier, S.; Sirenko, A.A.; Kazimirov, A.; Cai, Z.-H.; Goh, W.H.; Martin, J.; Martinez, A.; Moudakir, T.; Maloufi, N.; Assouar, M.B.; Ramdane, A.; Gratiet, L. Le; Ougazzaden, A.

    2010-01-01

    Highly relaxed GaN nanodots and submicron ridges have been selectively grown in the NSAG regime using MOVPE on lattice mismatched 6H-SiC and AlN substrates. 2D real space and 3D reciprocal space mapping was performed with a CCD detector using 10.4 keV synchrotron X-ray radiation at the 2-ID-D micro-diffraction beamline at Advanced Photon Source (APS). Calibration procedures have been developed to overcome the unique challenges of analyzing NSAG structures grown on highly mismatched substrates. We studied crystallographic planar bending on the submicron scale and found its correlation with strain relaxation in the NSAG ridges.

  20. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M; Rees, J.; /SLAC

    2016-12-19

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called "cavity radiation". The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  1. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into Si due to synergistic effects of ion beam energy losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into silicon upon irradiation of a Pt–Si thin film with medium-energy neon ions at constant fluence (1.0 × 1017 ions/cm2. Several values of medium-energy neon ions were chosen in order to vary the ratio of the electronic energy loss to the nuclear energy loss (Se/Sn from 1 to 10. The irradiated films were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. A TEM image of a cross section of the film irradiated with Se/Sn = 1 shows ≈5 nm Pt NPs were buried up to ≈240 nm into the silicon. No silicide phase was detected in the XRD pattern of the film irradiated at the highest value of Se/Sn. The synergistic effect of the energy losses of the ion beam (molten zones are produced by Se, and sputtering and local defects are produced by Sn leading to the synthesis and burrowing of Pt NPs is evidenced. The Pt NP synthesis mechanism and their burrowing into the silicon is discussed in detail.

  2. Investigation of Electron Beam Induced Mass Loss of Embedding Media in the Low Voltage STEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, V.; Hrubanová, Kamila; Nebesářová, J.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1270-1271 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S; GA TA ČR TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : mass loss * mass-thickness measurement * low voltage STEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  3. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: casual parameters and duration of memory loss. Final report for November 84

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron-beam exposure was investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task for 10, 1, and 0.1 microsecond pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 1,000,000 rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (1,000,000 rad/s) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory system activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  4. Beam backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during LHC loss map tests at beta*=40cm and beta*=80cm at Ebeam=6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this note the beam-background measurements with the ATLAS detector during lossmap tests of the LHC are described. Loss maps taken at beta*=40 cm and the normal 2015 setting of beta*=80 cm are compared. In the first case several collimator settings were explored, resulting in significant changes of beam backgrounds in ATLAS. Besides the studies of the dependence of background on collimation, which are important for optimisation of the LHC performance, these tests provide a clean environment to study the relative importance of beam halo losses on the experiment. The results show that the halo-related component of beam background in ATLAS decreases exponentially with increasing aperture of the tertiary collimators, the slope in terms of nominal sigma being about -0.5. From the data it is also shown that in normal operation conditions of LHC run 2 the beam halo losses contribute at most at the percent level to the total background, the dominant part coming from beam-gas interactions. The data are also used to ...

  5. Precision intercomparison of beam current monitors at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, R.; Dunham, B.; Krafft, G.A.; Legg, R.; Liang, C.; Sinclair, C.; Mamosser, J.

    1995-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator delivers a CW electron beam at fundamental 1497 MHz, with average beam current up to 200 μA. Accurate, stable nonintercepting beam current monitors are required for: setup/control, monitoring of beam current and beam losses for machine protection and personnel safety, and providing beam current information to experimental users. Fundamental frequency stainless steel RF cavities have been chosen for these beam current monitors. This paper reports on precision intercomparison between two such RF cavities, an Unser monitor, and two Faraday cups, all located in the injector area. At the low beam energy in the injector, it is straightforward to verify the high efficiency of the Faraday cups, and the Unser monitor included a wire through it to permit an absolute calibration. The cavity intensity monitors have proven capable of stable, high precision monitoring of the beam current

  6. Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the damage potential of electron beam and tests of beam loss detector based on quartz Cherenkov radiator read out by a silicon photomultiplier on CLIC Test Facility 3(CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Gazis, E

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at the development of an electron/positron linear collider with a centre of mass energy in the multi-TeV energy range. Each Linac will have a length of 21 km, which means that very high accelerating gradients (>100 MV/m) are required. To achieve the high accelerating gradients, a novel two-beam acceleration scheme, in which RF power is transferred from a high-current, low-energy drive beam to the low-current, high energy main accelerating beam is designed. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system will be designed for CLIC to meet the requirements of the accelerator complex. Its main role as part of the machine protection scheme will be to detect potentially dangerous beam instabilities and prevent subsequent injection into the main beam or drive beam decelerators. The first part of this work describes the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the damage potential of high energy electron beams impacting a copper target. The second...

  7. Assessing the long-term weathering of petroleum on shorelines : uses of conserved components for calibrating loss and bioremediation potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atlas, R. [Louisville Univ., Louisville, KY (United States); Bragg, J. [Creative Petroleum Solutions, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Shoreline samples from the Exxon Valdez oil spill were used to study the limitations and strengths of different conserved components as markers based on a 17-year field monitoring program. Approximately 100 oil samples collected from the shoreline in Prince William Sound, Alaska from 1999-2006 had been analyzed for internal markers such as chrysenes, terpanes, steranes and triaromatic steroids and then used to assess the biodegradation of the spilled petroleum. The specific biomarkers used in this study were selected to exclude those that might be generated via biodegradation and were chosen from those having the most significant concentrations in the extracts. Concentrations of the recovered weathered oil compounds were quantified and the concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) components were measured in the aromatic fractions. The extent of PAH weathering was subsequently calculated as a percentage loss of total PAH in order to calculate a bioremediation index to evaluate if an oil at a given shoreline may be amenable to bioremediation (or nutrient addition) to accelerate removal of remaining PAH. In order to compare the extent of weathering over the 17 years since the spill, chemical analyses were performed for samples from 1989-1991 for which no biomarkers were measured. The weathering of the oil has progressed in such a way that most of the remaining oil is now highly weathered. The trend of increasing biodegradation with time indicates that given sufficient time, the oil will continue to degrade naturally until all of the PAH components are consumed. The most stable biomarker compounds to quantify the loss of PAH or other oil components was shown to be C{sub 29}R-stigmastane. 35 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  8. Calibration of the radiation monitors from DESY and SPring-8 at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams using 100 and 300 MeV 7Li(p,n) reaction at RCNP in Osaka Japan in November 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, Albrecht; Asano, Yoshihiro; Klett, Alfred

    2017-09-01

    At the ring cyclotron facility of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) Osaka University, Osaka, Japan a series of measurement campaigns had been continued with quasi mono-energetic neutron beams in November 2014. A 7Li target was bombarded with 100 and 300 MeV protons and the generated neutron beams were directed into a long time-of-flight tunnel at 0 and 25 degrees deflection angle with respect to the proton beam. At a distance of 41 m the cross section of the neutron beam was large enough for the illumination of square meter sized objects like extended range rem-counters. The research institutes SPring-8/RIKEN, Japan, and DESY, Germany, participated in this campaign for the calibration of 4 different types of active ambient dose rate monitors: LB 6411, LB 6411-Pb, LB 6419 and LB 6420. The measurements of their responses are reported and compared with the calculated values.

  9. Calibration of the radiation monitors from DESY and SPring-8 at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams using 100 and 300 MeV 7Li(p,n reaction at RCNP in Osaka Japan in November 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leuschner Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At the ring cyclotron facility of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP Osaka University, Osaka, Japan a series of measurement campaigns had been continued with quasi mono-energetic neutron beams in November 2014. A 7Li target was bombarded with 100 and 300 MeV protons and the generated neutron beams were directed into a long time-of-flight tunnel at 0 and 25 degrees deflection angle with respect to the proton beam. At a distance of 41 m the cross section of the neutron beam was large enough for the illumination of square meter sized objects like extended range rem-counters. The research institutes SPring-8/RIKEN, Japan, and DESY, Germany, participated in this campaign for the calibration of 4 different types of active ambient dose rate monitors: LB 6411, LB 6411-Pb, LB 6419 and LB 6420. The measurements of their responses are reported and compared with the calculated values.

  10. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  11. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158 GeV/u $In^{49+}$ ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, Edgar; Hansen, Jan; Page, Eric; Vincke, H

    2004-01-01

    During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the super proton synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV) graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen) stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158 GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental ...

  12. MD#1182: Calibration of diamond particle detectors in IP6

    CERN Document Server

    Valette, Matthieu; Lindstrom, Bjorn Hans Filip; Wiesner, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In case of an asynchronous beam dump with a fully filled LHC machine it is expected that all standard ionisation chamber Beam Loss Monitors (IC BLM) around the LHC dumping region in IP6 will be saturated. Diamond Beam Loss Monitors (dBLM) were therefore installed next to the movable dump protection absorber (TCDQ) downstream of the extraction kickers. These detectors allow resolving losses at a nanosecond timescale and with an dynamic range of several orders of magnitude; thus, allowing to know the number of nominal bunches impacting the TCDQ. After a first series of calibrations using asynchronous beam dump tests, an experiment was conducted during MD#1182 to demonstrate the possibility of resolving a nominal bunch hitting the TCDQ. The impact parameter of the bunches on the TCDQ was first scanned using probe bunches with lower intensity then tests were done with nominal bunches (1.1e11 p/bunch) at injection energy. High energy calibration of the losses was also attempted unsuccessfully. Due to different beh...

  13. Comparative study between cold plasma and hot plasma with ion beam and loss-cone distribution function by particle aspect approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Soniya; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) instabilities with isotropic ion beam and general loss-cone distribution of cold and hot core plasmas are discussed. The growth rate, parallel and perpendicular resonance energies of the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in a low β (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), homogeneous plasma have been obtained using the dispersion relation for cold and hot plasmas. The wave is assumed to propagate parallel to the static magnetic field. The whole plasma is considered to consist of resonant and non-resonant particles permeated by isotropic ion beam. It is assumed that resonant particles and ion beam participate in energy exchange with the wave whereas non-resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave. We determined the variation in energies and growth rate in cold and hot plasmas by the energy conservation method with a general loss-cone distribution function. The thermal anisotropy of the core plasma acts as a source of free energy for EMIC wave and enhances the growth rate. It is noted that the EMIC wave emissions occur by extracting energy of perpendicularly heated ions in the presence of up flowing ion beam and steep loss-cone distribution in the anisotropic magnetosphere. The effect of the steep loss-cone distribution is to enhance the growth rate of the EMIC wave. The heating of ions perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field is discussed along with EMIC wave emission in the auroral acceleration region. The results are interpreted for the space plasma parameters appropriate to the auroral acceleration region of the earth's magnetoplasma.

  14. Testing and calibration through laser radiation and muon beams of the hadron calorimeter in ATLAS detector; Controle et etalonnage par lumiere laser et par faisceaux de muons du calorimetre hadronique a tuiles scintillantes d'ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garde, V

    2003-10-15

    This study is dedicated to the calibration of the hadronic calorimeter (Tilecal) of the ATLAS detector. This detector will be installed on the LHC collider at CERN. The first data will be taken in 2007. This thesis is divided in two parts. The first part is dedicated to the study of the LASER system. A prototype of the final system was studied. It was shown that the stability and the linearity of this prototype are conform to the specification. Several studies were devoted to measurements which can be done on the Tilecal: The relative gain can be calculated and gives the stability of the Tilecal with a resolution of 0.35 %. The number of photoelectrons per charge unit has been calculated. The linearity was checked for a normal range of functioning and was corrected for the functioning at high charge. In both cases it was shown that the non-linearity was smaller than 0.5 %. The second study is devoted to muons beams in test beam periods. These results are used to find a calibration constant. Several problems which come from the difference of size cells are not totally solved. But the resolution of the calibration constant found by this method cannot exceed 2.3%. (author)

  15. Beam loss caused by edge focusing of injection bump magnets and its mitigation in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hotchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, transverse injection painting is utilized not only to suppress space-charge induced beam loss in the low energy region but also to mitigate foil scattering beam loss during charge-exchange injection. The space-charge induced beam loss is well minimized by the combination of modest transverse painting and full longitudinal painting. But, for sufficiently mitigating the foil scattering part of beam loss, the transverse painting area has to be further expanded. However, such a wide-ranging transverse painting had not been realized until recently due to beta function beating caused by edge focusing of pulsed injection bump magnets during injection. This beta function beating additionally excites random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice superperiodicity, and its resultant deterioration of the betatron motion stability causes significant extra beam loss when expanding the transverse painting area. To solve this issue, we newly installed pulse-type quadrupole correctors to compensate the beta function beating. This paper presents recent experimental results on this correction scheme for suppressing the extra beam loss, while discussing the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms with the corresponding numerical simulations.

  16. Development and first use of a novel cylindrical ball bearing phantom for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of flat panel imaging devices used in image-guided ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, A; Stock, M; Kellner, D; Ziegler, I; Keuschnigg, P; Huber, P; Mayer, U; Sedlmayer, F; Deutschmann, H; Steininger, P

    2016-11-21

    Image guidance during highly conformal radiotherapy requires accurate geometric calibration of the moving components of the imager. Due to limited manufacturing accuracy and gravity-induced flex, an x-ray imager's deviation from the nominal geometrical definition has to be corrected for. For this purpose a ball bearing phantom applicable for nine degrees of freedom (9-DOF) calibration of a novel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner was designed and validated. In order to ensure accurate automated marker detection, as many uniformly distributed markers as possible should be used with a minimum projected inter-marker distance of 10 mm. Three different marker distributions on the phantom cylinder surface were simulated. First, a fixed number of markers are selected and their coordinates are randomly generated. Second, the quasi-random method is represented by setting a constraint on the marker distances in the projections. The third approach generates the ball coordinates helically based on the Golden ratio, ϕ. Projection images of the phantom incorporating the CBCT scanner's geometry were simulated and analysed with respect to uniform distribution and intra-marker distance. Based on the evaluations a phantom prototype was manufactured and validated by a series of flexmap calibration measurements and analyses. The simulation with randomly distributed markers as well as the quasi-random approach showed an insufficient uniformity of the distribution over the detector area. The best compromise between uniform distribution and a high packing fraction of balls is provided by the Golden section approach. A prototype was manufactured accordingly. The phantom was validated for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of the CBCT scanner with independently moveable source and detector arms. A novel flexmap calibration phantom intended for 9-DOF was developed. The ball bearing distribution based on the Golden section was found to be highly advantageous. The phantom showed

  17. Development and first use of a novel cylindrical ball bearing phantom for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of flat panel imaging devices used in image-guided ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, A.; Stock, M.; Kellner, D.; Ziegler, I.; Keuschnigg, P.; Huber, P.; Mayer, U.; Sedlmayer, F.; Deutschmann, H.; Steininger, P.

    2016-11-01

    Image guidance during highly conformal radiotherapy requires accurate geometric calibration of the moving components of the imager. Due to limited manufacturing accuracy and gravity-induced flex, an x-ray imager’s deviation from the nominal geometrical definition has to be corrected for. For this purpose a ball bearing phantom applicable for nine degrees of freedom (9-DOF) calibration of a novel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner was designed and validated. In order to ensure accurate automated marker detection, as many uniformly distributed markers as possible should be used with a minimum projected inter-marker distance of 10 mm. Three different marker distributions on the phantom cylinder surface were simulated. First, a fixed number of markers are selected and their coordinates are randomly generated. Second, the quasi-random method is represented by setting a constraint on the marker distances in the projections. The third approach generates the ball coordinates helically based on the Golden ratio, ϕ. Projection images of the phantom incorporating the CBCT scanner’s geometry were simulated and analysed with respect to uniform distribution and intra-marker distance. Based on the evaluations a phantom prototype was manufactured and validated by a series of flexmap calibration measurements and analyses. The simulation with randomly distributed markers as well as the quasi-random approach showed an insufficient uniformity of the distribution over the detector area. The best compromise between uniform distribution and a high packing fraction of balls is provided by the Golden section approach. A prototype was manufactured accordingly. The phantom was validated for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of the CBCT scanner with independently moveable source and detector arms. A novel flexmap calibration phantom intended for 9-DOF was developed. The ball bearing distribution based on the Golden section was found to be highly advantageous. The phantom showed

  18. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshikawa, M; Kawamori, E; Watanabe, Y; Watabe, C; Yamaguchi, N; Tamano, T

    2001-01-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 A) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  19. Absolute calibration of space-resolving soft X-ray spectrograph for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M. E-mail: yosikawa@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Okamoto, Y.; Kawamori, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Watabe, C.; Yamaguchi, N.; Tamano, T

    2001-07-21

    A grazing incidence flat-field soft X-ray (20-350 A) spectrograph was constructed and applied for impurity diagnostics in the GAMMA 10 fusion plasma. The spectrograph consisted of a limited height entrance slit, an aberration-corrected concave grating, a microchannel-plate intensified detector and an instant camera/a high speed solid state camera. An absolute calibration experiment for the SX spectrograph was performed at the Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization with monitoring the incident synchrotron beam intensity by using an absolutely calibrated XUV silicon photodiode. From the results of absolute calibration of the spectrograph, the radiation loss from the plasma was obtained.

  20. MD#2183: Calibration of the IR6 B2 diamond BLMs

    CERN Document Server

    Valette, Matthieu; Lindstrom, Bjorn Hans Filip

    2018-01-01

    In case of an asynchronous beam dump with a fully filled LHC machine, causing ~40 bunches to impact on the movable dump protection absorber (TCDQ), it is expected that all standard ionisation chamber Beam Loss Monitors (IC BLM) around the LHC dumping region in IR6 will be saturated. Diamond Beam Loss Monitors (dBLM) were therefore installed next to the TCDQ downstream of the extraction kickers. These detectors allow resolving losses at a nanosecond timescale and with a dynamic range of several orders of magnitude; thus, allowing to derive the number of nominal bunches impacting the TCDQ. After a first series of calibrations using asynchronous beam dump tests, an experiment was conducted during MD#1182 to demonstrate the possibility of resolving a nominal bunch hitting the TCDQ. During this first MD only the Beam 1 dBLM was calibrated appropriately, a second calibration MD was therefore performed in 2017 for the B2 system. Results from this MD and conclusions regarding dBLM saturation with a top energy nominal...

  1. Uniformity calibration for ICT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Gang; Liu Li; Que Jiemin; Zhang Yingping; Yin Yin; Wang Yanfang; Yu Zhongqiang; Yan Yonglian

    2004-01-01

    The uniformity of ICT image is impaired by beam hardening and the inconsistency of detector units responses. The beam hardening and the nonlinearity of the detector's output have been analyzed. The correction factors are determined experimentally by the detector's responses with different absorption length. The artifacts in the CT image of a symmetrical aluminium cylinder have been eliminated after calibration. (author)

  2. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  3. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...

  4. Calibration of a detector by activation with a continuous neutron source used as a transfer standard for measuring pulsed neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Jose; Silva, Patricio; Birstein, Lipo; Soto, Leopoldo

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calibrating activation detectors. These detectors will be used as transfer standard in measuring neutron fluxes produced by pulsed plasma sources. A standard neutron source is used as a secondary standard. The activation detector is being shielded in order to substantially reduce detection of gamma emission coming from the source. The detector's calibration factor is obtained by considering also the standard neutron source as a free source of gamma radiation so that the measurements can be done without quickly withdrawing the neutron source as it is usually done. This will substantially simplify the traditionally established method (JM)

  5. Blanket Module Boil-Off Times during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident - Case 0: with Beam Shutdown only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that document LBLOCA analyses for the Accelerator Production of Tritium primary blanket Heat Removal system. This report documents the analysis results of a LBLOCA where the accelerator beam is shut off without primary pump trips and neither the RHR nor the cavity flood systems operation

  6. Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

  7. Monte Carlo studies of the radiation fields in the linac coherent light source undulators and of the corresponding signals in the Cerenkov beam loss monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin. X.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz. (author)

  8. Ultrasonic calibration assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for in-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels have several problems associated with them which this invention seeks to overcome. The first is that of calibration or referencing a zero start point for the vertical axis of transducer movement to locate a weld defect. The second is that of verifying the positioning (vertically or at a predetermined angle). Thirdly there is the problem of ascertaining the speed per unit distance in the operating medium of the transducer beam prior to the actual inspection. The apparatus described is a calibration assembly which includes a fixed, generally spherical body having a surface for reflecting an ultrasonic beam from one of the transducers which can be moved until the reflection from the spherical body is the highest amplitude return signal indicating radial alignment from the body. (U.K.)

  9. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  10. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  11. BNL alternating gradient synchrotron with four helical magnets to minimize the losses of the polarized proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tsoupas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The principle of using multiple partial helical magnets to preserve the polarization of the proton beam during its acceleration was applied successfully to the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS which currently operates with two partial helical magnets. In this paper we further explore this idea by using four partial helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS, which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets and their relatively lower field of operation allows for better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection and allows both the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed within the “spin tune gap,” therefore eliminating the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS during the acceleration cycle. Second, it provides a wider spin tune gap. Third, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical. Although the spin tune gap, which is created with four partial helices, can also be created with a single or two partial helices, the high field strength of a single helical magnet which is required to generate such a spin tune gap makes the use of the single helical magnet impractical, and that of the two helical magnets rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare them with those from the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. Although in this paper we specifically discuss the effect of the four partial helices on the AGS, this method which can eliminate simultaneously the vertical and horizontal intrinsic spin resonances is a general method and can be applied to any medium energy synchrotron which operates in similar energy range like the AGS and provides the required space to

  12. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  13. Jet Calibration at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of jets at high transverse momentum produced in proton proton collision at a centre of mass energy at \\sqrt(s)=7 TeV is important in many physics analysis at LHC. Due to the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeter, signal losses due to noise thresholds and in dead material the jet energy needs to be calibrated. Presently, the ATLAS experiment derives the jet calibration from Monte Carlo simulation using a simple correction that relates the true and the reconstructed jet energy. The jet energy scale and its uncertainty are derived from in-situ measurements and variation in the Monte Carlo simulation. Other calibration schemes have been also developed, they use hadronic cell calibrations or the topology of the jet constituents to reduce hadronic fluctuations in the jet response, improving in that way the jet resolution. The performances of the various calibration schemes using data and simulation, the evaluation of the modelling of the properties used to derive each calibration...

  14. Merged-beams energy-loss technique for electron-ion excitation: Absolute total cross sections for O5+(2s→2p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.W.; Guo, X.Q.; Forand, J.L.; Rinn, K.; Swenson, D.R.; Thompson, J.S.; Dunn, G.H.; Bannister, M.E.; Gregory, D.C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Smith, A.C.H.; Mueller, A.; Timmer, C.A.; Wahlin, E.K.; DePaola, B.D.; Belic, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    A merged-beams electron-energy-loss technique is described, by which absolute cross sections can be measured for near-threshold electron-impact excitation of multipy charged ions. Results are reported here for absolute total electron-impact excitation cross sections for the O 5+ (2s→2p) transition from below threshold to 1.6 eV above threshold. The experimental data are in good agremeent with a seven-state close-coupling calculation throughout the energy range of the experiment. Results agree with calculations showing that more than 90% of the electrons causing excitation are ejected in the backward direction in the center-of-mass frame. This backscattering is shown in both quantum-mechanical and semiclassical calculations. Evidence is observed for high-lying metastable autoionizing states with a lifetime of approximately 0.9 μs which are made to ionize by electron impact

  15. Calibration of megavoltage cone-beam CT for radiotherapy dose calculations: Correction of cupping artifacts and conversion of CT numbers to electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Steven F.; Elmpt, Wouter J. C. van; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M. J. J. G.; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre L. A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) is used for three-dimensional imaging of the patient anatomy on the treatment table prior to or just after radiotherapy treatment. To use MV CBCT images for radiotherapy dose calculation purposes, reliable electron density (ED) distributions are needed. Patient scatter, beam hardening and softening effects result in cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distort the CT number to ED conversion. A method based on transmission images is presented to correct for these effects without using prior knowledge of the object's geometry. The scatter distribution originating from the patient is calculated with pencil beam scatter kernels that are fitted based on transmission measurements. The radiological thickness is extracted from the scatter subtracted transmission images and is then converted to the primary transmission used in the cone-beam reconstruction. These corrections are performed in an iterative manner, without using prior knowledge regarding the geometry and composition of the object. The method was tested using various homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms with varying shapes and compositions, including a phantom with different electron density inserts, phantoms with large density variations, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. For all phantoms, the cupping artifact was substantially removed from the images and a linear relation between the CT number and electron density was found. After correction the deviations in reconstructed ED from the true values were reduced from up to 0.30 ED units to 0.03 for the majority of the phantoms; the residual difference is equal to the amount of noise in the images. The ED distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose calculation accuracy for homogeneous cylinders of different size; errors decreased from 7% to below 1% in the center of the objects for the uncorrected and corrected images, respectively, and maximum differences were reduced from 17% to 2%, respectively. The

  16. Calibration and validation of SWAT model for estimating water balance and nitrogen losses in a small agricultural watershed in central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarzyńska Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT ver. 2005 was applied to study water balance and nitrogen load pathways in a small agricultural watershed in the lowlands of central Poland. The natural flow regime of the Zgłowiączka River was strongly modified by human activity (deforestation and installation of a subsurface drainage system to facilitate stable crop production. SWAT was calibrated for daily and monthly discharge and monthly nitrate nitrogen load. Model efficiency was tested using manual techniques (subjective and evaluation statistics (objective. Values of Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and percentage of bias for daily/monthly discharge simulations and monthly load indicated good or very good fit of simulated discharge and nitrate nitrogen load to the observed data set. Model precision and accuracy of fit was proved in validation. The calibrated and validated SWAT was used to assess water balance and nitrogen fluxes in the watershed. According to the results, the share of tile drainage in water yield is equal to 78%. The model analysis indicated the most significant pathway of NO3-N to surface waters in the study area, namely the tile drainage combined with lateral flow. Its share in total NO3-N load amounted to 89%. Identification of nitrogen fluxes in the watershed is crucial for decision makers in order to manage water resources and to implement the most effective measures to limit diffuse pollution from arable land to surface waters.

  17. Fat tissue measurements by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: cross-calibration of 3 different fan-beam instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Jorge; DiGregorio, Silvana; Del Rio, Luis; Torres, Ferran; Marin, Ana M; Farrerons, Jordi; Herrera, Silvia; Domingo, Pere

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of total tissue composition and, particularly, body fat measurements has become progressively important in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with different clinical conditions. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) fan-beam scanners are widely used to measure body composition, but the development of translational equations to be able to compare data of different scanning systems is necessary. The aim of this study was to assess the extent of agreement for regional measurements of body composition among the following 3 fan-beam DXA scanners: (1) Hologic Discovery (Hologic, Inc., Waltham, MA), (2) Lunar iDXA (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI), and (3) Lunar Prodigy Advance (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI). The study population consisted of 91 adult healthy volunteers (40 males and 51 females; mean age 48.5±14.4yr) who underwent DXA evaluation of the lumbar spine, hip, and whole body in each machine on the same day. Agreement among the 3 scanners was evaluated according to the Bland-Altman method and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Results showed a better agreement and concordance for the Lunar iDXA scanner than for any of them with the Hologic scanner. Differences were higher for any tissue or region than for the whole tissue mass. Translational equations were developed to ensure comparability of body composition measurements obtained with each of these 3 scanners. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Site Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...... is detailed described in [1] and [2]. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU Wind Energy....

  19. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  20. Investigation on calibration parameter of mammography calibration facilities at MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Md Saion Salikin; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Azuhar Ripin; Norriza Mohd Isa

    2004-01-01

    A mammography calibration facility has been established in the Medical Physics Laboratory, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). The calibration facility is established at the national level mainly to provide calibration services for radiation measuring test instruments or test tools used in quality assurance programme in mammography, which is being implemented in Malaysia. One of the accepted parameters that determine the quality of a radiation beam is the homogeneity coefficient. It is determined from the values of the 1 st and 2 nd Half Value Layer (HVL). In this paper, the consistency of the mammography machine beam qualities that is available in MINT, is investigated and presented. For calibration purposes, five radiation qualities namely 23, 25, 28, 30 and 35 kV, selectable from the control panel of the X-ray machine is used. Important parameters that are set for this calibration facility are exposure time, tube current, focal spot to detector distance (FDD) and beam size at specific distance. The values of homogeneity coefficient of this laboratory for the past few years tip to now be presented in this paper. Backscatter radiations are also considered in this investigation. (Author)

  1. Calibration of pressure gauge for Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saponjic, Nevena

    2013-01-01

    Solartron/Hamilton pressure gauges are used to monitor the gas pressure in the particle beam detectors installed in the experimental areas. Here is description of the test bench for the calibration of these gauges in Labview.

  2. Tests with different kind of k Vp-meters in standard X-rays beams used for instruments calibration, in diagnostic radiology level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, Rodrigo Ferreira de; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Vivolo, Vitor

    2008-01-01

    In this work, tests were carried out in one X-ray system, Medicor Moevek Roentgengyara, Model Neo-Diagnomax, (single-phase, full wave rectified) that operate in the range from 40 kV to 100 kV, and fixed 6 mA in the fluoroscopic mode, with total filtration of 2.5 mmAl. It was used as reference system an invasive system from Radcal, model Dynalyzer III (trade mark). The equipment tested were three non-invasive instruments, one PTW,model Diavolt (trade mark), and two Victoreen, model NERO (trade mark). It was performed measurements with those equipment, in the range from 50 kV to 100 kV, in steps of 10 kV and current of 6 mA (fixed). The quantity measured was kVp max . The results showed the maximum variation of 3 % for one NERO (trade mark) and 1 % for the other equipment of the same type, and 0,3 % for Diavolt (trade mark) related to the invasive reference measurement system. The differences in the obtained values could be caused by the different kind of equipment used in that, their manufacturer calibration and aged. (author)

  3. Energy calibration of the photon tagging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoru; Niki, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Akira

    1989-07-01

    There is a photon tagging system at the 1.3 GeV Electron Synchrotron (ES), and the system is designed to produce a monochromatic photon beam with an energy resolution of ±5 MeV. To calibrate the energies of tagged photons produced by this system, electron beams of various energies from ES are injected directly into this system. As the result of this calibration, we conclude that the photon tagging system has the performance of designed values. (author)

  4. Physiotherapy ultrasound calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, M.

    1996-01-01

    Calibration of physiotherapy ultrasound equipment has long been a problem. Numerous surveys around the world over the past 20 years have all found that only a low percentage of the units tested had an output within 30% of that indicatd. In New Zealand, a survey carried out by the NRL in 1985 found that only 24% had an output, at the maximum setting, within + or - 20% of that indicated. The present performance Standard for new equipment (NZS 3200.2.5:1992) requires that the measured output should not deviate from that indicated by more than + or - 30 %. This may be tightened to + or - 20% in the next few years. Any calibration is only as good as the calibration equipment. Some force balances can be tested with small weights to simulate the force exerted by an ultrasound beam, but with others this is not possible. For such balances, testing may only be feasible with a calibrated source which could be used like a transfer standard. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  5. Simulation and calibration of the specific energy loss of the central jet chambers of the H1 detector and measurement of the inclusive D*± meson cross section in photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennekemper, Eva

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis the photoproduction of D * mesons in ep collisions at HERA is analysed. D * mesons are detected in the 'golden' decay channel D * → Kππ s with the H1 detector. Compared to earlier analyses, the systematic uncertainty is reduced due to two main improvements. Firstly, the simulation of the Fast Track Trigger, which is based on tracks measured within the central jet chambers, allows the trigger efficiency dependence of various kinematic variables to be evaluated. Secondly, the use of specific energy loss provides the possibility to suppress the non-resonant background. In order to use particle identification with the specific energy loss in the analysis, the simulation of the specific energy loss in the central jet chambers of the H1 detector is improved and the necessary correction functions and calibrations have been determined. This improved final H1 detector simulation is used to determine the cross section of photoproduction of D * mesons in the HERA II data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 113 pb -1 . The measurement was performed in the kinematic region of Q 2 γp * mesons with transverse momenta above 1.8 GeV and in the central pseudorapidity range of vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke <1.5 are determined and are compared to leading and next to leading order QCD predictions. (orig.)

  6. Self-calibrating interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussmeier, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A self-calibrating interferometer is disclosed which forms therein a pair of Michelson interferometers with one beam length of each Michelson interferometer being controlled by a common phase shifter. The transfer function measured from the phase shifter to either of a pair of detectors is sinusoidal with a full cycle for each half wavelength of phase shifter travel. The phase difference between these two sinusoidal detector outputs represents the optical phase difference between a path of known distance and a path of unknown distance

  7. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a two-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  8. Calibration of Nacelle-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a four-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark.Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements...... with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements....

  9. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  11. Assessing the long-term weathering of petroleum on shorelines : uses of conserved components for calibrating loss and bioremediation potential, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atlas, R. [Louisville Univ., Louisville, KY (United States); Bragg, J. [Creative Petroleum Solutions, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Shoreline samples from the Exxon Valdez oil spill were used to study the limitations and strengths of different conserved components as markers based on a 17-year field monitoring program. Approximately 100 oil samples collected from the shoreline in Prince William Sound, Alaska from 1999-2006 had been analyzed for internal markers such as chrysenes, terpanes, steranes and triaromatic steroids and then used to assess the biodegradation of the spilled petroleum. The specific biomarkers used in this study were selected to exclude those that might be generated via biodegradation and were chosen from those having the most significant concentrations in the extracts. Concentrations of the recovered weathered oil compounds were quantified and the concentrations of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) components were measured in the aromatic fractions. The extent of PAH weathering was subsequently calculated as a percentage loss of total PAH in order to calculate a bioremediation index to evaluate if an oil at a given shoreline may be amenable to bioremediation (or nutrient addition) to accelerate removal of remaining PAH. In order to compare the extent of weathering over the 17 years since the spill, chemical analyses were performed for samples from 1989-1991 for which no biomarkers were measured. The weathering of the oil has progressed in such a way that most of the remaining oil is now highly weathered. The trend of increasing biodegradation with time indicates that given sufficient time, the oil will continue to degrade naturally until all of the PAH components are consumed. The most stable biomarker compounds to quantify the loss of PAH or other oil components was shown to be C{sub 29}R-stigmastane. 35 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Tonin, Renata Hernandes

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health(®), Rochester, NY, USA), and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066), periapical with Han-Shin (P periapical (P = 0.0027). Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007). Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004). Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  13. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158  GeV/u In^{49+} ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10^{4} to 10^{7} molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158  GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  14. Scintillator Based Energetic Ion Loss Diagnostic for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.S. Darrow

    2007-07-02

    A scintillator based energetic ion loss detector has been built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure the loss of neutral beam ions. The detector is able to resolve the pitch angle and gyroradius of the lost energetic ions. It has a wide acceptance range in pitch angle and energy, and is able to resolve the full, one-half, and one-third energy components of the 80 keV D neutral beams up to the maximum toroidal magnetic field of NSTX. Multiple Faraday cups have been embedded behind the scintillator to allow easy absolute calibration of the diagnostic and to measure the energetic ion loss to several ranges of pitch angle with good time resolution. Several small, vacuum compatible lamps allow simple calibration of the scintillator position within the field of view of the diagnostic's video camera.

  15. IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-particle tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies are performed with the IMPACT code. Beam measurement results are compared with the computer simulations, including beam longitudinal halo and beam losses in the superconducting linac, transverse beam Courant-Snyder parameters and the longitudinal beam emittance in the linac. In most cases, the simulations show good agreement with the measured results

  16. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos, F.Santos Pedrosa; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Guimara, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Urban, S.Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernadez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; 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Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Muino, P.Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro, P.E.Faria Salgado; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira, M.Branco; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, D.J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Vale, M.A.B.do; Do Valle, A.Wemans; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; 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Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y.V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C.B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H.K.; Hadley, D.R.; Haefner, P.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, J.B.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G.A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R.D.; Harris, O.M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H.S.; Haywood, S.J.; Head, S.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; 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Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.E.M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos, D.Santos; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schonig, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R.D.St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires, F.J.Viegas; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Pastor, E.Torro; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G.Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data- taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1+/-0.9 {\\mu}m and a relative momentum resolution {\\sigma}p/p = (4.83+/-0.16)...

  17. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented

  18. A novel iterative energy calibration method for composite germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S. E-mail: ssg@alpha.iuc.res.in

    2004-07-01

    An automatic method for energy calibration of the observed experimental spectrum has been developed. The method presented is based on an iterative algorithm and presents an efficient way to perform energy calibrations after establishing the weights of the calibration data. An application of this novel technique for data acquired using composite detectors in an in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiment is presented.

  19. Simulation and calibration of the specific energy loss of the central jet chambers of the H1 detector and measurement of the inclusive D{sup *{+-}} meson cross section in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekemper, Eva

    2011-12-15

    In this thesis the photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in ep collisions at HERA is analysed. D{sup *} mesons are detected in the 'golden' decay channel D{sup *} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sub s} with the H1 detector. Compared to earlier analyses, the systematic uncertainty is reduced due to two main improvements. Firstly, the simulation of the Fast Track Trigger, which is based on tracks measured within the central jet chambers, allows the trigger efficiency dependence of various kinematic variables to be evaluated. Secondly, the use of specific energy loss provides the possibility to suppress the non-resonant background. In order to use particle identification with the specific energy loss in the analysis, the simulation of the specific energy loss in the central jet chambers of the H1 detector is improved and the necessary correction functions and calibrations have been determined. This improved final H1 detector simulation is used to determine the cross section of photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in the HERA II data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 113 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the kinematic region of Q{sup 2}<2 GeV for the photon virtuality and photon-proton center of mass energies of 100

  20. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs

  1. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards; Avaliacao da dependencia energetica de camaras de ionizacao do tipo lapis calibradas em feixes padroes de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  2. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Mitsunari Takeshita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL. Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control, using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin, digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA, Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health ® , Rochester, NY, USA, and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey′s test at 5% significance level. Results: The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001. CBCT differed from panoramic (P = 0.0130, periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066, periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001, and digital periapical (P = 0.0027. Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007. Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004. Conclusions: Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  3. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Paul S. [Somerville College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by ~ 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  4. Characterisation of a protection level Am-241 calibration source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, G. A.; Rossiter, M. J.; Williams, T. T.

    1992-11-01

    The various measurements involved in the commissioning process of an Am-241 radioactive source and transport mechanisms to be used for protection level calibration work are detailed. The source and its handling mechanisms are described and measurements to characterize the resultant gamma ray beam are described. For the beam measurements, the inverse square law is investigated and beam uniformity is assessed. A trial calibration of ionization chambers is described. The Am-241 irradiation facility is concluded to be suitable for calibrating secondary standards as part of the calibration service offered for protection level instruments. The umbra part of beam is acceptably uniform for a range of chambers and the measurements obtained were predictable and consistent. This quality will be added to the range of qualities offered as part of the protection level secondary standard calibration service.

  5. Intensity measurements of slowly extracted heavy ion beams from the SIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeg, P.; Peters, A.; Strehl, P.

    1994-11-01

    The paper reports about performance tests of newly designed Secondary Electron Monitors (SEM), Ionization Chambers (IC) and Multi Diode Counters (MDC). Especially the linearity of the detectors with respect to the specific energy loss will be discussed. Calibration has been performed by means of scintillation particle counters at the lower end of the intensity region. The status of the Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC), which is provided for absolute measurements and calibration of detectors above some nA of beam current is reported, too. (orig.)

  6. Thermally induced diffraction losses for a Gaussian pump beam and optimization of the mode-to-pump ratio in an end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y T; Li, W J; Pan, L L; Yu, J T; Zhang, R H

    2013-01-01

    The analytical model of thermally induced diffraction losses for a Gaussian pump beam are derived as functions of the mode-to-pump ratio and pump power in end-pumped Nd-doped lasers considering the energy transfer upconversion effects. The mode-to-pump ratio is optimized based on it. The results show that the optimum mode-to-pump ratio with the thermally induced diffraction losses is less than 0.65, and it is less than the results in which the thermally induced diffraction losses are neglected. The theoretical model is applied to a diode-end-pumped Nd:GdVO 4 laser operating at 1342 nm, and the theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results. (paper)

  7. Dynamic properties of unbonded, multi-strand beams subjected to flexural loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asker, Haval K.; Rongong, Jem A.; Lord, Charles E.

    2018-02-01

    Beam-like structures, constructed from many long strands that are constrained rather than bonded together, can provide appreciable levels of structural damping through friction between individual strands. This paper describes experimental and numerical studies, carried out on square-section metal beams, which are aimed at improving understanding of the relationship between construction and performance. A beam is formed from a pack of square-section strands that is held together at various compression loads with pre-calibrated clamps. Flexural deformation of the assembled beam is simulated using standard finite element analysis employing simple Coulomb friction at the interfaces. The validity of the assumptions used in the models is confirmed by comparison with three point bend tests on a regular nine strand construction at several different clamp loads. Dynamic loss factors for this beam are obtained by conducting forced vibration tests, which show that the damping is insensitive to frequency. Subsequent numerical studies are used to investigate the effects of increasing the number of strands whilst maintaining the overall cross-section geometry of the beam. It is found that the system stiffness drops and loss factor increases when more strands are used for a maintained beam cross-section. Interestingly, the energy dissipated by each beam construction is almost the same. These results provide a vital and necessary insight into the physics for stranded structures and materials that are largely prevalent in mechanical (e.g. cables) and electrical (e.g. wires) elements.

  8. CEBAF beam viewer imaging software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; McDowell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the various software used in the analysis of beam viewer images at CEBAF. This software, developed at CEBAF, includes a three-dimensional viewscreen calibration code which takes into account such factors as multiple camera/viewscreen rotations and perspective imaging, and maintaining a calibration database for each unit. Additional software allows single-button beam spot detection, with determination of beam location, width, and quality, in less than three seconds. Software has also been implemented to assist in the determination of proper chopper RF control parameters from digitized chopper circles, providing excellent results

  9. Direct megavoltage photon calibration service in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.J.; Ramanthan, G.; Oliver, C.; Cole, A.; Harty, P.D.; Wright, T.; Webb, D.V.; Lye, J.; Followill, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) maintains the Australian primary standard of absorbed dose. Until recently, the standard was used to calibrate ionisation chambers only in 60 Co gamma rays. These chambers are then used by radiotherapy clinics to determine linac output, using a correction factor (k Q ) to take into account the different spectra of 60 Co and the linac. Over the period 2010–2013, ARPANSA adapted the primary standard to work in megavoltage linac beams, and has developed a calibration service at three photon beams (6, 10 and 18 MV) from an Elekta Synergy linac. We describe the details of the new calibration service, the method validation and the use of the new calibration factors with the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS-398 dosimetry Code of Practice. The expected changes in absorbed dose measurements in the clinic when shifting from 60 Co to the direct calibration are determined. For a Farmer chamber (model 2571), the measured chamber calibration coefficient is expected to be reduced by 0.4, 1.0 and 1.1 % respectively for these three beams when compared to the factor derived from 60 Co. These results are in overall agreement with international absorbed dose standards and calculations by Muir and Rogers in 2010 of k Q factors using Monte Carlo techniques. The reasons for and against moving to the new service are discussed in the light of the requirements of clinical dosimetry.

  10. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  11. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    traveling calibration station (calibrator) consisting of N (≥2) GNSS receivers+antennas+cables and PPS/frequency-distributors. It is a pre-cabled black...the PTB is taken as the reference of the calibration, a GNSS time link correction is equal to the classic GNSS equipment calibration correction [8...TWSTFT link calibration. If we replace the TWSTFT link by a GNSS link or a optical fiber (OF), it becomes a GNSS or an OF time link calibration. This

  12. Irradiator, particularly for calibration of dosimetric devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brethon, J.-P.; Germond, Philippe; Papot, Lucien.

    1977-01-01

    An irradiator is presented for dosimetric calibration, of the kind comprising one or more radiation emmitting sources, each one placed behind a collimator of which the orifice is covered by a shutter outside the periods of irradiation. This shutter is composed of two preset drop shutters located one behind the other, the drop of the outside curtain of the first shutter causes the beam to pass through and the drop of the internal curtain of the second shutter cuts the beam [fr

  13. Correcting the extended-source calibration for the Herschel-SPIRE Fourier-transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtchanov, I.; Hopwood, R.; Bendo, G.; Benson, C.; Conversi, L.; Fulton, T.; Griffin, M. J.; Joubaud, T.; Lim, T.; Lu, N.; Marchili, N.; Makiwa, G.; Meyer, R. A.; Naylor, D. A.; North, C.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C.; Polehampton, E. T.; Scott, J.; Schulz, B.; Spencer, L. D.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Wu, R.

    2018-03-01

    We describe an update to the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) calibration for extended sources, which incorporates a correction for the frequency-dependent far-field feedhorn efficiency, ηff. This significant correction affects all FTS extended-source calibrated spectra in sparse or mapping mode, regardless of the spectral resolution. Line fluxes and continuum levels are underestimated by factors of 1.3-2 in thespectrometer long wavelength band (447-1018 GHz; 671-294 μm) and 1.4-1.5 in the spectrometer short wavelength band (944-1568 GHz; 318-191 μm). The correction was implemented in the FTS pipeline version 14.1 and has also been described in the SPIRE Handbook since 2017 February. Studies based on extended-source calibrated spectra produced prior to this pipeline version should be critically reconsidered using the current products available in the Herschel Science Archive. Once the extended-source calibrated spectra are corrected for ηff, the synthetic photometry and the broad-band intensities from SPIRE photometer maps agree within 2-4 per cent - similar levels to the comparison of point-source calibrated spectra and photometry from point-source calibrated maps. The two calibration schemes for the FTS are now self-consistent: the conversion between the corrected extended-source and point-source calibrated spectra can be achieved with the beam solid angle and a gain correction that accounts for the diffraction loss.

  14. The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Hong Ma; Isabelle Wingerter

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop took place at LAPP-Annecy from the 1st to the 3rd of October; 45 people attended the workshop. A detailed program was setup before the workshop. The agenda was organised around very focused presentations where questions were raised to allow arguments to be exchanged and answers to be proposed. The main topics were: Electronics calibration Handling of problematic channels Cluster level corrections for electrons and photons Absolute energy scale Streams for calibration samples Calibration constants processing Learning from commissioning Forty-five people attended the workshop. The workshop was on the whole lively and fruitful. Based on years of experience with test beam analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, and the recent operation of the detector in the commissioning, the methods to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter are well known. Some of the procedures are being exercised in the commisssioning, which have demonstrated the c...

  15. Assessing electron beam sensitivity for SrTiO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} using electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord, Magnus, E-mail: magnunor@gmail.com [Department of Physics, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Vullum, Per Erik [Department of Physics, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Materials and Chemistry, SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway); Hallsteinsen, Ingrid; Tybell, Thomas [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Holmestad, Randi [Department of Physics, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Thresholds for beam damage have been assessed for La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} as a function of electron probe current and exposure time at 80 and 200 kV acceleration voltage. The materials were exposed to an intense electron probe by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with simultaneous acquisition of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data. Electron beam damage was identified by changes of the core loss fine structure after quantification by a refined and improved model based approach. At 200 kV acceleration voltage, damage in SrTiO{sub 3} was identified by changes both in the EEL fine structure and by contrast changes in the STEM images. However, the changes in the STEM image contrast as introduced by minor damage can be difficult to detect under several common experimental conditions. No damage was observed in SrTiO{sub 3} at 80 kV acceleration voltage, independent of probe current and exposure time. In La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}, beam damage was observed at both 80 and 200 kV acceleration voltages. This damage was observed by large changes in the EEL fine structure, but not by any detectable changes in the STEM images. The typical method to validate if damage has been introduced during acquisitions is to compare STEM images prior to and after spectroscopy. Quantifications in this work show that this method possibly can result in misinterpretation of beam damage as changes of material properties. - Highlights: • We studied the effects of a TEM electron beam on a perovskite heterostructure. • Using an improved ELNES quantification method, subtle changes could be observed. • On LSMO changes were observed in the ELNES, but none in the STEM-HAADF. • For STO changes were observed in both ELNES and STEM-HAADF. • This shows beam damage can be misinterpreted as material properties.

  16. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC.

  17. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC

  18. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  19. Method for Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashin, Constantine (Inventor); Wielicki, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention comprises an approach for calibrating the sensitivity to polarization, optics degradation, spectral and stray light response functions of instruments on orbit. The concept is based on using an accurate ground-based laser system, Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration (GSLC), transmitting laser light to instrument on orbit during nighttime substantially clear-sky conditions. To minimize atmospheric contribution to the calibration uncertainty the calibration cycles should be performed in short time intervals, and all required measurements are designed to be relative. The calibration cycles involve ground operations with laser beam polarization and wavelength changes.

  20. Space environment simulation and sensor calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Patton, James; Plis, Elena; Cooper, Russell; Hoffmann, Ryan; Ferguson, Dale; Hilmer, Robert V.; McGarity, John; Holeman, Ernest

    2018-02-01

    The Mumbo space environment simulation chamber discussed here comprises a set of tools to calibrate a variety of low flux, low energy electron and ion detectors used in satellite-mounted particle sensors. The chamber features electron and ion beam sources, a Lyman-alpha ultraviolet lamp, a gimbal table sensor mounting system, cryogenic sample mount and chamber shroud, and beam characterization hardware and software. The design of the electron and ion sources presented here offers a number of unique capabilities for space weather sensor calibration. Both sources create particle beams with narrow, well-characterized energetic and angular distributions with beam diameters that are larger than most space sensor apertures. The electron and ion sources can produce consistently low fluxes that are representative of quiescent space conditions. The particle beams are characterized by 2D beam mapping with several co-located pinhole aperture electron multipliers to capture relative variation in beam intensity and a large aperture Faraday cup to measure absolute current density.

  1. Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yves Roblin

    2011-09-01

    With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

  2. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references

  3. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references.

  4. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  5. Study of the behavior of radiation detectors for mammography in standard beams using a clinical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreira, Jacqueline Sales

    2014-01-01

    A mammogram is the x-ray of the breast that allows early detection of cancer, by being able to show lesions in very small early stage. But to get an early and reliable diagnosis is necessary that the mammography unit is calibrated and working properly, otherwise there may be a loss in image produced, may lead to a false diagnosis, and possible harm to the patient. So it is important to control these devices, especially in relation to the radiation produced by them. In this project, we propose a study of the behavior of ionization chambers for mammography calibrated beam patterns in a clinical system (Philips-VMI mammography, Graph Mammo AF, which operates a range of 20 to 35 kV) from Instruments Calibration Laboratory at IPEN-CNEN/SP, with the aim of determining parameters correction approaching conditions calibration conditions for clinical use. Measurements of the parameters of the beams set in mammography using simulators acrylic specially developed for these measurements were performed in order to establish a new protocol for calibration of the ionization chambers in a clinical system rather than the industrial system, or as a complement to this. (author)

  6. BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.

    2005-03-18

    Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

  7. Improvement of the calibration technique of clinical dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlin Caldas, L.V.

    1988-08-01

    Clinical dosemeters constituted of ionization chambers connected to electrometers are usually calibrated as whole systems in appropriate radiation fields against secondary standard dosemeters in calibration laboratories. This work reports on a technique of component calibration procedures separately for chambers and electrometers applied in the calibration laboratory of IPEN-CNEN, Brazil. For electrometer calibration, redundancy was established by using a standard capacitor of 1000pF (General Radio, USA) and a standard current source based on air ionization with Sr 90 (PTW, Germany). The results from both methods applied to several electrometers of clinical dosemeters agreed within 0.4%. The calibration factors for the respective chambers were determined by intercomparing their response to the response of a certified calibrated chamber in a Co 60 calibration beam using a Keithley electrometer type 617. Overall calibration factors compared with the product of the respective component calibration factors for the tested dosemeters showed an agreement better than 0.7%. This deviation has to be considered with regard to an uncertainty of 2.5% in routine calibration of clinical dosemeters. Calibration by components permits to calibrate ionization chambers one at a time for those hospitals who have several ionization chambers but only one electrometer (small hospitals, hospitals in developing countries). 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Commissioning the CMS Alignment and Calibration Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Futyan, David

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment has developed a powerful framework to ensure the precise and prompt alignment and calibration of its components, which is a major prerequisite to achieve the optimal performance for physics analysis. The prompt alignment and calibration strategy harnesses computing resources both at the Tier-0 site and the CERN Analysis Facility (CAF) to ensure fast turnaround for updating the corresponding database payloads. An essential element is the creation of dedicated data streams concentrating the specific event information required by the various alignment and calibration workflows. The resulting low latency is required for feeding the resulting constants into the prompt reconstruction process, which is essential for achieving swift physics analysis of the LHC data. This report discusses the implementation and the computational aspects of the alignment and calibration framework. Recent commissioning campaigns with cosmic muons, beam halo and simulated data have been used to gain detailed experience...

  9. A calibration method for phoswich detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gawlikowicz, W; Schröder, W U

    2002-01-01

    A new method of particle identification and energy calibration is proposed for phoswich detectors consisting of a fast plastic scintillator optically coupled to a CsI(Tl) crystal. In this method, functional relationships between integrated yields of three properly selected portions of the observed composite light output signal are parameterized in terms of three physical components (overlapping in time) of this signal. Then, a complete set of calibration constants is derived, linking these integrated partial yields to particle atomic numbers (Z) and energies (E). The calibration is based on the correlations between partial yields observed in actual data from the physics or 'production' runs, and energy deposits calculated for detector elements. The method is found suitable for a wide range of incident particle species and energies, largely eliminating the need for costly and time-consuming conventional calibration experiments with a variety of beams, targets, and bombarding energies.

  10. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  11. Beam Profiling through Wire Chambing Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, W

    2013-01-01

    This note describes the calibration of the Delay Wire Chambers (DWCs) used during test runs of CALICE’s Tungsten Digital Hadron Calorimeter (W-DHCAL) prototype in CERN’s SPS beam line (10 – 300 GeV).

  12. Cross sections of electron loss and capture for beams of O+ in water vapor from the energy range of 0,2 to 1,2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Vitor Jesus de

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interactions between atoms and molecules is important for the knowledge of the cross sections of the processes that contribute to the deposition of energy by charged particle beams used in radiotherapy planning and transport particle simulation codes. Heavy ions, such as oxygen, induce many cellular and molecular damages in human cells.as a result of interaction between the projectile and atoms and molecules. The use of proton and carbon as the projectile interacting with water molecules is well characterized, however there are few studies with oxygen ions. In this work we are interested in the study of electron loss (projectile ionization) and electron capture with charge state 1+. The Pelletron accelerator of 1.7 MeV from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro housed in the Atomic and Molecular collisions Laboratory (LACAM) has been used, which can accelerate atomic and molecular ions up to speeds of the order of hundredths of light speed, and consists of the source of negative ions, the Wien filter, the accelerator itself and the magnet load selector. The detection device used to evaluate the processes of interaction (capture and loss) between the beam of the O + and the water molecule is a Microchannel Plate (MCP) at the position sensitive anode. The collisions of O + beans are being studied in the range of 0.2 to 1.2 MeV with water vapor (Z = 10). Were obtained the respective absolute cross sections for electron loss and electron capture and compared with the cross sections of the molecule methane (CH4 → Z = 10), the isoelectronic water molecule. The experimental results show an agreement between the measurements with water and methane. Comparisons were made with results of theoretical models for electron loss using the 'Free Collision Model' and for capture the Bohr and Lindhard model. The theoretical results for electron loss show an agreement of experimental data with the model used. The model of Bohr and Lindhard describes

  13. Preliminary evaluation of a Neutron Calibration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Talysson S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Sanches, Matias P.; Mitake, Malvina B.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: talvarenga@ipen.br, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: msanches@ipen.br, E-mail: mbmitake@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial

    2013-07-01

    In the past few years, Brazil and several other countries in Latin America have experimented a great demand for the calibration of neutron detectors, mainly due to the increase in oil prospection and extraction. The only laboratory for calibration of neutron detectors in Brazil is localized at the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, which is part of the IAEA SSDL network. This laboratory is the national standard laboratory in Brazil. With the increase in the demand for the calibration of neutron detectors, there is a need for another calibration services. In this context, the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN/CNEN, Sao Paulo, which already offers calibration services of radiation detectors with standard X, gamma, beta and alpha beams, has recently projected a new calibration laboratory for neutron detectors. In this work, the ambient equivalent dose rate (H⁎(10)) was evaluated in several positions inside and around this laboratory, using Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP5 code), in order to verify the adequateness of the shielding. The obtained results showed that the shielding is effective, and that this is a low-cost methodology to improve the safety of the workers and evaluate the total staff workload. (author)

  14. A water flow calorimeter calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Neutral beam systems are instrumented by several water flow calorimeter systems, and some means is needed to verify the accuracy of such systems and diagnose their failures. This report describes a calibration system for these calorimeters. The calibrator consists of two 24 kilowatt circulation water heaters, with associated controls and instrumentation. The unit can supply power from 0 to 48 kW in five coarse steps and one fine range. Energy is controlled by varying the power and the time of operation of the heaters. The power is measured by means of precision power transducers, and the energy is measured by integrating the power with respect to time. The accuracy of the energy measurement is better than 0.5% when the power supplied is near full scale, and the energy resolution is better than 1 kilojoule. The maximum energy delivered is approximately 50 megajoules. The calorimetry loop to be calibrated is opened, and the calibrator is put in series with the calorimeter heat source. The calorimeter is then operated in its normal fashion, with the calibrator used as the heat source. The calibrator can also be used in a stand alone mode to calibrate calorimeter sensors removed from systems

  15. First absolute measurements of fast-ion losses in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Faitsch, M.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Hermann, A.; de Marne, P.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J. F.; Sieglin, B.; Snicker, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-10-01

    A new diagnostic technique that allows to obtain absolute fluxes of fast-ion losses measured with absolutely calibrated scintillator based fast-ion loss detectors (FILD) is presented here. First absolute fluxes of fast-ion losses have been obtained in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. An instrument function that includes the scintillator efficiency, collimator geometry, optical transmission and camera efficiency has been constructed. The scintillator response to deuterium ions in the relevant energy range of fast-ions has been characterized using a tandem accelerator. Absolute flux of neutral beam injection (NBI) prompt losses has been obtained in magnetohydrodynamic quiescent plasmas. The temporal evolution of the heat load measured with FILD follows that measured at the FILD entrance obtained with an Infra-Red camera looking at the FILD detector head. ASCOT simulations are in good agreement with the absolute heat load of NBI prompt losses measured with FILD.

  16. Energy-Calibration of the ATLAS Hadronic and Electromagnetic Liquid-Argon Endcap Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Sven

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the first combined beam test of the hadronic and electromagnetic liquid-argon endcap calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment took place at the SPS test beam at CERN. A total of 15 million events from electrons, muons and pions in the energy range from 6 to 200 GeV were recorded. The entire calibration chain, from digital filter weights, over calibration constants, to clustering and energy weights, as is relevant for the energy calibration of hadronic and electromagnetic showers in ATLAS was tested and applied to the beam test data. The calibration methods and first results for the combined performance of the two calorimeters are presented.

  17. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Wilton Mitsunari Takeshita; Lilian Cristina Vessoni Iwaki; Mariliani Chicarelli Da Silva; Renata Hernandes Tonin

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional...

  18. Time dependent formulation of the energy loss by an accelerated intense electron beam just emitted by the cathode of RF-FEL photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, Wa' el [Physics Department, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)]. E-mail: wael_salahh@hotmail.com; Coacolo, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Hallak, A.B. [Physics Department, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Al-Obaid, M. [Physics Department, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)

    2006-08-01

    The energy loss by an accelerated electron bunch of a conical shape propagating in the laser-driven RF-photoinjector is expressed in terms of an expansion of the vector and scalar potentials into a series of eigenfunctions of the empty unit 'pill-box' cavity. A versatile and simple analytical formula which can be easily applied to a bunch of any shape is obtained.

  19. Cyclotrons for high-intensity beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the important physical and technological aspects of cyclotrons for the acceleration of high-intensity beams. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of beam loss mechanisms and extraction schemes.

  20. Study of beam-beam long range compensation with octupoles

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068329; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Tambasco, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Long range beam-beam effects are responsible for particle losses and define fundamental operational parameters of colliders (i.e. crossing angles, intensities, emittances, ${\\beta}$${^∗}$). In this study we propose octuple magnets as a possible scheme to efficiently compensate long-range beam-beam interactions with a global correction scheme. The impact and improvements on the dynamic aperture of colliding beams together with estimates of the luminosity potentials are dis- cussed for the HL-LHC upgrade and extrapolations made for the FCC project.

  1. Limitations due to strong head-on beam-beam interactions (MD 1434)

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Iadarola, Giovanni; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Pojer, Mirko; Crockford, Guy; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Trad, Georges; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The results of an experiment aiming at probing the limitations due to strong head on beam-beam interactions are reported. It is shown that the loss rates significantly increase when moving the working point up and down the diagonal, possibly due to effects of the 10th and/or 14th order resonances. Those limitations are tighter for bunches with larger beam-beam parameters, a maximum total beam-beam tune shift just below 0.02 could be reached.

  2. First results about on-ground calibration of the silicon tracker for the AGILE satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, P.W.; Argan, A.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Buonomo, B.; Chen, A.W.; D'Ammando, F.; Froysland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellizzoni, A.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Quintieri, L.; Rappoldi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The AGILE scientific instrument has been calibrated with a tagged γ-ray beam at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF). The goal of the calibration was the measure of the Point Spread Function (PSF) as a function of the photon energy and incident angle and the validation of the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the silicon tracker operation. The calibration setup is described and some preliminary results are presented.

  3. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  4. Calibração das câmaras de ionização para feixes de tomografia computadorizada no Brasil: a realidade atual Calibration of ionization chambers for computed tomography beams in Brazil: the present reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo Maia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer, no Laboratório de Calibração de Instrumentos do Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, uma metodologia de calibração específica para as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis, que são utilizadas em procedimentos dosimétricos em feixes de tomografia computadorizada, seguindo as mais recentes recomendações internacionais. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados, neste estudo, um equipamento de radiação X industrial, várias câmaras de ionização, um sistema de colimação móvel (tipo diafragma e vários filtros de alumínio de alta pureza. RESULTADOS: Foram estabelecidos os campos padrões de radiodiagnóstico descritos na norma internacional IEC 61267, e foi elaborado um procedimento de calibração adequado para as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis. CONCLUSÃO: Atualmente, já é possível calibrar apropriadamente as câmaras de ionização tipo lápis no Brasil. O procedimento de calibração foi definido com base nas recomendações internacionais e em testes feitos com duas metodologias distintas.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to establish a calibration methodology specific for pencil ionization chambers used in computed tomography dosimetric procedures, in compliance with the most recent recommendations. The study was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An industrial x-ray equipment, several types of ionization chambers, a mobile collimator (diaphragm type, and several high purity aluminum filters were utilized in this study. RESULTS: Diagnostic radiology standard irradiation fields were established according to IEC 61267 standard, and an adequate calibration procedure for pencil ionization chambers was elaborated. CONCLUSION: The appropriate calibration of pencil ionization chambers is already a reality in Brazil. The calibration procedure was defined on the basis of

  5. Calibration procedure of Hukseflux SR25 to Establish the Diffuse Reference for the Outdoor Broadband Radiometer Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, Ibrahim M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Accurate pyranometer calibrations, traceable to internationally recognized standards, are critical for solar irradiance measurements. One calibration method is the component summation method, where the pyranometers are calibrated outdoors under clear sky conditions, and the reference global solar irradiance is calculated as the sum of two reference components, the diffuse horizontal and subtended beam solar irradiances. The beam component is measured with pyrheliometers traceable to the World Radiometric Reference, while there is no internationally recognized reference for the diffuse component. In the absence of such a reference, we present a method to consistently calibrate pyranometers for measuring the diffuse component. The method is based on using a modified shade/unshade method and a pyranometer with less than 0.5 W/m2 thermal offset. The calibration result shows that the responsivity of Hukseflux SR25 pyranometer equals 10.98 uV/(W/m2) with +/-0.86 percent uncertainty.

  6. Calibration of Geodetic Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bajtala

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of metrology and security systems of unification, correctness and standard reproducibilities belong to the preferred requirements of theory and technical practice in geodesy. Requirements on the control and verification of measured instruments and equipments increase and the importance and up-to-date of calibration get into the foreground. Calibration possibilities of length-scales (of electronic rangefinders and angle-scales (of horizontal circles of geodetic instruments. Calibration of electronic rangefinders on the linear comparative baseline in terrain. Primary standard of planar angle – optical traverse and its exploitation for calibration of the horizontal circles of theodolites. The calibration equipment of the Institute of Slovak Metrology in Bratislava. The Calibration process and results from the calibration of horizontal circles of selected geodetic instruments.

  7. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  8. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...... and finally data analysis based on the ISO approach. The device was calibrated and tested on commercially available laser systems. It showed good reproducibility. It was the target to be able to measure CW lasers with a power up to 200 W, focused down to spot diameters in the range of 10µm. In order...

  9. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  10. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  11. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  12. Dosimetry with the scanned proton beam on the PSI gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coray, A.; Pedroni, E.; Boehringer, T.; Lin, S.; Lomax, T.; Goitein, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The irradiation facility at PSI is designed for the treatment of deep seated tumours with a proton beam energy of up to 270 MeV. The spot scanning technique, which uses a proton pencil beam applied to the patient, is performed on a compact isocentric gantry. An optimal three-dimensional conformation of the dose distribution to the target volume can be realized. A fast steering system and a redundant interlock system are in operation. The dose delivery is controlled by a parallel plate transmission chamber, which is calibrated in terms of number of protons per monitor unit. The therapy planning is based on an empirical model, which takes into account attenuation of primary protons and losses outside the primary beam through secondary products. The therapy plan predicts an absolute dose. The calibration of the primary monitor is done using a reference thimble ionization chamber inside a homogeneous geometrical dose volume. The reference system is calibrated in a cobalt field at the national office of metrology in terms of absorbed dose to water. The dosimetry protocol used up to last year was based on the ICRU Report Nr. 59, we have switched to the IAEA Code of Practice starting this beam period. Data on the monitor calibration for various energies and using two different reference systems will be shown. The calibration of the beam monitor using a Faraday Cup in the static pencil beam results in a good agreement with the ionization chamber measurements, with a deviation of less than 1%. Following the daily setup of the machine, an extensive quality control and safety check of the whole system is performed. The daily dosimetry quality assurance program includes: measurement of dose rate and monitor ratios; check of the beam position monitors; measurement of a depth dose curve; dose measurement in a regular dose field. The doses measured daily in a regular scanned field show a standard deviation of about 1 %. Further daily checks results, which illustrate

  13. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, F., E-mail: federica.bonomo@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati - CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cristofaro, S. [Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  14. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  15. Calibration platforms for gravimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanruymbeke, M.

    Several methods investigated in order to calibrate gravimeters by the inertial acceleration produced by a vertical motion are described. The VRR 8601 calibrating platform is especially designed to calibrate La Coste and Romberg gravimeters. For heavier gravimeters such as tidal La Coste or superconducting instruments, two other principles are possible to lift up sinusoidally the platform: a mercury crapaudine or the rotation on an inclined plane.

  16. Coherent Beam-Beam Effects in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alexahin, Yu I; Herr, Werner; Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2001-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) two proton beams of similar intensities collide in several interaction points. It is well known that the head-on collision of two beams of equal strength can excite coherent modes whose frequencies are separated from the incoherent spectrum of oscillations of individual particles. This can lead to the loss of Landau damping and possibly to unstable motion. The beam-beam effect in the LHC is further complicated by a large number of bunches (2808 per beam), a finite crossing angle and gaps in the bunch train. The coherent beam-beam effects under various conditions and operational scenarios are studied analytically and with multiparticle simulations. We give an overview of the main results and present proposals to overcome these difficulties together with possible side effects.

  17. ATLAS Muon Calibration Frameowrk

    CERN Document Server

    Carlino, Dr; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, Dr; Kortner, Dr; Mazzaferro, Dr; Petrucci, Dr; Salvo, Dr; Simone, Dr; WALKER, Dr

    2010-01-01

    Automated calibration of the ATLAS detector subsystems ( like MDT and RPC chambers) are being performed at remote sites, called Remote Calibration Centers. The calibration data for the assigned part of the detector are being processed at these centers and send the result back to CERN for general use in reconstruction and analysis. In this work, we present the recent developments in data discovery mechanism and integration of Ganga as a backend which allows for the specification, submission, bookkeeping and post processing of calibration tasks on a wide set of available heterogeneous resources at remote centers.

  18. ATLAS Muon Calibration Framework

    CERN Document Server

    CARLINO, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Di Simone, A; Doria, A; Jha, MK; Mazzaferro, L; Walker, R

    2011-01-01

    Automated calibration of the ATLAS detector subsystems ( like MDT and RPC chambers) are being performed at remote sites, called Remote Calibration Centers. The calibration data for the assigned part of the detector are being processed at these centers and send the result back to CERN for general use in reconstruction and analysis. In this work, we present the recent developments in data discovery mechanism and integration of Ganga as a backend which allows for the specification, submission, bookkeeping and post processing of calibration tasks on a wide set of available heterogeneous resources at remote centers.

  19. RF impedance measurement calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  20. Planck 2013 results. V. LFI calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the methods employed to photometrically calibrate the data acquired by the Low Frequency Instrument on Planck. Our calibration is based on the Solar Dipole, caused by motion of the Solar System with respect to the CMB rest frame, which provides a signal of a few mK with the same spectrum...... as the CMB anisotrophies and is visible throughout the mission. In this data release we rely on the characterization of the Solar Dipole as measured by WMAP. We also present preliminary results on the study of the Orbital Dipole, caused by the motion of the Planck spacecraft, which agree with the WMAP value...... of the Solar System speed to 0.2%. We compute the calibration constant for each radiometer roughly once per hour, in order to keep track of changes in the detectors' gain. Since non-idealities in the optical response of the beams proved to be important, we implemented a fast convolution algorithm which...

  1. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  2. Beam Interlocks for LHC and SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Dinius, A; Gimeno-Vicente, J; Nouchi, P; Puccio, B; Schmidt, R; Wenninger, J

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC) will operate at 7 TeV/c with a luminosity of 10 cms. This requires two beams with about 3^10 protons/beam, corresponding to a stored energy of about 350 MJ, sufficient to heat and melt 500 kg of copper. Protection of equipment from damage in case of uncontrolled beam losses is challenging. Injection of the beam from the SPS to the LHC could already damage equipment and is only permitted when all LHC systems are correctly prepared. In case of an uncontrolled loss of the circulating LHC beams, it is required to extract the beams into a specially designed target as soon as possible. Beam loss monitors and equipment for hardware surveillance are distributed around the 26 km long accelerator. In case of failures or beam losses, the beam interlock system is informed and sends a dump request to the beam dumping system. The beam interlock system also inhibits injection when the LHC is not ready for beam. In this paper the requirements for the beam interlock system are discussed...

  3. Calibration methods of plane-parallel ionization chambers used in electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulla, Roseli Tadeu

    1999-01-01

    The use of linear accelerators in radiotherapy is of great importance in Medicine, and according to international recommendations the electron beam dosimetry has to be performed using plane-parallel ionization chambers, previously calibrated in standard gamma radiation fields at accredited laboratories. In this work, calibration methods of plane-parallel ionization chambers used in dosimetry procedures of high energy electron beams of clinical accelerators were presented, tested and intercompared. The experiments were carried out using gamma radiation beams of 60 Co at the Calibration Laboratory of Clinical Dosemeters at IPEN and electron beams od 4 to 16 MeV at the Radiotherapy Department of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo. A method was chosen to be established at IPEN. Proposals of the calibration procedure, calibration certificate and data sheets are presented. (author)

  4. The first experience with LHC beam gas ionization monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dehning, B; Guerrero, A; Patecki, M; Versteegen, R

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Gas Ionization Monitors (BGI) are used to measure beam emittance on LHC. This paper describes the detectors and their operation and discusses the issues met during the commissioning. It also discusses the various calibration procedures used to correct for non-uniformity of Multi-Channel plates and to correct the beam size for effects affecting the electron trajectory after ionization.

  5. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  6. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  7. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...

  8. Calibration of phase contrast imaging on HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Gong, S. B.; Xu, M.; Xiao, C. J.; Jiang, W.; Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Wang, H. J.; Wu, Y. F.; Yuan, B. D.; Lan, T.; Ye, M. Y.; Duan, X. R.; HL-2A Team

    2017-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) has recently been developed on HL-2A tokamak. In this article we present the calibration of this diagnostic. This system is to diagnose chord integral density fluctuations by measuring the phase shift of a CO2 laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 μm when the laser beam passes through plasma. Sound waves are used to calibrate PCI diagnostic. The signal series in different PCI channels show a pronounced modulation of incident laser beam by the sound wave. Frequency-wavenumber spectrum is achieved. Calibrations by sound waves with different frequencies exhibit a maximal wavenumber response of 12 cm-1. The conversion relationship between the chord integral plasma density fluctuation and the signal intensity is 2.3 × 1013 m-2/mV, indicating a high sensitivity.

  9. Test Beam Coordination: 2003 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B.

    The 2003 Test Beam Period The 2003 Test Beam period has been very fruitful for ATLAS. In spite of several days lost because of the accelerator problems, ATLAS has been able to achieve many results: FCAL has completed the calibration program in H6 Tilecal has completed the calibration program in H8 Pixel has performed extensive studies with normal and high intensity beams (up to 1.4*108 hadrons/spill) SCT has completed a variety of studies with quite a high number of modules operated concurrently TRT has performed several studies at high, low and very low energy (first use of the new H8 beam in the range 1 to 9 GeV) Muons (MDT,RPC and TGC) have been operating a large setup for about 5 months. The almost final MDT ROD (MROD) has been integrated in the readout and the final trigger electronics for TGC and RPC has been tested and certified with normal beam and during dedicated 40 MHz beam periods. The TDAQ has exploited a new generation prototype successfully and the new Event Filter infrastructure f...

  10. Beam Diagnostics for the J-PARC Main Ring Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Toyama, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Naoki; Kishiro, Junichi; Lee, Seishu; Miura, Takako; Muto, Suguru; Toyokawa, Ryoji

    2005-01-01

    Beam diagnostics: beam intensity monitors (DCCT, SCT, FCT, WCM), beam position monitors (ESM), beam loss monitors (proportional chamber, air ion chamber), beam profile monitors (secondary electron emission, gas-sheet) have been designed, tested, and will be installed for the Main Ring synchrotron of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). This paper describes the basic design principle and specification of each monitor, with a stress on how to cope with high power beam (average circulation current of ~12 A) and low beam loss operation (less than 1 W/m except a collimator region). Some results of preliminary performance test using present beams and a radiation source will be reported.

  11. ADT fast losses MD

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua Ferrando, BM; Sapinski, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The fast beam losses in the order of 1 ms are expected to be a potential major luminosity limitation for higher beam energies after the LHC long shutdown (LS1). Therefore a Quench Test is planned in the winter 2013 to estimate the quench limit in this timescale and revise the current models. This experiment was devoted to determination the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT) as a system for fast losses induction. A non-standard operation of the ADT was used to develop the beam oscillation instead of suppressing them. The sign flip method had allowed us to create the fast losses within several LHC turns at 450 GeV during the previous test (26th March 2012). Thus, the ADT could be potentially used for the studies of the UFO ("Unidentied Falling Object") impact on the cold magnets. Verification of the system capability and investigations of the disturbed beam properties were the main objectives of this MD. During the experiment, the pilot bunches of proton beam were excited independently in the horizontal and vertical ...

  12. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  13. Beam-beam collisions and crossing angles in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates the strength of head on and parasitic beam-beam collisions in RHIC when the crossing angle is zero. A non-zero crossing angle is not required in normal operation with 120 bunches, thanks to the early separation of the two beams. The RHIC lattice is shown to easily accommodate even conservatively large crossing angles, for example in beam dynamics studies, or in future operational upgrades to as many as 360 bunches per ring. A modest loss in luminosity is incurred when gold ions collide at an angle after 10 hours of storage

  14. Calibration of the instrumental polarization in LEST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    A method to calibrate the instrumental polarization of LEST (i.e., of the optics in front of the polarization and analysis package at the LEST secondary focus) is described and analysed. A laser sends a beam from the LEST observing room at ground level backwards through the telescope. The modulated return beam that has been reflected at the 2.4 m entrance window is received by the detector system at the end focus in the LEST observing room. Because of a wedge in the entrance window the reflections at the front and back window surfaces may be examined separately. The detected laser beam signals at the three AC frequencies are recorded as functions of the position angle of the modulator package at the LEST secondary focus. Aided by a theorem that is proven in the present paper, the information recorded by the detector system allows all unknowns of the instrumental polarization to be fully determined.

  15. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set

  16. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-07

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  17. Design, Performance, and Calibration of CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Baiatian, G; Emeliantchik, Igor; Massolov, V; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Stefanovich, R; Damgov, Jordan; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Piperov, Stefan; Vankov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Bencze, Gyorgy; Laszlo, Andras; Pal, Andras; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zálán, Peter; Fenyvesi, Andras; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Jas Bir; Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Dugad, Shashikant; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Katta, S; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Sudhakar, Katta; Verma, Piyush; Hashemi, Majid; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M; Paktinat, S; Babich, Kanstantsin; Golutvin, Igor; Kalagin, Vladimir; Kamenev, Alexey; Konoplianikov, V; Kosarev, Ivan; Moissenz, K; Moissenz, P; Oleynik, Danila; Petrosian, A; Rogalev, Evgueni; Semenov, Roman; Sergeyev, S; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Vishnevskiy, Alexander; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Druzhkin, Dmitry; Ivanov, Alexander; Kudinov, Vladimir; Orlov, Alexandre; Smetannikov, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Gershtein, Yuri; Ilyina, N; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kisselevich, I; Kolossov, V; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Litvintsev, Dmitri; Ulyanov, A; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Demianov, A; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Teplov, V; Vardanyan, Irina; Yershov, A; Abramov, Victor; Goncharov, Petr; Kalinin, Alexey; Khmelnikov, Alexander; Korablev, Andrey; Korneev, Yury; Krinitsyn, Alexander; Kryshkin, V; Lukanin, Vladimir; Pikalov, Vladimir; Ryazanov, Anton; Talov, Vladimir; Turchanovich, L; Volkov, Alexey; Camporesi, Tiziano; de Visser, Theo; Vlassov, E; Aydin, Sezgin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Koylu, S; Kurt, Pelin; Onengüt, G; Ozkurt, Halil; Polatoz, A; Sogut, Kenan; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankoc, K; Esendemir, Akif; Gamsizkan, Halil; Güler, M; Ozkan, Cigdem; Sekmen, Sezen; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Sever, Ramazan; Yazgan, Efe; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isiksal, Engin; Kaya, Mithat; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Grynev, B; Lyubynskiy, Vadym; Senchyshyn, Vitaliy; Hauptman, John M; Abdullin, Salavat; Elias, John E; Elvira, D; Freeman, Jim; Green, Dan; Los, Serguei; ODell, V; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Suzuki, Ichiro; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Arcidy, M; Hazen, Eric; Heering, Arjan Hendrix; Lawlor, C; Lazic, Dragoslav; Machado, Emanuel; Rohlf, James; Varela, F; Wu, Shouxiang; Baden, Drew; Bard, Robert; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Grassi, Tullio; Jarvis, Chad; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunori, Shuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Skuja, Andris; Podrasky, V; Sanzeni, Christopher; Winn, Dave; Akgun, Ugur; Ayan, S; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Miller, Michael; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Schmidt, Ianos; Akchurin, Nural; Carrell, Kenneth Wayne; Gusum, K; Kim, Heejong; Spezziga, Mario; Thomas, Ray; Wigmans, Richard; Baarmand, Marc M; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Kramer, Laird; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Cushman, Priscilla; Ma, Yousi; Sherwood, Brian; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Reidy, Jim; Sanders, David A; Karmgard, Daniel John; Ruchti, Randy; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Tully, Christopher; Bodek, Arie; De Barbaro, Pawel; Budd, Howard; Chung, Yeon Sei; Haelen, T; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Barnes, Virgil E; Laasanen, Alvin T

    2008-01-01

    Detailed measurements have been made with the CMS hadron calorimeter endcaps (HE) in response to beams of muons, electrons, and pions. Readout of HE with custom electronics and hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) shows no change of performance compared to readout with commercial electronics and photomultipliers. When combined with lead-tungstenate crystals, an energy resolution of 8\\% is achieved with 300 GeV/c pions. A laser calibration system is used to set the timing and monitor operation of the complete electronics chain. Data taken with radioactive sources in comparison with test beam pions provides an absolute initial calibration of HE to approximately 4\\% to 5\\%.

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  20. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Conductive hearing loss (CHL) occurs because of a mechanical problem in the outer or middle ear. This may be ...

  1. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Profile Measurements (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  2. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  3. Exposure of Plastic Track Detectors to Relativistic Pb Beam for the Purpose of Providing Calibration for the DUBLIN-ESTEC Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment Which was Exposed for Sixty-Nine Months in Earth Orbit

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % WA100 \\\\ \\\\ Solid state nuclear track detectors which formed part of the Dublin-ESTEC ultra heavy~cosmic~ray experiment aboard LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) and which was deployed in Earth orbit for sixty-nine months, will be exposed to relativistic Pb ions. The experiment was the largest of its kind ever undertaken in space and has successfully accumulated more than fifteen times the world sample of cosmic ray nuclei in the region above Z~=~70. The data include the first significant sample of cosmic ray actinide elements and is of major astrophysical importance. The total number of ultra heavy nuclei (Z~$>$~70) in the Dublin-ESTEC sample is $\\sim$~2800. \\\\ \\\\The exposure will be very simple. A stack of detectors (20.5~cm~x~26~cm x~3~cm in size) will be irradiated with a low density beam of Pb ions (a few hundred per cm$^2$ would be ideal, but a wide range of densities and areas could be tolerated). The response of the detectors to these ions of known charge and velocity will be measured and the da...

  4. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  5. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  6. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  7. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  8. SPOTS Calibration Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented using the procedure outlined by the Standardisation Project for Optical Techniques of Strain measurement to calibrate a digital image correlation system. The process involves comparing the experimental data obtained with the optical measurement system to the theoretical values for a specially designed specimen. The standard states the criteria which must be met in order to achieve successful calibration, in addition to quantifying the measurement uncertainty in the system. The system was evaluated at three different displacement load levels, generating strain ranges from 289 µstrain to 2110 µstrain. At the 289 µstrain range, the calibration uncertainty was found to be 14.1 µstrain, and at the 2110 µstrain range it was found to be 28.9 µstrain. This calibration procedure was performed without painting a speckle pattern on the surface of the metal. Instead, the specimen surface was prepared using different grades of grit paper to produce the desired texture.

  9. Site Calibration, FGW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Site Calibration report is describing the results of a measured site calibration for a site in Denmark. The calibration is carried out by DTU Wind Energy in accordance with Ref.[3] and Ref.[4]. The measurement period is given. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance...... measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio between the wind speed at the center of the turbine hub and at the met mast. The wind speed at the turbine is measured by a temporary mast placed at the foundation for the turbine. The site and measurement equipment...... is detailed described in [1] and [2]. All parts of the sensors and the measurement system have been installed by DTU Wind Energy....

  10. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  11. Calibration assembly for nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    A removable calibration assembly can be utilized to verify the angular mounting of transducers in an array employed in an ultrasonic inpsection apparatus, to calibrate one axis of movement of the array with reference to a starting point, or to measure and calibrate the speed per unit of distance of the transducer's ultrasonic beam in the operating medium. The calibration assembly includes both a large and small reflecting surface separated by known distances, and several large cones, the tips of which are machined or adjusted to angles at which certain of the transducers are to be mounted. Clamping means for securing the calibration assembly to the inspection apparatus at a predetermined orientation is provided

  12. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  13. Tutorial on beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a tutorial level review covering a wide range of aspects related to charged particle beam current measurement. The tutorial begins with a look at the characteristics of the beam as a signal source, the associated electromagnetic fields, the influence of the typical accelerator environment on those fields, and the usual means of modifying and controlling that environment to facilitate beam current measurement. Short descriptions of three quite different types of current monitors are presented and a quantitative review of the classical transformer circuit is given. Recognizing that environmental noise pick-up may present a large source of error in quantitative measurements, signal handling considerations are given considerable attention using real-life examples. An example of a successful transport line beam current monitor implementation is presented and the tutorial concludes with a few comments about signal processing and current monitor calibration issues

  14. Calibration of thermoluminiscent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1989-07-01

    In this report the relation between exposure and absorbed radiation dose in various materials is represented, on the base of recent data. With the help of this a calibration procedure for thermoluminescent materials, adapted to the IRI radiation standard is still the exposure in rontgen. In switching to the air kerma standard the calibration procedure will have to be adapted. (author). 6 refs.; 4 tabs

  15. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  16. Approximation Behooves Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Ribeiro, André Manuel; Poulsen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009.......Calibration based on an expansion approximation for option prices in the Heston stochastic volatility model gives stable, accurate, and fast results for S&P500-index option data over the period 2005–2009....

  17. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  18. Calibration of Local Area Weather Radar-Identifying significant factors affecting the calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lisbeth; Jensen, Niels Einar; Madsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    A Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is an X-band weather radar developed to meet the needs of high resolution rainfall data for hydrological applications. The LAWR system and data processing methods are reviewed in the first part of this paper, while the second part of the paper focuses on calibrat......A Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is an X-band weather radar developed to meet the needs of high resolution rainfall data for hydrological applications. The LAWR system and data processing methods are reviewed in the first part of this paper, while the second part of the paper focuses...... on calibration. The data processing for handling the partial beam filling issue was found to be essential to the calibration. LAWR uses a different calibration process compared to conventional weather radars, which use a power-law relationship between reflectivity and rainfall rate. Instead LAWR uses a linear...

  19. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  20. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  1. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  2. Vibration transducer calibration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Techniques for the calibration of vibration transducers used in the Aeronautical Quality Assurance Directorate of the British Ministry of Defence are presented. Following a review of the types of measurements necessary in the calibration of vibration transducers, the performance requirements of vibration transducers, which can be used to measure acceleration, velocity or vibration amplitude, are discussed, with particular attention given to the piezoelectric accelerometer. Techniques for the accurate measurement of sinusoidal vibration amplitude in reference-grade transducers are then considered, including the use of a position sensitive photocell and the use of a Michelson laser interferometer. Means of comparing the output of working-grade accelerometers with that of previously calibrated reference-grade devices are then outlined, with attention given to a method employing a capacitance bridge technique and a method to be used at temperatures between -50 and 200 C. Automatic calibration procedures developed to speed up the calibration process are outlined, and future possible extensions of system software are indicated.

  3. Composite Beam Theory with Material Nonlinearities and Progressive Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fang

    functions, and the 3D spatial gradients of these warping functions. Asymptotic analysis of the extended Hamiltonian's principle suggests dropping the terms of axial gradients of the warping functions. As a result, the solid mechanics problem resolved into a 3D continuum is dimensionally reduced to a problem of solving the warping functions on a 2D cross-sectional field by minimizing the information loss. The present theory is implemented using the finite element method (FEM) in Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional Analysis (VABS), a general-purpose cross-sectional analysis tool. An iterative method is applied to solve the finite warping field for the classical-type model in the form of the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The deformation gradient tensor is directly used to enable the capability of dealing with finite deformation, various strain definitions, and several types of material constitutive laws regarding the nonlinear elasticity and progressive damage. Analytical and numerical examples are given for various problems including the trapeze effect, Poynting effect, Brazier effect, extension-bending coupling effect, and free edge damage. By comparison with the predictions from 3D finite element analyses (FEA), 2D FEA based on plane stress assumptions, and experimental data, the structural and material responses are proven to be rigorously captured by the present theory and the computational cost is significantly reduced. Due to the semi-analytical feature of the code developed, the unrealistic numerical issues widely seen in the conventional FEA with strain softening material behaviors are prevented by VABS. In light of these intrinsic features, the nonlinear elastic and inelastic 3D material models can be economically calibrated by data-matching the VABS predictions directly with the experimental measurements from slender coupons. Furthermore, the global behavior of slender composite structures in meters can also be effectively characterized by VABS without unnecessary

  4. Radiation condition in computerized tomography (CT): determination and calibration of dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrade, L.C.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2016-01-01

    RQT is the standard for radiation conditions in computed tomography . It simulates a beam unrelieved of a CT scanner . The camera pencil ionization dosimeter is used in CT. The LNMRI become known characterization of RQT radiation conditions and the secondary standard calibration for type pencil ionisation chambers in its lab. The obtained beam has the characteristics required by IEC 61267. The results of the calibration presented combined uncertainty expanded to 95.45% from 2.22% . (author)

  5. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, A.; Faccio, D.; Couairon, A.; Papazoglou, D. G.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S.; Abdollahpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  6. Calibration of the ZEUS forward calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.

    1990-10-01

    The physics at the ep-collider HERA requires high resolution calorimetry calibrated with an accuracy of better than 2%. The ZEUS detector meets these conditions by means of a compensating uranium scintillator sandwich calorimeter with an energy resolution of σ/E = 35%/√E + σ cal , where σ cal is the calibration error. One of the tools to minimize σ cal is the calibration with the signals of the radioactivity of the Uranium plates (UNO). Taking UNO data every 8 hours keeps the calibration stable within ≅ 1%. The muon calibration is done employing an algorithm, that determines the most probable energy loss with a precision of ≅ 1%. The channel-to-channel fluctuations of the ratio μ/UNO for a forward calorimeter (FCAL) prototype show a spread of 5.2% for the electromagnetic calorimeter and ≅ 2.5% for the hadronic sections. Improvements in the construction of the FCAL modules decreased these fluctuations to 2.0% and ≅ 1.8% respectively. The influence of the cracks between the calorimeter modules amounts to ≅ 1.7% on average for the ZEUS geometry, if a 2 mm thick Pb-sheet is introduced between the modules. We conclude that we are able to keep σ cal below 2%. (orig.)

  7. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  8. Calibrating the Athena telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, J.; Guainazzi, M.; den Herder, J.; Bavdaz, M.; Burwitz, V.; Ferrando, P.; Lumb, D.; Natalucci, L.; Pajot, F.; Pareschi, G.

    2017-10-01

    Athena is ESA's upcoming X-ray mission, currently set for launch in 2028. With two nationally-funded, state-of-the-art instruments (a high-resolution spectrograph named X-IFU and a wide-field imager named WFI), and a telescope collecting area of 1.4-2 m^2 at 1 keV, the calibration of the spacecraft is a challenge in itself. This poster presents the current (spring 2017) plan of how to calibrate the Athena telescope. It is based on a hybrid approach, using bulk manufacturing and integration data as well as dedicated calibration measurements combined with a refined software model to simulate the full response of the optics.

  9. Beam-Beam effects at the CMS BRIL van-der-Meer scans

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project (BRIL) is devoted to the simulation and measurement of luminosity, beam conditions and radiation fields in the CMS Experiment at CERN. The project is engaged in operating and developing new detectors, compatible with the high luminosity experimental environments at the LHC. BRIL operates several detectors based on different physical principles and technologies. The detectors are calibrated using van-der-Meer scans to measure the luminosity that is a fundamental quantity of the LHC beam. In van-der-Meer scans the count rate in a detector is measured as a function of the distance between beams in the plane perpendicular to beam direction, to extract the underlying beam overlap area. The goal of the van-der-Meer scans is to obtain the calibration constant for each luminometer to be used at calibration then in physics data taking runs. The note presents the overview of beam-beam effects at the van-der-Meer scan and the corresponding corrections that sh...

  10. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  11. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  12. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...... to the lasso. The lasso is applied both directly as a calibration method and as a method to select important variables/wave lengths. It is demonstrated that the lasso algorithm, in general, leads to parameter estimates of which some are zero while others are quite large (compared to e.g. the traditional PLS...

  13. Radiation Calibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omondi, C.

    2017-01-01

    KEBS Radiation Dosimetry mandate are: Custodian of Kenya Standards on Ionizing radiation, Ensure traceability to International System (SI ) and Calibration radiation equipment. RAF 8/040 on Radioisotope applications for troubleshooting and optimizing industrial process established Radiotracer Laboratory objective is to introduce and implement radiotracer technique for problem solving of industrial challenges. Gamma ray scanning technique applied is to Locate blockages, Locate liquid in vapor lines, Locate areas of lost refractory or lining in a pipe and Measure flowing densities. Equipment used for diagnostic and radiation protection must be calibrated to ensure Accuracy and Traceability

  14. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  15. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  16. Reliability of an x-ray system for calibrating and testing personal radiation dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, M.C.; Silva, C.R.E.; Silva, T.A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rosado, P.H.G.; Cunha, P.G. [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Metrology laboratories are expected to maintain standardized radiation beams and traceable standard dosimeters to provide reliable calibrations or testing of detectors. Results of the characterization of an x-ray system for performing calibration and testing of radiation dosimeters used for individual monitoring are shown in this work. (author)

  17. Beam loading effects for two-beam ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lanfa; Lin Yuzheng; Tong Dechun

    1999-01-01

    An analytic treatment of multi-bunch potential well distortion for a two-beam storage ring is presented. The longitudinal wake effects are separated into: the mode loss, the synchrotron tune shift (both due to potential well distortion) and the coherent multi-bunch coupling. Here, only the first two effects are studied. Resulting simple analytic formulas describe the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by a given bunch within the two-beam, as a function of the high order mode's parameters. One can get immediately a simple quantitative answer in term of the mode loss and the synchrotron tune shift experienced by each bunch from these formulas, so the authors can know how to modify the existing configuration of parasitic cavity resonance (via frequency tuning) so that the resulting potential well distortion effects are minimized. When the RF cavities are symmetrically distributed about the interaction points, the two beams will have same beam loading effects, so the authors can compensate the phase shift of the two beam using the same method as in one beam case

  18. LIDAR TS for ITER core plasma. Part III: calibration and higher edge resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, P.; Gowers, C.; Salzmann, H.

    2017-12-01

    Calibration, after initial installation, of the proposed two wavelength LIDAR Thomson Scattering System requires no access to the front end and does not require a foreign gas fill for Raman scattering. As already described, the variation of solid angle of collection with scattering position is a simple geometrical variation over the unvignetted region. The additional loss over the vignetted region can easily be estimated and in the case of a small beam dump located between the Be tiles, it is within the specified accuracy of the density. The only additional calibration is the absolute spectral transmission of the front-end optics. Over time we expect the transmission of the two front-end mirrors to suffer a deterioration mainly due to depositions. The reduction in transmission is likely to be worse towards the blue end of the scattering spectrum. It is therefore necessary to have a method to monitor such changes and to determine its spectral variation. Standard methods use two lasers at different wavelength with a small time separation. Using the two-wavelength approach, a method has been developed to determine the relative spectral variation of the transmission loss, using simply the measured signals in plasmas with peak temperatures of 4–6 keV . Comparing the calculated line integral of the fitted density over the full chord to the corresponding interferometer data we also have an absolute calibration. At the outer plasma boundary, the standard resolution of the LIDAR Thomson Scattering System is not sufficient to determine the edge gradient in an H-mode plasma. However, because of the step like nature of the signal here, it is possible to carry out a deconvolution of the scattered signals, thereby achieving an effective resolution of ~ 1–2 cm in the outer 10–20 cm.

  19. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  20. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations

  1. Intra-beam Scattering Theory and RHIC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Malitsky, N.; Parzen, G.; Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Intra-beam scattering is the leading mechanism limiting the luminosity in heavy-ion storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiple Coulomb scattering among the charged particles causes transverse emittance growth and longitudinal beam de-bunching and beam loss, compromising machine performance during collision. Theoretically, the original theories developed by Piwinski, Bjorken, and Mtingwa only describe the rms beam size growth of an unbounded Gaussian distribution. Equations based on the Fokker-Planck approach are developed to further describe the beam density profile evolution and beam loss. During the 2004 RHIC heavy-ion operation, dedicated IBS experiments were performed to bench-mark the rms beam size growth, beam loss, and profile evolution both for a Gaussian-like and a longitudinal hollow beam. This paper summarizes the IBS theory and discusses the experimental bench-marking results

  2. Calibration bench of flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremond, J.; Da Costa, D.; Calvet, A.; Vieuxmaire, C.

    1966-01-01

    This equipment is devoted to the comparison of signals from two turbines installed in the Cabri experimental loop. The signal is compared to the standard turbine. The characteristics and the performance of the calibration bench are presented. (A.L.B.)

  3. Commodity-Free Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Commodity-free calibration is a reaction rate calibration technique that does not require the addition of any commodities. This technique is a specific form of the reaction rate technique, where all of the necessary reactants, other than the sample being analyzed, are either inherent in the analyzing system or specifically added or provided to the system for a reason other than calibration. After introduction, the component of interest is exposed to other reactants or flow paths already present in the system. The instrument detector records one of the following to determine the rate of reaction: the increase in the response of the reaction product, a decrease in the signal of the analyte response, or a decrease in the signal from the inherent reactant. With this data, the initial concentration of the analyte is calculated. This type of system can analyze and calibrate simultaneously, reduce the risk of false positives and exposure to toxic vapors, and improve accuracy. Moreover, having an excess of the reactant already present in the system eliminates the need to add commodities, which further reduces cost, logistic problems, and potential contamination. Also, the calculations involved can be simplified by comparison to those of the reaction rate technique. We conducted tests with hypergols as an initial investigation into the feasiblility of the technique.

  4. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...

  5. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  6. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  7. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Vesth, Allan

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report...

  8. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Federici, Paolo

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A part of the sensors has been installed by others, the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report, are only valid...

  9. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Villanueva, Héctor

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A part of the sensors has been installed by others, the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report, are only val...

  10. Entropic calibration revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.uk; Buckley, Ian R.C. [Centre for Quantitative Finance, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Constantinou, Irene C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Meister, Bernhard K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-11

    The entropic calibration of the risk-neutral density function is effective in recovering the strike dependence of options, but encounters difficulties in determining the relevant greeks. By use of put-call reversal we apply the entropic method to the time reversed economy, which allows us to obtain the spot price dependence of options and the relevant greeks.

  11. Gamma ray calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.; Flaherty, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is in the field of gamma ray inspection devices for tubular products and the like employing an improved calibrating block which prevents the sensing system from being overloaded when no tubular product is present, and also provides the operator with a means for visually detecting the presence of wall thicknesses which are less than a required minimum. (author)

  12. Calibration of Tilecal hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batkova, L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of a precise calibration of a calorimeter is to get the best response relationship between the calorimeter and the energy of incident particles. Different types of particles interact through various types of interactions with the environment. Therefore, calorimeters are optimized to detect one type of particle (electromagnetic particles and hadrons). Within current high energy physics experiments, where the detectors reached gigantic proportions, calorimeters hold two important features: - serve to measure power showers by complete absorption method; - reconstruct a direction of showers of particles after their interaction with the environment of calorimeter. To deterioration of the resolving power of the hadronic calorimeter contributes incompensation of its response to hadrons and electromagnetic particles (e, μ). They record more energy from electrons as from pions of the same nominal power. During building of experiment of the ATLAS the prototypes of Tile calorimeter were calibrated using Cs and then were tested by means of calibration particle beams (e, μ, π). The work is aimed to evaluation of the response of the muon beam calibration experiment ATLAS. The scope of the work is to determine correction factors for the calibration constants obtained from the primary calibration of the calorimeter by cesium for end Tilecal calorimeter modules. Tile calorimeter modules consist of three layers A, BC and D. A correction factor for calibration constant for A layer was determined by electron beam firing angle less than 20 grad. Muons are used to determine correction factors for the remaining two layers of the end calorimeter module, where the electrons of given energy do not penetrate. (author)

  13. PLEIADES ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION : INFLIGHT CALIBRATION SITES AND METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lachérade

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In-flight calibration of space sensors once in orbit is a decisive step to be able to fulfil the mission objectives. This article presents the methods of the in-flight absolute calibration processed during the commissioning phase. Four In-flight calibration methods are used: absolute calibration, cross-calibration with reference sensors such as PARASOL or MERIS, multi-temporal monitoring and inter-bands calibration. These algorithms are based on acquisitions over natural targets such as African deserts, Antarctic sites, La Crau (Automatic calibration station and Oceans (Calibration over molecular scattering or also new extra-terrestrial sites such as the Moon and selected stars. After an overview of the instrument and a description of the calibration sites, it is pointed out how each method is able to address one or several aspects of the calibration. We focus on how these methods complete each other in their operational use, and how they help building a coherent set of information that addresses all aspects of in-orbit calibration. Finally, we present the perspectives that the high level of agility of PLEIADES offers for the improvement of its calibration and a better characterization of the calibration sites.

  14. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  15. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2003-06-24

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Office of Repository Development (ORD). The UZ contains the unsaturated rock layers overlying the repository and host unit, which constitute a natural barrier to flow, and the unsaturated rock layers below the repository which constitute a natural barrier to flow and transport. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10.8 [under Work Package (WP) AUZM06, Climate Infiltration and Flow], and Section I-1-1 [in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans]). In Section 4.2, four acceptance criteria (ACs) are identified for acceptance of this Model Report; only one of these (Section 4.2.1.3.6.3, AC 3) was identified in the TWP (BSC 2002 [160819], Table 3-1). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, and drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-process models from the UZ Flow, Transport and Coupled Processes Department in the Natural Systems Subproject of the Performance Assessment (PA) Project. The Calibrated Properties Model output will also be used by the Engineered Barrier System Department in the Engineering Systems Subproject. The Calibrated Properties Model provides input through the UZ Model and other process models of natural and engineered systems to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models, in accord with the PA Strategy and Scope in the PA Project of the Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC). The UZ process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions. UZ flow is a TSPA model component.

  16. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  17. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  18. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten

    2007-01-01

    A field calibration method and results are described along with the experience gained with the method. The cup anemometers to be calibrated are mounted in a row on a 10-m high rig and calibrated in the free wind against a reference cup anemometer. The method has been reported [1] to improve...... the statistical bias on the data relative to calibrations carried out in a wind tunnel. The methodology is sufficiently accurate for calibration of cup anemometers used for wind resource assessments and provides a simple, reliable and cost-effective solution to cup anemometer calibration, especially suited...

  19. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  20. Study on routines and procedures of calibration of clinical dosemeter on gamma radiation beams at the IPEN-CNEN/SP, Brazil; Estudo das rotinas e procedimentos de calibracao de dosimetros clinicos em feixes de radiacao gama no IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damatto, Willian B.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Santos, Gelson P.; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: wbdamatto@ipen.b, E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.b, E-mail: gpsantos@ipen.b, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The calibration consists in the comparison of the equipment to be calibrated with other equipment already calibrated by another standard, which means the equipment that will accomplish shall be considered secondary or tertiary, depending on the calibration that will be accomplished. As the clinical dosemeters are used for quality control services in the hospitals, these dosemeters need a reliable measurement precision. Therefore, this work intends to demonstrate the importance of the clinical dosemeter and the calibration, requiring special care face to all clinical set

  1. LHC Report: Freshly squeezed beams!

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    After careful validation of  new machine settings, the LHC was ready for higher luminosity operation. New luminosity records have been set, but the operations team continues to wrestle with machine availability issues.   The commissioning of the squeeze to a ß* of 1 m in ATLAS and CMS described in the last Bulletin took until Wednesday, 7 September to complete. In order to validate the new set-up, beam losses were provoked in a controlled way with low intensity beams. The distribution of beam loss around the machine in these tests is known as a loss map. The loss maps showed that the collimation system is catching the large majority of beam losses as it should, and that the machine was ready for us to ramp the number of bunches back up and go to physics production. The ramp-up of the number of bunches went smoothly with fills at 264, 480, and 912 bunches on the way back to the machine’s previous record of 1380 bunches (first fill on Friday, 9 Se...

  2. Intensive Ion Beam In Storage Rings With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Kamerdjiev, V; Maier, R; Meshkov, I; Noda, K; Prasuhn, D; Sibuya, S; Sidorin, A; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Syresin, E M; Uesugi, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) and an ion beam at HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) are presented. Intensity of the ion beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described.

  3. MAVEN SEP Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The maven.sep.calibrated Level 2 Science Data Bundle contains fully calibrated SEP data, as well as the raw count data from which they are derived, and ancillary...

  4. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  5. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  6. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  7. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  8. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurman, B.; Erlandsson, B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes problems concerning the calibration of germanium detectors for the measurement of gamma-radiation from environmental samples. It also contains a brief description of some ways of reducing the uncertainties concerning the activity determination. These uncertainties have many sources, such as counting statistics, full energy peak efficiency determination, density correction and radionuclide specific-coincidence effects, when environmental samples are investigated at close source-to-detector distances

  9. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick Schauer; Barbara A. Spellman

    2017-01-01

    Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociolog...

  10. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  11. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  12. The laser system for calibration and monotoring of the Opal jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebel, O.; Boden, B.; Bug, S.; Eyring, A.; Fischer, H.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gross, S.; Knop, G.; Levegruen, S.; Maringer, G.; Mauer, E.; Maur, U.; Nellen, B.; Neumann, H.; Rollnik, A.; Schreiber, S.; Simon, A.; Thiebes, J.; Wolf, B.; Wuensch, B.; Boerner, H.; Breuker, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hauschild, M.; Heuer, R.D.; Karner, K.; Linser, G.; Runolfsson, O.; Seidl, W.; Voillat, D.; Wicht, P.; Schmitt, H. von der; Wagner, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we describe the construction and performance of the laser system which was used in Summer 1989 for the initial calibration of the OPAL jet chamber after installation on the LEP beam axis and which has served as a monitoring tool since then. Two Nd:YAG lasers are used to generate 48 high precision double beams which enter the chamber at fixed positions. The main features of the roughly 450 optical components are described and the beam alignment procedures are explained. Results are given for jet chamber calibration constants such as drift velocity, Lorentz angle, and residual sagittas. (orig.)

  13. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  14. Faraday cup dosimetry in a proton therapy beam without collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusell, Erik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Medin, Joakim

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday cup in a proton beam can give an accurate measurement of the number of protons collected by the cup. It is shown that the collection efficiency with a proper design can be close to unity. To be able to calibrate an ionization chamber from such a measurement, as is recommended in some dosimetry protocols, the energy spectrum of the proton beam must be accurately known. This is normally not the case when the lateral beam extension is defined by collimators. Therefore a method for relating an ionization chamber measurement in an uncollimated beam to the total number of protons in the beam has been developed and is described together with experimental results from calibrating an ionization chamber using this method in the therapeutic beam in Uppsala. This method is applicable to ionization chambers of any shape and the accuracy is estimated to be 1.6% (1 SD). (Author)

  15. Calibrated Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  16. Summary of KOMPSAT-5 Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Jeong, H.; Lee, S.; Kim, B.

    2013-12-01

    Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 5 (KOMPSAT-5), equipped with high resolution X-band (9.66 GHz) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), is planning to be launched on August 22, 2013. With the satellite's primary mission objective being providing Geographical Information System (GIS), Ocean monitoring and Land management, and Disaster and ENvironment monitoring (GOLDEN), it is expected that its applications for scientific research on geographical processes will be extensive. In order to meet its mission objective, the KOMPSAT-5 will provide three different kinds of SAR imaging modes; High Resolution Mode (1 m resolution, 5 km swath), Standard Mode (3 m resolution, 30 km swath), and Wide Swath Mode (20 m resolution, 100 km swath). The KOMPSAT-5 will be operated in a 550 km sun-synchronous, dawn- dusk orbit with a 28-day ground repeat cycle providing valuable image information on Earth surface day-or-night and even in bad weather condition. After successful launch of the satellite, it will go through Launch and Early Operation (LEOP) and In-Orbit Testing (IOT) period about for 6 months to carry out various tests on satellite bus and payload systems. The satellite bus system will be tested during the first 3 weeks after the launch focusing on the Attitude and Orbit Control Subsystem (AOCS) and Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR) calibration. With the completion of bus system test, the SAR payload system will be calibrated during initial In-Flight check period (11 weeks) by the joint effort of Thales Alenia Space Italy (TAS-I) and Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). The pointing and relative calibration will be carried out during this period by analyzing the doppler frequency and antenna beam pattern of reflected microwave signal from selected regions with uniform backscattering coefficients (e.g. Amazon rainforest). A dedicated SAR calibration, called primary calibration, will be allocated at the end of LEOP for 12 weeks to perform thorough calibration activities

  17. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  18. BESIII online electronics calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liang; Lei Guangkun; Zhu Kejun; Zhao Jingwei; Li Fei

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduce the components of BESIII DAQ System. It describe the relationship of internal online electrionics calibration's components, the mechanism of dataflow and message flow and the implementation of system functions. When BESIII is running, the system will be used to online calibrate electronics channels and provide the calibration params to adjust electronics data. (authors)

  19. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm 2 . The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation

  20. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm 2 . The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel-input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation